WorldWideScience

Sample records for airport ground transportation

  1. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    Modern airports are centers of transportation that service a large number of aircraft and passengers every day. To facilitate this large volume of transportation, airports are subject to many logistical and decision problems that must continuously be solved to make sure each flight and passenger...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators to...... planning, to highly detailed scheduling problems arising in the highly dynamic environment of airports....

  2. Airports, Hotel, and Ground Transportation Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airports in and near Washington, DC Reagan National Approximate 30 minute drive from Rockville* Has its own Metro stop on the blue and yellow lines in Virginia NOTE: This airport may be the closest and easiest option if not renting a car or do not want to pay for an airport cab/shuttle.   Dulles International Approximate 1 hour drive from Rockville* |

  3. Airport Ground Resource Planning Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort undertakes the creation of an Airport Ground Resource Planning (AGRP) tool. Little or no automation is currently available to support airport ground...

  4. Surveillance of ground vehicles for airport security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasch, Erik; Wang, Zhonghai; Shen, Dan; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Genshe

    2014-06-01

    Future surveillance systems will work in complex and cluttered environments which require systems engineering solutions for such applications such as airport ground surface management. In this paper, we highlight the use of a L1 video tracker for monitoring activities at an airport. We present methods of information fusion, entity detection, and activity analysis using airport videos for runway detection and airport terminal events. For coordinated airport security, automated ground surveillance enhances efficient and safe maneuvers for aircraft, unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) operating within airport environments.

  5. Airport in the intermodal transport system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of integrating of airports into the intermodal transport system is presented in this paper. The development of intermodal systems helps to use the available transport means in optimal and balanced way. The intermodality of the airport is analyzed in two areas: the airport accessibility and the integration of an airport with other transport means of domestic and international transport system. The railway transport is the main transport branch concerned to be integrated together with the air transport. The examples of existing solutions of intermodal systems in the biggest European hubs are presented with the strongest emphasis put on the airport in Frankfurt. The inhibiting and stimulating factors of the development of intermodal transport system are presented. The last part of the paper presents the conclusions how European solutions can be of the help in the process of the development of the Polish transport system.

  6. INNOVATION OF AIRPORTS AND AERODROMES IN TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz BALCERZAK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to characterize changes occurring in EU transport policy, taking into account innovation of airports and aerodromes. To face challenges like: increase in air traffic, ensuring safety of flight operations, regional development or requirements of passengers it is necessary to determine desired direction network of airports and aerodromes within the aviation policy, which is part of the national and European transport policy. Overview of national and EU studies, strategies and legislative plans enable to specify changes taking place in the EU aviation policy, as well as to create potential scenarios of its development with particular attention to the innovation of aerodromes and airports. Based on the above analysis it should be noted, that aims of the European institutions and agencies are: reduction amount of restrictive rules on general aviation (including GA aerodromes, spread concepts of multimodality and Small Aircraft Transport Systems, enhance competitiveness of the EU aviation sector but also reduction investment funding at airports. Conclusions may be a theoretical inspiration in the process of updating master plans of aerodromes and airports.

  7. Allocation of Ground Handling Resources at Copenhagen Airport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tor Fog

    Operating an airport is a very complex task involving many stakeholders. The primary role of airport management is to ensure that the airport provides sufficient capacity in all operational areas and that all the companies carrying out business at the airport have the best possible working...... knowledge to generate appropriate initial variables, enabling the heuristic to efficiently find near-optimal and operationally valid solutions. The work described in this thesis was carried out in the context of an Industrial PhD project at Copenhagen Airport in collaboration with the Technical University...... processes give rise to. The primary focus is on ground handling resource allocation problems, it looks in detail at the following problems: the check-in counter allocation problem, the baggage make-up position problem, the tactical stand and gate allocation problem, the operational stand and gate allocation...

  8. Models and algorithms for ground staff scheduling on airports

    OpenAIRE

    Herbers, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    The planning of airport ground staff gives rise to a number of challenging optimisation problems. Ground handling workloads are naturally represented as work tasks, e.g. for baggage unloading or passenger check-in. These workloads must be covered by appropriate employees. Staff scheduling is usually carried out in several stages: In demand planning, workloads are aggregated and analysed, in shift planning, appropriate shift duties are generated, and rostering consists in generating lines of d...

  9. A study of annoyance caused by ground based activities at Bromma airport

    OpenAIRE

    Bodén, Hans; Aslan, Johan; Yousif, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Bromma airport is located nearby the city centre of Stockholm Sweden. There are a number of residential areas around the airport. The paper reports results from a measurement campaign and a questionnaire survey investigation among the people living in the area Bromma kyrka, located approximately 500 meters from the airport. The objective of the study was to identify the most annoying sound sources related to ground activities at the airport. This means that the noise events caused by starting...

  10. Airports and Airfields - AIRPORTS_NTAD_IN: Public Use Airports in Indiana (Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Bernardin-Lochmueller and Associates (BLA) created an Indiana subset of the NTAD airports dataset described below. Dataset includes airports, heliports, seaplane...

  11. Optimizing Manpower Allocation for Ground Handling Tasks in Airports using Column Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Dohn; Kolind, Esben

    teams/workers, possibly with different skills, is required. This study focuses on the scheduling of ground handling tasks in some of Europe's major airports. Any daily schedule must comply with the time windows and skill requirements of tasks, transportation time between locations, the working hours of...... the staff, synchronization requirements between teams, and union regulations. The problem is solved using column generation in a Branch-and-Price framework. Synchronization between teams is enforced by branching on time windows. The resource constrained shortest path subproblem is solved by a label...

  12. Ground Handling Business at Non-European Biggest World Airports as a Problem of Market Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tomová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we analyse the market structures of ground handling at the biggest non-European passenger and cargo airports in accordance with the ACI list of the most important world airports in 2014. Using the IATA IGHC database as of spring 2015, our analysis revealed that out of Europe double digit numbers of providers are rare what contrasts with situation in Europe where ground handling markets were deregulated by the Council Directive 96/67/EC. The analysis also brought that the monopolistic structures of ground handling markets were more specific for the regions of Asia and the Middle East. Airports as ground handling providers were not found within the analysed sample in North America, Latin America, Africa and Australia and Oceania, while this arrangement was to a larger extent present at the analysed Asian airports. Asia and the Middle East biggest airports are identified by us as candidates for further deregulation of ground handling arguing by forecasted demand for air services in the regions, although expected deregulation may be curbed by national regulators.

  13. A Dynamic Programming-Based Heuristic for the Shift Design Problem in Airport Ground Handling

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Tommy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the heterogeneous shift design problem for a workforce with multiple skills, where work shifts are created to cover a given demand as well as possible while minimizing cost and satisfying a flexible set of constraints. We focus mainly on applications within airport ground handling where the demand can be highly irregular and specified on time intervals as short as five minutes. Ground handling operations are subject to a high degree of cooperation and specialization that require w...

  14. Journal of Airline and Airport Management: taking off on an exciting journey into air transport research

    OpenAIRE

    David Gonzalez-Prieto; Oriol Lordan; Jose M Sallan; Pep Simo; Mihaela Enache; Vicenc Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    We are pleased to introduce this first and inaugural issue of the first volume of the Journal of Airline and Airport Management (JAIRM). JAIRM is an international journal that proposes and fosters discussion on the theory and application in all areas of air transport, including (but not limited to) air transport and globalization, airline and airport management. We are interested in issues related to production, logistics, operations, marketing, policy and regulation, information systems, pro...

  15. A Rule-Based Local Search Algorithm for General Shift Design Problems in Airport Ground Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    We consider a generalized version of the shift design problem where shifts are created to cover a multiskilled demand and fit the parameters of the workforce. We present a collection of constraints and objectives for the generalized shift design problem. A local search solution framework with mul...... multiple neighborhoods and a loosely coupled rule engine based on simulated annealing is presented. Computational experiments on real-life data from various airport ground handling organization show the performance and flexibility of the proposed algorithm....

  16. A Dynamic Programming-Based Heuristic for the Shift Design Problem in Airport Ground Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    We consider the heterogeneous shift design problem for a workforce with multiple skills, where work shifts are created to cover a given demand as well as possible while minimizing cost and satisfying a flexible set of constraints. We focus mainly on applications within airport ground handling where...... on dynamic programming that allows flexibility in modeling the workforce. Parameters allow a planner to determine the level of demand coverage that best fulfills the requirements of the organization. Results are presented from several diverse real-life ground handling instances....

  17. Airports Geographic Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  18. Journal of Airline and Airport Management: Taking off on an exciting journey into Air Transport Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonzalez-Prieto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We are pleased to introduce this first and inaugural issue of the first volume of the Journal of Airline and Airport Management (JAIRM. JAIRM is an international journal that proposes and fosters discussion on the theory and application in all areas of air transport, including (but not limited to air transport and globalization, airline and airport management. We are interested in issues related to production, logistics, operations, marketing, policy and regulation, information systems, project management, quality, as well as regional development, economics, organizational behaviour, finance and accounting in air transport research.

  19. Accessibility of a Destination-Based Transportation System: A Large Airport Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jing; YING Xiwen

    2008-01-01

    The accessibility of a destination-based transportation system is defined to quantify the perform-ance of transportation systems which access a distinct destination. The access cost is used to reflect the utility of the transportation system including the fatigue and inconvenience in the total cost. The cost is quan-tified by two coefficients which represent the different characteristics of various people. The average cost and the income-relative accessibility are used to describe various aspects of the accessibility and to evaluate the accessibility of a destination-based system. A case study uses data from the Kunming transpor-tation system to evaluate the accessibility of the present city airport. The calibrated coefficients are then used to evaluate the transportation system to the new Kunming international airport. The results show that this transportation accessibility evaluation can be combined with transportation planning to study transporta-tion sub-systems.

  20. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  1. Ground settlement of Chek Lap Kok Airport, Hong Kong,detected by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry is used to investigate the slowly accumulating ground settlement at the new Chek Lap Kok Airport in Hong Kong. Most of the land occupied by the airport was reclaimed from the sea and therefore certain ground settlement in the area has been expected. A pair of ERS-2 SAR images spanning nearly a year is used in the study. The high spatial resolution (20 m× 20 m) ground settlement map derived indicates that the settlement that occurred in the area over the time period is as large as 50 mm. The SAR measurement results agree with the levelling measurements at some benchmarks in the area to well within 1 cm(rms error),and the overall correlation between the two types of results is 0.89. The paper presents some brief background of interferometric SAR, and outlines the data processing methods and results.

  2. Use of Ground Penetrating Radar at the FAA's National Airport Pavement Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injun, Song

    2015-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States has used a ground-coupled Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) since 2005. One of the primary objectives of the testing at the facility is to provide full-scale pavement response and failure information for use in airplane landing gear design and configuration studies. During the traffic testing at the facility, a GSSI GPR system was used to develop new procedures for monitoring Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) pavement density changes that is directly related to pavement failure. After reviewing current setups for data acquisition software and procedures for identifying different pavement layers, dielectric constant and pavement thickness were selected as dominant parameters controlling HMA properties provided by GPR. A new methodology showing HMA density changes in terms of dielectric constant variations, called dielectric sweep test, was developed and applied in full-scale pavement test. The dielectric constant changes were successfully monitored with increasing airplane traffic numbers. The changes were compared to pavement performance data (permanent deformation). The measured dielectric constants based on the known HMA thicknesses were also compared with computed dielectric constants using an equation from ASTM D4748-98 Standard Test Method for Determining the Thickness of Bound Pavement Layers Using Short-Pulse Radar. Six inches diameter cylindrical cores were taken after construction and traffic testing for the HMA layer bulk specific gravity. The measured bulk specific gravity was also compared to monitor HMA density changes caused by aircraft traffic conditions. Additionally this presentation will review the applications of the FAA's ground-coupled GPR on embedded rebar identification in concrete pavement, sewer pipes in soil, and gage identifications in 3D plots.

  3. Mapping of permafrost surface using ground-penetrating radar at Kangerlussuaq Airport, western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Andreasen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Kangerlussuaq Airport is located at 67°N and 51°W in the zone of continuous permafrost in western Greenland. Its proximity to the Greenlandic ice sheet results in a dry sub-arctic climate with a mean annual temperature of −5.7 °C. The airport is built on a river terrace mostly consisting of fluvi...

  4. Electric Ground Support Equipment Advanced Battery Technology Demonstration Project at the Ontario Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler Gray; Jeremy Diez; Jeffrey Wishart; James Francfort

    2013-07-01

    The intent of the electric Ground Support Equipment (eGSE) demonstration is to evaluate the day-to-day vehicle performance of electric baggage tractors using two advanced battery technologies to demonstrate possible replacements for the flooded lead-acid (FLA) batteries utilized throughout the industry. These advanced battery technologies have the potential to resolve barriers to the widespread adoption of eGSE deployment. Validation testing had not previously been performed within fleet operations to determine if the performance of current advanced batteries is sufficient to withstand the duty cycle of electric baggage tractors. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. The demonstration project also grew the relationship with Southwest Airlines (SWA), our demonstration partner at Ontario International Airport (ONT), located in Ontario, California. The results of this study have encouraged a proposal for a future demonstration project with SWA.

  5. Route planning for airport personnel transporting passengers with reduced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Clausen, Tommy; Pisinger, David

    unattended. A description of the problem together with a mathematical model is presented. The objective is to maximize the quality of service by scheduling as many of the passengers as possible, while ensuring a smooth transport with short waiting times. A simulated annealing based heuristic for solving the...... problem is presented. The algorithm makes use of an abstract representation of a candidate solution which in each step is transformed to an actual schedule by use of a greedy heuristic. Local search is performed on the abstract representation using advanced neighborhoods which modify large parts of the...... candidate solution. Computational results are reported showing that the algorithm is able to find good solutions within a couple of minutes, making the algorithm applicable for dynamic scheduling. Moreover high-quality solutions can be obtained by running the algorithm for 15 minutes....

  6. Passengers’ Airport Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Gelhausen, Marc Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Modelling airport choice of passengers has been a subject of interest for air transport scientists and airport managers already for a while. Wilken, Berster and Gelhausen have reported of a market segment specific model approach to airport choice in Germany in a paper entitled "Airport Choice in Germany - New Empirical Evidence of the German Air Traveller Survey 2003" presented at the Air Transport Research Society World Conference 2005 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In continuation of the analys...

  7. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Part 1; Analysis of Historical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation (+4% annual growth), resulting in unreliable service and systemic delays. Estimates of the impact of delays and unreliable air transportation service on the economy range from $32B to $41B per year. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making with regards to: (1) geographic access, (2) economic access, and (3) airline finances. This analysis evaluated markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size, airfares, and profit from 2005-2009. During this period, airlines experienced changes in costs of operation (due to fluctuations in hedged fuel prices), changes in travel demand (due to changes in the economy), and changes in infrastructure capacity (due to the capacity limits at EWR, JFK, and LGA). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of capacity limits at airports, as well as the effect of increased costs of operation (i.e. hedged fuel prices). The increases in costs of operation serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed.

  8. The concept of the development of cargo container transport system within airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Hentschel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transport of luggage units between the check-in terminal and airplanes is realized by the use of very simple transport solutions and manual reloading of the luggage. The luggage trolleys are used for the transport purposes, which are hitched to the mover and moved directly to the surroundings of the airplane. The loading and unloading of luggage is performed manually. Regarding actual safety requirements there was a need to create a new transport system, working in a closed cycle and based on the device for automatic loading and unloading of luggage units. Methods: Various potential variants of the device were generated based on results of analytical researches by the use of the morphological schema. The detail evaluation and the optimization of individual variants allow to prepare the concept of the complex method to solve problems of the reliable transport of luggage units within an airport. Results: The closed transport system was created as a result of the innovative project. The main element of this system is a container trolley, which is equipped in five storage layers. By the use of the special mover and gravitational forces, luggage units can be transported and placed inside this trolley as well as being loaded and unloaded. This solution enables to move 200 pieces of luggage in one transport cycle from the check-in terminal to the hatchway of the airplane.

  9. Fluctuations in airport arrival and departure traffic: A network analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shan-Mei; Xu Xiao-Hao; Meng Ling-Hang

    2012-01-01

    Air traffic is a typical complex system,in which movements of traffic components (pilots,controllers,equipment,and environment),especially airport arrival and departure traffic,form complicated spatial and temporal dynamics.The fluctuations of airport arrival and departure traffic are studied from the point of view of networks as the special correlation between different airports.Our collected flow volume data on the time-dependent activity of US airport arrival and departure traffic indicate that the coupling between the average flux and the fluctuation of an individual airport obeys a certain scaling law with a wide variety of scaling exponents between 1/2 and 1.These scaling phenomena can explain the interaction between the airport internal dynamics (e.g.queuing at airports,a ground delay program and following flying traffic) and a change in the external (network-wide) traffic demand (e.g.an increase in traffic during peak hours every day),allowing us to further understand the mechanisms governing the collective behaviour of the transportation system.We separate internal dynamics from external fluctuations using a scaling law which is helpful for us to systematically determine the origin of fluctuations in airport arrival and departure traffic,uncovering the collective dynamics.Hot spot features are observed in airport traffic data as the dynamical inhomogeneity in the fluxes of individual airports.The intrinsic characteristics of airport arrival and departure traffic under severe weather is discussed as well.

  10. TIGHTEN YOUR SEAT BELT, WE ARE ABOUT TO DESCEND : The Importance of Air Transportation in Tourism, Tenzing-Hillary Airport, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Dawadi, Bipin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was done in order to focus on the importance of air transportation on tourism industry; it shows how an airport in the remote sector of Nepal develops the tourism industry and the economic situation of the entire region as well as connects the region to the outer world. The thesis was based on Tenzing-Hillary airport in Lukla, Nepal. The airport is the only means of transportation in the entire region and a gateway to Mount Everest, therefore the airport plays a very important ro...

  11. Strategic integration of public transport networks with airport infrastructure in the megalopolis of Central Mexico: Evolution and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas, C.R.; Garcia Cejudo, D.; Van Timmeren, A.

    2014-01-01

    Airports represent the contemporary global gateways of metropolitan areas worldwide. In the case of the megalopolis of Central Mexico, air transport was traditionally used only by upper social segments of the population, however, during the last years, the introduction of low-cost airlines in the co

  12. Evolution of the airport and air transport industry in Colombia and it’s impact on the economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Diaz Olariaga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This article aims to describe the development and evolution of the airports and air transport industry in Colombia. During the past fifteen years Colombia has witnessed a remarkably rapid and dynamic growth in air transport. This period coincides with the establishment and continuous implementation of public policy specifically designed for the air transport sector and airports. Methodology / Approach: The evolution of air transport in Colombia is evaluated descriptively through the analysis of air transport and socio-economic historical data. The impact of public and investment policies is analyzed through a cause-effect approach. Findings: This paper describes how the air transport/airport industry in Colombia has been directly and positively affected by the implementation of public policies and other legislation, while measuring the effect and impact of this industry on the Colombian economy. Originality  / Value: This work fills a notorious deficiency in specialized literature concerning air transport in Colombia and Latin America in all its aspects and dimensions.

  13. Aircraft noise in Berlin affects quality of life even outside the airport grounds

    OpenAIRE

    Eibich, Peter; Kholodilin, Konstantin; Krekel, Christian; Wagner, Gert G.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft noise is a particularly problematic source of noise as many airports are located in or near major cities and, as a result, densely populated areas are affected. Data from the Berlin Aging Study II (Berliner Altersstudie II, BASE-II), whose socio-economic module is based on the longitudinal Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study which has been conducted since 1984, allows us to examine the effect of different levels of aircraft noise on the subjective wellbeing and health of the older resi...

  14. Is air transport of stroke patients faster than ground transport?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Steinmetz, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    observational study, we included patients referred to a stroke centre if their ground transport time exceeded 30 min, or they were transported by a secondarily dispatched, physician-staffed helicopter. The primary endpoint was time from telephone contact to triaging neurologist to arrival in the stroke centre....... Secondary endpoints included modified Rankin Scale at 3 months, 30-day and 1-year mortality. RESULTS: A total of 330 patients were included; 265 with ground transport and 65 with helicopter, of which 87 (33%) and 22 (34%), received thrombolysis, respectively (p=0.88). Time from contact to triaging...... neurologist to arrival in the regional stroke centre was significantly shorter in the ground group (55 (34-85) vs 68 (40-85) min, p<0.01). The distance from scene to stroke centre was shorter in the ground group (67 (42-136) km) than in the helicopter group (83 (46-143) km) (p<0.01). We did not detect...

  15. MODELLING AND MEASUREMENT OF AIRCRAFT ENGINE EMISSIONS INSIDE THE AIRPORT AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksander Zaporozhets

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed to improve complex model “PolEmiCa” by taking into account basic properties of contaminants transport and dilution by exhaust gases jet from aircraft engine near the ground. Validation of complex model “PolEmiCa” was implemented on the basis of measurement campaign at International Athens airport and International Boryspol airport.

  16. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Par 2; Analysis Using the Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation; the failure to increase capacity at the same rate as the growth in demand results in unreliable service and systemic delay. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making that affects geographic access, economic access, and airline finances, extending the analysis of these factors using historic data (from Part 1 of the report). The Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM) was used to evaluate how exogenous factors (passenger demand, airline operating costs, and airport capacity limits) affect geographic access (markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size), economic access (airfares), airline finances (profit), and air transportation efficiency (aircraft size). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of airport capacity limits, as well as the effect of increased hedged fuel prices, which serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed; also incorporated are demand elasticity curves based on historical data that provide information about how passenger demand is affected by airfare changes.

  17. Intelligent transportation systems in the planning and coordination of aircraft traffic at the airport apron

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Stanislav; Roguljić, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    Airport aprons are areas for aircraft handling, parking and maintenance. According to international rules the number of positions at the apron has to be at least equal to the number of aircraft staying at any one time at the airport. The air traffic at Split Airport increased rapidly in the mid-90s when it became the UN logistics base for Bosnia and Herzegovina. There were nomeans nor free space for further expansion of the apron, so the traffic had to be reorganised and re-coordinated. Alter...

  18. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  19. Financing the Airport of the Future: The Small Aircraft Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartle, John R.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of SATS is to reduce gridlock at hubs, reduce travel times, allow for personal control over travel, and anticipate demand shifts resulting from a migration from suburbs to rural places. The technology is presently available and economical to produce SATS aircraft. The public issue centers on the airports. SATS is a federal program, and many airports in the U.S. are under the control of local governments. The scope of the objective will require thousands of airports in rural and suburban areas to modify their infrastructure and increase their investment. Researchers at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), and others at other institutions, have prepared reports surveying the relevant issues of implementing SATS. Our UNO team focused on the issues of policy implementation, economic development, management, and finance specific to Nebraska. We are finding that these issues are similar to those in other states in our region and other rural states. This paper discusses how this investment might be financed.

  20. Airport Taxi Planning: Lagrangian Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Marín Gracia, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The airport taxi planning (TP) module is a decision tool intended to guide airport surface management operations. TP is defined by a flow network optimization model that represents flight ground movements and improves aircraft taxiing routes and schedules during periods of aircraft congestion. TP is not intended to operate as a stand‐alone tool for airport operations management: on the contrary, it must be used in conjunction with existing departing and arriving traffic tools and ...

  1. Airport Heterotopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    airport serves as a node in the network of flows that is air travel. Airports orchestrate social life into distinct movements and behaviors. The ontology of the airport is peculiarly split between a sense of placelessness, while at the same time being a place of material organization and social complexity....... It is a system of interconnected material worlds, and thus a heterotopia; a blending space of overlapping ontologies. Ursula Le Guin playfully examines this concept of overlapping ontologies in her short story collection Changing Planes, where airport travellers can shift realities due to the...

  2. Airport Logistics : Modeling and Optimizing the Turn-Around Process

    OpenAIRE

    Norin, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this licentiate thesis is air transportation and especially the logistics at an airport. The concept of airport logistics is investigated based on the following definition: Airport logistics is the planning and control of all resources and information that create a value for the customers utilizing the airport. As a part of the investigation, indicators for airport performance are considered. One of the most complex airport processes is the turn-around process. The turn-around is...

  3. Airport Surface Access and Mobile Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martin-Domingo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Airport Surface Access faces two main opposite issues: (1 cars, being the main transport mode, contribute to the increasing level of congestion and pollution of cities; and (2 simultaneously, parking fees are one important source of airports commercial revenue, creating a dilemma for airports when facing the problem. Following the recent trend of air passengers travelling with Smartphone (78% in 2013, the purpose of this paper is to monitor the adoption of mobile Applications (Apps by airports and to analyze if the information and functions provided in those Apps can help to overcome the above two issues. Design/methodology/approach: 31 iPhone App of some of the largest European airports were evaluated in the lab using the evaluation model of Destinations Mobile Applications (Scolari and Fernández-Cavia 2014 adapted for for the Airport Surface Access on Airport Apps Findings and Originality/value: The Apps evaluated provided a very limited functionality to help passengers to plan and book their trips to/from the airports on public transports and gave high priority to parking information and services. Originality/value: Although Airport Surface Access has been a widely researched, the originality of this paper is the analysis of airport mobile Apps as a potential tool for airports to deal with the surface airport access problems.Access, Airports, Mobile Internet, Commercial Revenues

  4. Public Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a vector point digital data structure that contains the locations of General Public Use Airports in the State of New Mexico. It only contains those...

  5. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 7 (ASR-7) is a short-range (60 nautical miles (nmi)) analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  6. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 8 (ASR-8) is a short-range (60 nautical mile (nmi)), analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  7. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 11

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 11 (ASR-11) is a short-range digital, integrated primary and secondary surveillance radar (SSR) radar system with a 60 nautical...

  8. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.325 Financial... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport planning... agency conducting a project for airport system planning shall submit a financial status report on a...

  9. Radiation exposure during air and ground transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a one year study program of radiation exposure experienced on both domestic and international flights of the China Airline and the Far East Airline in the Pacific, Southeast Asia and Taiwan areas and on trains and buses on Taiwan island are reported. CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters were used. It has been shown that transit exposures may amount to 10 times that on the ground with an altitude varying from 3,050 to 12,200 m. (U.K.)

  10. Mobile objects and ground transportation innovative services

    OpenAIRE

    Gransart, C.; RIOULT,J; USTER,G

    2003-01-01

    The T.ES.S project is involved in the field of the intelligent transport systems. This project aims to demonstrate that new innovative services for bus on line can be developed and can offer an access, with a good quality of service (with medium or high bandwith), to information, multimedia contents and databases from mobile objects. This article presents the software architecture currently developed allowing the communication between information sources located on internet or in the command ...

  11. A Systems Approach to Developing an Affordable Space Ground Transportation Architecture using a Commonality Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jerry L.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Bollo, Timothy R.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Robinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a structured approach for achieving a compatible Ground System (GS) and Flight System (FS) architecture that is affordable, productive and sustainable. This paper is an extension of the paper titled "Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System" by McCleskey et al. This paper integrates systems engineering concepts and operationally efficient propulsion system concepts into a structured framework for achieving GS and FS compatibility in the mid-term and long-term time frames. It also presents a functional and quantitative relationship for assessing system compatibility called the Architecture Complexity Index (ACI). This paper: (1) focuses on systems engineering fundamentals as it applies to improving GS and FS compatibility; (2) establishes mid-term and long-term spaceport goals; (3) presents an overview of transitioning a spaceport to an airport model; (4) establishes a framework for defining a ground system architecture; (5) presents the ACI concept; (6) demonstrates the approach by presenting a comparison of different GS architectures; and (7) presents a discussion on the benefits of using this approach with a focus on commonality.

  12. Heraklion Airport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter

    Heraklion City is located on Crete Island, Grece with a population of 150000. In the project for extension of the airport at Heraklion, part of the runway is placed in the sea. The runway must be designed to resist attack from the waves. the observed wave and wind data in the period of 1949...

  13. Synchronized dial-a-ride transportation of disabled passengers at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Clausen, Tommy; Pisinger, David

    2013-01-01

    model is presented. The objective is to schedule as many of the passengers as possible, while ensuring a smooth transport with short waiting times. A simulated annealing based heuristic for solving the problem is presented. The algorithm makes use of an abstract representation of a candidate solution...... which in each step is transformed to an actual schedule by use of a greedy heuristic. Local search is performed on the abstract representation using advanced neighborhoods which modify large parts of the candidate solution. Computational results show that the algorithm is able to find good solutions...... within a couple of minutes, making the algorithm applicable for dynamic scheduling. Moreover high-quality solutions can be obtained by running the algorithm for 10minutes....

  14. Airport surface operations requirements analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, John L.; Vonbokern, Greg J.; Wray, Rick L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Airport Surface Operations Requirements Analysis (ASORA) study. This study was conducted in response to task 24 of NASA Contract NAS1-18027. This study is part of NASA LaRC's Low Visibility Surface Operations program, which is designed to eliminate the constraints on all-weather arrival/departure operations due to the airport/aircraft ground system. The goal of this program is to provide the capability for safe and efficient aircraft operations on the airport surface during low visibility conditions down to zero. The ASORA study objectives were to (1) develop requirements for operation on the airport surface in visibilities down to zero; (2) survey and evaluate likely technologies; (3) develop candidate concepts to meet the requirements; and (4) select the most suitable concept based on cost/benefit factors.

  15. Eolian transport of geogenic hexavalent chromium to ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Clark, D.; Imes, J.L.; Councell, T.B.

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual model of eolian transport is proposed to address the widely distributed, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) observed in ground water in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Concentrations (30 to more than 1000 μg/L Cr+6) extend over thousands of square kilometers of ground water systems. It is hypothesized that the Cr is derived from weathering of chromium-rich pyroxenes and olivines present in ophiolite sequence of the adjacent Oman (Hajar) Mountains. Cr+3 in the minerals is oxidized to Cr+6 by reduction of manganese and is subsequently sorbed on iron and manganese oxide coatings of particles. When the surfaces of these particles are abraded in this arid environment, they release fine, micrometer-sized, coated particles that are easily transported over large distances by wind and subsequently deposited on the surface. During ground water recharge events, the readily soluble Cr+6 is mobilized by rain water and transported by advective flow into the underlying aquifer. Chromium analyses of ground water, rain, dust, and surface (soil) deposits are consistent with this model, as are electron probe analyses of clasts derived from the eroding Oman ophiolite sequence. Ground water recharge flux is proposed to exercise some control over Cr+6 concentration in the aquifer.

  16. Field Study of Ground Soft Improved by Vacuum Preloading on Airport%真空预压处理机场软基试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖媛媛

    2015-01-01

    Based on the expansion project of the airfield on the Wenzhou Yongqiang Airport, a field test of soft soil improved by vacuum preloading was conducted to investigate the consolidation characteristic and the deformation mechanism of soft soil under vacuum preloading by monitoring the ground settlement, the layered settlement, pore water pressure and groundwater table. The sealing effect of mixed slurry columns was explored. The results are beneficial to guide the similar projects.%本文以温州永强机场飞行区扩建工程为依托,开展了真空预压处理机场软基的现场试验,研究了真空预压下土体的固结特性和变形机理,对真空预压加固区内地表沉降、分层沉降、孔压、水位等变化进行了分析,对淤泥搅拌桩的密封效果进行了探讨.本文的研究成果对类似工程具有指导价值.

  17. SOME ISSUES OF THE AIRPORT MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Marian Ovidiu

    2012-01-01

    Internationally, the recommended standards for the operation and management of civil-use airports are provided by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). In most individual countries, airports are managed directly by the government, most often under the ministry of transport. In some countries, including EU countries, some airports are privately owned and operated, although, despite private ownership, they are still subject to much of the countryâ€(tm)s regulations regarding avi...

  18. Travel Time Variability and Airport Accessibility

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, P.R.; Kroes, E.P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    This discussion paper resulted in a publication in Transportation Research Part B: Methodological (2011). Vol. 45(10), pages 1545-1559. This paper analyses the cost of access travel time variability for air travelers. Reliable access to airports is important since it is likely that the cost of missing a flight is high. First, the determinants of the preferred arrival times at airports are analyzed, including trip purpose, type of airport, flight characteristics, travel experience, type of che...

  19. Location of airports - selected quantitative methods

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Merkisz-Guranowska; Maciej Bieńczak; Marcin Kiciński; Paweł Zmuda-Trzebiatowski

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of air transport in  the economic development of a country and its regions cannot be overestimated. The decision concerning an airport's location must be in line with the expectations of all the stakeholders involved. This article deals with the issues related to the choice of  sites where airports should be located. Methods: Two main quantitative approaches related to the issue of airport location are presented in this article, i.e. the question of opt...

  20. Airport surface access and mobile apps

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Martin-Domingo; Juan Carlos Martin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Airport Surface Access faces two main opposite issues: (1) cars, being the main transport mode, contribute to the increasing level of congestion and pollution of cities; and (2) simultaneously, parking fees are one important source of airports commercial revenue, creating a dilemma for airports when facing the problem. Following the recent trend of air passengers travelling with Smartphone (78% in 2013), the purpose of this paper is to monitor the adoption of mobile Applications (App...

  1. Speciation and transport of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the chemical speciation of a number of radionuclides migrating in a slightly contaminated ground water plume are identifying the most mobile species and providing an opportunity to test and/or validate geochemical models of radionuclide transport in ground waters. Results to date have shown that most of the migrating radionuclides are present in anionic or nonionic forms. These include anionic forms of 55Fe, 60Co, /sup 99m/Tc, 106Ru, 131I, and nonionic forms of 63Ni and 125Sb. Strontium-70 and a small fraction of the mobile 60Co are the only cationic radionuclides which have been detected moving in the ground water plume beyond 30 meters from the source. A comparison of the observed chemical forms with the predicted species calculated from modeling thermodynamic data and ground water chemical parameters has indicated a good agreement for most of the radioelements in the system, including Tc, Np, Cs, Sr, Ce, Ru, Sb, Zn, and Mn. The discrepancies between observed and calculated solutions species were noted for Fe, Co, Ni and I. Traces of Fe, Co, and Ni were observed to migrate in anionic or nonionic forms which the calculations failed to predict. These anionic/nonionic species may be organic complexes having enhanced mobility in ground waters. The radioiodine, for example, was shown to behave totally as an anion but further investigation revealed that 49-57% of this anionic iodine was organically bound. The ground water and aqueous extracts of trench sediments contain a wide variety of organic compounds, some of which could serve as complexing agents for the radionuclides. These results indicate the need for further research at a variety of field sites in defining precisely the chemical forms of the mobile radionuclide species, and in better understanding the role of dissolved organic materials in ground water transport of radionuclides

  2. Airport Configuration Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Airport configuration is a primary factor in various airport characteristics such as arrival and departure capacities and terminal area traffic patterns. These...

  3. Numerical simualtion of underground 37Ar transportation to the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring radioactive gas 37Ar is an important technique for the On-Site Inspection(OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. In order to establish a theoretical model that can be used to calculate the appearing time and radioactivity of 37Ar which transports to the ground after a nuclear explosion, the rock media in the test area is assumed to be a homogeneous porous media, without consideration of gas absorption by and release from the rock media. The seepage model in the porous media is used to calculate 37Ar transportation. Computational results give the time 37Ar leaks to the ground and the variation of its radioactivity with time. And we can analyze and consider the computational results when we have developed OSI noble gas monitoring systems and evaluated their effectiveness. (authors)

  4. SOME ISSUES OF THE AIRPORT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Ovidiu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, the recommended standards for the operation and management of civil-use airports are provided by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. In most individual countries, airports are managed directly by the government, most often under the ministry of transport. In some countries, including EU countries, some airports are privately owned and operated, although, despite private ownership, they are still subject to much of the country’s regulations regarding aviation operations. The complex system of civil airports is made up of individual airport facilities of varying sizes, serving various purposes, all organized into plans of regional, national, and international levels. The range of rules, regulations, and policies, administered from varying levels of government, cover the full spectrum of airport and aviation system operations. Furthermore, a large number of professional and industry organizations play a large part in influencing the policies by which airport management must operate their facilities. By understanding where an airport manager’s airport falls within the civil aviation system, what rules must be followed, and what sources of support and assistance exist, the task of efficiently managing the complex system that is an airport, becomes highly facilitated.

  5. Strategic development of commercial airports in Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏煦

    2014-01-01

    Civil airports in China in the last 10 years have expanded substantially, and the construction of airports has come into a period planning to build airports into large transportation hub. This article combines the new trends of commercial real estate and the airport business, and explores various business marketing and management modes for operating airports with specific reference to the case of Chongqing. The main research results are as follows: First, the introduction of products and services markets should make more focus on the structure and habits of travelers. Second, developing new commercial projects through the BOT model and practicing resource replacement mode. Third, planning the terminal surrounding functions, the layout of successful business is the key factor of the rapid increase of airport non-aeronautical revenue.

  6. Flight Characteristics Analysis Based on QAR Data of a Jet Transport During Landing at a High-altitude Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Edward Lan; WU Kaiyuan; YU Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Flight data of a twin-jet transport aircraft in revenue flight are analyzed for potential safety problems.Data from the quick access recorder (QAR) are first filtered through the kinematic compatibility analysis.The filtered data are then organized into longitudinal- and lateral-directional aerodynamic model data with dynamic ground effect.The dynamic ground effect requires the radio height and sink rate in the models.The model data ere then refined into numerical models through a funzzy logic algorithm without data smoothing in advance.These numerical models describe nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamics and are used in nonlinear flight dynamics simulation.For the jet transport under study,it is found that the effect of crosswind is significant enough to excite the Dutch roll motion.Through a linearized analysis in flight dynamics at every instant of time,the Dutch roll motion is found to be in nonlinear oscillation without clear damping of the amplitude.In the analysis,all stability derivatives vary with time and hence are nonlinear functions of state variables.Since the Dutch roll motion is not damped despite the fact that a full-time yaw damper is engaged,it is concluded that the design data for the yaw damper is not sufficiendy realistic and the contribution of time derivative of sideslip angle to damping should be considered.As a result of nonlinear flight simulation,the vertical wind acting on the aircrafl is estimated to be mostly updraft which varies along the flight path before touchdown.Varying updraft appears to make the descent rate more difficult to control to result in a higher g-load at touchdown.

  7. Aircraft engine exhaust emissions and other airport-related contributions to ambient air pollution: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-10-01

    Civil aviation is fast-growing (about +5% every year), mainly driven by the developing economies and globalisation. Its impact on the environment is heavily debated, particularly in relation to climate forcing attributed to emissions at cruising altitudes and the noise and the deterioration of air quality at ground-level due to airport operations. This latter environmental issue is of particular interest to the scientific community and policymakers, especially in relation to the breach of limit and target values for many air pollutants, mainly nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, near the busiest airports and the resulting consequences for public health. Despite the increased attention given to aircraft emissions at ground-level and air pollution in the vicinity of airports, many research gaps remain. Sources relevant to air quality include not only engine exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from aircraft, but also emissions from the units providing power to the aircraft on the ground, the traffic due to the airport ground service, maintenance work, heating facilities, fugitive vapours from refuelling operations, kitchens and restaurants for passengers and operators, intermodal transportation systems, and road traffic for transporting people and goods in and out to the airport. Many of these sources have received inadequate attention, despite their high potential for impact on air quality. This review aims to summarise the state-of-the-art research on aircraft and airport emissions and attempts to synthesise the results of studies that have addressed this issue. It also aims to describe the key characteristics of pollution, the impacts upon global and local air quality and to address the future potential of research by highlighting research needs.

  8. CYBER SECURITY FOR AIRPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasthurirangan Gopalakrishnan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In today’s information age, government organizations and business enterprises are heavily relying on interconnected computer systems to manage a variety of public services including energy, transportation, water, etc. While this increased connectivity has many operational advantages benefitting the public, they have also become vulnerable to cyber attacks such as Corporate Security Breaches, Spear Phishing, and Social Media Fraud. The aviation sector is one the critical infrastructure systems that is not only vulnerable to physical threats, but also cyber threats, especially with the increased use of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD at airports. It has been recognized that there is currently no cyber security standards established for airports in the United States as the existing standards have mainly focused on aircraft Control System (CS. This paper summarizes the need, background, ongoing developments and research efforts with respect to the establishment of cyber-security standards and best practices at U.S. airports with special emphasis on cyber security education and literacy.

  9. Sustainable ground transportation – review of technologies, challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Currently there are nearly 750 million ground vehicles in service worldwide. They are responsible for 50% of petroleum (oil) consumption and 60% of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. The number of vehicles is forecasted to double by 2050. Therefore the environmental issues such as noise, emissions and fuel burn have become important for energy and environmental sustainability. This paper provides an overview of specific energy and environmental issues related to ground transportation. The technologies related to reduction in energy requirements such as reducing the vehicle mass by using the high strength low weight materials and reducing the viscous drag by active flow control and smoothing the operational profile, and reducing the contact friction by special tire materials are discussed along with the portable energy sources for reducing the GHG emissions such as low carbon fuels (biofuels), Lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and stability, and fuel cells. The technological challenges and opportunities for innovations are discussed.

  10. Sustainable ground transportation – review of technologies, challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are nearly 750 million ground vehicles in service worldwide. They are responsible for 50% of petroleum (oil consumption and 60% of all greenhouse gas (GHG emissions worldwide. The number of vehicles is forecasted to double by 2050. Therefore the environmental issues such as noise, emissions and fuel burn have become important for energy and environmental sustainability. This paper provides an overview of specific energy and environmental issues related to ground transportation. The technologies related to reduction in energy requirements such as reducing the vehicle mass by using the high strength low weight materials and reducing the viscous drag by active flow control and smoothing the operational profile, and reducing the contact friction by special tire materials are discussed along with the portable energy sources for reducing the GHG emissions such as low carbon fuels (biofuels, Lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and stability, and fuel cells. The technological challenges and opportunities for innovations are discussed.

  11. Ant Colony Algorithm and Simulation for Robust Airport Gate Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport gate assignment is core task for airport ground operations. Due to the fact that the departure and arrival time of flights may be influenced by many random factors, the airport gate assignment scheme may encounter gate conflict and many other problems. This paper aims at finding a robust solution for airport gate assignment problem. A mixed integer model is proposed to formulate the problem, and colony algorithm is designed to solve this model. Simulation result shows that, in consideration of robustness, the ability of antidisturbance for airport gate assignment scheme has much improved.

  12. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE FOR THE ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE AIRPORT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildan Durmaz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Air transportation industry is a globally growing industry. As an inseparable part of this industry, airport management is also becoming more crucial issue to be dealt with. Airports offer economic and social benefits to the society, but also environmental impacts of airport operations are increasing due to high traffic growth. While airport capacity is increasing, airport operators are being responsible for mitigating environmental constraints. Today to implement airport environmental management system is seen as a critical way of solution. To ensure effective implementation of this system, an organizational change with definite roles, responsibilities and structure are needed. This study illustrates a way of organizational response to market forces and national regulations guiding the achievement of sustainable airports by determining the structure and the roles in an airport organization.

  13. BIOASSAY TECHNIQUES OF SOIL ECOLOGICAL STATUS ASSESSMENT NEAR THE AIRPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Madzhd

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of biological methods of an estimation of definition of toxicity of ground in territorie sadjoining to airports are presented. It is lead quality standard of a soil cover on biotests of different trophic levels.It is certain toxicity of ground in vicinities of airports

  14. Evaluating competitiveness of airports - Airport competitiveness index

    OpenAIRE

    Grancay, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The paper introduces a concept of airport competitiveness index. The index consists of numerous indicators grouped into four categories: market potential, infrastructure, charges and recent traffic results. Another important factor we take into account is safety. We find that from the selected sample the most competitive airports are Singapore Changi, New York Kennedy, Newark Liberty and Dubai International. U.S. and South-East Asian airports in general are among the most competitive.

  15. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  16. Airport Configuration Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is presently poor knowledge throughout the National Airspace System (NAS) of the airport configurations currently in use at each airport. There is even less...

  17. Potential risk of microplastics transportation into ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-04-01

    Microplastics, are plastics particles with a size smaller than 5mm. They are formed by the fragmentation of plastic wastes. They are present in the air, soil and water. But only in aquatic systems (ocean and rivers) are studies over their distribution, and the effect of microplastics on organisms. There is a lack of information of what is the distribution of microplastics in the soil, and in the ground water. This study tries to estimate the potential risk of microplastics transportation into the ground water by the activity of earthworms. Earthworms can produce burrows and/or galleries inside the soil, with the presence of earthworms some ecosystem services are enhanced, as infiltration. In this study we observed after 14 days with 5 treatments (0, 7, 28 and 60% w/w microplastics mixed with Populus nigra litter) and the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, in microcosms (3 replicas per treatment) that macroplastics are indeed deposit inside earthworms burrows, with 7% microplastics on the surface is possible to find 1.8 g.kg-1 microplastics inside the burrows, with a bioaumentation factor of 0.65. Burrows made by earthworms under 60% microplastics, are significant bigger (plitter that is deposit inside the burrows is significant higher (p<0.05) with the presence of microplastics on the surface than without microplastics. The microplastics size distribution is smaller inside the burrows than on the surface, with an abundance of particles under 63 μm.

  18. Hong Kong International Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraswamy, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    One element of the CIVCAL project Web-based resources containing images, tables, texts and associated data on the construction of Hong Kong International Airport. In 1989, the Hong Kong Government's Port and Airport Development Study (PADS) confirmed the island of Chek Lap Kok as the site selected for Hong Kong's new Airport. This project - to construct the Airport and related access infrastructure is one of the biggest in civil engineering history.

  19. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  20. Energy Research in Airports: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Ortega Alba; Mario Manana

    2016-01-01

    The main function of an airport is to provide access to air transport both for passengers and cargo. The number of air operations over the past 20 years has increased rapidly, and this has led to a rise in the energy needs of airports to satisfy this demand. As a consequence, the cost of energy supply for airport managers has escalated. At the same time, global energy consumption has soared due to the needs of emerging countries like China and India, with the consequent environmental impact. ...

  1. Waste and energy management at airports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korul, V.; Ozen, M. [Anadolu Univ., (Turkey). School of Civil Aviation

    2005-07-01

    Aviation is experiencing increased growth worldwide. As such, airports face a new and costly long-term threat in the form of environmental controls. Passenger traffic is expected to grow at an average annual rate of 4.5 per cent until 2020. This growth will be influenced by challenges such as airport and airspace congestion, environmental protection and increasing capital investment. Air transportation has created several environmental externalities such as aircraft noise, atmospheric pollution, water pollution and waste. Airports also take up large areas of land and are highly dependent on non-renewable energy sources. With increased traffic, the volume of waste also increases. The waste at airports is generated by airlines, airport operators and other airport related companies. Airport managers must come to the realization that sustainability within the aviation industry encompasses environmental, social and economic issues. Energy management is an essential part of the economical and efficient use of energy sources since it provides airports with a basis for evaluating power consumption and power supplies. Energy planning creates the foundation for a safe power supply from external sources or on-site power generation or cogeneration for a reliable supply of airport infrastructure services such as water, gas and air. This paper listed 9 advantages of using renewable energy sources for aviation high-energy requirements. Some airports generate waste volumes equivalent to those of small cities and their waste disposal costs are high. A strategy must be developed to deal with both solid and liquid wastes and address waste reduction and recycling. 38 refs.

  2. Remote Airport Tower Operation with Augmented Vision Video Panorama HMI

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Markus; rudolph, Michael; Werther, Bernd; Fürstenau, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the initial results of the DLR project Remote Airport Tower Operation Research (RapTOr) are described. Within this project an augmented vision video panorama system and a corresponding HMI is developed for remote surface movement management of small airports or of movement areas not directly visible for the controller. Ground traffic management is performed from a remotely located control center, e.g. a tower at a different airport. The setup and functions of the high resolution...

  3. Airports and Airfields - Volusia County Airports (Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Public Use Airports database is a geographic point database of aircraft landing facilities in the United States and U.S. Territories. This database has been...

  4. 76 FR 60962 - Noise Exposure Map Update for Buffalo Niagara International Airport, Buffalo, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Update for Buffalo Niagara International Airport, Buffalo, NY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation... Frontier Transportation Authority (NFTA), for Buffalo Niagara International Airport, under the...

  5. Total Airport Management (Operational Concept and Logical Architectur)

    OpenAIRE

    Günther, Yves; Inard, Anthony; Werther, Bernd; Marc BONNIER; Spies, Gunnar; Marsden, Alan; Temme, Marco; Böhme, Dietmar; Lane, Roger; Niederstraßer, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Airports are seen as constraints to growth in the future air transport system. In the context of a doubling of traffic by 2020, increased investment, development and research will be needed to support continuous improvement in airport throughput, efficiency and punctuality with continued safety considerations. Airport processes must be fully integrated within the Air Traffic Management (ATM) system and capable of interacting with other system components in order to be aware of the priorities ...

  6. STRATEGIC MARKET POSITION OF THE GDANSK AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Ćwikliński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Airports are a key link of the air transport infrastructure, which is a part of the whole transportation system. Their potential is determined by a network of airlines relations and affects the long-term, strategic position in the market of aviation services. The most possible scenario of the macro-environment of the Gdansk Airport has a relatively high predictability and generally positive influencing on the potential for development in the next years. Only international and demographic areas can constitute a barrier to achieving the strategic objectives. Gdansk Airport takes permanently the third position on the Polish market. Strategic gap analysis leads to the conclusion that, compared to its main competitors Airport Gdansk has a gap of compliance trends, but in relation to smaller regional airports excess gap. GDN services are located in the square "Star" in the BCG matrix. This airport has prepared an investment program till 2035. The dynamics of the projected increase in the number of passengers and air operations in Gdansk is generally slightly higher than the growth nationwide forecasts. The strategic challenge for next years will be to strengthen the status of the GDN as a Polish aviation gateway to Scandinavia.

  7. Tanzania - Mafia Island Airport

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation design and subsequent data gathering activities will address the following key research questions: a) Has the Mafia Island Airport Upgrade Project...

  8. Prehospital care at a major international airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwinn, A A; Dinerman, N; Pons, P T; Marlin, R

    1988-10-01

    Medical emergencies at a major metropolitan airport have a significant impact on prehospital care capabilities for the rest of the community in which the airport is located. Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado, is a facility that in 1985 had 14.4 million passengers and a static employee population of 12,000 to 15,000. In 1981, there were 1,182 ambulance trips to the airport, 40.4% of which did not result in the transport of a patient. The expense of sending an ambulance and fire engine out on such calls was great, and paramedics were out of service for approximately 300 hours on these nontransport cases. In order to improve prehospital services to the airport and the city, a paramedic has been stationed in the concourse at the airport 16 hours a day since 1982. The records for airport paramedic services for the 12 months ending September 1985 were reviewed. Paramedic services were requested for 1,952 patients. Of these, 696 (35.7%) were transported to hospital by ambulance; 115 (5.9%) went by private car; 284 (14.6%) refused any paramedic care or transport; and 857 (43.9%) were released, after base station contact, with instructions to seek definitive care at the final destination. Presenting complaints were classified into 55 categories and the frequencies and dispositions are described. The most common presentations resulting in transport were chest pain, 110 (5.6%); syncope, 60 (3.1%); psychiatric, 57 (2.9%); abdominal pain, 49 (2.5%); seizure, 36 (1.8%); fracture, 31 (1.6%); and cardiac arrest, 29 (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3177992

  9. Energy Research in Airports: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ortega Alba

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main function of an airport is to provide access to air transport both for passengers and cargo. The number of air operations over the past 20 years has increased rapidly, and this has led to a rise in the energy needs of airports to satisfy this demand. As a consequence, the cost of energy supply for airport managers has escalated. At the same time, global energy consumption has soared due to the needs of emerging countries like China and India, with the consequent environmental impact. This complex scenario of environmental and economic factors has made airport managers become aware of the need to reduce energy consumption as well as a more efficient use of it. The aim of this article is to analyze the main behaviors and energy trends at airports in more recent research, starting with the description of the main energy sources and consumers, the application of energy conservation and energy efficiency measures, the establishment of energy indicators and benchmarking between airports, as well as energy modeling and simulation.

  10. Vienna international airport noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidelinde Jelinek-Nigitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: On the topic of sustainable aviation a study was carried out to measure the difference between the actual change in air traffic noise and the airport’s residents’ perception of the noise change at Vienna International Airport. Therefore, a questionnaire was developed in cooperation with the airport and an online survey was conducted. Design/methodology/approach: For the survey of the opinion of the affected population of the surrounding communities, a web based online questionnaire is created and distributed via various channels including e-mail, and online forums. After the basic structure of the questionnaire had been defined, the questions were developed in cooperation with employees form the environmental department of VIE, who had a sustainable influence on the questions’ order and formulation. As the survey was supposed to be answered by residents around VIE. Findings: Results of the online study show that only parts of the participants are affected by air traffic noise at VIE. Even less experienced a significant change over the last five years. About one third of the participants stated that they are affected by air traffic noise in one way or another. The majority of these people live in Lower Austria, the federal state in which the airport is located. The participants obviously judge air traffic noise during day time more importantly than air traffic noise at night. Research limitations/implications: Due to the low number of returns, no statistically relevant conclusions can be drawn, the results of the survey can be used to make some general statements. Originality/value: Economic growth and deregulation lead to growing aircraft operations. Vienna International Airport with its approximately 260,000 flight movements per year is the biggest airport in Austria and a major hub in Europe. The combination of constantly growing air transport and the resulting noise exposure, as well as the steadily increasing

  11. Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports – Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Cherie; Morrell, Peter

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing trend of charging for externalities and the aim of encouraging the sustainable development of the air transport industry, there is a need to evaluate the social costs of these undesirable side effects, mainly aircraft noise and engine emissions, for different airports. The aircraft noise and engine emissions social costs are calculated in monetary terms for five different sized airports, ranging from hub airports to small regional airports. The number of residences within ...

  12. Nusantara: Between sky and earth, could the PPP be the solution for Indonesian airport infrastructures?

    OpenAIRE

    Carnis, Laurent; YULIAWATI, Eny

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the airport infrastructures in Indonesia and it investigates the possibility of defining a solution for their funding. Indeed the economic development in Indonesia requires huge capital needs for completing the numerous plans of investment in transport and particularly for the airport infrastructures. More than 63% of the budget for the airport infrastructure needs is not funded, while the characteristics of airport infrastructure investments involve large amounts of mon...

  13. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Alternative bio-based fuels for aviation: the clean airports program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, has been designated as the national coordinator of the Clean Airports Program. The U.S. Dept. of Energy (US DOE) conferred this designation in March 1996. This program, a spin-off of the Clean Cities Program, was initiated to increase the use of alternative fuels in aviation. The two major fuels used in aviation are the current piston engine aviation gasoline and the current turbine engine fuel. The environmental impact of each of these fuels is significant. Aviation gasoline (100LL), currently used in the general aviation piston engine fleet, contributes 100% of the emissions containing lead in the U.S. today. Turbine engine fuel (jet fuel) produces two major environmental impacts: a local one, in the vicinity of the airports, and a global impact on climate change. The Clean Airports Program was established to achieve and maintain clean air at and in the vicinity of airports, through the use of alternative fuel-powered air and ground transportation vehicles. (author)

  15. Sampling for global epidemic models and the topology of an international airport network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiy Bobashev

    Full Text Available Mathematical models that describe the global spread of infectious diseases such as influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, and tuberculosis (TB often consider a sample of international airports as a network supporting disease spread. However, there is no consensus on how many cities should be selected or on how to select those cities. Using airport flight data that commercial airlines reported to the Official Airline Guide (OAG in 2000, we have examined the network characteristics of network samples obtained under different selection rules. In addition, we have examined different size samples based on largest flight volume and largest metropolitan populations. We have shown that although the bias in network characteristics increases with the reduction of the sample size, a relatively small number of areas that includes the largest airports, the largest cities, the most-connected cities, and the most central cities is enough to describe the dynamics of the global spread of influenza. The analysis suggests that a relatively small number of cities (around 200 or 300 out of almost 3000 can capture enough network information to adequately describe the global spread of a disease such as influenza. Weak traffic flows between small airports can contribute to noise and mask other means of spread such as the ground transportation.

  16. Algorithm to quantify energy consumption and pollutant emissions in ground transportation of persons for alternative transportation system structures. Contribution to an objectification of transportation policy measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golling, B.

    1978-01-01

    A calculation system, consisting of a frame model MACSIM and a core model MICSIM, is developed in order to quantify the effects of changes in the transportation system structure in ground transportation of persons on energy consumption and pollutant emissions. This system is an aid in analyzing the efficiency of measures to reduce energy consumption and pollutant emissions in this field of transportation, and it helps in making more accurate prognoses on energy demand in transportation.

  17. Modelling airport congestion charges

    OpenAIRE

    Janić, Milan

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with modelling congestion charges at an airport. In this context, congestion charging represents internalizing the cost of marginal delays that a flight imposes on other flights due to congestion. The modelling includes estimating congestion and flight delays, the cost of these delays and the efficiency of particular flights following the introduction ofa congestion charge. The models are applied to an airport / New York LaGuardia / to illustrate their ability to handle mor...

  18. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 21)—nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... development. (a) Authority. 49 U.S.C. 1723 provides that (a) . . . whenever the Secretary of...

  19. UTMTOX, Toxic Chemical Transport in Atmosphere, Ground Water, Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Description of program or function: UTMTOX is a unified transport model for toxic materials. It combines hydrologic, atmospheric, and sediment transport in one computer code and extends the scope to predict the transport of not only trace metals but also many chemical compounds, including organics. UTMTOX is capable of calculating 1) the atmospheric dispersion of up to 20 chemicals from a maximum of 10 point, 10 line, and 10 area sources; 2) deposition of one chemical at a time in both wet and dry form on foliage or the surface of the earth; 3) surface flow and erosion; 4) percolation through the soil to a stream channel; and 5) flow in the stream channel to the outfall of a watershed. B - Method of solution: UTMTOX calculates rates of flux of chemicals from release to the atmosphere, through deposition on a watershed, infiltration, and runoff from the soil to flow in the stream channel and the associated sediment transport. From these values, mass balances can be established, budgets for the chemical can be made, and concentrations in many environmental compartments can be estimated. Since the coupling is established among three major submodels, they can share data

  20. Planned evolution of airport airside configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, A. G. A. N.

    Air travel has become one of the main modes of transportation in the modern world with ever increasing demand resulting in the need to expand airports. Further, airports have to undergo alterations as the characteristics of aircraft it is expected to handle, changes with advancements in related technology. Thus, airports evolve over time. A long term strategy is important to ensure efficiency of the airport airside configuration at different stages of its evolution. Establishment of a network of efficient airside configurations connected with possible paths of evolution from one configuration to another could enable airport designers to develop a long term strategy for planned evolution of airports. The objective of this research is to understand and develop the key requisites for establishing such a network. This thesis has initially identified the factors that affect the choice of airside configurations and is followed by an analysis of different classification systems established based on aircraft characteristics and a methodology in categorizing airports considering the aircraft they experience. The thesis includes a detailed analysis of air traffic rules established by regulatory authorities with an explanation on applicability of the rules for different circumstances, and recommendations for situations where current rules are found to be inadequate in terms of safety. This is followed by details on formulation of a network of different runway configurations indicating the possible paths of evolution from one configuration to another. Further, the thesis contains information on impact of the runway layout on the arrangement of passenger terminal buildings and their effect on aircraft taxiing distance. Finally, the thesis provides an explanation on the methodology in evaluating the airside configurations considering the capacity and taxiing distance which are important criteria in determining the efficiency of an airside configuration.

  1. Software Tool for Significantly Increasing Airport Throughput Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Airportal effort seeks to optimize aircraft surface movements through approaches that could double or...

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Passenger Traffic in a National Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Enciso, Javier; Vargas, Juan; Martínez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Optimal operation of a country's air transport infrastructure plays a major role in the economic development of nations. Due to the increasing use of air transportation in today's world, flights' boarding times have become a concern for both airlines and airports, thus the importance of knowing beforehand how changes in flights demand parameters and physical airport layout will affect passengers flow and boarding times. This paper presents a pedestrian modeling study in which a national airpo...

  3. Modelling of the reactive transport of organic pollutants in ground water; Modellierung des reaktiven Transports organischer Schadstoffe im Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, W. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Umweltphysik

    1999-07-01

    The book describes reactive transport of organic pollutants in ground water and its quantitative monitoring by means of numerical reaction transport models. A brief introduction dealing with the importance of and hazards to ground water and opportunities for making use of ground water models is followed by a more detailed chapter on organic pollutants in ground water. Here the focus is on organochlorine compounds and mineral oil products. Described are propagation mechanisms for these substances in the ground and, especially, their degradability in ground water. A separate chapter is dedicated to possibilities for cleaning up polluted ground water aquifers. The most important decontamination techniques are presented, with special emphasis on in-situ processes with hydraulic components. Moreover, this chapter discusses the self-cleaning capability of aquifers and the benefits of the application of models to ground water cleanup. In the fourth chapter the individual components of reaction transport models are indicated. Here it is, inter alia, differences in the formulation of reaction models as to their complexity, and coupling between suspended matter transport and reaction processes that are dealt with. This chapter ends with a comprehensive survey of literature regarding the application of suspended matter transport models to real ground water accidents. Chapter 5 consists of a description of the capability and principle of function of the reaction transport model TBC (transport biochemism/chemism). This model is used in the two described applications to the reactive transport of organic pollutants in ground water. (orig.) [German] Inhalt des vorliegenden Buches ist die Darstellung des reaktiven Transports organischer Schadstoffe im Grundwasser und dessen quantitative Erfassung mithilfe numerischer Reaktions-Transportmodelle. Auf eine kurze Einleitung zur Bedeutung und Gefaehrdung von Grundwasser und zu den Einsatzmoeglichkeiten von Grundwassermodellen folgt ein

  4. Maglev vehicles and superconductor technology: Integration of high-speed ground transportation into the air travel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.R.; Rote, D.M.; Hull, J.R.; Coffey, H.T.; Daley, J.G.; Giese, R.F.

    1989-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the potential contribution of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) to the technical and economic feasibility of magnetically levitated (maglev) vehicles, (2) determine the status of maglev transportation research in the United States and abroad, (3) identify the likelihood of a significant transportation market for high-speed maglev vehicles, and (4) provide a preliminary assessment of the potential energy and economic benefits of maglev systems. HTSCs should be considered as an enhancing, rather than an enabling, development for maglev transportation because they should improve reliability and reduce energy and maintenance costs. Superconducting maglev transportation technologies were developed in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Federal support was withdrawn in 1975, but major maglev transportation programs were continued in Japan and West Germany, where full-scale prototypes now carry passengers at speeds of 250 mi/h in demonstration runs. Maglev systems are generally viewed as very-high-speed train systems, but this study shows that the potential market for maglev technology as a train system, e.g., from one downtown to another, is limited. Rather, aircraft and maglev vehicles should be seen as complementing rather than competing transportation systems. If maglev systems were integrated into major hub airport operations, they could become economical in many relatively high-density US corridors. Air traffic congestion and associated noise and pollutant emissions around airports would also be reduced. 68 refs., 26 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Assessment of ground transportation stress in juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kathleen E; Innis, Charles J; Kennedy, Adam E; McNally, Kerry L; Davis, Deborah G; Burgess, Elizabeth A; Merigo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Sea turtle rehabilitation centres frequently transport sea turtles for long distances to move animals between centres or to release them at beaches, yet there is little information on the possible effects of transportation-related stress ('transport stress') on sea turtles. To assess whether transport stress is a clinically relevant concern for endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii), we obtained pre-transport and post-transport plasma samples from 26 juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles that were transported for 13 h (n = 15 turtles) or 26 h (n = 11 turtles) by truck for release at beaches. To control for effects of handling, food restriction and time of day, the same turtles were also studied on 'control days' 2 weeks prior to transport, i.e. with two samples taken to mimic pre-transport and post-transport timing, but without transportation. Blood samples were analysed for nine clinical health measures (pH, pCO2, pO2, HCO3, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, lactate and haematocrit) and four 'stress-associated' parameters (corticosterone, glucose, white blood cell count and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio). Vital signs (heart rate, respiratory rate and cloacal temperature) were also monitored. Corticosterone and glucose showed pronounced elevations due specifically to transportation; for corticosterone, this elevation was significant only for the longer transport duration, whereas glucose increased significantly after both transport durations. However, clinical health measures and vital signs showed minimal or no changes in response to any sampling event (with or without transport), and all turtles appeared to be in good clinical health after both transport durations. Thus, transportation elicits a mild, but detectable, adrenal stress response that is more pronounced during longer durations of transport; nonetheless, Kemp's ridley sea turtles can tolerate ground transportation of up to 26 h in good health. These results are likely

  6. Spatial Differences and Costs of Emissions at U.S. Airport Hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, Matthew J; Chester, Mikhail V; Ryerson, Megan S; Fraser, Andrew M

    2016-04-19

    As local governments plan to expand airport infrastructure and build air service, monetized estimates of damages from air pollution are important for balancing environmental impacts. While it is well-known that aircraft emissions near airports directly affect nearby populations, it is less clear how the airport-specific aircraft operations and impacts result in monetized damages to human health and the environment. We model aircraft and ground support equipment emissions at major U.S. airports and estimate the monetized human health and environmental damages of near airport (within 60 miles) emissions. County-specific unit damage costs for PM, SOx, NOx, and VOCs and damage valuations for CO and CO2 are used along with aircraft emissions estimations at airports to determine impacts. We find that near-airport emissions at major U.S. airports caused a total of $1.9 billion in damages in 2013, with airports contributing between $720 thousand and $190 million each. These damages vary by airport from $1 to $9 per seat per one-way flight and costs per passenger are often greater than airport charges levied on airlines for infrastructure use. As the U.S. aviation system grows, it is possible to minimize human and environmental costs by shifting aircraft technologies and expanding service into airports where fewer impacts are likely to occur. PMID:27007187

  7. Use of social media by airports

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Halpern

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates use of social media by airports according to geographical location of the airport, airport size, and airport ownership and operation. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a content analysis of airport websites. The sample consists of 1559 airports worldwide that are members of Airports Council International (ACI). Findings: Almost one-fifth of airports use at least one type of social media; 13% use Facebook, 12% use Twitter, 7% use LinkedIn...

  8. Waste and energy management at airports. Paper no. IGEC-1-024

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air transport is a high growth industry. The growth in demand for air transport has had very significant economic and environmental consequences for airlines and airports. With increased traffic, the volume of waste is increasing while the waste at airports is generated by airlines, airport operators and other airport related companies. Waste management is usually under the airport operators' responsibility. Energy management, associated with the provision of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting, is also very important. With energy conservation, as with waste management, there are good financial reasons for why airports should address these issues since environmental improvements may bring about considerable cost savings. This study aims to discuss the environmental issues at airports by giving a global perspective for the sustainability of aviation industry. (author)

  9. T-SDN architecture for space and ground integrated optical transport network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kunkun; Hu, Wenjing; Gao, Shenghua; Chang, Chengwu

    2015-11-01

    Integrated optical transport network is the development trend of the future space information backbone network. The space and ground integrated optical transport network(SGIOTN) may contain a variety of equipment and systems. Changing the network or meeting some innovation missions in the network will be an expensive implement. Software Defined Network(SDN) provides a good solution to flexibly adding process logic, timely control states and resources of the whole network, as well as shielding the differences of heterogeneous equipment and so on. According to the characteristics of SGIOTN, we propose an transport SDN architecture for it, with hierarchical control plane and data plane composed of packet networks and optical transport networks.

  10. Market Power : Airports - Vertical Integration between Airports and Airlines

    OpenAIRE

    Serebrisky, Tomás

    2003-01-01

    In the late 1980s and the 1990s many countries privatized airports or concessioned their operation. The United Kingdom began the trend, followed by other countries adopting new forms of infrastructure ownership and management. To control infrastructure licensing and the "natural monopoly" characteristics of some airport services, governments developed regulatory policies for airport system...

  11. Use of social media by airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Halpern

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the use of social media by airports using content analysis of 1,559 airport websites. One-fifth of airports use at least one type of social media. There is a greater use of social media by airports in North America and Europe, by larger airports, and by airports that are owned and operated by private interests. Demand for social media is greater at airports in North America and Europe, and at larger airports. Findings from 183 airport Twitter accounts demonstrate a positive correlation between the extent to which airports are active users of social media and the number of followers that they have.

  12. 76 FR 70531 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217/EUROCAE WG-44: Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Airport Mapping Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation... RTCA Special Committee 217/EUROCAE WG-44: Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases: For the tenth meeting... meeting of RTCA Special Committee 217/EUROCAE WG-44: Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. The...

  13. Risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel hydrocarbons at a major airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel-hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and ground water at a major airport in Colorado. In situ bioremediation pilot testing, natural attenuation modeling, and full-scale remedial action planning and implementation for soil and ground water contamination has conducted at four airport fuel farms. The sources of fuel contamination were leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) or pipelines transporting Jet A fuel and aviation gasoline. Continuing sources of contamination were present in several small cells of free-phase product and in fuel residuals trapped within the capillary fringe at depths 15 to 20 feet below ground surface. Bioventing pilot tests were conducted to assess the feasibility of using this technology to remediate contaminated soils. The pilot tests included measurement of initial soil gas chemistry at the site, determination of subsurface permeability, and in situ respiration tests to determine fuel biodegradation rates. A product recovery test was also conducted. ES designed and installed four full-scale bioventing systems to remediate the long-term sources of continuing fuel contamination. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected in ground water at concentrations slightly above regulatory guidelines

  14. Airports as a factor of regional development on the example of the Szymany Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdański Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodship is a NUTS II region, which belongs to the least developed regions of Poland and the EU. One of the reasons of its underdevelopment is poor transport accessibility, which limits the level of competitiveness and investment attractiveness. For this reason the voivodship authorities made a decision to build a regional airport by modernising the military airport in Szymany near Szczytno. The investment, which is co-financed by the European Funds, is aimed to reduce the level of peripherality of the region, increase its competitiveness and, as a consequence, raise the socio-economic development level.

  15. 机场服务质量之评价%An Evaluation of the Service Quality of Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建张

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of airport service quality is an important issue in the air travel transportation industry.The aim of this paper is to construct a SERVQUAL method for evaluating the service quality of airport.This assessment model is tested by a Taiwanese airport.The results show that this assessment model proposed in this paper seems to be promising.Finally,some interesting conclusions and useful suggestions are given to airport to improve the service quality.

  16. Analysis of airport traffic in the context of environmental throughput

    OpenAIRE

    Anna KWASIBORSKA; Anna STELMACH

    2014-01-01

    Increased air transport volumes force carriers to make more frequent flights as well as airport operations. Unfortunately, such progress has some negative effects which the main is environment nuisances. Due to its reach, aircraft noise is one of the most important and unpleasant effects of airport operations. The problem of protecting the environment against noise is becoming increasingly more important on the international market. A lot is being done here by the European Union, which urges ...

  17. Optimal Control of Airport Operations with Gate Capacity Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Khadilkar, Harshad Dilip; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2013-01-01

    The mitigation of airport surface congestion is an important step towards increasing the efficiency of the air transportation system, and decreasing flight delays. This paper proposes a strategy to control the release of departing flights from their gates with the specific objective of reducing their taxi times and fuel consumption, while limiting the impact on airport throughput. The proposed strategy also explicitly accounts for the practical constraints that arise due to limited gate resou...

  18. Hydrogen aircraft and airport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First flight tests with a hydrogen demonstrator aircraft, currently under investigation in the scope of the German-Russia Cryoplane project, are scheduled for 1999. Regular service with regional aircraft may begin around 2005, followed by larger Airbus-type airliners around 2010-2015. The fuel storage aboard such airliners will be of the order of 15 t or roughly 200 m3 LH2. This paper investigates a number of safety problems associated with the handling and air transport of so much hydrogen. The same is done for the infrastructure on the airport. Major risks are identified, and appropriate measures in design and operation are recommended. It is found that hydrogen aircraft are no more dangerous than conventional ones - safer in some respects. (author)

  19. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the sta...

  20. Airports Driving Economic and Tourism Development

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiana Cristureanu; Ana Bobirca

    2007-01-01

    Globalization of the world economy is a key driver of air traffic growth. Cross-investment between European countries, as well as to and from the USA, Far East and the rest of the world is increasingly a feature of modern business, with mobility of labor as a growing factor. The most important contribution of airports is the connectivity they provide, which allows the European economy and society to flourish. Air transport provides accessibility, which is essential in a modern economy and soc...

  1. Calibration of a ground water contamination transport model using Tritium-3Helium ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Dow Terneuzen is the largest US chemical industrial site in Europe. Situated in the southern part of The Netherlands at the southern shore of the Westershelde, the site occupies an area of roughly 2km times 3km. Several contaminant plumes are known in the ground water below the industrial area. They originate from accidents in the fifties until seventies and are transported with the ground water flow towards the borders of the site. Detailed hydrogeological investigations lead to a three-dimensional numerical model of ground water flow and transport. Although this model was carefully calibrated using the hydraulic heads, unrealistic travel times and ground water ages were obtained. In a case study one of the contaminant plumes was investigated for ground water age and distance velocity. Out of three multilevel wells along the plume a total of 13 samples for T/3He were obtained. All samples contained tritium, indicating a component of ground water younger than 40 years, whereas the numerical model gave travel times between 40 and 160 years. The Tritium data are further confirmed by SF6 which was present in concentrations well above the present day atmospheric equilibrium in two out of three samples. Two facts hamper the interpretation of the noble gas data as T/3He ages: i) Degradation of the organic contaminant (benzene) results in CO2 and CH4 production causing loss of noble gases in the aquifer by a stripping process. This also caused problems during the sampling and made the interpretation of the data as ages impossible for 5 of the 13 samples. ii) Ground water infiltration temperatures are unknown but elevated due to process heat released from the industrial environment. Accuracy of the derived ages is limited mainly by this unknown infiltration temperature. Despite these difficulties the derived T/ 3 He ages give clear hints for the improvement of the numerical model. Most probably ground water infiltration does not take place on the whole area as

  2. Calibration of a ground water contamination transport model using Tritium-3Helium ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Dow Terneuzen is the largest US chemical industrial site in Europe. Situated in the southern part of The Netherlands at the southern shore of the Westershelde, the site occupies an area of roughly 2km times 3km. Several contaminant plumes are known in the ground water below the industrial area. They originate from accidents in the fifties until seventies and are transported with the ground water flow towards the borders of the site. Detailed hydrogeological investigations lead to a three-dimensional numerical model of ground water flow and transport. Although this model was carefully calibrated using the hydraulic heads, unrealistic travel times and ground water ages were obtained. In a case study one of the contaminant plumes was investigated for ground water age and distance velocity. Out of three multilevel wells along the plume a total of 13 samples for T/3He were obtained. All samples contained tritium, indicating a component of ground water younger than 40 years, whereas the numerical model gave travel times between 40 and 160 years. The Tritium data are further confirmed by SF6 which was present in concentrations well above the present day atmospheric equilibrium in two out of three samples. Two facts hamper the interpretation of the noble gas data as T/3He ages: i) Degradation of the organic contaminant (benzene) results in CO2 and CH4 production causing loss of noble gases in the aquifer by a stripping process. This also caused problems during the sampling and made the interpretation of the data as ages impossible for 5 of the 13 samples. ii) Ground water infiltration temperatures are unknown but elevated due to process heat released from the industrial environment. Accuracy of the derived ages is limited mainly by this unknown infiltration temperature. Despite these difficulties the derived T/3He ages give clear hints for the improvement of the numerical model. Most probably ground water infiltration does not take place on the whole area as

  3. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  4. Climate change, productivity shocks and demand for freight ground transportation in Atlantic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine the impacts of climate change on the transportation sector in a regional context. The purpose was to analyze potential climate change impacts on demand for freight transportation in Atlantic Canada through its association with other sectors of the regional economy. Freight transportation is designed to meet transportation demands of commodity producers who must deliver their goods to final users. Since it is a by-product of profit maximization and cost minimization by producers of all types of commodities in various sectors of the economy, this study modelled climate change impacts as productivity shocks in relevant sectors of the economy. A computerized simulation was then used to determine how the consequences of these shocks influence the demand for freight transportation. This was accomplished by collecting climate related data in Atlantic Canada as well as aggregate economic data that reflects the economic performance of the regional economy. A growth model that links regional economy to freight transportation was then developed and different scenarios for future developments associated with climate change impacts were evaluated. Computer simulation with Mathcad-8 showed that the conditions specified in the best-case scenario, expected-case scenario and worst-case scenario resulted in a cumulative loss in demand for ground freight transportation of 7.213, 582.127 and 610.92 billion tonne-kilometers respectively, over the 2001-2100 period. In general, the results of the computer simulation demonstrated a considerable decrease in the demand for ground freight transportation in Atlantic Canada resulting from climate change impacts. The loss in demand was found to occur mostly in the first half of this century, with some recovery in the second half because the economic system would adapt to new climate conditions. It was recommended that policy instruments such as regulations or taxes, should be put in place to reduce the impacts

  5. Climate change, productivity shocks and demand for freight ground transportation in Atlantic Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yevdokimov, Y. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Economics]|[New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Byelyayev, O. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2005-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the impacts of climate change on the transportation sector in a regional context. The purpose was to analyze potential climate change impacts on demand for freight transportation in Atlantic Canada through its association with other sectors of the regional economy. Freight transportation is designed to meet transportation demands of commodity producers who must deliver their goods to final users. Since it is a by-product of profit maximization and cost minimization by producers of all types of commodities in various sectors of the economy, this study modelled climate change impacts as productivity shocks in relevant sectors of the economy. A computerized simulation was then used to determine how the consequences of these shocks influence the demand for freight transportation. This was accomplished by collecting climate related data in Atlantic Canada as well as aggregate economic data that reflects the economic performance of the regional economy. A growth model that links regional economy to freight transportation was then developed and different scenarios for future developments associated with climate change impacts were evaluated. Computer simulation with Mathcad-8 showed that the conditions specified in the best-case scenario, expected-case scenario and worst-case scenario resulted in a cumulative loss in demand for ground freight transportation of 7.213, 582.127 and 610.92 billion tonne-kilometers respectively, over the 2001-2100 period. In general, the results of the computer simulation demonstrated a considerable decrease in the demand for ground freight transportation in Atlantic Canada resulting from climate change impacts. The loss in demand was found to occur mostly in the first half of this century, with some recovery in the second half because the economic system would adapt to new climate conditions. It was recommended that policy instruments such as regulations or taxes, should be put in place to reduce the impacts

  6. Airport Ground Resource Planning Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA-developed Surface Management System (SMS) is currently being used by several air carriers on a daily basis. Although SMS was intended to create shared...

  7. Managing Projects with Strong Technological Rupture - Case of High-Speed Ground Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    DE TILIÈRE, Guillaume

    2002-01-01

    Managing the launch of new technological trajectories is a complex task, especially in the case of High-Speed Ground Transportation (HSGT) Systems. For instance, Maglev systems are now developed since 40 years, and none of these technologies has been implemented until the first Transrapid contract for Shanghai (which could lead to a 1250 km track between Beijing and Shanghai). What are the future challenges for cutting-edge technologies such as a Swissmetro or the Japanese MLX-01? Be...

  8. The economic impact of South Africa’s international airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrastructure is strongly linked to economic growth and plays a major role in providing greater mobility and choice, leading to an improvement in incomes and welfare. Transport infrastructure such as highways, bridges, ports, airports and railways is critical in achieving economic growth. If the supply of these facilities does not keep up with rising demand, the cost of moving goods will increase, and there will be a downward pressure on profits and growth. Airports play a critical role in generating employment within an economy, creating wealth, contributing to the tax base, stimulating tourism and contributing to world trade. While the latter two are less easily measured, it is possible to determine a base impact that an airport has on an economy by measuring the direct and indirect gross domestic product, employment and taxation impacts. This study quantifies these for the three main international airports in South Africa.

  9. Apron layout design and flight-to-gate assignment at Lanseria International airport

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, T.; J. Bekker

    2013-01-01

    Air traffic is continuously increasing and more efficient air transport systems are required to handle the air travel demand. The study investigates the expansion of Lanseria International Airport in Gauteng, South Africa. Expansion of Lanseria requires a study of the airport apron layout to ensure efficient passenger-aircraft flow as well as the efficient flow of aircraft to and from the airport. The candidate layout designs are based on the layout concept of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta I...

  10. Transport and distribution of nutrients in anchovy spawning ground to the southern waters of Shandong Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Shengquan; Lin Yi'an; Jin Mingming; Liu Xiaoya

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of nutrients and the effect of side transport of nutrients on anchovy spawning ground to the southern waters of Shandong Peninsula are discussed based on the data collected in June 2000, May and June 2001. The coastal current and upwelling are the main physical processes of nutrient transport to the southern waters of Shandong Peninsula. The concentrations of nutrients, Chla, the density of anchovy eggs, larva and juvenile fish increase obviously where they are greatly affected by these processes, while the contents of nutrients and Chl-a, the density of anchovy eggs, larva and juvenile fish decrease significantly where these processes diminish or disappear. The investigation suggest that the side transport of nutrients by Lubei (North Shandong) coastal current in the northern area causes the Chl-a content to be high and dense anchovy eggs, larva and juvenile fish to be dense in the coastal area of the Chengshan Cape. In the southern area, the riverine input from Subei irrigation ditch with high content of nutrients inshore and upwelling in the western edge of the Huanghai Sea Cold Water offshore should be responsible for high Chl-a concentration and dense anchovy eggs, larva and juvenile fish.It is possible that these processes of nutrient transport have controlled the anchovy spawning ground to the southem waters of Shandong Peninsula.

  11. Scarcity rents and airport charges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Burghouwt; W. de Wit

    2015-01-01

    This report addresses the responses related to scarcity rents and airport charges. The Commission has asked ITF/SEO to provide evidence on scarcity rents in the London airport system. Different reports submitted in response to the Commission’s consultation make different assumptions on the way airli

  12. Effects of heterogeneous porous geology on ground-water flow and transport modeling in multiaquifer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, D.E.; Duffield, G.M.; Buss, D.R.; Wadsworth, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional model was used to investigate the influence of simple heterogeneities and discontinuities in an acquitard on ground-water flow and transport in a 17 mi/sup 2/ region of Savannah River Plant (SRP) where geologic and hydrologic control exists. Simple ''holes'' and faults in the confining bed were studied. These features produced variations in the distribution of hydraulic heads that could be difficult to detect without closely spaced monitoring wells in the vicinity of the feature. In terms of solute transport, however, significant changes in flow directions and rates resulted from the presence of the feature. The simulations showed that such heterogeneities and discontinuities can reverse flow directions near the feature and significantly reduce contaminant travel times to lower aquifers. The results of these model simulations indicate the importance of adequate geologic control for the accurate prediction of ground-water flowpaths in multiaquifer systems with implications for ground-water monitoring strategies, remedial system design, and risk assessments. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Permafrost in Marine Deposits at Ilulissat Airport in Greenland, Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Ilulissat Airport was constructed in 1982 to 1984 after detailed geotechnical investigations as the construction site included up to 12 m thick basins of marine clay deposits. Despite soil temperatures of approx -3oC the soil appeared unfrozen from 4 to 5 m below ground surface due to a high...

  14. Apron layout design and flight-to-gate assignment at Lanseria International airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard, T.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is continuously increasing and more efficient air transport systems are required to handle the air travel demand. The study investigates the expansion of Lanseria International Airport in Gauteng, South Africa. Expansion of Lanseria requires a study of the airport apron layout to ensure efficient passenger-aircraft flow as well as the efficient flow of aircraft to and from the airport. The candidate layout designs are based on the layout concept of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta, USA. In the study, different airport apron layouts were compared, including the existing layout of Atlanta Airport, via a simulation model of each. Designs based mainly on passenger transfer distance between the terminal building and aircraft were evaluated. The cross-entropy method was used to develop a generic flight-to-gate assignment program that minimises passenger transfer distances.

  15. Aircraft emissions at Turkish airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with estimating aircraft landing and take-off (LTO) emissions (HC, CO, NOx, SO2) at 40 Turkish airports including the biggest airports, i.e. Ataturk International Airport (AIA) in Istanbul, Antalya Airport in Antalya and Esenboga Airport in Ankara in 2001. The calculation model is based on flight data recorded by the State Airports Authority. The flight data include the type and number of aircraft, number of passengers, amount of cargo etc., which depend on day-time and date. For the emission calculations the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)-Engine emission data bank, which includes minimum and maximum values for both fuel flow rates and emissions factors, is used. By using first the minimum and then the maximum values from the data bank, two estimations of aircraft LTO emissions at Turkish airports are calculated: i.e. minimum and maximum estimations. Total LTO emissions from aircraft at Turkish airports are estimated to be between 7614.34 and 8338.79 t/year. These results are comparable with those from USA airports. Approximately half of these amounts are produced at AIA. To predict future emissions, it is estimated that an increase of 25% in LTO cycles might cause a rise of between 31 and 33% in emissions. The estimations show that a decrease of 2 min in taxiing time results in a decrease of 6% in LTO emissions. The estimation model used in this study can be used for expansions and planning of airports from an environmental point of view. (author)

  16. Airport Pricing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  17. 78 FR 51810 - Twenty-Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Security Access Control Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control... RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held...

  18. 77 FR 25525 - Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... Access Control Systems. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems DATES: The meeting will be held May 30, 2012, from...

  19. 77 FR 73310 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... regulations relating to the entry and clearance of aircraft in international commerce and the transportation of persons and cargo by aircraft in international commerce. Generally, a civil aircraft arriving from... Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, Belgrade, MT AGENCY: U.S. Customs...

  20. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. Determination of land use must be based on professional... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND...

  1. Air Cargo Development in the Regional Airports of the Baltic Sea Region Through Road Feeder Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifert Anatoli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As issued in the Competition Policy Brief on the new state aid rules for a competitive aviation industry by the Competition Directorate-General of the European Commission in February 20141, it will be more difficult for unprofitable airports, to obtain financial public subsidies on EU, national or regional level. Although the positive impact of small airports on the regional development and general accessibility was mentioned, still the operating aid to the airports shall be cut out over a maximum of 10 years. It has been further stated that the vast majority of small and regional airports experience problems to cover their running operative costs, as a result from an intensive market competition and overlapping of airports’ catchment areas preventing even some promising airports from growth. Public subsidies are mostly used by the airport management for infrastructural investments, to cover operating losses or to attract price-sensitive airlines. Herewith, among other things, the EU Commission is pointing out at the lack of cooperation structures and network strategies among the regional airports and at rather isolated and individual approach during elaboration of the airport development scenarios. However, the Competition Policy Brief permits public aid to regional airports, among other things if there is sufficient transports need to establish transition periods for small airports; the need for more flexibility of the regional airports in the remote areas has been underlined. The EU Commission is expecting herewith not to close the regional airports, but to stimulate them to operate on cost efficient and profitable basis, and that only the most inefficient airports will be closed.

  2. Impact of Arrivals on Departure Taxi Operations at Airports

    OpenAIRE

    Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee; Simaiakis, Ioannis; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft taxi operations are a major source of fuel burn and emissions on the ground. Given rising fuel prices and growing concerns about the contributions of aviation to air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, recent research aims to develop strategies to reduce fuel burn at airports. In order to develop such strategies, an understanding of taxi operations and the factors that affect taxi-out times is required. This paper describes an analysis of taxi-out times at two major U.S. airports...

  3. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  4. The employment and income benefits of airport operation on the country in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Huderek-Glapska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The air transport market in Poland is undergoing significant changes, which take place both on the demand and supply side. Polish airports have experienced the unprecedented growth of air traffic. However, the increase in the number of airline connections - which benefits airports, passengers, aircraft industry and, indirectly, the whole society - at the same time results in the growth of social costs reflected by the intensification of noise and environmental pollution. The benefits of airport operation are reflected in the generation of employment and income. Existing literature reveals a gap in the knowledge in respect of impact of aviation in countries in transition. Material and methods: This paper investigates the applicability of socio-economic impact of air transport model to country in transition. In particular, it presents the employment and income benefits of airport operation. The input-output model is employed to measure the economic benefits of airport operation. The largest airport in Poland, Warsaw Chopin Airport is used as a case study. Results: The estimation results for the income and employment effects are found to be significant.  The operations of Warsaw Chopin Airport contributed to the generation of 527.8m EUR in current prices in 2011. Altogether, 19,349 jobs have been generated as the result of the direct, indirect and induced impact of Warsaw Chopin Airport.  Conclusion:  The size of production in the airport expressed in the number of aircraft operations and the number of passengers and goods serviced is positively correlated with the level of economic impact. The restriction on the development of the airport reflected by the inability to meet transport needs expressed by the society may generate opportunity costs.  

  5. Inteligentni transportni sistemi pri načrtovanju in usklajevanju gibanja in parkiranja letal na ploščadi letališča: Intelligent transportation systems in the planning and coordination of aircraft traffic at the airport apron:

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Stanislav; Roguljić, Slavko

    2004-01-01

    Airport aprons are areas for aircraft handling, parking and maintenance. According to international rules the number of positions at the apron has to be at least equal to the number of aircraft staying at any one time at the airport. The air traffic at Split Airport increased rapidly in the mid-90s when it became the UN logistics base for Bosnia and Herzegovina. There were nomeans nor free space for further expansion of the apron, so the traffic had to be reorganised and re-coordinated. Alter...

  6. Disposal facility in olkiluoto, description of above ground facilities in lift transport alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The above ground facilities of the disposal plant on the Olkiluoto site are described in this report as they will be when the operation of the disposal facility starts in the year 2020. The disposal plant is visualised on the Olkiluoto site. Parallel construction of the deposition tunnels and disposal of the spent fuel canisters constitute the principal design basis of the disposal plant. The annual production of disposal canisters for spent fuel amounts to about 40. Production of 100 disposal canisters has been used as the capacity basis. Fuel from the Olkiluoto plant and from the Loviisa plant will be encapsulated in the same production line. The disposal plant will require an area of about 15 to 20 hectares above ground level. The total building volume of the above ground facilities is about 75000 m3. The purpose of the report is to provide the base for detailed design of the encapsulation plant and the repository spaces, as well as for coordination between the disposal plant and ONKALO. The dimensioning bases for the disposal plant are shown in the Tables at the end of the report. The report can also be used as a basis for comparison in deciding whether the fuel canisters are transported to the repository by a lift or by a vehicle along the access tunnel. (orig.)

  7. Airports, Air Pollution, and Contemporaneous Health

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfram Schlenker; W. Reed Walker

    2011-01-01

    Airports are some of the largest sources of air pollution in the United States. We demonstrate that daily airport runway congestion contributes significantly to local pollution levels and contemporaneous health of residents living nearby and downwind from airports. Our research design exploits the fact that network delays originating from large airports on the East Coast increase runway congestion in California, which in turn increases daily pollution levels around California airports. Using ...

  8. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  9. SAR Raw Data Generation for Complex Airport Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The method of generating the SAR raw data of complex airport scenes is studied in this paper. A formulation of the SAR raw signal model of airport scenes is given. Via generating the echoes from the background, aircrafts and buildings, respectively, the SAR raw data of the unified SAR imaging geometry is obtained from their vector additions. The multipath scattering and the shadowing between the background and different ground covers of standing airplanes and buildings are analyzed. Based on the scattering characteristics, coupling scattering models and SAR raw data models of different targets are given, respectively. A procedure is given to generate the SAR raw data of airport scenes. The SAR images from the simulated raw data demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  10. Optical design of airport control tower cabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, P D; Budde, H W

    1980-02-15

    A study has been made of optical aspects of airport control towers as part of a planned general optimization of control towers by Transport Canada. Problems found were reflections, glare, visual obstructions, identification of distant objects, and excessive solar heat. The study makes recommendations on cab shape, tower height, glazing, shades, sunglasses, binoculars, and internal lighting. Proper choice of cab shape (e.g., 30 degrees window inclination and 12-28 sides) provided effective control of reflections. Some plastic shades werefound to increase the risk of eye damage. Two tower cabs incorporating the recommendations have been built and were found to be satisfactory. PMID:20216882

  11. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  12. Z Specification of Gate and Apron Control Management at Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazir Ahmad Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of an air traffic control (ATC system is an open issue and has become a challenging problem due to its complexity and increase of traffic at airports and in airspace. Consequently, automated ATC systems are suggested to improve efficiency ensuring the safety standards. It is reported that the number of collisions that occurred at airports surface is three times larger than in airspace. Further, it is observed that gates and aprons congestions cause significant delays at airports; hence, effective monitoring and guidance mechanisms are required to control ground air traffic. In this paper, formal procedure of managing air traffic from gate to enter in the active area of airport for taxiing is provided using Z notation. An integration of gate and apron controllers is described to manipulate the information for correct decision making and flow management. Graph theory is used for representation of airport topology and appropriate routs. In static part of the model, safety properties are described in terms of invariants over the critical data types. In dynamic model, the state space is updated by defining pre- and postconditions ensuring the safety. Formal specification is analysed using Z/Eves tool.

  13. Radioxenon Production and Transport from an Underground Nuclear Detonation to Ground Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.; Hao, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Radioxenon isotopes are considered as possible indicators for detecting and discriminating underground nuclear explosions. To monitor and sample the release of radioxenon isotopes, both independent and chain-reaction yields need to be considered together with multiphase transport in geological systems from the detonation point to the ground surface. For the sake of simplicity, modeling of radioxenon isotopic radioactivities has typically been focused either on chain reactions in a batch reactor without considering multiphase transport or on radionuclide transport with simplified reactions. Although numerical methods are available for integrating coupled differential equations of complex decay networks, the stiffness of ordinary differential equations due to greatly differing decay rates may require substantial additional effort to obtain solutions for the fully coupled system. For this reason, closed-form solutions for sequential reactions and numerical solutions for multiparent converging and multidaughter branching reactions were previously developed and used to simulate xenon isotopic radioactivities in the batch reactor mode. In this paper, we develop a fully coupled numerical model, which involves tracking 24 components (i.e., 22 radionuclide components plus air and water) in two phases to enhance model predictability of simultaneously simulating xenon isotopic transport and fully coupled chain reactions. To validate the numerical model and verify the corresponding computer code, we derived closed-form solutions for first-order xenon reactions in a batch reactor mode and for single-gas phase transport coupled with the xenon reactions in a one-dimensional column. Finally, cylindrical 3-D simulations of two-phase flow within a dual permeability fracture-matrix medium, simulating the geohydrologic regime of an underground nuclear explosion, indicate the existence of both a strong temporal and spatial dependence of xenon isotopic ratios sampled at the surface. In

  14. Vienna international airport noise abatement

    OpenAIRE

    Heidelinde Jelinek-Nigitz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: On the topic of sustainable aviation a study was carried out to measure the difference between the actual change in air traffic noise and the airport’s residents’ perception of the noise change at Vienna International Airport. Therefore, a questionnaire was developed in cooperation with the airport and an online survey was conducted. Design/methodology/approach: For the survey of the opinion of the affected population of the surrounding communities, a web based online questionnai...

  15. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123 Section 93.123 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... not include charter flights, or other nonscheduled flights of scheduled or supplemental air...

  16. INFORMATION SYSTEM OF AIRPORT NETWORK DEVELOPMENT MONITORING FORMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Smirnov

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the approaches to the development of information system in public administration of this important branch of transport civil aviation. In particular, it is shown that the application of algorithmic elements allows to increase the objectivity and transparency when making decisions regarding the regulation of development of the airport network.

  17. Statistical analysis of the airport network of Pakistan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yasir Tariq Mohmand; Aihu Wang; Haibin Chen

    2015-07-01

    Transportation infrastructure plays a vital role in the development of a country’s economy and is regarded as one of the most important indicators of its economic growth. In this study, we analyse the Airport Network of Pakistan (ANP), which represents Pakistan’s domestic civil aviation infrastructure, as a weighted complex network. We find that ANP is a small-world network and is disassortative in nature. We further analyse the dynamic properties of the network and compare them to their topological counterparts. Although small in size, the ANP does show similar properties as compared to the US, China and especially the Indian airport network.

  18. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... the entry and clearance of aircraft in international commerce and the transportation of persons and cargo by aircraft in international commerce. Generally, a civil aircraft arriving from a place outside... qualifying for designation as international or landing rights airports, have been approved by...

  19. 76 FR 30822 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Naples Municipal Airport, Naples, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... aircraft in international commerce and the transportation of persons and cargo by aircraft in international commerce. Generally, a civil aircraft arriving from a place outside of the United States is required to... international or landing rights airports, have been approved by the Commissioner of CBP to receive, for a...

  20. Characterization of the Hanford 300 area burial grounds. Task IV. Biological transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of radioactive waste burial sites at the 300 area burial grounds on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, southeastern Washington were studied. The potential vectors of radionuclide transport studied were vegetation and animals. The overall results showed a low potential for uptake and transport of radionuclides from the 300 area sites. However, additional methods to control physical and biological mechanisms may contribute to the effectiveness of waste burial practices. From the results, the Biological Transport task recommended field studies which include reduction of soil erosion and addition of biobarriers to plants and animals. Vegetation plays a major role in reducing soil erosion, and thereby maintaining the backfill over the burial sites. Of the several species found on the 300 area sites, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) appears to be the most desirable as a cover. Besides retarding erosion, it has a shallow root system (does not easily penetrate buried material); it has a low affinity for radionuclide uptake; and its tissues are not easily blown away. Small mammals (specifically, mice) appear to have the most potential for radionuclide exposure and uptake. Small mammals were live-trapped within 10 x 10-meter trap grids. Each animal trapped was surgically implanted with a thermoluminescent dosimeter. When the animal was recaptured, the dosimeter was removed and read for exposure. Exposures were reported in milli-Roentgens. The most consistently trapped small mammals were the Great Basin pocket mouse (Perognathus parvus) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Results from the dosimeter readings showed that some of those animals had higher than background exposures. Biobarriers to animals could be considered as a mechanism to reduce the potential for radionuclide transport

  1. Groundwater transport modeling of constituents originating from the Burial Grounds Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operates a number of sites for the land disposal of various leachable radionuclide, organic, and inorganic wastes. Located within the General Separations Area (GSA) of SRS are the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) and the Old Burial Ground (OBG). A portion of the LLRWDF has been designated as the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). The OBG began receiving waste in 1952 and was closed in 1974. Various wastes, including transuranic, intermediate and low level beta-gamma, and solvents, were received during this period of operation. In 1969, prior to the closing of the OBG, a portion of the MWMF/LLRWDF (the MWMF) began receiving waste. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by WSRC to conduct a numerical modeling study to assess groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of the MWMF in support of an Alternate Concentration Limits demonstration for the Part B permit. The project was divided into two phases: development of a groundwater flow model of the hydrogeologic system underlying the MWMF which includes the entire GSA, and development of a solute transport model to assess migration of 19 designated constituents of concern (COCs) over a period 30 years into the future. The first phase was completed in May of 1992 and the results documented in GeoTrans (1992). That report serves as the companion volume to the present contaminant transport modeling report. The transport study is intended to develop predictions of concentration and mass flux of the 19 COCs at downgradient exposure points over the 30 year period of interest. These results are to be used in human health and ecological risk assessments which are also being performed in support of the Part B permit

  2. The role of moisture transport between ground and atmosphere in global change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Projections of the effect of climate change on future water availability are examined by reviewing the formulations used to calculate moisture transport between the ground and the atmosphere. General circulation models and climate change impact models have substantially different formulations for evapotranspiration, so their projections of future water availability often disagree, even though they use the same temperature and precipitation forecasts. General circulation models forecast little change in tropical and subtropical water availability, while impact models show severe water and agricultural shortages. A comparison of observations and modeling techniques shows that the parameterizations in general circulation models likely lead to an underestimate of the impacts of global warming on soil moisture and vegetation. Such errors would crucially affect the temperature and precipitation forecasts used in impact models. Some impact model evaporation formulations are probably more appropriate than those in general circulation models, but important questions remain. More observations are needed, especially in the vicinity of forests, to determine appropriate parameterizations

  3. An Agent-based Model for Airline Evolution, Competition, and Airport Congestion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Junhyuk

    2005-01-01

    The air transportation system has grown significantly during the past few decades. The demand for air travel has increased tremendously as compared to the increase in the supply. The air transportation system can be divided into four subsystems: airports, airlines, air traffic control, and passengers, each of them having different interests. These subsystems interact in a very complex way resulting in various phenomena. On the airport side, there is excessive flight demand during the peak ...

  4. Approaches towards airport economic performance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana STRYČEKOVÁ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to assess how economic benchmarking is being used by airports as a means of performance measurement and comparison of major international airports in the world. The study focuses on current benchmarking practices and methods by taking into account different factors according to which it is efficient to benchmark airports performance. As methods are considered mainly data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis. Apart from them other approaches are discussed by airports to provide economic benchmarking. The main objective of this article is to evaluate the efficiency of the airports and answer some undetermined questions involving economic benchmarking of the airports.

  5. Superfund TIO videos: Set C. Ground water: Fate and transport of contaminants in ground water. Part 5. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The videotape explains how to assess the primary modes of interaction that might be expected between a contaminant and the soil/solids matrix or the fluid phase. An overview of general hydrology and the physical, chemical, and biological processes of contaminants in ground water are discussed

  6. Primary heat transport pump trip by ground fault (deterioration of insulation in the cable quick disconnect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At 08:29 Sept. 1, 1988, Wolsong unit 1 was operating at 100% full power when a primary heat transport pump was suddenly tripped by breaker trip due to ground fault in the power distribution connector assembly. Soon after the pump trip, the reactor was shut down automatically on low heat transport flow. Operators tried to restart the pump twice but failed. A field operator reported to the shift supervisor that he found an electrical spark and smoke at the vicinity of the pump when the pump started to run. Inspection showed that a power distribution connector assembly for making fast and easy power connections to the PHT pump motor, 3312-PM2, was damaged severely by thermal shock. Particularly, broken parts of the insulating plug flew away across the boiler room and dropped to the floor. Direct causes of the failure were bad contact and deterioration of integrity along the creep paths between the insulating plug and the connector housing. The failed connector assembly had been used for more than 7 years. Its status had been checked infrequently during the in-service period. The standard torque value was not applied to the installation of connectors. Therefore, we concluded that long term inservice in combinations of application of improper torque value induced failure of insulation. This paper describes the scenarios, causes of the event and corrective actions to prevent recurrence of this event. (author)

  7. Review of ground-water flow and transport models in the unsaturated zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oster, C.A.

    1982-11-01

    Models of partially saturated flow and transport in porous media have application in the analysis of existing as well as future low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. An extensive literature search along with telephone and mail correspondence with recognized leading experts in the field, was conducted to identify computer models suitable for studies of low-level radioactive waste facilities located in the unsaturated zone. Fifty-five existing models were identified as potentially useful. Ten of these models were selected for further examination. This report contains a statement of the ground-water flow-contaminant transport problem, a discussion of those methods used to reduce the physical problem to a computer model, a brief discussion about the data requirements of these models. The procedure used to select the ten codes for further discussion is given, along with a list of these models. Finally, the Appendices contain the data about the fifty-five codes examined. Specifically Appendix D contains the detailed discussion of each of the ten selected codes. Included in each discussion are such items which a potential user requires in determining whether the code is suitable for his applications. Appendix E contains brief summary information about each of the fifty-five codes. Included in the summaries are identification data, authors, pertinent references, and model type.

  8. Review of ground-water flow and transport models in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models of partially saturated flow and transport in porous media have application in the analysis of existing as well as future low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. An extensive literature search along with telephone and mail correspondence with recognized leading experts in the field, was conducted to identify computer models suitable for studies of low-level radioactive waste facilities located in the unsaturated zone. Fifty-five existing models were identified as potentially useful. Ten of these models were selected for further examination. This report contains a statement of the ground-water flow-contaminant transport problem, a discussion of those methods used to reduce the physical problem to a computer model, a brief discussion about the data requirements of these models. The procedure used to select the ten codes for further discussion is given, along with a list of these models. Finally, the Appendices contain the data about the fifty-five codes examined. Specifically Appendix D contains the detailed discussion of each of the ten selected codes. Included in each discussion are such items which a potential user requires in determining whether the code is suitable for his applications. Appendix E contains brief summary information about each of the fifty-five codes. Included in the summaries are identification data, authors, pertinent references, and model type

  9. Some Aspects of Mega-Floating Airport Design and Production

    OpenAIRE

    Hadžić, Neven; Tomić, Marko; Vladimir, Nikola; Senjanović, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Mega-Floating Airports (MFA) are unique and complex offshore transport system components that emerged as a consequence of tremendous land price increase in the vicinity of very large coastal cities. An overview of MFAs design and production aspects is presented within this paper including design concept, model tests and full scale measurement, air transport analysis, infrastructure, main particulars and structure, wave breaker, hydroelastic analysis due to wave load and airplane moving ...

  10. Characterization of the Hanford 300 Area Burial Grounds. Task III: fluid transport and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Task III, Fluid Transport and Modeling, a computer model was developed and applied to the 300 Area Burial Grounds to analyze the influence of potential evaporation and rainfall patterns on drainage. The model describes one-dimensional unsaturated flow. Fluid transport equations were evaluated to describe the driving forces of fluid flow. The data indicate that the major processes are evaporative drying, capillarity, and gravity flow. Thermally induced transport does not appear significant in the subsurface sediments of the area. Several empirical evaporation methods are available for assessing potential evaporation/evapotranspiration. Four methods were used with the unsaturated flow model. Ultimately, the Blaney-Criddle method was chosen for subsequent simulation examples because it relies only on the climatic data available and gave results comparable to the other methods tested. Simulations showed that a dry layer formation is important in controlling the soil-water balance in the profile. The surface dry layer acts as a mulch to retard the evaporative water losses and increase water storage. The most important climatic factor in determining drainage appears to be yearly rainfall distribution. When rainfall is distributed in fall or winter, during periods of low potential evaporation, both water storage and drainage are increased. Summer showers, on the other hand, were shown to add little to the annual water storage. Rainfall occurring in one year influences the subsequent annual drainage for several succeeding years because of annual changes in water storage capacity and the transient nature of unsaturated flow in the storage zone. 47 figures, 9 tables

  11. 75 FR 23841 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Reading Regional Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... acres (Lot 5 Reading Regional Airport Waste Water Treatment Plant), of non-aeronautical airport property... needed for airport development as shown on the Airport Layout Plan. Any proceeds from the sale...

  12. Operations Strategy and Airport Development

    OpenAIRE

    Boehm, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary The airport business is taking off. During the last twenty-five years the airport in-dustry has been transformed from being a branch of government into a dynamic and commercial orientated business (Doganis, 1992). The world�������¢��â����â�¬��â����â�¢s airports served over 4 billion passengers in 2005, a new record for the industry. Passenger traffic was up 6% over 2004, with strong growth in all regions. (ACI 2006a). In order to cope with t...

  13. Evolution of Chinese airport network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Cao, Xian-Bin; Du, Wen-Bo; Cai, Kai-Quan

    2010-09-01

    With the rapid development of the economy and the accelerated globalization process, the aviation industry plays a more and more critical role in today’s world, in both developed and developing countries. As the infrastructure of aviation industry, the airport network is one of the most important indicators of economic growth. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the Chinese airport network (CAN) via complex network theory. It is found that although the topology of CAN has remained steady during the past few years, there are many dynamic switchings inside the network, which have changed the relative importance of airports and airlines. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of traffic flow (passengers and cargoes) on CAN. It is found that the traffic continues to grow in an exponential form and has evident seasonal fluctuations. We also found that cargo traffic and passenger traffic are positively related but the correlations are quite different for different kinds of cities.

  14. Evolution of Chinese airport network

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jun; Du, Wen-Bo; Cai, Kai-Quan

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid development of economy and the accelerated globalization process, the aviation industry plays more and more critical role in today's world, in both developed and developing countries. As the infrastructure of aviation industry, the airport network is one of the most important indicators of economic growth. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of Chinese airport network (CAN) via complex network theory. It is found that although the topology of CAN remains steady during the past several years, there are many dynamic switchings inside the network, which changes the relative relevance of airports and airlines. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of traffic flow (passengers and cargoes) on CAN. It is found that the traffic keeps growing in an exponential form and it has evident seasonal fluctuations. We also found that cargo traffic and passenger traffic are positively related but the correlations are quite different for different kinds of cities.

  15. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  16. Analysis of airport traffic in the context of environmental throughput

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna KWASIBORSKA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased air transport volumes force carriers to make more frequent flights as well as airport operations. Unfortunately, such progress has some negative effects which the main is environment nuisances. Due to its reach, aircraft noise is one of the most important and unpleasant effects of airport operations. The problem of protecting the environment against noise is becoming increasingly more important on the international market. A lot is being done here by the European Union, which urges or obliges Member States to comply with certain rules, laws and standards aimed at preventing too much interference of socio-economic development with nature 19]. Considering how air transport is growing, it is necessary to conduct studies into airport throughput including throughput environment. This throughput is determined by Restricted Use Area and it is defined as acceptable daily number of performed air operations resulting from the noise limit at airport. There are the following noise level limits classification: noise level limits per flight which is measured at monitoring points, with special attention paid to those measures specific to night-time and noise volume limits over a time-period, particularly at night-time.

  17. Airport electric vehicle powered by fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontela, Pablo [Hybrid Systems Area of R and D Unit, BESEL S.A., Av del mediterraneo 22, Parque Tecnologico de Leganes, Leganes (Spain); Soria, Antonio [Area of Hybrid Systems Area of R and D Unit, BESEL S.A. (Spain); Mielgo, Javier; Sierra, Jose Francisco; de Blas, Juan [R and D Unit, BESEL S.A. (Spain); Gauchia, Lucia [Electric engineering Department, Carlos III University, Universidad Carlos III, Av. Universidad 30, Leganes (Spain); Martinez, Juan M. [Electric engineering Department, Carlos III University (Spain)

    2007-06-10

    Nowadays, new technologies and breakthroughs in the field of energy efficiency, alternative fuels and added-value electronics are leading to bigger, more sustainable and green thinking applications. Within the Automotive Industry, there is a clear declaration of commitment with the environment and natural resources. The presence of passenger vehicles of hybrid architecture, public transport powered by cleaner fuels, non-aggressive utility vehicles and an encouraging social awareness, are bringing to light a new scenario where conventional and advanced solutions will be in force. This paper presents the evolution of an airport cargo vehicle from battery-based propulsion to a hybrid power unit based on fuel cell, cutting edge batteries and hydrogen as a fuel. Some years back, IBERIA (Major Airline operating in Spain) decided to initiate the replacement of its diesel fleet for battery ones, aiming at a reduction in terms of contamination and noise in the surrounding environment. Unfortunately, due to extreme operating conditions in airports (ambient temperature, intensive use, dirtiness,..), batteries suffered a very severe degradation, which took its toll in terms of autonomy. This reduction in terms of autonomy together with the long battery recharge time made the intensive use of this fleet impractical in everyday demanding conditions. (author)

  18. Precise Ortho Imagery as the Source for Authoritative Airport Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, H.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    As the aviation industry moves from paper maps and charts to the digital cockpit and electronic flight bag, producers of these products need current and accurate data to ensure flight safety. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) require certified suppliers to follow a defined protocol to produce authoritative map data for the aerodrome. Typical airport maps have been produced to meet 5 m accuracy requirements. The new digital aviation world is moving to 1 m accuracy maps to provide better situational awareness on the aerodrome. The commercial availability of 0.5 m satellite imagery combined with accurate ground control is enabling the production of avionics certified .85 m orthophotos of airports around the globe. CompassData maintains an archive of over 400+ airports as source data to support producers of 1 m certified Aerodrome Mapping Database (AMDB) critical to flight safety and automated situational awareness. CompassData is a DO200A certified supplier of authoritative orthoimagery and attendees will learn how to utilize current airport imagery to build digital aviation mapping products.

  19. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred J. Molz, III

    2010-05-28

    to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that

  20. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    to Pu uptake by corn roots and xylem transport. Plants were started in wet paper wrapped around each corn seed. When the tap roots were sufficiently long, the seedlings were transplanted to a soil container with the tap root extending out the container bottom. The soil container was then placed over a nutrient solution container, and the solution served as an additional medium for root growth. To conduct an uptake study, a radioactive substance, such as Pu complexed with the bacterial siderophore DFOB, was added to the nutrient solution. After a suitable elapsed time, the corn plant was sacrificed, cut into 10 cm lengths, and the activity distribution measured. Experimental results clarified the basic nature of Pu uptake and transport in corn plants, and resulting simulations suggested that each growing season Pu in the SRS lysimeters would move into the plant shoots and be deposited on the soil surface during the Fall dieback. Subsequent isotope ratio analyses showed that this did happen. OVERALL RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS - (1) Pu transport downward from the source is controlled by advection, dispersion and adsorption, along with surface-mediated REDOX reactions. (2) Hysteresis, extreme root distribution functions, air-content dependent oxidation rate constants, and large evaporation rates from the soil surface were not able to explain the observed upward migration of Pu. (3) Small amounts of Pu uptake by plant roots and translocation in the transpiration stream creates a realistic mechanism for upward Pu migration (4) Realistic xylem cross-sectional areas imply high flow velocities under hot, wet conditions. Such flow velocities produce the correct shape for the observed activity distributions in the top 20 cm of the lysimeter soil. (5) Simulations imply that Pu should have moved into the above-ground grass tissue each year during the duration of the experiments, resulting in an activity residual accumulating on the soil surface. An isotope ratio analysis showed that

  1. An integrated transportation and operations comparison of space and ground based OTV's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. E.; Rehder, J. J.

    1981-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of space vs. ground basing of orbital transfer vehicles (OTV). The comparison was done assuming an 11-year mission model beginning in 1995 and averaging over 100 MT of payloads per year to GEO. When analyzed from a total transportation standpoint, the launch system employed had the greatest impact on the basing mode comparison. A launch fleet consisting of both a basic STS and a Shuttle derivative cargo vehicle provided the least cost. Only a small advantage (3%) was found in flight performance for the space based (SB) OTV once it incorporated the necessary provisions for space debris protection and on-orbit maintenance. Propellant storage and transfer losses associated with the SB OTV amounted to 12% of the actual flight propellant requirement. Turnaround of the SB OTV required a crew of 3 and 40% duty cycle. The life cycle cost comparison including all involved space elements indicated less than a 10% difference between basing modes. The SB OTV however is judged to provide more flexibility in launch manifesting, simplified recovery operations and greater potential for improvement.

  2. Air freight in the Stockholm region with focus on Eskilstuna Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell-Åke Allan Brorsson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conditions for commencing air freight operations at the regional Eskilstuna Airport in Sweden, which require investments in airport infrastructure of at least SEK 140 –180 million. Design/ methodology: The qualitative data collection for the study was carried out through open-ended interviews with representatives of airport management, staff, representatives of residents, and actors and stakeholders in the field. In addition, much written material was collected from different authorities. Document analysis was used to systematically evaluate and review the collected documents. Content analysis was applied to organize collected data into categories. Based on the reports, decisions, environmental scanning and interviews, the data have been coded and categorized in tables via thematic analysis. Findings: The major findings of the study are that Eskilstuna Airport lacks cargo facilities and has limited apron space, and that there is strong competition from four other airports in the Stockholm region. The prospects for permanent air freight operations at Eskilstuna Airport are therefore not favourable in the current situation. However, if the development of Eskilstuna Logistics Park and the concept of inter modal highway-rail transportation are successful, they could serve as a major driving force for the development of air cargo. Furthermore, with sustainable development as a guiding principle, there is great potential to develop an airport with a high standard of environmental profile. Originality/ value: My findings are of great value to managers of airports and cargo airlines, as they highlight some of the competition aspects associated with engaging in air cargo at regional airports. The study fills a gap in existing research whose main focus is environmental issues concerning airports in general.

  3. Assessment of ground transportation stress in juvenile Kemp’s ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii)

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Kathleen E.; Innis, Charles J.; Kennedy, Adam E.; McNally, Kerry L.; Davis, Deborah G.; Burgess, Elizabeth A.; Merigo, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Sea turtle rehabilitation centres frequently transport sea turtles for long distances to move animals between centres or to release them at beaches, yet there is little information on the possible effects of transportation-related stress (‘transport stress’) on sea turtles. To assess whether transport stress is a clinically relevant concern for endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii), we obtained pre-transport and post-transport plasma samples from 26 juvenile Kemp’s ridley...

  4. Assessment of ground-water flow and chemical transport in a tidally influenced aquifer using geostatistical filtering and hydrocarbon fingerprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional environmental investigations at tidally influenced hazardous waste sites such as marine fuel storage terminals have generally failed to characterize ground-water flow and chemical transport because they have been based on only a cursory knowledge of plume geometry, chemicals encountered, and hydrogeologic setting and synoptic ground-water level measurement. Single-time observations cannot be used to accurately determine flow direction and gradient in tidally fluctuating aquifers since these measurements delineate hydraulic head at only one point in time during a tidal cycle, not the net effect of the fluctuations. In this study, a more rigorous approach was used to characterize flow and chemical transport in a tidally influenced aquifer at a marine fuel storage terminal using: (1) ground-water-level monitoring over three tidal cycles (72 hours), (2) geostatistical filtering of ground-water-level data using 25-hour and 71-hour filtering methods, and (3) hydrocarbon fingerprinting analysis. The results from the study indicate that naphtha released from one of the on-site naphtha tanks has been the predominant contributor to the hydrocarbon plume both on-site and downgradient off-site and that net ground-water and hydrocarbon movement has been to the southeast away from the tank since 1989

  5. Atmospheric effects on infrared measurements at ground level: Application to monitoring of transport infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Dumoulin, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Being able to perform easily non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of critical transport infrastructures is a major preoccupation of many technical offices. Among all the existing electromagnetic methods [1], long term thermal monitoring by uncooled infrared camera [2] is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its low cost on the market. Nevertheless, Knowledge of environmental parameters during measurement in outdoor applications is required to carry out accurate measurement corrections induced by atmospheric effects at ground level. Particularly considering atmospheric effects and measurements in foggy conditions close as possible to those that can be encountered around transport infrastructures, both in visible and infrared spectra. In the present study, atmospheric effects are first addressed by using data base available in literature and modelling. Atmospheric attenuation by particles depends greatly of aerosols density, but when relative humidity increases, water vapor condenses onto the particulates suspended in the atmosphere. This condensed water increases the size of the aerosols and changes their composition and their effective refractive index. The resulting effect of the aerosols on the absorption and scattering of radiation will correspondingly be modified. In a first approach, we used aerosols size distributions derived from Shettle and Fenn [3] for urban area which could match some of experimental conditions encountered during trials on transport infrastructures opened to traffic. In order to calculate the influence of relative humidity on refractive index, the Hänel's model [4] could be used. The change in the particulate size is first related to relative humidity through dry particle radius, particle density and water activity. Once the wet aerosol particle size is found, the effective complex refractive index is the volume weighted average of the refractive indexes of the dry aerosol substance

  6. CYBER SECURITY FOR AIRPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Kasthurirangan Gopalakrishnan; Manimaran Govindarasu; Doug W. Jacobson; Brent M. Phares

    2013-01-01

    In today’s information age, government organizations and business enterprises are heavily relying on interconnected computer systems to manage a variety of public services including energy, transportation, water, etc. While this increased connectivity has many operational advantages benefitting the public, they have also become vulnerable to cyber attacks such as Corporate Security Breaches, Spear Phishing, and Social Media Fraud. The aviation sector is one the critical infrastructure systems...

  7. Risk assessment of aircraft accidents anywhere near an airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work analyzes the more suitable areas to build new facilities, taking into account the conditions imposed by an airport located nearby. Initially, it describes the major characteristics of the airport. Then, the restrictions imposed to ensure the normal operation of the aircraft are analyzed. Following, there is a summary of the evolution of studies of aircraft accidents at nuclear facilities. In the second part, three models of aircraft crash probabilities are presented, all of them developed in the U.S.A, each with an increasing level of complexity in modeling the likelihood of accidents. The first model is the 'STD-3014' Department of Energy (DOE), the second is the 'ACRAM'(Aircraft Crash Risk Assessment Methodology) prepared by the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory'(LLNL) and finally the more advanced 'ACRP-3', produced by the 'Transportation Research Board'. The results obtained with the three models establish that the risks imposed on the airport vicinity, remain low due to the improvement and innovation in the aircraft's safety, reducing the risk margin for the location of new nuclear facilities near an airport. (author)

  8. A new approach of drawing airport noise contours on computer based on Surfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bang-jun; GUO Chun-yan; Di Guo-qing

    2004-01-01

    Noise contours are used to describe the extent of airport noise pollution and to plan land use around airports. The LwEcPN (weighted equivalent continuous perceive noise level) recommended by ICAO(International Civil Aviation Organization ) is adopted as airport noise rating parameter in this paper. With the help of various mathematical models in the software Surfer, noise contours can be drawn automatically by the completed program in Visual C++ Code. Corrections for thrust, velocity, atmospheric temperature, humidity and lateral ground attenuation are also considered in the new method, which can improve the efficiency of drawing contours. An example of its use for drawing noise contours of an airport in Zhejiang Province of China is proposed and the predictions and the measurements show agreements well.

  9. Determining the sensitivity of Data Envelopment Analysis method used in airport benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea BOSCOIANU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade there were some important changes in the airport industry, caused by the liberalization of the air transportation market. Until recently airports were considered infrastructure elements, and they were evaluated only by traffic values or their maximum capacity. Gradual orientation towards commercial led to the need of finding another ways of evaluation, more efficiency oriented. The existing methods for assessing efficiency used for other production units were not suitable to be used in case of airports due to specific features and high complexity of airport operations. In the last years there were some papers that proposed the Data Envelopment Analysis as a method for assessing the operational efficiency in order to conduct the benchmarking. This method offers the possibility of dealing with a large number of variables of different types, which represents the main advantage of this method and also recommends it as a good benchmarking tool for the airports management. This paper goal is to determine the sensitivity of this method in relation with its inputs and outputs. A Data Envelopment Analysis is conducted for 128 airports worldwide, in both input- and output-oriented measures, and the results are analysed against some inputs and outputs variations. Possible weaknesses of using DEA for assessing airports performance are revealed and analysed against this method advantages.

  10. Ground-based research of crystal growth of II-VI compound semiconductors by physical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao; Zhou, W.; Dudley, M.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Brebrick, R. F.; Wang, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based investigation of the crystal growth of II-VI semiconductor compounds, including CdTe, CdS, ZnTe, and ZnSe, by physical vapor transport in closed ampoules was performed. The crystal growth experimental process and supporting activities--preparation and heat treatment of starting materials, vapor partial pressure measurements, and transport rate measurements are reported. The results of crystal characterization, including microscopy, microstructure, optical transmission photoluminescence, synchrotron radiation topography, and chemical analysis by spark source mass spectrography, are also discussed.

  11. The impact of mobile marketing in airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Florido-Benítez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper seeks to analyze the effects of mobile marketing tool at airports and passengers. Design/methodology: This research approach consist of going through data files and bibliographical sources in search of information gathered by authors, institutions and organizations regarding our case study. Findings: Mobile marketing to increase passenger satisfaction and commercial income in the airports. Large airports are taking advantage of the consolidation of mobile devices in the 21st century to create applications for branding and communication. Originality/value: This paper is the first research that examines the impact of mobile marketing in airports. First, to evaluate the effects that mobile marketing is having over the levels of passenger satisfaction at airports. Second, to analyze the impact of mobile marketing on passengers behavior in the aerodrome; lastly, to study the effects of this tool on the perceived image of an airport.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Helicopter Versus Ground Emergency Medical Services for Trauma Scene Transport in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, M. Kit; Staudenmayer, Kristan L.; Wang, N. Ewen; Spain, David A.; Weir, Sharada; Owens, Douglas K.; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We determined the minimum mortality reduction that helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) should provide relative to ground EMS for the scene transport of trauma victims to offset higher costs, inherent transport risks, and inevitable overtriage of minor injury patients. Methods We developed a decision-analytic model to compare the costs and outcomes of helicopter versus ground EMS transport to a trauma center from a societal perspective over a patient's lifetime. We determined the mortality reduction needed to make helicopter transport cost less than $100,000 and $50,000 per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained compared to ground EMS. Model inputs were derived from the National Study on the Costs and Outcomes of Trauma (NSCOT), National Trauma Data Bank, Medicare reimbursements, and literature. We assessed robustness with probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results HEMS must provide a minimum of a 17% relative risk reduction in mortality (1.6 lives saved/100 patients with the mean characteristics of the NSCOT cohort) to cost less than $100,000 per QALY gained and a reduction of at least 33% (3.7 lives saved/100 patients) to cost less than $50,000 per QALY. HEMS becomes more cost-effective with significant reductions in minor injury patients triaged to air transport or if long-term disability outcomes are improved. Conclusions HEMS needs to provide at least a 17% mortality reduction or a measurable improvement in long-term disability to compare favorably to other interventions considered cost-effective. Given current evidence, it is not clear that HEMS achieves this mortality or disability reduction. Reducing overtriage of minor injury patients to HEMS would improve its cost-effectiveness. PMID:23582619

  13. Airport atmospheric environment : respiratory health at work

    OpenAIRE

    Léa Touri; Hélène Marchetti; Irène Sari-Minodier; Nicolas Molinari; Pascal Chanez

    2013-01-01

    Air traffic is increasing, raising concern about local pollution and its adverse health effects on the people living in the vicinity of large airports. However, the highest risk is probably occupational exposure due to proximity. Jet exhaust is one of the main concerns at an airport and may have a health impact, particularly on the respiratory tract. Current studies are neither numerous enough nor strong enough to prove this kind of association. Yet, more and more people work in airports, and...

  14. Network Congestion Control of Airport Surface Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Khadilkar, Harshad Dilip; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of taxi-out times at airports has the potential to substantially reduce delays and fuel consumption on the airport surface, and to improve the air quality in surrounding communities. The taxiway and runway systems at an airport determine its maximum possible departure throughput, or the number of aircraft departures that it can handle per unit time. Current air traffic control procedures allow aircraft to push from their gates and enter the taxiway system as soon as they are rea...

  15. Approaches towards airport economic performance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana STRYČEKOVÁ

    2011-01-01

    The paper aims to assess how economic benchmarking is being used by airports as a means of performance measurement and comparison of major international airports in the world. The study focuses on current benchmarking practices and methods by taking into account different factors according to which it is efficient to benchmark airports performance. As methods are considered mainly data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis. Apart from them other approaches are discussed by air...

  16. Airport privatization competition including domestic airline networks

    OpenAIRE

    Akio Kawasaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of hub airport privatization, similar to the studies by Matsumura and Matsushima (2012) and Mantin (2012). However, differentiating from their papers, this paper introduces a domestic airline network. That is, each country has one major hub airport and some local airports. The main result obtained in this paper is as follows. When at least one country has a small domestic airline network, the same result as that by Matsumura and Matsushima (2012) and Mantin (2...

  17. Airport terminal choice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Helena Muñoz-Hoyos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La mayoría de los estudios del modo aéreo han tratado individua lmente los aspectos de tarifas, demoras y demás variables inher entes a este medio de transporte, así como la elección del modo aéreo f rente a otros modos, pero poco se ha hecho por modelar cómo un viajero elige un aeropuerto entre dos opciones disponibles en una gran ciudad. En la actualidad un pasajero que parte de la ciudad de Medellín - Colombia a algunos destinos nacionales, tiene la opción de v iajar por alguno de los dos aeropuertos, el José María Córdova (JMC o el Enriqu e Olaya Herrera (EOH; esta investigación presenta los resultad os de una encuesta de preferencias declaradas en un experimento de elecci ón discreta, y partiendo de esto se obtiene un modelo por desti no; para cada uno de estos se hallaron modelos logit multinomial y logit mixt o; en cada trayecto evaluado se eligió el logit multinomial com o el mejor.

  18. Comparison of an algebraic multigrid algorithm to two iterative solvers used for modeling ground water flow and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Russell L; Mehl, Steffen; Rajaram, Harihar; Cheung, Wendy W

    2002-01-01

    Numerical solution of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems is often constrained by the convergence behavior of the iterative solvers used to solve the resulting systems of equations. We demonstrate the ability of an algebraic multigrid algorithm (AMG) to efficiently solve the large, sparse systems of equations that result from computational models of ground water flow and transport in large and complex domains. Unlike geometric multigrid methods, this algorithm is applicable to problems in complex flow geometries, such as those encountered in pore-scale modeling of two-phase flow and transport. We integrated AMG into MODFLOW 2000 to compare two- and three-dimensional flow simulations using AMG to simulations using PCG2, a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that uses the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioner and is included with MODFLOW 2000. CPU times required for convergence with AMG were up to 140 times faster than those for PCG2. The cost of this increased speed was up to a nine-fold increase in required random access memory (RAM) for the three-dimensional problems and up to a four-fold increase in required RAM for the two-dimensional problems. We also compared two-dimensional numerical simulations of steady-state transport using AMG and the generalized minimum residual method with an incomplete LU-decomposition preconditioner. For these transport simulations, AMG yielded increased speeds of up to 17 times with only a 20% increase in required RAM. The ability of AMG to solve flow and transport problems in large, complex flow systems and its ready availability make it an ideal solver for use in both field-scale and pore-scale modeling. PMID:12019641

  19. Air Travel Choices in Multi-Airport Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Ishii; Sunyoung Jun; Kurt Van Dender

    2006-01-01

    We estimate a conditional logit model to measure the impact of airport and airline supply characteristics on the air travel choices of passengers departing from one of three San Francisco Bay area airports and arriving at one of four airports in greater Los Angeles in October 1995. Non-price characteristics like airport access time, airport delay, flight frequency, the availability of particular airport-airline combinations, and early arrival times are found to strongly affect choice probabil...

  20. Assessing coastal flood risk and sea level rise impacts at New York City area airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, K. A.; Kimball, N.; Osler, M.; Eberbach, S.

    2014-12-01

    's understanding of the effects of sea level rise on coastal flooding at the airports and guiding decision-making in the selection of effective adaptation actions. Given the importance of these airports to transportation, this project is advancing security and continuity of national and international commerce well into the 21st century.

  1. Tighter Airports,Safer Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China’s aviation authorities have beefed up security measures in order to guarantee an incident-free Olympics New security check procedures issued by China’s civil aviation authorities in the wake of a foiled terrorist attack will make Chinese airports and air travel safer. The regulations,which came into force on March 14,banned liquid products,including drinks,and some cosmetics and medicines from carry-on luggage on domestic flights. The day before the cabin ban,the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China (CAAC) had announced it was stepping up safety checks ahead of the Olympic Games.

  2. The Effect of Governance Forms on North American Airport Efficiency: A Comparative Analysis of Airport Authority vs. Government Branch

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Qi; Choo, Yap Y.; Oum, Tae H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies a stochastic cost frontier model to a panel of 54 major airports over 2002-2008 to examine how the two dominant governance forms of publicly owned airports in the United States and Canada, namely, operation and governance by a government (city, county, or state) branch, or by an airport authority, affect airport efficiency performance. Our key findings are (a) airports operated by an airport authority achieve higher cost efficiency (on average, 14% higher technical efficien...

  3. Ground based measurements of particulate emissions from supersonic transports. Concorde olympus engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitefield, Ph.D.; Hagen, D.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The application of a mobile aerosol monitoring facility, the Mobile Aerosol Sampling System (MASS) is described to characterize engine aerosol emissions from the Rolls Royce Olympus Engine. The multi-configurational MASS has been employed in both ground and airborne field operations. It has been successfully flown on research aircrafts. In ground tests the MASS has participated in numerous jet engine related ground tests, and has been deployed to resolve aerosol generation problems in a high power chemical laser system. In all cases the measurements were made on samples taken from a harsh physical and chemical environment, with both high and low temperature and pressure, and in the presence of highly reactive gases. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  4. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written to provide guidance to managers and site operators on how ground-water transport codes should be selected for assessing burial site performance. There is a need for a formal approach to selecting appropriate codes from the multitude of potentially useful ground-water transport codes that are currently available. Code selection is a problem that requires more than merely considering mathematical equation-solving methods. These guidelines are very general and flexible and are also meant for developing systems simulation models to be used to assess the environmental safety of low-level waste burial facilities. Code selection is only a single aspect of the overall objective of developing a systems simulation model for a burial site. The guidance given here is mainly directed toward applications-oriented users, but managers and site operators need to be familiar with this information to direct the development of scientifically credible and defensible transport assessment models. Some specific advice for managers and site operators on how to direct a modeling exercise is based on the following five steps: identify specific questions and study objectives; establish costs and schedules for achieving answers; enlist the aid of professional model applications group; decide on approach with applications group and guide code selection; and facilitate the availability of site-specific data. These five steps for managers/site operators are discussed in detail following an explanation of the nine systems model development steps, which are presented first to clarify what code selection entails

  5. Fever Screening at Airports and Imported Dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Pei-Yun; Chien, Li-Jung; Chang, Shu-Fen; Su, Chien-Ling; Kuo, Yu-Chung; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Ho, Mei-Shang; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    Airport fever screening in Taiwan, July 2003–June 2004, identified 40 confirmed dengue cases. Results obtained by capture immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG enzyme-linked immunoassay, real time 1-step polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation showed that 33 (82.5%) of 40 patients were viremic. Airport fever screening can thus quickly identify imported dengue cases.

  6. Modelling delay propagation within an airport network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyrgiotis, N.; Malone, K.M.; Odoni, A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe an analytical queuing and network decomposition model developed to study the complex phenomenon of the propagation of delays within a large network of major airports. The Approximate Network Delays (AND) model computes the delays due to local congestion at individual airports and capture

  7. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  8. Scheduling of outbound luggage handling at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Torben C.; Pisinger, David

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the outbound luggage handling problem at airports. The problem is to assign handling facilities to outbound flights and decide about the handling start time. This dynamic, near real-time assignment problem is part of the daily airport operations. Quality, efficiency and rob...

  9. Airports of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes airports in the United States, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The data were derived from an extract of the Public-Use Airports...

  10. Virtual queuing at airport security lanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de R.; Samoilovich, I.; Rhee, van der B.

    2013-01-01

    Airports continuously seek opportunities to reduce the security costs without negatively affecting passenger satisfaction. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities of implementing virtual queuing at airport security lanes, by offering some passengers a time window during which they can arrive

  11. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  12. Insects, vegetation, and the control of laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) at Kennedy International Airport, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, P.A.; McCarthy, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. In response to a purported 'bird-strike problem' at J.F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, we examined short (5 cm) and long (45 cm) grass heights as gull deterrents, in a randomized-block experiment. 2. Vegetative cover, numbers of adult insects and of larval beetles (suspected on-airport food of the gulls) were sampled in the six-block, 36-plot study area, as well as gut contents of adult and downy young gulls in the immediately adjacent colony in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 3. We found that (i) Oriental beetle larvae were the most numerous and concentrated in one experimental block; (ii) beetle larvae numbers were uncorrelated with grass height; (iii) adult beetles were also uncorrelated with grass height; (iv) laughing gulls were distributed across blocks irrespective of percentage cover; (v) within blocks, laughing gulls were selecting short grass and avoiding long grass plots; (vi) laughing gull numbers were positively associated with numbers of Oriental beetle larvae; (vii) adult laughing gulls on the airport were eating lower-nutrition food of terrestrial origin (74-83% adult beetles, mostly Oriental plus green June and ground beetles); (viii) on the other hand, gull chicks in the adjacent breeding colony were being fed more easily digested, higher-protein food of marine origin (86-88% fishes, crustacea and molluscs); (ix) laughing gulls on the airport were taking their adult beetles only in short-grass plots, ignoring large numbers in adjacent long grass; (x) during the summer, on-airport gulls shifted from performing largely maintenance activities on pavement to feeding actively for beetles on newly mown short grass, the change coinciding with adult beetle emergence; (xi) standing water on the airport attracted significantly more gulls than dry areas all summer long. 4. We recommend a series of ecologically compatible, but aggressive habitat management actions for controlling laughing gulls on Kennedy Airport by rendering the airport

  13. Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-06-01

    Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

  14. Earth sciences contribution to the safe development of ground transportation systems in Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper looks at land transport safety aspects paying main attention to natural disaster analysis in the context of the Central European Initiative. It highlights mainly seismicity issues and proposes to build a geodynamic model as a crucial necessity. This model combined with credible hazard scenarios, and with seismic microzonation studies represent the base for the realistic definition, including the energetic aspects, of the peak perturbations that can be experienced by different transportation systems

  15. U.S. airport entry screening in response to pandemic influenza: Modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, John D. [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Brigantic, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Muller, G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gadgil, Ashok [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Delp, Woody [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); McMahon, Benjamin H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lee, Russell [ORNL; Kulesz, Jim [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mihelic, F. Matthew [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic discrete event simulation model was developed to assess the effectiveness of passenger screening for Pandemic Influenza (PI) at U.S. airport foreign entry. Methods: International passengers arriving at 18 U.S. airports from Asia, Europe, South America, and Canada were assigned to one of three states: not infected, infected with PI, infected with other respiratory illness. Passengers passed through layered screening then exited the model. 80% screening effectiveness was assumed for symptomatic passengers; 6% asymptomatic passengers. Results: In the first 100 days of a global pandemic, U.S. airport screening would evaluate over 17 M passengers with 800 K secondary screenings. 11,570 PI infected passengers (majority asymptomatic) would enter the U.S. undetected from all 18 airports. Foreign airport departure screening significantly decreased the false negative (infected/undetected) passengers. U.S. attack rates: no screening (26.9%-30.9%); screening (26.4%-30.6%); however airport screening results in 800 K-1.8 M less U.S. PI cases; 16 K-35 K less deaths (2% fatality rate). Antiviral medications for travel contact prophylaxis (10 contacts/PI passenger) were high - 8.8 M. False positives from all 18 airports: 100-200/day. Conclusions: Foreign shore exit screening greatly reduces numbers of PI infected passengers. U.S. airport screening identifies 50% infected individuals; efficacy is limited by the asymptomatic PI infected. Screening will not significantly delay arrival of PI via international air transport, but will reduce the rate of new US cases and subsequent deaths. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Flow and transport model of the Savannah River Site Old Burial Grounds using Data Fusion modeling (DFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Data Fusion Modeling (DFM) approach has been used to develop a groundwater flow and transport model of the Old Burial Grounds (OBG) at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The resulting DFM model was compared to an existing model that was calibrated via the typical trial-and-error method. The OBG was chosen because a substantial amount of hydrogeologic information is available, a FACT (derivative of VAM3DCG) flow and transport model of the site exists, and the calibration and numerics were challenging with standard approaches. The DFM flow model developed here is similar to the flow model by Flach et al. This allows comparison of the two flow models and validates the utility of DFM. The contaminant of interest for this study is tritium, because it is a geochemically conservative tracer that has been monitored along the seepline near the F-Area effluent and Fourmile Branch for several years

  17. Detection of pollution transport events southeast of Mexico City using ground-based visible spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grutter

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents ground based differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the Tenango del Aire research site located to the southeast of Mexico City. The DOAS NO2 column density measurements are used in conjunction with ceilometer, meteorological and surface nitric oxide (NO, nitrogen oxides (NOx and total reactive nitrogen (NOy measurements to analyze pollution transport events to the southeast of Mexico City during the MILARGO field campaign. The study divides the data set into three case study pollution transport events that occurred at the Tenango del Aire research site. The unique data set is then used to provide an in depth analysis of example days of each of the pollution transport events. An in depth analysis of 13 March 2006, a Case One day, shows the transport of several air pollution plumes during the morning through the Tenango del Aire research site when southerly winds are present and demonstrates how DOAS tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCD, surface NO2 mixing ratios and ceilometer data are used to determine the vertical homogeneity of the pollution layer. The analysis of 18 March 2006, a Case Two day, shows that when northerly winds are present for the entire day, the air at the Tenango del Aire research site is relatively clean and no major pollution plumes are detected. Case 3 days are characterized by relatively clean air throughout the morning with large DOAS NO2 enhancements detected in the afternoon. The analysis of 28 March 2006 show the DOAS NO2 enhancements are likely due to lightning activity and demonstrate how suitable ground-based DOAS measruements are for monitoring anthropogenic and natural pollution sources that reside above the mixing layer.

  18. MODFLOW/MT3DMS-based simulation of variable-density ground water flow and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D; Guo, Weixing

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for coupling MODFLOW and MT3DMS for the simulation of variable-density ground water flow. MODFLOW routines were modified to solve a variable-density form of the ground water flow equation in which the density terms are calculated using an equation of state and the simulated MT3DMS solute concentrations. Changes to the MODFLOW and MT3DMS input files were kept to a minimum, and thus existing data files and data files created with most pre- and postprocessors can be used directly with the SEAWAT code. The approach was tested by simulating the Henry problem and two of the saltpool laboratory experiments (low- and high-density cases). For the Henry problem, the simulated results compared well with the steady-state semianalytic solution and also the transient isochlor movement as simulated by a finite-element model. For the saltpool problem, the simulated breakthrough curves compared better with the laboratory measurements for the low-density case than for the high-density case but showed good agreement with the measured salinity isosurfaces for both cases. Results from the test cases presented here indicate that the MODFLOW/MT3DMS approach provides accurate solutions for problems involving variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. PMID:16681515

  19. A low-cost transportable ground station for capture and processing of direct broadcast EOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Don; Bennett, Toby; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS), part of a cohesive national effort to study global change, will deploy a constellation of remote sensing spacecraft over a 15 year period. Science data from the EOS spacecraft will be processed and made available to a large community of earth scientists via NASA institutional facilities. A number of these spacecraft are also providing an additional interface to broadcast data directly to users. Direct broadcast of real-time science data from overhead spacecraft has valuable applications including validation of field measurements, planning science campaigns, and science and engineering education. The success and usefulness of EOS direct broadcast depends largely on the end-user cost of receiving the data. To extend this capability to the largest possible user base, the cost of receiving ground stations must be as low as possible. To achieve this goal, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a prototype low-cost transportable ground station for EOS direct broadcast data based on Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) components and pipelined, multiprocessing architectures. The targeted reproduction cost of this system is less than $200K. This paper describes a prototype ground station and its constituent components.

  20. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after due... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation as international airport....

  1. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury. Location... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section...

  2. 78 FR 3311 - Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Authority; Sioux Falls Regional Airport; Southwest Airlines; St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport...) on Safety Enhancements Part 139, Certification of Airports (76 FR 5510). In the NPRM, the FAA... period until May 13, 2011, (76 FR 20570) because we learned that a number of airport operators were...

  3. Monitoring Aircraft Motion at Airports by LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C.; Jozkow, G.; Koppanyi, Z.; Young, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.

    2016-06-01

    Improving sensor performance, combined with better affordability, provides better object space observability, resulting in new applications. Remote sensing systems are primarily concerned with acquiring data of the static components of our environment, such as the topographic surface of the earth, transportation infrastructure, city models, etc. Observing the dynamic component of the object space is still rather rare in the geospatial application field; vehicle extraction and traffic flow monitoring are a few examples of using remote sensing to detect and model moving objects. Deploying a network of inexpensive LiDAR sensors along taxiways and runways can provide both geometrically and temporally rich geospatial data that aircraft body can be extracted from the point cloud, and then, based on consecutive point clouds motion parameters can be estimated. Acquiring accurate aircraft trajectory data is essential to improve aviation safety at airports. This paper reports about the initial experiences obtained by using a network of four Velodyne VLP- 16 sensors to acquire data along a runway segment.

  4. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  5. Sustainable Development and Airport Surface Access: The Role of Technological Innovation and Behavioral Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Qazi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development reflects an underlying tension to achieve economic growth whilst addressing environmental challenges, and this is particularly the case for the aviation sector. Although much of the aviation-related focus has fallen on reducing aircraft emissions, airports have also been under increasing pressure to support the vision of a low carbon energy future. One of the main sources of airport-related emissions is passenger journeys to and from airports (the surface access component of air travel, which is the focus of this paper. Two aspects associated with the relationship between sustainable development and airport surface access are considered. Firstly, there is an evaluation of three technological innovation options that will enable sustainable transport solutions for surface access journeys: telepresence systems to reduce drop-off/pick-up trips, techniques to improve public transport and options to encourage the sharing of rides. Secondly, the role of behavioral change for surface access journeys from a theoretical perspective, using empirical data from Manchester airport, is evaluated. Finally, the contribution of technology and behavioral intervention measures to improvements in sustainable development are discussed.

  6. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David; Ross, Shane; Lin, Binbin

    2014-05-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. Members of this genus are important pathogens and mycotoxin producers. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. Spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2,200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. Some of the species of Fusarium identified from our collections have not been previously reported in the state of Virginia. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season. This work extends previous studies showing an association between atmospheric transport barriers (Lagrangian coherent structures or LCSs) and the movement of Fusarium in the lower atmosphere. An increased understanding of the aerobiology of Fusarium may contribute to new and improved control strategies for diseases causes by fusaria in the future.

  7. Interactions of technology and society: Impacts of improved airtransport. A study of airports at the grass roots. [in rural communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, T.; Rosenthal, S.; Ross, S.; Lee, K. N.; Levine, E.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of applying a particular conception of technology and social change to specific examples of technological development was investigated. The social and economic effects of improved airport capabilities on rural communities were examined. Factors which led to the successful implementation of a plan to construct sixty small airports in Ohio are explored and implications derived for forming public policies, evaluating air transportation development, and assessing technology.

  8. Marketing research into the quality of services provided by the Leos Janacek Airport in Ostrava-Mošnov

    OpenAIRE

    Matušková, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Transport infrastructure and accessibility is one of benchmarking criteria on successful regional development and prosperity. The accessibility is important not only for tourist industries and their customers, but especially for potential investors. The existence of an airport is a precondition for the air traffic accessibility. The majority of us take the existence of the airport for granted without realizing the fact that it is largely financed by the Moravia-Silesia Region. With rega...

  9. 75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... CFR Sec. 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653... International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia Airport (LGA), and Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR). This... airport and by day, but DCA, JFK, LGA, and EWR all were affected by the storms. However, the...

  10. Airports Environmental Management: Results from the Evaluation of European Airports Environmental Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Dimitriou; Asimina Voskaki; Maria Sartzetaki

    2014-01-01

    Although airports contribute to region's economic development, they have a negative impact on the environment and on the communities around them. Environmental impacts such as noise, air and water pollution, and natural resources consumption are some of the implications resulting from the operation of airports that have the ability to constrain airports further development. In addition, increased public concern, regarding climate change, imposes more restrictions on carbon use and greenhouse ...

  11. Uncertainty characteristics of EPA's ground-water transport model for low-level waste performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance assessment is an essential step either in design or in licensing processes to ensure the safety of any proposed radioactive waste disposal facilities. Since performance assessment requires the use of computer codes, understanding the characteristics of computer models used and the uncertainties of the estimated results is important. The PRESTO-EPA code, which was the basis of the Environmental Protection Agency's analysis for low-level-waste rulemaking, is widely used for various performance assessment activities in the country with no adequate information available for the uncertainty characteristics of the results. In this study, the groundwater transport model PRESTO-EPA was examined based on the analysis of 14C transport along with the investigation of uncertainty characteristics

  12. A review of smoking policies in airports around the world

    OpenAIRE

    Frances A Stillman; Soong, Andrea; Kleb, Cerise; Grant, Ashley; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review smoking policies of major international airports, to compare these policies with corresponding incountry tobacco control legislation and to identify areas of improvement for advancing smoke-free policy in airports. Methods We reviewed smoking policies of 34 major international airports in five world regions, and collected data on current national and subnational legislation on smoke-free indoor places in the corresponding airport locations. We then compared airport smoking...

  13. Airport Capacity Forecast : Short-term forecasting of runway capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Hesselink, Henk; Nibourg, Joyce; D'Estampes, Ludovic; Lezaud, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    International audience Airports expect major benefits from increasing predictability of the operation. This paper will investigate the use of forecast information to determine forecast airport capacity, which will allow airport stakeholders to optimize the use of their resources. The focus will be on forecasting runway capacity, at most airports the major factor for the overall airport capacity. The possibility to model forecast runway capacity, based on probabilistic inputs, will be inves...

  14. Role of prototype ground-test stands in developing transportable nuclear power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naval and shipborne (transportable) nuclear power installations (NPI) must incorporate the main constituents of the power installations of nuclear power plants (NPP) and meet some distinguishing specifications. Firstly as a direct consequence of the higher power-to-weight ratio of the installation (due to severe restrictions on its weight and size parameters), the power intensity of the core of the transportable NPI is higher than that of the cores used in NPP. Secondly, in view of the space constraints, a close arrangement of the equipment is necessary. Thirdly, the highly autonomous nature of the transportable NPI increases the stringency of the specifications with respect to the reliability and the service life of NPI that are realized, as a rule, by ensuring high reliability of the individual components and by reserving the extremely important elements (spares) of the systems of the installations. Furthermore, the required overall reliability of the installation and minimization of the number of operators calls for a high degree of automatic control. The prototype stand is a powerful facility for solving the problems related to the development and the assimilation of the newly designed transportable NPI. Its efficiency would be maximum if it is put into operation 2-3 years before completing the construction of the prototype NPI of a given type. In order to ensure efficient operation, it must satisfy certain conditions among which the most important ones are ensuring maximum identity of NPI tested using the stand and the newly created series-produced NPI, availability of powerful facilities for collecting, possessing and storing the obtained information, inclusion of a modeling complex based on the modern computer technology, and the presence of a well developed scientific infrastructure and a structure of the maintenance and engineering services

  15. Encouraging Sustainable Transport Choices in American Households: Results from an Empirically Grounded Agent-Based Model

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Natalini; Giangiacomo Bravo

    2013-01-01

    The transport sector needs to go through an extended process of decarbonisation to counter the threat of climate change. Unfortunately, the International Energy Agency forecasts an enormous growth in the number of cars and greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Two issues can thus be identified: (1) the need for a new methodology that could evaluate the policy performances ex-ante and (2) the need for more effective policies. To help address these issues, we developed an Agent-Based Model called ...

  16. Wireless Channel Characterization: Modeling the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Future Airport Surface Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matolak, D. W.; Apaza, Rafael; Foore, Lawrence R.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a recently completed wideband wireless channel characterization project for the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System (MLS) extension band, for airport surface areas. This work included mobile measurements at large and small airports, and fixed point-to-point measurements. Mobile measurements were made via transmission from the air traffic control tower (ATCT), or from an airport field site (AFS), to a receiving ground vehicle on the airport surface. The point-to-point measurements were between ATCT and AFSs. Detailed statistical channel models were developed from all these measurements. Measured quantities include propagation path loss and power delay profiles, from which we obtain delay spreads, frequency domain correlation (coherence bandwidths), fading amplitude statistics, and channel parameter correlations. In this paper we review the project motivation, measurement coordination, and illustrate measurement results. Example channel modeling results for several propagation conditions are also provided, highlighting new findings.

  17. On Physical Aeroacoustics with Some Implications for Low-Noise Aircraft Design and Airport Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M. B. C. Campos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Air traffic is growing at a steady rate of 3% to 5% per year in most regions of the world, implying a doubling every 15–25 years. This requires major advances in aircraft noise reduction at airports, just not to increase the noise exposure due to the larger number of aircraft movements. In fact it can be expected, as a consequence of increased opposition to noise by near airport residents, that the overall noise exposure will have to be reduced, by bans, curfews, fines, and other means and limitations, unless significantly quieter aircraft operations are achieved. The ultimate solution is aircraft operations inaudible outside the airport perimeter, or noise levels below road traffic and other existing local noise sources. These substantial noise reductions cannot come at the expense of a degradation of cruise efficiency, that would affect not just economics and travel time, but would increase fuel consumption and emission of pollutants on a global scale. The paper reviews the: (i current knowledge of the aircraft noise sources; (ii the sound propagation in the atmosphere and ground effects that determine the noise annoyance of near-airport residents; (iii the noise mitigation measures that can be applied to current and future aircraft; (iv the prospects of evolutionary and novel aircraft designs towards quieter aircraft in the near term and eventually to operations inaudible outside the airport perimeter. The 20 figures and 1 diagram with their legends provide a visual summary of the review.

  18. Atmospheric transport and radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and of the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic contamination source as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Plant was the radioactive cloud and the gas stream. Based on the analyses of atmospheric aerosol samples collected in the immediate vicinity of the reactor an enrichment in iodine and cesium radionuclides was found. The meteorological conditions which governed the dispersion of air masses in the area around the Station determined the basic zone of close-in radioactive fallout to the north-west and the north-east of the Station. The distribution of radiation levels on the ground, the change in the concentrations of source radionuclides, data concerning the radioactive contamination of rivers and water reservoirs and values for the plutonium contamination of soil and grass are presented in tables, graphs and maps

  19. Future Airportal Surveillance and Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent advances in airport surface surveillance and other sensor, automation, and data sharing technologies now allow the consideration of a significant change in...

  20. Southampton international airport: an environmental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplen, J.G.F. [Southampton Business School, Southampton Institute (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    This study examines the effect of airport noise on residents living within the locality of Southampton International Airport (SIA). It briefly reviews the hedonic pricing method, contrasting it with the contingent valuation method (CVM), explaining why the latter approach is more relevant in this case. Problems generated by the airport and the airport authority's approach to reaching individual solutions, in conjunction with the local authorities of Eastleigh and Southampton, are discussed; these include air pollution, emissions and odour. Most of these are addressed to the satisfaction of the majority of local residents, with the exception being night aircraft noise, which has resulted in much local controversy. A local survey of residents' preferences is detailed and analysed in an attempt to quantify the cost to local residents. A discussion of sources of bias is included, along with considerations and recommendations. (author)

  1. CERN lands a slot at Geneva Airport

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    From left to right:Carlo Lamprecht, Luciano Maiani and Jean-Pierre Jobin. When you step off your plane at Geneva Airport there's a good chance you'll come face-to-face with an advertising hoarding bearing the message 'CERN, the world's largest particle physics research laboratory, where the World Wide Web was born...five minutes from here'. This may be obvious to you, but it certainly isn't to the majority of the 7 million travellers who pass through the gates of Geneva Airport every year. On the initiative of the Chairman of its Board of Directors, State Councillor Carlo Lamprecht, Geneva International Airport has therefore come up with the idea of highlighting CERN's presence by giving the Laboratory its own hoarding. The hoarding was inaugurated on 24 May by Carlo Lamprecht, Airport Director Jean-Pierre Jobin and CERN Director-General Luciano Maiani.

  2. Airport Gate Assignment: New Model and Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chendong

    2008-01-01

    Airport gate assignment is of great importance in airport operations. In this paper, we study the Airport Gate Assignment Problem (AGAP), propose a new model and implement the model with Optimization Programming language (OPL). With the objective to minimize the number of conflicts of any two adjacent aircrafts assigned to the same gate, we build a mathematical model with logical constraints and the binary constraints, which can provide an efficient evaluation criterion for the Airlines to estimate the current gate assignment. To illustrate the feasibility of the model we construct experiments with the data obtained from Continental Airlines, Houston Gorge Bush Intercontinental Airport IAH, which indicate that our model is both energetic and effective. Moreover, we interpret experimental results, which further demonstrate that our proposed model can provide a powerful tool for airline companies to estimate the efficiency of their current work of gate assignment.

  3. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... applicant for a pilot school certificate or a provisional pilot school certificate must show that he or she... path by at least 50 feet. (c) Each airport must have a wind direction indicator that is visible...

  4. Airports and Airfields, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Geographic coordinate system; in a Not Sure projection; The extent...

  5. Airport Congestion When Carriers Have Market Power

    OpenAIRE

    Brueckner, Jan K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes airport congestion when carriers are nonatomistic, showing how the results of the road-pricing literature are modified when the economic agents causing congestion have market power. The analysis shows that when an airport is dominated by a monopolist, congestion is fully internalized, yielding no role for congestion pricing under monopoly conditions. Under a Cournot oligopoly, however, carriers are shown to internalize only the congestion they impose on themselves. A toll ...

  6. 77 FR 27857 - Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Kingman Airport Authority, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Kingman Airport Authority, Inc. Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC (KTRR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to operate over approximately 3 miles of track \\1\\ within the Kingman...

  7. Potential Energy Curves and Transport Properties for the Interaction of He with Other Ground-state Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Harry; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interactions of a He atom with a heavier atom are examined for 26 different elements, which are consecutive members selected from three rows (Li - Ne, Na - Ar, and K,Ca, Ga - Kr) and column 12 (Zn,Cd) of the periodic table. Interaction energies are determined wing high-quality ab initio calculations for the states of the molecule that would be formed from each pair of atoms in their ground states. Potential energies are tabulated for a broad range of Interatomic separation distances. The results show, for example, that the energy of an alkali interaction at small separations is nearly the same as that of a rare-gas interaction with the same electron configuration for the dosed shells. Furthermore, the repulsive-range parameter for this region is very short compared to its length for the repulsion dominated by the alkali-valence electron at large separations (beyond about 3-4 a(sub 0)). The potential energies in the region of the van der Waals minimum agree well with the most accurate results available. The ab initio energies are applied to calculate scattering cross sections and obtain the collision integrals that are needed to determine transport properties to second order. The theoretical values of Li-He total scattering cross sections and the rare-gas atom-He transport properties agree well (to within about 1%) with the corresponding measured data. Effective potential energies are constructed from the ab initio energies; the results have been shown to reproduce known transport data and can be readily applied to predict unknown transport properties for like-atom interactions.

  8. Airport Merchandising Using Micro Services Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bhaskar Sankaranarayanan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Airport offers an ecosystem where passengers, airlines, airport, and merchants meet under one roof during travel. During the journey, there is a good amount of time spent by passengers on waiting or transit before boarding the flight. Passengers look for spending that time by shopping, dining, and entertainment. Airport merchants and airlines look for merchandising opportunities to acquire new customers, up-sell, and cross-sell their products and services. Highly personalized merchandising offers can be generated on the fly by combining contextual information from passenger profile, likes and interests, merchant offers, and location specific events, seasons, and festivals. To achieve this, a strong airport merchandising platform is needed. The goal of the airport merchandising platform is to exchange information in a seamless manner across travel systems. The platform is designed on microservices design principles that use information from airlines, airport, social media, and merchant systems. Microservices can promote quick development, deployment, and realization of services. Microservices also improve the time to market capabilities. Mobile and desktop applications consume them to offer a personalized shopping experience to the passengers.

  9. Encouraging Sustainable Transport Choices in American Households: Results from an Empirically Grounded Agent-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Natalini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport sector needs to go through an extended process of decarbonisation to counter the threat of climate change. Unfortunately, the International Energy Agency forecasts an enormous growth in the number of cars and greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Two issues can thus be identified: (1 the need for a new methodology that could evaluate the policy performances ex-ante and (2 the need for more effective policies. To help address these issues, we developed an Agent-Based Model called Mobility USA aimed at: (1 testing whether this could be an effective approach in analysing ex-ante policy implementation in the transport sector; and (2 evaluating the effects of alternative policy scenarios on commuting behaviours in the USA. Particularly, we tested the effects of two sets of policies, namely market-based and preference-change ones. The model results suggest that this type of agent-based approach will provide a useful tool for testing policy interventions and their effectiveness.

  10. Airports and Airfields, To provide airports recognized by LA DOTD as "official" airports, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2007. It is described as 'To provide airports recognized by LA DOTD as "official"...

  11. Uranium-series isotopes transport in surface, vadose and ground waters at San Marcos uranium bearing basin, Chihuahua, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the U deposit area at San Marcos in Chihuahua, Mexico, hydrogeological and climatic conditions are very similar to the Nopal I, Peña Blanca U deposit, 50 km away. The physicochemical parameters and activity concentrations of several 238U-series isotopes have been determined in surface, vadose and ground waters at San Marcos. The application of some published models to activity ratios of these isotopes has allowed assessing the order of magnitude of transport parameters in the area. Resulting retardation factors in San Marcos area are Rf238 ≈ 250–14,000 for the unsaturated zone and ≈110–1100 for the saturated zone. The results confirm that the mobility of U in San Marcos is also similar to that of the Nopal I U deposit and this area can be considered as a natural analog of areas suitable for geologic repositories of high-level nuclear waste.

  12. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates methods were used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 meters) above an air--ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth--concrete model containing 0.9 meters of borated concrete beginning 0.5 meters below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 meters. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon and, in all cases, the secondary gamma ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths greater than 0.6 meter. 4 figures, 4 tables

  13. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1979-03-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates methods were used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 meters) above an air--ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth--concrete model containing 0.9 meters of borated concrete beginning 0.5 meters below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 meters. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon and, in all cases, the secondary gamma ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths greater than 0.6 meter. 4 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma-ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates methods have been used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma-ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 m) above an air-ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth-concrete model containing 0.9 m of borated concrete beginning 0.5 m below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 m. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon, and in all cases, the secondary gamma-ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths > 0.6 m

  15. Radiation transport in earth for neutron and gamma-ray point sources above an air-ground interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillie, R.A.; Santoro, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional discrete-ordinates methods have been used to calculate the instantaneous dose rate in silicon and neutron and gamma-ray fluences as a function of depth in earth from point sources at various heights (1.0, 61.3, and 731.5 m) above an air-ground interface. The radiation incident on the earth's surface was transported through an earth-only and an earth-concrete model containing 0.9 m of borated concrete beginning 0.5 m below the earth's surface to obtain fluence distributions to a depth of 3.0 m. The inclusion of borated concrete did not significantly reduce the total instantaneous dose rate in silicon, and in all cases, the secondary gamma-ray fluence and corresponding dose are substantially larger than the primary neutron fluence and corresponding dose for depths > 0.6 m.

  16. Transport in arrays of submicron Josephson junctions over a ground plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Teressa Rae [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) arrays of Al islands linked by submicron Al/Al{sub x}O{sub y}/Al tunnel junctions were fabricated on an insulating layer grown on a ground plane. The arrays were cooled to temperatures as low as 20 mK where the Josephson coupling energy E{sub J} of each junction and the charging energy E{sub C} of each island were much greater than the thermal energy k{sub B}T. The capacitance C{sub g} between each island and the ground plane was much greater than the junction capacitance C. Two classes of arrays were studied. In the first class, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was much larger than the resistance quantum for single electrons, R{sub N}{much_gt} R{sub Q{sub e}}{identical_to} h/e{sup 2} {approx} 25.8 k{Omega}, and the islands were driven normal by an applied magnetic field such that E{sub J} = 0 and the array was in the Coulomb blockade regime. The arrays were made on degenerately-doped Si, thermally oxidized to a thickness of approximately 100 nm. The current-voltage (I - V) characteristics of a 1D and a 2D array were measured and found to display a threshold voltage V{sub T} below which little current flows. In the second class of arrays, the normal state tunneling resistance of the junctions was close to the resistance quantum for Cooper pairs, R{sub N}{approx}R{sub Q}{equivalent_to}h/4e{sup 4}{approx}6.45k{Omega}, such that E{sub J}/E{sub C}{approx}1. The arrays were made on GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas approximately 100 nm below the surface. One array displayed superconducting behavior at low temperature. Two arrays displayed insulating behavior at low temperature, and the size of the Coulomb gap increased with increasing R{sub g}.

  17. Ecological transport and radiation doses from ground water borne radioactive matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnover of radioactive matter entering the biosphere with ground water has been studied with regard to exposure and dose to critical groups and populations. The main alternatives considered for outflow of radioactive effluents to the biosphere are: outflow in a valley containing wells, outflow to a fresh-water lake, and outflow in a coastal region of the Baltic Sea. Mathematical models of a set of coupled ecosystems on local, regional- intermediate- and global levels have been used for calculations of doses. The intermediate system refers to the Baltic Sea. The mathematical analysis, based on first order kinetics for the exchange of matter in a system according to compartment principles, also includes products in decay chains, i.e. daughter nuclides generated by decay of nuclides under ecological cycling. The time dependent exposures have been studied for certain long-lived nuclides of radiological interest in waste from reprosessed fuel. Dose and dose commitment have been calculted for different release patterns comprising idealised episodes for outflow to the biosphere during short periods and outflow governed by constant leakage from a source on the border between geosphere and biosphere. (author)

  18. Ground-level ozone in four Chinese cities: precursors, regional transport and heterogeneous processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Xue

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed measurements of ozone (O3 and its precursors made at rural/suburban sites downwind of four large Chinese cities – Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou, to elucidate their pollution characteristics, regional transport, in situ production, and impacts of heterogeneous processes. The same measurement techniques and observation-based model were used to minimize uncertainties in comparison of the results due to difference in methodologies. All four cities suffered from serious O3 pollution but showed different precursor distributions. The model-calculated in situ O3 production rates were compared with the observed change rates to infer the relative contributions of on-site photochemistry and transport. At the rural site of Beijing, export of the well-processed urban plumes contributed to the extremely high O3 levels (up to an hourly value of 286 ppbv, while the O3 pollution observed at suburban sites of Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou was dominated by intense in-situ production. The O3 production was in a VOCs-limited regime in both Shanghai and Guangzhou, and a NOx-controlled regime in Lanzhou. The key VOC precursors are aromatics and alkenes in Shanghai, and aromatics in Guangzhou. The potential impacts on O3 production of several heterogeneous processes, namely, hydrolysis of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5, uptake of hydro peroxy radical (HO2 on particles and surface reactions of NO2 forming nitrous acid (HONO, were assessed. The analyses indicate the varying and considerable impacts of these processes in different areas of China depending on the atmospheric abundances of aerosol and NOx, and suggest the urgent need to better understand these processes and represent them in photochemical models.

  19. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  20. Geohazard risk assessment using high resolution SAR interferometric techniques: a case study of Larissa National Airport Central Greece

    OpenAIRE

    F. Fakhri; R. Kalliola

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of use the productions of Earth Resource Satellite (ERS-1/2) and Advanced Environment Satellite ENVISAT SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) C-band have given the potential to detect and estimate the time series of dynamic ground deformation within high spatial and temporal resolution. The Larissa National Airport is suffering from continued ground deformation as evidenced by the presence of ground fissures and sinkholes as well ...

  1. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property (75 FR 54946..., Safety Management System for Certificated Airports (75 FR 62008, October 7, 2010). However, the agency... into account all of the criteria for inclusion in the NPIAS. Comment: The policy does not address...

  2. Integrated Mode Choice, Small Aircraft Demand, and Airport Operations Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yackovetsky, Robert E. (Technical Monitor); Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2004-01-01

    A mode choice model that generates on-demand air travel forecasts at a set of GA airports based on changes in economic characteristics, vehicle performance characteristics such as speed and cost, and demographic trends has been integrated with a model to generate itinerate aircraft operations by airplane category at a set of 3227 airports. Numerous intermediate outputs can be generated, such as the number of additional trips diverted from automobiles and schedule air by the improved performance and cost of on-demand air vehicles. The total number of transported passenger miles that are diverted is also available. From these results the number of new aircraft to service the increased demand can be calculated. Output from the models discussed is in the format to generate the origin and destination traffic flow between the 3227 airports based on solutions to a gravity model.

  3. Analytical solutions for multidimensional transport of a four-member radionuclide decay chain in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical solutions based on the Laplace and Fourier transformation techniques are presented for the two- and three-dimensional space-time-dependent convective-dispersive transport of a four-member radionuclide decay chain in homogeneous porous media. The longitudinal dispersion-free solution is also reported. The computation was executed using the MASCOT model on a VAX/VMS-Version 4.1. The solutions are designed for an unbounded medium flow field assumed to be semi-infinite in the direction normal to the source, and infinite orthogonal to the source, with a variety of boundary conditions (single or multiple finite line source or a Gaussian distributed source in the two-dimensional case; single or multiple patch source or bivariate normally distributed source in the three-dimensional case). Radionuclide release modes of the constant and nuclide-dependent type are taken into account. An optimization of the convergence of the integration required by these solutions is achieved after operating a transformation of the infinite interval into the sum of two finite ones. The efficiency of two quadrature formulas (Gauss-Legendre and a fourth-order Newton-Cotes based on an iterative approach) was investigated. Solution accuracy was verified against available one- and two-dimensional analytical solutions. 15 refs

  4. Isoprene concentrations over Russia: ground-based measurements and chemistry-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina, Elena; Konovalov, Igor; Berezin, Evgeny; Skorokhod, Andrey; Elansky, Nikolay; Belikov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Near-surface isoprene concentration was measured over Russia using the proton mass spectrometry method (PTR-MS) in TROICA (TRanscontinental Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) experiments along the Trans-Siberian railway from 21.06.08 to 04.08.08 (TROICA-12) and from 08.10.09 to 23.10.09 (TROICA-13). The highest isoprene concentration is observed in the Far East (up to 3 ppb) due to the emissions from the major isoprene source - deciduous forests. The TROICA measurements were compared to the corresponding simulations performed with the CHIMERE chemistry transport model (CTM) using the MEGAN biogenic emission inventory. Simulated and measured isoprene concentrations are highly correlated (r = 0.8), but the simulated isoprene concentration is about 4-6 times higher than the measured one. The selection of daytime and background (from isoprene/benzene ratios) isoprene concentrations don't significantly increase the experimental values; moreover, even the isoprene concentration corrected for atmospheric photochemical losses (that is, the near-source concentration) is found to be 1.5 times lower than the simulated data. Therefore, the systematic discrepancy between the measurements and simulations could not be unambiguously attributed to the representativity error. The weak exponential dependence of summer isoprene concentration on temperature both for the model (R2 = 0.3) and for the experimental data (R2 = 0.4) is observed. However, a much stronger linear correlation (r ~ 0.9) is found between the isoprene concentration and temperature in Russian regions separated according to the type of vegetation. The differences between the simulated and experimental dependences of isoprene concentration on temperature are not statistically significant. The above results prompt the conclusion that the parameterization of isoprene emissions in the CHIMERE CTM is qualitatively adequate, but the isoprene emission factors applicable for Russian forest are likely

  5. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Williams [West Virginia University Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  6. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasts for East-Central Florida Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Winfred C.

    2013-01-01

    The forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL, (NWS MLB) identified a need to make more accurate lightning forecasts to help alleviate delays due to thunderstorms in the vicinity of several commercial airports in central Florida at which they are responsible for issuing terminal aerodrome forecasts. Such forecasts would also provide safer ground operations around terminals, and would be of value to Center Weather Service Units serving air traffic controllers in Florida. To improve the forecast, the AMU was tasked to develop an objective lightning probability forecast tool for the airports using data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The resulting forecast tool is similar to that developed by the AMU to support space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) for use by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) in previous tasks (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). The lightning probability forecasts are valid for the time periods and areas needed by the NWS MLB forecasters in the warm season months, defined in this task as May-September.

  7. Method of airport concrete pavement design for large military transport aircrafts%适应大型特种飞机的机场水泥混凝土道面结构设计方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李巧生; 赵鸿铎; 凌建明

    2011-01-01

    对适应大型特种飞机的机场水泥混凝土道面的损坏模式、设计标准和厚度计算方法进行研究.明确了大型特种飞机荷载重、起落架复杂的特点;三维有限元分析的结果表明,其多轮叠加效应明显,建议在道面结构设计中考虑全起落架荷载.针对大型特种飞机的特点提出以9块板二维有限元模型作为力学分析模型,以板疲劳断裂作为损坏模式,基于累积损伤原理考虑混合交通.基于Miner原理,给出了累积损伤因子CDF的计算公式,并以CDF接近1(道面达到50%的开裂密度)作为道面设计标准.详细分析了不同机型通行一覆盖率的计算方法,以此为基础形成了各机型预期覆盖次数的计算方法.系统对比了国内外的水泥混凝土道面疲劳方程,建议以美国NCHRPI-26提出的疲劳方程作为现阶段构建水泥混凝土道面设计方法的基础,并进一步明确了允许覆盖次数的计算方法.综合提出了适应大型特种飞机的机场水泥混凝土道面结构设计流程.%This paper is about airport concrete pavement design method for large special aircrafts. Based on 3-D FEM analysis, full landing gear is recommended for pavement design. Considering the characteristics of large special aircrafts,a 3-D FEM model with 9 concrete slabs is employed for pavement design. Fatigue crack is taken as a damage pattern,and a cumulative principle is recommended to consider mixed traffic. Based on Miner's principle, the functions of calculating CDF are given. CDF = 1 is accepted as the design criteria of concrete pavement, which indicates 50% crack density. The P/C (pass to coverage ratio) calculation functions are put forwarded for various aircrafts, and the equation for calculating the expected coverage is developed. Various fatigue functions of airport concrete pavement are compared.The functions developed by NCHRP 1-26 are accepted as the fatigue functions to calculate the allowable coverage of

  8. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the

  9. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a standoff sensor that can measure 3D components of wind velocity in the vicinity of an airport has the potential to improve airport throughput,...

  10. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... selection process, and the initial airport locations. See 77 FR 5681 and 8 CFR 235.12. Travelers who wish to... (CLT); Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Phoenix, Arizona (PHX); and Denver...

  11. Microscopic Analysis and Modeling of Airport Surface Sequencing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Although a number of airportal surface models exist and have been successfully used for analysis of airportal operations, only recently has it become possible to...

  12. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA)

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  13. Aspect Of Reliability In Airport Business Continuity Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozłowski Michał

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the issue of ensuring the continuity of the operation at the airport. Requirements and objectives relating to business continuity management have been defined in accordance with ISO 22301 international standard. Conducted a study of reliability issues operation of the airport. Defined the function of the reliability and operational readiness of the airport. Presented the concept of using function of operational readiness in the risk assessment for the continuity of the airport.

  14. AIRPORTS PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY EVALUATION BASED ON MULTIDIMENTIONAL TOOLS

    OpenAIRE

    Jardim, João Pedro; Baltazar, Maria; Silva, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Airport benchmarking depends on airport operational performance and efficiency indicators, which are important issues for business, operational management, regulatory agencies, airlines and passengers. There are several sets of single and complex indicators to evaluate airports performance and efficiency as well as several techniques to benchmark such infrastructures. The general aim of this work is the development of airport performance and efficiency predictive models using robust but flexi...

  15. A Mixed Prediction Model of Ground Subsidence for Civil Infrastructures on Soft Ground

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyoshi Kobayashi; Kiyoyuki Kaito

    2012-01-01

    The estimation of ground subsidence processes is an important subject for the asset management of civil infrastructures on soft ground, such as airport facilities. In the planning and design stage, there exist many uncertainties in geotechnical conditions, and it is impossible to estimate the ground subsidence process by deterministic methods. In this paper, the sets of sample paths designating ground subsidence processes are generated by use of a one-dimensional consolidation model incorpora...

  16. Airports and Airfields, Airport hangers areas for storage of airplanes and tiedown areas., Published in unknown, Johnson County AIMS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of unknown. It is described as 'Airport hangers areas for storage...

  17. 19 CFR 122.14 - Landing rights airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... landing. Permission to land is not required for an emergency or forced landing (covered under § 122.35... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Landing rights airport. 122.14 Section 122.14... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.14 Landing rights airport. (a) Permission...

  18. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... expected to serve; (2) The name, location, telephone number, and emergency capability of each hospital and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  19. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  20. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required...

  1. Demand for ground transportation fuel and pricing policy in Asian tigers: A comparative study of Korea and Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, S.; Chakravorty, U.; Leung, P.S.

    1999-07-01

    This paper examines the demand for gasoline and diesel in the ground transportation sectors of South Korea and Taiwan, comparing the effects of their different pricing policies and stages of economic growth. To account for substitutability between the two fuels, the model proposed here uses a system of equations estimated simultaneously with time-series data from 1973--1992. Results yield demand elasticities that confirm previous research showing that oil product demand is generally price inelastic, which income elasticities (reflecting a longer period of economic growth than previous studies in the Asian region) are lower than those previously reported. The estimated demand functions are then used to generate forecasts for both countries and, in particular, for an assumed reduction in a 180% tax on gasoline in Korea. Forecasted increases in demand by the year 2010 range from 40 to 180%, while the tax analysis suggests that Korea's pricing policy has reduced total demand and promoted the use of diesel over gasoline.

  2. An Experimental Study of the Ground Transportation System (GTS) Model in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Ft Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Ross, James C.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Stephen M.; Driver, David M.; Zilliac, Gregory G.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 1/8-scale Ground Transportation System (GTS) model was studied experimentally in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Ft Wind Tunnel. Designed for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the GTS model has a simplified geometry with a cab-over-engine design and no tractor-trailer gap. As a further simplification, all measurements of the GTS model were made without wheels. Aerodynamic boattail plates were also tested on the rear of the trailer to provide a simple geometry modification for computation. The experimental measurements include body-axis drag, surface pressures, surface hot-film anemometry, oil-film interferometry, and 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). The wind-averaged drag coefficient with and without boattail plates was 0.225 and 0.277, respectively. PIV measurements behind the model reveal a significant reduction in the wake size due to the flow turning provided by the boattail plates. Hot-film measurements on the side of the cab indicate laminar separation with turbulent reattachment within 0.08 trailer width for zero and +/- 10 degrees yaw. Oil film interferometry provided quantitative measurements of skin friction and qualitative oil flow images. A complete set of the experimental data and the surface definition of the model are included on a CD-ROM for further analysis and comparison.

  3. Proteus aircraft over Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  4. Proteus aircraft low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  5. Service quality, national differences, and shopping behaviour at airport commercial area : the case of Keflavik International Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Bryndís Marteinsdóttir

    2016-01-01

    As the airport industry is becoming more competitive airports are under increased pressure to increase their non-aeronautical revenues. Airports are thus focusing more and more on service quality and customer satisfaction, in order to differentiate themselves and attract more passengers, to increase commercial revenues and gain a competitive advantage. However, a deeper understanding of how passengers of different national cultures perceive airport service quality is needed, as well as a deep...

  6. 77 FR 68196 - Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... CFR 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 77 FR 30585 (May... Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia Airport (LGA), and Newark... occurred at slot-controlled and non- slot-controlled airports. JFK and EWR were effectively closed...

  7. NASA Research on an Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Surface operations at airports in the US are based on tactical operations, where departure aircraft primarily queue up and wait at the departure runways. There have been attempts to address the resulting inefficiencies with both strategic and tactical tools for metering departure aircraft. This presentation gives an overview of Spot And Runway Departure Advisor with Collaborative Decision Making (SARDA-CDM): an integrated strategic and tactical system for improving surface operations by metering departure aircraft. SARDA-CDM is the augmentation of ground and local controller advisories through sharing of flight movement and related operations information between airport operators, flight operators and air traffic control at the airport. The goal is to enhance the efficiency of airport surface operations by exchanging information between air traffic control and airline operators, while minimizing adverse effects on stakeholders and passengers. The presentation motivates the need for departure metering, and provides a brief background on the previous work on SARDA. Then, the concept of operations for SARDA-CDM is described. Then the preliminary results from testing the concept in a real-time automated simulation environment are described. Results indicate benefits such as reduction in taxiing delay and fuel consumption. Further, the preliminary implementation of SARDA-CDM seems robust for two minutes delay in gate push-back times.

  8. Optimal Hybrid Renewable Airport Power System: Empirical Study on Incheon International Airport, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoin Baek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to global energy problems (e.g., the oil crisis, the Fukushima accident, the Paris Agreement, the South Korean government has executed a strict renewable energy plan to decrease the country’s dependence on fossil fuel. Public facilities, such as international airports, which use substantial amounts of electricity, are the most in need of government regulation. In this study, we attempt to determine the optimal hybrid electricity generation system for South Korea’s largest airport: Incheon International Airport. In the analysis, we use three scenarios: the current load, 120% of the current load, and 140% of the current load, according to the plan to expand Incheon International Airport. According to the COE (cost of electricity and the NPC (net present cost of the result, it is economically feasible to completely cover the potential increase in the electric load with PV power. Government policy implications and limitations are discussed.

  9. Public Use Airports, Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [public_use_airports_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Public Use Airports database is a geographic point database of aircraft landing facilities in the United States and U.S. Territories. Attribute data is provided...

  10. Public Use Airport Runways, Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [public_use_airport_runway_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Public Use Airport Runways database is a geographic dataset of runways in the United States and US territories containing information on the physical...

  11. Louisiana Airports, Geographic NAD83, FEMA (1997)[airports_FEMA_1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is is a point dataset for the locations and attributes of 20 Louisiana airports. The attributes include name, address, city, county (sic), state, phone,...

  12. 75 FR 54946 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Federal Register on October 13, 2009 (74 FR 52524). Comments were due on March 31, 2010. Comments on the... the airport in local politics. Response: Owners of residential lots with through-the-fence...

  13. Trans-boundary aerosol transport during a winter haze episode in China revealed by ground-based Lidar and CALIPSO satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kai; Wu, Lixin; Wong, Man Sing; Letu, Husi; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Sheng, Shijie; Teng, Jiyao; Xiao, Xin; Yuan, Limei

    2016-09-01

    By employing PM2.5 observation data, ground-based lidar measurements, MODIS and CALIPSO satellite images, meteorological data, and back trajectories analysis, we investigate a trans-boundary transport of aerosols during a large-area haze episode in China during 3-5 January 2015. The ground-based lidar observations indicated similar episodes of external aerosols passing through and mixing into three East China cities. A considerable amount of total AOD below 3 km (46% in average) was contributed by the external aerosol layers during passing over and importing. CALIPSO satellite observations of central and eastern China revealed a high altitude pollutant belt on January 3. Although the severest ground pollution was found in central and south-eastern Hebei, the high altitude pollution transport was greater in south-western Shandong, north-western Jiangsu, and north-western Anhui. These observations along with the analysis of air mass trajectories and wind fields indicates pollutants moving from Hebei, Henan and Hubei probably contributed to the haze pollution in Shandong and Jiangsu. This study reveals haze transports from North China Plain to East China could be a common phenomenon influenced by the winter monsoon in northern China. Hence, effective control of air pollution requires collaboration among different cities and provinces throughout China. The long-term measurements of aerosol vertical properties by ground-based lidar and CALIPSO are extremely valuable in quantifying the contributions of external factors and will be helpful in validating and improving various air quality models.

  14. The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Off-Nominal Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, B.; Williams, D.; Consiglio, M.; Conway, S.; Adams, C.; Abbott, T.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to conduct concurrent, multiple aircraft operations in poor weather, at virtually any airport, offers an important opportunity for a significant increase in the rate of flight operations, a major improvement in passenger convenience, and the potential to foster growth of charter operations at small airports. The Small Aircraft Transportation System, (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept is designed to increase traffic flow at any of the 3400 nonradar, non-towered airports in the United States where operations are currently restricted to one-in/one-out procedural separation during Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The concept's key feature is pilots maintain their own separation from other aircraft using procedures, aircraft flight data sent via air-to-air datalink, cockpit displays, and on-board software. This is done within the Self-Controlled Area (SCA), an area of flight operations established during poor visibility or low ceilings around an airport without Air Traffic Control (ATC) services. The research described in this paper expands the HVO concept to include most off-nominal situations that could be expected to occur in a future SATS environment. The situations were categorized into routine off-nominal operations, procedural deviations, equipment malfunctions, and aircraft emergencies. The combination of normal and off-nominal HVO procedures provides evidence for an operational concept that is safe, requires little ground infrastructure, and enables concurrent flight operations in poor weather.

  15. Aircraft noise in the region of the Bucharest-Otopeni Airport. [noise pollution in airport environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, M.; Gherghel, C.; Curtoglu, A.

    1974-01-01

    Aircraft noise, especially in the region adjoining airports, constitutes a problem that will be aggravated in the near future because of increasing aircraft traffic and the appearance of new types of large tonnage aircraft with continuously increasing powers and speeds. Criteria for the evaluation of aircraft noise are reported and some results of studies carried out in the region of Bucharest-Otopeni Airport are detailed.

  16. A Multi Agent Based Model for Airport Service Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Ip

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aviation industry is highly dynamic and demanding in nature that time and safety are the two most important factors while one of the major sources of delay is aircraft on ground because of it complexity, a lot of machinery like vehicles are involved and lots of communication are involved. As one of the aircraft ground services providers in Hong Kong International Airport, China Aircraft Services Limited (CASL aims to increase competitiveness by better its service provided while minimizing cost is also needed. One of the ways is to optimize the number of maintenance vehicles allocated in order to minimize chance of delay and also operating costs. In the paper, an agent-based model is proposed for support decision making in vehicle allocation. The overview of the aircrafts ground services procedures is firstly mentioned with different optimization methods suggested by researchers. Then, the agent-based approach is introduced and in the latter part of report and a multi-agent system is built and proposed which is decision supportive for CASL in optimizing the maintenance vehicles' allocation. The application provides flexibility for inputting number of different kinds of vehicles, simulation duration and aircraft arrival rate in order to simulation different scenarios which occurs in HKIA.

  17. Airport databases for 3D synthetic-vision flight-guidance displays: database design, quality assessment, and data generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Axel; Raabe, Helmut; Schiefele, Jens; Doerr, Kai Uwe

    1999-07-01

    -platforms or aircraft-platforms. To achieve the highest horizontal accuracy requirements stated in ICAO Annex 14 for runway centerlines (0.50 meters), at the present moment only images acquired from aircraft based sensors can be used as source data. Still, ground reference by GCP (Ground Control-points) is obligatory. A DEM (Digital Elevation Model) can be created automatically in the photogrammetric process. It can be used as highly accurate elevation model for the airport area. The final verification of airport data is accomplished by independent surveyed runway- and taxiway- control-points. The concept of generation airport-data by means of remote sensing and photogrammetry was tested with the Stuttgart/Germany airport. The results proved that the final accuracy was within the accuracy specification defined by ICAO Annex 14.

  18. An RFID-based luggage and passenger tracking system for airport security control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastianos, George E.; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Kountouriotis, Vassilios I.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2014-06-01

    Market analysis studies of recent years have shown a steady and significant increase in the usage of RFID technology. Key factors for this growth were the decreased costs of passive RFIDs and their improved performance compared to the other identification technologies. Besides the benefits of RFID technologies into the supply chains, warehousing, traditional inventory and asset management applications, RFID has proven itself worth exploiting on experimental, as well as on commercial level in other sectors, such as healthcare, transport and security. In security sector, airport security is one of the biggest challenges. Airports are extremely busy public places and thus prime targets for terrorism, with aircraft, passengers, crew and airport infrastructure all subject to terrorist attacks. Inside this labyrinth of security challenges, the long range detection capability of the UHF passive RFID technology can be turned into a very important tracking tool that may outperform all the limitations of the barcode tracking inside the current airport security control chain. The Integrated Systems Lab of NCSR Demokritos has developed an RFID based Luggage and Passenger tracking system within the TASS (FP7-SEC-2010-241905) EU research project. This paper describes application scenarios of the system categorized according to the structured nature of the environment, the system architecture and presents evaluation results extracted from measurements with a group of different massive production GEN2 UHF RFID tags that are widely available in the world market.

  19. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 2. Special test cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. Volume 1, titled ''Guideline Approach,'' consists of Chapters 1 through 5 and a glossary. Chapters 2 through 5 provide the more detailed discussions about the code selection approach. This volume, Volume 2, consists of four appendices reporting on the technical evaluation test cases designed to help verify the accuracy of ground-water transport codes. 20 refs

  20. MONITORING AND MODELLING OF AIR POLLUTION PRODUCED BY AIRCRAFT ENGINE EMISSION INSIDE THE ATHENS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksander I. Zaporozhets

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  Experimental measuring of air pollution inside the airport, produced by aircraft engine emission during accelaration and take-off on the runway. Measurement data were used for verification of modelling results according to complex model «PolEmiCa». It consists of the following basic components: engine emission inventory calculation; transport of the contaminants by engine jets, dispersion of the contaminants in atmosphere due to wind and atmospheric turbulence.

  1. Assessing the impacts of the JFK Ground Management Program

    OpenAIRE

    Stroiney, Steven; Levy, Benjamin; Khadilkar, Harshad Dilip; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Management Program at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) aims to leverage the availability of comprehensive airport surface surveillance data and airline schedule information to better manage the taxi-out process, reduce taxi times, and improve efficiency. During periods when departure demand exceeds capacity, departing aircraft are held at the gate or another holding location, and released to the runway in time to join a short departure queue before taking off. As a resul...

  2. Comparison of flying qualities derived from in-flight and ground-based simulators for a jet-transport airplane for the approach and landing pilot tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective was to provide information to the flight controls/flying qualities engineer that will assist him in determining the incremental flying qualities and/or pilot-performance differences that may be expected between results obtained via ground-based simulation (and, in particular, the six-degree-of-freedom Langley Visual/Motion Simulator (VMS)) and flight tests. Pilot opinion and performance parameters derived from a ground-based simulator and an in-flight simulator are compared for a jet-transport airplane having 32 different longitudinal dynamic response characteristics. The primary pilot tasks were the approach and landing tasks with emphasis on the landing-flare task. The results indicate that, in general, flying qualities results obtained from the ground-based simulator may be considered conservative-especially when the pilot task requires tight pilot control as during the landing flare. The one exception to this, according to the present study, was that the pilots were more tolerant of large time delays in the airplane response on the ground-based simulator. The results also indicated that the ground-based simulator (particularly the Langley VMS) is not adequate for assessing pilot/vehicle performance capabilities (i.e., the sink rate performance for the landing-flare task when the pilot has little depth/height perception from the outside scene presentation).

  3. Bifacial PV system in Aichi Airport-site Demonstrative Research Plant for New Energy Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Ichiro; Nakahara, Hirotaka; Tomita, Takashi [Photovoltaic Solar Cells and Modules Business Department, Power Systems, Hitachi Ltd., 1-1 Saiwai-cho 3-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan); Tatsunokuchi, Mitsuhiro [Urban Development Solution Div., Urban Planning and Development Systems, Hitachi Ltd., Akihabara UDX Building, 14-1 Soto-Kanda 4-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8010 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    NEDO Demonstrative Project of Regional Power Grids with Various New Energies includes several kinds of FC system and PV system with sodium-sulfur battery. One of the PV systems is vertically installed fence-type bifacial PV system, 30 kW for its front surface Pmax. The bifacial PV worked as an outer fence of the global loop in the EXPO 2005 Aichi, Japan. The whole generation system was moved from the site of the EXPO 2005 to the site near the Aichi Airport, and then it re-started its power generation in September 2006 as the Aichi Airport-site Demonstrative Research Plant for New Energy Power Generation, where the bifacial PV array was installed on the ground faced to southwest and northeast. The paper introduces the outline of the plant and describes the evaluation of actual yearly generation of the bifacial PV system. (author)

  4. Hotellipaketin suunnittelu Case: Hilton Helsinki Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Kyrö, Niina; Grönqvist, Henna

    2014-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön aiheena oli hotellipaketin suunnittelu, joka toteutettiin toimeksiantona kansainväliseen Hilton -ketjuun kuuluvalle Hilton Helsinki Airportille. Hilton Helsinki Airport tarjoaa täyden palvelun hotellina asiakkailleen majoitus-, kokous- ja ravintolapalveluita. Opinnäytetyö oli toiminnallinen. Sen tavoitteena oli tuottaa toteuttamiskelpoinen hotellipaketti. Työn tarkoituksena oli luoda lisäarvoa toimeksiantajan hotellipakettitarjontaan ja edistää hotellin asiakastyytyväisyyt...

  5. Geothermal Energy at Oslo Airport Gardermoen

    OpenAIRE

    Huuse, Karine Valle; Moxnes, Vilde

    2012-01-01

    Rock Energy is a Norwegian company with a patented solution for drilling deep geothermal wells, for exploitation of deep geothermal energy from Hot Dry Rocks. The concept involves a drilled sub-surface heat exchanger, referred to as cross wells. The concept is well suited for production of heat for direct heat applications. In this thesis an analysis of the existing district heating plant at Oslo Airport Gardermoen has been conducted, together with examining possibilities of implementing geot...

  6. Pulkovo Airport terminal hall steel structure

    OpenAIRE

    Georgii Sergeevich Diagilev

    2015-01-01

    The first stage of Pulkovo International Airport new terminal hall was put into operation in 4th December 2013. The second stage after complete transfer of the operations from the old Pulkovo-1 and Pulkovo-2 terminals will begin in early 2015. The striking new roof of the terminal building has been designed to accommodate the varied extremes of the Russian climate. It has been conceived in modular bays, expressive structural 'trees' being positioned such that it can support the we...

  7. An Airport Pavement Traffic Simulation Based on CPN

    OpenAIRE

    Heng Hong-jun; Yang Jue

    2014-01-01

    According to the characteristics of airport pavement traffic, we discuss a method of building an airport pavement traffic model which is based on CPN theory and simulate a practical situation as well. The method overcomes the shortage of modelling with normal Petri Net theory, solves the difficult problems of airport pavement traffic such as complex traffic nets, frequent road changing, etc., refines the process of the model, and will be good for the model’s analysis and simulation.

  8. A network congestion control approach to airport departure management

    OpenAIRE

    Khadilkar, Harshad Dilip; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to managing the aircraft taxi-out process at airports, by posing the problem in a network congestion control framework. We develop a network model for a generic airport and then validate it using surface surveillance data from Boston Logan International Airport. A set of stochastic processes that constitute the link travel times are proposed, followed by a discussion of the theoretical maximum network throughput. Finally, we propose a control algorithm tha...

  9. Metrics to Characterize Airport Operational Performance Using Surface Surveillance Data

    OpenAIRE

    Khadilkar, Harshad Dilip; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2013-01-01

    Detailed surface surveillance datasets from sources such as the Airport Surface Detection Equipment, Model-X (ASDE-X) have the potential to be used for the analysis of airport operations, in addition to their primary purpose of enhancing safety. This paper describes how surface surveillance data can be used to measure airport performance characteristics in three different ways: (1) Characterization of surface flows, including identification of congestion hotspots, queue dynamics and departure...

  10. Effects of Corruption on Efficiency of the European Airports

    OpenAIRE

    Laingo M. Randrianarisoa; Denis Bolduc; Yap Yin Choo; Oum, Tae H.; Jia Yan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of corruption on airport productive efficiency is analyzed using an unbalanced panel data of major European airports from 2003 to 2009. We first compute the residual (or net) variable factor productivity using the multilateral index number method and then apply robust cluster random effects model in order to evaluate the importance of corruption. We find strong evidence that corruption has negative impacts on airport operating efficiency; and the effects depend on the ownership for...

  11. Medical treatment at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport after hurricane Katrina: the experience of disaster medical assistance teams WA-1 and OR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Christopher; Jui, Jonathan; Miller, Helen C; Jobe, Kathleen A

    2007-07-01

    In the week following Hurricane Katrina, over 3000 patients were evacuated by air from a triage and medical treatment station at the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport. This represents the largest air evacuation in history. Over 24,000 additional evacuees were transported from the airport to shelters. Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs) from several US states were deployed to the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport to provide medical care to those evacuated from New Orleans. Despite warning from the US National Weather Service of catastrophic damage to New Orleans, adequate medical staffing was not attained at the airport triage station until 6 days after the hurricane struck. Organizational lapses, including inadequate medical and operational planning, understaffing of medical personnel, and failure to utilize Incident Command System, diminished the effectiveness of the Hurricane Katrina New Orleans Medical Operation. PMID:17574144

  12. Low Cost Carriers and Airports Performance: Empirical Evidence from a Panel of UK Airports

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Bottasso; Maurizio Conti; Piga, Claudio A.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the proliferation of Low Cost Carriers and the related huge increase in traffic has been the most visible effect of the deregulation of the airline market in Europe. Little attention has been paid to how airports were affected by the changes in the new institutional environment. In this study we model the total factor productivity (TFP) for a panel of the UK largest airports over the 2002-2005 period and investigate whether the presence of LCCs has some impact on airpo...

  13. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  14. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume.... Ardmore, Oklahoma Ardmore Industrial Airpark. Bakersfield, California Meadows Field Airport....

  15. Airport Surface Management Tools for NAS Users Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Decision support tools that make use of surface surveillance technologies data can potentially make it possible to increase airport throughput, better accommodate...

  16. The Opportunities and Threats of Turning Airports into Hubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Andreas; Koch, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the opportunities and threats which arise when turning origin/destination airports into hubs. The analysis focuses on market development trends, competitive structures, especially in the light of airline network strategies and the growing rivalry between airports, and finally the potential financial impacts for the airport, including both investment efforts and the financial results from hub operations. We argue that in most cases a decision against converting a traditional origin/destination airport into a major transfer point is preferable to the transformation into a hub.

  17. Profile of the horizontal wind variance near the ground in near neutral flow. K-theory and the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahaya, S.; Frangi, J.P. [Paris 7 Univ., 75 (France). Equipe Geomateriaux et Environnement

    2009-07-01

    This paper deals with the characteristics of the atmospheric turbulent flow in the vicinity of the ground, and particularly with the profile of the horizontal wind variance. The study is based on experimental measurements performed with fast cup anemometers located near the ground at 5 different levels (from 0.25 to 4 m) and sampled at 1 Hz. The experiment was carried over two agricultural plots with various tillage treatments in a fallow semiarid area (Central Aragon, Spain). The results of this study reveal that near the ground surface and under moderate wind, the horizontal wind variance logarithmically increases with height, in direct relationship with the friction velocity and the roughness length scale. A theoretical development has allowed us to link this behaviour to the modeling of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) transport through the eddy diffusivity. Thus, the study proposes a formulation of the similarity universal function of the horizontal wind variance. Besides, the formulation offers a new method for the determination of the friction velocity and the roughness length scale and can be used for the evaluation of the TKE transport rate. (orig.)

  18. Methodology for evaluating lateral boundary conditions in the regional chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) using combined satellite and ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.; Devasthale, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hemispheric transport of air pollutants can have a significant impact on regional air quality, as well as on the effect of air pollutants on regional climate. An accurate representation of hemispheric transport in regional chemical transport models (CTMs) depends on the specification of the lateral boundary conditions (LBCs). This study focuses on the methodology for evaluating LBCs of two moderately long-lived trace gases, carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3), for the European model domain and over a 7-year period, 2006-2012. The method is based on combining the use of satellite observations at the lateral boundary with the use of both satellite and in situ ground observations within the model domain. The LBCs are generated by the global European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Meteorological Synthesizing Centre - West (EMEP MSC-W) model; they are evaluated at the lateral boundaries by comparison with satellite observations of the Terra-MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) sensor (CO) and the Aura-OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) sensor (O3). The LBCs from the global model lie well within the satellite uncertainties for both CO and O3. The biases increase below 700 hPa for both species. However, the satellite retrievals below this height are strongly influenced by the a priori data; hence, they are less reliable than at, e.g. 500 hPa. CO is, on average, underestimated by the global model, while O3 tends to be overestimated during winter, and underestimated during summer. A regional CTM is run with (a) the validated monthly climatological LBCs from the global model; (b) dynamical LBCs from the global model; and (c) constant LBCs based on in situ ground observations near the domain boundary. The results are validated against independent satellite retrievals from the Aqua-AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) sensor at 500 hPa, and against in situ ground observations from the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) network. It is found that (i) the use of

  19. 75 FR 61173 - Jackson Hole Airport Agreement Extension, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Grand Teton...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... National Park Service Jackson Hole Airport Agreement Extension, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Grand... of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Jackson Hole Airport Agreement... Impact Statement for the Jackson Hole Airport Agreement Extension, Grand Teton National Park,...

  20. 76 FR 72996 - Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223 Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223 Airport Surface Wireless...: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 223 Airport Surface Wireless Communications Eleventh Meeting. SUMMARY..., Airport Surface Wireless Communications Eleventh Meeting DATES: The meeting will be held December...

  1. 77 FR 38705 - Draft Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Draft Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings... comment on the Draft ``Specification for Airport Light Bases, Transformer Housings, Junction Boxes, and... recommendations for airport light bases, transformer housings, junction boxes and accessories. The FAA has...

  2. The need for the design and implementation of TQM system for the airport services TAV Airports Holding, Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitreva, Elizabeta; Taskov, Nako; Lazarovski, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we will make a full diagnosis of some business processes in the company for Airport services TAV Airports Holding, Macedonia. Based on the analysis we have made on the existing quality system an appropriate methodology is designed for each feature of the TQM (Total Quality Management) system in order to find the optimal solution for smooth operation of the airport traffic, in order to meet the wishes and needs of the customer, while the company makes a profit.

  3. The Development of Jomo Kenyatta International Airport as a Regional Aviation Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irandu, Evaristus M.; Rhoades, Dawna L.

    2006-01-01

    Air transportation plays an important role in the social and economic development of the global system and the countries that seek to participate in it. As Africa seeks to take its place in the global economy, it is increasingly looking to aviation as the primary means of connecting its people and goods with the world. It has been suggested that Africa as a continent needs to move toward a system of hubs to optimize its scarce resources. Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, is one of the airports in the eastern region of Africa that is seeking to fill this role. This paper discusses the prospects for success and the challenges that it will need to overcome, including projections through 2020 for the growth in passenger and cargo traffic.

  4. MANAGEMENT AND CHALLENGES OF BRAZILIAN AIRPORT INFRASTRUCTURE: OPERATIONAL DIFFICULTIES FOR LARGE EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz Knupp Rodrigues

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to present, discuss and reflect on the solutions and consequences for the achievement of major events in Brazil in relation to the main operational difficulties in its current airport infrastructure. Operational difficulties refers to various factors that hinder or prevent the development of airport activities, such as aircraft delays, flight cancellations and customer discomfort. Therefore, this article seeks to think over the structure of the facilities, the lack of investment, the deadlines for solutions and other problems that need definite solution so that they will not occur again. In order to reach our objectives, we use data from literature and documentary analysis of statistical data. We present the main difficulties of operational modal Brazilian air transportation, the options for solution and the importance of actions for social, technical and financial development in Brazil.

  5. Transport infrastructure; 1 : 1 000 000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport infrastructure is represented by the road and railway networks, airports, ports, road and railway border crossings. The individual roads and railways are discerned according to their importance. (author

  6. Structural Evaluation for Maputo Airport Pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose F.R.Diogo; LU Yang; ZHANG Hua

    2007-01-01

    Maputo Airport was initially constructed to serve mixed traffic of light and medium aircrafts. With its opening to heavier aircrafts such as B727, DC10, Airbus 340, etc. , structural improvements have become necessary. For this purpose, structural evaluation were described and performed using falling weight deflectometer. Results show that while subgrade response to loads appears more consistent with depth, surface layer of the pavement is significantly influenced by the layer thickness as well as mechanical properties of pavement materials. Load magnitude also affects pavement performance. But loading conditions show an equivalent or even greater influence on pavement performance.

  7. Radiation situation on the Gomel' airport territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of measuring gamma radiation fields on the Gomel' airport territory made in Jule-August 1991 are discused. It is shown that radiation dose rate varies in the limits from 15 up to 320 muR/h. The given data show that the maximum dose rate (345 muR/h) is registered in places of AN-2 and MI-2 parking. The maximum dose rate near the return taxi track and passenger ramp does not exceed 300 muR/h. The data of measuring the gamma radiation dose rate near the industrial buildings are given, as well. 7 refs.; 1 tab

  8. Summary of ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport computer codes used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents information on computer codes for numerical and analytical models that have been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to model ground water and surface water flow and contaminant transport. Organizations conducting modeling at the INEL include: EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., US Geological Survey, and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company. Information concerning computer codes included in this report are: agency responsible for the modeling effort, name of the computer code, proprietor of the code (copyright holder or original author), validation and verification studies, applications of the model at INEL, the prime user of the model, computer code description, computing environment requirements, and documentation and references for the computer code

  9. Development of Nested, Heterogeneous Ground-Water Flow Models for Study of Transport and Fate of Agricultural Chemicals, Merced County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, S. P.; Green, C. T.; Zamora, C.

    2006-05-01

    Multi-scale models of ground-water flow were developed as part of a study of the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the US Geological Survey. Agricultural chemicals of interest included forms of nitrogen and selected pesticides A three- dimensional local-scale model (17 square km) surrounds a well-instrumented, 1-km transect near the Merced River within a principally agricultural land-use setting. This model is nested within a regional-scale model (2,700 square km) of northeastern San Joaquin Valley, California, which provides hydrologically reasonable boundary conditions for the local model. Boundary fluxes were passed from the regional to local model using a hydraulic-conductivity-weighted distribution. The heterogeneity of aquifer materials was incorporated explicitly into the regional and local models. Three-dimensional kriging was used to interpolate sediment texture data from about 3,500 drillers' logs in the regional model area. The resulting distribution of sediment texture was used to estimate hydraulic parameters for each cell in the 16-layer regional model. A subset of these data was used to generate multiple transition-probability-based realizations of hydrofacies distributions for the 110-layer local model. Explicit depiction of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity and porosity in the local model incorporates macro-scale hydrodynamic dispersion into the flow model, allowing more direct comparison of particle-tracking results to tracer-derived estimates of ground-water age. Water levels measured in multi-depth wells along the 1-km transect were used to calibrate the local model (median error 0.12 m). Two-dimensional heat-flow models calibrated using continuous multi-depth temperature data from below the bed of the Merced River suggest an annual range of ground-water inflow of about 0-2.4 cm/d for water year 2005. This estimate compares reasonably well to the 4 cm/d simulated in the

  10. Fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil and ground water at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky, 2002-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shannon D.; Ladd, David E.; Farmer, James

    2006-01-01

    In 2002 and 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), by agreement with the National Park Service (NPS), investigated the effects of oil and gas production operations on ground-water quality at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area (BISO) with particular emphasis on the fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils and ground water. During a reconnaissance of ground-water-quality conditions, samples were collected from 24 different locations (17 springs, 5 water-supply wells, 1 small stream, and 1 spring-fed pond) in and near BISO. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) compounds were not detected in any of the water samples, indicating that no widespread contamination of ground-water resources by dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons probably exists at BISO. Additional water-quality samples were collected from three springs and two wells for more detailed analyses to obtain additional information on ambient water-quality conditions at BISO. Soil gas, soil, water, and crude oil samples were collected at three study sites in or near BISO where crude oil had been spilled or released (before 1993). Diesel range organics (DRO) were detected in soil samples from all three of the sites at concentrations greater than 2,000 milligrams per kilogram. Low concentrations (less than 10 micrograms per kilogram) of BTEX compounds were detected in lab-analyzed soil samples from two of the sites. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria counts in soil samples from the most contaminated areas of the sites were not greater than counts for soil samples from uncontaminated (background) sites. The elevated DRO concentrations, the presence of BTEX compounds, and the low number of -hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in contaminated soils indicate that biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils at these sites is incomplete. Water samples collected from the three study sites were analyzed for BTEX and DRO. Ground-water samples were collected from three small springs at the

  11. Establishing aeolian particulate 'fingerprints' in an airport environment using magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sue; Hoon, Stephen R.; Richardson, Nigel; Bennett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of particulate matter (PM) from aviation activity on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment, in particular, may be derived from a wide range of potential sources including aircraft; vehicles; ground support equipment and buildings. In order to investigate and remediate potential problem sources, it is important to be able to identify characteristic particulate 'fingerprints' which would allow source attribution, particularly respirable particulates. To date the identification of such 'fingerprints' has remained elusive but remains a key research priority for the aviation industry (Webb et al, 2008). In previous PM studies, environmental magnetism has been used as a successful technique for discriminating between different emission types and particulate sources in both urban and industrial environments (e.g. Hunt et al 1984; Lecoanet et al 2003, Jones et al 2015). Environmental magnetism is a non-destructive and relatively rapid technique involving the use of non-directional, rock magnetic measurements to characterise the mineral magnetic properties of natural and anthropogenic materials. In other studies scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has also been used as an effective characterisation technique for the investigation of grain size and morphology of PM derived from vehicle emissions (e.g. Bucko et al 2010) and fossil fuel combustion sources (Kim et al 2009). In this study, environmental magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX have been used to characterise dusts from specific aircraft sources including engines, brakes and tyres. Furthermore, these methods have also been applied to runway (both hard and grass covered surfaces), taxiway and apron dusts collected during extensive environmental sampling at Manchester International Airport, UK in order to

  12. A methodology for the valuation and selection of adaptable technology portfolios and its application to small and medium airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinon, Olivia J.

    The increase in the types of airspace users (large aircraft, small and regional jets, very light jets, unmanned aerial vehicles, etc.), as well as the very limited number of future new airport development projects are some of the factors that will characterize the next decades in air transportation. These factors, associated with a persistent growth in air traffic will worsen the current gridlock situation experienced at some major airports. As airports are becoming the major capacity bottleneck to continued growth in air traffic, it is therefore primordial to make the most efficient use of the current, and very often, underutilized airport infrastructure. This research thus proposes to address the increase in air traffic demand and resulting capacity issues by considering the implementation of operational concepts and technologies at underutilized airports. However, there are many challenges associated with sustaining the development of this type of airports. First, the need to synchronize evolving technologies with airports’ needs and investment capabilities is paramount. Additionally, it was observed that the evolution of secondary airports, and their needs, is tightly linked to the environment in which they operate. In particular, sensitivity of airports to changes in the dynamics of their environment is important, therefore requiring that the factors that drive the need for technology acquisition be identified and characterized. Finally, the difficulty to evaluate risk and make financially viable decisions, particularly when investing in new technologies, cannot be ignored. This research provides a methodology that addresses these challenges and ensures the sustainability of airport capacity-enhancement investments in a continuously changing environment. In particular, it is articulated around the need to provide decision makers with the capability to valuate and select adaptable technology portfolios to ensure airport financial viability. Hence, the four

  13. Optimizing integrated airport surface and terminal airspace operations under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Christabelle S.

    In airports and surrounding terminal airspaces, the integration of surface, arrival and departure scheduling and routing have the potential to improve the operations efficiency. Moreover, because both the airport surface and the terminal airspace are often altered by random perturbations, the consideration of uncertainty in flight schedules is crucial to improve the design of robust flight schedules. Previous research mainly focused on independently solving arrival scheduling problems, departure scheduling problems and surface management scheduling problems and most of the developed models are deterministic. This dissertation presents an alternate method to model the integrated operations by using a machine job-shop scheduling formulation. A multistage stochastic programming approach is chosen to formulate the problem in the presence of uncertainty and candidate solutions are obtained by solving sample average approximation problems with finite sample size. The developed mixed-integer-linear-programming algorithm-based scheduler is capable of computing optimal aircraft schedules and routings that reflect the integration of air and ground operations. The assembled methodology is applied to a Los Angeles case study. To show the benefits of integrated operations over First-Come-First-Served, a preliminary proof-of-concept is conducted for a set of fourteen aircraft evolving under deterministic conditions in a model of the Los Angeles International Airport surface and surrounding terminal areas. Using historical data, a representative 30-minute traffic schedule and aircraft mix scenario is constructed. The results of the Los Angeles application show that the integration of air and ground operations and the use of a time-based separation strategy enable both significant surface and air time savings. The solution computed by the optimization provides a more efficient routing and scheduling than the First-Come-First-Served solution. Additionally, a data driven analysis is

  14. 78 FR 65417 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ..., in person at this same location. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA invites public comment on the... property will result in the land at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR) being changed from aeronautical to non-aeronautical use and release the lands from the conditions of the Airport Improvement...

  15. Sensitivity analysis of airport noise using computer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Maldonado Bentes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the method to analyze the sensitivity of airport noise using computer simulation with the aid of Integrated Noise Model 7.0. The technique serves to support the selection of alternatives to better control aircraft noise, since it helps identify which areas of the noise curves experienced greater variation from changes in aircraft movements at a particular airport.

  16. 19 CFR 122.12 - Operation of international airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.12 Operation of international... Administration in 14 CFR part 91. (2) Customs and Border Protection. CBP, based on security or other risk... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operation of international airports....

  17. Verification of the capacity of Malpensa Airport: Final report

    OpenAIRE

    Air Transport Group

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to assess the capacity of Malpensa airport taking into account the impact of environmental measures introduced by the Italian Government Environmental Decree of 13th December 1999. Second, to assess the impact of projected traffic growth in the Milan airport system.

  18. Art at the Airport: An Exploration of New Art Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Many airports have transformed empty waiting spaces into mini malls, children's play areas, and displays of beautiful art, making a long wait a bit more pleasant. For the modern airport, showcasing art has become an important component, with perks including a built-in global audience, as well as the vast spaces of modern architecture. For the art…

  19. Transportation Network Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Scott, John

    2004-01-01

    A discomforting reality has materialized on the transportation scene: our existing air and ground infrastructures will not scale to meet our nation's 21st century demands and expectations for mobility, commerce, safety, and security. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity in the 21st century. Clearly, new thinking is required for transportation that can scale to meet to the realities of a networked, knowledge-based economy in which the value of time is a new coin of the realm. This paper proposes a framework, or topology, for thinking about the problem of scalability of the system of networks that comprise the aviation system. This framework highlights the role of integrated communication-navigation-surveillance systems in enabling scalability of future air transportation networks. Scalability, in this vein, is a goal of the recently formed Joint Planning and Development Office for the Next Generation Air Transportation System. New foundations for 21st thinking about air transportation are underpinned by several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems. Complexity science and modern network theory give rise to one of the technological developments of importance. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of scalability, efficiency, robustness, resilience, and other metrics. The paper offers an air transportation system topology as framework for transportation system innovation. Successful outcomes of innovation in air transportation could lay the foundations for new paradigms for aircraft and their operating capabilities, air transportation system architectures, and airspace architectures and procedural concepts. The topology proposed considers air transportation as a system of networks, within which

  20. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of fungi in the genus Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Binbin; Ross, Shane D.; Prussin, Aaron J.; Schmale, David G.

    2014-09-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. We hypothesized that (1) atmospheric concentrations of Fusarium spores in an agricultural ecosystem vary with height and season and (2) transport distances from potential inoculum source(s) vary with season. To test these hypotheses, spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season, and produced mean transport distances of 1.4 km for the spring, 1.7 km for the summer, 1.2 km for the fall, and 4.1 km for the winter. Environmental signatures that predict atmospheric loads of Fusarium could inform disease spread, air pollution, and climate change.

  1. Characterizing a persistent Asian dust transport event: Optical properties and impact on air quality through the ground-based and satellite measurements over Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Tijian; Xie, Chenbo; Zhao, Kun; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu

    2015-08-01

    The optical properties, time-height distribution and impact on the local air quality from a heavy Asian dust transport episode are investigated with a synergistic ground-based, satellite sensors and transport model on 1 May, 2011 at Nanjing (32.05° N, 118.78° E, and 94 m ASL) in southeast China. Two dust layers located in the planetary-boundary-layer (PBL, deserts and the higher one from the Taklimakan deserts. The dust aerosol layer shows the depolarization ratios at 0.1-0.2 and strong extinction coefficients of 1.0 km-1 at 532-nm, while the extinction-to-backscatter ratios (e.g. lidar ratios) of dust are 47.3-55 sr below 2.5 km. During this dust intrusion period, the aerosol optical depths (AOD) dramatically increase from 0.7 to 1.6 at 500-nm whereas the Angstrom exponents decrease from 1.2 to 0.2. Meanwhile, surface PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations show a significant and coincident increase with the peak value reaching 767 μg/m3 and 222 μg/m3, respectively, indicating the mixture of dust with the anthropogenic aerosols. Regional influences of the transported dust in east China are further illustrated by the AERONET-sunphotometer at Taihu and Xianghe sites (downwind and upwind from Nanjing), satellites MODIS, CALIPSO and model products. Furthermore, the model product of dust profile and surface concentration are evaluated with the ground-based and CALISPO observation. The results indicate the model is capable of simulating the right timing of dust transport event and most loading below 3-km altitude; normalization of model dust with the PM10 near the Gobi deserts improves modeling surface dust concentration in Nanjing.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL CAPACITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF AIRPORTS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katheryna Kazhan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Forecasting of development of the major airports of Ukraine indicates that further increasingof air traffic and approaching of residential areas close to airports will cause constraints of airportoperational capacity according to ensuring environmental requirements. At present, aircraft noise is themost significant factor among other factors of airport environmental impact. For ensuring sustainabledevelopment of civil airports the model of airport environmental capacity is proposed. The model in longtermconsideration allows determination of optimal (according to reduction of noise levels fleet, choosingthe most profitable aircraft operational regimes in the frames of ICAO Balanced Approach to aircraft noisecontrol. The model is based on entropy optimization method. Using proposed approach needs taking intoaccount additional constraints: operational, environmental (emissions of aircraft engines. Meteorologicaland flight characteristics of aircraft type also should be taken into account.Keywords: aircraft noise, acoustical capacity, environmental capacity, operational restrictions.

  3. Future of Colombo Airport (CMB) as an Airline Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalath, J. T. D.; Bandara, J. M. S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Aviation throughout the world has seen profound changes within the last two decades. Today more and more airports are looking for hub operations. However, as the success of hub operation would depend on a number of parameters such as geographic location, route network, facilities available, passengers' acceptance etc., not all airports would be able to operate as successful hubs. This paper investigates the possibility for (he Bandaranayake international airport, Colombo, Sri Lanka (CMB) to emerge as a hub airport in the South Asian region. It is found that CMB is situated in a geographically advantageous position in the region with respect to the airline route network. Comparison of travel distances between CMB and prominent O-D pairs and evaluation of airline schedules at relevant established hub airports indicates that CMB could operate as a directional hub serving the South Asian market if the number of destinations with daily flights could be increased.

  4. Hydrogeologic Settings and Ground-Water Flow Simulations for Regional Studies of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to Public-Supply Wells - Studies Begun in 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Suzanne S., (Edited By)

    2007-01-01

    This study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) is being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and was designed to increase understanding of the most important factors to consider in ground-water vulnerability assessments. The seven TANC studies that began in 2001 used retrospective data and ground-water flow models to evaluate hydrogeologic variables that affect aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability at a regional scale. Ground-water flow characteristics, regional water budgets, pumping-well information, and water-quality data were compiled from existing data and used to develop conceptual models of ground-water conditions for each study area. Steady-state regional ground-water flow models were used to represent the conceptual models, and advective particle-tracking simulations were used to compute areas contributing recharge and traveltimes from recharge to selected public-supply wells. Retrospective data and modeling results were tabulated into a relational database for future analysis. Seven study areas were selected to evaluate a range of hydrogeologic settings and management practices across the Nation: the Salt Lake Valley, Utah; the Eagle Valley and Spanish Springs Valley, Nevada; the San Joaquin Valley, California; the Northern Tampa Bay region, Florida; the Pomperaug River Basin, Connecticut; the Great Miami River Basin, Ohio; and the Eastern High Plains, Nebraska. This Professional Paper Chapter presents the hydrogeologic settings and documents the ground-water flow models for each of the NAWQA TANC regional study areas that began work in 2001. Methods used to compile retrospective data, determine contributing areas of public-supply wells, and characterize oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions also are presented. This Professional Paper Chapter provides the foundation for future susceptibility and vulnerability analyses in the TANC

  5. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  6. 76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ...\\ 14 CFR 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653....\\1\\ \\1\\ 75 FR 9017 (Feb. 26, 2010). ATA also stated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Airport (DCA) and Operating Authorizations (slots) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK),...

  7. Sensitivity Study of Cross-Atlantic Dust Transport to Dust Emissions, Chemical Aging and Removal Processes and Comparison with Ground and Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mohamed; Metzger, Swen; Klingmüller, Klaus; Steil, Benedikt; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    -range transport. The comparison of the EMAC results with ground-based observations (AERONET, CASTNET, EMEP), as well as various satellite data (MODIS, MISR and CALIPSO) shows that uncertainties associated with the calculation of the dust transport into the Caribbean reduces by considering the dust aging processes.

  8. The competitive landscape of air transport in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Lieshout; P. Malighetti; R. Redondi; G. Burghouwt

    2016-01-01

    Competition between airlines and airports increased significantly since the deregulation of the intra-European air transport market in 1997. The passenger has a wider choice in terms of routings and departure airports than twenty-five years ago and pays a lower price. In this paper we investigate in

  9. Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport is one of the major causes of environmental damage in Austria. Energy consumption, pollutants emissions, noise emissions, use of surfaces, sealing of surfaces, dissection of ecosystems and impact on landscape are the most significant environmental impacts caused by it. An overview of the transport development of passengers and freight in Austria is presented. Especially the energy consumption growth, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions by type of transport, and the emissions development (HC, particle and carbon monoxide) of goods and passengers transport are analyzed covering the years 1980 - 1999. The health cost resulting from transport-related air pollution in Austria is given and measures to be taken for an effective control of the transport sector are mentioned. Figs. 8, Table 1. (nevyjel)

  10. Emergency Preparedness for Catastrophic Events at Small and Medium Sized Airports: Lacking or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of security methods and processes in general has had a decisive impact on the aviation industry. However, efforts to effectively coordinate varied aspects of security protocols between agencies and general aviation components have not been adequately addressed. Whether or not overall security issues, especially with regard to planning for catastrophic terrorist events, have been neglected at the nation's smaller airports is the main topic of this paper. For perspective, the term general aviation is generally accepted to include all flying except for military and scheduled airline operations. Genera aviation makes up more than 1 percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product and supports almost 1.3 mission high-skilled jobs in professional services and manufacturing and hence is an important component of the aviation industry (AOPA, n.d.). In both conceptual and practical terms, this paper argues for the proactive management of security planning and repeated security awareness training from both an individual and an organizational perspective within the general aviation venue. The results of a research project incorporating survey data from general aviation and small commercial airport managers as well as Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employees are reported. Survey findings suggest that miscommunication does take place on different organizational levels and that between TSA employees and airport management interaction can be contentious and cooperation diminished. The importance of organizational training for decreasing conflict and increasing security and preparedness is discussed as a primary implication.

  11. Airports' noise nuisance and emissions: estimation and validation through INM and EDSM simulation at Italian airports

    OpenAIRE

    Grampella, M; Martini, G; Tassan Got, F; Zambon, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development of two indexes for the evaluation of airports’ environmental externalities such as emissions (LAP) and noise nuisance (ANE) produced by the aircrafts. We verify their reliability through the comparison of the results with the outputs of models calculations at three Italian airports. The Integrated Noise Model (INM) has been used for the calculation of noise levels, while the Emissions and Dispersion Modeling System (EDMS) has been adopted for air pollutants...

  12. Determinants of Passengers’ Choice: A Case Study of Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport (Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Egba Ubogu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Airports vary in their ability to attract traffic especially when such airports have competitors for air traffic. This study examines choice factors that air travelers consider most as determinants of their choice for an airport. The study relied on primary data obtained through the administration of questionnaire survey. The survey was conducted in Mallam Aminu Kano International Airport, Kano where air passengers were sampled purposively as they await to board their international flights at the international airport. In all, 240 respondents were interviewed. The technique of data analysis employed include correlation matrix and factor analysis. The results of the correlation matrix obtained indicate that the choice factors considered are positively correlated. The factor loadings indicate that of all the variables considered in the study, the location of the airport in the region, access time to airport, frequency of flight at the airport are the three most significant factors that air passengers consider most in their choice of Kano airport. Similarly, the relationship between the choice variables that showed high positive correlations include location of the airport in the region and access time to the airport (r = 0.97, previous usage of the airport and minimum waiting time (r = 0.98 as well as available parking space at the airport and low fare charges (r = 0.92. The implications of this result are paramount for airport planning and management especially for airports attracting traffic in multi-airport regions.

  13. 78 FR 15804 - Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance: Rolla National Airport (VIH), Rolla, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance: Rolla National Airport (VIH... airport property at the Rolla National Airport (VIH) from aeronautical use to non-aeronautical for revenue... Airport (VIH) is proposing the release of one parcel, of 10 acres, more or less from aeronautical to...

  14. 75 FR 64393 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Chicago Executive Airport, Prospect Heights and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... proposed action. Approval does not constitute a commitment by the FAA to financially assist in the... (NCP) submitted by the Chicago Executive Airport Board of Directors for Chicago Executive Airport under... exposure maps submitted by Chicago Executive Airport Board of Directors for Chicago Executive Airport...

  15. 78 FR 19356 - Notice of Schedule Information Submission Deadline for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... International Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18620 (Apr. 4, 2011); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18618 (Apr. 4...'s John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), and Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)...

  16. 77 FR 19410 - Notice of Schedule Information Submission Deadline for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18620 (Apr. 4, 2011); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18618 (Apr. 4, 2011). The FAA...'s John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), and Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)...

  17. The new devices of gas-turbine engines of ground transport on the basis cascade pressure exchanger of Krajniuk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander KRAJNIUK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Main trends of perfection of gas-turbine engines (GTE of transport plants by application of principles of the cascade pressure exchange (CPE for air compression in the working cycle of gas-turbine plant have been analyzed. The principle of action and performances of work of heat compressor CPE realizing compression of working body on the whole at the expense straight convert inputting heat in disposing work of torrent with insignificant distraction mechanics work from shaft selection of power has been described. The results of computational investigation of four variants of the GTE working process organization on the basis of the two-staged compression assembly with intermediate cooling and heating of air-gas medium have been adduced. Application of units CPE in the capacity of compressing stage GTE opens the prospect of adaptations GTE performance by conditions of work in the capacity of forcing units of overland transport.

  18. MODEL FOR THE EVALUATION OF THE AIRPORT SECURITY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek SKORUPSKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An airport is a complex human-factors engineering system; it is composed of many elements interconnected with numerous internal relations with a strongly pronounced role of the human factor. One of specific tasks carried out by the airport managing entity (AME is to configure the airport protection system (APS so that to attain the expected level of confidence in the airport safety. The task consists in selection of infrastructure, technical equipment, allocation of personnel and financial means that are necessary to perform all functions of the APS. The paper discusses the elements that make up the APS that are both decision variables for the airport operator during the execution of the APS configuration tasks. Fuzzy APS analysis is proposed based on the model of dependency and impact of the individual components of the system at the level of airport security. This assessment will be expressed by the value of linguistic variable. The method to obtain this value would include an assessment of the effectiveness of the baggage inspection system, the passenger inspection system, the level of external protection and security culture. To illustrate the concept of the method, local models to assess the level of protection against unauthorized activities at the airport and to assess the effectiveness of the baggage inspection system are presented. The paper describes a method for obtaining parameters of trapezoidal membership functions which have been adopted for the linguistic variables “Napłotowy” and “Wykrywalność materiałów”. The proposed method of assessing the airport security system involves the construction of a hierarchical fuzzy inference system in which the outputs of the lower-level local models are inputs of higher-order local models. Such a system is being established. Preliminary analyzes show that the proposed approach can be effective as part of a system for supporting the airport operator in configuring APS.

  19. Hydrogeophysical characterization of transport processes in fractured rock by combining push-pull and single-hole ground penetrating radar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakas, Alexis; Linde, Niklas; Baron, Ludovic; Bochet, Olivier; Bour, Olivier; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-02-01

    The in situ characterization of transport processes in fractured media is particularly challenging due to the considerable spatial uncertainty on tracer pathways and dominant controlling processes, such as dispersion, channeling, trapping, matrix diffusion, ambient and density driven flows. We attempted to reduce this uncertainty by coupling push-pull tracer experiments with single-hole ground penetrating radar (GPR) time-lapse imaging. The experiments involved different injection fractures, chaser volumes and resting times, and were performed at the fractured rock research site of Ploemeur in France (H+ network, hplus.ore.fr/en). For the GPR acquisitions, we used both fixed and moving antenna setups in a borehole that was isolated with a flexible liner. During the fixed-antenna experiment, time-varying GPR reflections allowed us to track the spatial and temporal dynamics of the tracer during the push-pull experiment. During the moving antenna experiments, we clearly imaged the dominant fractures in which tracer transport took place, fractures in which the tracer was trapped for longer time periods, and the spatial extent of the tracer distribution (up to 8 m) at different times. This demonstrated the existence of strongly channelized flow in the first few meters and radial flow at greater distances. By varying the resting time of a given experiment, we identified regions affected by density-driven and ambient flow. These experiments open up new perspectives for coupled hydrogeophysical inversion aimed at understanding transport phenomena in fractured rock formations.

  20. Technology and politics: The regional airport experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, J. D.; Brown, J.; Gerhardt, J. M.; Dominus, M. I.

    1976-01-01

    The findings of a comparative study of the following six regional airports were presented: Dallas/Fort Worth, Kansas City, Washington, D.C., Montreal, Tampa, and St. Louis. Each case was approached as a unique historical entity, in order to investigate common elements such as: the use of predictive models in planning, the role of symbolism to heighten dramatic effects, the roles of community and professional elites, and design flexibility. Some of the factors considered were: site selection, consolidation of airline service, accessibility, land availability and cost, safety, nuisance, and pollution constraints, economic growth, expectation of regional growth, the demand forecasting conundrum, and design decisions. The hypotheses developed include the following: the effect of political, social, and economic conflicts, the stress on large capacity and dramatic, high-technology design, projections of rapid growth to explain the need for large capital outlays.

  1. Pulkovo Airport terminal hall steel structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii Sergeevich Diagilev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The first stage of Pulkovo International Airport new terminal hall was put into operation in 4th December 2013. The second stage after complete transfer of the operations from the old Pulkovo-1 and Pulkovo-2 terminals will begin in early 2015. The striking new roof of the terminal building has been designed to accommodate the varied extremes of the Russian climate. It has been conceived in modular bays, expressive structural 'trees' being positioned such that it can support the weight of standing snow experienced in the winter months. Steel structures constitute a roof of the terminal hall, while supporting structures are made from reinforced concrete. Report describes the architecture, structure geometry, static scheme and main characteristics. Two independent calculations were compared and bearing capacity of the roof was checked.

  2. Airports offer unrealized potential for alternative energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Travis L; Belant, Jerrold L; Blackwell, Bradley F; Martin, James A; Schmidt, Jason A; Wes Burger, L; Patterson, James W

    2012-03-01

    Scaling up for alternative energy such as solar, wind, and biofuel raises a number of environmental issues, notably changes in land use and adverse effects on wildlife. Airports offer one of the few land uses where reductions in wildlife abundance and habitat quality are necessary and socially acceptable, due to risk of wildlife collisions with aircraft. There are several uncertainties and limitations to establishing alternative energy production at airports, such as ensuring these facilities do not create wildlife attractants or other hazards. However, with careful planning, locating alternative energy projects at airports could help mitigate many of the challenges currently facing policy makers, developers, and conservationists. PMID:22245856

  3. Take control of your 802.11n airport network

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Make your 802.11n-based AirPort network fast, reliable, and secure! Find real-world advice from Wi-Fi wizard Glenn Fleishman on setting up the 802.11n models of Apple's AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, and Time Capsule, with full information about the simultaneous dual-band models introduced in early 2009. You'll get help with all the special networking details, such as how to set the best band and channel for your network, use pre-802.11n base stations and clients without hurting performance, set up complex Int

  4. Transportation vehicle energy intensities. A joint DOT/NASA reference paper. [energy consumption of air and ground vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascy, A. C.; Paullin, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A compilation of data on the energy consumption of air and ground vehicles is presented. The ratio BTU/ASM, British Thermal Units/Available Seat Mile, is used to express vehicle energy intensiveness, and related to the energy consumed directly in producing seat-mile or ton-mile productivity. Data is presented on passenger and freight vehicles which are in current use or which are about to enter service, and advanced vehicles which may be operational in the 1980's and beyond. For the advanced vehicles, an estimate is given of the date of initial operational service, and the performance characteristics. Other key considerations in interpreting energy intensiveness for a given mode are discussed, such as: load factors, operations, overhead energy consumption, and energy investments in new structure and equipment.

  5. Ground Taxi Navigation Problems and Training Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Cheryl; Walter, Kim E.; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Adverse weather conditions can put considerable strain on the National Airspace System. Even small decreases in visibility on the airport surface can create delays, hinder safe movement and lead to errors. Studies of Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) surface movement incidents support the need for technologies and procedures to improve ground operations in low-visibility conditions. This study examined 139 ASRS reports of low-visibility surface movement incidents at 10 major U.S. airports. Errors were characterized in terms of incident type, contributing factors and consequences. The incidents in the present sample were comprised of runway transgressions, taxiway excursions and ground conflicts. The primary contributing factors were Airport Layout and Markings, Communication and Distraction. In half the incidents the controller issued a new clearance or the flight crew took an evasive action and in the remaining half, no recovery attempt was made because the error was detected after the fact. By gaining a better understanding the factors that affect crew navigation in low visibility and the types of errors that are likely to occur, it will be possible to develop more robust technologies to aid pilots in the ground taxi task. Implications for crew training and procedure development for low-visibility ground taxi are also discussed.

  6. Preliminary Validation of the Small Aircraft Transportation System Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel; Consiglio, Maria; Murdoch, Jennifer; Adams, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    This document provides a preliminary validation of the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept for normal conditions. Initial results reveal that the concept provides reduced air traffic delays when compared to current operations without increasing pilot workload. Characteristic to the SATS HVO concept is the establishment of a newly defined area of flight operations called a Self-Controlled Area (SCA) which would be activated by air traffic control (ATC) around designated non-towered, non-radar airports. During periods of poor visibility, SATS pilots would take responsibility for separation assurance between their aircraft and other similarly equipped aircraft in the SCA. Using onboard equipment and simple instrument flight procedures, they would then be better able to approach and land at the airport or depart from it. This concept would also require a new, ground-based automation system, typically located at the airport that would provide appropriate sequencing information to the arriving aircraft. Further validation of the SATS HVO concept is required and is the subject of ongoing research and subsequent publications.

  7. A Mixed Integer Linear Program for Airport Departure Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gautam; Jung, Yoon Chul

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft departing from an airport are subject to numerous constraints while scheduling departure times. These constraints include wake-separation constraints for successive departures, miles-in-trail separation for aircraft bound for the same departure fixes, and time-window or prioritization constraints for individual flights. Besides these, emissions as well as increased fuel consumption due to inefficient scheduling need to be included. Addressing all the above constraints in a single framework while allowing for resequencing of the aircraft using runway queues is critical to the implementation of the Next Generation Air Transport System (NextGen) concepts. Prior work on airport departure scheduling has addressed some of the above. However, existing methods use pre-determined runway queues, and schedule aircraft from these departure queues. The source of such pre-determined queues is not explicit, and could potentially be a subjective controller input. Determining runway queues and scheduling within the same framework would potentially result in better scheduling. This paper presents a mixed integer linear program (MILP) for the departure-scheduling problem. The program takes as input the incoming sequence of aircraft for departure from a runway, along with their earliest departure times and an optional prioritization scheme based on time-window of departure for each aircraft. The program then assigns these aircraft to the available departure queues and schedules departure times, explicitly considering wake separation and departure fix restrictions to minimize total delay for all aircraft. The approach is generalized and can be used in a variety of situations, and allows for aircraft prioritization based on operational as well as environmental considerations. We present the MILP in the paper, along with benefits over the first-come-first-serve (FCFS) scheme for numerous randomized problems based on real-world settings. The MILP results in substantially reduced

  8. Modelling of ground water movement and transport of radioactive substances in performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety analyses and performance assessments for nuclear waste repositories include the survey of possible phenomena, events and processes, which might endanger the safety of disposal systems. Secondly the probabilities of disruptive events caused either by natural events or by human actions have to be assessed. Thirdly the radiological consequences of different scenarios are analyzed. The most comprehensive part of the consequence estimation is the analysis of the groundwater flow and transport of radionuclides within the engineered barriers of the repository and in the geosphere

  9. Observations of the Interaction and/or Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns from AERONET Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Reid, Jeffrey; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Sinyuk, Alexander; Trevino, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds would likely be even greater for satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to 3-D effects and sub-pixel cloud contamination issues.

  10. Organic Wastewater Compounds, Pharmaceuticals, andColiphage in Ground Water Receiving Discharge from OnsiteWastewater Treatment Systems near La Pine, Oregon:Occurrence and Implications for Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Stephen J.; Weick, Rodney J.; Johnson, Jill M.; Cahill, Jeffery D.; Smith, Steven G.; Rich, Barbara J.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of organic wastewater compounds (components of 'personal care products' and other common household chemicals), pharmaceuticals (human prescription and nonprescription medical drugs), and coliphage (viruses that infect coliform bacteria, and found in high concentrations in municipal wastewater) in onsite wastewater (septic tank effluent) and in a shallow, unconfined, sandy aquifer that serves as the primary source of drinking water for most residents near La Pine, Oregon, was documented. Samples from two types of observation networks provided basic occurrence data for onsite wastewater and downgradient ground water. One observation network was a group of 28 traditional and innovative (advanced treatment) onsite wastewater treatment systems and associated downgradient drainfield monitoring wells, referred to as the 'innovative systems network'. The drainfield monitoring wells were located adjacent to or under onsite wastewater treatment system drainfield lines. Another observation network, termed the 'transect network', consisted of 31 wells distributed among three transects of temporary, stainless-steel-screened, direct-push monitoring wells installed along three plumes of onsite wastewater. The transect network, by virtue of its design, also provided a basis for increased understanding of the transport of analytes in natural systems. Coliphage were frequently detected in onsite wastewater. Coliphage concentrations in onsite wastewater were highly variable, ranging from less than 1 to 3,000,000 plaque forming units per 100 milliliters. Coliphage were occasionally detected (eight occurrences) at low concentrations in samples from wells located downgradient from onsite wastewater treatment system drainfield lines. However, coliphage concentrations were below method detection limits in replicate or repeat samples collected from the eight sites. The consistent absence of coliphage detections in the replicate or repeat samples is interpreted to indicate

  11. Ground level chemical analysis of air transported from the 1998 Mexican-central american fires to the southwestern USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva Fierro, Ignacio [Departmento de Ciencias Ambientales, COFAA, CIIDIR-IPN Unidad Durango, Durango, Durango (Mexico)]. E-mail: ifierro62@yahoo.com; Popp, Carl J. [Department of Chemistry, New Mexico Tech, NM (United States); Dixon, Roy W. [Department of Chemistry, California State University at Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (USA); Martin, Randal S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, UT (United States); Gaffney, Jeffrey S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR(United States); Marley, Nancy A. [Graduate Institute of Technology, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR (United States); Harris, Joyce M. [Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, ERL/CMDL, NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-02-15

    In May 1998, a large number of forest fires in the region of southern Mexico and Central America, released huge amounts of contaminants that were transported over the Pacific Ocean, then, due to a change in air current direction, the primary contaminants and their secondary pollutant products impacted central New Mexico after 5 to 6 days transport time. The total distance traveled was approximately 3000 km from the fire source. Background measurements of a number of key chemical markers were taken before and during the haze incursion at a site located at Socorro, NM. A number of days before the haze episode in NM, large areas of Texas, Louisiana and the lower Mississippi River valley were also inundated by smoke from the fires. The sum of carbonyl compounds was 5.6 ppbv before and 15.5 ppbv during the smoke event; the sum of carboxylic acids went from 7.2 ppbv to 8.6 ppbv; C1-C2 hydrocarbons went from 270 ppbv to 133 ppbv; particulate NO{sub 3}{sup -} went from 0.1 to 1.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3}; SO{sub 4}{sup -2} went from 1.2 to 3.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}; and PM10 concentrations remained between the range measured before the episode (15-20 {mu}g/m{sup 3}). The results indicate the significant impact on a rural site from long range transport of primary and secondary smoke pollutants from biomass burning events and the importance of these species being primarily in the gaseous and fine aerosol size range. These fine aerosols are important as climate forcing agents and in reducing air quality and visibility. [Spanish] En mayo de 1998, varios incendios forestales en la region sur de Mexico y en America Central, emitieron enormes cantidades de contaminantes que fueron transportados al Oceano Pacifico; entonces, debido a los cambios de direccion de las corrientes de aire, los contaminantes primarios emitidos, o como contaminantes secundarios, empezaron a llegar al centro de Nuevo Mexico, despues de 5 a 6 dias del episodio. La distancia total del transporte fue de aproximadamente 3000

  12. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 1. Guideline approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. This volume includes specific recommendations for decision-making managers and site operators on how to use these guidelines. The more detailed discussions about the code selection approach are provided. 242 refs., 6 figs

  13. Airports and Airfields, Shows airport runway and taxi with elevation information as well as runway numbers and names., Published in unknown, Johnson County AIMS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of unknown. It is described as 'Shows airport runway and taxi with...

  14. Airports and Airfields, Airports in 18 county region in South Georgia, Published in 1999, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale as of 1999. It is described as 'Airports in 18 county region in South Georgia'. Data by...

  15. Airports and Airfields, SDE Feature Class of the Southern Wisconsin Regional Airport, Rock County, Wisconsin, Published in 2005, Rock County Planning, Economic, and Community Development Agency.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset as of 2005. It is described as 'SDE Feature Class of the Southern Wisconsin Regional Airport, Rock County, Wisconsin'. Data by...

  16. Global Map: Airports of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes Global Map data showing airports in the United States, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The data are a modified version of the...

  17. Microscopic Analysis and Modeling of Airport Surface Sequencing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The complexity and interdependence of operations on the airport surface motivate the need for a comprehensive and detailed, yet flexible and validated analysis and...

  18. Novel Surveillance Technologies for Airport Ramp Area Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the current research is to develop the concept, algorithms and software necessary for enabling a novel surveillance system for airports ramp areas....

  19. US Helicopter Expands Service to Newark Liberty International Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ US Helicopter Corporation ("US Helicopter") (OTC Bulletin Board: USHP) and Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL)announced a partnership to provide eight-minute shuttle service between Manhattan and Newark Liberty International Airport beginning Dec.18, 2006.

  20. Airport Configuration Planner with Optimized Weather Forecasts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The core planning algorithms to support the NGATS concepts will need accurate predictions of airport configuration over planning horizons of six hours or more. Such...

  1. Astronaut Virgil Grissom and family at Patrick AFB airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Virgil I. (Gus) Grissom and his family are shown at the airport at Patrick Air Force Base facing a crowd of news media representatives. Grissom is speaking into microphones for the news media.

  2. Airports and Airfields, Published in unknown, Douglas County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in Other (please...

  3. Airports and Airfields, Airportpolys, Published in 2008, Daggett County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as 'Airportpolys'. Data by this publisher are...

  4. Review of measured vibration and noise environments experienced by passengers in aircraft and in ground transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    Measured vibration and interior noise data are presented for a number of air and surface vehicles. Consideration is given to the importance of direction effects; of vehicle operations such as take-off, cruise, and landing; and of measurement location on the level and frequency of the measurements. Various physical measurement units or descriptors are used to quantify and compare the data. Results suggest the range of vibration and noise associated with a particular mode of transportation and illustrate the comparative levels in terms of each of the descriptors. Collectively, the results form a data base which may be useful in assessing the ride of existing or future systems relative to vehicles in current operation.

  5. Quasi-three-dimensional analysis of ground water flow and dissolved multicomponent solute transport in saturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational procedure was developed in this study to provide flexibility needed in the application of three-dimensional groundwater flow and dissolved multicomponent solute transport simulations. In the first part of this study, analytical solutions were proposed for the dissolved single-component solute transport problem. These closed form solutions were developed for homogeneous but stratified porous media. This analytical model took into account two-dimensional diffusion-advection in the main aquifer layer and one-dimensional diffusion-advection in the adjacent aquitards, as well as first order radioactive decay and linear adsorption isotherm in both aquifer and aquitards. The associated analytical solutions for solute concentration distributions in the aquifer and aquitards were obtained using Laplace Transformation and Method of Separation of Variables techniques. Next, in order to analyze the problem numerically, a quasi-three-dimensional finite element algorithm was developed based on the multilayer aquifer concept. In this phase, advection, dispersion, adsorption and first order multi-species chemical reaction terms were included to the analysis. Employing this model, without restriction on groundwater flow pattern in the multilayer aquifer system, one may analyze the complex behavior of the groundwater flow and solute movement pattern in the system. These numerical models may be utilized as calibration tools in site characterization studies, or as predictive models during the initial stages of a typical site investigation study. Through application to several test and field problems, the usefulness, accuracy and efficiency of the proposed models were demonstrated. Comparison of results with analytical solution, experimental data and other numerical methods were also discussed

  6. Passengers' perception on airport service and quality satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    MK CHING

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate passengers’ expected and perceived service and quality satisfaction of the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) as the overall quality perceived would affect the number of future travelers to Hong Kong. After determining a list of known factors affecting airport service quality, passengers’ satisfaction survey was carried out at the main entrances and exits of the HKIA. Based on the collected data, a passenger satisfaction rating was compiled reflecting the us...

  7. Seizure Of Live Otters In Bangkok Airport, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, Chris R.; Panjit Tansom

    2013-01-01

    On 22 January, 2013, TRAFFIC reported that the Royal Thai Customs officers working at the Wildlife Checkpoint of Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi International Airport discovered 11 live otters when they scanned a bag that had been left at the oversized luggage area of the airport. The otters, six Smooth Otters Lutrogale perspicllata and five Oriental Small-clawed Otters Aonyx cinereus were all juveniles and are suspected to have been smuggled out of Thailand, bound for Japan to be sold as exotic pets....

  8. Geohazard risk assessment using high resolution SAR interferometric techniques: a case study of Larissa National Airport Central Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, F.; Kalliola, R.

    2014-07-01

    The possibility of use the productions of Earth Resource Satellite (ERS-1/2) and Advanced Environment Satellite ENVISAT SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) C-band have given the potential to detect and estimate the time series of dynamic ground deformation within high spatial and temporal resolution. The Larissa National Airport is suffering from continued ground deformation as evidenced by the presence of ground fissures and sinkholes as well as observed land subsidence. This study uses two Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometric techniques (InSAR) to detect short- and long-term ground deformation dynamics in the airport using the GAMMA Software (S/W). The results indicate complex subsidence and uplift processes at ranges between -15 and 25 mm a-1 to co-occur in different parts of the study region. Some of these changes may be attributed to tectonic fault movements but some of the observed ground deformation processes are more likely to result from human induced changes in the groundwater level and expansive soils.

  9. Geohazard risk assessment using high resolution SAR interferometric techniques: a case study of Larissa National Airport Central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fakhri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of use the productions of Earth Resource Satellite (ERS-1/2 and Advanced Environment Satellite ENVISAT SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar C-band have given the potential to detect and estimate the time series of dynamic ground deformation within high spatial and temporal resolution. The Larissa National Airport is suffering from continued ground deformation as evidenced by the presence of ground fissures and sinkholes as well as observed land subsidence. This study uses two Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometric techniques (InSAR to detect short- and long-term ground deformation dynamics in the airport using the GAMMA Software (S/W. The results indicate complex subsidence and uplift processes at ranges between −15 and 25 mm a−1 to co-occur in different parts of the study region. Some of these changes may be attributed to tectonic fault movements but some of the observed ground deformation processes are more likely to result from human induced changes in the groundwater level and expansive soils.

  10. Ground Metric Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Cuturi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Transportation distances have been used for more than a decade now in machine learning to compare histograms of features. They have one parameter: the ground metric, which can be any metric between the features themselves. As is the case for all parameterized distances, transportation distances can only prove useful in practice when this parameter is carefully chosen. To date, the only option available to practitioners to set the ground metric parameter was to rely on a priori knowledge of the features, which limited considerably the scope of application of transportation distances. We propose to lift this limitation and consider instead algorithms that can learn the ground metric using only a training set of labeled histograms. We call this approach ground metric learning. We formulate the problem of learning the ground metric as the minimization of the difference of two polyhedral convex functions over a convex set of distance matrices. We follow the presentation of our algorithms with promising experimenta...

  11. An Algorithm for Managing Aircraft Movement on an Airport Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maresca

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the development of an algorithm for safely and optimally managing the routing of aircraft on an airport surface in future airport operations. This tool is intended to support air traffic controllers’ decision-making in selecting the paths of all aircraft and the engine startup approval time for departing ones. Optimal routes are sought for minimizing the time both arriving and departing aircraft spend on an airport surface with engines on, with benefits in terms of safety, efficiency and costs. The proposed algorithm first computes a standalone, shortest path solution from runway to apron or vice versa, depending on the aircraft being inbound or outbound, respectively. For taking into account the constraints due to other traffic on an airport surface, this solution is amended by a conflict detection and resolution task that attempts to reduce and possibly nullify the number of conflicts generated in the first phase. An example application on a simple Italian airport exemplifies how the algorithm can be applied to true-world applications. Emphasis is given on how to model an airport surface as a weighted and directed graph with non-negative weights, as required for the input to the algorithm.

  12. Seasonal variation of spherical aerosols distribution in East Asia based on ground and space Lidar observation and a Chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Y.; Yumimoto, K.; Uno, I.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Ohara, T.

    2009-12-01

    The anthropogenic aerosols largely impact on not only human health but also global climate system, therefore air pollution in East Asia due to a rapid economic growth has been recognized as a significant environmental problem. Several international field campaigns had been conducted to elucidate pollutant gases, aerosols characteristics and radiative forcing in East Asia. (e.g., ACE-Asia, TRACE-P, ADEC, EAREX 2005). However, these experiments were mainly conducted in springtime, therefore seasonal variation of aerosols distribution has not been clarified well yet. National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) has been constructing a lidar networks by automated dual wavelength / polarization Mie-lidar systems to observe the atmospheric environment in Asian region since 2001. Furthermore, from June 2006, space-borne backscatter lidar, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), onboard NASA/CALIPSO satellite, measures continuous global aerosol and cloud vertical distribution with very high spatial resolution. In this paper, we will show the seasonal variation of aerosols distribution in East Asia based on the NIES lidar network observation, Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling System (CMAQ) chemical transport model simulation and CALIOP observation over the period from July 2006 to December 2008. We found that CMAQ result explains the typical seasonal aerosol characteristics by lidar observations. For example, CMAQ and ground lidar showed a summertime peak of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at Beijing, an autumn AOT peak at Guangzhou and summertime AOT trough at Hedo, Okinawa. These characteristics are mainly controlled by seasonal variations of Asian summer/winter monsoon system. We also examined the CMAQ seasonal average aerosol extinction profiles with ground lidar and CALIOP extinction data. These comparisons clarified that the CMAQ reproduced the observed aerosol layer depth well in the downwind region. Ground lidar and CALIOP seasonal

  13. The effect of air transport on the production of goods and services

    OpenAIRE

    Sheard, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates the effect of air transport on local production in the manufacturing and service sectors. The analysis is conducted using data from the United States. These effects are important for the design of policies that aim to develop an airport or to otherwise attract airlines to operate to and from the airport. This type of policy is commonly employed by national and local governments, indeed most large commercial airports in the United States and Canada are publicly owned. Thou...

  14. Conducting Safe and Efficient Airport Surface Operations in a NextGen Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) vision proposes many revolutionary operational concepts, such as surface trajectory-based operations (STBO) and technologies, including display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability of a flight crew to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM. Position accuracy of traffic was varied, and the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability was measured. Another goal was to evaluate the crew's ability to safely conduct STBO by assessing the impact of providing traffic intent information, CD&R system capability, and the display of STBO guidance to the flight crew on both head-down and head-up displays (HUD). Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near-collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidents were averted. During the STBO testing, the flight crews met their required time-of-arrival at route end within 10 seconds on 98 percent of the trials, well within the acceptable performance bounds of 15 seconds. Traffic intent information was found to be useful in determining the intent of conflicting traffic, with graphical presentation preferred. The CD&R system was only

  15. Airports and Airfields, airport data set, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2006. It is described as...

  16. Airports and Airfields, airport data set attribute, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2006. It is described as...

  17. Airports and Airfields, airports, Published in 2005, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Marathon County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2005. It is described as...

  18. Airports and Airfields, Polygons of airport runways, Published in 1995, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Cochise County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 1995. It is described...

  19. Airports and Airfields, Princeton Airport, Published in 2011, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Township of Montgomery.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Airports and Airfields dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2011. It is described as...

  20. Low back load in airport baggage handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblauch, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Low back pain (LBP) constitutes a major economic problem in many countries. The causes of LBP are still largely unknown and several risk factors have been suggested including heavy lifting, which causes high compression forces of the tissues in the low back. Micro-fractures in the endplates of the vertebrae caused by compression forces have been suggested as a source of unspecific pain. Although airport baggage handlers exhibit a high prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints the amount of biomechanical research within this and similar areas is limited. The aims of this thesis were to perform a general description of the lumbar loading in baggage handlers (Paper I), to develop a generically useful tool to examine specific lumbar compression in a valid manner (Paper II & III), and to investigate the spinal loading in common work tasks for baggage handlers. (Paper III). We recorded electromyography during baggage handling in the baggage hall, by a conveyor, and inside the aircraft baggage compartment. Electromyography was analyzed using amplitude probability distribution functions (APDF) on both tasks and full day recordings and root mean square (RMS) values on tasks. Furthermore, we estimated L4/L5 compression and moment along with shoulder flexor moment with a Watbak model based on more specific subtasks. In addition, we built an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal computer model using the AnyBody Modeling System (AMS). Motion capture recorded the movements in 3D during a stooped and a kneeling lifting task simulating airport baggage handler work. Marker trajectories were used to drive the model. The AMS-models computed estimated compression forces, shear forces and the moments around the L4/L5 joint. The compression forces were used for comparison with the vertebral compression tolerances reported in the literature. The RMS muscle activity was high in all tasks. The average peak RMS muscle activity was up to 120% EMGmax in the erector spinae during the baggage

  1. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  2. Ground-water flow and transport modeling of the NRC-licensed waste disposal facility, West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a simulation study of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport from disposal at the NRC licensed waste disposal facility in West Valley, New York. A transient, precipitation driven, flow model of the near-surface fractured till layer and underlying unweathered till was developed and calibrated against observed inflow data into a recently constructed interceptor trench for the period March--May 1990. The results suggest that lateral flow through the upper, fractured till layer may be more significant than indicated by previous, steady state flow modeling studies. A conclusive assessment of the actual magnitude of lateral flow through the fractured till could however not be made. A primary factor contributing to this uncertainty is the unknown contribution of vertical infiltration through the interceptor trench cap to the total trench inflow. The second part of the investigation involved simulation of the migration of Sr-90, Cs-137 and Pu-239 from the one of the fuel hull disposal pits. A first-order radionuclide leach rate with rate coefficient of 10-6/day was assumed to describe radionuclide release into the disposal pit. The simulations indicated that for wastes buried below the fractured till zone, no significant migration would occur. However, under the assumed conditions, significant lateral migration could occur for radionuclides present in the upper, fractured till zone. 23 refs., 68 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Methodology for Analysis, Modeling and Simulation of Airport Gate-waiting Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng

    This dissertation presents methodologies to estimate gate-waiting delays from historical data, to identify gate-waiting-delay functional causes in major U.S. airports, and to evaluate the impact of gate operation disruptions and mitigation strategies on gate-waiting delay. Airport gates are a resource of congestion in the air transportation system. When an arriving flight cannot pull into its gate, the delay it experiences is called gate-waiting delay. Some possible reasons for gate-waiting delay are: the gate is occupied, gate staff or equipment is unavailable, the weather prevents the use of the gate (e.g. lightning), or the airline has a preferred gate assignment. Gate-waiting delays potentially stay with the aircraft throughout the day (unless they are absorbed), adding costs to passengers and the airlines. As the volume of flights increases, ensuring that airport gates do not become a choke point of the system is critical. The first part of the dissertation presents a methodology for estimating gate-waiting delays based on historical, publicly available sources. Analysis of gate-waiting delays at major U.S. airports in the summer of 2007 identifies the following. (i) Gate-waiting delay is not a significant problem on majority of days; however, the worst delay days (e.g. 4% of the days at LGA) are extreme outliers. (ii) The Atlanta International Airport (ATL), the John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) and the Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) experience the highest gate-waiting delays among major U.S. airports. (iii) There is a significant gate-waiting-delay difference between airlines due to a disproportional gate allocation. (iv) Gate-waiting delay is sensitive to time of a day and schedule peaks. According to basic principles of queueing theory, gate-waiting delay can be attributed to over-scheduling, higher-than-scheduled arrival rate, longer-than-scheduled gate-occupancy time, and reduced gate

  4. Vertical and horizontal NO2 transport in urban area associated with land-sea breeze as observed by ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Since July 2012, continuous NO2 profile observations have been performed by using ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) at Fukuoka (33.55N, 130.36E), an urban site in Japan. MAX-DOAS is a passive remote sensing technique using scatted visible and ultraviolet solar radiation at several elevation angles, and it can allow us to retrieve vertical information on several trace gasses. In this study, the vertical resolution of the profiles is roughly 1 km below 2 km height. We investigate inhomogeneity of NO2 over Fukuoka by observing at two azimuth angles, Tenjin (downtown area) direction and Itoshima (out of downtown area) direction. Understanding of the spatial inhomogeneity of NO2 in urban area is important for measuring a priori profiles for satellite and for validating chemical transport model. Diurnal variation with maximum in the morning is clearly observed in both directions throughout the year for 0-1 km. Diurnal variation with maximum around noon is sometimes observed in Itoshima direction, which is delayed by 1-2 hours from maxima in Tenjin direction. The NO2 maximum for upper level (1-2 km) is also delayed from the maximum in Tenjin direction. From the analysis of surface wind field, these variations seems to be strongly related to vertical/horizontal transport of high concentration of NO2 from the downtown area (and development of the boundary layer) and horizontal transport of low concentration from ocean associated with land-sea breeze. We also present a comparison of NO2 data measured with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor.

  5. Responding effectively to fuel spills at airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel spills are among the most frequent causes of emergency calls faced by airport firefighters. Most fuel spills are a result of human error and careless procedures. They always constitute an emergency and require fast, efficient action to prevent disaster. A fuel spill is an accidental release of fuel, in this case, from an aircraft fuel system, refueling vehicle or refueling system. A normal release of a few drops of fuel associated with a disconnection or other regular fueling operations should not be classified as a fuel spill. However, anytime fuel must be cleaned up and removed from an area, a fuel spill has occurred. Volatile fuels pose significant threats to people, equipment, facilities and cargo when they are released. Anyone near a spill, including ramp workers, fueling personnel and aircraft occupants, are in danger if the fuel ignites. Buildings and equipment in a spill area, such as terminals, hangars, aircraft, fuel trucks and service equipment also are at risk. An often neglected point is that aircraft cargo also is threatened by fuel spills

  6. Air transport system

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The book addresses all major aspects to be considered for the design and operation of aircrafts within the entire transportation chain. It provides the basic information about the legal environment, which defines the basic requirements for aircraft design and aircraft operation. The interactions between  airport, air traffic management and the airlines are described. The market forecast methods and the aircraft development process are explained to understand the very complex and risky business of an aircraft manufacturer. The principles of flight physics as basis for aircraft design are presented and linked to the operational and legal aspects of air transport including all environmental impacts. The book is written for graduate students as well as for engineers and experts, who are working in aerospace industry, at airports or in the domain of transport and logistics.

  7. Evaluating a 3-D transport model of atmospheric CO2 using ground-based, aircraft, and space-borne data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-D. Paris

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport model (v8-02-01 of CO2 over 2003–2006, driven by GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorology from the NASA Goddard Global Modelling and Assimilation Office, using surface, aircraft and space-borne concentration measurements of CO2. We use an established ensemble Kalman filter to estimate a posteriori biospheric+biomass burning (BS+BB and oceanic (OC CO2 fluxes from 22 geographical regions, following the TransCom 3 protocol, using boundary layer CO2 data from a subset of GLOBALVIEW surface sites. Global annual net BS+BB+OC CO2 fluxes over 2004–2006 for GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 meteorology are −4.4±0.9 (−4.2±0.9, −3.9±0.9 (−4.5±0.9, and −5.2±0.9 (−4.9±0.9 Pg C yr−1 , respectively. The regional a posteriori fluxes are broadly consistent in the sign and magnitude of the TransCom-3 study for 1992–1996, but we find larger net sinks over northern and southern continents. We find large departures from our a priori over Europe during summer 2003, over temperate Eurasia during 2004, and over North America during 2005, reflecting an incomplete description of terrestrial carbon dynamics. We find GEOS-4 (GEOS-5 a posteriori CO2 concentrations reproduce the observed surface trend of 1.91–2.43 ppm yr−1, depending on latitude, within 0.15 ppm yr−1 (0.2 ppm yr−1 and the seasonal cycle within 0.2 ppm (0.2 ppm at all latitudes. We find the a posteriori model reproduces the aircraft vertical profile measurements of CO2 over North America and Siberia generally within 1.5 ppm in the free and upper troposphere but can be biased by up to 4–5 ppm in the boundary layer at the start and end of the growing season. The model has a small negative bias in the free troposphere CO2 trend (1.95–2.19 ppm yr−1 compared to AIRS data which has a trend of 2.21–2.63 ppm yr−1 during 2004–2006, consistent with surface data. Model CO2 concentrations in the upper troposphere, evaluated using CONTRAIL (Comprehensive

  8. Modeling Water and Nutrient Transport through the Soil-Root-Canopy Continuum: Explicitly Linking the Below- and Above-Ground Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.; Drewry, D.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation roots provide a fundamental link between the below ground water and nutrient dynamics and above ground canopy processes such as photosynthesis, evapotranspiration and energy balance. The “hydraulic architecture” of roots, consisting of the structural organization of the root system and the flow properties of the conduits (xylem) as well as interfaces with the soil and the above ground canopy, affect stomatal conductance thereby directly linking them to the transpiration. Roots serve as preferential pathways for the movement of moisture from wet to dry soil layers during the night, both from upper soil layer to deeper layers during the wet season (‘hydraulic descent’) and vice-versa (‘hydraulic lift’) as determined by the moisture gradients. The conductivities of transport through the root system are significantly, often orders of magnitude, larger than that of the surrounding soil resulting in movement of soil-moisture at rates that are substantially larger than that through the soil. This phenomenon is called hydraulic redistribution (HR). The ability of the deep-rooted vegetation to “bank” the water through hydraulic descent during wet periods for utilization during dry periods provides them with a competitive advantage. However, during periods of hydraulic lift these deep-rooted trees may facilitate the growth of understory vegetation where the understory scavenges the hydraulically lifted soil water. In other words, understory vegetation with relatively shallow root systems have access to the banked deep-water reservoir. These inter-dependent root systems have a significant influence on water cycle and ecosystem productivity. HR induced available moisture may support rhizosphere microbial and mycorrhizal fungi activities and enable utilization of heterogeneously distributed water and nutrient resources To capture this complex inter-dependent nutrient and water transport through the soil-root-canopy continuum we present modeling

  9. 78 FR 7852 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Rocky Mountain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport, Broomfield, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... public comment on the release of land at the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport under the provisions of..., Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Mountain Region, Airports Division, Denver...

  10. [Airports and air quality: a critical synthesis of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, Giorgio; Di Menno di Bucchianico, Alessandro; Gaeta, Alessandra; Romani, Daniela; Fontana, Luca; Iavicoli, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    This work reviewed existing literature on airport related activities that could worsen surrounding air quality; its aim is to underline the progress coming from recent-year studies, the knowledge emerging from new approaches, the development of semi-empiric analytical methods as well as the questions still needing to be clarified. To estimate pollution levels, spatial and temporal variability, and the sources relative contributions integrated assessment, using both fixed point measurement and model outputs, are needed. The general picture emerging from the studies was a non-negligible and highly spatially variable (within 2-3 km from the fence line) airport contribution; even if it is often not dominant compared to other concomitant pollution sources. Results were highly airport-specific. Traffic volumes, landscape and meteorology were the key variables that drove the impacts. Results were thus hardly exportable to other contexts. Airport related pollutant sources were found to be characterized by unusual emission patterns (particularly ultrafine particles, black carbon and nitrogen oxides during take-off); high time-resolution measurements allow to depict the rapidly changing take-off effect on air quality that could not be adequately observed otherwise. Few studies used high time resolution data in a successful way as statistical models inputs to estimate the aircraft take-off contribution to the observed average levels. These findings should not be neglected when exposure of people living near airports is to be assessed. PMID:25115478

  11. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development, Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen. Steve

    2010-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." The proposed future C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system, referred to as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), is anticipated to increase overall air-to-ground data communications systems capacity by using a new spectrum (i.e., not very high frequency (VHF)). Although some critical services could be supported, AeroMACS will also target noncritical services, such as weather advisory and aeronautical information services as part of an airborne System Wide Information Management (SWIM) program. AeroMACS is to be designed and implemented in a manner that will not disrupt other services operating in the C-band. This report defines the AeroMACS concepts of use, high-level system requirements, and architecture; the performance of supporting system analyses; the development of AeroMACS test and demonstration plans; and the establishment of an operational AeroMACS capability in support of C-band aeronautical data communications standards to be advanced in both international (International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO) and national (RTCA) forums. This includes the development of system parameter profile recommendations for AeroMACS based on existing Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) 802.16e- 2009 standards

  12. 78 FR 9449 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Southwest Florida International Airport, Fort Myers, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... ``A'' 2012 NEM and Map ``B'', 2017; NEM Chapter 9, Page 9-1, Airport Sponsor's Noise Exposure Map Certification; November 1, 2012 Airport Sponsor NEM Submittal Letter. The FAA has determined that these...

  13. 75 FR 76067 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Naples Municipal Airport, Naples, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Municipal Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et. seq (Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act... Noise Abatement Act (the Act), an ] airport operator may submit to the FAA Noise Exposure Maps...

  14. 78 FR 79061 - Noise Exposure Map Notice; Key West International Airport, Key West, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Key West International Airport under the provisions of the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act and... Noise Abatement Act (the Act), an airport operator may submit to the FAA Noise Exposure Maps which...

  15. 78 FR 8683 - Environmental Impact Statement: Theodore Francis Green Airport, Warwick, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Re-evaluation has been prepared for Theodore Francis Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Doucette, Environmental Program Manager, Federal... Federal Aviation Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Theodore Francis Green Airport,...

  16. A Novel Surveillance System Applied in Civil Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hua Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional security monitoring of civil airport usually uses a fixed camera to acquire images. There are several problems with performance including difficulties introduced in the information transmission, storage, and analysis of the process. Insect compound eyes offer unique advantages for moving target capture and these have attracted the attention of many researchers in recent years. This paper contributes to this research by proposing a new surveillance system applied in civil airport. We discuss the finished bionic structure of the system, the development of the bionic control circuit, and introduce the proposed mathematical model of bionic compound eyes for data acquisition and image mosaic. Image matching for large view is also illustrated with different conditions. This mode and algorithm effectively achieve safety surveillance of airport with large field of view and high real-time processing.

  17. Nowcasting system MeteoExpert at Irkutsk airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazlova, Tatiana; Bocharnikov, Nikolai; Solonin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Airport operations are significantly impacted by low visibility concerned with fog. Generation of accurate and timely nowcast products is a basis of early warning automated system providing information about significant weather conditions for decision-makers. Nowcasting system MeteoExpert has been developed that provides aviation forecasters with 0-6 hour nowcasts of the weather conditions including fog and low visibility. The system has been put into operation at the airport Irkutsk since August 2014. Aim is to increase an accuracy of fog forecasts, contributing to the airport safety, efficiency and capacity improvement. Designed for operational use numerical model of atmospheric boundary layer runs with a 10-minute update cycle. An important component of the system is the use of AWOS at the airdrome and three additional automatic weather stations at fogging sites in the vicinity of the airdrome. Nowcasts are visualized on a screen of forecaster's workstation and dedicated website. Nowcasts have been verified against actual observations.

  18. Land Use and Property Market Impacts of the Relocation of Athens International Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Politakis, Alexis

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the impact of the relocation of Athens International Airport (AIA), the most significant urban development in the modern history of the city of Athens, on land uses and the property market around the former airport site (FAS) and the new Eleftherios Venizelos airport (EV). Airport relocations are in themselves relatively rare events in global aviation. In this dissertation, for the first time, sources from various fields are brought together to be...

  19. 77 FR 71474 - Seventeenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held December 13, 2012... Federal Aviation Administration Seventeenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  20. 78 FR 43963 - Twenty-Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held on June 20, 2013... Federal Aviation Administration Twenty-Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  1. 77 FR 64838 - Sixteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held November 15, 2012... Federal Aviation Administration Sixteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  2. 78 FR 16757 - Twentieth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held April 4, 2013 from 9... Federal Aviation Administration Twentieth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  3. 77 FR 2343 - Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ...). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY: The FAA..., Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held February 9, 2012, from 10 a.m.-4..., Airport Security Access Control Systems. The agenda will include the following: February 9, 2012...

  4. 78 FR 31627 - Twenty-Second Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held on June 20, 2013... Federal Aviation Administration Twenty-Second Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  5. 78 FR 7850 - Nineteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held February 21, 2013... Federal Aviation Administration Nineteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  6. 77 FR 55894 - Fifteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems DATES: The meeting will be held September 27-28, 2012... Federal Aviation Administration Fifteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  7. 78 FR 22025 - Twenty First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ...). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. SUMMARY... Committee 224, Airport Security Access Control Systems. DATES: The meeting will be held April 9-10, 2013... Federal Aviation Administration Twenty First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 224, Airport Security...

  8. Airport Economics in Latin America and the Caribbean : Benchmarking, Regulation, and Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Serebrisky, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a first-ever, comprehensive study of how Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region airports have evolved during a notable period of transition in airport ownership. It is an unbiased, positive analysis of what happened, rather than a normative analysis of what should be done to reform and to attract private sector participation to the airport sector. ...

  9. 75 FR 30899 - Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless...: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications. DATES:...

  10. 75 FR 14483 - Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless...: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications. DATES:...

  11. 77 FR 55894 - Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless...: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications. SUMMARY: The FAA is..., Airport Surface Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held October 2-3, 2012, from 9...

  12. 75 FR 78799 - Noise Compatibility Program Notice, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort Worth, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Compatibility Program Notice, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort... 5, 2009. On December 1, 2010, the FAA approved the Fort Worth Alliance Airport noise compatibility... Date: The effective date of the FAA's approval of the Fort Worth Alliance Airport noise...

  13. Criteria for asphalt-rubber concrete in civil airport pavements: Mixture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, F. L.; Lytton, R. L.; Hoyt, D.

    1986-07-01

    A mixture design procedure is developed to allow the use of asphalt-rubber binders in concrete for flexible airport pavement. The asphalt-rubber is produced by reacting asphalt with ground, scrap tire rubber to produce the binder for the asphalt-rubber concrete. Procedures for laboratory preparation of alsphalt-rubber binders using an equipment setup that was found by researchers to produce laboratory binders with similar properties to field processes are included. The rubber-asphalt concrete mixture design procedure includes adjustments to the aggregate gradation to permit space for the rubber particles in the asphalt-rubber binder as well as suggested mixing and compaction temperatures, and compaction efforts. While the procedure was used in the laboratory to successfully produce asphalt-rubber concrete mixtures, it should be evaluated in the field to ensure that consistent results can be achieved in a production environment.

  14. Application of a pedestrian portal monitor at Madrid International Airport in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujol, Ll., E-mail: luis.pujol@cedex.e [Centro de Estudios y Experimentacion de Obras Publicas (CEDEX), Alfonso XII, 3, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Univ Politecn Madrid (UPM), Dept Civil Engn Hydraul and Energet, ETSI Caminos, Profesor Aranguren, s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Gonzalez, J.A.; Suarez-Navarro, M.J. [Univ Politecn Madrid (UPM), Dept Civil Engn Hydraul and Energet, ETSI Caminos, Profesor Aranguren, s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Three pedestrian portal monitor systems, designed to detect illicit trafficking or inadvertent movement of radioactive materials carried by passengers at airports, have been evaluated. The systems were supplied by three manufacturers: Bicron, Exploranium and Thermo-Eberline. In an initial evaluation, conducted at the Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering of the School of Civil Engineering, it was observed that the FHT-1372 system manufactured by Thermo-Eberline gave a more sensitive response and allowed the measurement of total photon dose rate and artificial photon dose rate. Therefore, this system was installed at Barajas International Airport in Madrid in 2002 for a period of 108 days in order to select an appropriate investigation level (defined as the radiation level that is selected as the trigger for further investigation). During this period 1,339,931 passengers were screened and a total of 39 alarms were triggered, 5 of which with a value 10 times the mean value of the natural background from photon radiation (which was 85 nSv/h), and no alarms exceeded 100 {mu}Sv/h at 1 m distance, which is the level of response for legal transport of radioactive materials set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). An investigation level of approximately 1.3 times the natural background was finally selected. This value coincides with the results obtained in the ITRAP (Illicit Trafficking Radiation Detection Assessment Program) carried out by the IAEA.

  15. Background frequency of Bacillus species at the Canberra Airport: A 12 month study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Michelle E; Thomas, Rory; Rossi, Rebecca; Nelson, Michelle; Roffey, Paul; Richardson, Michelle M; McNevin, Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, is a naturally occurring disease in Australia. Whilst mainly limited to livestock in grazing regions of Victoria and New South Wales, movement of people, stock and vehicles means B. anthracis could be present outside this region. Of particular interest is the "background" prevalence of B. anthracis at transport hubs including airports. The aim of this study was to determine the background frequency of B. anthracis and the commonly used hoax agent Bacillus thuringiensis at the Canberra Airport over a 12 month period. Samples were collected daily for seven days each month from August 2011-July 2012 and analyzed using species specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen samples (of a total of 575) were positive for the B. anthracis PL3 genomic marker, 24 for the cya (pXO1) plasmid marker and five for the capB (pXO2) plasmid marker. Whilst five samples were positive for both PL3 and cya, no samples were positive for all three markers hence there is no evidence to suggest the presence of pathogenic B. anthracis strains. B. anthracis targets were detected primarily in February 2012 and B. thuringiensis peaked in October and November 2011 and again in April and May 2012. This study provides a rapid method to screen for, and differentiate, Bacillus species. Armed with this information investigators will be able to discriminate a "threat" from "background" frequencies should the need arise. PMID:26298416

  16. Wind Vibration Study of Long-span Steel Arch Structure of Beijing Capital International Airport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dai; MA Jun; ZHU Zhong-yi; LIU Jie

    2005-01-01

    The wind-induced dynamic response of long-span light-weight steel arch structure of the global transportation center (GTC) of Beijing Capital International Airport was studied. A composite technique with combination of WAWS(Weighted Amplitude Wavelet Superposition) and FFT(Fast Fourier Transformation) was introduced to simulate wind velocity time series of hundreds of spatial points simultaneously. The structural shape fac tors of wind load was obtained from wind tunnel model test. The wind vibration factor based on structural displacement response was investigated. After comparing the computational results with wind tunnel model test data, it was found out that the two results accord with each other if wind comes from 0° direction angle, but are quite different if wind comes from 180° direction angle in the area blocked off by airport terminals. The possible reasons of this difference were analyzed. Haar wavelet was used to transform and analyze wind velocity time series and structural wind-induced dynamic responses. The relationship between exciting wind loads and structural responses was studied in time and frequency domains.

  17. A Study into the Impact of Physical Structures on the Runway Velocity Field at the Atlantic City International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David, Jr.; Manson, Russell; Trout, Joseph; Decicco, Nicholas; Rios, Manny

    2015-04-01

    Wake vortices are generated by airplanes in flight. These vortices decay slowly and may persist for several minutes after their creation. These vortices and associated smaller scale turbulent structures present a hazard to incoming flights. It is for this reason that incoming flights are timed to arrive after these vortices have dissipated. Local weather conditions, mainly prevailing winds, can affect the transport and evolution of these vortices; therefore, there is a need to fully understand localized wind patterns at the airport-sized mircoscale. Here we have undertaken a computational investigation into the impacts of localized wind flows and physical structures on the velocity field at Atlantic City International Airport. The simulations are undertaken in OpenFOAM, an open source computational fluid dynamics software package, using an optimized geometric mesh of the airport. Initial conditions for the simulations are based on historical data with the option to run simulations based on projected weather conditions imported from the Weather Research & Forcasting (WRF) Model. Sub-grid scale turbulence is modeled using a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach. The initial results gathered from the WRF Model simulations and historical weather data analysis are presented elsewhere.

  18. 75 FR 62008 - Safety Management System for Certificated Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you... airports hosting air carrier operations. An SMS is a formalized approach to managing safety by developing...) defines SMS as a ``systematic approach to managing safety, including the necessary...

  19. The Competitive Position of Hub Airports in the Transatlantic Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghouwt, Guillaume; Veldhuis, Jan

    2006-01-01

    This article puts forward the argument that the measurement of connectivity in hub-and-spoke networks has to take into account the quality and quantity of both direct and indirect connections. The NETSCAN model, which has been applied in this study, quantifies indirect connectivity and scales it into a theoretical direct connection. NETSCAN allows researchers, airports, airlines, alliances and airport regions to analyse their competitive position in an integrated way. Using NETSCAN, the authors analysed the developments on the market between northwest Europe and the United States (US) between May 2003 and May 2005. One of the most striking developments has certainly been the impact of the Air France-KLM merger and the effects of the integration of KLM and Northwest into the SkyTeam alliance on the connectivity of Amsterdam Schiphol. Direct as well as indirect connectivity (via European and North American hubs) from Amsterdam to the US increased substantially. The main reason for this increase is the integration of the former Wings and SkyTeam networks via the respective hub airports. Moreover, the extended SkyTeam alliance raised frequencies between Amsterdam and the SkyTeam hubs (Atlanta, Houston, for example), opened new routes (Cincinnati) and boosted the network between Amsterdam and France. As a result of the new routes and frequencies, Amsterdam took over Heathrow s position as the third best-connected northwest European airport to the US.

  20. Aircraft noise exposure from Schiphol airport: A relation with complainants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, R.G. de; Wiechen, C.M.A.G. van; Franssen, E.A.M.; Lebret, E.

    2002-01-01

    The possible relation between aircraft noise exposure and the prevalence of complainants around Schiphol airport was studied. The home address of people who complain about aircraft noise at the Environment Advisory Committee Schiphol was combined with annual average noise levels, using a Geographic

  1. Optimal assignment of incoming flights to baggage carousels at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Torben C.

    The problem considered in this report is an assignment problem occurring at airports. This problem concerns the assignment of baggage carousels in baggage claim halls to arriving aircraft (baggage carousel assignment problem). This is a highly dynamic problem since disruptions frequently occur du...

  2. 78 FR 38069 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Register on February 6, 2012 (77 FR 5681), promulgated the regulation to establish Global Entry as an... FR 17492.) Travelers who wish to participate in Global Entry must apply via the CBP Global Entry Web..., New York (JFK); George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Houston, Texas (IAH); Washington...

  3. Evaluating and optimizing resilience of airport pavement networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faturechi, Reza; Levenberg, Eyal; Miller-Hooks, Elise

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of assessing and maximizing the resilience of an airport's runway and taxiway network under multiple potential damage-meteorological scenarios. The problem is formulated as a stochastic integer program with recourse and an exact solution methodology based on the...

  4. Operational workforce planning for check-in counters at airports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolletz, Raik

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses operation models for workforce planning for check-in systems at airports. We characterize different tasks of the hierarchical workforce planning problem with time-dependent demand. A binary linear programming formulation is developed for the fortnightly tour scheduling problem...

  5. 77 FR 67862 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... Bake Memorial Airport (OCQ) Oconto, WI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of.... Douglas Bake Memorial Airport, Oconto, WI. Parcel No. 18 is located outside of the airport fence along the... be released at the J. Douglas Bake Memorial Airport in Oconto, Wisconsin: Part of Government Lot...

  6. 78 FR 57677 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    .... Kennedy International Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 78 FR 28276 (May 14, 2013); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 78 FR 28280 (May 14...'s John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), and Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)...

  7. 76 FR 18622 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, John F...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Airport (ORD), New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), and Newark Liberty International... INFORMATION: The FAA has designated ORD as an IATA Level 2, Schedules Facilitated Airport, and JFK and EWR as Level 3, Coordinated Airports. Scheduled operations at JFK and EWR are limited by the FAA ] Orders,...

  8. Designing Public Space for Mobility: Contestation, Negotiation and Experiment at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaeva, Anna

    2012-01-01

    complexity and interdependency of the interests at stake in the airport design, as well the value of an airport terminal as an urban design exercise. This is particularly relevant in the discussion of the transformation of spaces of mobility, such as airports or railway stations, into multifunctional public...... spaces and may also be valid for urban spaces where mobilities are becoming increasingly important. The paper analyses the challenges and opportunities that arise in such design situations, tracing the recent transformations of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol from the perspective of professionals who have......The paper investigates airport design, using the example of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, from the point of view of managers, architects and designers. It is argued that existing accounts of the airport as a space of transit as well as a place for shopping and entertainment have underrated the...

  9. Study Results on Knowledge Requirements for Entry-Level Airport Operations and Management Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper identifies important topical knowledge areas required of individuals employed in airport operations and management positions. A total of 116 airport managers and airfield operations personnel responded to a survey that sought to identify the importance of various subject matter for entry level airport operations personnel. The results from this study add to the body of research on aviation management curriculum development and can be used to better develop university curriculum and supplemental training focused on airport management and operations. Recommendations are made for specialized airport courses within aviation management programs. Further, this study identifies for job seekers or individuals employed in entry level positions those knowledge requirements deemed important by airport managers and operations personnel at different sized airports.

  10. Meanings of a Territorial Infrastructure: the Airports Significati di una infrastruttura territoriale: gli aeroporti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mazzeo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available

    The paper want to explore the major meanings of an airport. It is a territorial infrastructure that increases the spatial accessibility and the economic potential of a territory; in this sense, it is also a port to boost tourism and cultural exchanges. It is also an infrastructure bringing with it investment in other areas of mobility. Since the sixties, finally, it has also become an architectural icon and a symbol of urban level. Objective limitations remain; in particular for the position, outside the city, and for the service, that can be ordered and tidy. The airports have an important role for the move of people. As the international transport statistics the number of passengers in the main airports is growing, also if has suffered the blows of the international economic crisis. The expansion of air passenger traffic is related with the tendency to the specialization of travels, according to the range of movement of persons. The actual changing economic world coincides with a process of continuous growth of passenger flows, partly independent from that of economic growth; the combination of these two processes has multiplied the number of connections and has produced new phenomena. The transport system isn’t a neutral system, also if it is sectorial; it, rather, is linked very strongly with the territorial system in which it operates and with the location choices of firms and individuals. This reflection has value for all the transport’s infrastructures, although with different degrees. In this ranking the airports are located in a great importance position, as they can be a strategic asset in the territorial economic growth processes, contributing directly or indirectly to the development of local enterprises. An airport operates whether as a supplier of infrastructure or as a business reality in itself, operating in a highly competitive market with an high speed of change. Airports are an architectural and urban typology typically

  11. Ranging airport pseudolite for local area augmentation using the global positioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartone, Chris Gregory

    The Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is being developed to support precision approach and landing operations in and about the local area surrounding an airport. The LAAS Program is currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards for the LAAS being developed by RTCA, Incorporated. The LAAS uses differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and includes one or more airport pseudolites (APL) to increase the availability for certain installations. This dissertation addresses the addition of a differentially corrected, ranging APL into a LAAS. Prior to this work, no ranging APL has been integrated into a prototype LAAS and demonstrated in a real-time flight environment showing that an increase in LAAS availability is feasible. The APL requirements resulted in a prototype APL transmitting and receiving subsystem with a coarse-acquisition (C/A) code format that could be operated at any frequency within the L1± 10.0 MHz band. To investigate the major APL error the developmental approach was performed in two phases. Phase I implemented an APL operating at a center frequency off-L1 and concentrated on multipath limiting. The Phase II on-L1 APL architecture implemented a unique pulsing, automatic gain control (AGC) and GPS Blanker technique in the common reception path to maximize APL signal tracking and minimize electromagnetic interference to DGPS. To minimize ground multipath for the APL geometry, which is more severe than for GPS, a multipath limiting antenna (MLA) was designed, fabricated, and tested within a 4-month period. The implementation of this MLA concept was a first for APL applications and also contributed to the successful multipath limiting of ground multipath at the DGPS LAAS Ground Station. This effort successfully demonstrated that ground multipath can be limited (with low variance and no long-term bias) for the APL geometry and that suitable precision approach performance

  12. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 11, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Fink, Mary (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: Analysis of System-wide Investment in the National Airspace System: A Portfolio Analytical Framework and an Example; Regional Air Transport in Europe: The Potential Role of the Civil Tiltrotor in Reducing Airside Congestion; The Development of Jomo Kenyatta International Airport as a Regional Aviation Hub; Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation; The Competitive Effects of Airline Mergers and Acquisitions: More Capital Market Evidence; and The Competitive Position of Hub Airports in the Transatlantic Market.

  13. Structural Properties of the Brazilian Air Transportation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Guilherme S; da Silva, Ana Paula Couto; Ruiz, Linnyer B; Benevenuto, Fabrício

    2015-09-01

    The air transportation network in a country has a great impact on the local, national and global economy. In this paper, we analyze the air transportation network in Brazil with complex network features to better understand its characteristics. In our analysis, we built networks composed either by national or by international flights. We also consider the network when both types of flights are put together. Interesting conclusions emerge from our analysis. For instance, Viracopos Airport (Campinas City) is the most central and connected airport on the national flights network. Any operational problem in this airport separates the Brazilian national network into six distinct subnetworks. Moreover, the Brazilian air transportation network exhibits small world characteristics and national connections network follows a power law distribution. Therefore, our analysis sheds light on the current Brazilian air transportation infrastructure, bringing a novel understanding that may help face the recent fast growth in the usage of the Brazilian transport network. PMID:26312421

  14. Ground subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    Rozikov, U. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we give a concept of ground subgroup for finite and countable groups. By our definition such a subgroup of a group depends on a given subset of the group and on a given partition of the subset. For finite and free groups we describe some sets of ground subgroups. We apply the ground subgroups to describe ground states of a model of statistical mechanics.

  15. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  16. Real-time Inter-modal Strategies for Airline Schedule Perturbation Recovery and Airport Congestion Mitigation under Collaborative Decision Making (CDM)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this dissertation is to propose a new analytical framework and supporting optimization models that will encourage the aviation industry to incorporate alternative transportation modes when major airports in the system encounter temporary closures or severe capacity deficiencies. This framework can provide a way to reduce passenger disutility due to delay and misconnection, to help airlines reduce operating cost and recover schedule more promptly, and to assist air traffic flo...

  17. 14 CFR 417.109 - Ground safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground safety. 417.109 Section 417.109... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Launch Safety Responsibilities § 417.109 Ground safety. (a) Ground safety... 417.115(c), and subpart E of this part provide launch operator ground safety requirements....

  18. Long-range transport of dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and Indian region – A case study using satellite data and ground-based measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Badarinath, K.V.S.; Kharol, S.K.; Kaskaoutis, D.G.; Sharma, A.R.; Ramaswamy, V.; Kambezidis, H.D.

    geostationary satellite KALPANA-1 Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) together with ground observations are used to analyze the temporal variation of the dust event that occurred from 19 to 24 February 2008 with the strongest intensity on 22 February...

  19. The use of meta-heuristics for airport gate assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chun-Hung; Ho, Sin C.; Kwan, Cheuk-Lam

    2012-01-01

    proposed to generate good solutions within a reasonable timeframe. In this work, we attempt to assess the performance of three meta-heuristics, namely, genetic algorithm (GA), tabu search (TS), simulated annealing (SA) and a hybrid approach based on SA and TS. Flight data from Incheon International Airport......Improper assignment of gates may result in flight delays, inefficient use of the resource, customer’s dissatisfaction. A typical metropolitan airport handles hundreds of flights a day. Solving the gate assignment problem (GAP) to optimality is often impractical. Meta-heuristics have recently been...... are collected to carry out the computational comparison. Although the literature has documented these algorithms, this work may be a first attempt to evaluate their performance using a set of realistic flight data....

  20. Nuclear techniques for finding chemical explosives in airport luggage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzins, Lee

    1991-05-01

    Chemical explosives are composed of concentrated densities of nitrogen and oxygen. High values of the nitrogen alert the presence of a bomb; high values of both nitrogen and oxygen densities certify the bomb's presence uniquely. More than a dozen nuclear-based techniques have been proposed for rapidly scanning airport luggage to find hidden explosives by measuring these elemental distributions. In almost every scheme, the technological challenge is the accelerator, which must be small, well-shielded, cost-effective, and be operable in busy airports by nominally-trained personnel, with minimum unscheduled downtime for repairs or service. This paper will summarize, within the limits imposed by security, four of the imaging schemes.

  1. Statistical thunderstorm short time forecast for the Barranquilla airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on logistic regression, an approach to thunderstorm forecasting is proposed as well as a model for the Barranquilla (Colombia) city airport. With the analysis of both meteorological surface and height variables, such as thermodynamic indices that represent the physical processes involved in thunderstorm generation, the relationship between these variables and the occurrence of the phenomenon is brought out; the variables and indices with the greatest influence were identified and, with their use, the thunderstorm processes were summarized in a single mathematical function that allows the determination of the probability of occurrence or not occurrence of a thunderstorm on a specific day. That function was tested as a forecast tool for the Barranquilla airport

  2. The community response to aircraft noise around six Spanish airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Faus, L. J.; Garcia, A. M.

    1993-06-01

    The community response to aircraft noise has been studied through a social survey. A total of 1800 persons living in the vicinity of six major Spanish airports have been interviewed at their homes concerning the environmental quality of the area, dissatisfaction with road traffic noise and aircraft noise, activities interfered with by noise, most disturbing aircraft types, and subjective evaluation of airport impact. All the responses obtained in this survey have been compared with aircraft noise levels corresponding to the residence locations of the people interviewed (values of NEF levels were calculated with the INM model). The results obtained in this work allow one to evaluate the impact of aircraft noise under a wide range of different situations.

  3. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Volume 3 of the 2003 Air Transport Reserch Society (ATRS) World Conference includes papers on topics relevant to airline operations worldwide. Specific topics include: European Union and civil aviation regimens;simulating decision making in airline operations, passenger points of view on convenient airports; route monopolies and nonlinear pricing; cooperation among airports in Europe; fleet modernizaiton in Brazil;the effects of deregulation on the growth of air transportation in Europe and the United States.

  4. Formerly utilized MED/AEC sites Remedial Action Program. Radiological survey of the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of two radiological surveys of the St. Louis-Lambert Airport property, formerly known as the Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, Missouri, are presented. Uranium- and radium-bearing waste materials were stored from the 1940's to the late 1960's in this area. The surveys included direct measurements of beta-gamma radiation; determination of uranium, actinium, and radium concentrations in soil samples and from bore holes; determination of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater and surface water; measurement of radon flux from the ground surface; and measurements of 222Rn in air near the site. Results indicate that some offsite drainage pathways are becoming contaminated, probably by runoff from the site; no migration of 222Rn from the site was observed

  5. Airport multipath simulation for siting DGPS reference stations

    OpenAIRE

    Macabiau, Christophe; Roturier, Benoit; Chatre, Eric; Renard, Alain

    1999-01-01

    The siting of a GPS reference station on an airport is achieved by minimizing the influence of the environ-ment on the pseudorange measurements, while comply-ing with the practical operational installation constraints. The CNS Research Laboratory (URE-CNS) of the ENAC, in collaboration with the STNA and SEXTANT AVION-IQUE, has started a study that aims at providing siting guidelines for the French Civil Aviation Authority. As a result, a tool is developed, based on computed error predictions ...

  6. Design of Airport Rigid Runway Structures with Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Covatariu, Gabriela; Zarojanu, H.; Ciongradi, I.; Budescu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Computing with neural networks ranges between engineering and artificial intelligence. It uses classical engineering mathematical techniques and heuristic methods specific for Artificial Intelligence. This paperwork illustrates the way of using neural networks for improving the computing method by increasing the accuracy in design the concrete slabs from airport infrastructure. The results obtained using the models developed with the method of finite element were used for creating neural netw...

  7. Aircraft Noise and Quality of Life around Frankfurt Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Eikmann; Christin Peschel; Cara Kahl; Dirk Schreckenberg; Markus Meis

    2010-01-01

    In a survey of 2,312 residents living near Frankfurt Airport aircraft noise annoyance and disturbances as well as environmental (EQoL) and health-related quality of life (HQoL) were assessed and compared with data on exposure due to aircraft, road traffic, and railway noise. Results indicate higher noise annoyance than predicted from general exposure-response curves. Beside aircraft sound levels source-related attitudes were associated with reactions to aircraft noise. Furthermore, aircraft n...

  8. Discharge of surface water from Billund Airport (VB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetlesen, Kåre Wessel; Møller, Jens; Bastholm, Lars;

    1999-01-01

    It has been found that Billund Airport does not cause any environmental strain on Billund Stream that it can not handle by itself. Thought it has been assessed that in combination with extreme weather the strain can exceed a critical limit. Such situation can cause great damage to the flora and...... fauna of the stream.To lower the risk of these situations it is recommended to switch from using urea for de-iceing to patassiumformiat and keep using propylenglycol....

  9. Design of air traffic control tower at Brnik airport

    OpenAIRE

    Štular, David

    2007-01-01

    Design of air traffic control tower at Brnik airport according to European Standard Eurocode is presented. The structure of tower is a concrete, 106 m high core, supported by 31 m long piles. Calculation of self weight, variable actions, snow and wind load has been examined. The main part of diploma thesis is earthquake analysis. The building belongs to importance class III which determinates the building to be designed for the earthquake with a longer return period as regular ...

  10. Queuing Models of Airport Departure Processes for Emissions Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Simaiakis, Ioannis; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft taxiing on the surface contribute significantly to the fuel burn and emissions at airports. This paper investigates the possibility of reducing fuel burn and emissions from surface operations through a reduction of the taxi times of departing aircraft. A novel approach is proposed that models the aircraft departure process as a queuing system, and attempts to reduce taxi times and emissions through improved queue management strategies. The departure taxi (taxi-out) ...

  11. Automatic Terminal Information System for El Alto Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Cuentas, Natalia Indira; Román-González, A

    2015-01-01

    The air traffic controllers of the El Alto airport must give to the landing and taking off aircrafts, necessary information such as the visibility of the runway, the wind speed and direction, cloud cover, temperature, pressure, etc. This information called Meteorological Terminal Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) is essential for taking decision respect to the landing procedure. At aerodromes with a considerable level of traffic, the METAR issue has become a problem, may cause congestio...

  12. Regional public support to airlines and airports: an unsolved puzzle.

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Sánchez, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a structural model to explain the motivation of regional public authorities to arrange marketing agreements for route and traffic development. Furthermore, using data from Spanish airports, we empirically test this model obtaining the demand function according to the preferences of public authorities. The results show that the public budget, airport’s attributes or intermodal competition affect to the demand for aircraft operations of regional public agencies. Finally, we ...

  13. Metallic ground state and glassy transport in single crystalline URh$_2$Ge$_2$: Enhancement of disorder effects in a strongly correlated electron system

    OpenAIRE

    Süllow, S.; Maksimov, I.; Otop, A.; Litterst, F. J.; Perucchi, A.; Degiorgi, L.; Mydosh, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the electronic transport properties on a single crystalline specimen of the moderately disordered heavy fermion system URh$_2$Ge$_2$. For this material, we find glassy electronic transport in a single crystalline compound. We derive the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and establish metallicity by means of optical conductivity and Hall effect measurements. The overall behavior of the electronic transport properties closely resembles that of ...

  14. A New Intelligent Airplane Landing Planning Method in Congested Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Dastgerdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays considering many advantages of air traveling, we notice that traffic congestion has significantly increased in airspace of countries, and it is expected that this growth rate, increases even more in the forthcoming years.This growth rate and different limitations posed on developing some airports led to the problem of landing airplanes to become one of the most important issues formed in the field of aviation. In this paper, in the form of a new approach based on CPSO algorithm for intelligent landing planning, determining optimal landing times, optimal allocation of runways, and at last the order of successive landings of planes has been done in a way that appropriately fulfills the main goal of the problem (minimizing the total flights delays; thus helping significantly to controlling air traffic congestion in airports approaches. The simulation results show that compared to the last presented methods, including methods based on genetic algorithms, GLS and Bionomic, has decreased the total amounts of flight delays considerably. Getting zero for total amount of flight delays for the two problems with real data of DFW airport in Texas, United States, confirms the more capability of CPSO algorithm compared to the other intelligent methods for obtaining optimal solutions to the problem.

  15. Geophysical characterization of permafrost terrain at Iqaluit International Airport, Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenborger, Greg A.; LeBlanc, Anne-Marie

    2015-12-01

    Iqaluit International Airport presently suffers from instabilities and subsidence along its runway, taxiways and apron. In particular, asphalt surfaces are significantly impacted by settlement and cracking. These instabilities may be related to permafrost, permafrost degradation and associated drainage conditions. Low induction number electromagnetic measurements along with galvanic and capacitive electrical resistivity surveys were performed over selected areas within the airport boundary and in the near vicinity to assist with permafrost characterization and to investigate active permafrost processes. Electrical resistivity images suggest distinct electrical signatures for different terrain units and sediment types, and for ice-rich material including ice wedges. Anomalous regions are identified that are coincident with localized settlement problems. Repeated resistivity maps reveal seasonal changes indicative of high unfrozen water content and freeze/thaw of groundwater beneath airport infrastructure in distinct regions related to surficial geology. Even with continuous permafrost and cold permafrost temperatures, the resistivity models reveal anomalously conductive material at depth that is not obviously correlated to mapped surficial sediments and that may represent thaw susceptible sediments or significant unfrozen water content.

  16. Characterization of delay propagation in the airport network

    CERN Document Server

    Fleurquin, Pablo; Eguíluz, Victor M

    2013-01-01

    Complex networks provide a suitable framework to model air traffic. Previous works described the world air-traffic network as a graph with direct flights between airports as edges and passenger commercial airports as vertices. In this work we study the US airport network, in the time period 2005-2011. We characterize the topological structure of the network and identify how the plane rotations adjust to it. The reactionary delays are supposed to propagate following the structure of this network. We analyze the properties of flight delays including the total distribution of delays, the delays per day of the week and the hour-by-hour evolution of the delays within each day. We pay special attention to the long-delayed flights, those accumulating delays longer than 12 hours, and study when and where this type of incidences is most common. The goal of this work is to gain a better understanding of the factors contributing to the reactionary delay propagation with the aim of developing models able to realistically...

  17. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two such...... of ground war tactics for how we understand political campaigns and what it means to participate in them. He shows how ground wars are waged using resources well beyond those of a given candidate and their staff. These include allied interest groups and civic associations, party-provided technical...... professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  18. Developing an Indicator System for Monitoring, Analyzing, and Assessing Airport Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Janic, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with developing an indicator system for monitoring, analyzing, and assessing sustainability of airports. The sustainability implies simultaneous increasing of the overall socialeconomic benefits and increasing at a slower rate, stagnating, and/or diminishing of the negative impacts of these airports during the specified medium- to long-term period of time. The indicator system consists of the indicators and their measures reflecting the airport operational, economic, social, ...

  19. Shoppers' motivations at the airport; The impact of impulse buying tendency and time-pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Sepp, Katri

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study is to expand the understanding of the factors influencing customer behavior in airport retailing environment. More specifically, the focus is on Asian customers visiting the Finnair Tax-Free Shop at Helsinki Airport. The aim of the study is to find out how shopping motivations are affected by time pressure and impulse buying tendency, as both are factors related strongly to the shopping in the airport environment. METHODS: The study draws on ...

  20. The role of London airports in providing connectivity for the UK: regional dependence on foreign hubs

    OpenAIRE

    Suau-Sanchez, Pere; Voltes-Dorta, Augusto; Hector, Rodriguez-Deniz

    2015-01-01

    In a context of ongoing debate about the future UK aviation policy and its implications for regional economic development, this paper discusses the role of London Heathrow and the South East airports in providing connectivity for the UK, with particular focus on the international markets that originate from regional UK airports. Using an MIDT dataset of worldwide passenger itineraries served by the European airport network during May 2013, we first establish whether London Heathrow can curren...

  1. An evaluation of the provision of terminal facilities for the design of low cost airport terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Sabar, Rohafiz

    2009-01-01

    The growth of the Low Cost Carriers (LCCs) in the world will have a significant impact on future airport development. LCCs such as Ryanair, Air Asia and EasyJet prefer only basic terminal facilities (TFs) at Low Cost Terminals (LCTs) to reduce associated costs (airport charges, capital investment, operational costs). Pressure by LCCs for reduced airport charges has led to the inclusion of only basic TFs so as to reduce capital investment and operational costs. This has raised a...

  2. Airport sentinel surveillance and entry quarantine for dengue infections following a fever screening program in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan Mei-Mei; Chang Feng-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Dengue has not reached an endemic status in Taiwan; nevertheless, we have implemented a fever screening program at airports for the early detection of febrile passengers with a dengue infection. This study is intended to assess the performance of the airport screening procedures for dengue infection. Methods We analyzed data from the national surveillance system of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control. We included the imported dengue cases reported by sentinel airports a...

  3. Economic effects of a temporary shutdown of an airport - Review and case study

    OpenAIRE

    DE LANGHE, Katrien; STRUYF, Els; SYS, Christa; Van De Voorde, Eddy; VANELSLANDER, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Airports are crucial nodes, ensuring the economic activity in a region. This paper reports on the direct and indirect effects of a temporary shutdown of an airport. Airports can be closed for several reasons and this can have major effects on different stakeholders. Therefore, this paper offers an analysis of this issue, so that all stakeholders can prepare themselves for the case a shutdown occurs, and will be able to take measures. Firstly, the effects of a temporary shutdown are discussed ...

  4. Commercial aircraft noise modeling Effects of air traffic and airport infrastructure changes

    OpenAIRE

    Khardi, S.; Konovalova, E.; LADEGAILLERIE, Y; HAMADICHE, M

    2010-01-01

    International air traffic is growing rapidly and environmental concerns induced by excessive aircraft noise become a major objective of airport authorities and aircraft manufacturers despite of the reduction of the aircraft noise levels by 20 dB during the last thirty years. The large numbers of people living in communities near airports, affected by aircraft noise, have been complaining. This paper gives detailed operations data of Lyon Saint-Exupéry International Airport (France) and provid...

  5. Analysis of Airport Performance using Surface Surveillance Data: A Case Study of BOS

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa; Reilly, Brendan; Khadilkar, Harshad Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Detailed surface surveillance datasets from sources such as the Airport Surface Detection Equipment, Model-X (ASDE-X) have the potential to be used for analysis of airport operations, in addition to their primary purpose of enhancing safety. In this paper, we describe how airport performance characteristics such as departure queue dynamics and throughput can be analyzed using surface surveillance data. We also propose and evaluate several metrics to measure the daily operational performance o...

  6. PERIODIZATION LIFE CYCLE STAGE OF AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT UKRAINE UNDER SPECIFICS OF THEIR BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.М. ЛОЖАЧЕВСЬКА

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  In the article the considered problem of division into periods of phases of life cycle of air-ports, in accordance with the features of influence of marketing environment on their activity. Authors offersown vision of problem of phase development of air-ports is offered, in accordance with conception of life cycle of organization. This approach enables to show out Ukrainian air-ports on the new stage of the strategic planning and management.

  7. Arrival manager (AMAN) and its implementation study at Vilnius International Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Bimal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study in detail the working principle of AMAN, its components involved, develop a trajectory prediction simulator using BADA 3.6 and compare the initial flight plan predicted time with that of TP simulator. Due to the increasing traffic demands in major European airports, those airports are implementing it to assist the controllers and decrease their workload. AMAN is used to balance the flow of inbound aircraft and capacity of airport by proving sequence of aircr...

  8. Doubling the task - Effects of task switching during simultaneous control of multiple airports

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Norbert; Moehlenbrink, Christoph; Andrea, Kiesel

    2011-01-01

    Research on remote tower control solutions for small airports raised the question whether it is possible for an air traffic controller to control multiple airports simultaneously. This simultaneous control would require the air traffic controller to switch between task sets of two airports. Therefore it is important to analyse the factors influencing task switching in these dynamic multiple task environments and how they are affecting the air traffic controller. A human-in-the-loop microwo...

  9. Hub Airports, the knowledge economy and how close is close? Evidence from Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Thierstein, Alain; Conventz, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Airports have stepped beyond the stage of being simply pure infrastructure facilities. Hub airports in particular are considered to function as supra-regional and international gateway infrastructure thus having a decisive impact on firms' competitiveness and stimulating urban development. Hub airports have ? through their capability of concentrating different types of flows, from local to global ? morphed into strategic nodes within the networked economy. Recent studies indicate that hub air...

  10. Competitive interaction between airports, airlines and high-speed rail: Summary and conclusions

    OpenAIRE

    OECD; International Transport Forum

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes, structures, and provides some context for discussions of the Round Table mentioned in the title. The first part of the paper focuses on sources of market power for airports and on policy responses. When an airport is congested and competition with other airports is limited, regulation may be justified, and the dual till approach likely works best. In other cases, however, policy should establish conditions for competition to emerge as much as possible, instead of attemp...

  11. The development of long-haul air services from regional and secondary airports in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    In recent years there has been tremendous interest in the growth of low-cost airlines in Europe operating from regional and secondary airports. These have been entirely in the short-haul sector, however. Intercontinental services remain dominated by a few large airports such as London Heathrow, Frankfurt, Paris CDG and Amsterdam. This paper examines the recent development of long-haul services and shows that some of the medium sized European airports have seen their network reduced in the las...

  12. Modeling the impact of air transport on the economy - practices, problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Huderek-Glapska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of measuring the contribution of air transport to the regional economy is very important nowadays since many airport infrastructure projects are being implemented, using available European Union funds. As a result of growing transport needs and increasing incomes among the population, the air transport market is strongly developing.  This development results to many direct and indirect socio-economic benefits to locations in close proximity of an airport but also in the whole economy. The measurement of these benefits is important because the decisions made with respect to air transport influence local and regional economic performance. The most commonly used tool for measuring the positive effects associated with the operation of an airport is the input-output analysis. The aim of the article is to present the characteristics of the input-output method, to indicate its applications in Poland - the country with the most dynamic growth of air transport, to present the possible limitations of this method and propose improvements. Methods: The method used in this research is one that measures the effects of changes in the economy as a result of air transport activity. Particular input-output analysis is used. Results: On the background of the results of modeling the impact of polish airport on regional economy in 2009 the updated analysis in 2012 is provided. The economic impacts of Krakow, Katowice, Wroclaw and Szczecin airports are estimated. Then the limitations of input-output method are presented and suggestions of possible improvements are made. Comments: Proper measurement of the impact of airport's operation and investment on the economy, leads to more effective air transport policy development. For future research, the advanced input-output method to assess the positive impact of airports on regional development is recommended. However, a comprehensive assessment of the operation and expansion of airport

  13. Human-Centered Design of Adaptive Planning Tools for Airport Surface Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two critical requirements for an effective airport surface management system are: ? The need to adapt plans both strategically and tactically because of...

  14. 75 FR 39614 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Modesto City-County Airport, Modesto, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ...-County Airport study contains a proposed noise compatibility program comprised of actions designed for... Ceres, and Stanislaus County General Plans; Consistently designate the area northwest of the...

  15. GRASP [GRound-Water Adjunct Sensitivity Program]: A computer code to perform post-SWENT [simulator for water, energy, and nuclide transport] adjoint sensitivity analysis of steady-state ground-water flow: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRASP (GRound-Water Adjunct Senstivity Program) computes measures of the behavior of a ground-water system and the system's performance for waste isolation, and estimates the sensitivities of these measures to system parameters. The computed measures are referred to as ''performance measures'' and include weighted squared deviations of computed and observed pressures or heads, local Darcy velocity components and magnitudes, boundary fluxes, and travel distance and time along travel paths. The sensitivities are computed by the adjoint method and are exact derivatives of the performance measures with respect to the parameters for the modeled system, taken about the assumed parameter values. GRASP presumes steady-state, saturated grondwater flow, and post-processes the results of a multidimensional (1-D, 2-D, 3-D) finite-difference flow code. This document describes the mathematical basis for the model, the algorithms and solution techniques used, and the computer code design. The implementation of GRASP is verified with simple one- and two-dimensional flow problems, for which analytical expressions of performance measures and sensitivities are derived. The linkage between GRASP and multidimensional finite-difference flow codes is described. This document also contains a detailed user's manual. The use of GRASP to evaluate nuclear waste disposal issues has been emphasized throughout the report. The performance measures and their sensitivities can be employed to assist in directing data collection programs, expedite model calibration, and objectively determine the sensitivity of projected system performance to parameters

  16. Strategy to Increase the State’s Role in the Business Process Management on the Airport Service Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubenko AV

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies the causes and factors that prove the urgent need to increase the state’s role in developing and implementing strategies to introduce innovative technologies in the management of Russian airports. Solution of the problem of the international market entry and maintain there the required level of competitiveness of Russian airlines of various sizes requires the selection of optimal forms and mechanisms targeted on improving adaptability and competitiveness in the international systems of constraints and dynamics of indicators of demand for the services of the air carriers. This in the turn requires the substantiation of the choice of strategic directions of development of companies operating in the transport market, the development of tools that determine the characteristics of the relationship between marketing strategy and conditions for its implementation. In this connection, the authors examined the structure of the innovation cycle management and functions assigned to the recommended to the creation state airport management company. The article also refined the forms of airlines consolidation depending on the subject of cooperation, systematized agreements benefits for the joint operation of airlines for the passenger and the carrier. The authors consider methods to improve the efficiency of Russian air transportation market, including by reducing tariffs and the introduction of the economic process of airline low-cost carriers business models.

  17. Low-Cost Carriers, Local Economy and Tourism Development at Four Portuguese Airports. A Model of Cost–Benefit Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The liberalisation of air transport created a new era in the sector. The entry of low-cost carriers triggered dynamism and consequently changed the behaviours of the demand and supply of air transport services. The volume of traffic at Portuguese airports increased from 17 million passengers in 2002 to more than 30 million in 2012, representing cumulative growth of 75%. The commitment to low-cost carriers (LCCs was a determining factor for this growth in that, in 2012, these carriers recorded a market share of 33%. This study aims to analyse the evolution of LCC air traffic in Portugal and its impact on regional economic development. Through a model of cost–benefit analysis, we determine the costs, benefits and net welfare in the developmet of the region driven by the LCC routes of 4 Portuguese airports, Faro, Lisbon, Funchal and Porto, between 2005 and 2012. The methodology proves the existence of a positive net impact driven by LCCs on the local economy, directly through job creation and increased consumption in the tourism sector and indirectly by the increased demand from other sectors.

  18. Long-range transport of carbon monoxide from tropical ground to upper troposphere: a case study for South East Asia in October 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) were observed in October 1997 at the upper troposphere of the western tropical Pacific. Transport from the potential sources of CO due to biomass burning in the tropics was investigated by using a global chemical transport model (CTM) driven by assimilated meteorological data provided from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). A CTM evaluation simulation using water vapor showed that the amount of vertical transport of moisture by large-scale flow was consistent with the precipitation predicted at the convective zone. A series of CTM simulations using 10-day emission periods of an artificial material with lifetime of 60 days indicated that vertical lifting of surface air at the Indonesian archipelago occurred in the concentrated convections west of Sumatra Island. No evidence was found that CO from the Amazon region or Africa significantly contributed to high concentrations in the western tropical Pacific. Transport formed a large scale anvil below the tropopause by rapid vertical transport and by divergence flow. The average time required for the transport from Kalimantan and Sumatra Island to the point of high CO concentration was about 15 days. High concentrations at an altitude of 10 km in the Southern Hemisphere were transported by large-scale subsidence from the upper tropospheric maximum, which was presumably produced from the sources at Kalimantan and Sumatra Island. Estimated emissions of CO in September and October from Kalimantan and Sumatra were substantially larger than the previous estimates. Omission of chemical reaction was a possible problem for the overestimate, but not significant. The possible problems in the transport were incorrect CTM transport due to insufficient horizontal (2.5 x 2.5 deg) and vertical resolution of the CTM, and to inaccuracy in the wind fields at the upper part of the troposphere and a divergent flow pattern in the upper part of the troposphere

  19. Modelling passenger flows in public transport facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daamen, W.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the developement of a new type of simulation tool for the assessment of designs of public transport facilities (stations, airports) and other public spaces with intensive pedestrian flows. Since the available space for such facilities is increasingly under pressure, the space e

  20. Metallic ground state and glassy transport in single crystalline URh2Ge2: enhancement of disorder effects in a strongly correlated electron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süllow, S; Maksimov, I; Otop, A; Litterst, F J; Perucchi, A; Degiorgi, L; Mydosh, J A

    2004-12-31

    We present a detailed study of the electronic transport properties on a single crystalline specimen of the moderately disordered heavy-fermion system URh2Ge2. For this material, we find glassy electronic transport in a single crystalline compound. We derive the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity and establish metallicity by means of optical conductivity and Hall effect measurements. The overall behavior of the electronic transport properties closely resembles that of metallic glasses, with at low temperatures an additional minor spin disorder contribution. We argue that this glassy electronic behavior in a crystalline compound reflects the enhancement of disorder effects as a consequence of strong electronic correlations. PMID:15698001