WorldWideScience

Sample records for airglow

  1. Byurakan sky night airglow observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data on sky night airglow are obtained by Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory of the Acadamy of Sciences of the Armenian SSR. (BAO). The picfures of brightness distribution of BAO sky night airglow are presented. The observations were carried out with the help of one-channel electrophotometre placed at the 0.5 metre A 3T-14A telescope in U, B, V bands of the international photometric system in moonless nights of the 1st/2nd October, 1976 and 22nd/23d February, 1977. Presented are also the U, B, V values of BAO sky night airglow brightness from one sguare second in zenith. The ilumination of Erevan and Byurakan is the cause of the increase of airglow brightness of BAO sky night, particularly in the town and village direction

  2. Seasonal hemispherical SWIR airglow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeffrey; Dayton, David C.; Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael M.; Nolasco, Rudolph

    2011-09-01

    Airglow luminescence in the SWIR region due to upper atmospheric recombination of solar excited molecules is a well accepted phenomenon. While the intensity appears broadly uniform over the whole sky hemisphere, we are interested in variations in four areas: 1) fine periodic features known as gravity waves, 2) broad patterns across the whole sky, 3) temporal variations in the hemispheric mean irradiance over the course of the night, and 4) long term seasonal variations in the mean irradiance. An experiment is described and results presented covering a full year of high resolution hemispheric SWIR irradiance images. An automated gimbal views 45 hemispheric positions, using 30 second durations, and repeats approximately every half hour through out the night. The gimbal holds co-mounted and bore-sighted visible and SWIR cameras. Measuring airglow with respect to spatial, temporal, and seasonal variations will facilitate understanding its behavior and possible benefits, such as night vision and predicting upper atmosphere turbulence. The measurements were performed in a tropical marine location on the island of Kauai Hi.

  3. Lyman alpha airglow observations from SORCE SOLSTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinar, E.; Snow, M.; Holsclaw, G.; Thomas, G. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instrument on board the Solar Radiation Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft in low Earth orbit observes stars every orbit for in-flight calibration. It also observes several star-free regions of the sky near the wavelength of Lyman alpha to correct for airglow emission in the stellar measurements. Although the airglow measurements are only taken during the eclipse portion of the orbit, the look directions cover nearly the entire anti-sunward hemisphere. This seven-year record of Lyman alpha airglow observations (2003-2010) shows the response of the Hydrogen geocorona to changes in the solar Lyman alpha irradiance over the solar cycle.

  4. Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Airglow Rocket Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Stanley C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes work done in support of the Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Air-glow Rocket Experiments at the University of Colorado for NASA grant NAG5-5021 under the direction of Dr. Stanley C. Solomon. (The overall rocket program is directed by Dr. Thomas N. Woods, formerly at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and now also at the University of Colorado, for NASA grant NAG5-5141.) Grant NAG5-5021 provided assistance to the overall program through analysis of airglow and solar data, support of two graduate students, laboratory technical services, and field support. The general goals of the rocket program were to measure the solar extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance, measure the terrestrial far-ultraviolet airglow, and analyze their relationship at various levels of solar activity, including near solar minimum. These have been met, as shown below. In addition, we have used the attenuation of solar radiation as the rocket descends through the thermosphere to measure density changes. This work demonstrates the maturity of the observational and modeling methods connecting energetic solar photon fluxes and airglow emissions through the processes of photoionization and photoelectron production and loss. Without a simultaneous photoelectron measurement, some aspects of this relationship remain obscure, and there are still questions pertaining to cascade contributions to molecular and atomic airglow emissions. However, by removing the solar irradiance as an "adjustable parameter" in the analysis, significant progress has been made toward understanding the relationship of far-ultraviolet airglow emissions to the solar and atmospheric conditions that control them.

  5. Airglow study of ionospheric plasma irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. An instrument for all-sky spectrophotometric imaging was developed for airglow measurements. A 630.0 nm airglow imaging system has been developed for ground-based studies of the optical signatures of tropical plasma irregularities in the F-region. The system was designed for narrowband interference filters (10 angstrom full width at half power) with all-sky (180deg) lenses and records images photographically by using a standard Nikon D300 camera. A field test of the apparatus was conducted on Cachoeira Paulista close to the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (22.7degS, 45.0 degW, dip angle = -28deg) from March 20 to March 29, 2009. The optical signature of plasma irregularities are airglow depletion bands in the OI 630 nm emission like plasma bubbles or MSTIDs. The production of the OI 630.o nm emission depends on the molecular oxygen density [O2] and on the oxygen ion density [O+]. The oxygen ion density [O+] is approximately equal to the electron density in the F-region. The height of the F-layer peak electron density is around 350-400 km, while the molecular oxygen density [O2] increases with decreasing height. Thus, the OI 630 nm emission peak occurs in the bottomside of the F region around 220-300 km. The initial results to come from these observations show the presence of airglow depletions in the OI 630 nm. In this work, the characteristics and resolution of the all-sky developed is present and discuss.

  6. Heater-induced ionization inferred from spectrometric airglow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, D. L.; Miceli, R. J.; Varney, R. H.; Schlatter, N.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Spectrographic airglow measurements were made during an ionospheric modification experiment at HAARP on March 12, 2013. Artificial airglow enhancements at 427.8, 557.7, 630.0, 777.4, and 844.6 nm were observed. On the basis of these emissions and using a methodology based on the method of Backus and Gilbert [1968, 1970], we estimate the suprathermal electron population and the subsequent equilibrium electron density profile, including contributions from electron impact ionization. We find that the airglow is consistent with significant induced ionization in view of the spatial intermittency of the airglow.

  7. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether J.W. Jr.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations of the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station of Arequipa. Peru (16.2/sup 0/S, 71.4/sup 0/W geographic, 3.2/sup 0/S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridonal wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22/sup h/ LT lasting for 1 or 2 hours. The temperature increases of 10 K or more existed only in the poleward (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge.

  8. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations on the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station at Arequipa, Peru (16.2 S, 71.4 W geographic, 3.2 S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridional wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22h LT lasting for 1 to 2 hours. The temperature increases of 100K or more existed only in the poleware (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge. (Author)

  9. Equatorial enhancement of the nighttime OH mesospheric infrared airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. J.; Thurgood, B. K.; Harrison, W. K.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    Global measurements of the hydroxyl mesospheric airglow over an extended period of time have been made possible by the NASA SABER infrared sensor aboard the TIMED satellite which has been functioning since December of 2001. The orbital mission has continued over a significant portion of a solar cycle. Experimental data from SABER for several years have exhibited equatorial enhancements of the nighttime mesospheric OH (Δv=2) airglow layer consistent with the high average diurnal solar flux. The brightening of the OH airglow typically means more H+O3 is being reacted. At both the spring and autumn seasonal equinoxes when the equatorial solar UV irradiance mean is greatest, the peak volume emission rate (VER) of the nighttime Meinel infrared airglow typically appears to be both significantly brighter plus lower in altitude by several kilometres at low latitudes compared with midlatitude findings.

  10. Equatorial enhancement of the nighttime OH mesospheric infrared airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D J [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Thurgood, B K [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Harrison, W K [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Mlynczak, M G [NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 401-B, Hampton, VA 23665-5225 (United States); Russell, J M [Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Hampton University, 23 Tyler Street Hampton, VA 23668 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Global measurements of the hydroxyl mesospheric airglow over an extended period of time have been made possible by the NASA SABER infrared sensor aboard the TIMED satellite which has been functioning since December of 2001. The orbital mission has continued over a significant portion of a solar cycle. Experimental data from SABER for several years have exhibited equatorial enhancements of the nighttime mesospheric OH ({delta}v=2) airglow layer consistent with the high average diurnal solar flux. The brightening of the OH airglow typically means more H+O{sub 3} is being reacted. At both the spring and autumn seasonal equinoxes when the equatorial solar UV irradiance mean is greatest, the peak volume emission rate (VER) of the nighttime Meinel infrared airglow typically appears to be both significantly brighter plus lower in altitude by several kilometres at low latitudes compared with midlatitude findings.

  11. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Mishin; Burke, W. J.; Pedersen, T.

    2005-01-01

    International audience Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line) and 557.7nm (green line) during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume a...

  12. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  13. The Nonlinear Model of the Response of Airglow to Gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Xu; H. Gao; A.V. Mikhalev

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we develope a timodependent, nonlinear, photochemical-dynamical 2-D model which is composed of 3 models: dynamical gravity wave model, middle atmospheric photochemical model, and airglow layer photochemical model. We use the model to study the effect of the gravity wave propagation on the airglow layer. The comparison between the effects of the different wavelength gravity wave on the airglow emission distributions is made. When the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave is close to or is shorter than the thickness of the airglow layer, the gravity wave can make complex structure of the airglow layer, such as the double and multi-peak structures of the airglow layer. However, the gravity wave that has long vertical wavelength can make large scale perturbation of the airglow emission distribution.

  14. Solar cycle variation of gravity waves observed in OH airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Reid, I. M.; Woithe, J.; Vincent, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Airglow imaging provides a unique means by which to study many wave-related phenomena in the 80 to 100 km altitude regime. Two-dimensional image observations reveal quasi-monochromatic disturbances associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) as well as small-scale instabilities, often called ripples. Image-averaged temperature and intensity measurements can be used to study the response of the airglow layer to tides and planetary waves, as well as monitor longer-term climatological variations. Here we present results of low and mid-latitude OH airglow observations beginning near solar max of solar cycle 23 and continuing through solar max of cycle 24. Aerospace imagers deployed at Alice Springs (23o42'S, 133o53'E) and Adelaide (34o55'S, 138o36'E) have been operating nearly continuously since ~2001. The imagers employ filters measuring OH Meinel (6, 2) and O2 Atmospheric (0, 1) band emission intensities and temperatures, as well as atmospheric gravity wave parameters. The Aerospace Corporation's Infrared Camera deployed at Maui, HI (20.7N,156.3W), collected more than 700 nights of airglow images from 2002-2005. The camera measures the OH Meinel (4,2) emission at 1.6 um using a 1 second exposure at a 3 second cadence, which allows the study of AGW and ripple features over very short temporal and spatial scales. The camera was relocated to Cerro Pachon, Chile (30.1 S, 70.8 W) and has been operating continuously since 2010. Temperature, intensity and gravity wave climatologies derived from the two Australian airglow imagers span a full solar cycle (solar max to solar max). Emission intensities have been calibrated using background stars, and temperatures have been calibrated with respect to TIMED/SABER temperatures, reducing the influence of instrument degradation on the solar cycle climatology. An automated wave detection algorithm is used to identify quasi monochromatic wave features in the airglow data, including wavelength, wave period and propagation

  15. The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging: Instrument Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery; Ward, William E.; Gault, William A.; Miller, Ian; Scott, Alan

    The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI) is a new implementation of the imaging field-widened Michelson interferometer concept. Airglow signatures in the mesopause region are imaged through the interferometer and wind and intensity images are simultaneously recorded. The field-of-view for this instrument is a 30 degree square region. This field will be divided into 100 bins (10 by 10) and measurements of intensity and line-of-sight wind taken for each bin. Two emissions (oxygen green line and hydroxyl) will be viewed simultaneously. The scientific purpose of this instrument is to provide unambiguous information on gravity waves since the background horizontal wind, and wind and irradiance variations will be simultaneously obtained. In the paper, the measurement principle and the characteristics of the instrument will be described and some initial results presented.

  16. The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ward, W. E.

    2009-05-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI) is a new implementation of the imaging field-widened Michelson interferometer concept which images airglow signatures in the mesopause region and simultaneously records wind and intensity images. The scientific purpose of this instrument is to provide unambiguous information on gravity waves since the background horizontal wind and irradiance variations will be simultaneously obtained. Calibration and characterization of instrument parameters has been completed at a field site in Shigaraki Japan and initial observations have been taken. Co-located alongside MIADI are the MU radar, Na Lidar and several All-Sky Imagers. Observation campaigns are ongoing to acquire simultaneous data sets from these instruments. In this paper, the calibration and characterization results will be summarized. The initial measurements of winds and intensity will be presented and the scientific goals of the current observing campaign outlined.

  17. Contributions of the OH airglow to space object irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruninger, John; Duff, James W.; Brown, James H.

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the contributions of the hydroxyl (OH) airglow to the illumination of resident space objects. During nighttime, in a moonless sky, the airglow is the largest contributor to the sky brightness in the visible (vis), the near-infrared (NIR) and short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral region. The dominant contributors to the airglow are vibrationally excited hydroxyl radicals, OH(ν). The radicals are formed in vibrational states up to υ=9 by the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ozone. The strong emissions, known as Meinel emissions, are sequences with σν= 1-6. Emissions with υ = 3, 4, 5 and 6 occur in the visible and NIR between .4 and 1.0 µm. From 1.0 to 2.5 µm there are very strong emissions from the δν= 2 sequences. The σν= 1 emissions extend into the thermal infrared to 4.5 μm. In this work, we considered four band passes, a vis-NIR band pass, two SABER band passes centered at 1.6 and 2.0 μm, respectively, and a broad band pass around 2.7 µm. SAMM2 was utilized to compute spectra and line of sight radiances. We used line of sight (LOS) radiances to compute the irradiance on a space object that was taken as a flat plate with a Lambertian surface reflectance. Profiles of irradiance versus orientation were calculated. The OH airglow will illuminate a facet even if it is pointing somewhat upward. However, the irradiance in the 2.7 μm band pass comes almost entirely from the atmosphere in the low altitude and the earth emission.

  18. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.N.; Rottman, G.J. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory); Bailey, S.M.; Solomon, S.C. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics)

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution.

  19. Near-infrared oxygen airglow from the Venus nightside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, D.; Meadows, V. S.; Allen, D. A.; Bezard, B.; Debergh, C.; Maillard, J.-P.

    1992-01-01

    Groundbased imaging and spectroscopic observations of Venus reveal intense near-infrared oxygen airglow emission from the upper atmosphere and provide new constraints on the oxygen photochemistry and dynamics near the mesopause (approximately 100 km). Atomic oxygen is produced by the Photolysis of CO2 on the dayside of Venus. These atoms are transported by the general circulation, and eventually recombine to form molecular oxygen. Because this recombination reaction is exothermic, many of these molecules are created in an excited state known as O2(delta-1). The airglow is produced as these molecules emit a photon and return to their ground state. New imaging and spectroscopic observations acquired during the summer and fall of 1991 show unexpected spatial and temporal variations in the O2(delta-1) airglow. The implications of these observations for the composition and general circulation of the upper venusian atmosphere are not yet understood but they provide important new constraints on comprehensive dynamical and chemical models of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere of Venus.

  20. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution

  1. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with approximately 15-nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy, providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates.

  2. Low Cost Earth Sensor Based on Oxygen Airglow (AIRES)

    OpenAIRE

    Scheidegger, N.; Shea, H.; Charbon, E.; Rugi-Grond, E

    2008-01-01

    This project has demonstrated the feasibility of a low-cost Earth sensor based on imaging oxygen airglow, allowing 0.4° accuracy from GEO under any illumination condition. Available Earth Sensor (ES) are based on the measurement of the earth’s infrared radiation to determine the vector to the Earth’s centre. These designs provide excellent accuracies over a large field of view, but are often heavy, large, require cooling or temperature stabilization and are power hungry. In addition, the sens...

  3. Global temperature distributions from OGO-6 6300 A airglow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamont, J. E.; Luton, J. M.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The OGO-6 6300 A airglow temperature measurements have been used to develop models of the global temperature distributions under solstice and equinox conditions for the altitude region from 240 to 300 km and for times ranging from dawn in this altitude region to shortly after sunset. The distributions are compared with models derived from satellite orbital decay and incoherent scatter sounding. The seasonal variation of the temperature as a function of latitude is shown to be very different from that derived from static diffusion models with constant boundary conditions.

  4. Single vs multi-level quenching of the hydroxyl airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Christoph; Espy, Patrick J.; Hibbins, Robert; Djupvik, Anlaug Amanda

    2016-04-01

    The reaction in the upper mesosphere between atomic hydrogen and ozone results in hydroxyl (OH) that is produced in excited vibrational levels 6 through 9. The vibrationally excited OH radiates in a thin (~8 km thick) layer near 87 km, giving rise to the strong near infrared airglow emission that has been used for remote sensing of the mesopause region. The interpretation of the emission relies on accurate knowledge of the population and quenching of the upper states, and open questions remain as to whether the quenching takes place through single- or multi-quantum deactivation. Here we will demonstrate how high quality spectral observations of OH (9,7) and (8,6) airglow emissions are available as background measurements during standard K-band astronomical observations from the Nordic Optical Telescope (18°W, 29°N). These emissions have been analysed to ascertain the quenching of the upper vibrational populations. Together with a steady-state model of these emissions, an estimate of the ratio of single to multi-quantum quenching efficiency and the impact on the populations of the lower vibrational levels will be presented.

  5. Mesospheric hydroxyl airglow signatures of acoustic and gravity waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Numerical model results demonstrate that acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may produce cylindrical "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer. They may arrive as precursors to upward propagating gravity waves, generated simultaneously by the same sources, and produce strong temperature perturbations in the thermosphere above. Transient and short-lived, the acoustic wave airglow intensity and temperature signatures are predicted to be detectable by ground-based airglow imaging systems and may provide new insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1993-08-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far ultraviolet (FUV) were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University (Supriya Chakrabarti), but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University of Colorado (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed here. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 1/4 meter Rowland circle EUV spectrograph which has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2 nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon XUV photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with about 15 nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc-seconds. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2 nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional CODACON detectors were developed at CU by Dr. George Lawrence. The pre-flight and post-flight photometric calibrations were performed at our calibration laboratory and at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet

  7. Calibration of the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Siegmund, Oswald

    1989-01-01

    The Berkeley Extreme-ultraviolet Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS), a multiinstrument sounding rocket payload, made comprehensive measurements of the earth's dayglow. The primary instruments consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers: one channel to measure several atomic oxygen features at high spectral resolution (about 1.5 A) in the band passes 980-1040 and 1300-1360 A, and the other to measure EUV dayglow and the solar EUV simultaneously in a much broader bandpass (250-1150 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A). The payload also included a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and goecoronal emissions. The instrument was calibrated at the EUV calibration facility at the University of California at Berkeley, and was subsequently launched successfully on September 30, 1988 aboard a four-stage experimental sounding rocket, Black Brant XII flight 12.041 WT. The calibration procedure and resulting data are presented.

  8. TIMED GUVI and SEE Observations of Solar Irradiance Variations and the Terrestrial Airglow Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolven, B.; Paxton, L.; Morrison, D.; Woods, T.

    2004-12-01

    Since the launch of the TIMED mission in 2001, the SEE and GUVI instruments have observed solar radiance changes during numerous solar flares, and measured their short-term impact on the terrestrial airglow, manifested as changes in both resonantly scattered and photoelectron excited emissions. The continuous coverage and higher time resolution of the GUVI airglow observations, in conjunction with the multispectral (5-color) image format, constitute a unique source of information on the time variation of the solar irradiance in different spectral regions. GUVI limb observations provide additional data on heating and composition changes in the thermosphere in response to these energy inputs. We examine changes in the observed airglow between quiet and flare conditions, and attempt to understand the differences between SEE measurements and the radiances inferred from GUVI airglow data.

  9. OH Airglow and Equatorial Variations Observed by ISUAL Instrument on Board the FORMOSAT 2 Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Bai Nee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OH airglow observed by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning instrument on board the FORMOSAT 2 satellite is reported in this paper. The satellite is sun-synchronous and it returns to the same orbit at the same local time daily. By using this property, we can study the upper atmosphere in detail. With a CCD camera, ISUAL has measured the emission layers of OH Meinel band at 630 nm for several two-week periods in 2004 and 2007 in equatorial regions. ISUAL images are snapshots of the atmosphere 250 km (height _ 1200 km (horizontal distance. These images of OH airglow are analyzed to derive its peak height and latitudinal variations. ISUAL observation is unique in its capability of continuous observation of the upper atmosphere as the satellite travels from south to north along a specific orbit. However, 630 nm filter also measured O(1D at 200 km, and there are interferences between O(1D and OH airglows as as observed from a distance in space. We have studied the overlap of two airglows by simulations, and our final analyses show that OH airglow can be correctly derived with its average peak height of 89 _ 2.1 km usually lying within _ latitude about the equator. ISUAL data reveal detailed structures of equatorial OH airglow such as the existences of a few secondary maxima within the equatorial regions, and the oscillations of the peak latitudes. These results are discussed and compared with previous reports.

  10. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer: BEARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Chakrabarti, S

    1992-09-20

    We describe the Berkeley extreme-UV airglow rocket spectrometer, which is a payload designed to test several thermospheric remote-sensing concepts by measuring the terrestrial O I far-UV and extreme-UV dayglow and the solar extreme-UV spectrum simultaneously. The instrument consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers and a Lyman-alpha photometer. The dayglow spectrometer covered two spectral regions from 980 to 1040 A and from 1300 to 1360 A with 1.5-A resolution. The solar spectrometer had a bandpass of 250-1150 A with an ~ 10-A resolution. All three spectra were accumulated by using a icrochannel-plate-intensified, two-dimensional imaging detector with three separate wedge-and strip anode readouts. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer was included to monitor the solar Lyman-alpha irradiance and geocoronal Lyman-alpha emissions. The instrument was designed, fabricated, and calibrated at the University of California, Berkeley and was successfully launched on 30 September 1988 aboard the first test flight of a four-stage sounding rocket, Black Brant XII. PMID:20733778

  11. A new perspective on the molecular oxygen and hydroxyl airglow emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.

    The mesospheric molecular oxygen and hydroxyl airglow emissions have traditionally been measured in order to derive minor species abundances or to diagnose dynamical phenomena. We present a new interpretation of these airglow emissions and show them to be fundamental measures of energy deposition from which rates of atmospheric heating are readily derived. The heating rate due to absorption of ultraviolet radiation in the Hartley band of ozone may be derived from simultaneous measurements of the oxygen atmospheric band and infrared atmospheric band volume emission rates independent of knowledge of the ozone density, the solar irradiance, and the ozone absorption cross sections. The heating rates due to key exothermic reactions may be derived directly from appropriate airglow observations independent of the reactant concentrations and the temperature-dependent reaction rates. The accuracy of heating rates derived directly from airglow measurements is also inherently higher than that obtained in standard approaches. We suggest that heating rates derived in this manner be treated as data products and that they be compared with numerical model computations to enhance understanding of atmospheric thermodynamics. An initial comparison of airglow-derived energy deposition rates with deposition rates traditionally computed from numerical models shows agreement to within 20% for the Hartley band of ozone in the lower and upper mesosphere.

  12. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Broadfoot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 85 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6% of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been identified in night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments and through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The FeO* and NiO* emissions both originate from a reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone and so support the presence of NiO* in the night airglow.

  13. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. J. Evans

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 87 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6 % of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A very faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been detected in the night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments. Through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The altitude profile of the new airglow emission has also been measured. The similarity of the altitude profiles of the FeO* and NiO* emissions also suggests the emission is NiO as both can originate from reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone. The observed NiO* to FeO* ratio exhibits considerable variability; possible causes of this observed variation are briefly discussed.

  14. Simulations of airglow variations induced by the CO2 increase and solar cycle variation from 1980 to 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tai-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Airglow intensity and Volume Emission Rate (VER) variations induced by the increase of CO2 gas concentration and F10.7 variation (used as a proxy for the 11-year solar cycle variation) were investigated for the period from 1980 to 1991, encompassing a full solar cycle. Two airglow models are used to simulate the induced variations of O(1S) greenline, O2(0,1) atmospheric band , and OH(8,3) airglow for this study. The results show that both the airglow intensities and peak VERs correlate positively with the F10.7 solar cycle variation and display a small linear trend due to the increase of CO2 gas concentration. The solar-cycle induced airglow intensity variations show that O(1S) greenline has the largest variation (~26%) followed by the O2(0,1) atmospheric band (~23%) and then OH(8,3) airglow (~8%) over the 11 year timespan. The magnitudes of the induced airglow intensity variations by the increase of CO2 gas concentration are about an order of magnitude smaller than those by the F10.7 solar cycle variation. In general, the F10.7 solar cycle variation and CO2 increase do not seem to systematically alter the VER peak altitude of the airglow emissions, though the OH(8,3) VER peak altitude moves up slightly during the years when the F10.7 value falls under 100 SFU.

  15. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suzuki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3° E, 0.2° S, Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere.

  16. Hydroxyl (6−2 airglow emission intensity ratios for rotational temperature determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lowe

    Full Text Available OH(6–2 Q1/P1 and R1/P1 airglow emission intensity ratios, for rotational states up to j' = 4.5, are measured to be lower than implied by transition probabilities published by various authors including Mies, Langhoff et al. and Turnbull and Lowe. Experimentally determined relative values of j' transitions yield OH(6–2 rotational temperatures 2 K lower than Langhoff et al., 7 K lower than Mies and 13 K lower than Turnbull and Lowe.Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; pressure, density and temperature

  17. HF-induced airglow structure as a proxy for ionospheric irregularity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility allows scientists to test current theories of plasma physics to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms at work in the lower ionosphere. One powerful technique for diagnosing radio frequency interactions in the ionosphere is to use ground-based optical instrumentation. High-frequency (HF), heater-induced artificial airglow observations can be used to diagnose electron energies and distributions in the heated region, illuminate natural and/or artificially induced ionospheric irregularities, determine ExB plasma drifts, and measure quenching rates by neutral species. Artificial airglow is caused by HF-accelerated electrons colliding with various atmospheric constituents, which in turn emit a photon. The most common emissions are 630.0 nm O(1D), 557.7 nm O(1S), and 427.8 nm N2+(1NG). Because more photons will be emitted in regions of higher electron energization, it may be possible to use airglow imaging to map artificial field-aligned irregularities at a particular altitude range in the ionosphere. Since fairly wide field-of-view imagers are typically deployed in airglow campaigns, it is not well-known what meter-scale features exist in the artificial airglow emissions. Rocket data show that heater-induced electron density variations, or irregularities, consist of bundles of ~10-m-wide magnetic field-aligned filaments with a mean depletion depth of 6% [Kelley et al., 1995]. These bundles themselves constitute small-scale structures with widths of 1.5 to 6 km. Telescopic imaging provides high resolution spatial coverage of ionospheric irregularities and goes hand in hand with other observing techniques such as GPS scintillation, radar, and ionosonde. Since airglow observations can presumably image ionospheric irregularities (electron density variations), they can be used to determine the spatial scale variation, the fill factor, and the lifetime characteristics of

  18. Application of tomographic inversion in studying airglow in the mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that observations of periodic nightglow structures give excellent information on atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The periods, the horizontal wavelengths and the phase speeds of the waves can be determined from airglow images and, using several cameras, the approximate altitude of the luminous layer can also be determined by triangulation. In this paper the possibility of applying tomographic methods for reconstructing the airglow structures is investigated using numerical simulations. A ground-based chain of cameras is assumed, two-dimensional airglow models in the vertical plane above the chain are constructed, and simulated data are calculated by integrating the models along a great number of rays with different elevation angles for each camera. After addition of random noise, these data are then inverted to obtain reconstructions of the models. A tomographic analysis package originally designed for satellite radiotomography is used in the inversion. The package is based on a formulation of stochastic inversion which allows the input of a priori information to the solver in terms of regularization variances. The reconstruction is carried out in two stages. In the first inversion, constant regularization variances are used within a wide altitude range. The results are used in determining the approximate altitude range of the airglow structures. Then, in the second inversion, constant non-zero regularization variances are used inside this region and zero variances outside it. With this method reliable reconstructions of the models are obtained. The number of cameras as well as their separations are varied in order to find out the limitations of the method.

    Key words. Tomography · Airglow · Mesopause · Gravity waves

  19. First spaceborne observation of the entire concentric airglow structure caused by tropospheric disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiya, Y.; Saito, A.; Sakanoi, T.; Hozumi, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Nishioka, M.; Tsugawa, T.

    2014-10-01

    Spaceborne imagers are able to observe the airglow structures with wide field of views regardless of the tropospheric condition that limits the observational time of the ground-based imagers. Concentric wave structures of the O2 airglow in 762 nm wavelength were observed over North America on 1 June 2013 from the International Space Station. This was the first observation in which the entire image of the structure was captured from space, and its spatial scale size was determined to be 1200 km radius without assumptions. The apparent horizontal wavelength was 80 km, and the amplitude in the intensity was approximately 20% of the background intensity. The propagation velocity of the structure was derived as 125 ± 62 m/s and atmospheric gravity waves were estimated to be generated for 3.5 ± 1.7 h. Concentric structures observed in this event were interpreted to be generated by super cells that caused a tornado in its early phase.

  20. HF-enhanced 4278-Å airglow: evidence of accelerated ionosphere electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallen, C. T.; Watkins, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    We report calculations from a one-dimensional physics-based self-consistent ionosphere model (SCIM) demonstrating that HF-heating of F-region electrons can produce 4278-Å airglow enhancements comparable in magnitude to those reported during ionosphere HF modification experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory in Alaska. These artificial 'blue-line' emissions, also observed at the EISCAT ionosphere heating facility in Norway, have been attributed to arise solely from additional production of N2+ ions through impact ionization of N2 molecules by HF-accelerated electrons. Each N2+ ion produced by impact ionization or photoionization has a probability of being created in the N2+(1N) excited state, resulting in a blue-line emission from the allowed transition to its ground state. The ionization potential of N2 exceeds 18 eV, so enhanced impact ionization of N2 implies that significant electron acceleration processes occur in the HF-modified ionosphere. Further, because of the fast N2+ emission time, measurements of 4278-Å intensity during ionosphere HF modification experiments at HAARP have also been used to estimate artificial ionization rates. To the best of our knowledge, all observations of HF-enhanced blue-line emissions have been made during twilight conditions when resonant scattering of sunlight by N2+ ions is a significant source of 4278-Å airglow. Our model calculations show that F-region electron heating by powerful O-mode HF waves transmitted from HAARP is sufficient to increase N2+ ion densities above the shadow height through temperature-enhanced ambipolar diffusion and temperature-suppressed ion recombination. Resonant scattering from the modified sunlit region can cause a 10-20 R increase in 4278-Å airglow intensity, comparable in magnitude to artificial emissions measured during ionosphere HF-modification experiments. This thermally-induced artificial 4278-Å aurora occurs independently of any artificial

  1. Thermospheric airglow emissions - A comparison of measurements from Atlas-1 and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, Douglas G.; Torr, Marsha R.; Richards, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive thermospheric model is presently used to derive conditions appropriate to the time of the Atlas-1 Space Shuttle mission, comparing the slant-path intensities thus computed as a function of altitude, latitude, and local time with a dozen major emissions measured in the course of a specific observing sequence. The agreement thus obtained is found to be reasonably good, implying that the major thermospheric airglow-controlling processes are essentially understood.

  2. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  3. Median Algorithm for Sector Spectra Calculation from Images Registered by the Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2011-01-01

    The Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager is an instrument, specially designed for investigation of the wave processes in the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere. In order to determine the kinematic parameters of a wave, the values of a physical quantity in different space points and their changes in the time should be known. As a result of the possibilities of the SATI instrument for space scanning, different parts of the images (sectors of spectrograms) correspond to the respective mesopause areas (where the radiation is generated). An approach is proposed for sector spectra determination from SATI images based on ordered statistics instead of meaning. Comparative results are shown.

  4. Discovery of a new orange feature from FeO in the night airglow with the OSIRIS spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W. F.; Gattinger, R.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Degenstein, D. A.; Slanger, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of a new airglow feature in the earth’s atmosphere is presented. The FeO orange feature has been detected in the night airglow spectrum with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the ODIN spacecraft. The orange chemiluminescent airglow has been measured in the spectral region from 530 nm to 650 nm. The OSIRIS imaging spectrograph measures the airglow spectrum over the 275 to 815 nm wavelength range. At the spectral resolution of OSIRIS, the band systems of FeO appear as a weak continuum-like structure in the 600 nm region at 85 km in the upper mesosphere. As the satellite scans, spectra are obtained of the terrestrial limb with tangent altitudes ranging between 5 km and 110 km. Since the instrument is a CCD spectrograph, all wavelengths are exposed simultaneously thus avoiding the effect of temporal intensity variations inherently present in spectrally scanning instruments. The relative spectral sensitivity over the entire wavelength range has been quantified to yield an estimated 5% precision. In order to maintain accurate on-orbit spectral calibrations an atmospheric radiation model with multiple Rayleigh scattering is employed to regularly update the OSIRIS spectral response. Averages of spectra at a series of tangent limb altitudes were assembled from numerous limb scans at low latitudes. Limb radiance altitude profiles for a number of observed spectral features were obtained from these averaged spectra. These radiance profiles were inverted to obtain volume emission rate altitude profiles. Synthetic spectra for the hydroxyl and O2 Herzberg airglow emission bands were generated and scaled with the observed band intensities to remove the known airglow components in order to isolate the underlying airglow feature. Tropical latitudes were chosen to minimize the classic green airglow continuum from the reaction of nitric oxide with atomic oxygen since nitric oxide is small at 90 km in the tropics. Other potential photochemical sources of the orange glow are

  5. Modeling of Na airglow emission and first results on the nocturnal variation at midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, T.; Sunil Krishna, M. V.; Singh, Vir

    2015-12-01

    A model for sodium airglow emission is developed by incorporating all the known reaction mechanisms. The neutral, ionic, and photochemical mechanisms are successfully implemented into this model. The values of reaction rate coefficients are based upon the theoretical calculations as well as from experimental observations. The densities of major species are calculated using the continuity equations, whereas for the minor, intermediating, and short-lived species steady state approximation method is used. The modeled results are validated with the rocket, lidar, and photometer observations for a branching ratio of 0.04 for the production of Na(2P) in the reaction NaO + O → Na(2P, 2S). The inputs have been obtained from other physics-based models and ground- and satellite-based observations to give the combined volume emission rate (VER) of Na airglow between 80 and 110 km altitude. In the present study, the model is used to understand the nocturnal variation of Na VER during the solstice conditions. The model results suggest a variation of peak emission layer between 85 and 90 km during summer solstice condition, indicating a lower value of peak emission rate during summer solstice. The emission rates bear a strong correlation with the O3 density during summer solstice, whereas the magnitude of VER follows the Na density during winter solstice. The altitude of peak VER shows an upward shift of 5 km during winter solstice.

  6. Calibration of the San Marco airglow-solar spectrometer instrument in the extreme ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, John; Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Tai, Hongsheng; Doll, Harry G.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1996-02-01

    The San Marco 5 carried the airglow-solar spectrometer instrument (ASSI). This 18-channel spectrometer measured the solar and terrestrial radiation in the wavelength region between 20 and 700 nm for 9 months in 1988. The ASSI extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels showed significant sensitivity changes during the mission. The sensitivity changes of the EUV channels are quantified by comparing ASSI solar EUV irradiance measurements to the solar EUV irradiance derived from a solar proxy model. A sensitivity change model is developed that shows that exponential curves can adequately describe the sensitivity changes of the ASSI optics and detectors. The November 10 calibration parameters and the sensitivity change model can be used to derive the EUV terrestrial airglow brightness for the time period of the ASSI mission. Analysis of the solar Lyman-(alpha) irradiance measured by the ASSI, the solar mesospheric explorer (SME), and the upper atmosphere research satellite has led to a revised Lyman-(alpha) irradiance for the San Marco mission. For example, the ASSI November 10, 1988, Lyman-(alpha) measurement is 5.3 X 1011 photons cm-2 s-1 versus the reported SME measurement of 3.35 X 1011 photons cm-2 s-1.

  7. A novel approach for the extraction of cloud motion vectors using airglow imager measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Satheesh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the possibility of implementing an advanced photogrammetric technique, generally employed for satellite measurements, on airglow imager, a ground-based remote sensing instrument primarily used for upper atmospheric studies, measurements of clouds for the extraction of cloud motion vectors (CMVs. The major steps involved in the algorithm remain the same, including image processing for better visualization of target elements and noise removal, identification of target cloud, setting a proper search window for target cloud tracking, estimation of cloud height, and employing 2-D cross-correlation to estimate the CMVs. Nevertheless, the implementation strategy at each step differs from that of satellite, mainly to suit airglow imager measurements. For instance, climatology of horizontal winds at the measured site has been used to fix the search window for target cloud tracking. The cloud height is estimated very accurately, as required by the algorithm, using simultaneous collocated Lidar measurements. High-resolution, both in space and time (4 min, cloud imageries are employed to minimize the errors in retrieved CMVs. The derived winds are evaluated against MST radar-derived winds by considering it as a reference. A very good correspondence is seen between these two wind measurements, both showing similar wind variation. The agreement is also found to be good in the both zonal and meridional wind velocities with RMSEs −1. At the end, the strengths and limitations of the algorithm are discussed, with possible solutions, wherever required.

  8. First Light from Triple-Etalon Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Atmospheric OI Airglow (6300 A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchorn, S.; Noto, J.; Pedersen, T.; Betremieux, Y.; Migliozzi, M.; Kerr, R. B.

    2006-05-01

    Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI) has developed a triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) to observe neutral winds in the ionosphere by measuring neutral oxygen (O I) emission at 630.0 nm during the day. This instrument is to be deployed in the SSI airglow building at the Cerro Tololo observatory (30.17S 70.81W) in Chile, in support of the Comm/Nav Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) project. Post-deployment observation will be made in conjunction with two other Clemson University Fabry-Perots in Peru, creating a longitudinal chain of interferometers for thermospheric observations. These instruments will make autonomous day and night observations of thermospheric dynamics. Instruments of this type can be constructed for a global chain of autonomous airglow observatories. The FPI presented in this talk consists of three independently pressure-controlled etalons, fed collimated light by a front optical train headed by an all-sky lens with a 160-degree field of view. It can be controlled remotely via a web-based service which allows any internet-connected computer to mimic the control computer at the instrument site. In fall 2005, the SSI system was first assembled at the Millstone Hill Observatory in Westford, Massachusetts, and made day and evening observations. It was then moved to the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Project (HAARP) site in Gakona, Alaska, to participate in joint optical/ionospheric heating campaigns. Additionally, natural airglow observations were made, both locally and remotely via the internet from Massachusetts. The Millstone and HAARP observations with two etalons yielded strong 630-nm atmospheric Fraunhofer absorption lines, with some suggestion of the Ring effect. By modeling the atmospheric absorption line as the constant times the corresponding solar absorption -- itself modeled as a Gaussian plus a polynomial -- the absorption feature is subtracted, leaving only the emission feature. Software ring-summing tools developed at the

  9. Seasonal dependence of MSTIDs obtained from 630.0 nm airglow imaging at Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, C.; Baumgardner, J.; Wroten, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2010-06-01

    All-sky imaging data of 630.0 nm airglow emissions are used to study the seasonal and solar activity dependence of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) over Arecibo, Puerto Rico (18.3° N, 66.7° W, 28° N mag lat). MSTIDs are typical F-region signatures at midlatitudes, yet limited statistical results in the American sector hindered the progress in our understanding of these dynamical structures. This study compiles data from 2002 to 2007 and shows for the first time that optically-determined MSTIDs at Arecibo present a semiannual pattern with peak occurrence at both solstices. In the Japanese longitude sector, a similar pattern has been found, but one with a main peak during local summer. This paper explains the high occurrence rate during local winter at Arecibo via E-layer/F-layer coupling and inter-hemispheric coupling, thus accounting for a consistent morphology between the two longitude sectors.

  10. Measurement of mesospheric winds using the Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery; Ward, William E.; Nakamura, Takuji

    MIADI images the wind and irradiance fields present in mesospheric airglow signatures using a new implementation of the field widened Michelson technique. The system is unique in its ability to image the mean wind and irradiance as well as the perturbation quantities, allowing for unambiguous gravity wave parameters to be derived using a single optical element. MIADI was installed and tested at the MU radar field site in Shigaraki Japan in 2009. Several nights of observations have been obtained and the initial analysis has been completed. In this presentation, the instrument technique, calibration process and installation/testing will be described and the analysis of the initial wind and irradiance measurements will be presented.

  11. A GIANO-TNG high resolution IR spectrum of the airglow emission

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva, E; Maiolino, R; Baffa, C; Biliotti, V; Bruno, P; Falcini, G; Gavriousev, V; Ghinassi, F; Giani, E; Gonzalez, M; Leone, F; Lodi, M; Massi, F; Montegriffo, P; Mochi, I; Pedani, M; Rossetti, E; Scuderi, S; Sozzi, M; Tozzi, A; Valenti, E

    2013-01-01

    A flux-calibrated high resolution spectrum of the airglow emission is a practical lambda-calibration reference for astronomical spectral observations. It is also useful for constraining the molecular parameters of the OH molecule and the physical conditions in the upper mesosphere. methods: We use the data collected during the first technical commissioning of the GIANO spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). The high resolution (R~50,000) spectrum simultaneously covers the 0.95-2.4 micron wavelength range. Relative flux calibration is achieved by the simultaneous observation of spectrophotometric standard star. results: We derive a list of improved positions and intensities of OH infrared lines. The list includes Lambda-split doublets many of which are spectrally resolved. Compared to previous works, the new results correct errors in the wavelengths of the Q-branch transitions. The relative fluxes of OH lines from different vibrational bands show remarkable deviations from theoretical predicti...

  12. Dynamics of the polar mesopause and lower thermosphere region as observed in the night airglow emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work utilizes night airglow emissions to deduce temperatures, dynamics, energetics, transport and photochemistry of the polar 80-110 km atmospheric region. The morphological behaviour of the polar 80-110 km region as seen in the night airglow emissions is best described by quasi regular to regular variations in the temperature and in the intensities of the emissions with periods ranging from minutes to a few days. Temperature amplitudes are seen from a few degrees up to ±50 K. Intensity changes up to several hundred percent may occur. Gravity waves from below are generally found to be present in the region, being responsible for much of the short period variations. The long period variations are seen to be related to circulation changes in the lower atmosphere. Stratospheric warmings are generally associated by a cooling of the 80-110 km region by a ratio approximately twice as large in amplitude as the heating at the 10 mbar level. The semidiurnal tide is found to be dominant with a peak to peak amplitude of about 5 K, in contrast to model calculations. Effects from geomagnetic phenomena on the energetics and dynamics of the region are not seen and, if present, have to be small or rare as compared to the influence from below. There is a mesopause temperature maximum at winter solstice. Pronounced differences in the day to day and seasonal behaviour of the odd oxygen associated nightglows at the North and South Pole are found. This may indicate fundamental differences at the two poles in the winter mesopause region circulation and energetics

  13. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. In general, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1Σg+−X3Σg− atmospheric band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3Σg− infrared atmospheric band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  14. Limb Viewing Hyper Spectral Imager (LiVHySI) for airglow measurements onboard YOUTHSAT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, R. S.; Hait, A. K.; Babu, P. N.; Sarkar, S. S.; Benerji, A.; Biswas, A.; Saji, A. K.; Samudraiah, D. R. M.; Kirankumar, A. S.; Pant, T. K.; Parimalarangan, T.

    2014-08-01

    The Limb Viewing Hyper Spectral Imager (LiVHySI) is one of the Indian payloads onboard YOUTHSAT (inclination 98.73°, apogee 817 km) launched in April, 2011. The Hyper-spectral imager has been operated in Earth’s limb viewing mode to measure airglow emissions in the spectral range 550-900 nm, from terrestrial upper atmosphere (i.e. 80 km altitude and above) with a line-of-sight range of about 3200 km. The altitude coverage is about 500 km with command selectable lowest altitude. This imaging spectrometer employs a Linearly Variable Filter (LVF) to generate the spectrum and an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) area array of 256 × 512 pixels, placed in close proximity of the LVF as detector. The spectral sampling is done at 1.06 nm interval. The optics used is an eight element f/2 telecentric lens system with 80 mm effective focal length. The detector is aligned with respect to the LVF such that its 512 pixel dimension covers the spectral range. The radiometric sensitivity of the imager is about 20 Rayleigh at noise floor through the signal integration for 10 s at wavelength 630 nm. The imager is being operated during the eclipsed portion of satellite orbits. The integration in the time/spatial domain could be chosen depending upon the season, solar and geomagnetic activity and/or specific target area. This paper primarily aims at describing LiVHySI, its in-orbit operations, quality, potential of the data and its first observations. The images reveal the thermospheric airglow at 630 nm to be the most prominent. These first LiVHySI observations carried out on the night of 21st April, 2011 are presented here, while the variability exhibited by the thermospheric nightglow at O(1D) 630 nm has been described in detail.

  15. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  16. Climatology of planetary wave type oscillations with periods of 2–20 days derived from O2 atmospheric and OH(6-2) airglow observations at mid-latitude with SATI

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. López-González; Rodríguez, E.; M. García-Comas; Costa, V; Shepherd, M G; Shepherd, G. G.; Aushev, V. M.; S. Sargoytchev

    2009-01-01

    The presence of planetary wave type oscillations at mid-latitudes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region has been investigated using airglow observations. The observations were taken with a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI) installed at Sierra Nevada Observatory (37.06° N, 3.38° W) at 2900 m height. Airglow data of the column emission rate of the O2 Atmospheric (0-1) band and of the OH Meinel (6-2) band and deduced rotational temperatur...

  17. Atmospheric wave induced O2 and OH airglow intensity variations: effect of vertical wavelength and damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gobbi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available From nocturnal variations of the airglow O2 (0-1 and OH Meinel (6-2 band emission intensity and the rotational temperature, gravity waves and the damping effect in the MLT region were investigated. The data set was obtained from photometer measurements at Rikubetsu (43.5° N, 143.8° E, Japan, from March 2004 to August 2005. The ratio of the amplitude of oscillation and their phase difference between the two emissions were calculated when simultaneous periodic variations were observed. The ratio showed a linear correlation with the phase difference. The vertical wavelength and damping rate were estimated by using a model calculation carried out by previous works. The results show that the wave damping is significant when the vertical wavelength is shorter than 30–40 km. Krassovsky's parameter η, which represents a ratio between the emission intensity and temperature oscillations, was also calculated. The results show that the η also depends on the damping effect.

  18. A mesospheric airglow multichannel photometer and an optical method to measure mesospheric AGW intrinsic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangognia, Anthony; Swenson, Gary; Vargas, Fabio; Liu, Alan

    2016-05-01

    A multichannel photometer (MCP) instrument, designed with filters for three specific airglow emissions, OH Meinel (5-1), (6-2), 840 nm; O2 (b) (0,1), 865 nm; and O(1S), 557.7 nm, as well as background, is used to observe atmospheric wave perturbations to layers in the local zenith with high temporal resolution (∼5 s). By measuring the relative phase of propagating waves through the layers, with known altitude separation, we deduce the vertical wavelength. We describe here the instrument attributes, a unique background subtraction technique, and the validation of a new method for determining intrinsic wave parameters via MCP and imager data that can be taken from various platforms, including ground-based and spacecraft platforms. Vertical wavelengths deduced using this method are in close agreement with those measured using LIDAR temperatures as well as those calculated with the dispersion relation using a combination of all-sky imager (horizontal wavelength) and meteor radar (winds) data.

  19. Solar measurements from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the solar spectral irradiance from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite is the focus for this research grant. A pre-print copy of the paper describing the calibrations of and results from the San Marco ASSI is attached to this report. The calibration of the ASSI included (1) transfer of photometric calibration from a rocket experiment and the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME), (2) use of the on-board radioactive calibration sources, (3) validation of the ASSI sensitivity over its field of view, and (4) determining the degradation of the spectrometers. We have determined that the absolute values for the solar irradiance needs adjustment in the current proxy models of the solar UV irradiance, and the amount of solar variability from the proxy models are in reasonable agreement with the ASSI measurements. This research grant also has supported the development of a new solar EUV irradiance proxy model. We expected that the magnetic flux is responsible for most of the heating, via Alfen waves, in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. From examining time series of solar irradiance data and magnetic fields at different levels, we did indeed find that the chromospheric emissions correlate best with the large magnetic field levels.

  20. HiT&MIS: Instrumentation for Auroral and Ionospheric Airglow Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewawasam, K.; Maguire, R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Baumgardner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high-throughput imaging spectrograph that uses an echelle grating operating at a high dispersion order to observe extended sources such as atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions at high spectral resolution. Instead of the conventional single slit this instrument uses four with appropriate foreoptics to image a long, narrow field of view of approximately 0.1 × 50 deg. By using interference filters for order sorting, this instrument can simultaneously observe multiple spectral features located anywhere in the visible band (approximately 300 to 1000 nm) at high resolution. The current implementation images the scene at 6 wavelengths (427.8, 486.1, 557.7, 630.0, 656.3 and 777.4 nm), but the flexibility of the design of the instrument allows varying the wavelengths of interest with minimal modifications. We have constructed two spectrographs to be located at different geomagnetic locations. This will enable tomography of atmospheric phenomena for full 3-D rendering of the volume emission. We will combine HiT&MIS data with data from LITES, GROUP-C (on ISS) and other ground based sources such as GIRO, HiTIES, HIRISE and CHIMES along with the 13 all-sky imagers operated by Boston University to form a more complete picture of the ionosphere.This work is supported by the NSF grant AGS1315354

  1. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at Kolhapur (India)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Ghodpage; Devendraa Siingh; R P Singh; G K Mukherjee; P Vohat; A K Singh

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous photometric measurements of the OI 557.7 nm and OH (7, 2) band from a low latitude station, Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours have been recorded. Some of these waves having subharmonic tidal oscillation periods 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours propagate upward with velocity lying in the range 1.6–11.3 m/s and the vertical wave length lying between 28.6 and 163 kms. The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application of these waves in studying the thermal structure of the region is discussed.

  2. Statistical Comparison of Gravity Wave Characteristics Obtained from Airglow All-Sky Observation at Mt. Bohyun, Korea and Shigaraki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Previously, all-sky airglow images observed at Shigaraki (34.9° N, 136.1° E), Japan, during 2004 and 2005 were analyzed in relation to those observed at Mt. Bohyun (36.2° N, 128.9° E) for a comparison of their gravity wave characteristics (Kim et al. 2010). By applying the same selection criteria of waves and cloud coverages as in the case of Mt. Bohyun all-sky images, we derived apparent wavelengths, periods, phase velocities, and monthly occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki in this study. The distributions of wavelengths, periods, and speeds derived for Shigaraki were found to be roughly similar to those for Mt. Bohyun. However, the overall occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki were 36% and 34% for OI 557.7 nm and OH Meinel band airglow layers, respectively, which were significantly higher than those at Mt. Bohyun. The monthly occurrence rates did not show minima near equinox months, unlike those for Mt. Bohyun. Furthermore, the seasonal preferential directions that were clearly apparent for Mt. Bohyun were not seen in the wave propagation trends for Shigaraki. These differences between the two sites imply different origins of the gravity waves near the Korean peninsula and the Japanese islands. The gravity waves over the Japanese islands may originate from sources at various altitudes; therefore, wind filtering may not be effective in causing any seasonal preferential directions in the waves in the airglow layers. Our analysis of the Shigaraki data supports recent theoretical studies, according to which gravity waves can be generated from in situ sources, such as mesosphere wind shear or secondary wave formation, in the mesosphere.

  3. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2° N, 117.4° E in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60 m s−1. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the non-uniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien T.; Zemcov, Michael; Battle, John; Bock, James J.; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Meek, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using a λ/Δλ = 320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. At low airmasses, the absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 ± 30 nW m‑2 sr‑1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ∼100 s integrations the noise performance of the instrument does not appear to significantly degrade from expectations, giving a proof of concept that near-infrared line intensity mapping may be feasible from ground-based sites.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hien T; Battle, John; Bock, James J; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Philip; Meek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using an R=320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. The absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 +/- 30 nW m^-2 sr^-1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ~100s integrations the noise performance of the instrument ...

  6. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Q.; Yuan, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Graduate Univ.; Xu, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Yue, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory; Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang (China). College of Mathematics and Information Science

    2011-07-01

    An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI) was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2 N, 117.4 E) in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60ms{sup -1}. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the nonuniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter. (orig.)

  7. Simultaneous temperature measurements of the upper mesosphere obtained by lidar and airglow in the Brazilian low latitude sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. We present temperature measurements of the upper mesosphere obtained by lidar and airglow in the Brazilian low latitude sector over a period of two years. In the 80-110 km region, free sodium atoms are abundant enough to allow probing of the Doppler broadened hyperfine structure of the D2 resonance transition by ground-based lidar. The lidar technique consists in detection of the resonance transition at two wavelengths, one at the D2a peak, and another at the minimum between the D2a and D2b peaks, making it possible to calculate the density and temperature profiles. At the same time, rotational temperatures obtained from the airglow OH (6-2) emission using photometer data were determined. Given the lidar-derived temperature profile, we adjusted the height of an empirical OH emission profile so as to minimize the difference between the observed OH temperatures and the lidar data. This procedure was carried out using lidar data from Sao Jose dos Campos (23 deg S, 46 deg W) and photometer data from Cachoeira Paulista (22,7 deg S, 45 deg W), about 100 km away. In general, the OH temperatures were higher than those derived from the lidar measurements, and it was not always possible to fine an emission profile giving good agreement between the two. On some occasions we observed oscillations in the estimated OH emission height, which we believe to be caused by gravity waves.

  8. The O2 night airglow in Venus atmosphere from VIRTIS VEX measurements: local time and temporal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, Ludmila; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Shakun, Alexey; Altieri, Francesca; Gorinov, Dmitry

    Observation of the O2 1.27 µm airglow intensity distribution on the night side of Venus is one of the methods of study of the circulation in upper mesosphere 90-100 km. VIRTIS-M on board Venus Express made these observations in nadir and limb modes in Southern and Northern hemispheres respectively. To avoid high noisy data we use for analysis only those, obtained with exposure > 3 s. It was found that intensity of emission decreases to poles and to terminators in both hemispheres which gives evidence for existence of SS-AS circulation with transport of the air masses through poles and terminators with ascending/descending flows at SS/AS areas. Asymmetry of distribution of intensity of airglow is observed in both hemispheres. Global map for southern hemisphere (from nadir data) has good statistics at φ > 10-20°S and pretty poor at lower latitudes. Maximum emission was found shifted from midnight by 1 - 2 hours to the evening (22-23h) and deep minimum of emission is found at LT=2-4 h at φ > 20°S. This asymmetry is extended up to equatorial region, however statistic is poor there. No evident indication for existence of the Retrograde Zonal Superrotation (RZS) is found: maximum emission in this case, which is resulting from downwards flow, should be shifted to the morning. VIRTIS limb observations cover the low northern latitudes and they are more sparse at higher latitudes. Intensity of airglow at φ = 0 - 20° N shows wide maximum, which is shifted by 1- 2 h from midnight to morning terminator. This obviously indicates that observed O2 night glow distribution in low North latitudes is explained by a superposition of SS-AS flow and RZS circulation at 95-100 km. This behavior is similar to the NO intensity distribution, obtained by SPICAV. Temporal wariation was found at low latitudes of the Northern hemisphere: during 820 days observations three maxima were observed separated by 150 - 200 days approximately.

  9. Spectral measurements of atmospheric OH and O2 NIR airglow with a Michelson FTS and InGaAs detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments and the integration of and InGaAs detector with a precision, compact Michelson interferometer have provided a very sensitive, reliable, and portable measurement tool for studying near infrared upper atmospheric emissions. Spectrically resolved and calibrated line intensity measurements of major portions of the Δν = 2 and the Δν = 3 band sequences of the OH Meinel airglow emissions are obtainable from ground based sites. Typically, the spectrometer provides signal-to-noise rations of 50/1 in one minute measurement time. Time resolved rotational OH temperatures and therefore ambient temperatures corresponding to the 80 to 95 Km OH emission region can be obtained from the data

  10. Oxygen airglow emission on Venus and Mars as seen by VIRTIS/VEX and OMEGA/MEX imaging spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, A.; Altieri, F.; Zasova, L.; Piccioni, G.; Bellucci, G.; Cardesín Moinelo, A.; Drossart, P.; D'Aversa, E.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2011-08-01

    Imaging spectrometers are highly effective instruments for investigation of planetary atmospheres. They present the advantage of coupling the compositional information to the spatial distribution, allowing simultaneous study of chemistry and dynamics in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars. In this work, we summarize recent results about the O 2(a 1Δg) night and day glows, respectively obtained by VIRTIS/Venus Express and OMEGA/Mars Express, the imaging spectrometers currently in orbit around Venus and Mars. The case of the O 2(a 1Δg - X 3Σg-) IR emission at 1.27 μm on the night side of Venus and the day side of Mars is analyzed, pointing out dynamical aspects of these planets, like the detection of gravity waves in their atmospheres. The monitoring of seasonal and daily airglow variations provides hints about the photochemistry on these planets.

  11. Solar energy deposition rates in the mesosphere derived from airglow measurements: Implications for the ozone model deficit problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-07-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-μm oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat.budget.gats.inc.com.

  12. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  13. Night airglows in Venus atmosphere and dynamics around 100 km from VIRTIS-M VEX data. Comparison with the Earth atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L.; Khatuntsev, I.; Shakun, A.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.

    2012-04-01

    Analysis of the O2 1.27um night airglow in the Venus atmosphere is presented. Night glow is extremely variable in space and local time. However, averaged over all nadir observations for Southern hemisphere and over all nadir observations for Northern hemisphere it allows to study a global circulation around 100 km altitude. The global circulation at these levels may be presented by SS-AS, zonal retrograde, as well tides and waves may influence nightglow distribution. In Southern hemisphere in the latitude range 20-60S a maximum emission is found at 22 - 23 h local time, which correlates with minimum horizontal wind speed (downward flow) and minimum emission is observed at 2-4 h, which correlates with maximum of horizontal wind speed. In Northern hemisphere maximum emission is observed at 1 h in latitude range from equator to 40-50°N. It indicates to existence of superposition of SS-AS and zonal retrograde circulation (in the case of SS-AS maximum emission should be found at midnight). For Northern hemisphere there is no simultaneous wind measurements. Thin O3 layer (Montmessin et al. 2011) from SPICAV data was found in Southern hemisphere for latitudes and local time where high O2 airglow (and consequently OH) intensity was also found by VIRTIS. The O2 night airglow of Venus and Earth are compared.

  14. Relationship between propagation direction of gravity waves in OH and OI airglow images and VHF radar echo occurrence during the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Onoma

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We report simultaneous observations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW in OI (557.7nm and OH airglow images and VHF radar backscatter from field-aligned irregularities (FAI in the E-region during the SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 campaign period from 29 July to 9 August 2002. An all-sky imager was operated at Nishino-Omote (30.5 N, 130.1 E, Japan. On 14 nights, 17 AGW events were detected in OI and OH airglow images. AGW propagated mostly toward the northeast or southeast. From comparison with the E-region FAI occurrence, which is detected by a nearby VHF radar (31.57MHz, we found that AGW tended to propagate southeastward during FAI events. This result suggests that the interaction between AGW and E-region plasma plays an important role in generating FAI. Furthermore, polarization electric fields generated directly by AGW may contribute to the FAI generation.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora, Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities, Mid-latitude ionosphere

  15. Parametric excitation of electron Bernstein waves by radio waves in the ionosphere and its possible consequence for airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high power radio wave, launched into the polar ionosphere at angle θ with the earth's magnetic field from a ground-based transmitter in the vicinity of twice the electron cyclotron frequency (2.75 MHz), is reported to create an airglow at an effective radiated power (ERP) = 10 MW. We interpret this result as a consequence of parametric decay of the radio wave into an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) and an ion acoustic wave (IAW). The oscillatory velocity of electrons due to the pump couples with the density perturbation due to the IAW to produce a current, driving the Bernstein mode. The latter, in connection with the pump, exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons, driving the IAW. The growth rate of the parametric instability is maximum for θ = 0. At the same time, for any given value of θ, the growth rate increases with b(=k12vth2/2ωc2) and attains a maximum around b ∼ 2, then falls gradually. The EBW produces energetic electrons via cyclotron damping. These electrons collide with the neutral atoms of the plasma to excite them to higher energy states. As the excited atoms return to lower energy states, they radiate in the visible

  16. Climatology of the O+ temperatures over Arecibo for the historical deep solar minimum using Incoherent Scatter Radar and airglow data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P. T.; Brum, C. G. M.; Kerr, R.; Noto, J.

    2014-12-01

    At Arecibo Observatory (AO) a comprehensive description of the ionosphere and thermosphere environment is achieved by the synergy between the Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) and the optical instruments nested on site. An example of this synergy is present in his work where optical and radar techniques were reconciled in order to obtain the O+ temperature variability for 2008 and 2009. During this period, a historical deep solar minimum condition was registered with a remarkable absence of sunspots for a long period (translated into a decreasing in the EUV-UV irradiance). This particular feature implies in an important tool to investigate the variability of O+ temperature, once that any variation can be related to season (modulated by the neutral atmosphere) and/or another modulator different than solar energy input. The OII 7320 Å twilight airglow data used in this work were obtained during new moon periods using a high-spectral resolution Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) with CCD array detection. The FPI was configured with 0.9 cm plate spacing, which produced a free spectral range of 0.298Å and a spectral resolution of 0.03Å, sufficient to sample line width temperatures as low as 500K. A very narrow 3Å Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) three-cavity interference filter was also used.

  17. Gravity waves in mesopause region induced by thunderstorms over Northern China observed by a no-gap OH airglow imager network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiyao

    2016-07-01

    A no-gap OH airglow all-sky imager network was established in northern China in February 2012. The network is composed of 6 all-sky airglow imagers that make observations of OH airglow gravity waves and cover an area of about 2000 km east and west and about 1400 km south and north. A large number of gravity wave events in the mesopause region induced by thunderstorms were observed by the network during the past 4 years. A comparison of the observations in 2012, 2013, and 2014 are made, which shows that there were more strong thunderstorms take place in 2013 in the northern China and produce more Concentric Gravity Wave (CGW) events. Especially, a series of CGW events were observed by the network nearly every night during the first half of August 2013. These events were also observed by satellite sensors from FY-2, AIRS/Aqua, and VIIRS/Suomi NPP. Combination of the ground imager network with satellites provides multi-level observations of the CGWs from the stratosphere to the mesopause region. In this talk, two representative CGW events in August 2013 are studied in detail and movies of the two events are displayed. One is the CGW on the night of 13 August 2013, likely launched by a single thunderstorm. The temporal and spatial analyses indicate that the CGW horizontal wavelengths agree with the GW dispersion relation within 300 km from the storm center. A gravity wave with horizontal wavelength of about 20 km propagates horizontally to more than 800 km in the mesopause region, probably due to a ducting layer. Another CGW event was induced by two very strong thunderstorms on 09 August 2013. Multi-scale waves with horizontal wavelengths ranging from less than 10 km to 200 km were observed. Many ripples were found, probably due to the breaking of strong gravity waves with large relative OH intensity perturbations of 10%.

  18. Coordinated airglow observations between IMAP/VISI and a ground-based all-sky imager on concentric gravity wave in the mesopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Hozumi, Y.; Akiya, Y.; Saito, A.; Shiokawa, K.; Kawamura, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of concentric gravity waves (CGWs) event from the coordinated observation between Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping (IMAP)/Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI), all-sky camera at Rikubetsu, Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and MF radar at Wakkanai combined with Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application data. IMAP/VISI is the first space-based imager that capable of imaging the airglow in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in the nadir-looking direction. Therefore, it has a unique ability to observe a great extend of CGWs propagation. Arc-like shaped, part of CGWs pattern was observed around the mesopause (~95 km) in the O2 762 nm airglow emission obtained by IMAP/VISI at 1204 UT on 18 October 2012. Similar patterns were also observed by the all-sky imager at Rikubetsu (43.5°N, 143.8°E) in OI 557.7 nm and OH band airglow emissions from ~1100 to 1200 UT. Horizontal wavelengths of the observed small-scale gravity waves are ~50 km (OH band and OI 557.7 nm) and ~67 km (O2 762 nm). The source is suggested to be a deep convective activity over Honshu Island which likely was an enhanced convective activity related to a typhoon in the south of Japan. The data showed that the CGWs could propagate up to ~1400-1500 km horizontally from the source to the mesopause but not farther away. Using atmospheric temperature profiles obtained by Thermospheric Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, we conclude that this long-distance propagation of the waves could be caused by thermal duct in the middle atmosphere. The arc-like shaped instead of full circle pattern points out that the wind filtering effect is significant for the particular direction of wave propagation.

  19. Gravity Wave Energetics Determined From Coincident Space-Based and Ground-Based Observations of Airglow Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the goals of this proposal in a number of areas during the covered period. Section 5.1 contains a copy of the originally proposed schedule. The tasks listed below have been accomplished: (1) Construction of space-based observing geometry gravity wave model. This model has been described in detail in the paper accompanying this report (Section 5.2). It can simulate the observing geometry of both ground-based, and orbital instruments allowing comparisons to be made between them. (2) Comparisons of relative emission intensity, temperatures, and Krassovsky's ratio for space- and ground-based observing geometries. These quantities are used in gravity wave literature to describe the effects of the waves on the airglow. (3) Rejection of Bates [1992], and Copeland [1994] chemistries for gravity wave modeling purposes. Excessive 02(A(sup 13)(Delta)) production led to overproduction of O2(b(sup 1)(Sigma)), the state responsible for the emission of O2. Atmospheric band. Attempts were made to correct for this behavior, but could not adequately compensate for this. (4) Rejection of MSX dataset due to lack of coincident data, and resolution necessary to characterize the waves. A careful search to identify coincident data revealed only four instances, with only one of those providing usable data. Two high latitude overpasses and were contaminated by auroral emissions. Of the remaining two mid-latitude coincidences, one overflight was obscured by cloud, leaving only one ten minute segment of usable data. Aside from the statistical difficulties involved in comparing measurements taken in this short period, the instrument lacks the necessary resolution to determine the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave. This means that the wave cannot be uniquely characterized from space with this dataset. Since no observed wave can be uniquely identified, model comparisons are not possible.

  20. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  1. Long-term Trends in Mesospheric Temperatures at high and low latitudes derived from OH airglow spectra of Kiruna FTS and Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongha; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Gawon; Lee, Youngsun

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed mesospheric temperatures from OH airglow measurements with Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) in the period of 2003 - 2012 at Kiruna (67.9°N, 21.1°E). We also derived mesospheric temperatures from rotational emission lines of the OH airglow (8-3) band in the sky spectra of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the period of 2000 - 2014. The main objective of SDSS is to make a detailed 3-dimensional map of the universe by observing images and spectra of various celestial objects at Apache Point Observatory (APO, 32°N 105°W). From both temperature sets we first estimated the solar responses of mesospheric temperatures to F10.7 variation and the seasonal variation of mesospheric temperatures. After removing the solar response, we found the long-term mesospheric temperature trends of -4 ˜-6.6 K/decade at Kiruna and -0.02 ± 0.7 K/decade at Apache Point. Our results indicate significant cooling trend at the high latitude but very little or no cooling at the low latitude. Although both trends are comparable and consistent with other studies, the temperature trend from SDSS spectra should be regarded as unique contribution to global monitoring of climate change because the SDSS project is completely independent of climate studies.

  2. On the inversion of O+(2D-2P) 7320 Angstrom twilight airglow observations: A method for recovering both the ionization frequency and the thermospheric oxygen atom densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate that it is possible to invert twilight observations of the O+(2D-2P)-7320 Angstrom airglow emission to obtain information about both the thermospheric atomic oxygen densities and the unattenuated O+(2P) ionization frequency. The efficacy of the proposed approach, which relies upon making twilight observations in more than one viewing direction, is illustrated using a synthetic data set and an inversion algorithm based on a simple photochemical model. The results of this study show that day-to-day variations in the thermospheric oxygen atom densities may be monitored from the ground without requiring complementary measurements of the solar EUV flux. The study also shows that twilight observations may be used to monitor variations in the solar flux components that are responsible for O+(2P) production and EUV heating of the upper thermosphere

  3. Studies of OI 630.0 nm night airglow and GPS-TEC observations during the geomagnetic storm at low latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Ground based photometric observations of OI 630.0 nm emission line have been carried out from Kolhapur station (Geog. Lat.16.8degN , Geo. Long 74.2degE) and GPS data processed by UNB Ionospheric Modeling Technique and RDRINEX software used to get both TEC and variation in TEC i.e d(TEC)/dT from Hyderabad (17.41degN, 78.55degE) and Bangalore (13.02degN, 77.57degE) station, India during the period of the largest geomagnetic storm of the solar cycle 23 which occurred on 20 November 2003, with minimum Dst index -472 nT occurring around mid-night hours. We observed that on 19 November 2003 which was geomagnetically quiet day, the airglow activity of OI 630 nm emission and d(TEC)/dT were subdued and it was decreasing monotonically. However, on the night of November 20, 2003 the enhancement is observed during geomagnetic storm due to the increased electron density at the altitude of the F region which is related to the downward transport of electrons from the plasmasphere to the F-region. Airglow intensity at OI 630.0 nm and d(TEC)/dt showed increase around midnight on November 21, 2003 but comparatively on a smaller scale. On this night the Dst index was about -100 nT. This implies that the effect of the geomagnetic storm persisted on that night also. These observations have been explained by the penetration of magnetospheric electric field to the low latitude region and the subsequent modulation of meridional wind during the magnetic disturbance at night.

  4. Long-term ozone decline and its effect on night airglow intensity of Li 6708 Å at Varanasi (25°N, 83°E) and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; I Saha; S Mukhopadhyay

    2011-04-01

    A critical analysis has been made on the long-term yearly and seasonal variations of ozone concentration at Varanasi (25°N, 83°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of Li 6708 Å line at Varanasi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of Li 6708 Å line has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and seasonal variations of intensities of Li 6708 Å line for the above two stations are shown and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of Li 6708 Å line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  5. Ozone decline and its effect on night airglow intensity of Na 5893°A at Dumdum (22.5°N, 88.5° E) and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; S C Nandi

    2006-10-01

    The paper presents the effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of Na 5893 A line at Dumdum (22.5°N, 88.5°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic service station. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of Na 5893 A line will also be affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The nature of yearly variation and seasonal variation of the intensity of Na 5893 A line for the above two stations are shown and compared. It is shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of Na 5893 A line is comparatively more at Halley Bay due to the dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration. A possible explanation for this dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration is also mentioned.

  6. Climatology of planetary wave type oscillations with periods of 2–20 days derived from O2 atmospheric and OH(6-2 airglow observations at mid-latitude with SATI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Aushev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of planetary wave type oscillations at mid-latitudes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region has been investigated using airglow observations. The observations were taken with a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI installed at Sierra Nevada Observatory (37.06° N, 3.38° W at 2900 m height. Airglow data of the column emission rate of the O2 Atmospheric (0-1 band and of the OH Meinel (6-2 band and deduced rotational temperatures from 1998 to 2007 have been used in this study. From these observations a climatology of planetary wave type oscillations at this location is inferred. It has been found that the planetary wave type oscillations of 5-day period is predominant in our data throughout the year, with activity greater than 50% during March/April and October/November months. The planetary wave type oscillations of 2-day period is predominant during both solstices, being predominant during winter solstice in O2 while a 10-day oscillation appears throughout the year with activity around 20% and with maximum activity during spring and autumn equinoxes. The 16-day oscillation has maximum occurrence during autumn-winter while its activity is almost disappeared during spring-summer. No clear seasonal dependence of the amplitude of the planetary wave type oscillations was observed in the cases considered in this study. The waves simultaneously detected in the rotational temperatures deduced from both OH and O2 emissions usually show an upward energy propagation and are affected by dissipation processes.

  7. Climatology of planetary wave type oscillations with periods of 2-20 days derived from O{sub 2} atmospheric and OH(6-2) airglow observations at mid-latitude with SATI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.J.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Costa, V. [CSIC, Granada (Spain). Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia; Shepherd, M.G.; Shepherd, G.G.; Sargoytchev, S. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science; Aushev, V.M. [National Centre of Space Research and Technology, National Space Agency, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Dept. Inst. of Ionosphere

    2009-07-01

    The presence of planetary wave type oscillations at mid-latitudes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region has been investigated using airglow observations. The observations were taken with a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI) installed at Sierra Nevada Observatory (37.06 N, 3.38 W) at 2900 m height. Airglow data of the column emission rate of the O{sub 2} Atmospheric (0-1) band and of the OH Meinel (6-2) band and deduced rotational temperatures from 1998 to 2007 have been used in this study. From these observations a climatology of planetary wave type oscillations at this location is inferred. It has been found that the planetary wave type oscillations of 5-day period is predominant in our data throughout the year, with activity greater than 50% during March/April and October/November months. The planetary wave type oscillations of 2-day period is predominant during both solstices, being predominant during winter solstice in O{sub 2} while a 10-day oscillation appears throughout the year with activity around 20% and with maximum activity during spring and autumn equinoxes. The 16-day oscillation has maximum occurrence during autumn-winter while its activity is almost disappeared during spring-summer. No clear seasonal dependence of the amplitude of the planetary wave type oscillations was observed in the cases considered in this study. The waves simultaneously detected in the rotational temperatures deduced from both OH and O{sub 2} emissions usually show an upward energy propagation and are affected by dissipation processes. (orig.)

  8. I. Airglow on Mars: Model predictions for the oxygen IR atmospheric band at 1.27 micrometers, the hydroxyl radical Meinel bands and the hydroxyl radical A-X band system. II. Physical and chemical aeronomy of HD 209458b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Munoz, Antonio

    The first part of this dissertation is concerned with model predictions of airglow from the O2 IR atmospheric band at 1.27 mum, the OH Meinel bands and the OH A-X band system in the low-latitude neutral atmosphere of Mars. As an observable feature, airglow provides a means to remotely probe the composition, dynamics and energetics of the Martian atmosphere. The daytime emission from the O2 IR atmospheric band, a direct result of ozone photodissociation, has long been known to be a prominent emission of the Martian airglow. The motivation for pursuing the modelling of the nighttime components of the O2 IR atmospheric band and the OH Meinel bands is the potential of these two processes for characterizing the atomic oxygen profile in the 50-80 km region of the atmosphere. Likewise, the OH A-X band system may be useful to constrain the abundance of the hydroxyl radical on the illuminated side of the planet below 60 km. Both, O and OH are indicators of the photochemical state of the atmosphere. The results reported herein are expected to serve as guidelines for prospective observations of the atmosphere of Mars. The second part of the dissertation investigates the physical and chemical aeronomy of HD 209458b. The discovery of this extrasolar planet by radial velocity measurements was announced in 2000. Shortly afterwards, the inference of the mean planetary density from transit observations indicated the plausible gaseous nature of the planet. Later in-transit spectrally-resolved photometric observations revealed a cloud of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen atoms extending to a few planetary radii above the surface of the planet, which has been interpreted as evidence for an escaping atmosphere around HD 209458b. At an orbital distance of 0.05 AU, intense EUV stellar irradiation may lead to the massive escape of the atmosphere. In this work, the composition, escape and energy balance of the atmosphere are consistently modelled. Escape rates and abundances of the main hydrogen

  9. Longitudinal difference of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere structures observed with ground-based lidar, airglow and radar measurements between Japan (∼135E) and Colorado (∼105W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Ground and satellite observations, as well as modeling studies, have indicated that there is a significant longitudinal variability in the mesosphere and the upper atmosphere. One of the sources of such zonal variability, especially at the equatorial and low/mid- latitude region, is the tropospheric convection or latent heat release and non-migrating tides generated by these conditions. The outstanding structure of non-migrating tides in the low/mid latitudes is an eastward propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 3 (DE3), which causes a wave-4 structure in zonal direction, when sampled at the same local time. This would suggest that when we compare the dynamical (and chemical) structures, such as atmospheric instability/stability, wave ducts, and critical layers at the same local time, significant zonal variability could exist. In order to study such longitudinal variability, we have compared ground-based observations at two locations; Shigaraki, Japan (135E) and Fort Collins, CO (∼105W). The former is the site of the MU radar, where OMTI (Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers) is collocated. A sodium temperature lidar is also operated at Uji, within 30 km distance. The latter is the site of CSU sodium temperature and wind lidar, with an airglow imager operated nearby. Seasonal and height cross-section of lidar temperature in the MLT region were different between the two sites. At Ft. Collins, annual variation was dominant, but at Shigaraki, semiannual variation seems to be more significant, which suggests stronger effect of low latitude SAO. The airglow imaging data at the two sites are also being compared in detail, for both gravity waves and ripple structures (the latter indicating existence of instability).

  10. On applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium approach for retrieval of O and H mesospheric distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the airglow emission and ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Alexander; Belikovich, Mikhail; Kulikov, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Atomic oxygen and hydrogen are known to be among key components for the photochemistry and energy balance of the Earth's atmosphere between approximately 80 and 100 km altitude (mesopause region). Therefore, obtaining information about the vertical distributions of O and H concentrations is an important task in studies of this region. Solving of this problem is rather difficult due to the absence of regular methods which allow one to direct measurements of distributions of these components in mesosphere. However, indirect methods used to retrieve O and H distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the OH and O2(1D) airglow emission, as well as the data of IR and microwave O3 measurements have a sufficiently long development history. These methods are rooted in the use of the condition of photochemical equilibrium of ozone density in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. A significant factor is that an insufficient volume of such measurement data forces researchers to use approximate ("truncated") photochemical-equilibrium conditions. In particular, it is assumed that in the daytime the ozone production reaction is perfectly balanced by ozone photodissociation, whereas during the night the only ozone sink is the reaction of ozone with atomic hydrogen, which, in its turn, leads to formation of excited OH and airglow emission of the latter. The presentation analyzes applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium conditions both in the total and truncated forms for description of the spatio-temporal evolution of mesospheric ozone during a year. The analysis is based on year-long time series generated by a 3D chemical transport model, which reproduces correctly various types of atmosphere dynamics in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. These data are used to determine statistics of the ratio between the correct (calculated dynamically) distributions of the O3 density and its uncontracted and truncated equilibrium values for the conditions of the

  11. Yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone over New Delhi (29°N, 77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), British Antarctic Survey Station and its effect on night airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) for the period 1979–2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; D K Saha; D Sarkar

    2012-12-01

    A critical analysis made on the long-term monthly, seasonal, yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone (TCO) concentration at New Delhi (29°N,77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station reveals more decline in yearly mean ozone concentration at Halley Bay than at New Delhi from 1979 to 2005. The nature of variations of monthly mean TCO during the months of August and September was the most identical with that of yearly mean ozone values at New Delhi and Halley Bay, respectively, for the same period. Annual cycles of TCO over these stations are completely different for the above period. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of OH(8, 3) line at New Delhi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and annual cycle of intensities of OH(8, 3) line for the above two stations are depicted and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of OH(8, 3) line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  12. Laboratory Investigation of the Airglow Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Brian; Yu, Shanshan; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of oxygen A-band night glow simulated using a static discharge cell. Our static discharge system reproduces the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(^1D) + O_2 as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for rare molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b-Xvibrational bands were observed with a Bruker 125 HR for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were observed also for the main isotopologue. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for (16-17, 17-17, and 17-18), enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state in the global fit of Yu et al. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1) and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.6 and I(0,0)/I(1,1) = 60 are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data. S. Yu, C.E. Miller, B.J. Drouin, H.S.P. Müller, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024304, 2012

  13. SWIR Hemispherical Air-Glow Plotting System SHAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael M.; Dayton, David C.; Fertig, Gregory; Allen, Jeffrey; Nolasco, Rudolph; Maia, Franscisco

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band of wave length 0.9 to 1.7 μm. Numerous studies of these phenomena have demonstrated that the irradiance shows significant temporal and spatial variations in the night sky. Changes in weather patterns, seasons, sun angle, moonlight, etc have the propensity to alter the SWIR air glow irradiance pattern. By performing multiple SWIR measurements a mosaic representation of the celestial hemisphere was constructed and used to investigate these variations over time and space. The experimental setup consisted of two sensors, an InGaAs SWIR detector and a visible astronomical camera, co-located and bore sighted on an AZ-EL gimbal. This gimbal was programmed to view most of the sky using forty five discrete azimuth and elevation locations. The dwell time at each location was 30 seconds with a total cycle time of less than 30 minutes. The visible astronomical camera collected image data simultaneous with the SWIR camera in order to distinguish SWIR patterns from clouds. Data was reduced through batch processing producing polar representations of the sky irradiance as a function of azimuth, elevation, and time. These spatiotemporal variations in the irradiance, both short and long term, can be used to validate and calibrate physical models of atmospheric chemistry and turbulence. In this paper we describe our experimental setup and present some results of our measurements made over several months in a rural marine environment on the Island of Kauai Hawaii.

  14. Helium 10830 Å airglow emission response to solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P. P.; Azeem, S. M.; Sivjee, G. G.

    2007-05-01

    It has been suggested by Gadsden [1967] that the radiance of Helium 10830 Å line can be used to monitor the solar irradiance in the EUV. Conversely, we can use the 10830 Å line to study the response of the upper atmosphere over the course of a solar cycle. In this paper we will examine Helium emission line at 10830 Å to study the correlation between brightness of the emission line with F10.7 solar flux. The Helium data was acquired from Michelson Interferometers located at two stations, South Pole Station (90° S), Antarctica and Resolute Bay (74.68° N, 94.90° W), Canada. The data will be examined to isolate periods with no auroral contamination. Long term HeI data, from 1992 to 2005, will be presented to study correlation between Helium brightness and the F10.7 solar flux.

  15. Novel Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission Observations with Artificial Airglow Using RF Excitation with HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Michell, R.; Hampton, D. L.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral hydrogen plays an important role in determining the state of the plasmasphere and its response to forcing from geomagnetic storms. Hydrogen's solar cycle variation is counterintuitive: there is more hydrogen at solar minimum at 300 km that there is at solar maximum. Similarly there is more hydrogen in winter than in summer and hydrogen density maximizes in the morning. In this presentation we describe these variations and consider some possible causes for them.

  16. Airglow and magnetic field disturbances over Brazilian region during Chile tsunami (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Klausner, V; Candido, C M N; Abalde, J R; Fagundes, P R; Kherani, E A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present first report on disturbances over Brazilian atmosphere on 16--17 September, 2015 following the Chile tsunami occurrence. Using all-sky imager and magnetometer located at 2330 km away from the epicenter, the presence of disturbances is noted 1--3 hours after the tsunami beginning time and during time which seismic tremor was also felt in the region. We argue that their presence towards continent at 2000-3000 km away from the epicenter offers another example of similar atmospheric response as those observed during Tohoku-Oki tsunami, 2011. This similarity and their appearance during seismic tremor over the region classify them to be of tsunamigenic and/or seismogenic nature.

  17. High resolution spectral analysis of oxygen. III. Laboratory investigation of the airglow bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan; Elliott, Ben M.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of simulated oxygen A-band night glow. Our static discharge system approximates the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(1D) + O2 (X ^3Σ _g^-) → O(3P) + O2 (b ^1Σ _g^+) → O2 (X ^3Σ _g^-) + hν as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for all six molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b - X vibrational bands were observed for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were also observed for 16O2. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for 16O17O, 17O2, and 17O18O, enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state global fit. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.53(24); I(1,1)/I(1,0) = 11.9(65); I(0,0)/I(0,2) = 503(197); and I(1,1)/I(1,2) = 5.6(19) are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data and calculated Franck-Condon factors.

  18. Seasonal trends and nightly fluctuations of SWIR air-glow irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Allen, Jeffrey; Nolasco, Rudolph; Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael; Fertig, Gregory

    2011-11-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band with wavelength between 0.9 and 1.7 μm. This air glow has been proposed as an illumination source for obtaining imagery in the dark of night. By examining short term nightly fluctuations and long term seasonal trends in the ground level irradiance we hope to determine the source reliability for night time low light surveillance and imaging.

  19. Measurements of the helium 584 Å airglow during the Cassini flyby of Venus

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Gustin, Jacques; Hubert, Benoît; Gladstone, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity. The brightness was measured along the disk from the morning terminator up to the bright limb near local noon. The mean disk intensity was ˜320 R, reaching ˜700 R at the bright limb. These values are slightly higher than those determined from previous observations. The sensitivity of the 584 Å ...

  20. Measurements of the helium 584 Å airglow during the Cassini flyby of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Gustin, J.; Hubert, B.; Gladstone, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-10-01

    The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity. The brightness was measured along the disk from the morning terminator up to the bright limb near local noon. The mean disk intensity was ∼320 R, reaching ∼700 R at the bright limb. These values are slightly higher than those determined from previous observations. The sensitivity of the 584 Å intensity to the helium abundance is analyzed using recent cross-sections and solar irradiance measurements at 584 Å. The intensity distribution along the UVIS footprint on the disk is best reproduced using the EUVAC solar flux model and the helium density distribution from the VTS3 empirical model. It corresponds to a helium density of 8×106 cm-3 at the level of where the CO2 is 2×1010 cm-3.

  1. Far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet rocket instrumentation for measuring the solar spectral irradiance and terrestrial airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment is being developed for the study of EUV spectral irradiance and its effects on the upper atmosphere, using three solar EUV instruments devised by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. These include a 25-cm Rowland circle EUV spectrograph, an array of Si X-UV photodiodes, and an X-UV imager with 20 arcsec resolution of the sun.

  2. Spatial characteristics of airglow and solar-scatter radiance from the earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguenin, R.; Wohlers, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R.; Eastes, R.

    1989-08-09

    Data measured by the Polar BEAR/AIRS UV Experiment were processed to extract spatial-radiance characteristics. Photometer-mode 1304A dayside data measured on Julian Day 219, 1987, near mid-day were analyzed. The spatial structure of thermospheric dayside radiance at 1304A appeared to be controlled principally by turbulence over spatial scales of 10 million - 100 meters, with modifications imposed by Rayleigh-scattering effects and magnetospherically forced phenomena. Spatial structure can be adequately modeled fractally, using dimensions based on Kolmogorov formalism modified by the Rayleigh scattering phase function. Mean radiance can be modeled using existing models of radiant intensity, resonance scattering, and absorption combined with thermospheric composition and general circulation models, such as MSIS-83, scaled to the mean and RHS intensities measured by Polar BEAR. The results can be incorporated in a background radiance simulation model that will provide a means for testing and refining phenomenological models of the structured earth background. This will be important not only for improving physical and chemical models of atmospheric features and processes, but it will allow parametric predictions of spatial structure and clutter to be developed for sensor applications.

  3. Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Plasma Bubbles Observed by an All-Sky Airglow Imager at Yonaguni, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiko Ogawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on night time air glow imaging observations of the low latitude ionosphere by means of a 630-m all-sky imager in stalled in March 2006 at Yonaguni, Japan _ _ _ geomagnetic, about 100 km east of Taiwan. The imager detected medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs for about 7 hours on the night of 26 May 2006. A dense GPS net work in Japan also ob served the same MSTID event on this night. The imager and GEONET data indicate that most of the MSTIDs prop a gated south west ward from the north of Japan to the south of Yonaguni and Taiwan over 4000 km, with a southern limit of _ (geomagnetic latitude _ or lower. On the night of 10 November 2006, the imager observed two weak emission bands that were embedded on the F-region anomaly crest to the south of Yonaguni. The simultaneous electron density profiles from the FORMOSAT-3/COS MIC mission demonstrate that the weak emission bands are due to density depletions in equatorial plasma bubbles. These case studies suggest that the Yonaguni imager in collaboration with other instruments is very suit able for the study of ionospheric disturbances in and around the northern F-region anomaly crest.

  4. Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Plasma Bubbles Observed by an All-Sky Airglow Imager at Yonaguni, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tadahiko Ogawa; Yuichi Otsuka; Kazuo Shiokawa; Takuya Tsugawa; Akinori Saito; Kazuaki Hoshinoo; Keisuke Matunaga; Minoru Kubota; and Mamoru Ishii

    2009-01-01

    We report on night time air glow imaging observations of the low latitude ionosphere by means of a 630-m all-sky imager in stalled in March 2006 at Yonaguni, Japan _ _ _ geomagnetic), about 100 km east of Taiwan. The imager detected medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) for about 7 hours on the night of 26 May 2006. A dense GPS net work in Japan also ob served the same MSTID event on this night. The imager and GEONET data indicate that most of the MSTIDs prop a gated south ...

  5. Comment on Airglow observations of the OI 7774 A multiplet at Arecibo during a magnetic storm by Roger G. Burnside, John W. Meriwether and James C. G. Walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Y.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Teixeira, N. R.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements and theoretical calculations of the 7774A and 6300A emissions for Arecibo, Puerto Rico, for May 2-3, 1976 during severe magnetic storm conditions are presented. The 6300 A observations were made with a tilting filter photometer looking at zenith, whereas the 7774A observations were made with a 1.0 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer looking towards the west at an elevation angle of 20 deg. The theoretical calculations of the vertical column intensities of these emissions for this specific night, were performed using vertical electron density profile measurements made with the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Their results show a reasonably good fit between experimental and theoretical 6300 A emissions. However, for the 7774A emission, there is a discrepancy between the theoretical vertical column intensities and the intensities observed looking west at 70 deg. from the zenith. Possible excitation mechanisms to explain the excess 7774A observed intensities are discussed.

  6. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan nightglow spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Gustin, Jacques; Larsen, Kristopher; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Esposito, Larry W.; Mcclintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; Bradley, E. Todd

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the first nightside EUV and FUV airglow limb spectra of Titan showing molecular emissions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan's day and night limb-airglow and disk-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. The 71 airglow observations analyzed in this paper show EUV (600-1150 Å) and FUV (1150-1900 Å) atomic multiplet lines and band emissions arising from either photoelectron induced fluor...

  7. A first look at the ASSI ultraviolet results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Tobiska, W. K.; Schmidtke, G.; Doll, H.; Gerard, J.-C.

    1993-01-01

    The Airglow and Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco D satellite has obtained near-simultaneous measurements of solar irradiances and airglow emissions in the 200-7000 A spectral region. The satellite was placed in an equatorial, elliptical orbit on 25 March 1988, which permitted observations of airglow emissions in the 280-600-km altitude range at various local times. The instrument complement on the satellite provides an opportunity both for self-consistent examination of the excitation mechanisms of various airglow features and for constraining model parameters. An overview of the data obtained by ASSI is presented along with preliminary modeling results of the UV airglow.

  8. A search for evidence of tidal activity in OH(3,l)airglow omissions recorded at Maynooth (53.23° N, 6.35° W)

    OpenAIRE

    Mulligan, F. J.; Nallen, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Spectra of the Meinel hydroxyl emissions in the wavelength range LO-l.6 um, which originate at altitudes close to the mesopause, have been obtained, using a Fourier transform spectrometer at Maynooth (53.23°N, 6.35*W), Ireland, on all suitable nights during the period December 1992 to July 1995. Rotational temperatures and integrated band intensities have been calculated from the spectra of the OH (3, 1) vibrational band. These data have been analysed for evidence of tidal activity. Ou...

  9. Mesospheric temperature and atomic oxygen response during the January 2009 major stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Marianna G.; Cho, Young-Min; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Ward, William; Drummond, James R.

    2010-07-01

    The study examines the response of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere to the major stratospheric warming (SSW) event from January 2009, as seen in the OH and O2(0,1) atmospheric band airglow observations nominally at 87 and 94 km, respectively, by a SATI (Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager) instrument installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) as part of the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change. At the time of the SSW, the airglow emissions and the derived rotational temperatures appear depleted and decreased, followed by an enhancement of the airglow emission rates during the SSW recovery phase, while the temperatures returned to their pre-event state. An empirical relationship between OH airglow peak altitude determined by SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry) and SATI integrated emission rates allowed perturbed OH and O2(0,1) airglow altitudes to be assigned to the SATI observations. From these, the O volume mixing ratio (VMR), corresponding to the observed OH and O2(0,1) airglow emission rates were modeled. Atomic oxygen depletion by a factor of ˜5 was observed during the SSW and lasted for about 5 days. During the SSW recovery phase, the O VMR giving rise to the observed O2(0,1) airglow emission rates increased by a factor of 3.5 from its pre-SSW level and 17 times from the peak of the SSW. Perturbations in the OH and O2(0,1) airglow layers with periods of 4, 6, 8, and 12 h indicate nonlinear interaction between zonally symmetric semidiurnal tides and planetary waves.

  10. Methodological possibilities for using the electron and ion energy balance in thermospheric complex measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination of ground based measurements for determination of basic thermospheric characteristics is proposed . An expression for the energy transport between components of space plasma is also derived and discussed within the framework of the presented methodology which could be devided into the folowing major sections: 1) application of ionosonde, absorption measurements, TEC-measurements using Faradey radiation or the differential Doppler effect; 2) ground-based airglow measurements; 3) airglow and palsma satelite measurements. 9 refs

  11. Investigation of major stratospheric warming effects on atmospheric coupling at high latitudes using the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, M. G.; Beagley, S. R.; Cho, Y.; Fomichev, V.; Shepherd, G. G.

    2010-12-01

    The study examines the response of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere to the major stratospheric warming (SSW) event from January 2009, as seen in the OH and O2 (0,1) Atmospheric band airglow observations nominally at 87 km and 94 km, respectively by a SATI (Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager) instrument installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) as part of the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change. At the time of the SSW the airglow emissions and the derived rotational temperatures appear depleted and decreased, respectively followed by an enhancement of the airglow emission rates during the SSW recovery phase, while the temperatures returned to their pre-event state. An empirical relationship between OH airglow peak altitude determined by SABER and SATI integrated emission rates allowed perturbed OH and O2 (0,1) airglow altitudes to be assigned to the SATI observations. From these the O volume mixing ratio (VMR), corresponding to the observed OH and O2 (0,1) airglow emission rates were modeled. Atomic oxygen depletion by a factor of ~5 was observed during the SSW and lasted for about 5 days. During the SSW recovery phase the O VMR giving rise to the observed O2 (0,1) airglow emission rates increased by a factor of 3.5 from its pre-SSW level and 17 times from that observed during the peak of the SSW. The observed response of the MLT region to the major stratospheric warming is further examined employing assimilated temperature and wind fields by the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) at high latitudes and throughout the middle atmosphere from 10 to 100 km height. Temperature observations by the COSMIC/Formosat-3 and MLS-Aura satellites are also considered in this study.

  12. Upper Atmospheric Density Retrievals from UVIS Dayglow Observations of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. S.; Ajello, J. M.; Bradley, E. T.; Meier, R. R.; Westlake, J. H.; Waite, J. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan’s dayside limb on multiple occasions between 2007-2012. The airglow observations reveal the same variety of EUV (600-1150 λ) and FUV (1150-1900 λ) emissions arising from photoelectron impact and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2) on Earth. Through spectral analysis we extract radiance profiles for each set of UVIS limb emissions in the EUV and FUV, which are attenuated by methane (CH4). Using a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan, we derive the N2 and CH4 density profiles using the prescribed solar irradiance for the relevant Cassini orbit and compare the calculated radiance profiles directly with observations. We find that the Titan airglow can be explained by solar driven processes to within the uncertainties of the UVIS observations. Fluctuations in the observed airglow between flybys suggest compositional changes in the background atmosphere. The source of these compositional changes is not yet known, although the interaction of Titan with Saturn’s magnetosphere has been implicated as an important contributing factor. Here we use unique UVIS airglow observations over Titan’s disk to quantify compositional fluctuations with latitude and local time. We furthermore compare N2 and CH4 densities retrieved from the UVIS airglow to in situ observations by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and discuss how the UVIS and INMS variations may be related to Titan’s varying plasma environment.

  13. Ground-satellite conjugate observations of low-latitude travelling ionospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shin; Liu, Huixin; Yatini, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are studied by using three CHAMP satellite overpasses on ground-based 630-nm airglow images. The airglow images are obtained from Kototabang (KTB), Indonesia (geographic coordinates: 0.2S, 100.3E, geomagnetic latitude: 10.6S). From 7-year data from October 2002 to October 2009, April 30, 2006 (event 1), September 28, 2006 (event 2) and April 12, 2004 (event 3) are the only TID events found in both ground and satellite measurements. They show southward-moving structures in 630-nm airglow images. The events 1 and 2 are single pulse with horizontal scales of ~500-1000 km and event 3 show three wave fronts with horizontal scale sizes of 500-700 km. For events 1 and 3, the neutral density in CHAMP shows out-of-phase variations with the airglow intensity, while event 2 is in-phase. For event 1, the relation between electron density and airglow intensity is out of phase, while relationships of event 2 and 3 are unclear. These unclear relationships suggest that ionospheric plasma variation is not the cause of the TIDs. In the case if gravity waves in the thermosphere is the source of the observed TIDs, in-phase and out-of-phase relationships of neutral density and airglow intensity can be explained by different vertical wavelengths of the gravity wave. We estimate possible vertical wavelengths for those events using observed wave parameters and modeled neutral winds.

  14. Compositional Variations from UVIS Observations of Titan's Dayglow and Comparisons with in situ INMS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M. H.; Evans, J. S.; Ajello, J. M.; Bradley, E. T.; Meier, R. R.; Westlake, J. H.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan’s dayside limb on multiple occasions between 2007 and 2011. The airglow observations reveal the same variety of EUV (600-1150Å) and FUV (1150-1900Å) emissions arising from photoelectron excitation and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2) on Earth. Through spectral analysis we extract radiance profiles for each set of UVIS limb emissions in the EUV and FUV, which are attenuated by methane (CH4). Using a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan, we derive the N2 and CH4 density profiles using the prescribed solar irradiance for the relevant Cassini orbit and compare the calculated radiance profiles directly with observations. We find that the UVIS airglow observations can be explained by solar driven processes, although fluctuations in the observed airglow between flybys suggest compositional changes in the background atmosphere. We compare the compositional variations inferred from the UVIS airglow to in situ observations by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) from the same Titan orbit and discuss how the variations may be related to Titan’s varying plasma environment.

  15. Climatology of the O(1S) and O(1D) emission rates from WINDII/UARS global measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Shepherd, S.

    The Wind Imaging Interferometer WINDII on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite UARS has provided a large number of O 1S green line 557 7 nm and O 1D red line 630 0 nm emission rate profiles during 1991-1997 of unprecedented high quality The daytime airglow emission is produced mainly by solar energy deposition and vary according to changes of the solar zenith angle and solar irradiance The nighttime airglow emission rates show strong latitudinal and local time dependences Using both daytime and nighttime measurements the directly solar excited daytime emission rates can be removed and the indirectly excited component is revealed This study presents the seasonal and latitudinal variations of the indirect component of the two airglow emission rates which may be due to tides geomagnetic effects and other physical and photochemical processes

  16. An EUV spectrometer for atmospheric remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS) experiment, designed to investigate the interactions between the solar ionizing radiation and the earth's upper atmosphere. The primary objective of this experiment is the verification the feasibility of using EUV observations as a quantitative diagnostic of the terrestrial atmosphere and its plasma environment. The expected information provided by spectroscopic measurements of EUV emission will include data on the excitation mechanisms, excitation rates, and branching ratios. The BEARS experimental package consists of a high-resolution EUV airglow spectrometer, a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to measure both the solar radiations and the geocoronal emissions, and a moderate-resolution solar EUV spectrometer. In a test experiment, the instruments were carried aboard a four-stage sounding rocket to a peak altitude of about 960 km and obtained airglow spectra in the 980-1060 A range and in the 1300-1360 range. 34 refs

  17. Plan to develop predictive capability for equatorial scintillation storms. Semi-annual report, 1 July-31 December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendillo, M.; Aarons, J.

    1997-01-27

    To begin the assembly of a coordinated, multiparameter data base suitable for testing various approaches to prediction the team went to Tucuman, Argentina and set up an airglow imaging system to record the 6300 A airglow depletions that mark the boundaries of low latitude irregularity patterns. A successful series of measurements were made during the campaign. Optical observations at Arequipa, Peru were made. The data are being reduced as of this time with interesting comparisons of phase and amplitude scintillation with optical and radar data. Localized differences are considerable so that on some days the occurrence of scintillation was different for stations 500 km apart.

  18. Video and photographic spectroscopy of 1998 and 2001 Leonid persistent trains from 300 to 930 nm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abe, S.; Ebizuka, N.; Murayama, H.; Ohtsuka, K.; Sugimoto, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Yano, H.; Watanabe, J.; Borovička, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 95, 1-4 (2005), s. 265-277. ISSN 0167-9295. [Meteoroids 2004. London, Ontario, 16.08.2004-20.08.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : airglow * Leonid meteor * shower Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2005

  19. Solar and chemical reaction-induced heating in the terrestrial mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.

    1992-01-01

    Airglow and chemical processes in the terrestrial mesosphere and lower thermosphere are reviewed, and initial parameterizations of the processes applicable to multidimensional models are presented. The basic processes by which absorbed solar energy participates in middle atmosphere energetics for absorption events in which photolysis occurs are illustrated. An approach that permits the heating processes to be incorporated in numerical models is presented.

  20. Proceedings of the 13th annual meeting on upper atmosphere studies by optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 41 papers were presented under the following session topics: Atmospheric emissions; auroral features and dynamics; auroral pulsations; airglow and atmospheric parameters; atmospheric constituents; instrumentation and data handling; and observation programs. The report presents the full text or abstracts of 31 of the lectures given at the meeting. 25 of the papers are seperate input to the data base from this report

  1. Study of mid-latitude 5577A CI dayglow emissions. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Summary of thesis: The green line (5577angstroms) is a bright, persistent component of the visible airglow. It is produced by an electric quadruple transition from the metastable second excited state (1So) to the first excited state (1D2) of atomic oxygen. These two excited states all lie in the same electron shell of the atom and have the same electron configuration as the ground state of 1s22s22p4, which is the 3P2,1,0. This emission is present in both the daytime and night airglow and in the aurora, and despite a long history of study it is still not fully understood. The emission in the dayglow and the nightglow is relatively homogeneous spatially and global in coverage. In the aurora, the emission is much brighter than the airglow, high structured and very localized being restricted to higher latitudes. The structure of the 5577angstroms emission with altitude and the chemistry responsible for the production of the emission are complex. The vertical structure for the emission has two distinct layers in the airglow each with its own set of production and loss mechanisms. the chemistry for either of these layers is not completely known. The auroral emission is not understood either since it overlaps the upper and lower layer altitudes and it tends to contain some parts of the chemistry of both layers as sources and losses.

  2. Circulation in upper mesosphere of Venus in the Southern and Northern hemispheres from the O2 1.27 μm night glow (VIRTIS-M/VEX data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L.; Shakun, A.; Khatuntsev, I.; Gorinov, D.; Migliorini, A.; Altieri, F.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.

    2014-04-01

    Mapping spectrometer VIRTIS-M on board Venus Express [1] made observations of the O2 1.27 μm airglow intensity distribution on the night side of Venus in nadir and limb modes in Southern and Northern hemispheres respectively. The work is devoted to comparison of the results, obtained for both hemispheres.

  3. The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) Payload Facility on the ISS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibaldi, Giuseppe; Nasca, Rosario; Neubert, Torsten;

    in severe thunderstorms, • Ionisation and heating of the mesosphere and lower ionosphere by electromagnetic waves from lightning discharges and TLEs, and • Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by electromagnetic waves from lightning discharges. ASIM will also study auroral dynamics, airglow, and...

  4. Fabrication and performance of intrinsic germanium photodiodes. [for atmospheric IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiting, E. J., III; Feldman, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents fabrication details for an intrinsic germanium photodiode developed for study of atmospheric constituents, the airglow and auroras in the 1-2 micron spectral range. Attention is given to cutting of the single crystal, spreading of the lithium dispersion, sputtering of a gold coating, and surface passivation. A wavelength response curve is presented.

  5. Ten-color Gegenschein-zodiacal light photometer. [onboard Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Weinberg, J. L.; Hahn, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A ten-color Fabry photometer was used during Skylab missions SL-2 and SL-3 to measure sky brightness and polarization associated with zodiacal light, background starlight, F region airglow, and spacecraft corona. A brief description is given of the design, calibration, and performance of the instrument.

  6. Orbital Sunrise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The STS-68 crew aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour told a post-flight audience at JSC that this sunrise was one of the most scenic sunrises/ sunsets witnessed during the week and a half long Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-2) mission. Jutting clouds, back-lit by the dawn colors, are sandwiched between the blue airglow and the silhouetted horizon of Earth.

  7. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan nightglow spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; West, Robert A.; Gustin, Jacques; Larsen, Kristopher; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Esposito, Larry W.; McClintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; Bradley, E. Todd

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we present the first nightside EUV and FUV airglow limb spectra of Titan showing molecular emissions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan's day and night limb-airglow and disk-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. The 71 airglow observations analyzed in this paper show EUV (600-1150 Å) and FUV (1150-1900 Å) atomic multiplet lines and band emissions arising from either photoelectron induced fluorescence and solar photo-fragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N2) or excitation by magnetosphere plasma. The altitude of the peak UV emissions on the limb during daylight occurred inside the thermosphere at the altitude of the topside ionosphere (near 1000 km altitude). However, at night on the limb, a subset of emission features, much weaker in intensity, arise in the atmosphere with two different geometries. First, there is a twilight photoelectron-excited glow that persists with solar depression angle up to 25-30 degrees past the terminator, until the solar XUV shadow height passes the altitude of the topside ionosphere (1000-1200 km). The UV twilight glow spectrum is similar to the dayglow but weaker in intensity. Second, beyond 120° solar zenith angle, when the upper atmosphere of Titan is in total XUV darkness, there is indication of weak and sporadic nightside UV airglow emissions excited by magnetosphere plasma collisions with ambient thermosphere gas, with similar N2 excited features as above in the daylight or twilight glow over an extended altitude range.

  8. Error calculation and analysis for an improved wind retrieval method based on the ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houmao; Wang, Yongmei

    2015-11-01

    A ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fabricated by American National Center for Atmospheric Research (A-NCAR) was deployed in Kelan (111.6° E, 38.7° N), in middle of China, to observe OH 892.0 nm, OI 630.0 nm, and OI 557.7 nm airglow emissions for wind retrieval of mesospheric and thermospheric atmosphere using a method based on the convolution of the source profile and instrumental function. Based on the instrument, wind velocities were retrieved using another retrieval method but improved in both noise reduction and choice of interference fringes, which can reduce the disturbance of bad fringes and advance the retrieval precision. The retrieval results were subsequently compared with the FPI wind products, and good agreement was found between them. The averaged deviations of wind velocities between the two retrieval methods depend on airglow intensity with 5.7 m/s for 892.0 nm emission, 6.18 m/s for 630.0 nm emission, and 3.66 m/s for 557.7 nm emission, respectively. Then, a new method was proposed for error calculation by considering the influence of airglow intensity, CCD dark noise, background emissions, and data processing, which can steadily evaluate the precision and reliability of wind retrieval. The relationships between errors derived from the two retrieval methods and airglow intensity were compared and analyzed. It is found that the variation of errors is inversely correlated with the variation of airglow intensity.

  9. Stratospheric Warming Influence on the Thermosphere as seen by the Extended CMAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Marianna; Shepherd, Gordon; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor; Beagley, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    Ground-based observations of the OH and O2 (0,1) Atmospheric band airglow, nominally at 87 km and 94 km, respectively by a SATI (Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager) instrument installed at Resolute Bay (75°N, 95°W) and at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka (80°N, 86°W) have shown that at the time of stratospheric warming events (e.g. 2004, 2009) (SSW) the airglow emissions and the derived rotational temperatures decreased, followed by an enhancement of the airglow emission rates during the SSW recovery phase, while the temperatures returned to their pre-event state. An empirical relationship between OH airglow peak altitude determined by SABER and SATI integrated emission rates allowed perturbed OH and O2 (0,1) airglow altitudes to be assigned to the SATI observations. From these the O volume mixing ratio (VMR), corresponding to the observed OH and O2 (0,1) airglow emission rates were modeled. A significant atomic oxygen depletion was observed during the SSW, while during the SSW recovery phase the O VMR giving rise to the observed O2 (0,1) airglow emission rates increased up to 17 times from that observed during the peak of the SSW. The effect of SSW on the thermosphere has also been examined through the response of thermospheric O(1S) dayglow as a proxy for SSW- induced variations in the O VMR observed by the WIND Imaging Interferometer on UARS, from 90 km to 280 km height. A depletion above 140 km in the daytime O(1S) volume emission rates was observed, which commenced around the onset of the SSW and lasted over a period of 3 -- 4 days before returning to and exceeding the pre-SSW values during the SSW recovery phase. Below 140 km height the effect was manifested by a four-fold enhancement in the O(1S) volume emission rate at ˜100 km, which correlated with the cold temperature anomaly of the SSW at and below the stratopause. The observed response of the MLT region to the major SSW is further examined employing

  10. Antarctic Wave Dynamics Mystery Discovered by Lidar, Radar and Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cao; Chu, Xinzhao; Fong, Weichun; Lu, Xian; McDonald, Adrian J.; Pautet, Dominique; Taylor, Mike

    2016-06-01

    Since the start of the McMurdo Fe lidar campaign, largeamplitude (~±30 K), long-period (4 to 9 h) waves with upward energy propagating signatures are frequently observed in the MLT temperatures. Despite its frequent appearance, such type of wave was neither widely observed nor well understood in the past. At McMurdo (77.8°S, 166.7°E), the simultaneous observations of such waves using lidar, radar and airglow imager can provide 3-D intrinsic wave-propagation properties, which are greatly needed for understanding their sources and potential impacts. This study presents the first coincident observation of these 4-9 h waves by lidar, radar and airglow imager in the Antarctic mesopause region.

  11. Temporal and spectral variations of the photoelectron flux and solar irradiance during an X class solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W. K.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Richards, P. G.

    2008-06-01

    Photoelectrons are the main energy source of airglow used to diagnose the state of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. Because of measurement uncertainties and substantial gaps in the historical record, parameterized models of the EUV irradiance and photoelectron flux are generally used to estimate airglow intensities. This paper compares observed and modeled photoelectron spectra from an X3 class flare that occurred on July 15, 2002. The photoelectron data were obtained from the FAST satellite. Model photoelectron spectra were obtained from the Field Line Inter-hemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model using 10 s cadence solar spectra at 1 nm resolution from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The observed and modeled spectra agree well temporally and spectrally within the uncertainties of the models and data. Systematic differences found between observed and modeled photoelectron spectra suggest that the solar irradiance from FISM could be improved at wavelengths shortward of 17 nm.

  12. A reanalysis of rocket measurements of the ultraviolet dayglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, R.; Gladstone, G. R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Mcconnell, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    Rocket measurements of O I 989, 1304, 1356 A and N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band emission in the midlatitude dayglow reported by Gentieu et al. (1979) and Eastes et al. (1985) are reexamined. MSIS-83 atomic oxygen densities, the 1304 and 1356 A excitation cross sections of Zipf and Erdman (1985), and SMM solar 1304 A irradiance measurements are consistent with the observed O I and N2 emission intensities. Atmosphere Explorer E (AE-E) measurements of the solar EUV irradiance near solar maximum are consistent with the 1980 rocket airglow data, but the solar EUV irradiance required to explain the 1978 airglow data is a factor of 1.5 larger than indicated by AE-E. Enhancement of the 1304 A excitation cross section due to radiative entrapment of cascade-feeding photons is much less than the factor of two predicted by the cascade model of Julienne and Davis (1976).

  13. Wave Signatures in the Polar Mesopause Region during the January, 2009 Sudden Stratospheric Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W. E.; Kristoffersen, S.; Vail, C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations on a two minute cadence at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, Eureka, Nunavut, 80N) with an all sky imager and a Doppler Imaging Interferometer were taken during the January, 2009 major stratospheric warming. These observations complement temperature and irradiance measurments previously reported from the same location. Oscillations with periods of 4 days, 2.5 days, 24 hours, 16 hours 12 hours and 8 hours are observed during this warming period. In addition shorter period oscillations in the airglow observations and wind observations are observed. This paper summarizes these observations and delineates the evolution of these features and the large scale winds during this warming event.Meridional winds from Doppler shifts in the oxygen green line airglow observed with the ERWIN II instrument from January 16-31, 2009. Individual points are observations every 2 minutes with an error of 2 m/s.

  14. Variability of the nitric oxide nightglow at Venus during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Montmessin, F.; Marcq, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from a NO airglow inversion method based on Venus Express data acquired from 2006 to 2010, during the last solar minimum period. We retrieve an altitude of 114 ± 10 km for the emission peak of the NO layer, with an associated scale height of 20 ± 10 km and an average limb brightness of 59.3 kR with a standard deviation of 63 kR. The inversion method allows for the quantification of the horizontal homogeneity of the NO layer. Images of the SPICAV field of view show a great variability of airglow morphologies, with NO layers that can be horizontally homogenous and continuous over distances exceeding 100 km, as well as sporadic patches of NO on a smaller horizontal scale. Frequent secondary emissions seen at lower tangent altitudes are the signatures of the complex dynamics of the upper Venusian atmosphere.

  15. Recent observations of dynamic variations of the thermosphere and ionosphere by the Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers (OMTIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Lakshmi Narayanan, Viswanathan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    The Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers (OMTIs) consist of fourteen all-sky cooled-CCD imagers, five Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs), three meridian scanning photometers, and four airglow temperature photometers. They measure two-dimensional pattern, Doppler wind, and temperature through airglow emissions from oxygen (wavelength: 557.7 nm) and OH (near infrared band) in the mesopause region (80-100 km) and from oxygen (630.0 nm) in the thermosphere/ionosphere (200-300 km). They are in automatic operation at 14 stations at Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, far-east Russia, Japan, Canada, Hawaii, Norway, and Nigeria. Station information and quick look plots are available at http://stdb2.stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp/omti/. In this presentation we show recent observations of the dynamical variations of the thermosphere and ionosphere observed by OMTIs at various latitudes from the equator to the auroral zone.

  16. Wave-coupling from the troposphere to the mesosphere and thermosphere observed by the Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers (OMTIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Takeo, Daiki; Fujinami, Hatsuki

    2016-07-01

    The airglow emissions from the mesopause region and the thermosphere are very useful to monitor dynamical variations of the neutral and plasma atmosphere in the upper atmosphere. The Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers (OMTIs) measure two-dimensional pattern, Doppler wind, and temperature through airglow emissions from oxygen (wavelength: 557.7 nm) and OH (near infrared band) in the mesopause region (80-100 km) and from oxygen (630.0 nm) in the thermosphere/ionosphere (200-300 km) at various locations in the world. Station information and quick look plots are available at http://stdb2.stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp/omti/. In this presentation we show recent observations by OMTIs for the vertical coupling of atmospheric gravity waves from the troposphere to the mesopause region and to the thermosphere/ionosphere.

  17. Observation of mesospheric gravity waves at Comandante Ferraz Antarctica Station (62° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Souza

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An airglow all-sky imager was operated at Comandante Ferraz Antarctica Station (62.1° S, 58.4° W, between April and October of 2007. Mesospheric gravity waves were observed using the OH airglow layer during 43 nights with good weather conditions. The waves presented horizontal wavelengths between 10 and 60 km and observed periods mainly distributed between 5 and 20 min. The observed phase speeds range between 5 m/s and 115 m/s; the majority of the wave velocities were between 10 and 60 m/s. The waves showed a preferential propagation direction towards the southwest in winter (May to July, while during spring (August to October there was an anisotropy with a preferential propagation direction towards the northwest. Unusual mesospheric fronts were also observed. The most probable wave source could be associated to orographic forcing, cold fronts or strong cyclonic activity in the Antarctica Peninsula.

  18. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Tomikawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A new method of obtaining power spectral distribution of gravity waves as a function of ground-based horizontal phase speed and propagation direction from airglow observations has recently been proposed. To explain gravity wave power spectrum anisotropy, a new gravity wave transmission diagram was developed in this study. Gravity wave transmissivity depends on the existence of critical and turning levels for waves that are determined by background horizontal wind distributio...

  19. The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) Payload Facility on the ISS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibaldi, Giuseppe; Nasca, Rosario; Neubert, Torsten; Hartnack, Ole

    the utilization of the ISS. ASIM will study • The recently discovered electrical discharges in the stratosphere and mesosphere above thunderstorms, • Relativistic electron beams accelerated above thunderstorms, injected into the magnetosphere, • Gravity waves in the thermosphere powered by convection...... in severe thunderstorms, • Ionisation and heating of the mesosphere and lower ionosphere by electromagnetic waves from lightning discharges and TLEs, and • Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by electromagnetic waves from lightning discharges. ASIM will also study auroral dynamics, airglow, and...

  20. Optimizing an Infrared Camera for Observing Atmospheric Gravity Waves from a CubeSat Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Rønning, Snorre Stavik

    2012-01-01

    The NTNU Test Satellite (NUTS) is a double CubeSat deigned by master students at NTNU. The goal of the project is to image atmospheric gravity waves in the OH airglow layer. This thesis explores the theory behind gravity waves and discuss the design of an infrared camera as a payload onboard. Different requirement based on scientific and mechanical limitations are presented. Based on this a suitable infrared camera is presented.

  1. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observedthrough ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during Tohoku-Oki tsunami propagation. High-frequency perturbations of these parameters are observed during three expected crossings of the tsunami-generated gravity waves by the GOCE satellite. From theore...

  2. Investigation of gravity wave activity based on NDMC, NDACC and CTBTO measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wüst, S.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Schmidt, C.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Kramer, R.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Bittner, M.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Hauchecorne, A.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; Keckhut, P.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; LePichon, A.; Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA), France; Marchetti, E.; Università degli studi di firenze (UNIFI); Mze, N.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; Pecora, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia

    2014-01-01

    GRIPS (Ground based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer) airglow measurements allow the derivation of kinetic temperature in the mesopause region during night with a temporal resolution of 10s to 15s. Amongst others, these time series can be used for the investigation of atmospheric dynamics like gravity wave activity. GRIPS measurements are performed in the framework of NDMC – the international Network for the Detection of Mesospheric Change. The project ARISE combines NDMC, NDACC (Network for th...

  3. EARTHQUAKE LIGHTS IN LEGENDS OF THE GREEK ORTHODOXY

    OpenAIRE

    Florinsky, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    Local legends may contain information about real geological events of the past. Earthquake lights (EQL) can occur in the atmosphere over earthquake epicenter areas and adjacent faults before and during quakes. They may look like diffuse airglow, flashes, fiery pillars, and luminous balls. EQL may cause a mystical experience probably due to the influence of their electromagnetic fields on the brain. Subjective perception and interpretation of EQL depend on religious and cultural traditions. We...

  4. Observations of Polar Dynamics in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere from the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A suite of instruments capable of observing phenomena in the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been established at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) situated in the Canadian high Arctic at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80N, 86W). Observations with some instruments started in 2007 but the full suite started operation in 2008.Instruments located at this site include a meteor radar, a Rayleigh lidar, a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI), an all sky airglo...

  5. Response of the Upper Atmosphere to Variations in the Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-11-01

    Terrestrial Far Ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of Nitric Oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N _2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N_2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the thermosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  6. Response of the upper atmosphere to variations in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. Ph.D. Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial far ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of nitric oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the atmosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  7. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  8. GALEX Observations of Diffuse UV Radiation at High Spatial Resolution from the Sandage Nebulosity

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha, N. V.; Murthy, Jayant; Karnataki, Abhay; Henry, Richard Conn; Bianchi, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    Using the GALEX ultraviolet imagers we have observed a region of nebulosity first identified as starlight scattered by interstellar dust by Sandage (1976). Apart from airglow and zodiacal emission, we have found a diffuse UV background of between 500 and 800 \\phunit in both the \\galex FUV (1350 -- 1750 \\AA) and NUV (1750 -- 2850 \\AA). Of this emission, up to 250 \\phunit is due to \\htwo fluorescent emission in the FUV band; the remainder is consistent with scattering from interstellar dust. We...

  9. Active Experiment with High-Power Electron Gun in the Polar Region (Plan)

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki,Susumu/Kaneko,Osamu/Kawashima,Nobuki/Yagi,Yasuyuki/Akai,Kazunori/Nakai,Yutaka

    1981-01-01

    A plan of a high-power electron beam experiment in the polar region is discussed. An electron beam is quite useful for studying space plasma phenomena as one of the active experiments. The main objective of the experiment is to study the aurora/airglow and various kinds of waves artificially excited by the electron beam, as compared with natural ones. It can be also used to trace the magnetic field line in the polar region.

  10. Twinkling Lights in the Nightside Upper Atmosphere: How Nightglow Contributes to our Understanding of Global Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Brecht, Amanda; Bougher, S.; Stiepen, Arnaud; Soret, Lauriane; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Upper atmospheres of planets continuously emit photons in the UV, Visible, and IR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some of these emissions are classified as airglow, which includes dayglow and nightglow. There are several mechanisms to create these emissions, but this presentation will focus on nightglow emissions resulting from photochemistry of neutral components. These neutral components originate on the dayside and are transported from the dayside to the nightside of a planet, ...

  11. Characterization of VHF radar observations associated with equatorial Spread F by narrow-band optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF radars have been extensively used to investigate the structures and dynamics of equatorial Spread F (ESF irregularities. However, unambiguous identification of the nature of the structures in terms of plasma depletion or enhancement requires another technique, as the return echo measured by VHF radar is proportional to the square of the electron density fluctuations. In order to address this issue, co-ordinated radar backscatter and thermospheric airglow intensity measurements were carried out during March 2003 from the MST radar site at Gadanki. Temporal variations of 630.0-nm and 777.4-nm emission intensities reveal small-scale ("micro" and large-scale ("macro" variations during the period of observation. The micro variations are absent on non-ESF nights while the macro variations are present on both ESF and non-ESF nights. In addition to the well-known anti-correlation between the base height of the F-region and the nocturnal variation of thermospheric airglow intensities, the variation of the base height of the F-layer, on occasion, is found to manifest as a bottomside wave-like structure, as seen by VHF radar on an ESF night. The micro variations in the airglow intensities are associated with large-scale irregular plasma structures and found to be in correspondence with the "plume" structures obtained by VHF radar. In addition to the commonly observed depletions with upward movement, the observation unequivocally reveals the presence of plasma enhancements which move downwards. The observation of enhancement in 777.4-nm airglow intensity, which is characterized as plasma enhancement, provides an experimental verification of the earlier prediction based on numerical modeling studies.

  12. Determining rotational temperatures from the OH(8-3 band, and a comparison with OH(6-2 rotational temperatures at Davis, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Phillips

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Rotational temperatures derived from the OH(8–3 band may vary by ~18K depending on the choice of transition probabilities. This is of concern when absolute temperatures or trends determined in combination with measurements of other hydroxyl bands are important. In this paper, measurements of the OH(8–3 temperature-insensitive Q/P and R/P line intensity ratios are used to select the most appropriate transition probabilities for use with this band. Aurora, airglow and solar and telluric absorption in the OH(8–3 band are also investigated. Water vapour absorption of P1(4, airglow or auroral contamination of P1(2 and solar absorption in the vicinity of P1(5 are concerns to be considered when deriving rotational temperatures from this band.

    A comparison is made of temperatures derived from OH(6–2 and OH(8–3 spectra collected alternately at Davis (69° S, 78° E in 1990. An average difference of ~4K is found, with OH(8–3 temperatures being warmer, but a difference of this magnitude is within the two sigma uncertainty limit of the measurements.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure airglow and aurora; pressure, density, and temperature

  13. Post midnight spread-F occurrence over Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E during low and ascending phases of solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    Full Text Available A study carried out on the occurrence of post midnight spread-F events at a low-latitude station, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E, India revealed that its occurrence is maximum in the summer solstice months of the low solar activity period and decreases with an increase in the sunspot activity. The F-region virtual height variations show that 80% of these spread-F cases are associated with an increase in the F-region altitude. It is suggested with the support of the night airglow 6300 A zenith intensity data obtained with co-located ground-based night airglow photometer and electron temperature data from the Indian SROSS C2 satellite that the seasonal variation of the occurrence and probable onset times of the post midnight spread-F depend on the characteristics of the highly variable semipermanent equatorial Midnight Temperature Maximum (MTM.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; ionosphere atmosphere interactions Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and Aurora

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of SWIR air glow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Jeffery; Dayton, David; Gonglewski, John; Myers, Michael; Nolasco, Rudolf

    2011-05-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band between 0.9 and 1.7 μm wave length. This phenomenon, often referred to as airglow, has been demonstrated as an effective illumination source for passive low light level night time imaging applications. It addition it has been shown that observation of the spatial and temporal variations of the illumination can be used to characterize atmospheric tidal wave actions in the airglow region. These spatio-temporal variations manifest themselves as traveling wave patterns whose period and velocity are related to the wind velocity at 85 km as well as the turbulence induced by atmospheric vertical instabilities. In this paper we present nearly a year of airglow observations over the whole sky, showing long term and short term fluctuations to characterize SWIR night time image system performance.

  15. Titan's night-glow mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavvas, P.; West, R. A.; Gronoff, G.

    2014-04-01

    Observations of Titan's emissions during its 2009 eclipse by Saturn revealed a weak airglow around the moon, as well as a brighter emission from its disk (Fig.1). We explore here the potential mechanisms that could generate these emissions and more specifically the role of magnetospheric plasma and cosmic rays in the upper and lower atmosphere, respectively [2]. We consider excitation of N2 by these energy sources and calculate the resulting emissions through a detailed model of N2 airglow [3](Fig.2), followed by careful radiation transfer of the emitted photons through the atmosphere, and into the UVIS and ISS instruments (Figs 3 & 4). Our results indicate that the observed limb emissions are consistent with magnetospheric plasma energy input, while emissions instigated by cosmic ray excitation deep in the atmosphere are strongly attenuated by the haze and can not explain the observed disk emissions [4](Tables 1 & 2). We discuss possible contributions from other sources that could potentially explain the disk observations. These include airglow from other species, chemiluminescence, aerosol particle fluorescence, and scattered light from the stellar background.

  16. New measurements by the TIMED solar extreme-ultraviolet experiment: Implications for thermospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bailey, S. M.; Eparvier, F. G.; Gladstone, G. R.; Paxton, L. J.; Woods, T. N.

    2003-04-01

    The Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite, launched in December 2001, is now performing comprehensive new measurements of the solar irradiance spectrum in the extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions. The TIMED solar EUV experiment (SEE) consists of an ultraviolet spectrometer and an X-ray photometer, and performs a full-disk spectral measurement once per orbit. Comparison of TIMED/SEE measurements to contemporaneous satellite observations from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) and a calibration rocket shows that solar irradiance in the XUV spectral range, from about 1 to 25 nm, is significantly more intense than previous observations. SEE solar spectra can be used as inputs to thermosphere/ionosphere models, including photoelectron/airglow models, thermosphere global mean models, and general circulation models. The resulting revisions to predicted photoelectron fluxes, ionization rates, electron density, ion composition, odd-nitrogen composition, and airglow emission rates show improved agreement with observations. We compare predictions to measurements for some of these, including ground based measurements of ionospheric parameters and airglow measurements by the TIMED global ultraviolet imager.

  17. Twin mesospheric bores observed over Brazilian equatorial region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, A. F.; Paulino, I.; Taylor, M. J.; Fechine, J.; Takahashi, H.; Buriti, R. A.; Lima, L. M.; Wrasse, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Two consecutive mesospheric bores were observed simultaneously by two all-sky cameras on 19 December 2006. The observations were carried out in the northeast of Brazil at two different stations: São João do Cariri (36.5° W, 7.4° S) and Monteiro (37.1° W, 7.9° S), which are by about 85 km apart. The mesospheric bores were observed within an interval of ˜ 3 h in the NIR OH and OI557.7 nm airglow emissions. Both bores propagated to the east and showed similar characteristics. However, the first one exhibited a dark leading front with several trailing waves behind and progressed into a brighter airglow region, while the second bore, observed in the OH layer, was comprised of several bright waves propagating into a darker airglow region. This is the first paper to report events like these, called twin mesospheric bores. The background of the atmosphere during the occurrence of these events was studied by considering the temperature profiles from the TIMED/SABER satellite and wind from a meteor radar.

  18. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  19. A Sounding Rocket experiment to Validate Ultraviolet Remote Sensing of the Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Erickson, P. J.; Cook, T.; Mende, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Despite decades of observations and interpretations of ultraviolet airglow, advancing the derivation of physical parameters of the ionosphere and atmosphere beyond the current successes presents difficult challenges due to the lack of comprehensive understanding of the fundamental detailed physics that surrounds the associated airglow emission process. The daytime thermosphere, while better characterized than the ionosphere, is still subject to uncertainties caused by the need for somewhat ad-hoc modeling using a multi-step process that creates the UV airglow emissions. The state of the field for the daytime ionosphere is currently based on only a few dozen profiles obtained from sounding rocket and satellite missions, none of which were designed to obtain the necessary comprehensive set of measurements. We have designed a sounding rocket experiment that will validate extreme and far ultraviolet (EUV/FUV) remote sensing of the ionosphere and thermosphere during day time. The sounding rocket data will be coordinated with simultaneous observations by an Incoherent Scatter Radar which will provide altitude profiles of daytime electron density, ion composition, electron and ion temperatures, and ion drifts due to winds and electric fields as well as neutral temperature profiles. The instruments aboard the sounding rocket will observe full-disk solar EUV and FUV irradiance measurements in the 2 - 131 nm band along with a high speed multi-wavelength photometer package that will provide altitude profiles of thermospheric neutral species along the rocket track. The dayglow instrument will cover 60 - 140 nm spectral range and observe the emissions in a direction perpendicular to the rocket axis, which will point towards the Sun. With these measurements, we hope to answer how well the EUV and FUV dayglow measurements can be used to provide a self-consistent measure of the day time ionosphere-thermosphere space environment.

  20. Response of the upper atmosphere to variations in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial far ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of nitric oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airflow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the atmosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  1. What can we do with an atmospheric seismometer moving at 8 km/s?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Brissaud, Q.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.

    2014-12-01

    The solid/ocean/atmosphere coupling of terrestrial planets has been widely investigated through detection and imaging of electron density perturbations in the ionosphere.Recently, two new observations methods have proven their efficiency: perturbations of airglow emissions and variations of the drag of very low Earth orbit satellites.The perturbations of these observables are mainly due to air density variations induced by post-seismic infrasounds or atmospheric gravity waves generated by tsunamis.Even if the airglow emissions present the great advantage of providing an imaging capability, the weakness of the airglow signal induces long integration time, and does not allow to infer high frequency infrasound signals.Moreover, restrictions on observation conditions and line of sight integration reduce the capability of detailed imaging of atmospheric wavefronts.On the other hand, variations of the satellite drag provide only one measurement point along the satellite orbit.However, the unprecedented quality of the data of GOCE mission allows a precise estimate of air density perturbations, but also vertical and cross track winds estimates.Consequently, this capability to measure the vibrations induced by atmospheric waves along 3 axes is very similar to the one of a ground seismometer.We first present some polarisation analysis using these data in order to discriminate between infrasonic waves, gravity waves and perturbations induced by thermosphere dynamics.Then, we summarize some recent developments in numerical modeling of atmospheric and acoustic and gravity wave propagation with SPECFEM software.Finally, we present how this numerical tool will allow to perform studies comparable to what was done in solid seismology.We conclude by a prospect on the application of these observables and numerical tools to other terrestrial planets.

  2. A study of the feasibility and performance of an active/passive imager using silicon focal plane arrays and incoherent continuous wave laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H.

    This dissertation describes an active/passive imager (API) that provides reliable, nighttime, target acquisition in a man-portable package with effective visual range of about 4 kilometers. The reflective imagery is easier to interpret than currently used thermal imagery. Also, in the active mode, the API provides performance equivalent to the big-aperture, thermal systems used on weapons platforms like tanks and attack helicopters. This dissertation describes the research needed to demonstrate both the feasibility and utility of the API. Part of the research describes implementation of a silicon focal plane array (SFPA) capable of both active and passive imaging. The passive imaging mode exceeds the nighttime performance of currently fielded, man-portable sensors. Further, when scene illumination is insufficient for passive imaging, the low dark current of SFPA makes it possible to use continuous wave laser diodes (CWLD) to add an active imaging mode. CWLD have advantages of size, efficiency, and improved eye safety when compared to high peak-power diodes. Because of the improved eye safety, the API provides user-demanded features like video output and extended range gates in the active as well as passive imaging modes. Like any other night vision device, the API depends on natural illumination of the scene for passive operation. Although it has been known for decades that "starlight" illumination is actually from diffuse airglow emissions, the research described in this dissertation provides the first estimates of the global and temporal variation of ground illumination due to airglow. A third related element of the current research establishes the impact of atmospheric aerosols on API performance. We know from day experience that atmospheric scattering of sunlight into the imager line-of-sight can blind the imager and drastically degrade performance. Atmospheric scattering of sunlight is extensively covered in the literature. However, previous literature did not

  3. The emission of oxygen green line and density of O atom determined by using ISUAL and SABER measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-B. Nee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of the 557.7 nm green line airglow observed by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning instrument on board the FORMOSAT-2 satellite in May and November 2008 are studied here to derive the density distributions of the atomic oxygen by using atmospheric parameters from MSISE-00 model and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry measurements. The May observations were made in 10 days from a fixed orbit of longitude (100° E with the results showing emission rate and O atom density both peaked at heights of about 90 km over 10° to 20° latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH, the emission rate and density of O atom are both low compared with those in NH. In November, the observations were made as the satellite traveled over all 14 orbits around the earth, covering all longitudes and latitudes of 25° S–45° N. Strong peaks of emission rates and O atoms are found at heights of about 95 km in the mid-latitudes in both hemispheres. In the equator, the airglow layer has a weaker emission rate but with higher altitude compared with those of mid-latitudes. In the lower and upper mesosphere at heights below 85 km and above 105 km, there are more O atoms in the equatorial regions than in the mid-latitudes. And there is a good correlation between the O atom and the temperature structure. A comparison with O atom distribution derived from OH airglow observed by TIMED/SABER at about the same time shows similar results.

  4. Ionospheric irregularities at low latitudes in the American sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed analysis of the atomic oxigem airglow emission at the wavelength of 6300 A observed at Cachoeira Paulista (22041'S, 45000'W) shows that intensity perturbations frequently occur and propagate from north to south and from west to east. Such irregularities originated in the ionospheric F region and occur essencially during the premidnight period. These perturbations have a high frequency of occurrence during spring and summer and are rare during winter and fall. The disturbances are correlated with range type spread F detected over Cachoeira Paulista, and have characteristics similar to equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles (i.e., similar seazonal variation, time of occurrence, ionogram signatures, direction and speed of propagation, etc.). A numerical simulation is carried out for the generation and evolution of ionospheric bubbles based on the theory of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability for the equatorial and Cachoeira Paulista regions. Also a study was made of the, evolution of the bubble as a function of the electron density profile and as a function of the amplitude of the initial density perturbation. Assuming the electron density profile perturbed by the bubble, the [OI] 6300 A intensity was calculated for various latitudes arbitrarily taken within the photometer scanning range. The bubble was assumed to be aligned with the Earth's magnetic field and extending from higher altitudes at the equatorial region down to be arbitrary height of 150 Km at which a negligible conductivity is assumed. It was also assumed that the bubble was moving upwards with the velocity of 120 m/s, which in turn was estimated from initial numerical simulation results. The airglow calculation results show that as the bubble goes up, the disturbances in the airglow intensity propagate from north to south, in accord with observed experimental results. (Author)

  5. Gravity Wave Refraction in the Atmosphere: : Ray tracing versus Geometric Location from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Nærø, Karoline

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents two methods of finding the sources of gravity waves observed in the night-time hydroxyl airglow; ray-tracing and geometric localisation by fitting concentric circles onto the curvature of the gravity waves' fronts. The observations were made at Dragvoll, Trondheim during winter season of 2012/2013 using an all-sky camera system with a 45$^\\circ$ field of view. Wintertime in Trondheim has proved to be a good place to study gravity waves by OH nightglow imaging. Nearly...

  6. The evolution of a breaking mesospheric bore wave packet

    OpenAIRE

    Stockwell, R G.; Taylor, M. J.; Nielsen, K.; Jarvis, M J

    2011-01-01

    All-sky CCD observations of mesospheric gravity waves have been made from Halley Station Antarctica (75.5°S, 26.7°W) as part of a collaborative research program between British Antarctic Survey, U.K. and Utah State University, USA. A mesospheric bore event was observed in the nightglow emissions over a period of several hours on the 27th of May, 2001. Two dimensional S-Transform (ST) analysis is applied to the airglow images of this bore event. This local spectral technique allows one to calc...

  7. Airborne Sodium and Rayleigh Lidar Observations from ALOHA-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Chris A.; Gardner, Chester S.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne Na and Rayleigh lidar observations from the Airborne Lidar and Observations of Hawaiian Airglow Campaign (ALOHA-90) campaign are described. We present gravity wave vertical and horizontal wave number spectra from the upper stratosphere and the upper mesosphere. Also, we document the occurrence of a large amplitude short horizontal scale quasi-monochromatic gravity wave event and discuss the implications of the event in light of recently developed gravity wave horizontal wave number spectra models. Finally, we discuss observations of sporadic Na layer events.

  8. High Resolution Imagery of Haarp-Induced Optical Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    One powerful technique for diagnosing radio frequency interactions in the ionosphere is to use ground-based optical instrumentation. High-frequency (HF), heater-induced optical emission observations can be used to diagnose electron energies and distributions in the heated region, illuminate natural and/or artificially induced ionospheric irregularities, determine ExB plasma drifts, and measure quenching rates by neutral species. Optical emissions are caused by HF-accelerated electrons colliding with various atmospheric constituents, which in turn emit a photon. The most common emissions are 630.0 nm O(1D), 557.7 nm O(1S), and 427.8 nm N2+(1NG). Since fairly wide field-of-view imagers are typically deployed in airglow campaigns, it is not well-known what meter-scale features exist in the artificial airglow emissions. Telescopic imaging provides high resolution spatial coverage of ionospheric irregularities and goes hand in hand with other observing techniques such as GPS scintillation, radar, and ionosonde. Imaging can be used to verify the interpretation of data from these other instruments, and this in turn allows confidence in such measurements when airglow cannot be observed (high solar angle or cloud cover). Telescopic imaging of airglow is the only technique capable of simultaneously determining the properties of ionospheric irregularities at decameter resolution over a range of several kilometers. The HAARP telescopic imager consists of two cameras, a set of optics for each camera, and a robotic mount that supports and orients the system. The camera and optics systems are identical except for the camera lenses: one has a wide-angle lens (~19 degrees) and the other has a telescopic lens (~3 degrees). The telescopic imager has a resolution of ~20 m in the F layer and ~10 m in the E layer, which allows the observation of decameter- and kilometer-scale features. Telescopic data has been recorded at HAARP for several years and images will be presented showing

  9. Ionospheric modification at twice the electron cyclotron frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, a new transmission band was added to the HAARP high-frequency ionospheric modification facility that encompasses the second electron cyclotron harmonic at altitudes between ∼220 and 330 km. Initial observations indicate that greatly enhanced airglow occurs whenever the transmission frequency approximately matches the second electron cyclotron harmonic at the height of the upper hybrid resonance. This is the reverse of what happens at higher electron cyclotron harmonics. The measured optical emissions confirm the presence of accelerated electrons in the plasma

  10. Circulation of Venus upper mesosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, Ludmila; Gorinov, Dmitry; Shakun, Alexey; Altieri, Francesca; Migliorini, Alessandra; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Observation of the O2 1.27 μm airglow intensity distribution on the night side of Venus is one of the methods of study of the circulation in upper mesosphere 90-100 km. VIRTIS-M on board Venus Express made these observations in nadir and limb modes in Southern and Northern hemispheres respectively. Global map of the O2 night glow is published (Piccioni et al. 2009). In this work we use for analysis only data, obtained with exposure > 3 s to avoid high noisy data. It was found that intensity of emission decreases to poles and to terminators (similar to Piccioni et al.2009) in both hemispheres, which gives evidence for existence of SS-AS circulation with transport of the air masses through poles and terminators with ascending/descending flows at SS/AS areas. However, asymmetry of distribution of intensity of airglow is observed in both hemispheres. Global map for southern hemisphere (from nadir data) has good statistics at φ > 10-20° S and pretty poor at low latitude. Maximum emission is shifted from midnight by 1 - 2 hours to the evening (22-23h) and deep minimum of emission is found at LT=2-4 h at φ > 20° S. This asymmetry is extended up to equatorial region, however statistic is poor there. No evident indication for existence of the Retrograde Zonal Superrotation (RZS) is found: maximum emission in this case, which is resulting from downwards flow, should be shifted to the morning. The thermal tides, gravity waves are evidently influence on the night airglow distribution. VIRTIS limb observations cover the low northern latitudes and they are more sparse at higher latitudes. Intensity of airglow at φ = 0 - 20° N shows wide maximum, which is shifted by 1- 2 h from midnight to morning terminator. This obviously indicates that observed O2 night glow distribution in low North latitudes is explained by a superposition of SS-AS flow and RZS circulation at 95-100 km. This behavior is similar to the NO intensity distribution, obtained by SPICAV.

  11. Theoretical support to NRL's upper atmospheric branch: Physics and chemistry of the upper and middle atmospheres with emphasis on daytime, nighttime, and auroral optical emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Significant advances were made in the ability to model physical processes in the thermosphere (airglow and aurora) and middle atmosphere. These advances came in the form of code development and improved methods for updating input parameters (most notably, cross sections). Important advances were also made in the development of an algorithm for deducing O3 and O2 density profiles from full solar disk extinction measurements to be made by the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS).

  12. Solar influence on the O(1S) and O(1D) dayglow emission rates: Global-scale measurements by WINDII on UARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Sheperd, G.

    More than 130,000 emission rate profiles of the O(^1D) dayglow (630 nm) and 500,000 of the O(^1S) (557.7nm) dayglow were observed by WINDII on UARS during 1991-1997, which provides an unprecedented and unigue database for studying the mechanisms and global climatology of the two airglow layers, and the energy balance and effects of dynamics and solar storms on the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system. Empirical models are derived from WINDII measurements for the two emission rates as functions of the solar zenith angle and solar irradiance using the F10.7 cm flux as a proxy.

  13. Can Ground-based Telescopes Detect The Oxygen 1.27 Micron Absorption Feature as a Biomarker in Exoplanets ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Hajime; Matsuo, Taro; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Murakami, Naoshi; Tamura, Motohide; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from the Earth-like planets has been considered the most promising metabolic biomarker of the exo-life. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the 1.27 micron oxygen band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late- type stars observed with a future instrument on a 30 m class ground-based telescope. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 micron with IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong te...

  14. Dominant winter-time mesospheric wave signatures over a low latitude station, Hawaii (20.8°N): An investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Taori; M Taylor

    2010-06-01

    We utilize mesospheric O2 airglow emission intensity and temperature data collected during January–February 2003 on 17 consecutive nights from Maui, Hawaii (20.8°N, 156.2°W) to study the dominant and long period wave features at mesospheric altitudes. Apart from large day-to-day variability, it is found that nocturnal data for the period under consideration was dominated by a terdiurnal tide-like wave. Together, a quasi 5-day wave is also noticed with significant amplitude.

  15. Design of Attitude Control System of a Double CubeSat

    OpenAIRE

    Bråthen, Gaute

    2013-01-01

    The NTNU Test Satellite, NUTS, is a satellite being build in a student CubeSat project at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The project was started in September 2010 as a part of the Norwegian student satellite program run by NAROM (Norwegian Centre for Space-related Education). The NUTS project goals are to design, manufacture and launch a double CubeSat by 2014. As payload an IR-camera observing waves in the air-glow layer is planned, as well as a short-range RF experiment...

  16. A review on recent upper atmosphere atomic oxygen measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Martin; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin; Zhu, Yajun

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen is a key player in the upper mesosphere lower and thermosphere chemistry, energy balance, and dynamics. In recent years, a few new global datasets of this species have been presented. They are based on airglow measurements from low earth satellites. Surprisingly, the atomic oxygen abundance differs by 30-50% for similar atmospheric conditions. This paper gives an overview on the various atomic oxygen datasets available so far and presents most recent results obtained from measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument on Envisat. Differences between the datasets are discussed.

  17. Auroral spectrograph data annals of the international geophysical year, v.25

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, Anne; Norman, S J

    1964-01-01

    Annals of the International Geophysical Year, Volume 25: Auroral Spectrograph Data is a five-chapter text that contains tabulations of auroral spectrograph data. The patrol spectrograph built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation for the Aurora and Airglow Program of the IGY is a high-speed, low-dispersion, automatic instrument designed to photograph spectra of aurora occurring along a given magnetic meridian of the sky. Data from each spectral frame were recorded on an IBM punched card. The data recorded on the cards are printed onto the tabulations in this volume. These tabulations are available

  18. Evidence for tropospheric wind shear excitation of high-phase-speed gravity waves reaching the mesosphere using the ray-tracing technique

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pramitha; M. Venkat Ratnam; Taori, A.; B. V. Krishna Murthy; D. Pallamraju; S. Vijaya Bhaskar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Sources and propagation characteristics of high-frequency gravity waves observed in the mesosphere using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.5° E) are investigated using reverse ray tracing. Wave amplitudes are also traced back, including both radiative and diffusive damping. The ray tracing is performed using background temperature and wind data obtained from the MSISE-90 and HWM-07 models, respectively. For the Gadanki region, the s...

  19. Comparative investigations of equatorial electrodynamics and low-to-mid latitude coupling of the thermosphere-ionosphere system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Colerico

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The thermospheric midnight temperature maximum (MTM is a highly variable, but persistent, large scale neutral temperature enhancement which occurs at low latitudes. Its occurrence can impact many fundamental upper atmospheric parameters such as pressure, density, neutral winds, neutral density, and F-region plasma. Although the MTM has been the focus of several investigations employing various instrumentation including photometers, satellites, and Fabry-Perot interferometers, limited knowledge exists regarding the latitude extent of its influence on the upper atmosphere. This is largely due to observational limitations which confined the collective geographic range to latitudes within ±23°. This paper investigates the MTM's latitudinal extent through all-sky imaging observations of its 6300Å airglow signature referred to by Colerico et al. (1996 as the midnight brightness wave (MBW. The combined field of view of three Southern Hemisphere imaging systems located at Arequipa, Peru, and Tucuman and El Leoncito, Argentina, for the first time extends the contiguous latitudinal range of imager observations to 8° S-39° S in the American sector. Our results highlight the propagation of MBW events through the combined fields of view past 39° S latitude, providing the first evidence that the MTM's effect on the upper atmosphere extends into mid-latitudes. The observations presented here are compared with modeled 6300Å emissions calculated using the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamic general circulation model (TIEGCM in conjunction with an airglow code. We report that at this time TIEGCM is unable to simulate an MBW event due to the model's inability to reproduce an MTM of the same magnitude and occurrence time as those observed via FPI measurements made from Arequipa. This work also investigates the origins of an additional low latitude airglow feature referred to by Colerico et al. (1996 as the pre-midnight brightness

  20. An analysis of the OI 1304 A dayglow using a Monte Carlo resonant scattering model with partial frequency redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R. R.; Lee, J.-S.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of resonance radiation under optically thick conditions is shown to be accurately described by a Monte Carlo model of the atomic oxygen 1304 A airglow triplet in which partial frequency redistribution, temperature gradients, pure absorption and multilevel scattering are accounted for. All features of the data can be explained by photoelectron impact excitation and the resonant scattering of sunlight, where the latter source dominates below 100 and above 500 km and is stronger at intermediate altitudes than previously thought. It is concluded that the OI 1304 A emission can be used in studies of excitation processes and atomic oxygen densities in planetary atmospheres.

  1. High resolution 2-D maps of OI 630.0 nm thermospheric dayglow from equatorial latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pallam Raju

    Full Text Available The first-ever high resolution 2-D maps of OI 630.0 nm dayglow obtained from equatorial latitudes clearly reveal the movement as a large-scale feature of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA. These also show the presence of wave-like features classified as gravity waves presumably originating at the crest of the EIA, similar to the equatorial electrojet acting as a source of these waves. These results are presented and discussed.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora · Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Instruments and techniques.

  2. Unexpected variability of Martian hydrogen escape

    OpenAIRE

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stewart, Ian; Montmessin, Franck; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    International audience Mars today is much drier than the Earth, though they likely began with similar relative amounts of water. One potential cause for this discrepancy is hydrogen loss to space, which may have removed a large fraction of Mars' initial water. Here we demonstrate an order-of-magnitude change in the Martian hydrogen escape rate in 2007, inconsistent with established models for the source of escaping hydrogen. We analyze 121.6 nm (hydrogen Lyman-α) airglow observations made ...

  3. Mariner 6, 7, and 9 ultraviolet spectrometer experiment - Analysis of hydrogen Lyman alpha data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Four Lyman alpha airglow measurements of the limb and disk of Mars, made by ultraviolet spectrometers on Mariner 6 and 7 in 1969 and Mariner 9 in 1971, are analyzed to determine the amount and distribution of atomic hydrogen above 80 km. The variation of atomic hydrogen with altitude is calculated by using time-independent chemical diffusion models from 80 to 250 km, and an exospheric model is used above 250 km. By employing radiative transfer theory that includes effects of pure absorption and accounts for temperature variations in the atmosphere, a spherical model of the airglow Lyman alpha emission is used to produce theoretical intensities for comparison with the data. It is found that (1) the exospheric temperature and distribution in 1971 are consistent with those determined in 1969, (2) the vertical optical depth above 80 km was 2.2 in 1969 and 5 in 1971, and (3) the derived atomic hydrogen distribution from 80 to 250 km requires a source of atomic hydrogen above 80 km. Comparison of observed profiles with chemical diffusion models implies a large downward flow of atomic hydrogen at 80 km coupled with a large upward flow of molecular hydrogen.-

  4. Mesospheric temperatures from observations of the hydroxyl (6–2 emission above Davis, Antarctica: A comparison of rotational and Doppler measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available We present observations of the hydroxyl (6–2 airglow lines from ~ 87 km altitude obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, in the austral winter of 1999. Nine nights of observations were made of the P-branch near λ840 nm with a Czerny-Turner scanning spectrometer (CTS; at the same time, high-resolution Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS spectra were collected of the Q1(1 doublet at λ834 nm. Rotational temperatures were determined from the CTS observations, while Doppler temperatures were derived from the line-widths of the FPS Q1(1 spectra. Absolute temperatures determined by these methods are uncertain by ~ 2 and ~ 20 K, respectively. For the comparison we set the value of the reflective finesse of the FPS at λ834 nm so the mean FPS temperature from one night of simultaneous data was equal to that from the CTS, and then looked at the measured variations in each data set for the other eight nights. Both instruments show the upper mesosphere temperature to vary in a similar manner to within the observational errors of the measurements, implying an equivalence of the rotational and Doppler temperatures. We believe that this is the first published simultaneous, same-site, comparison of rotational and Doppler temperatures from the OH emission.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; pressure density and temperature; instruments and techniques

  5. Suomi satellite brings to light a unique frontier of nighttime environmental sensing capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D; Mills, Stephen P; Elvidge, Christopher D; Lindsey, Daniel T; Lee, Thomas F; Hawkins, Jeffrey D

    2012-09-25

    Most environmental satellite radiometers use solar reflectance information when it is available during the day but must resort at night to emission signals from infrared bands, which offer poor sensitivity to low-level clouds and surface features. A few sensors can take advantage of moonlight, but the inconsistent availability of the lunar source limits measurement utility. Here we show that the Day/Night Band (DNB) low-light visible sensor on the recently launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite has the unique ability to image cloud and surface features by way of reflected airglow, starlight, and zodiacal light illumination. Examples collected during new moon reveal not only meteorological and surface features, but also the direct emission of airglow structures in the mesosphere, including expansive regions of diffuse glow and wave patterns forced by tropospheric convection. The ability to leverage diffuse illumination sources for nocturnal environmental sensing applications extends the advantages of visible-light information to moonless nights. PMID:22984179

  6. Long Term Trend and 11-Year Cyclic Variations in Mesopause Temperature Data Observed by Michelson Interferometers at Arctic and Antarctic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, I.; Sivjee, G. G.; Won, Y.-

    2006-05-01

    The response of the mesopause temperature to solar cycle variations has been investigated using OH airglow observations from Michelson Interferometer instruments located at Eureka (80o N, 85.56º W), Canada, Resolute Bay (74.68º N, 94.90º W), Canada, and South Pole Station, Antarctica (90o S). These aforementioned stations have been making continuous measurements of temperature and airglow emissions during the six months of each polar winter night. In this paper we present our results to elucidate solar cycle and long-term trend in the MI temperature time series data. We discuss mesospheric seasonal variation in the Northern and Southern hemispheres and compare these mesopause temperatures to highlight similarities and disagreements observed in the OH temperature response to solar cycle at Arctic and Antarctic sites. In addition, we also present He 10830Å line as a way of monitoring the response of the thermosphere to changes in solar irradiance in the EUV region over a solar cycle period.

  7. Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry observations of daytime mesospheric O2(1Δ) 1.27 μm emission and derivation of ozone, atomic oxygen, and solar and chemical energy deposition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Russell, James M.; Thompson, R. Earl; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-08-01

    We report observations of the daytime O2(1Δ) airglow emission at 1.27 μm recorded by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. The measured limb radiances are inverted to yield vertical profiles of the volume emission rate of energy from the O2 molecule. From these emission rates we subsequently derive the mesospheric ozone concentrations using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative and kinetic model. Rates of energy deposition due to absorption of ultraviolet radiation in the Hartley band of ozone are also derived, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance and solar irradiances. Atomic oxygen concentrations are obtained from the ozone abundance using photochemical steady state assumptions. Rates of energy deposition due to exothermic chemical reactions are also derived. The data products illustrated here are from a test day (4 July 2002) of SABER Version 1.07 data which are now becoming publicly available. This test day illustrates the high quality of the SABER O2(1Δ) airglow and ozone data and the variety of fundamental science questions to which they can be applied.

  8. Measurement of two-dimensional Doppler wind fields using a field widened Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery A; Ward, William E; Scott, Alan; Arsenault, Dennis L

    2013-03-10

    An implementation of the field widened Michelson concept has been applied to obtain high resolution two-dimensional (2D) images of low velocity (irradiance measurements to be determined on a bin by bin basis with an accuracy of less than 2.5 m/s from CCD images over the observed field of view. The interferometer scanning mirror position is controlled to subangstrom precision with subnanometer repeatability using the multi-application low-voltage piezoelectric instrument control electronics developed by COM DEV Ltd.; it is the first implementation of this system as a phase stepping Michelson. In this paper the calibration and characterization of the Doppler imaging system is described and the planned implementation of this new technique for imaging 2D wind and irradiance fields using the earth's airglow is introduced. Observations of Doppler winds produced by a rotating wheel are reported and shown to be of sufficient precision for buoyancy wave observations in airglow in the mesopause region of the terrestrial atmosphere. PMID:23478764

  9. HEUVAC: A new high resolution solar EUV proxy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Philip G.; Woods, Thomas N.; Peterson, William K.

    This paper presents a new high-resolution version of the solar EUV irradiance model for aeronomic calculations (HEUVAC) that is designed to facilitate comparisons with measured spectra and enable more accurate calculations of ionization rates, airglow emission rates, and photoelectron calculations. The HEUVAC model bins can range from 0.1 to 100 nm and extends the EUV model below 5 nm. The new solar EUV irradiance calculations with the high resolution irradiance model show good agreement with the most recent solar EUV irradiance measurements from the solar EUV experiment (SEE) instrument on the thermosphere, ionosphere, mesosphere, energetics, and dynamics satellite. Also, photoelectron fluxes calculated from both the SEE measured and EUVAC modeled solar EUV irradiances agree well with photoelectron flux measurements by the FAST satellite. The good agreement of the EUVAC and SEE derived photoelectron fluxes with the FAST measured fluxes at solar maximum lends support to an earlier finding that the previous reference solar EUV irradiances from the Atmosphere Explorer measurements need to be adjusted upward by a factor of 2 3 below 25 nm wavelength. This result is important for remote sensing of the ionosphere and thermosphere because, as this paper shows, the airglow emission rates calculated using the SEE and HEUVAC models are 50% higher than those based on earlier solar EUV irradiance models. The calculations also show that for solar maximum conditions on 21 April 2002, most of the degradation of the escaping photoelectron flux takes place below 1000 km altitude.

  10. Can Ground-based Telescopes Detect The Oxygen 1.27 Micron Absorption Feature as a Biomarker in Exoplanets ?

    CERN Document Server

    Kawahara, Hajime; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Murakami, Naoshi; Tamura, Motohide; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from the Earth-like planets has been considered as the most promising metabolic biomarker of the exo-life. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the oxygen 1.27 micron band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars with a 30 m class ground-based telescope with a future instrument. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 micron with IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by the midnight. With compilation of nearby star catalogues combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant photon noise of the oxygen 1.27 micron detection comes from the night airglow if the leakage is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors for which the detection contras...

  11. Lines and continuum sky emission in the near infrared: observational constraints from deep high spectral resolution spectra with GIANO-TNG

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva, E; Scuderi, S; Benatti, S; Carleo, I; Lapenna, E; Mucciarelli, A; Baffa, C; Biliotti, V; Carbonaro, L; Falcini, G; Giani, E; Iuzzolino, M; Massi, F; Sanna, N; Sozzi, M; Tozzi, A; Ghedina, A; Ghinassi, F; Lodi, M; Harutyunyan, A; Pedani, M

    2015-01-01

    Aims Determining the intensity of lines and continuum airglow emission in the H-band is important for the design of faint-object infrared spectrographs. Existing spectra at low/medium resolution cannot disentangle the true sky-continuum from instrumental effects (e.g. diffuse light in the wings of strong lines). We aim to obtain, for the first time, a high resolution infrared spectrum deep enough to set significant constraints on the continuum emission between the lines in the H-band. Methods During the second commissioning run of the GIANO high-resolution infrared spectrograph at La Palma Observatory, we pointed the instrument directly to the sky and obtained a deep spectrum that extends from 0.97 to 2.4 micron. Results The spectrum shows about 1500 emission lines, a factor of two more than in previous works. Of these, 80% are identified as OH transitions; half of these are from highly excited molecules (hot-OH component) that are not included in the OH airglow emission models normally used for astronomical ...

  12. Gravity wave vertical energy flux at 95 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, P. G.; Jacka, F.

    1985-01-01

    A three-field photometer (3FP) located at Mt. Torrens near Adelaide, is capable of monitoring different airglow emissions from three spaced fields in the sky. A wheel containing up to six different narrow bandpass interference filters can be rotated, allowing each of the filters to be sequentially placed into each of the three fields. The airglow emission of interest is the 557.7 nm line which has an intensity maximum at 95 km. Each circular field of view is located at the apexes of an equilateral triangle centered on zenith with diameters of 5 km and field separations of 13 km when projected to the 95-km level. The sampling period was 30 seconds and typical data lengths were between 7 and 8 hours. The analysis and results from the interaction of gravity waves on the 557.7 nm emission layer are derived using an atmospheric model similar to that proposed by Hines (1960) where the atmosphere is assumed isothermal and perturbations caused by gravity waves are small and adiabatic, therefore, resulting in linearized equations of motion. In the absence of waves, the atmosphere is also considered stationary. Thirteen nights of quality data from January 1983 to October 1984, covering all seasons, are used in this analysis.

  13. Cassini UVIS Solar Zenith Angle Studies of Titan Dayglow Based on N2 High Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, Joseph; West, Robert; Holsclaw, Greg; Royer, Emilie; Heays, Alan; Bradley, Todd; Stevens, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed photon emissions of Titan’s day and night limb-airglow on multiple occasions, including during an eclipse observation. On one occasion the UVIS made a Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) study of the Titan limb dayglow (2011 DOY 171) from about 70 to 95 degrees SZA. The UV intensity variation observations of the N2 photoelectron excited spectral features from the EUV (563-118.2 nm) and FUV (111.5-191.2nm) sub-systems followed a Chapman function. For other observations at night on the limb, the emission features are much weaker in intensity. Beyond 120 deg SZA, when the upper atmosphere of Titan below 1200 km is in total XUV darkness, there is an indication of weak and sporadic night side UV airglow emission excited by magnetosphere plasma collisions with ambient thermosphere gas, with similar N2 excited features as above in the daylight or twilight glow over an extended altitude range. We have analyzed the UVIS airglow spectra with models based on high resolution laboratory electron impact induced fluorescence spectra. We have measured high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by electron impact at 20 and 100 eV. Molecular emission was observed to vibrationally-excited ground state levels as high as v''=17, from the a 1Πg , b 1Πu, and b‧ 1Σu+ excited valence states and the Rydberg series c‧n+1 1Σu+, cn 1Πu and o 1Πu for n between 3 and 9. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N2 electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets. Their emission cross sections were measured.The blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a model which solves the coupled-Schroedinger equation

  14. New image measurements of the gravity wave propagation characteristics from a low latitude Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivakandan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The image observations of mesospheric O(1S 558 nm have been performed from a low latitude Indian station, Gadanki (13.5° N; 79.2° E using a CCD based all sky camera system. Based on three years (from year 2012 to the year 2014 of image data during March–April, we characterize the small scale gravity wave properties. We noted 50 strong gravity wave event and 19 ripple events to occur. The horizontal wavelengths of the gravity waves are found to vary from 12 to 42 km with the phase velocity ranging from 20 to 90 km. In most cases, these waves were propagating towards north with only a few occasions of southward propagation. The outgoing longwave radiation data suggest that lower atmospheric convection was most possible reason for the generation of the waves observed in the airglow data.

  15. Combined operation of two ground transmitters for enhanced ionospheric heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined operation of an HF or MF ground transmitter and a VLF transmitter for enhanced ionospheric heating is discussed. The HF or MF transmitter, operated in a pulsed mode, can preferentially produce short-scale density striations that can render the nonlinear mode conversion of the subsequently launched VLF waves into lower hybrid waves. In addition to the mode conversion process, the VLF waves, if intense enough, can also excite meter-scale density striations and lower hybrid waves via parametric instabilities. Intensified density striations and enhanced airglow are expected, and they can be detected by incoherent backscatter radars and photometers, respectively. The feasibility and planning of the proposed experiments are addressed. (author)

  16. Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reports on experiments performed in the Spacelab 1 whose objectives are to study the vehicle charging in space and charging neutralization by using plasma and neutral gas plume, to study the beam-plasma interaction in space (e.g. wave excitation in the very low frequency to high frequency range in the interaction of the electron beam with space plasma and plasma heating resulting from the nonlinear beam-plasma interaction), to study the beam atmospheric interaction exciting artificial aurora and airglow, and to trace the magnetic field configuration of the magnetosphere and detect the field aligned electric field. Topics considered include SEPAC hardware, SEPAC operation, and the SEPAC follow-on mission. Includes a table and 3 drawings

  17. Time evolution of high-altitude plasma bubbles imaged at geomagnetic conjugate points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shiokawa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial evolution of two high-altitude plasma bubbles (evening and midnight was observed on 4 April 2002, at geomagnetic conjugate points at Sata, Japan (magnetic latitude 24° N, and Darwin, Australia (magnetic latitude 22° S, using two 630-nm airglow imagers. The apex height of the bubbles reached ~1500km. The upward velocity of the evolution was faster in the evening (~170m/s at 20:00-21:00 LT than around midnight (~28m/s at 23:00-00:00 LT. Bifurcating features of the bubbles into a smaller scale size of ~50km were clearly seen for both the evening and midnight bubbles, showing fairly good conjugacy between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  18. Quality studies of the data taking conditions for the Auger Fluorescence Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, R; Insolia, A; Petrera, S; Martino, J R

    2005-01-01

    As more than half of the Fluorescence Detector (FD) of the Auger Observatory is completed, data taking is becoming a routine job. It is then necessary to follow strict procedures to assure the quality of the data. An overview of the data taking methods is given. The nature of the FD background signal is due to the night sky brightness (stars and planet faint light, moonlight, twilight, airglow, zodiacal and artificial light) and to the electronic background (photomultiplier and electronic noise). The analysis of the fluctuations in the FADC signal (variance analysis), directly proportional to the background mean light level, performed for each night of data taking is used to monitor the FD background signal. The data quality is analysed using different techniques, described in detail. Examples of trigger rates, number of stereo events, dead time due to moonlight, weather or hardware problems are given. The analysis comprises several months of data taking, giving an overview of the FD capabilities, performance...

  19. Small-scale field-aligned currents caused by tropical cyclones as observed by the SWARM satellites above the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, T.; Iyemori, T.; Nakanishi, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present case studies of small-scale magnetic fluctuations above typhoons, hurricanes and cyclones as observed by the swarm constellation. It is reported lately that AGWs(atmospheric gravity waves) generated by meteorological phenomena in the troposphere such as typhoons and tornadoes, large earthquakes and volcanic eruptions propagate to the mesosphere and thermosphere. We observe them in various forms(e.g. airglows, ionospheric disturbances and TEC variations). We are proposing the following model. AGWs caused by atmospheric disturbances in the troposphere propagate to the ionospheric E-layer, drive dynamo action and generate field-aligned currents. The satellites observe magnetic fluctuations above the ionosphere. In this presentation, we focus on cases of tropical cyclone(hurricanes in North America, typhoons in North-West Pacific).

  20. Model insights into energetic photoelectrons measured at Mars by MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shotaro; Rahmati, Ali; Mitchell, David L.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Mazelle, Christian; Peterson, W. K.; Eparvier, Francis G.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2015-11-01

    Photoelectrons are important for heating, ionization, and airglow production in planetary atmospheres. Measured electron fluxes provide insight into the sources and sinks of energy in the Martian upper atmosphere. The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer instrument on board the MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN) spacecraft measured photoelectrons including Auger electrons with 500 eV energies. A two-stream electron transport code was used to interpret the observations, including Auger electrons associated with K shell ionization of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. It explains the processes that control the photoelectron spectrum, such as the solar irradiance at different wavelengths, external electron fluxes from the Martian magnetosheath or tail, and the structure of the upper atmosphere (e.g., the thermal electron density). Our understanding of the complex processes related to the conversion of solar irradiances to thermal energy in the Martian ionosphere will be advanced by model comparisons with measurements of suprathermal electrons by MAVEN.

  1. Modeling the Thermosphere/Ionosphere Response to Large Solar Flares and Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Lu, G.; Qian, L.; Richmond, A. D.; Woods, T. N.

    2004-05-01

    During October-November 2003, a series of large coronal mass ejections and solar flares caused significant changes in the terrestrial upper atmosphere and ionosphere. We have simulated these effects using the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). Solar photon inputs to the model were obtained from solar irradiance instruments on the TIMED and SORCE satellites, and auroral forcing obtained using the AMIE procedure. This study enables quantification of the relative importance of photon and auroral forcing of ionosphere/thermosphere density and temperature. Ion density enhancements and airglow intensities derived from the model results can be compared to observations to investigate the simulation fidelity during these extraordinary events.

  2. New Solar Extreme-Ultraviolet and Soft X-ray Measurements: Model Comparisons with Thermosphere and Ionosphere Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bailey, S. M.; Christensen, A. B.; Eparvier, F. G.; Gladstone, G. R.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Woods, T. N.

    2002-05-01

    The Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) spacecraft is performing the first comprehensive measurements of the extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray region of the solar spectrum since the end of the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) mission in 1981. Comparison of TIMED/SEE measurements to contemporaneous satellite observations and a calibration rocket shows that solar irradiance in the soft X-ray and hard EUV spectral ranges, from about 2 to 25 nm, is much more intense than the AE-era observations. Using these new results as inputs to thermosphere/ionosphere models causes revisions to predicted photoelectron fluxes, ionization rates, electron density, ion composition, odd-nitrogen composition, and airglow emission rates. We compare predictions to measurements for some of these, including ground based measurements of ionospheric parameters during the first phase of the TIMED mission and far-ultraviolet dayglow limb profiles measured by the GUVI instrument.

  3. Scientific objectives of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G. E.; Barth, C. A.; Hansen, E. R.; Hord, C. W.; Lawrence, G. M.; Mount, G. H.; Rottman, G. J.; Rusch, D. W.; Stewart, A. I.; Thomas, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the NASA Solar Mesosphere Explorer mission which will study mesospheric ozone and the processes which form and destroy it, measure the ozone density and its altitude distribution from 30 to 80 km, monitor incoming solar UV radiation, and provide a rigorous test of the photochemical equilibrium theory of the mesospheric oxygen-hydrogen system. Five instruments will be carried on the polar-orbiting spacecraft: UV ozone, IR airglow, and visible NO2 programmable Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, a four-channel IR radiometer, and a solar UV spectrometer. Atmospheric measurements will be made of the mesospheric and stratospheric ozone density distribution, water vapor density distribution, temperature profile, ozone photolysis rate, and NO2 density distribution. In addition, the solar UV monitor will measure both the 0.2-0.31 micron spectral region and the Lyman-alpha (0.1216 micron) contribution to the solar irradiance.

  4. Atmospheric soundings from Mount Abu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Som; Sinha, H. S. S.

    2005-06-01

    An atmospheric science laboratory was set up at Gurushikhar, in the campus of PRL's Infrared observatory, in 1994. A variety of scientific instruments were housed in the atmospheric science laboratory to explore the Earth's ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A powerful Nd-YAG laser based Lidar, a multi-wavelength all sky imaging system, Day-night-airglow photometer/spectrometer and a proton precession magnetometer are in operation along with a surface ozone sampler, a carbon mono-oxide analyzer and a UV radiometer (measures solar ultraviolet irradiance between 280 and 320 nm). This article highlights the neutral density and temperature measurements by the lidar as well as Atmospheric/Ionospheric parameters derived by other instruments.

  5. Solar EUV irradiance from the San Marco ASSI - A reference spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Woods, Thomas N.; Worden, John; Rottman, Gary J.; Doll, Harry; Wita, Claus; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1992-11-01

    The only satellite measurement of the solar EUV irradiance during solar cycle 22 has been obtained with the Airglow Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) aboard the San Marco 5 satellite flown in 1988. The ASSI in-flight calibration parameters are established by using the internal capabilities of ASSI and by comparing ASSI results to the results from other space-based experiments on the ASSI calibration rocket and the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME). A solar EUV irradiance spectrum derived from ASSI observations on November 10, 1988 is presented as a reference spectrum for moderate solar activity for the aeronomy community. This ASSI spectrum should be considered as a refinement and extension of the solar EUV spectrum published for the same day by Woods and Rottman (1990).

  6. Solar Irradiance Variation and the Response of the Upper Atmosphere - A Review of Recent Progress in the International TIGER Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Stanley

    Solar irradiance in the ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray spectral regions are a key determinant of the state and variation of upper atmosphere and ionosphere parameters, including densities, temperatures, composition, photoelectron fluxes, airglow emission processes, and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Geosphere Research (TIGER) program was established in 1998 with the objective of obtaining a better quantitative understanding of variations in solar irradiance and the effects on the upper atmosphere. The TIGER program has contributed to progress in this area through an ongoing series of conferences, workshops, publications, and data exchange. Advances in measurement and modeling of the solar spectrum have led to improved understanding of the atmosphere/ionosphere response, and to closure between models and measurements in several areas. In this paper, a brief overview of recent results is provided, some critical outstanding questions are identified, and the prospects for new solar and terrestrial observational programs are described.

  7. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, Hugues

    2013-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  8. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2011-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  9. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  10. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Rachel

    2010-09-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  11. CISCO Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS on the Subaru Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Motohara, K; Maihara, T; Oya, S; Tsukamoto, H; Imanishi, M; Terada, H; Goto, M; Iwai, J; Tanabe, H; Hata, R; Taguchi, T; Harashima, T

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO), mounted on the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru telescope. It is primarily designed as a back-end camera of the OH-Airglow Suppressor (OHS), and is also used as an independent, general-purpose near-infrared camera/spectrograph. CISCO is based on a single 1024x1024 format HgCdTe HAWAII array detector, and is capable of either wide-field imaging of 1.8'x1.8' field-of-view or low-resolution spectroscopy from 0.9 to 2.4 um. The limiting magnitudes measured during test observations were found to be J=23.5mag and K'=22.4mag (imaging, 1" aperture, S/N=5, 1 hr exposure).

  12. Leonid storm research

    CERN Document Server

    Rietmeijer, Frans; Brosch, Noah; Fonda, Mark

    2000-01-01

    This book will appeal to all researchers that have an interest in the current Leonid showers It contains over forty research papers that present some of the first observational results of the November 1999 Leonid meteor storm, the first storm observed by modern observing techniques The book is a first glimpse of the large amount of information obtained during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign and groundbased campaigns throughout the world It provides an excellent overview on the state of meteor shower research for any professional researcher or amateur meteor observer interested in studies of meteors and meteoroids and their relation to comets, the origin of life on Earth, the satellite impact hazard issue, and upper atmosphere studies of neutral atom chemistry, the formation of meteoric debris, persistent trains, airglow, noctilucent clouds, sprites and elves

  13. Ultraviolet spectrographs for thermospheric and ionospheric remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been developing far- and extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs for remote sensing the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The first of these sensors, called the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI), will be flying on the Air Force's Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) block 5D3 satellites as an operational sensor in the 1997-2010 time frame. A second sensor, called the High-resolution ionospheric and Thermospheric Spectrograph (HITS), will fly in late 1995 on the Air Force Space Test Program's Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS, also known as P91-1) as part of NRL's High Resolution Airglow and Auroral Spectroscopy (HIRAAS) experiment. Both of these instruments are compact and do not draw much power and would be good candidates for small satellite applications. The instruments and their capabilities are discussed. Possible uses of these instruments in small satellite applications are also presented

  14. The generalization of upper atmospheric wind and temperature based on the Voigt line shape profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmin; He, Jian

    2006-12-25

    The principle of probing the upper atmospheric wind field, which is the Voigt profile spectral line shape, is presented for the first time. By the Fourier Transform of Voigt profile, with the Imaging Spectroscope and the Doppler effect of electromagnetic wave, the distribution and calculation formulae of the velocity field, temperature field, and pressure field of the upper atmosphere wind field are given. The probed source is the two major aurora emission lines originated from the metastable O(1S) and O(1D) at 557.7nm and 630.0nm. From computer simulation and error analysis, the Voigt profile, which is the correlation of the Gaussian profile and Lorentzian profile, is closest to the actual airglow emission lines. PMID:19532147

  15. STS-39 AFP-675 CIRRIS-1A in OV-103's payload bay (PLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39's Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) Uniformly Redundant Array (URA) and Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle 1A (CIRRIS-1A) mounted on the experiment support system (ESS) pallet are documented in Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). Part of the ESS pallet power distribution system thermal covering is visible at the bottom of the frame. AFP-675 is a Department of Defense (DOD)-sponsored collection of experiments whose objective is to gather data on the Earth's atmosphere (aurora, Earth limb, and airglow), celestial objects, and the environment in and around the PLB. In the background are the aft PLB bulkhead, the vertical tail, and the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods.

  16. STS-39 AFP-675 and STP-1 MPESS in OV-103's payload bay (PLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    An overview of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, aft payload bay (PLB) documents a variety of STS-39's payloads. In the foreground is the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) with the Spacecraft Kinetic Infrared Test (SKIRT) (left), ascent particle monitor (APM) (center), and advanced liquid feed experiment (ALFE) (two canisters) visible. Behind the STP-1 is the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS) with ESS tape recorders (left), Uniformly Redundant Array (URA) (front),and Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle 1A (CIRRIS-1A) (center back) visible. The ESS pallet power distribution system thermal covering (gold-colored) is visible at the bottom. AFP-675 is a Department of Defense (DOD)-sponsored collection of experiments whose objective is to gather data on the Earth's atmosphere (aurora, Earth limb, and airglow), celestial objects, and the environment in and around the PLB. In the backgroun

  17. WIZARD: A New System for Observing Zodiacal Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, F.; Ishiguro, M.; Kwon, S. M.; Fujino, M.; Lee, C.; Nakamura, R.; Sekiguchi, K.; Miyashita, A.; Nakagiri, M.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.

    Zodiacal light is sunlight scattered by the cloud of the interplanetary dust particles in our solar system. By observing the zodiacal light, we can find the origin and evolution of interplanetary dust. We have developed a new system (WIZARD: Wide-field Imager of Zodiacal light with ARray Detector) designed for zodiacal light observation. Since the zodiacal light is faint and wide-spread all over the sky, WIZARD consists of a very sensitive CCD chip and a wide-angle lens with an airglow reduction filter. WIZARD will be able to measure the absolute brightness of diffuse sources in visible wavelengths. Using this instrument, we observed the zodiacal light in 2001 February, March and 2002 March at Mauna Kea, Hawaii (4200 m). In this paper, we report the design and the current performance of the WIZARD system.

  18. Evidence of meso-scale structure in the high-latitude thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Aruliah

    Full Text Available There is a widely held assumption that the thermospheric neutral gas is slow to respond to magnetospheric forcing owing to its large inertia and therefore, may be treated as a steady state background medium for the more dynamic ionosphere. This is shown to be over simplistic. The data presented here compare direct measurements of the thermospheric neutral winds made in Northern Scandinavia by Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs with direct measurements of the ionosphere made by the EISCAT radar and with model simulations. These comparisons will show that the neutral atmosphere is capable of responding to ionospheric changes on mesoscale levels, i.e., spatial and temporal scale sizes of less than a few hundred kilometres and tens of minutes, respectively.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (air-glow and aurora; instruments and techniques – Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interactions

  19. Observations of OI 7774 emission excited by conjugate photoelectrons. [ionosonde data analhysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A. B.

    1975-01-01

    Observations and computer calculations of O I 7774 A airglow emissions excited by conjugate photoelectrons have been carried out. The observations were made at McDonald Observatory, Texas using a 2 m grille spectrometer from December 1972 to June 1973. The zenithal emission intensity during conjugate photoelectron precipitation was fairly constant at 2-4 R until conjugate sunset, after which it diminished steadily and ceased near a conjugate solar zenith angle of 105 (plus or minus 3) deg. A predawn enhancement in both O I 7774 A and forbidden O I 6300 A was observed to commence near 102 deg. The computations utilize the two-stream technique of Nagy and Banks (1970) to obtain the escaping photoelectron flux and the local excitation rates of the oxygen emissions. Good agreement with the observations is obtained for the dependence of the emission rate on conjugate solar zenith angle.

  20. Tropical F region winds from O I 1356-A and forbidden OI 6300-A emissions. I - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, J. A.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper theoretically investigates the relationship of neutral winds and E x B plasma drifts to the time-dependent distribution of 1356-A and 6300-A airglow intensities in the region of the Appleton anomaly. Radiative recombination, ion-ion neutralization, and dissociative recombination are considered as main mechanisms in producing the atomic oxygen tropical nightglow. A quantitative relation is determined between the neutral wind velocities and the resultant asymmetry in the emissions about the dip equator. The height difference at northern and southern conjugate points is shown to be linearly related to the vector sum of the wind velocity components along the magnetic meridian at the latitude of the conjugate points. The height difference at conjugate points may be used to study the pattern of neutral wind velocities in the tropical ionosphere.

  1. Ionospheric disturbances in north-eastern region of Asia during sudden stratospheric warmings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. This paper presents an investigation of the subauroral and mid-latitude ionosphere variations in the north eastern region of Asia during stratospheric warming in 2008 and 2009. We used the data from network of vertical and oblique-incidence sounding ionosondes, Irkutsk incoherent scatter (IS) radar and optic instruments of ISTP SB RAS. Irkutsk chirp-sounder and IS radar ran every 1 minute on 24-hour basis from the 18th January until the 17th February, 2008 and from the 22nd January until the 21st February, 2008 to study small-scale and medium-scale disturbances. Observation of airglow near Irkutsk was provided by the zenith photometer that measured intensities of 557.7 nm and 630.0 nm atomic oxygen emissions. Airglow observations were conducted over 2 weeks off the new moon. The experiments on the radio paths Magadan-Irkutsk and Norilsk -Irkutsk were conducted every 4 minutes on 24-hour basis on January 22 - February 21, 2009. The frequency range was from 4 to 30 MHz, the sweep rate used 500 kHz/sec.Vertical sounding stations operated in standard regime. To identify the stratospheric warming events the Berlin Meteorological University data (http://strat-www.met.fu-berlin.de) on stratospheric warming at standard isobaric levels and the atmospheric temperature height profiles measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the EOS Aura spacecraft were used. The increase of wave activity recorded both in low and in upper ionosphere during sudden stratospheric warming. Spectrums of multi-scale variations were derived from the data obtained during the prolonged experiments. We used the spectral analysis based on a modified Fourier transform with varying upper limit. The possible reasons of the ionospheric disturbances and their intensity spatial distribution are discussed. This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 08-05-00658).

  2. An observation of ionospheric convection and auroral arc motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An all-sky imager operated at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland has been used to make auroral measurements in correlation with data from the incoherent scatter radar. Reviewing the images as movie sequences with an apparent time compression ratio of 60 allows the eye to discern features which are not apparent in the individual frames. The faint 630 nm airglow background lying poleward of the bright auroral oval arcs appears to be structured in the time lapse observations and drifting at a uniform rate. Analysis of the motion of the airglow structures shows excellent agreement with Doppler radar measurement of the ion drift velocities. Electron density profiles derived from the radar data corroborate the existence of high altitude F-region ionization enhancements. The electron temperature in the patches was about 1,000 K and no higher than outside of the patch signifying that the patches were not produced by local soft electron precipitation. According to the radar Doppler data there was a small component of the drift velocity parallel to the arc at either side of the auroral boundary. The sense of those small components was consistent with drifts driven by a convergent electric field which would also produce an up going field aligned current. The larger component of drift velocity perpendicular to the arc appeared to be continuous on either side of the arc. This drift component shows the existence of an electric field parallel to the arc, showing that the arc was not on an equipotential. During the observations the arc moved slowly in the opposite sense to the ion drift, signifying that the auroral arc motion is not driven by the electric field impressed on the atmosphere by the magnetosphere. Calculations of the expected intensity of the 630 nm emissions are in good agreement with the measured intensities of the moving patches

  3. Polar ionospheric responses to solar wind IMF changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    Full Text Available Auroral and airglow emissions over Eureka (89° CGM during the 1997-98 winter show striking variations in relation to solar wind IMF changes. The period January 19 to 22, 1998, was chosen for detailed study, as the IMF was particularly strong and variable. During most of the period, Bz was northward and polar arcs were observed. Several overpasses by DMSP satellites during the four day period provided a clear picture of the particle precipitation producing the polar arcs. The spectral character of these events indicated excitation by electrons of average energy 300 to 500 eV. Only occasionally were electrons of average energy up to ~1 keV observed and these appeared transitory from the ground optical data. It is noted that polar arcs appear after sudden changes in IMF By, suggesting IMF control over arc initiation. When By is positive there is arc motion from dawn to dusk, while By is negative the motion is consistently dusk to dawn. F-region (anti-sunward convections were monitored through the period from 630.0 nm emissions. The convection speed was low (100-150 m/s when Bz was northward but increased to 500 m/s after Bz turned southward on January 20.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora - Ionosphere (particle precipitation - Magnetospheric Physics (polar cap phenomena

  4. Mesopause temperature perturbations caused by infrasonic waves as a potential indicator for the detection of tsunamis and other geo-hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bittner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many geo-hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, severe weather, etc., produce acoustic waves with sub-audible frequency, so called infrasound. This sound propagates from the surface to the middle and upper atmosphere causing pressure and temperature perturbations. Temperature fluctuations connected with the above mentioned events usually are very weak at the surface, but the amplitude increases with height because of the exponential decrease of atmospheric pressure with increasing altitude. At the mesopause region (80–100 km height signal amplitudes are about two to three orders of magnitude larger than on the ground.

    The GRIPS (GRound-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer measurement system operated by the German Remote Sensing Data Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR-DFD derives temperatures of the mesopause region by observing hydroxyl (OH airglow emissions in the near infrared atmospheric emission spectrum originating from a thin layer at approximately 87 km height.

    The GRIPS instrument is in principle suited for the detection of infrasonic signals generated by e.g. tsunamis and other geo-hazards. This is due to the fact that the infrasound caused by such events should induce observable short-period fluctuations in the OH airglow temperatures. First results obtained during a field campaign performed at the Environmental Research Station "Schneefernerhaus", Zugspitze (47.4° N, 11.0° E from October to December 2008 are presented regarding potential sources of meteorological and orographical origin.

    An adequate distinction of the overlapping infrasonic signatures caused by different infrasound sources in the OH temperature record is needed for the ascription to the proper source. The approach presented here could form a contribution to a hazard monitoring and early warning system.

  5. Comparison of calculation models for determination of the mesopause temperature using SATI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2011-06-01

    The Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager is an instrument for ground-based spectroscopic measurements of the night-glow atmosphere emissions. This instrument was developed specially for gravity wave investigation. The measured airglow spectra are matched to synthetic spectra calculated in advance for determination of the temperature in the mesopause region where the radiation maximum of some О 2 emissions is situated. The synthetic spectra are transformed into a format which corresponds to the measured spectra in order to be matched. This transformation is based on the known values of the refractive index and the central wavelength of the interference filter used. A substantial part of the processing algorithms of the SATI images is connected with determination of these two filter parameters. The results of the original and newly-proposed algorithms for filter parameter calculation and their importance for the final results for temperature determination on the basis of the О 2 (864-868 nm) emission measurements are presented. Considerable systematic differences (˜20 K) between temperatures at different points in the mesopause retrieved by the two algorithms are established. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the original one is illustrated by retrieved rotational temperatures and by lower error values. Furthermore, the irregular errors in the nocturnal variation of the temperature retrieved by the original algorithm are absent when the proposed approach is applied. The error investigation in the calculations and the stability of the individual components of the processing algorithms and the calculation models may be helpful in achieving better results and enhancing the potentialities of the SATI instrument.

  6. Geomagnetism and climate I: the last 400 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevanlinna, H.; Shumilov, O.; Mörner, N.-A.; Dergachev, V.

    2003-04-01

    During the last 400 years there seems to exist a close linkage between sunspot activity and paleoclimate. The combined Schwabe Gleisberg cycles provide a good approximation of past climate. Changes in the phase of the sunspot cycles exhibit a very close correlation with observed changes in climate for the last 150 years. The heliomagnetic aa-index provides a close correlation with climate over the last 150 years. The close correlation between sunspot activity and atmospheric changes in radiocarbon indicates that changes in heliomagnetic interaction with the Earth’s magnetosphere play a central role in this solar-terrestrial interaction; via its modulation of the cosmic ray flux or its modulation of Earth’s rate of rotation. Variations in cosmic ray flux have the capacity of affecting Earth’s climate via its modulation of airglow and cloudiness (especially at the level around 15 km). There is a good correlation between Solar Wind intensity and Earth’s rate of rotation (LOD), implying that variations in Solar Wind intensity (sunspot activity) act in retarding and speeding up in the spin rate of Planet Earth. During the Spörer, Maunder and Dalton Sunspot Minima, the Earth’s rate of rotation was significantly speeded-up, affecting the ocean surface circulation and the atmospheric circulation as to create significant changes in local climate; “Little Ice Ages” in western and northern Europe and “Little Interglacial” in southwest Europe and northwest Africa. In conclusion, Earth’s climate seems closely driven by changes in sunspot activity. This correlation may operate via the cosmic ray effects on airglow and/or cloudiness, or via the heliomagnetic (Solar Wind) effects on Earth’s rate of rotation, or a combination of these processes. Changes in the Earth’s own internal geomagnetic field seem to have played little or no role during this time period. Nor are there any reasons to advocate major changes in Solar irradiance.

  7. Morphology of 557.7 nm dayglow emission under varying solar activity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M. V. Sunil; Singh, Vir

    The atomic oxygen emission at 557.7 nm is the most widely observed airglow feature in the upper mesosphere and lower thermospheric regions. The approximation of solar irradiance fluxes is very crucial in the modeling of this emission. The recently introduced Solar2000 EUV flux model is a suitable candidate to provide the solar EUV flux for any level of solar activity on any given day. The Solar2000 EUV flux model has not been tested for its applicability in the airglow modeling studies. In the present study a comprehensive model has been developed to study the 557.7 nm dayglow emission using Solar2000 EUV flux model. This study presents the model results of diurnal and yearly variations of 557.7 nm dayglow emission under equinox conditions. The effect of varying solar activity on this emission is studied for a period of five years (2001-2005) at a fixed date of April 3. This date is chosen due to the fact of large variations in the solar activity during the period of five years. The volume emission rates obtained from the model in the upper mesospheric region are found higher than the observed results. This discrepancy is due to the extremely high values of solar EUV flux generated by the Solar2000 EUV flux model at 102.5 and 103.7 nm wavelengths. The model is found in good agreement with the measurements in the thermospheric region. The morphology is presented as a function of F10.7 solar index for five years (2001 -2005) equator and 45° N at a fixed longitude.

  8. VIRTIS/VEX O2(a1Δg) nightglow profiles affected by gravity waves action: modeling and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Francesca; Miglirioni, Alessandra; Shakun, Alexey; Zasova, Ludmila; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Bellucci, Giancarlo

    2013-04-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are mesoscale atmospheric oscillations related to the buoyancy restoring force, which play a key role in the circulation of planetary atmospheres. Their propagation, inducing fluctuation in both temperature and density fields, can also affect the intensity of the airglow emissions. In this work we report on the modelling of O2(a1Δg) nightglow limb profiles perturbed by the GWs propagation in the Venus atmosphere. O2(a1Δg) excited molecules arise by the three-body reaction between two atoms of oxygen and carbon dioxide, then they decay at the fundamental state by emitting most of the photons at 1.27 µm or through collisions with CO2 molecules (quenching). The 1.27 µm emission behavior is analyzed through the data acquired by the VIRTIS (Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer) instrument on boards the ESA mission Venus Express (VEX). The high variability observed in the shape of the O2(a1Δg) nightglow limb profiles between 80 and 120 km, often characterized by the presence of a double peak, implies GWs occurrence at the considered altitudes. In order to model and derive the GWs properties, we apply to Venus a well-known theory used to study terrestrial airglow fluctuations induced by the GWs propagation. The initial O2(a1Δg) molecules density profile have been assumed to be Gaussian shaped. Unperturbed temperatures and density profiles have been taken from SPICAV data, while the initial atomic oxygen density profile has been derived with the same approach of Gerard et al. [2009]. This study confirms the high variability induced by the waves propagation in the O2 profiles, as observed in the VIRTIS data.

  9. Infrasonic induced mesopause temperature perturbations. As an early indicator for the detection of tsunamis and other geo-hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Many geo-hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, severe weather etc. cause infrasonic waves which can travel over large distances (several thousand kilometers) in the atmosphere. These longitudinal pressure waves contribute to the coupling of the various atmospheric altitude layers and directly lead to temperature perturbations. Temperature fluctuations connected with the above mentioned events usually are very weak at the surface, but the amplitude increases with height because of the exponential decrease of atmospheric pressure with increasing altitude. At the mesopause region (∼87 km height) signal intensities should be about four to five orders of magnitude larger than on the ground. The modeling structure of infrasound propagation as well as of acoustic heating is presented. Subject of the present study is to show the potential of the GRIPS (Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer) measurement system which is currently used at DLR-DFD to monitor climate signals in the mesopause region, to better understand the impact of atmospheric dynamics on larger-scale circulation, to validate satellite-based measurements and to evaluate climate and atmospheric models. GRIPS utilises the airglow phenomenon. Mesopause temperatures (at ∼87 km height) are currently and routinely derived night by night from observations of hydroxyl (OH*) emissions in the near infrared using two ground-based infrared spectrometers (GRIPS 3 and GRIPS 5). The main idea of the presentation is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the modulation of OH*-temperatures caused by infrasonic waves travelling through the airglow layer, which are generated by geo-hazards such as tsunamis and to quantify acoustic heating rates. The system is expected to add value to multi-hazard early warning systems.

  10. From Sumatra 2004 to Tuhoku-Oki 2011: what we learn about Tsunami detection by ionospheric sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, G.; Rolland, L.; Coisson, P.; Watada, S.; Makela, J. J.; Hebert, H.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The recent tsunamigenic Tohoku earthquake (2011) strongly affirms, again, after the 26 December 2004, the necessity to open new paradigms in oceanic monitoring. Detection of ionospheric anomalies following the Sumatra earthquake tsunami (e.g., Occhipinti et al. 2006) demonstrated that ionosphere is sensitive to earthquake and tsunami propagation: ground and oceanic vertical displacement induces acoustic-gravity waves propagating within the neutral atmosphere and detectable in the ionosphere. Observations supported by modelling proved that tsunamigenic ionospheric anomalies are deterministic and reproducible by numerical modeling via the ocean/neutral-atmosphere/ionosphere coupling mechanism (Occhipinti et al., 2008). To prove that the tsunami signature in the ionosphere is routinely detected we show here perturbations of total electron content (TEC) measured by GPS and following tsunamigenic eartquakes from 2004 to 2010 (Rolland et al. 2010, Occhipinti et al., 2013, Occhipinti, 2014), nominally, Sumatra (26 December, 2004 and 12 September, 2007), Chile (14 November, 2007), Samoa (29 September, 2009) and the recent Tohoku-Oki (11 Mars, 2011). In addition to GPS/TEC observations close to the epicenter and measured by GEONET network, new exciting measurements in the far-field were performed by Airglow measurement in Hawaii: those measurements show the propagation of the IGWs induced by the Tohoku tsunami in the Pacific Ocean (Occhipinti et al., 2011). Based on the observations close to the epicenter, mainly performed by GPS networks located in Sumatra, Chile and Japan, we highlight the TEC perturbation observed within the first hour after the seismic rupture. This perturbation contains informations about the ground displacement, as well as the consequent sea surface displacement resulting in the tsunami. In this talk we present all this new tsunami observations in the ionosphere and we discuss, under the light of modelling, the potential role of ionospheric sounding

  11. 四分束风成像偏振干涉仪信噪比的研究%The signal-to-noise ratio of the quarter beam of wind imaging polarization interferometer∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宣妮; 张淳民; 艾晶晶

    2013-01-01

    The novel static polarization wind imaging interferometer adopts four-face pyramid prism and polarization array to obtain four different phase interferograms on four sections of CCD once. It can detect the target in real time and overcome the moving mirror scan detection mode defect that leads to be unable to accurately detect the rapily changing target. For the signal beam that is split into four equal parts, their intensities drop significantly, so whether the signal can be detected is a key problem. In this paper, the target spectral characteristic of the airglow is taken as the starting point of analysis, then the optical transmission properties and response of the NSPWII system and CCD signal-to-noise ratio are analyzed. Finally the conclusion is obtained that weak signal (such as night airglow) cannot be detected in the conventional detecting mode. Some improving measure is presented which extends light integration time, adopts pixel merger technology and select high sensitivity CCD (as electron multiplication CCD), they all can improve the signal-to-noise ratio effectively. After integrated using the these measures, the signal-to-noise ratio and responsiveness of NSPWII system are calculated. In view of the rapid changes of cost and objectives, only pixel binning is adopted, and the simulated curve of signal-to-noise ratio versus digital output is obtained. The result shows that the weak signal as night airglow can be detected.%  新型静态偏振风成像干涉仪采用四面角锥棱镜与偏振阵列的组合结构,在CCD的四个分区上一次得到四个不同相位的干涉图,可以实现对目标的实时探测,克服了动镜扫描探测模式不能对快速变化目标进行精确探测的缺陷。由于光束被四等分,强度大幅度下降,微弱的气辉信号能否被探测到成为研究的关键。本文从目标气辉光谱的特性出发,分析了静态偏振风成像干涉仪系统的光学

  12. All Sky Imager Network for Science and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, A.; Kendall, E. A.; Zalles, D. R.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2012-12-01

    A new all sky imager network for space weather monitoring and education outreach has been developed by SRI International. The goal of this program is to install sensitive, low-light all-sky imagers across the continental United States to observe upper atmospheric airglow and aurora in near real time. While aurora borealis is often associated with the high latitudes, during intense geomagnetic storms it can extend well into the continental United States latitudes. Observing auroral processes is instrumental in understanding the space weather, especially in the times of increasing societal dependence on space-based technologies. Under the THEMIS satellite program, Canada has installed a network of all-sky imagers across their country to monitor aurora in real-time. However, no comparable effort exists in the United States. Knowledge of the aurora and airglow across the entire United States in near real time would allow scientists to quickly assess the impact of a geomagnetic storm in concert with data from GPS networks, ionosondes, radars, and magnetometers. What makes this effort unique is that we intend to deploy these imagers at high schools across the country. Selected high-schools will necessarily be in rural areas as the instrument requires dark night skies. At the commencement of the school year, we plan to give an introductory seminar on space weather at each of these schools. Science nuggets developed by SRI International in collaboration with the Center for GeoSpace Studies and the Center for Technology in Learning will be available for high school teachers to use during their science classes. Teachers can use these nuggets as desired within their own curricula. We intend to develop a comprehensive web-based interface that will be available for students and scientific community alike to observe data across the network in near real time and also to guide students towards complementary space weather data sets. This interface will show the real time extent of

  13. Observation of a mesospheric front in a dual duct over King George Island, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Bageston

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A mesospheric bore was observed with an all-sky airglow imager on the night of 9–10 July 2007 at Ferraz Station (62° S, 58° W, located on King George island on the Antarctic Peninsula. The observed bore propagated from southwest to northeast with a well defined wave front and a series of crests behind the main front. There was no evidence of dissipation during its propagation within the field of view. The wave parameters were obtained via a 2-D Fourier transform of the imager data providing a horizontal wavelength of 33 km, an observed period of 6 min, and a horizontal phase speed of 92 m s−1. Simultaneous mesospheric winds were measured with a medium frequency (MF radar at Rothera Station (68° S, 68° W and temperature profiles were obtained from the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite. These wind and temperature profiles were used to estimate the propagation environment of the bore. A wavelet technique was applied to the wind in the plane of bore propagation at the OH emission height spanning three days centered on the bore event to define the dominant periodicities. Results revealed a dominance of near-inertial periods, and semi-diurnal and terdiurnal tides suggesting that the ducting structure enabling bore propagation occurred on large spatial scales. The observed tidal motions were used to reconstruct the winds employing a least-squares method, which were then compared to the observed ducting environment. Results suggest an important contribution of large-scale winds to the ducting structure, but with buoyancy frequency variations in the vertical also expected to be important. These results allow us to conclude that the bore was supported by a duct including contributions from both winds and temperature (or stability. A co-located airglow temperature imager operated simultaneously with the all-sky imager confirmed that the bore event was the dominant small-scale wave event during the analysis interval.

  14. Creation of polar cap patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, K.; Taguchi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Polar cap patches, which are islands of enhanced plasma density drifting anti-sunward, are one of the outstanding phenomena in the polar cap F region ionosphere. In the last decade, data from all-sky airglow imagers have been extensively used for better understanding the propagation of patches in the central polar cap region. But still, it has been rather difficult to capture the birth of patches in their generation region near the dayside cusp, because, in most places, the dayside part of the polar cap ionosphere is sunlit even in winter. In Longyearbyen (78.1N, 15.5E), Norway, however, optical observations are possible near the dayside cusp region in a limited period around the winter solstice. This enables us to directly image how polar cap patches are born in the cusp. In this paper, we present a few intervals of daytime optical observations, during which polar cap patches were generated within the field-of-view of an all-sky imager in Longyearbyen. During all the intervals studied here, we identified several signatures of poleward moving auroral forms (PMAF) in the equatorward half of the field-of-view, which are known as ionospheric manifestations of dayside reconnection. Interestingly, patches were directly produced from such poleward moving auroral signatures and propagated poleward along the anti-sunward convection near the cusp. In the literature, Lorentzen et al. (2012) first reported such a direct production of patches from PMAFs. During the current observations, however, we succeeded in tracking the propagation of patches until they reached the poleward edge of the field-of-view of the imager. This confirms that the faint airglow structures produced from PMAFs were actually transported for a long distance towards the central polar cap area; thus, polar cap patches were produced. From this set of observations, we suggest that polar cap patches during moderately disturbed conditions (i.e, non-storm time conditions) can be directly produced by the

  15. The O-STATES Sounding Rocket Project - First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, J.

    2015-12-01

    In October 2015, the sounding rocket project O-STATES was conducted from Esrange Space Center (67.9°N, 21.1°E) in northern Sweden. The acronym O-STATES stands for "Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky" and the basic idea is that comprehensive information on the composition, specifically atomic oxygen in the ground state O and first excited state O(1D), and temperature of the lower thermosphere can be obtained from a limited set of optical measurements. Starting point for the analysis are daytime measurements of the O2(b1∑g+ - X3∑g-) Atmospheric Band system in the spectral region 755-780 nm and the O(1D-3P) Red Line at 630 nm. In the daytime lower thermosphere O(1D) is produced by O2 photolysis and the excited O2(b) state is mainly produced by energy transfer from O(1D) to the O2(X) ground state. In addition to O2 photolysis, both electron impact on O and dissociative recombination of O2+ are major sources of O(1D) in the thermosphere. Recent laboratory studies at SRI demonstrate that the O2(b) production populates the vibrational levels v=1 and v=0 in a ratio of ~4. While O2(b, v=0) is essentially unquenched, O2(b, v=1) is subject to collisional quenching that is dominated by O at altitudes above 160 km. Hence, the ratio of the Atmospheric Band emission from O2(b, v=1) and O2(b, v=0) is a measure of the O density. Finally, the spectral shape of the O2 Atmospheric Band is temperature dependent and spectrally resolved measurements of the Atmospheric Bands thus provide a measure of atmospheric temperature. This O2 Atmospheric Band analysis has been advocated as a technique for thermospheric remote sensing under the name Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) Mapping. With O-STATES we want to characterize the GOAT technique by in-situ analysis of the O2 Atmospheric Band airglow and the underlying excitation mechanisms. By performing this dayglow analysis from a rocket payload, detailed local altitude profiles of the relevant emissions and

  16. Atomic oxygen and temperature in the lower thermosphere from the O-STATES sounding rocket project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Megner, Linda; Stegman, Jacek; Seo, Mikael; Khaplanov, Mikhail; Slanger, Tom; Kalogerakis, Konstantinos; Friedrich, Martin; Torkar, Klaus; Eberhart, Martin; Löhle, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2016-04-01

    In October 2015 the O-STATES payload was launched twice from Esrange Space Center (67.9° N, 21.1° E) in northern Sweden, first into moderately disturbed and then into calm geomagnetic conditions. The basic idea of O-STATES ("Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky") is that comprehensive information on the composition, specifically atomic oxygen in the ground state O(3P) and first excited state O(1D), and temperature of the lower thermosphere can be obtained from a limited set of optical measurements. Starting point for the analysis are daytime measurements of the O2(b1 ∑ g+ ‑ X3 ∑ g‑) Atmospheric Band system in the spectral region 755-780 nm and the O(1D-3P) Red Line at 630 nm. In the daytime lower thermosphere, O(1D) is produced by O2 photolysis and the excited O2(b) state is mainly produced by energy transfer from O(1D) to the O2(X) ground state. In addition to O2 photolysis, both electron impact on O(3P) and dissociative recombination of O2+ are major sources of O(1D) in the thermosphere. Laboratory studies at SRI International have shown that O2(b) production in vibrational level v=1 dominates. While O2(b, v=0) is essentially unquenched, O2(b, v=1) is subject to collisional quenching that is dominated by O at altitudes above 160 km. Hence, the ratio of the Atmospheric Band emission from O2(b, v=1) and O2(b, v=0) is a measure of the O density at sufficiently high altitudes. In addition, the spectral shape of the O2 Atmospheric Band is temperature dependent and spectrally resolved measurements of the Atmospheric Bands thus provide a measure of atmospheric temperature. This O2 Atmospheric Band analysis has been suggested as a new technique for thermospheric remote sensing under the name Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) Mapping. With O-STATES we want to characterize the GOAT technique by in-situ analysis of the O2 Atmospheric Band airglow and the underlying excitation mechanisms. By performing this dayglow analysis from a rocket

  17. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  18. The global ultraviolet imager (GUVI) for the NASA TIMED mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) investigation is designed to provide quantitative observations and interpretation of the Earth's airglow and auroral emissions in support of the NASA Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energy and Dynamics (TIMED) mission. It will address TIMED objectives dealing with energetics, dynamics, and the specification of state variables. The instrument will provide multiple-wavelength, simultaneous ''monochromatic'' images of the far-ultraviolet emission (115 to 180 nm) using a scan mirror to sweep the instantaneous field of view of a spectrographic imager through an arc of up to 140 degree aligned perpendicular to the orbit plane of the spacecraft. The instantaneous field of view is 11.8 degree by 0.37 degree (adjustable) along the slit and perpendicular to the slit, respectively. The field of view is mapped to a two-dimensional image plane with up to 64 spatial pixels by 160 spectral pixels of spectral width 0.4 nm per pixel. Binning of pixels can be performed along both the spatial and spectral axes of the array to reduce the demands on the downlink telemetry. The f/3 Rowland circle scanning spectrographic imager is outfitted with a toroidal grating ruled at 1,200 grooves per millimeter. The fore-optics consist of a plane scanning mirror and an off-axis parabolic telescope. The detector is a photon-counting microchannel plate with a wedge and strip anode mounted in a sealed tube

  19. The evolution of a breaking mesospheric bore wave packet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, R. G.; Taylor, M. J.; Nielsen, K.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2011-10-01

    All-sky CCD observations of mesospheric gravity waves have been made from Halley Station Antarctica (75.5°S, 26.7°W) as part of a collaborative research program between British Antarctic Survey, U.K. and Utah State University, USA. A mesospheric bore event was observed in the nightglow emissions over a period of several hours on the 27th of May, 2001. Two dimensional S-Transform (ST) analysis is applied to the airglow images of this bore event. This local spectral technique allows one to calculate the wave parameters as a function of time and space. It is observed that the horizontal phase speed and wavelength decrease over time as the amplitude attenuates. Simultaneously with this wave event the background wind experiences a large acceleration in the direction of the wave propagation. Mesospheric bore theory calculations are used to estimate the bore duct depth and it is shown that as the wave packet evolves, the bore duct collapses (decreasing in its vertical extent). As the bore duct shrinks, the wave's group velocity decelerates, the amplitude attenuates, and the wave dissipates.

  20. Propagation of short-period gravity waves at high-latitudes during the MaCWAVE winter campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nielsen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically winter campaign an all-sky monochromatic CCD imager has been used to investigate the properties of short-period mesospheric gravity waves at high northern latitudes. Sequential measurements of several nightglow emissions were made from Esrange, Sweden, during a limited period from 27–31 January 2003. Coincident wind measurements over the altitude range (~80–100 km using two meteor radar systems located at Esrange and Andenes have been used to perform a novel investigation of the intrinsic properties of five distinct wave events observed during this period. Additional lidar and MSIS model temperature data have been used to investigate their nature (i.e. freely propagating or ducted. Four of these extensive wave events were found to be freely propagating with potential source regions to the north of Scandinavia. No evidence was found for strong orographic forcing by short-period waves in the airglow emission layers. The fifth event was most unusual exhibiting an extensive, but much smaller and variable wavelength pattern that appeared to be embedded in the background wind field. Coincident wind measurements indicated the presence of a strong shear suggesting this event was probably due to a large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  1. Correlations of mesospheric winds with subtle motion of the Arctic polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhattacharya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between high latitude upper mesospheric winds and the state of the stratospheric polar vortex in the absence of major sudden stratospheric warmings. A ground based Michelson Interferometer stationed at Resolute Bay (74°43' N, 94°58' W in the Canadian High Arctic is used to measure mesopause region neutral winds using the hydroxyl (OH Meinel-band airglow emission (central altitude of ~85 km. These observed winds are compared to analysis winds in the upper stratosphere during November and December of 1995 and 1996; years characterized as cold, stable polar vortex periods. Correlation of mesopause wind speeds with those from the upper stratosphere is found to be significant for the 1996 season when the polar vortex is subtly displaced off its initial location by a strong Aleutian High. These mesopause winds are observed to lead stratospheric winds by approximately two days with increasing (decreasing mesospheric winds predictive of decreasing (increasing stratospheric winds. No statistically significant correlations are found for the 1995 season when there is no such displacement of the polar vortex.

  2. OH(6-2 spectra and rotational temperature measurements at Davis, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Greet

    Full Text Available The OH(6-2 band was monitored during 1990 at Davis, Antarctica (68.6°S, 78.0°E using a Czerny-Turner scanning spectrometer. Spectra obtained with a 0.15-nm bandwidth and wavelength steps of 0.005 nm have been recorded in an attempt to isolate auroral features. This has enabled detailed study of weak features in the region λ837.5–855.5 nm. These weak features can contribute to the apparent intensity of P-branch lines and to the background. Their presence is allowed for in our calculation of rotational temperature, but the P1(3 line is excluded because of significant contamination. An average temperature of 221±2 K is obtained from a selected data set of 104 spectra. The mid-winter average temperature, for the months of May, June and July, is 224±2 K, which is consistent with the 1986 CIRA model values for mid-winter at this height and latitude, but this result is dependent on the choice of transition probabilities. Preliminary assessments of seasonal and diurnal variations in rotational temperature and intensity are presented.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Airglow and aurora; Middle-atmosphere composition and chemistry · Pressure · density and temperature

  3. UV spectral measurements at moderately high resolution and of OH resonance scattering resolved by polarization during the MANTRA 2002-2004 stratospheric balloon flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A moderately high-resolution (<0.1 nm) grating spectrometer designed to measure the solar radiation in the spectral range 295-315 nm was flown on the MANTRA stratospheric balloon payloads of 2002 and 2004. The instrument measures both the direct sunlight and the radiation scattered by the atmosphere. The latter can be observed in two orthogonal polarization directions, at 90 deg. from the solar azimuth and at several elevations above the horizon. As the OH molecule is the principal resonant scatterer in this spectral region, this permits the inference of both ozone and OH column amounts as well as limited profile information. This paper describes the instrument and its in-flight characterization, the basic data processing and the influence of several aspects of the flight profile. The direct sun measurements are analyzed both to characterize the spectrometer responsivity to scattered radiation and to estimate the ozone abundance at the flight altitude and above. An example of a high-resolution solar spectrum at 37 km altitude is presented and compared with others in the literature. The measured OH and Rayleigh-scattered spectra are used to derive OH radiation intensity measurements (the OH airglow), which are compared with others in the literature

  4. UV spectral measurements at moderately high resolution and of OH resonance scattering resolved by polarization during the MANTRA 2002-2004 stratospheric balloon flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasick, D.W. [Air Quality Research Division, Environment Canada, Downsview, ON, M3H 5T4 (Canada)], E-mail: david.tarasick@ec.gc.ca; Wardle, D.I.; McElroy, C.T.; McLinden, C. [Air Quality Research Division, Environment Canada, Downsview, ON, M3H 5T4 (Canada); Brown, S.; Solheim, B. [Solar Terrestrial Physics Laboratory, Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    A moderately high-resolution (<0.1 nm) grating spectrometer designed to measure the solar radiation in the spectral range 295-315 nm was flown on the MANTRA stratospheric balloon payloads of 2002 and 2004. The instrument measures both the direct sunlight and the radiation scattered by the atmosphere. The latter can be observed in two orthogonal polarization directions, at 90 deg. from the solar azimuth and at several elevations above the horizon. As the OH molecule is the principal resonant scatterer in this spectral region, this permits the inference of both ozone and OH column amounts as well as limited profile information. This paper describes the instrument and its in-flight characterization, the basic data processing and the influence of several aspects of the flight profile. The direct sun measurements are analyzed both to characterize the spectrometer responsivity to scattered radiation and to estimate the ozone abundance at the flight altitude and above. An example of a high-resolution solar spectrum at 37 km altitude is presented and compared with others in the literature. The measured OH and Rayleigh-scattered spectra are used to derive OH radiation intensity measurements (the OH airglow), which are compared with others in the literature.

  5. Water vapour and the equatorial mesospheric semi-annual oscillation (MSAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Gattinger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the mesospheric semi-annual oscillation (MSAO in the equatorial region have been reported dating back several decades. Seasonal variations in both species densities and airglow emissions are well documented. The extensive observations available offer an excellent case study for comparison with model simulations. The broad range of measurements is summarised with emphasis on the 80 to 100 km region. Photochemical model simulations are described for near-equinox and near-solstice conditions, the two times with notable differences in the observed MSAO parameters. Diurnal tides are included in order to facilitate comparisons of observations made at different local times. The roles of water vapour as the "driver" species and ozone as the "response" species are examined to test for consistency between the model results and observations. The model simulations suggest the interactions between eddy mixing and background vertical advection play a significant role in the MSAO phenomenon. At the equator, 90 km altitude, the derived eddy mixing rate is approximately 1 × 106 cm2 s−1 and vertical advection 0.8 cm s−1. For April the corresponding values are 4 × 105 cm2 s−1 and 0.1 cm s−1.

  6. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena

  7. Obituary: Joseph Wyan Chamberlain, 1928-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    2004-12-01

    are glad that his last nineteen active years were spent in that role. In the 1960's the AAS had no Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS), and the group organized an annual series of five Arizona Conferences on Planetary Atmospheres. By 1967 several members of the community felt that a DPS was needed; the AAS Council asked Joe to serve as chair of the organizing committee, and when the Division was formed he became the first Chairman. In 1971, he became Director of the NASA Lunar Science Institute and a few years later Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy at Rice University (Houston). After retirement as Professor Emeritus in 1992, he returned to Tucson where he continued an active interest in golf, opera, chess and satirical humor. Joe's program at Yerkes began with observations of aurora and airglow, making use of the wonderful spectrographs designed and built by Meinel. Among his many contributions was the identification and analysis of a band system in the airglow that now bears his name. His interests shifted toward the theoretical; for example, he applied the radiative-transfer theory of his colleague Chandrasekhar to the sodium twilight airglow. In 1961 he published Theory of the Aurora and Airglow, a book so influential that it was reprinted a few years ago by the American Geophysical Union. In the same period his interest in interplanetary hydrogen led to a low-velocity model that was at odds with Eugene N. Parker's model of the solar wind, and a debate ensued until observations showed Parker to be essentially correct. But the Chamberlain ideas were applied to the structure of the Earth's hydrogen exosphere, and for 40 years this work has been accepted as definitive. Later he studied the reduction of the hydrogen escape rate by the "cooling" that results from the loss of the energy carried by the escaping atoms. Joe was selected to deliver the 1961 Helen Warner lecture and chose the topic "The upper atmospheres of the planets." This paper clearly expounds

  8. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Han, S.-M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Scales, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions of high power HF radio waves in the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska is the world's largest heating facility, yielding effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are identical to more traditional patterns. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region from a pencil beam. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of stable artificial airglow layers because of the horizontal structure of the ring. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  9. Obituary: Joseph Wyan Chamberlain, 1928-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    2004-12-01

    are glad that his last nineteen active years were spent in that role. In the 1960's the AAS had no Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS), and the group organized an annual series of five Arizona Conferences on Planetary Atmospheres. By 1967 several members of the community felt that a DPS was needed; the AAS Council asked Joe to serve as chair of the organizing committee, and when the Division was formed he became the first Chairman. In 1971, he became Director of the NASA Lunar Science Institute and a few years later Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy at Rice University (Houston). After retirement as Professor Emeritus in 1992, he returned to Tucson where he continued an active interest in golf, opera, chess and satirical humor. Joe's program at Yerkes began with observations of aurora and airglow, making use of the wonderful spectrographs designed and built by Meinel. Among his many contributions was the identification and analysis of a band system in the airglow that now bears his name. His interests shifted toward the theoretical; for example, he applied the radiative-transfer theory of his colleague Chandrasekhar to the sodium twilight airglow. In 1961 he published Theory of the Aurora and Airglow, a book so influential that it was reprinted a few years ago by the American Geophysical Union. In the same period his interest in interplanetary hydrogen led to a low-velocity model that was at odds with Eugene N. Parker's model of the solar wind, and a debate ensued until observations showed Parker to be essentially correct. But the Chamberlain ideas were applied to the structure of the Earth's hydrogen exosphere, and for 40 years this work has been accepted as definitive. Later he studied the reduction of the hydrogen escape rate by the "cooling" that results from the loss of the energy carried by the escaping atoms. Joe was selected to deliver the 1961 Helen Warner lecture and chose the topic "The upper atmospheres of the planets." This paper clearly expounds

  10. Comparative Planetary Atmospheres of the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Darrell F.

    We know that each of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter has a tenuous atmosphere by terrestrial standards. Io has an SO2 atmosphere with column densities ~ 1016 cm-2 in the equatorial regions and at least an order of magnitude smaller densities in the polar regions. Europa and Ganymede have O2 atmospheres with column densities in the range of (1-10) x 1014 cm-2 whereas Callisto has an CO2 atmosphere of comparable column density. I will give exploratory comparisons of the composition of these atmospheres and their production and loss rates to estimate residence times of the dominant molecules. Based on measured and calculated ionospheric density profiles the ionospheric Pedersen and Hall conductances can be computed to estimate the strengths of their electrodynamic interactions with the Io plasma torus. As a result of these interactions large electric currents flow through their ionospheres (~ 106 A) accompanied by large Joule heating rates that can be the dominant heating mechanism of their atmospheres. Production mechanisms for HST/STIS observed UV airglow/auroras will be discussed in terms of neutral composition electron densities and temperatures necessary to achieve measured brightnesses.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of dark band structures in the OI 630 nm emission all-sky images associated with Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Perkins instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Using ground-based measurements we investigate the simultaneous occurrence of dark band structures in the OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Perkins instability. This is the first reported observation related to the quasi north-south aligned intensity depletion bands (plasma bubble) simultaneously with the presence of medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) in the tropical region using OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images. On February 27-28, 2006, the OI 630 nm emission all-sky images obtained at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7 deg S, 45.0 deg W), Brazil, were used to map the spatial and temporal locations of plasma bubble and MSTIDs in the bottomside of the F-region. The ionospheric plasma bubble zonal drift measured by the all-sky imaging showed that it moved to eastward with average speed of 50 m/s, whereas MSTIDs moved from southeast to northwest with average speed of about 40 m/s. Also, digisonde observations registered abrupt increases in both the F-layer peak height (hmF2) and base height (h'F) when the MSTIDs passed over Cachoeira Paulista. It should be pointed out that these thermospheric/ionospheric events are not related to geomagnetic disturbed conditions. In this work, we present and discuss the dynamics of these kind airglow structures and their effects in the thermosphere/ionosphere dynamics.

  13. LAICE CubeSat mission for gravity wave studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, John; Earle, Gregory; Bishop, Rebecca; Swenson, Gary R.; Vadas, Sharon; Clemmons, James; Davidson, Ryan; Fanelli, Lucy; Fish, Chad; Garg, Vidur; Ghosh, Alex; Jagannatha, Bindu B.; Kroeker, Erik; Marquis, Peter; Martin, Daniel; Noel, Stephen; Orr, Cameron; Robertson, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The Lower Atmosphere/Ionosphere Coupling Experiment (LAICE) CubeSat mission will focus on understanding the interaction of atmospheric gravity waves generated by weather systems in the lower atmosphere with the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Specifically, LAICE will focus on the energy and momentum delivered by these waves and attempt to connect the wave sources and the wave effects in three widely different altitude ranges, substantially adding to our knowledge of critical coupling processes between disparate atmospheric regions. The LAICE mission consists of a 6U CubeSat with a four-instrument payload. The retarding potential analyzer (RPA) will provide in-situ ion density and temperature measurements. A four-channel photometer will measure density and temperature variations in the mesosphere through observations of O2 (0, 0) Atmospheric band and O2 Herzberg I band airglows. There are two pressure sensors that comprise the Space Pressure Suite (SPS): the Space Neutral Pressure Instrument (SNeuPI) and the LAICE Ionization gauge Neutral Atmosphere Sensor (LINAS). Both will provide neutral density measurements, but SNeuPI is a prototype sensor that will be validated by LINAS. This CubeSat mission, scheduled for launch in early 2016 from the International Space Station, provides a cost-effective approach to measuring low altitude in-situ parameters along with simultaneous imaging that is capable of addressing the fundamental questions of atmospheric gravity wave coupling in the MLTI region.

  14. A Dual Narrowband Survey for H\\alpha\\ Emitters at z=2.2: Demonstration of the Technique and Constraints on the H\\alpha\\ Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Janice C; Spitler, L; Labbe, I; Salim, S; Persson, S E; Ouchi, M; Dale, D; Monson, A; Murphy, D

    2012-01-01

    We present first results from a narrowband imaging program for intermediate redshift emission-line galaxies using the newly commissioned FourStar infrared camera at the 6.5m Magellan telescope. To enable prompt identification of H\\alpha\\ emitters, a pair of custom 1% filters, which sample low-airglow atmospheric windows at 1.19 \\mu m and 2.10 \\mu m, is used to detect both H\\alpha\\ and [OII]\\lambda 3727 emission from the same redshift volume at z=2.2. Initial observations are taken over a 130 arcmin^2 area in the CANDELS-COSMOS field. The exquisite image quality resulting from the combination of the instrument, telescope, and standard site conditions (~0.55" FWHM) allows the 1.19 \\mu m and 2.10 \\mu m data to probe 3\\sigma\\ emission-line depths down to 1.0e-17 erg/s/cm^2 and 1.2e-17 erg/s/cm^2 respectively, in less than 10 hours of integration time in each narrowband. For H\\alpha\\ at z=0.8 and z=2.2, these fluxes correspond to observed star formation rates of ~0.3 and ~4 Msun/yr respectively. We find 122 source...

  15. Doppler shifted H Ly α emission from Jupiter's aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IUE observations of the aurora on Jupiter have been performed with high spectral resolution in a search for Doppler shifted H Ly α emission produced through charge exchange by fast precipitating protons, as observed in the Earth's aurora. No emission has been observed corresponding to proton energies greater than 200 eV, placing a strict upper limit on the contribution of KeV - MeV protons to the production of Jupiter's aurora. However, a large fraction of the H Ly α emission has appeared Doppler-shifted mainly toward the blue by roughly 50 km/sec, corresponding to a kinetic energy of 10-20 eV for a fast proton or H atom, and there are higher velocity wings on the line extending out to equivalent energies of 150-200 eV. The blue shift indicates motion up out of the atmosphere, and the authors suggest that the emission results from the in situ acceleration of ionospheric protons in Jupiter's auroral ionosphere by analogy to the ionospheric potentials observed in the Earth's auroral zones. These observations demonstrate that the acceleration of ionospheric plasma in an H2 atmosphere can lead to bright Ly α emission, with implications for the production of the outer planet airglow emissions

  16. Night Sky Background Analysis for the Cherenkov Telescope Array using the Atmoscope instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Gaug, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The site selection group for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) has deployed sensitive light sensors at 9 candidate sites, 5 of them in the Southern and 4 in the Northern hemisphere. The sensors are equipped with a PIN diode and a calibrated V-filter, and a blue/UV filter matching the spectral response of the photomultipliers to be employed in the CTA cameras. All sensor installations, denominated "Atmoscopes", have been cross-calibrated before deployment, and their sensitivity is monitored every two to five months. We show that a thoroughly developed model of the integral contribution of starlight to the overall light measure serves as an additional cross-calibration for each device during each night, reducing the systematic uncertainty of this measurement to less than 15%. The starlight can then be subtracted from the measurements, and the residuals compared among the different sites. We show that in most cases a decomposition into the contributions from zodiacal light, airglow and anthropogenic lig...

  17. MATLAS, a complete optical sample to probe the stellar populations on the outskirts of galaxies: overview and instrumental challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferrarese, Laura; Karabal, Emin; Regnault, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The MATLAS project (Mass Assembly of early-Type GaLAxies with their fine Structures) has now turned into an extensive collection of early-type and late-type galaxies. It is made of more than 250 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey and 150 spirals, many of which from the NGVS. Unique by its size, the MATLAS volume limited sample is effective to characterize the external parts of massive nearby galaxies and constraints models used in numerical simulations of mergers, the mass assembly of galaxies leaving various imprints in their surroundings, such as shells, streams, tails, tidal dwarf galaxies. Detecting those extremely faint features is instrumental in understanding further the mechanisms driving the mass assembly. The MATLAS sample is made exclusively of ultra deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the CFHT, leading to colour profiles at large galactic radii, 5 - 10 effective radii. Following a general presentation of MATLAS and its main results, I will report on advances in deep low surface brightness photometry using the wide-field instrument MegaCam. Focusing on deep imaging of galaxies, addressing challenges, and discussing the optimization of an observing strategy coupled to a dedicated data reduction pipeline. With new territories in signal level being explored (~28.5 mag/arcsec2 in direct detection and 32 mag/arcsec2 on integrated profiles) I will then address a number of limiting issues such as optical reflection halos, stray light, airglow, and the ubiquitous cirrus emission.

  18. Status of UHE CR Orbital Fluorescence Detector Tus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, P.; Garipov, G.; Khrenov, B.; Kalmykov, N.; Morozenko, V.; Panasyuk, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shirokov, A.; Yashin, I.; Biktemerova, S.; Grinyuk, A.; Naumov, D.; Tkachev, L.; Tkachenko, A.; Saprykin, O.; Park, I.; Lee, J.; Na, G.; Martinez, O.; Salazar, H.

    2011-06-01

    The pioneer space fluorescence ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHE CR) detector TUS, is preparing in SINP MSU, Russia. The main goal of this project is study of cosmic rays beyond GZK cut-off (50 EeV). It consists of segmented Fresnel-type mirror concentrator (area 1.86 m2 , focal distance 1.5 m) and photo receiver (256 pixels - PMT R1463). Total FOV of detector is 9 × 9 degrees. Developed electronics allow events measurements in various time scales, and provide PMT gain control to operate with any atmosphere UV background. Night atmosphere radiation depends mainly on moon phase and atmosphere air-glow and was studied in "Tatiana-1" and "Tatiana-2" experiments. The electronics of TUS were tested in space conditions during these experiments. Recently, detector TUS was included into "Mikhailo Lomonosov" satellite scientific payload. This satellite should be launched at the end of 2011 in honour of Russian scientist and founder of Moscow State University M.V. Lomonosov. TUS will study various extreme phenomena which produce UV light in the atmosphere (UHECR, transient luminous events) and will be a "pathfinder" for further projects (JEM-EUSO, MEMS Space Telescope).

  19. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.N.; Rottman, G.J. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1990-05-01

    The solar EUV irradiance from 30 to 100 nm was obtained from a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. This measurement will be used to cross calibrate the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument on the San Marco D/L satellite. The solar EUV spectrograph had pre- and post-flight photometric calibrations with an average uncertainty of 6% at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The observed solar EUV irradiance is about 20% less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux (F{sub 10.7}) and its 81-day mean () and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970's. This measurement was obtained during the ascending phase of the solar cycle 22, while the AE-E data were obtained during the ascending phase of solar cycle 21. Measurements of the solar Lyman {alpha} irradiance at 121.6 nm were also obtained with an nitric oxide ionization cell. The derived Lyman {alpha} flux is 3.30 {plus minus} 0.5 ({times} 10{sup 11} photons s{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}2}) as compared to 3.35 {plus minus} 0.3 derived from the Solar Mesospheric Explorer solar data on November 10, 1988.

  20. Comparative solar EUV flux for the San Marco ASSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Chakrabarti, S.; Schmidtke, G.; Doll, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Airglow and Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco D/L satellite has measured solar extreme ultraviolet irradiances. The data are currently being released for analysis. As a preliminary step in evaluating this important dataset, modeled solar irradiances from 4 to 105 nm are presented for comparison to the San Marco data. The comparable flux for March-December 1988 is obtained from a revised and extended empirical solar EUV model derived from OSO 1, OSO 3, OSO 4, OSO 6, AEROS A, and AE-E satellite and six rocket flight datasets. Solar rotational features are prominent on several occasions in the model time series. A useful example is the modeled integrated flux between 30-31 nm which includes the Si XI (30.3-nm) and He II (30.4-nm) irradiance. The modeled flux in this 1-nm range shows both an absolute 22 percent increase from beginning to end of mission and a solar rotational variability with a typical peak-to-valley ratio of 14 percent.

  1. Ionization by Cosmic Rays in the Atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ measurements by Cassini-Huygens have shown the importance of ionizing particles (solar photons, magnetospheric electrons and protons, cosmics rays) on the atmosphere of Titan. Ionizing particles play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of Titan and must therefore be accurately modeled to understand the contribution of the differing sources of ionization. To model the initial galactic cosmic ray environment, the Badwar-O'Neill cosmic ray spectrum model was adapted for use at Titan. The Aeroplanets model, an electron transport model for the study of airglow and aurora, was then coupled to the Planetocosmics model, a Monte-carlo cosmic ray transport and energy deposition model, to compute ion production from cosmic rays. In addition, the NAIRAS model, a cosmic ray irradiation model adapted for fast computations, was adopted to the Titan environment and, for the first time, used to compute an ionization profile on a planet other than Earth and compared to the Planetocosmics results. For the first time, the importance of high charge cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere was demonstrated. High charge cosmic rays were found to be especially important below an altitude of 400 km, contributing significantly to the total ionization. Specifically, between 200 km and 400 km, alpha and higher charge cosmic rays are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The increase due to high charge cosmic rays was found for both the Planetocosmics and NAIRAS models.

  2. Earth FUV Dayglow Response to the 20 January 2005 Solar Flare: TIMED and IMAGE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Solomon, S. C.; Immel, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    An X-class solar flare occurred on 20 January 2005 when the TIMED and IMAGE spacecraft were both well positioned to observe the response of Earth's dayglow emission intensity. Brightness enhancements during the flare relative to just before were determined at tangent altitudes of peak emission viewed toward the limb with TIMED. The TIMED observations were made at low solar zenith angles and show flare enhancements of roughly 15%, 30%, 30%, and 60%, respectively, for OI 130.4 nm, OI 135.6 nm, N2 LBH Short, and N2 LBH Long modes of the TIMED/GUVI instrument. However, GUVI observations of HI Lyman-alpha emission brightness do not show a significant brightness change. This lack of change in HI Lyman-alpha dayglow brightness is consistent with no significant change (airglow sources most affected by the EUV and x-ray components of solar irradiance variability. We report our preliminary analysis of the response of FUV dayglow emissions to this event.

  3. Dynamics and constituent measurements with the Waves Michelson Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W. E.; Wang, D. Y.; Kowalski, M.; Gault, W. A.; Bell, A.

    The Waves Michelson Interferometer WaMI is an imaging Michelson interferometer designed to provide altitude profiles of wind temperature ozone atomic oxygen and density from the stratopause to the lower thermosphere This is accomplished through simultaneous measurements of the Doppler shifts line widths and irradiance of emission lines in airglow emissions O2 IR atmospheric band OH and O 1S These measurements are crucial to an understanding the behaviour of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and its role in the middle atmosphere Observations in this region are complicated by observational issues and subtleties in the dynamical forcings Amplitudes of gravity waves and tides are substantial and as a result temperatures and winds exhibit strong variability In addition vertical and horizontal displacements associated with these waves are significant so that the interpretation of constituent signatures becomes difficult By providing simultaneous profiles of a number of quantities of dynamical interest WaMI has the potential to resolve a number of these observational issues and to provide insights into the dynamics and constituent transport in this region These measurements would be most valuable if they were part of a multiple satellite mission tentatively termed the D-Train D for dynamics each satellite of which sampled a different local time In this talk the measurement and inversion approach being developed for WaMI is described The importance of these measurements for interpreting the behaviour of the atmosphere in the upper stratosphere and

  4. Solar Flare Effects on the Thermosphere and Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S.; Qian, L.; Rodgers, E.; Bailey, S.

    The Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Experiment SEE on the TIMED satellite and by the X-ray Photometer System XPS on the SORCE satellite provide the first comprehensive irradiance measurements of the complete solar spectrum during large solar flares However the soft X-ray portion of these observations are performed using silicon photodiodes coated with metallic filters to provide photometric measurements with multiple band passes which leads to complexities in obtaining spectral information A new analysis technique developed specifically for flare conditions is used to infer flare spectra in this region These are combined with spectrographic measurements in the extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet and applied to the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model TIE-GCM The electron content neutral density and airglow response to large flares during the declining phase of solar cycle 23 are calculated using this model and compared to several measurement sets obtaining good agreement This supports both the validity of the solar X-ray analysis and the modeling methodology showing that although flare-driven effects in the upper atmosphere are significant they are shorter and of much smaller magnitude than geomagnetic disturbances

  5. Modeling of 8446 A dayglow emission in the northern hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallepula Venkata, S.; Singh, V.

    2009-12-01

    The atomic oxygen OI 8446 A emission is a prominent airglow feature observed in the thermosphere. This emission has a long observational history in twilight and aurora. This emission is very useful in understanding the varying levels of atomic oxygen concentration at these altitudes. A comprehensive model is developed to study the 8446 A dayglow emission incoporating different production processes. The emission profiles are obtained with the help of recently developed Solar2000 EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) flux model also known as Solar Irradiance Platform. A span of five years (2001-2005) is chosen to study the effect of solar activity on this emission. The emission is modeled for April 3 which lies under equinox conditions. In the year 2001 the solar F10.7 index on the chosen date was as high as 223.1 which is the case of solar maximum. The F10.7 variation during the mentioned five year period is between 223 and 80, this window gives an opportunity to study this emission for different solar activity conditions. It is found that the intensity does not vary linearly with the F10.7 solar index. The OI 8446 A emission is found to be very sensitive to the solar activity. The results of modeling of yearly and diurnal variation of volume emission rate and intensity at different locations in the northern hemisphere are discussed.

  6. Application of thermospheric general circulation models for space weather operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Rowell, T.; Minter, C.; Codrescu, M.

    Solar irradiance is the dominant source of heat, ionization, and dissociation of the thermosphere, and to a large extent drives the global dynamics, and controls the neutral composition and density structure. Neutral composition is important for space weather applications because of its impact on ionospheric loss rates, and neutral density is critical for satellite drag prediction. The future for thermospheric general circulation models for space weather operations lies in their use as state propagators in data assimilation techniques. The physical models can match empirical models in accuracy provided accurate drivers are available, but their true value comes when combined with data in an optimal way. Two such applications have recently been developed. The first utilizes a Kalman filter to combine space-based observation of airglow with physical model predictions to produce global maps of neutral composition. The output of the filter will be used within the GAIM (Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement) model developed under a parallel effort. The second filter uses satellite tracking and remote sensing data for specification of neutral density. Both applications rely on accurate estimates of the solar EUV and magnetospheric drivers.

  7. HIRISE observations of daytime aurora over boston from ground in response to the magnetic disturbance of october 30, 2003 as corroborated by the TIMED measurements from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallamraju, D.; Chakrabarti, S.

    HIRISE (High Resolution Imaging Spectrograph using Echelle grating) is a high-resolution spectrograph built at Boston University, which is capable of making unambiguous ground-based daytime airglow/aurora measurements. HIRISE has been making daytime red line (OI 630.0nm) emission measurements from Boston (42.2° N, 71° W) on all clear sky days since April 2003. On October 30, 2003, in response to a severe geomagnetic disturbance, HIRISE measured intense daytime red line emissions of 15 KR (scattered background continuum around 2 MRÅ-1)^at 1500 LT (2000 UT; SZA around 75°), which are a factor of 6 -- 8 greater when compared to the typical quiet time dayglow emission rates at that time. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz stayed negative throughout that day but showed a monotonic increase from --20 nT at 0 UT to --15 nT by 24 UT. IMF By was mostly positive (around 5 nT) throughout the day, which is known to move the precipitation/interaction region towards postnoon time, raising interest on whether the magnetospheric cusps moved as far down to mid-latitudes on this day. GUVI (Global UltraViolet Imager) onboard TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite showed nearly an order of magnitude enhancements in irradiances of 1356 and LBH emissions during this time as compared to the quiet time values. Comparison against TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) brightness data will also be made. These different simultaneous measurements will be presented.

  8. Comparison of Data From Far Ultraviolet Limb Scanning and Imaging Instrumentation Aboard the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, P. W.; Carruthers, G. R.; Dymond, K. F.; Finch, M. A.; McDonald, S. E.; Nicholas, A. C.; Thonnard, S. E.; Budzien, S. A.; McCoy, R. P.

    2001-05-01

    The ARGOS satellite includes two Naval Research Laboratory experiments that monitor naturally occurring far ultraviolet emissions in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Coincident observations between these two instruments, the Global Imaging Monitor of the Ionosphere (GIMI) and the Low Resolution Airglow and Auroral Spectrograph (LORAAS), have been obtained. The GIMI instrument produces 9 ° x 9 ° limb images with passband coverage between 131 and 200 nm. The LORAAS instrument provides the spectral distribution from 80 to 170 nm for 2.4 ° x 17 ° field of regard. The two instruments are coaligned aboard the spacecraft, aft-looking in the orbital plane. Preliminary comparisons of observations obtained from the imaging and scanning instruments under quiet geomagnetic conditions are reported, including irradiances and spectral distributions. By combining the GIMI data with that from LORAAS, the study of the dynamics of the ionosphere can be expanded to investigate both horizontal and vertical distrubutions and their variances. The improved capability can extend to the study of active periods with highly variable and disturbed ionospheres, and examples are discussed from data acquired during periods of high geomagnetic activity. These results provide the first direct comparison between near simultaneous limb scans and images from ARGOS, and show promise as a validation technique to improve capabilities for the study of ionospheric variability.

  9. Where goes the Thermospheric Ionospheric GEospheric Research (TIGER) initiative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Radicella, Sandro M.; Jacobi, Christoph; Thuillier, Gerard; Nikutowski, Bernd; Erhardt, Christian; Eparvier, Francis G.

    The 10th TIGER/COSPAR symposium raises the questions: What have been the issues, tasks and aims of TIGER at the end of the 20th century? Where we will have to go now? - Over the span of the TIGER initiative great strides have been made in observing and understanding the EUV solar spectral irradiance. Carefully calibrated observations from TIMED-SEE, SDO-EVE, SOLACES and SOLSPEC, PROBA-2 LYRA, and others have provided new insights into this important and highly variable energy input to the geospace environment. Agreement in terms of variability and absolute scales between recent solar irradiance data sets will be shown as well as improvements in solar and atmosphere irradiance modeling. Precise and continuous EUV measurements can be used to monitor solar variability and its effect on the upper atmosphere/ionosphere (T/I) system at time scales from days to decades by using them as input for ionospheric models or ionospheric proxies or indices. Even more, there is growing interest in scientific support for further improving the GNSS data evaluation which for new on-line EUV/UV measuring methods with airglow monitoring will be discussed. These methods would also improve the quantitative monitoring of space weather effects in the geospheric T/I system.

  10. Spherical EUV and Plasma Spectrometer (seps) -a Monitor to Measure the Plasma and EUV Environment in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Raimund; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Konz, Werner; Pfeffer, Wilfried

    A low-cost monitor to measure the EUV and plasma environment in space is presented. The device consists of three (or more) isolated spheres, a metallic sphere, one or more highly trans-parent Inner Grids and Outer Grids. Each one is being connected to a sensitive floating elec-trometer. By setting different potentials to the grids as well as to the sphere and varying one or more of their voltages, measurements of spectral solar EUV irradiance (15-200 nm), of local plasma parameters such as electron and ion densities, electron energies and temperatures as well as ion compositions and debris events can be derived from the current recordings. This detector does not require any (solar) pointing device. The primary goal is to study the impact of solar activity events (e.g. CMEs) as well as subsequent reactions of the ionospheric/thermospheric systems (including space weather occurences). The capability of SEPS for measuring EUV pho-ton fluxes as well as plasma parameters in the energy range from 0 to +/-70 eV is demonstrated by laboratory measurements as performed in the IPM laboratory, at BESSY-PTB electron syn-chrotron in Berlin and at ESA/ESTEC plasma chamber. Based on the laboratory recording of plasma recombination EUV emission the sensor is suitable to detect also auroral and airglow radiations. -The state of the art in the development of this device is reported.

  11. Investigating gravity waves evidences in the Venus upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Alessandra; Altieri, Francesca; Shakun, Alexey; Zasova, Ludmila; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Grassi, Davide

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to investigate gravity waves properties in the upper mesosphere of Venus, through the O2 nightglow observations acquired with the imaging spectrometer VIRTIS on board Venus Express. Gravity waves are important dynamical features that transport energy and momentum. They are related to the buoyancy force, which lifts air particles. Then, the vertical displacement of air particles produces density changes that cause gravity to act as restoring force. Gravity waves can manifest through fluctuations on temperature and density fields, and hence on airglow intensities. We use the O2 nightglow profiles showing double peaked structures to study the influence of gravity waves in shaping the O2 vertical profiles and infer the waves properties. In analogy to the Earth's and Mars cases, we use a well-known theory to model the O2 nightglow emissions affected by gravity waves propagation. Here we propose a statistical discussion of the gravity waves characteristics, namely vertical wavelength and wave amplitude, with respect to local time and latitude. The method is applied to about 30 profiles showing double peaked structures, and acquired with the VIRTIS/Venus Express spectrometer, during the mission period from 2006-07-05 to 2008-08-15.

  12. The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem: Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument was designed for long-range, high resolution imaging of Saturn and its system of rings and moons. It consists of two cameras, a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC, 2000 mm focal length) and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC, 200 mm focal length). The NAC has sensitivity from 200 nm to 1100 nm. The WAC is sensitive from 350 nm to 1100 nm. Among the mission highlights thus far for ISS have been discoveries of particulate plumes from Enceladus, details of surface topography along the 'tiger stripes', the discovery of an equatorial ridge on Iapetus, detailed images of small inner moons and distant moons Phoebe and Hyperion, features in Saturn's rings including perturbed edges near embedded moons, 'propellers', ephemeral clumps, and evidence for impacts in the rings and free-oscillation modes in Saturn's interior. The camera documented the aftermath of a methane/ethane 'rain' storm on Titan as well as seasonal behavior in the detached haze and visible airglow generated by magnetospheric plasma. The cameras documented the formation and evolution of a giant storm on Saturn, lightning from storms on Saturn, and determined that eddies are powering Saturn's zonal jets. In the F-ring and Proximal orbits ISS will obtain even better resolution on the rings, planet and inner moons.

  13. Magnetospheric effects of ion and atom injections by the satellite power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Y.T.; Luhmann, J.G.; Schulz, M.; Cornwall, J.M.

    1980-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year assessment of magnetospheric effects of the construction and operation of a satellite power system. This assessment effort is based on application of present scientific knowledge rather than on original scientific research. As such, it appears that mass and energy injections of the system are sufficient to modify the magnetosphere substantially, to the extent of possibly requiring mitigation measures for space systems but not to the extent of causing major redirection of efforts and concepts. The scale of the SPS is so unprecedentedly large, however, that these impressions require verification (or rejection) by in-depth assessment based on original scientific treatment of the principal issues. Indeed, it is perhaps appropriate to state that present ignorance far exceeds present knowledge in regard to SPS magnetospheric effects, even though we only seek to define the approximate limits of magnetospheric modifications here. Modifications of the space radiation environment, of the atmospheric airglow background, of the auroral response to solar activity and of the fluctuations in space plasma density are identified to be the principal impacts.

  14. Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometers calibration and the heliosphere neutrals composition: reassessment

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    The Voyagers (V) 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometers (UVS) data harvest covers outer planets encounters, heliosphere sky-background measurements, and stellar spectrophotometry. Because their operation period overlaps with many ultraviolet missions, the V1 and V2 UVS calibration with other spectrometers are invaluable. Here we revisit the UVS calibration to assess the intriguing 243 % (V1) and 156 % (V2) sensitivity enhancements recently proposed. Using the Saturn Lyman-$\\alpha$ airglow, observed in-situ by both Voyagers, and remotely by IUE, we match the Voyager values to IUE, taking into account the shape of the Saturn Lyman-$\\alpha$ line observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. For all known ranges of the interplanetary hydrogen density, we show that the V1 and V2 UVS sensitivities cannot be enhanced by the amounts thus far proposed. The same diagnostic holds for distinct channels covering the diffuse HeI 58.4 nm emission. Our prescription is to keep the origi...

  15. Global Observations of the 630-nm Nightglow and Patterns of Brightness Measured by ISUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yu Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the distributions and occurrence mechanisms of the global local-midnight airglow brightness through FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL satellite imaging observations. We focus on the OI 630.0 nm nightglow emission at altitudes of ~250 km along equatorial space. The database used in this study included data from 2007 to 2008 under solar minimum conditions. The data were classified into four specified types in the statistical study. We found that the occurrence of equatorial brightness was often in the vicinity of the geographic equator and mostly at equinoxes with a tendency to move toward the summer hemisphere as the season changes. Conjugate brightness occurring simultaneously on both sides of the geomagnetic equator was observed predominantly in the northern winter. Furthermore, midnight brightness appeared to have lower luminosity from May to July. We suggest that the global midnight brightness associated with the locations and seasons was the result of several effects which include the influence of the thermospheric midnight temperature maximum (MTM, summer-to-winter neutral wind, and ionospheric anomalies.

  16. MAVEN Primary Mission Results from the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph: Aurora, Meteor Showers, Dayglow and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. Its payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. I will present an overview of selected IUVS results, including: • The impact of Comet Siding Spring's tail on Mars' atmosphere; • The discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora near crustal fields; • Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric dayglow emissions; • Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and • Mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, to measure the escape rates of H and O and their variability.

  17. On recent measurements from the Andes Lidar Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Snively, Jonathan; Heale, Christopher; Cao, Bing

    2016-07-01

    The Andes Lidar Observatory is an upper atmosphere observatory located in Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.3S, 70.7W). It houses a Na Wind/Temperature Lidar, an all sky airglow imager, a mesospheric temperature mapper, an infrared imager and a meteor radar. This suite of instrumentation provides comprehensive measurements of the mesopause region and enables detailed study of wave dynamics. With the recent upgrade of the Na lidar, many complex dynamic processes were observed and resolved in detail. I will present several intriguing phenomena seen in the lidar measurement from recent campaigns, and a detailed analysis of a complex wave propagation event, which involved a large vertical wind oscillation exceeding 10 m/s. A nonlinear gravity wave model was able to reproduce most of the observed features. The results suggest that the wave experienced partial reflections at two altitudes and a critical layer in between, resulting in large vertical wind amplitude and multi-layer distribution of wave energy.

  18. Ionospheric effects of rocket exhaust products (HEAO-C, Skylab and SPS-HLLV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the current state of our understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The currently planned HLLV flight profile calls for main second-stage propulsion confined to altitudes below 124 km, and a brief orbit-circularization maneuver at apogee. The second-stage engines deposit 9 x 1031 H2O and H2 molecules between 56 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit-circularization burn deposits 9 x 1029 exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region 0+ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. Also described are experimental airglow and incoherent-scatter radar measurements performed in conjunction with the 1979 launch of satellite HEAO-C, together with prelaunch and post-launch computations of the ionospheric effects. Several improvements in the model have been driven by the experimental observations. The computer model is described in some detail

  19. Sounding Rockets within Swedish National Balloon and Rocket Programme- Providing Access to Space from Esrange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjolander, K.; Karlsson, T.; Lockowandt, C.

    2015-09-01

    Initiated in 2012 by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), a new programme dedicated for Swedish scientists to gain access to space using balloons and sounding rockets was started. This programme promotes the possibility to ensure continuity in both the science and the technology used. The sounding rocket part of this national programme started with three possible missions. SPIDER (Small Payloads for Investigation of Disturbances in Electrojet by Rockets) from the Space and Plasma physics department of KTH, 0-STATES (Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky) from the Department of Meteorology Stockholm University (MISU) and LEEWAVES (Local Excitation and Effects of Waves on Atmospheric VErtical Structure) that is collaboration between KTH and MISU. These three missions were planned for launches in 2015 and 2016. SSc has been contracted on a launch ticket basis to provide the launch and service to the scientific instrumentation. This paper presents the SPIDER, 0-STATES and LEEWAVES missions focussing on a mission related technical solutions perspective.

  20. C/NOFS observations of electromagnetic coupling between magnetically conjugate MSTID structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. J.; Martinis, C. R.; Lai, P. C.; Gentile, L. C.; Sullivan, C.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates empirically that couplings between magnetically conjugate medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are electromagnetic in nature. This is accomplished by comparing plasma density, electric, and magnetic perturbations sampled simultaneously by sensors on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. During the period of interest on 17 February 2010, C/NOFS made three consecutive orbits while magnetically conjugate to the field of view of an all-sky imager located at El Leoncito, Argentina (31.8°S, 69.3°W). Imaged 630.0 nm airglow was characterized by alternating bands of relatively bright and dark emissions that were aligned from northeast to southwest and propagated toward the northwest, characteristic of MSTIDs in the southern hemisphere. Measurable Poynting fluxes flow along the Earth's magnetic field (S||) from "generator" to "load" hemispheres. While S|| was predominantly away from the ionosphere above El Leoncito, interhemispheric energy flows were not one-way streets. Measured Poynting flux intensities diminished with time over the three C/NOFS passes, suggesting that source mechanisms of MSTIDs were absent or that initial impedance mismatches between the two hemispheres approached an equilibrium status.

  1. Investigation of a mesospheric bore event over northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A mesospheric bore event was observed using an OH all-sky airglow imager (ASAI at Xinglong (40.2° N, 117.4° E, in northern China, on the night of 8–9 January 2011. Simultaneous observations by a Doppler meteor radar, a broadband sodium lidar, and TIMED/SABER OH intensity and temperature measurements are used to investigate the characteristics and environment of the bore propagation and the possible relations with the Na density perturbations. The bore propagated from northeast to southwest and divided the sky into bright and dark halves. The calculations show that the bore has an average phase velocity of 68 m s−1. The crests following the bore have a horizontal wavelength of ~ 22 km. These parameters are consistent with the hydraulic jump theory proposed by Dewan and Picard, as well as the previous bore reports. Simultaneous wind measurements from the Doppler meteor radar at Shisanling (40.3° N, 116.2° E and temperature data from SABER on board the TIMED satellite are used to characterize the propagating environment of the bore. The result shows that a thermal-Doppler duct exists near the OH layer that supports the horizontal propagation of the bore. Simultaneous Na lidar observations at Yanqing (40.4° N, 116.0° E suggest that there is a downward displacement of Na density during the passage of the mesospheric bore event.

  2. Ionospheric modification by high-power radio waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powerful, high-frequency radio waves have been used to temporarily modify the ionosphere. Thermal and parametric interactions have led to a diverse range of observed phenomena, including generation of density striations and artificial spread-F, enhancements of electron plasma waves, production of extrathermal electron fluxes and enhanced airglow, modification of the D-region temperature and densities, wideband signal attenuation, and self-focusing and scattering of the electromagnetic waves. The physics of ionospheric modification by high-power radio waves is reviewed in the context of our current theoretical understanding; disturbance generation mechanisms are qualitatively described. In addition, results of recent experiments are summarized in which ionospheric irregularities are generated and their evolution and decay processes investigated in detail. The effects and potential controlled applications of these HF ionospheric modifications for various RF systems studies are discussed. The C3I scientific community provides an important motivation for these ionospheric modification studies; their increased interaction and active participation in experimental design and interpretation are encouraged

  3. Detection of small scale fluctuations in the near-IR cosmic infrared background from long exposure 2MASS fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kashlinsky, A; Mather, J; Skrutskie, M F; Cutri, R M

    2002-01-01

    We report first results for the cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations at 1.25, 1.65 and 2.17 micron obtained from long exposures constructed from 2MASS standard star fields. We have co-added and analyzed scans from one such field with a total exposure time > 1 hour, and removed sources and other artifacts. The stars and galaxies were clipped out to K_s~19^m leaving only high-z galaxies (or possibly local low-surface-brightness systems). The residual component of the diffuse emission on scales from a few arc-sec to a few arc-min has a power-law slope consistent with emission produced by clustered galaxies. The noise (and residual artifacts) contribution to the signal is small and the colors of the signal are very different from Galactic stars or air-glow. We therefore identify the signal as CIB fluctuations from the faint unresolved galaxies. We show that the present-day galaxies with no evolution would produce a significant deficit in the observed CIB fluctuations. Thus the dominant contribution to th...

  4. Global exospheric temperatures and densities under active solar conditions. [measured by OGO-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydra, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Temperatures measured by the OGO-6 satellite using the 6300 A airglow spectrum are compared with temperatures derived from total densities and N2 densities. It is shown that while the variation of the total densities with latitude and magnetic activity agree well with values used for CIRA (1972), the temperature behavior is very different. While the temperatures derived from the N2 density were in much better agreement there were several important differences which radically affect the pressure gradients. The variation of temperature with magnetic activity indicated a seasonal and local time effect and also a latitude and delay time variation different from previous density derived temperatures. A new magnetic index is proposed that is better correlated with the observed temperatures. The temperature variations at high latitudes were examined for three levels of magnetic activity for both solstices and equinox conditions. A temperature maximum in the pre-midnight sector and a minimum in the noon sector were noted and seasonal and geomagnetic time and latitude effects discussed. Neutral temperature, density, pressure and boundary oxygen variations for the great storm of March 8, 1970 are presented.

  5. A study of the terrestrial thermosphere by remote sensing of OI dayglow in the far and extreme ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upper region of the Earth's atmosphere, the thermosphere, is a key part of the coupled solar-terrestrial system. An important method of obtaining information in the this region is through analysis of radiation excited through the interactions of the thermosphere with solar ionizing, extreme and far ultraviolet radiation. This dissertation presents one such study by the remote sensing of OI in the far and extreme ultraviolet dayglow. The research program included the development construction, and flight of a sounding rocket spectrometer to test this current understanding of the excitation and transport mechanisms of the OI 1356, 1304, 1027, and 989 angstrom emissions. This data set was analyzed using current electron and radiative transport models with the purpose of checking the viability of OI remote sensing; that is, whether existing models and input parameters are adequate to predict these detailed measurements. From discrepancies between modeled and measured emissions, inferences about these input parameters were made. Among other things, the data supports a 40% optically thick cascade contribution to the 1304 angstrom emission. From upper lying states corresponding to 1040, 1027 and 989 angstrom about half of this cascade has been accounted for in this study. There is also evidence that the Lyman β airglow from the geo-corona contributes a significant proportion (30-50%) to the OI 1027 angstrom feature. Furthermore, the photoelectron contribution to the 1027 angstrom feature appears to be underestimated in the current models by a factor of 20

  6. Development and field tests of a narrowband all-reflective spatial heterodyne spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, J B; Harris, W M; Mierkiewicz, E J; Roesler, F L

    2015-10-20

    We describe the design, development, and performance of a narrowband, all-reflective, unaliased spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) that has been tested in observations at the focus of the 1.6 m main telescope of the McMath-Pierce solar telescope on Kitt Peak. The all-reflective SHS described herein is a highly robust common-path Fourier transform spectrometer without moving parts that, over a limited spectral region, combines the large field of view and high resolving power characteristic of interference spectrometers but at substantially reduced instrument size and optical tolerances. The self-scanned region of wavelength space and resolving power of the SHS are determined by the beam size, the diffraction grating groove density, the number of detector elements, and the fixed orientation of a set of pilot mirrors. The results presented here represent the first successful implementation of this reflective SHS design for field use. We discuss concepts behind the unaliased reflective SHS design and report the performance of the instrument when used to observe terrestrial airglow and absorption features, the solar spectrum, and the Jovian spectrum near λ=6300  Å, at the achieved resolving power (R=λ/δλ) of R>100,000. The results confirm that reflective SHS instruments can deliver effective interferometric performance in the visible to the far-ultraviolet wavelengths with commercial optics of moderate surface quality. PMID:26560368

  7. Comparison of measured and modeled solar EUV flux and its effect on the E-F1 region ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of the E-F1 region ionosphere to different solar EUV flux models is investigated theoretically using two different photochemical schemes, and the results are compared with incoherent scatter radar electron density measurements taken at Millstone Hill. The latest EUV flux model (Tobiska, 1991), which incorporates more recent measurements, has generally more flux at short wavelengths compared to the Hinteregger et al. (1981) flux model based on AE-E satellite data. This results in better agreement with the measurements in the E-F1 region and above. The Tobiska flux model, however, gives a smaller E' region peak density, due to the influence of low Lyman β flux in the November 10, 1988, rocket measurements of Woods and Rottman (1990). The photochemical scheme of Buonsanto (1990) has been improved and now gives results similar to the more comprehensive scheme of (Solomon et al., 1988; Solomon and Abreu, 1989; S.C. Solomon and R.G. Roble, Simulation of the global thermospheric airglow, 1, Methodology, submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research, 1992), provided that the ratios of photoelectron impact ionization to photoionization (pe/pi) given by this latter model are included. The pe/pi ratios calculated by this model and by the models of Lilensten et al. (1989) and Richards and Torr (1988) differ significantly, and work is needed to resolve these differences

  8. Calculated ionospheric variations due to changes in the solar EUV flux measured by the AEROS spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar EUV radiation from the whole solar disk for wavelengths between 15.5 and 103.76 nm was measured by the AEROS-EUV spectrometer during the period December 1972 through August 1973. These measurements show a long-term decrease in solar EUV output with decreasing solar activity, a 27-day variation, and day-to-day and other short-term fluctuations. These solar EUV flux data are used with a model of the ionospheric E- and F- regions to calculate the variation of ionospheric properties that are associated with the changes in the measured solar EUV flux. The model calculates the variations in electron and ion density, electron and ion temperature, photoelectron spectra, various airglow emission rates, and the minor neutral constituents N(2D), N(4S) and NO. The results show that in general the magnitude of all ionospheric and atmospheric properties increases with increasing solar EUV flux. However, percentage changes of the calculated properties are different from each other and also from the percentage change of the measured total solar EUV energy flux. This occurs because a nonuniform variation of the solar flux with wavelength is observed over the EUV spectrum by the AEROS-EUV spectrometer and altitude-dependent aeronomic processes are sensitive to the detailed flux values within the solar EUV spectrum. (author)

  9. Super plasma fountain and ionospheric storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The relative importance of diffusion, electric field and neutral wind on equatorial plasma fountain and ionospheric storms during strong daytime eastward electric field events are evaluated using SUPIM and the electric fields obtained from the equatorial electrojet during the super geomagnetic storm of 08 November 2004. The plasma fountain rapidly develops into a super fountain during the strong daytime eastward prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) event. The super fountain becomes strong with less poleward turning of the plasma flux vectors in the presence of an equatorward wind that reduces (or stops) the downward velocity component due to diffusion and raises the ionosphere to high altitudes of reduced chemical loss. The equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crests in Nmax and TEC shift rapidly to higher than normal latitudes during the PPEF event. However, the crests be- come stronger than normal only in the presence of an equatorward neutral wind. The results suggest that the presence of an equatorward neutral wind is required to produce strong positive ionospheric storms during daytime eastward PPEF events. The model results are supported by the positive ionospheric storms observed in Ne, Nmax, TEC and airglow. The plasma fountain becomes a reverse plasma fountain during a strong westward electric field event.

  10. Linking Atmospheric Gravity Wave Research to the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, J.; Nielsen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves are often generated in the lower atmosphere and can, under favorable atmospheric conditions, propagate into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. As a consequence of this vertical propagation, the waves carry momentum fluxes and energy from the lower atmosphere into the near-space environment, providing a strong coupling across atmospheric layers. While these waves have been observed and studied in details for decades, there are still many questions to be addressed regarding the tropospheric source location and nature of individually observed waves in the mesosphere. In an effort to increase undergraduate student research experiences, we are linking atmospheric gravity wave research and undergraduate curriculum to improve both academic and scholarly experiences by our students. In this particular case, we present a research project addressing the identification of tropospheric source locations of mesospheric waves observed by airglow imagers. The project involves observations, theory, and modeling techniques with a strong emphasis on how each part plays a role in the curriculum. Specifically, a simple ray tracing model is propagating observed waves downwards through the atmosphere until the point of origin is reached. In the process, we apply basic calculus, numerical methods, and simple fluid dynamics related to course taught at the undergraduate level.

  11. Status of development of lightning detector for PLANET-C mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Sato, M.; Teraguchi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetometer onboard Venus Express detected whistler mode waves whose source can be considered to be lightning discharge occurring well below the spacecraft orbit. However, there still remain some uncertainties to conclude finally such waves are originated by lightning discharge in the atmosphere. In order to identify the discharge phenomena in the atmosphere of Venus without any doubt, we plan to observe the lightning activity with high-speed optical detector onboard Planet-C, the Japanese Venus Climate Orbiter mission which will be launched in 2010 by JAXA. We are developing a new type of lightning detector, LAC (Lightning and Airglow Camera). Main difference from other equipments which have provided evidences of lightning existence in Venus is the high-speed sampling rate at 50kHz for each pixel, enabling us to distinguish the optical lightning flash from other pulsing noises. On the other hand, spatial resolution is not first priority as the first detector of Venus lightning. New type of APD (avalanche photo diode) array with a format of 8 x 8 is used and a narrow band interference filter at wavelength of 777.4 nm (OI) is selected for lightning measurement. The development is now at the stage for designing and manufacturing the flight model, based on the performance and environmental tolerance of the proto model. Especially, the algorithm for self- triggering is carefully improved in order to exclude false-trigger by other pulse-like noise.

  12. Sprites and lightning in Venus: constraints for observations by the Planet-C mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yair, Y.; Goto, Y.; Sentman, D.; Yoshida, J.; Sato, M.; Hoshino, N.

    2007-12-01

    Lightning activity in Venus has been mystery for long period, although many studies based on observations both by spacecrafts and by ground-based telescope have been carried out. This situation may be attributed to the ambiguity of these evidential measurements. In order to conclude this controversial subject, we are developing a new type of lightning detector, LAC (Lightning and Airglow Camera), which will be onboard Planet-C (Venus Climate Orbiter: VCO). PLanet-C will be launched in 2010 by JAXA. To distinguish optical lightning flash from other pulsing noises, high-speed sampling at 50kHz for each pixel, that enables us to investigate the time variation of each lightning flash phenomenon, is adopted. On the other hand, spatial resolution is not first priority. For this purpose we developed new type of APD (avalanche photo diode) array with a format of 8 x 8. Narrow band interference filter at wavelength of 777.4 nm (OI), which is expected lightning color based on laboratory discharge experiment, is chosen for lightning measurement. LAC detects lightning flash with an optical intensity of average of Earth's lightning or less at a distance of 3 Rv. We also present results of theoretical calculations of the expected occurrance heights and emissions of sprites above thunderstorms in the CO2 atmosphere of Venus and the Hydrogen-Helium atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. General detection methodology of sprites/lightning in planetary atmospheres by orbiting spacecraft will be discussed.

  13. Lightning Detection by LAC Onboard the Japanese Venus Climate Orbiter, Planet-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yoshida, J.; Yair, Y.; Imamura, T.; Nakamura, M.

    2008-06-01

    Lightning activity in Venus has been a mystery for a long period, although many studies based on observations both by spacecraft and by ground-based telescope have been carried out. This situation may be attributed to the ambiguity of these evidential measurements. In order to conclude this controversial subject, we are developing a new type of lightning detector, LAC (Lightning and Airglow Camera), which will be onboard Planet-C (Venus Climate Orbiter: VCO). Planet-C will be launched in 2010 by JAXA. To distinguish an optical lightning flash from other pulsing noises, high-speed sampling at 50 kHz for each pixel, that enables us to investigate the time variation of each lightning flash phenomenon, is adopted. On the other hand, spatial resolution is not the first priority. For this purpose we developed a new type of APD (avalanche photo diode) array with a format of 8×8. A narrow band interference filter at wavelength of 777.4 nm (OI), which is the expected lightning color based on laboratory discharge experiment, is chosen for lightning measurement. LAC detects lightning flash with an optical intensity of average of Earth’s lightning or less at a distance of 3 Rv. In this paper, firstly we describe the background of the Venus lightning study to locate our spacecraft project, and then introduce the mission details.

  14. Response of Thermospheric Hydrogen to Solar Variability and Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Qian, L.; Solomon, S. C.; Burns, A. G.; Wang, W.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Woodward, R. C., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Geocoronal hydrogen forms the upper boundary of the Earth's HOx chemisty and is a byproduct of methane and water vapor below. We will discuss observational and modeling studies of the upper atmospheric hydrogen response to the solar cycle and increases in greenhouse gases. The Wisconsin Northern hemisphere hydrogen airglow data set spans over two solar cycles. These data show a statistically significant solar cycle variation and a possible increase in intensity between successive solar maximum periods. We will discuss these data in the context of recent modeling studies with a single-column version of the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. We investigate mechanisms associated with the solar cycle and greenhouse gas forcing of hydrogen by separately doubling carbon dioxide and methane, as well as doubling both together. These simulations indicate that carbon dioxide cooling, as well as methane changes to the source species for hydrogen, both lead to predicted increases in the upper thermospheric hydrogen density and that the response of hydrogen to greenhouse gases depends on the phase of the solar cycle. However, the effect of greenhouse gas doubling is not as large as the modeled solar cycle variability of thermospheric hydrogen. I will discuss results from these simulations and comparisons to observations.

  15. Vertical Distribution of Vibrationally Excited Hydroxyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Becker, Erich; Sonnemann, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the vertical distribution of the vibrationally excited states of hydroxyl (OH*) is important for the interpretation of airglow measurements with respect to dynamical processes in the mesopause region. We derive an approximate analytical expression for the distribution of OH* that highlights the dependence on atomic oxygen and temperature. In addition, we use an advanced numerical model for the formation and relaxation of OH* and investigate the distributions of the different vibrationally exited states of OH*. For the production of OH*, the model includes the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone, as well as the reaction of atomic oxygen with hydroperoxy radicals. As loss processes we include 1) deactivation by atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, and molecular nitrogen, 2) spontaneous emission, and 3) loss due to chemical reaction with atomic oxygen. All these processes take the dependence on the vibrational number into account. The quenching by molecular and atomic oxygen is parameterized by a multi-quantum relaxation scheme. This diagnostic model for OH* has been implemented as part of a chemistry-transport model that is driven by the dynamics simulated with the KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model). Numerical results confirm that emission from excited states with higher vibrational number is weaker and emanates from higher altitudes. In addition we find that the OH*-peak altitudes depend significantly on season and latitude. This behavior is mainly controlled by the corresponding variations of atomic oxygen and temperature, as is also confirmed by the aforementioned approximate theory.

  16. Concurrent observations at the magnetic equator of small-scale irregularities and large-scale depletions associated with equatorial spread F

    CERN Document Server

    Hickey, D A; Rodrigues, F S; Varney, R H; Milla, M A; Nicolls, M J; Strømme, Anja; Arratia, J F

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 an all-sky imager (ASI) and an Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar consisting of 14 panels (AMISR-14) system were installed at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. The ASI measures airglow depletions associated with large-scale equatorial spread F irregularities (10s-100s km), while AMISR-14 detects small-scale irregularities (0.34 m). This study presents simultaneous observations of equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularities at 10-100 km scales using the all sky-imager, at 3 m scales using the JULIA (Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere) radar, and at 0.34 m scales using the AMISR-14 radar. We compare data from the three instruments on the night of 20-21 August, 2014 by locating the radar scattering volume in the optical images. During this night no topside plumes were observed, and we only compare with bottomside ESF. AMISR-14 had five beams perpendicular to the magnetic field covering ~200 km in the east-west direction at 250 km altitude. Comparing the rada...

  17. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Spencer P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 5 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  18. Short- and Long-Timescale Thermospheric Variability as Observed from OI 630.0 nm Dayglow Emissions from Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallamraju, Duggirala; Das, Uma; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2011-01-01

    We carried out high-cadence (5 min) and high-spatial resolution (2deg magnetic latitude) observations of daytime OI 630.0 nm airglow emission brightness from a low-latitude station to understand the behavior of neutral dynamics in the daytime. The results indicate that the wave periodicities of 12.20 min, and 2 h exist over a wide spatial range of around 8deg-12deg magnetic latitudes. The 20.80 min periodicities in the dayglow seem to appear more often in the measurements closer to the magnetic equator and not at latitudes farther away. Further, periodicities in that range are found to be frequent in the variations of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength as well. We show that wave periodicities due to the neutral dynamics, at least until around 8deg magnetic latitude, are influenced by those that affect the EEJ strength variation as well. Furthermore, the average daily OI 630.0 nm emission brightness over 3 months varied in consonance with that of the sunspot numbers indicating a strong solar influence on the magnitudes of dayglow emissions.

  19. Optical effects of the operation of the onboard engine of the Progress M-17M spacecraft at thermospheric heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhalev, A. V.; Khakhinov, V. V.; Beletskii, A. B.; Lebedev, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of optical observations in the active space experiment "Radar-Progress" on April 17, 2013, after switching on the approach-correction engine of the Progress M-17M cargo spacecraft at thermospheric heights (412 km), are presented in this paper. During engine operation, a region of enhanced emission intensity has been recorded. It was presumably related to the scatter of twilight solar emission at the engine exhausts in the cargo spacecraft orbit and, probably to the occurrence of an additional emission in the atomic oxygen line [OI] 630 nm. The maximum observed dimensions of the emission region were ~350 and ~250 km along the orbit and across it, respectively. The velocity of the expansion of the emission region at the first moments after the initiation of engine operation was ~7 and ~3.5 km/s along the orbit and across it, respectively. The maximum intensity of the disturbed region is estimated to be a value equivalent to ~40-60 R within the spectral band of 2 nm. No optical manifestation, which would exceed the natural variations in brightness of the night airglow and which would be related to possible large-scale modification of the ionosphere, was detected in the natural emission lines [O] 557.7 and 630.0 nm in a zone remote from the place of injection of engine exhausts.

  20. An Overview of High-Altitude Balloon Experiments at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Safonova, Margarita; Sreejith, A G; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, S; Nirmal, K; Talnikar, Sameer; Hadigal, Shripathy; Prakash, Ajin; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    The High-Altitude Ballooning programme began at Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, in the year 2011 with the primary purpose of developing and flying low-cost scientific payloads on a balloon-borne platform. Some of the science goals are studies of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, of airglow and zodiacal light, and observations of extended astronomical objects such as, for example, comets, from near space (20 to 30 km). A brief summary and results of the tethered flights carried out at CREST campus are given in Ref.~1. Here we present a complete overview of the 9 free-flying balloon experiments conducted from March 2013 to November 2014. We describe the launch procedures, payloads, methods of tracking and recovery of the payloads. Since we fall in the light/medium balloon category, the weight of the payload is limited to less than 5 kg --- we use a 3-D printer to fabricate lightweight boxes and structures for our experiments. We are also developing in-house lightweight sensors and co...

  1. An empirical determination of the production efficiency for auroral 6300 AA emmission by energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral data from the Soft Particle Spectrometer and the Red Line Photometer on the ISIS-2 spacecraft have been selected to form an electron energy flux and optical auroral emission data base. The energy fluxes are stored as integrated fluxes over four energy bands, and the corresponding stored optical emission rates are corrected for airglow and for albedo. Because of the variety of electron energy spectra represented in the data base it was possible to perform a regression analysis that yielded the production efficiency for the production of emission for each of the four bands. While the results of this analysis are interesting to compare with theoretical predictions of 6300 AA excitation processes, these statistical results are not as precise as the comparisons of individual experiments where all parameters, such as the atmospheric composition and temperature profiles are measured. The significance of this approach is that it permits a multiparameter description of an electron energy spectrum, and its relationship to a specific optical emission, by purely empirical means. This is particularly useful in the interpretation of ISIS-2 data from the instruments which provided the results, but should find further application in optical-particle auroral studies. (author)

  2. New Horizons Constraints on Charon's Present Day Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, S A; Gladstone, G R; Steffl, A J; Cheng, A F; Young, L A; Weaver, H A; Olkin, C B; Ennico, K; Parker, J W; Parker, A H; Lauer, T R; Zangari, A; Summers, M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a variety of standard techniques used by New Horizons including a solar ultraviolet occultation, ultraviolet airglow observations, and high-phase look-back particulate search imaging to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's large moon Charon during its flyby in July 2015. Analyzing these datasets, no evidence for a present day atmosphere has been found for 14 potential atomic and molecular species, all of which are now constrained to have pressures below 0.3 nanobar, as we describe below, these are much more stringent upper limits than the previously available 15-110 nanobar constraints (e.g., Sicardy et al. 2006); for example, we find a 3$\\sigma$ upper limit for an N$_2$ atmosphere on Charon is 4.2 picobars and a 3$\\sigma$ upper limit for the brightness of any atmospheric haze on Charon of I/F=2.6x10$^{-5}$. A radio occultation search for an atmosphere around Charon was also conducted by New Horizons but will be published separately by other authors.

  3. Seasonal dependence of mesospheric gravity waves ( Peach Mountain Observatory, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Killeen, T. L.

    We present results from a 14-month study of all-sky camera observations of the Hydroxyl (OH) nightglow made at the Peach Mountain Observatory, Michigan (42.3°N 83.7°W) Spatial variations in the observed OH airglow images have been used to assess gravity-wave (GW) occurrence frequency at ∼85 km altitude as a function of season. A Strong seasonal dependence of mesospheric GW activity is observed, with peak activity in the summer months and much reduced activity during the winter months. Gravity waves (as defined by observed coherent variations in relative OH brightnesses of >∼7.5) were found to be present on about 70% of the clear-sky nights during the summer months. During the spring, fall, and winter months, however, the observed GW occurrence frequency was very low (<10%). Most of the GWs were observed to propagate towards the eastward hemisphere. We suggest that the tropospherically-generated GWs are anisotropic (eastward) thus passing through to the mesosphere only in the summer and being filtered out by the intervening neutral winds during other seasons. It is also possible that the GWs are able to reach higher altitudes without breaking because of their smaller amplitudes at lower altitudes during the summer season relative to the winter season.

  4. Sky Background Variability Measured on Maunakea at Gemini North Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam B.; Roth, Katherine; Stephens, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Gemini North has recently implemented a Quality Assessment Pipeline (QAP) that automatically reduces images in realtime to determine sky condition quantities, including background sky brightness from the optical to near-infrared. Processing archived images through the QAP and mining the results allows us to look for trends and systematic issues with the instruments and optics during the first decade of Gemini.Here we present the results of using the QAP calculated values to quantify how airglow affects the background sky brightness of images taken with Gemini's imaging instruments, GMOS and NIRI, as well as searching for other factors that may cause changes in the sky brightness. By investigating the dependence of measured sky brightness as a function of a variety of variables, including time after twilight, airmass, season, distance from the moon, air temperature, etc., we quantify the effect of sky brightness and its impact on the sensitivity of Gemini optical and near-infrared imaging data. These measurements will be used to determine new sky background relationships for Maunakea, and to improve the Gemini Integration Time Calculators (ITCs).

  5. MAVEN Imaging UV Spectrograph Results on the Mars Atmosphere and Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael; Schneider, Nick; McClintock, Bill; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stiepen, Arnaud; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi, Majd; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Mike; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, whose payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. IUVS uses ultraviolet light to investigate the lower and upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. IUVS, along with other MAVEN instruments, obtains a comprehensive picture of the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes that control atmospheric escape. We present an overview of selected IUVS results, including (1) the discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora localized near crustal magnetic fields; (2) widespread detection of mesospheric clouds; (3) Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric composition; (4) Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and (5) mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, deriving the escape rates of H and O and their variability. This last is of particular importance for understanding the long term evolution of Mars and its atmosphere, with the observed preset escape of H potentially capable of removing a large fraction of Mars' initial water inventory, and the differential escape of O relative to H potentially providing a net source of oxidizing power to the atmosphere and planet at present, in contrast with a photochemical theory that predicts stoichiometrically balanced escape. The atmospheric and escape

  6. The roles of vertical advection and eddy diffusion in the equatorial mesospheric semi-annual oscillation (MSAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Gattinger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the mesospheric semi-annual oscillation (MSAO in the equatorial region have been reported dating back several decades. Seasonal variations in both species densities and airglow emissions are well documented. The extensive observations available offer an excellent case study for comparison with model simulations. A broad range of MSAO measurements is summarised with emphasis on the 80–100 km region. The objective here is not to address directly the complicated driving forces of the MSAO, but rather to employ a combination of observations and model simulations to estimate the limits of some of the underlying dynamical processes. Photochemical model simulations are included for near-equinox and near-solstice conditions, the two times with notable differences in the observed MSAO parameters. Diurnal tides are incorporated in the model to facilitate comparisons of observations made at different local times. The roles of water vapour as the "driver" species and ozone as the "response" species are examined to test for consistency between the model results and observations. The simulations suggest the interactions between vertical eddy diffusion and background vertical advection play a significant role in the MSAO phenomenon. Further, the simulations imply there are rigid limits on vertical advection rates and eddy diffusion rates. For August at the Equator, 90 km altitude, the derived eddy diffusion rate is approximately 1 × 106 cm2 s−1 and the vertical advection is upwards at 0.8 cm s−1. For April the corresponding values are 4 × 105 cm2 s−1 and 0.1 cm s−1. These results from the current 1-D model simulations will need to be verified by a full 3-D simulation. Exactly how vertical advection and eddy diffusion are related to gravity wave momentum as discussed by Dunkerton (1982 three decades ago remains to be addressed.

  7. Observation sequences and onboard data processing of Planet-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Imamura, T.; Nakamura, M.; Ishi, N.; Ueno, M.; Hihara, H.; Abe, T.; Yamada, T.

    Planet-C or VCO Venus Climate Orbiter will carry 5 cameras IR1 IR 1micrometer camera IR2 IR 2micrometer camera UVI UV Imager LIR Long-IR camera and LAC Lightning and Airglow Camera in the UV-IR region to investigate atmospheric dynamics of Venus During 30 hr orbiting designed to quasi-synchronize to the super rotation of the Venus atmosphere 3 groups of scientific observations will be carried out i image acquisition of 4 cameras IR1 IR2 UVI LIR 20 min in 2 hrs ii LAC operation only when VCO is within Venus shadow and iii radio occultation These observation sequences will define the scientific outputs of VCO program but the sequences must be compromised with command telemetry downlink and thermal power conditions For maximizing science data downlink it must be well compressed and the compression efficiency and image quality have the significant scientific importance in the VCO program Images of 4 cameras IR1 2 and UVI 1Kx1K and LIR 240x240 will be compressed using JPEG2000 J2K standard J2K is selected because of a no block noise b efficiency c both reversible and irreversible d patent loyalty free and e already implemented as academic commercial software ICs and ASIC logic designs Data compression efficiencies of J2K are about 0 3 reversible and 0 1 sim 0 01 irreversible The DE Digital Electronics unit which controls 4 cameras and handles onboard data processing compression is under concept design stage It is concluded that the J2K data compression logics circuits using space

  8. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance (SSI) for ionospheric application - history and contemporary state-of-art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.; Jacobi, Ch.; Nikutowski, B.; Erhardt, Ch.

    2014-11-01

    After a historical survey of space related EUV measurements in Germany and the role of Karl Rawer in pursuing this work, we describe present developments in EUV spectroscopy and provide a brief outlook on future activities. The group of Karl Rawer has performed the first scientific space project in Western Europe on 19th October 1954. Then it was decided to include the field of solar EUV spectroscopy in ionospheric investigations. Starting in 1957 an intensified development of instrumentation was going on to explore solar EUV radiation, atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions until the institute had to stop space activities in the early nineteen-eighties. EUV spectroscopy was continued outside of the institute during eight years. This area of work was supported again by the institute developing the Auto-Calibrating Spectrometers (SolACES) for a mission on the International Space Station (ISS). After more than six years in space the instrument is still in operation. Meanwhile the work on the primary task also to validate EUV data available from other space missions has made good progress. The first results of validating those data and combine them into one set of EUV solar spectral irradiance are very promising. It will be recommended for using it by the science and application community. Moreover, a new low-cost type of an EUV spectrometer is presented for monitoring the solar EUV radiation. It shall be further developed for providing EUV-TEC data to be applied in ionospheric models replacing the Covington index F10.7. Applying these data for example in the GNSS signal evaluation a more accurate determination of GNSS receiver positions is expected for correcting the propagation delays of navigation signals traveling through the ionosphere from space to earth. - Latest results in the field of solar EUV spectroscopy are discussed, too.

  9. Data-model comparison search analysis of coincident PBO Balmer α, EURD Lyman β geocoronal measurements from March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Gómez, J. F.; Morales, C.

    2004-05-01

    Recent Lyman series and Balmer series airglow measurements provide a fresh opportunity to investigate the density distribution and variability of atomic hydrogen in the upper atmosphere. Dedicated nightside Balmer α Fabry-Perot spectrometer measurements at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO), University of Wisconsin-Madison, have been acquired since late 1999 taking advantage of several technological advances. Extreme ultraviolet spectral radiance measurements by the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish MINISAT-1 satellite from October 1997 to December 2001 provide extensive sets of geocoronal Lyman β, Lyman γ and He 584 Å emission intensities. In this paper, coincident EURD Lyman β and PBO Balmer α radiance measurements from the early March 2000 new moon period are presented. In addition to serving as examples of the data sets now available, the data volume poses an analysis challenge not faced in prior geocoronal studies. A data-model comparison search procedure employing resonance radiation transport results for extensive sets of parametric density distribution models is being developed for use in analyses of multiple large data sets; this is described, and example results for the PBO and EURD March 2000 data sets are presented. The tightness of the constraints obtained for the solar line-center Lyman β irradiance and the atomic hydrogen column abundance is somewhat surprising, given the crudeness of the parameter binning in the search procedure and the fact that a small number of recognized corrections remain to be made to each data set.

  10. Solar UV Irradiances and Associated Issues for the Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W.

    Several new solar proxies have been developed in the past year as the beginning of a second generation solar UV modeling and forecasting capability. These proxies help characterize the energy input into operational space physics models that provide information content on the neutral thermosphere and ionosphere. Between 1999-2000, a full solar spectrum was developed (SOLAR2000) for use in numerical atmospheric and ionospheric models relevant to climatological studies and the E10.7 index was produced for empirical thermospheric and ionospheric model applications. In 20012002, new proxies have been derived including a sunspot number, Rsn, for use by operational HF radio ray-trace algorithms and the Qeuv thermospheric heating rate for use by the aeronomy community to compare airglow-derived versus solar-derived upper atmosphere heating. The Peuv heat production term has also been developed as an index for comparing solar heating to joule heating on a global scale. The S(t) index is the integrated solar spectrum used for solar radiation pressure calculations related to spacecraft attitude control. Finally, the Tinf is the exospheric temperature that is provided for long-term climate change studies. Second generation modeling and forecasting is in development and includes higher cadence solar input information beyond daily flux values where solar flare characterization will soon become reality. The second generation forecasting is also incorporating improved algorithms ranging from wavelet transforms to solar dynamo theory in order to specify solar variability on seven time scales from nowcast and 72-hour forecast to 5 solar cycle estimation. These new proxies are derivatives of the SOLAR2000 model whose solar irradiance specification is compliant with the developing ISO draft standard WD 21348 for Determining Solar Irradiances.

  11. Suomi NPP VIIRS Imagery evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillger, Donald; Seaman, Curtis; Liang, Calvin; Miller, Steven; Lindsey, Daniel; Kopp, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) combines the best aspects of both civilian and military heritage instrumentation. VIIRS has improved capabilities over its predecessors: a wider swath width and much higher spatial resolution at swath edge. The VIIRS day-night band (DNB) is sensitive to very low levels of visible light and is capable of detecting low clouds, land surface features, and sea ice at night, in addition to light emissions from both man-made and natural sources. Imagery from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite has been in the checkout process since its launch on 28 October 2011. The ongoing evaluation of VIIRS Imagery helped resolve several imagery-related issues, including missing radiance measurements. In particular, near-constant contrast imagery, derived from the DNB, had a large number of issues to overcome, including numerous missing or blank-fill images and a stray light leakage problem that was only recently resolved via software fixes. In spite of various sensor issues, the VIIRS DNB has added tremendous operational and research value to Suomi NPP. Remarkably, it has been discovered to be sensitive enough to identify clouds even in very low light new moon conditions, using reflected light from the Earth's airglow layer. Impressive examples of the multispectral imaging capabilities are shown to demonstrate its applications for a wide range of operational users. Future members of the Joint Polar Satellite System constellation will also carry and extend the use of VIIRS. Imagery evaluation will continue with these satellites to ensure the quality of imagery for end users.

  12. The Optomechanical Design and Operation of the Ionospheric Mapping and Geocoronal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmanson, Phillip C.; Wilczynski, Janusz; Wood, Kent; Dymond, Kenneth; Thonnard, Stefan; Spann, James

    2005-01-01

    The Ionospheric Mapping and Geocoronal Experiment (IMAGER) is a space-based, multispectral, imaging payload, designed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. IMAGER is designed to be at the forefront of space based remote sensing instruments for the study of the ionosphere in regards to the spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions it will possess. IMAGER S mission is to find, track, and measure ionospheric irregularities as they move across the surface of the Earth and vary with time. IMAGER will observe the ionosphere of the Earth in the extreme and far ultraviolet wavelengths from 83.4 nm to 143.0 nm using the airglow emission from the nighttime and daytime ionosphere. The heart of the instrument consists of a 160mm, F/4.0 telescope which is an off-axial portion of a very fast aplanatic Gregorian. The focal length is 640 mm and the field of view is 2.17 degrees. The modulation transfer function is above 0.90 at 2.8 line pairs/ millimeter over the field corresponding to a 20 km line pair on the Earth. A system of reflective filters is used to select different wavelengths of interest. The telescope will be gimbaled to provide a field of regard encompassing the entire disk and limb of the Earth. The gimbal will also allow the telescope to track the ionospheric irregularities as they move. This paper describes the design of the optical and mechanical systems and their intended performance and includes an overview of the mission and science requirements that defined those aforementioned systems.

  13. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  14. Mesospheric, Thermospheric, and Ionospheric Responses to Acoustic and Gravity Waves Generated by Transient Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Strong acoustic waves with periods ~1-4 minutes have been confirmed to perturb the ionosphere following their generation by earthquakes [e.g., Garcia et al., GRL, 40(5), 2013] and volcanic eruption events [e.g., Heki, GRL, 33, L14303, 2006]. Clear acoustic and gravity wave signatures have also been reported in ionospheric data above strong tropospheric convection [Nishioka, GRL, 40(21), 2013], and prior modeling results suggest that convectively-generated acoustic waves with ~3-4 minute periods are readily detectable above their sources in TEC [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. These observations have provided quantitative insight into the coupling of processes occurring near Earth's surface with the upper atmosphere and ionosphere over short time-scales. Here, we investigate acoustic waves and short-period gravity waves generated by sources near ground level, and the observable responses of the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI) systems. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model, in cylindrically-axisymmetric coordinates, to investigate wave generation, upward propagation, steepening, and dissipation. Acoustic waves may produce observable signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer [e.g., Snively, GRL, 40(17), 2013], and can strongly perturb the lower-thermosphere and E- and F-region ionosphere, prior to the arrival of simultaneously-generated gravity waves. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for mid and low latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013], we investigate its response to realistic acoustic wave perturbations. In particular, we demonstrate that the MLT and ionospheric responses are significantly and nonlinearly determined by the acoustic wave source geometry, spectrum, and amplitude, in addition to the local ambient state of the

  15. Physics of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliünas, Vytenis M.

    This book, one in the Cambridge Atmospheric and Space Science Series, joins a growing list of advanced-level textbooks in a field of study and research known under a variety of names: space plasma physics, solar-terrestrial or solar-planetary relations, space weather, or (the official name of the relevant AGU section) space physics and aeronomy. On the basis of graduate courses taught by the author in various departments at the University of Michigan, complete with problems and with appendices of physical constants and mathematical identities, this is indeed a textbook, systematic and severe in its approach. The book is divided into three parts, in length ratios of roughly 6:4:5. Part I, “Theoretical Description of Gases and Plasmas,” starts by writing down Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz transformation (no nonsense about any introductory material of a descriptive or historical nature) and proceeds through particle orbit theory, kinetics, and plasma physics with fluid and MHD approximations to waves, shocks, and energetic particle transport. Part II, “The Upper Atmosphere,” features chapters on the terrestrial upper atmosphere, airglow and aurora, and the ionosphere. Part III, “Sun-Earth Connection,” deals with the Sun, the solar wind, cosmic rays, and the terrestrial magnetosphere. The book thus covers, with two exceptions, just about all the topics of interest to Space Physics and Aeronomy scientists, and then some (the chapter on the Sun, for instance, briefly discusses also topics of the solar interior: thermonuclear energy generation, equilibrium structure, energy transfer, with a page or two on each). One exception reflects a strong geocentric bias: there is not one word in the main text on magnetospheres and ionospheres of other planets and their interaction with the solar wind (they are mentioned in a few problems). The other exception: the chapter on the terrestrial magnetosphere lacks a systematic exposition of the theory of

  16. Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Changyong; Zong, Yuqing; Bai, Yan; Shao, Xi

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm-2·sr-1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth's atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.

  17. A case study of Ionospheric storm effects during long-lasting southward IMF Bz driven geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple instrumental observations including GPS TEC, foF2 and hmF2 from ionosondes, vertical ion drift measurements from C/NOFS, magnetometer data and far-ultraviolet airglow measured by TIMED/GUVI are used to investigate the profound ionospheric disturbances at mid- and low-latitudes during the 14-17 July 2012 geomagnetic storm event, which was featured by prolonged southward interplanetary geomagnetic field component for about 30 hours below -10 nT. In the East Asian/Australian sector, latitudinal profile of TEC variations in the main phase were characterized by three bands of increments and separated by weak depressions in the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA) crest regions, which were caused by the combined effects of disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF) and equatorward neutral winds. In the recovery phase, strong inhibition of EIA occurred and the summer crest of EIA disappeared on 16 July due to the combined effects of intrusion of neutral composition disturbance zone as shown by the TIME/GUVI O/N2 measurements and long-lasting daytime westward DDEF inferred from the equatorial electric electrojet (EEJ) observations. The transit time of DDEF over the dip equator from westward to eastward is around 2200 LT. In the American longitude, the salient ionospheric disturbances in the summer hemisphere were characterized by daytime periodical intrusion of negative phase for three consecutive days in the recovery phase, preceded by storm enhanced density (SED) plume in the initial phase. In addition, multiple short-lived prompt penetration electric fields (PPEF) appeared during stable southward IMF Bz in the recovery phase and were responsible for enhanced the EIA and equatorial ionospheric uplift around sunset.

  18. A case study of ionospheric storm effects during long-lasting southward IMF Bz-driven geomagnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Libo; Nakamura, Takuji; Zhao, Biqiang; Ning, Baiqi; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-09-01

    Multiple instrumental observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), foF2 and hmF2 from ionosondes, vertical ion drift measurements from Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System, magnetometer data, and far ultraviolet airglow measured by Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Global Ultraviolet Imager (TIMED/GUVI) are used to investigate the profound ionospheric disturbances at midlatitude and low latitude during the 14-17 July 2012 geomagnetic storm event, which was featured by prolonged southward interplanetary geomagnetic field component for about 30 h below -10 nT. In the East Asian/Australian sector, latitudinal profile of TEC variations in the main phase were characterized by three bands of increments and separated by weak depressions in the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) crest regions, which were caused by the combined effects of disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF) and equatorward neutral winds. In the recovery phase, strong inhibition of EIA occurred and the summer crest of EIA disappeared on 16 July due to the combined effects of intrusion of neutral composition disturbance zone as shown by the TIMED/GUVI O/N2 measurements and long-lasting daytime westward DDEF inferred from the equatorial electrojet observations. The transit time of DDEF over the dip equator from westward to eastward is around 2200 LT. In the American longitude, the salient ionospheric disturbances in the summer hemisphere were characterized by daytime periodical intrusion of negative phase for three consecutive days in the recovery phase, preceded by storm-enhanced density plume in the initial phase. In addition, multiple short-lived prompt penetration electric fields appeared during stable southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz in the recovery phase and were responsible for enhanced the EIA and equatorial ionospheric uplift around sunset.

  19. Photochemistry-emission coupled model for Europa and Ganymede

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cessateur Gaël

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of the JUICE mission, preliminary studies of the Jupiter’s icy moons, such as Ganymede and Europa, are mandatory. The present paper aims at characterizing the impact of the solar UV flux and its variability on their atmospheres. The solar UV radiation is responsible for the photoionization, photodissociation, and photoexcitation processes within planetary atmospheres. A 1-D photoabsorption model has been developed for different observational geometries, on the basis of a neutral atmospheric model. Considering various production and loss mechanisms but also the transport of oxygen atoms, we estimate the red and green line emissions from photo impact-induced excitation only. These dayglow emissions can represent few percent of the global airglow emission, mainly dominated by electron-induced excitation in auroral regions. For limb viewing conditions, red line emission is bright enough to be detected from actual spectrometers, from 338 R to 408 R according to the solar activity. This is also the case for the green line with 8 R at limb viewing. Considering a different neutral atmosphere model, with an O2 column density 50% more important, leads to a 14% increase in the red line emissions for limb viewing close to the surface. This difference could be important enough to infer which neutral model is the most likely. However, uncertainties on the solar UV flux might also prevent to constrain the O2 column density when using ground-based observations in the visible only. The impact of solar flares on the red line emissions for Europa has also been investigated within a planetary space weather context.

  20. Effects of solar zenith angles on CO Cameron bands emission intensities in the dayside atmosphere of Mars: MEX/SPICAM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothuraju, Thirupathaiah; Haider, Syed A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a model to calculate the photoelectron energy fluxes and emission intensities of the CO Cameron bands in the upper atmosphere of Mars between solar zenith angles 0° to 90°. The production and loss mechanisms of CO (a ^{3}Π) are incorporated in the model. The atmospheric neutral parameters are adopted from the Mars Climate Database (v5.2). The required solar EUV fluxes are taken from the Solar2000 model (v2.37) and scaled to Mars. The photoelectron fluxes are calculated at different solar zenith angles using an analytical yield spectrum approach based on the Monte Carlo method. In this model we have assumed that crustal magnetic fields are horizontal in direction. Thus, photoelectrons are losing their energy at the same height where they are produced. This assumption is valid at mid and high latitudes where magnetic fields are mostly horizontal. We have also developed a coupled chemistry model to calculate the ion and electron density at different solar zenith angles, which are used in the airglow model. The model results are compared with the observations provided by the SPICAM onboard MEX. Our model reproduces the observed intensity profiles quite well. The CO (a ^{3}Π) is produced due to photoelectron excitation/dissociation, photodissociation, and dissociative recombination processes. It is destroyed by CO _{2}, CO and radiative decay. It is found that photon and photoelectron dissociation are dominant production processes of CO (a ^{3}Π), while radiative decay is a major loss mechanism of this state. The estimated photoelectron fluxes, production rates and intensities are decreasing with increasing solar zenith angles.

  1. The Limb-Imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Budzien, Scott A.

    2015-04-01

    The Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) is being prepared for flight in early 2016 aboard the Space Test Program Houston 5 (STP-H5) experiment pallet to the International Space Station (ISS). LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans 60-140 nm and will obtain limb profiles of the ionosphere, along with the key upper atmospheric constituents O and N2. During the day, LITES measures the OII 83.4 and 61.7 nm emissions that are produced by solar photoionization of atomic oxygen in the lower thermosphere. The 83.4 nm emission is resonantly scattered by ionospheric O+, and thus its altitude profile is formed by both the initial ionization brightness and the ionospheric content. The 61.7 nm emission is not scattered and is used to constrain the photoionization brightness in the retrieval. At night, recombination of O+ and electrons produces optically thin emissions at 91.1 and 135.6 nm that are used to tomographically reconstruct the two-dimensional ionosphere in the orbital plane.These observations will be complemented and validated by ground-based data from an international network of digisondes, visible spectrographs, and imagers, which will provide ground truth for the space-based measurements. Additionally, the STP-H5 mission includes the GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) experiment that consists of a high-sensitivity, nadir-viewing photometer that measures the nighttime ionospheric airglow at 135.6 nm, and a GPS receiver that measures ionospheric electron content and scintillation. We will discuss the LITES measurements and science goals, and how LITES data will be combined with these other experiments to study low and middle latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale.

  2. SWIR detectors for night vision at AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figgemeier, H.; Benecke, M.; Hofmann, K.; Oelmaier, R.; Sieck, A.; Wendler, J.; Ziegler, J.

    2014-06-01

    Detectors for the short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral range are particularly suitable for observation under hazy weather conditions as well as under twilight or moon light conditions. In addition, SWIR detectors allow using the airglow for observation under moonless sky. SWIR detectors are commonly based on InGaAs or HgCdTe (MCT) and demand extremely low dark currents to ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio under low background light conditions. AIM has developed a read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) with 640×512 pixels and a 15 μm pixel pitch for low light level applications. The ROIC supports analog or digital correlated double sampling (CDS) for the reduction of reset-noise (also known as kTC-noise). Along with CDS, a rolling shutter (RS) mode has been implemented. The input stage of the ROIC is based on a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) with two selectable gain settings. The dark current of our SWIR MCT detectors has recently been significantly reduced to allow for high operating temperatures. In contrast to InGaAs, the MCT material offers the unique possibility to adjust the cut-off wavelength according to the application while maintaining the matching of the lattice constant to the one of the CdZnTe substrate. The key electro-optical performance parameters of lately developed MCT based SWIR Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) with a 1.75 μm cut-off wavelength will be presented. In addition, AIMs SWIR detectors covering the spectral range from 0.9 μm to 2.5 μm and available in formats of 384×288 pixels - 24 μm pitch and 1024×256 pixels - 24×32 μm2, will be introduced.

  3. Statistical study of the GPS phase scintillation associated with plasma blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Miloch, Wojciech; Moen, Joran

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of the space weather effect of GNSS scintillation in the auroral/polar cap ionosphere with multi-instrument observations, including GNSS scintillation receiver, all-sky imager, and EISCAT radar. We focus on the period when polar cap patches (islands of high density F region plasma with density enhanced more than twice above the surrounding) exit the polar cap. When the patch exits into the nightside auroral region (and then it is termed blob), the GNSS phase scintillation can be enhanced; indicating that the blob is important for the scintillation study [Jin et al., 2014]. In the present study, we expand the data set to see how representative it is. From November of 2010 to February of 2014, 41.4 hours of data from all-sky imager were collected in 16 days when the airglow patches were observed to hit the nightside aurora and when the aurora covered a quarter of the all-sky imager field of view at Ny-Ålesund. The collocated GNSS scintillation receiver is used to study the scintillation impact. This study clearly shows that the scintillation level of a blob is higher than the scintillation level of the corresponding patch. However, no clear relation between the blob scintillation and the pre-conditioning of polar cap patches is found. Furthermore, the aurora alone did not produce strong scintillation. This implies that the aurora plays a role in structuring of the blob and increases its scintillation level. We also look into possible instability mechanisms which produce the plasma density irregularities.

  4. Radio Induced Fluorescence (RIF) Imaging Of E-region Quasi-periodic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    The horizontal structure of sporadic-E layers has been imaged using artificial airglow excited by high power radio waves. In January 1998, the HF facility at Arecibo, Puerto Rico beamed a 80 MW signal upward at 3.175 MHz. The beam reflected in the E- region near 120 km altitude to excite green-line emissions at 557.7 nm. Ground based images showed quasi-periodic structures with periods near 2 and 10 km. These struc- tures been interpreted as being produced by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities in the neutral atmosphere. The excitation of radio induced fluorescence (RIF) emissions has been studied with both one-dimensional and two-dimensional computer simulations of the conversion of electromagnetic waves into electron plasma waves. The steep gradients on the bottomside of the E-layer provide conditions for efficient mode conversion. The re- sulting Langmuir waves accelerate electrons to energies between 2 and 10 eV. These suprathermal electrons collide with oxygen atoms to produce green-line emissions. The optical glow only occurs in the parts of the E-region where the plamsa is dense enough to reflect the 3.175 MHz radio waves. Results of the E-layer observations using the RIF technique have shown horizontal stuctures that are most likely produced by the K-H instability. A numerical model has been generated to demonstrate the effects of neutral wind shears on the E-region structures. The model includes the effects of both speed-shear and turning shear dy- namics. The results of the numerical model are used to suggest future research using high-power radio wave to study the ion dynamics of the lower thermosphere.

  5. Photographic surface photometry of the Milky Way. III - Photometry of the central area of the Galaxy in the ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proell, H. J.; Schmidt-Kaler, T.; Schlosser, W.

    1983-01-01

    6 photographic plates, taken at La Silla, Chile, with the spherical mirror super-wide-angle camera of the Astronomisches Institut der Ruhr Universität Bochum (see paper I: Schmidt-Kaler, Th. et al., 1982) were measured to study the surface brightness distribution in the area around the centre of the Milky Way, between galactic longitudes 297° and 27°, and latitudes - 30° to + 30°, with an angular resolution of 0.°3 × 0.°3 (Fig. 5). In section 2 the plate material and details of the reductions are presented, so far as not already given in paper I. During the photometric scanning of the plates all stars brighter than a limiting magnitude mlim were marked by hand, and the corresponding data points were replaced by an average from neighbouring points (section 3). Defined at the level of 50% elimination, mlim ≌ 8.m0 (in U). Figure 4 shows the effect of various methods of eliminating bright stars. The errors of the surface photometry are discussed in section 4. The internal mean error of the intensity of one data point, as determined from the scatter from the 6 plates, is ± 9.4%. This error is split into an additive component ± 8 S10U (S10 = intensity of a star of 10m), mostly due to the contributions of airglow and scattered light, and a multiplicative component of ± 7.5%, mostly due to the uncertainty of the photographic characteristic curve. Possible systematic errors are estimated and upper limits for these are given in table II. Section 5 presents the results of the photometry. For the sake of clear representation in the isophote map (Fig 5) data with intermediate intensities 110 paragraph we discuss the structure of the Milky Way central region in U, in particular those spiral filaments which appear inclined to the galactic equator (shingles, corrugations). The three shingles discovered by Schmidt-Kaler and Schlosser (1973) in the next-inner spiral arm-I and an additional feature appear if the data-field of the UV photometry is spatially differentiated

  6. The high-resolution microchannel plate detector for FUV spectroscopy in the BepiColombo mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Go; Ezawa, Fukuhiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Chassefiere, Eric; Maria, Jean-Luc

    Mariner-10 UV measurements and telescopic spectroscopy from the Earth identified six elements (Ca, Na, K, H, He, and O) in the Mercury's exosphere. Other species are expected, e.g. H2 , OH, and some noble gasses (Ar, Ne, and Xe). All species representative of the surface composition, directly produced by impact vaporization driven by micrometeoroids, physical sputtering, photo-stimulated desorption, and thermal desorption from the regolith, should also be present. To determine the composition of the Mercury's exosphere, the PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) instrument on Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will measure the emission lines of the exosphere. PHEBUS is a dual FUV-EUV spectrometer working in the wavelength range from 55 to 315 nm. We are now developing the compact detector system sensitive to FUV airglow emissions of the Mercury. The FUV detector is required to have high spatial resolution (80 µm) so that the wavelength resolution of the PHEBUS instrument should be 2 nm at the FUV range. The FUV detector consists of a Cs2 Te photocathode, microchannel plates (MCPs), and a resistive anode encoder (RAE). In a position-sensitive system with an RAE, the spatial resolution is determined by the signal-to-noise ratios at the anode terminals. Therefore, a high and stable electron gain of MCPs allows the position determination of each photoelectron event with high spatial resolution. We studied a method for achieving a high and stable electron gain. We fabricated a test model of the FUV detector incorporating a clamped pair of MCPs (V-stack) followed by a gap and a clamped triplet of MCPs (Z-stack) in cascade. We have investigated the effect of the negative potential applied across the inter-stack (V-Z) gap on the PHD and the spatial resolution by means of calculation and experiments. The calculation with a simple ballistic model showed that the negative inter-stack potential reduced the size of the electron cloud by 70%. The result

  7. Utah Valley University Field Station at Capitol Reef National Park: A Venue for Improved Student Learning and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K.; Schultz, M.; Williams, B.; Gay, J.; Johnson, S.; Dunn, P.

    2015-12-01

    faint upper atmospheric airglow emissions. This presentation details the upper atmospheric undergraduate educational program at UVU, and will also include a section regarding the newly established interdisciplinary air pollution educational program, and how communities outside of UVU can use the facility.

  8. Spread F – an old equatorial aeronomy problem finally resolved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Woodman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the oldest scientific topics in Equatorial Aeronomy is related to Spread-F. It includes all our efforts to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the existence of ionospheric F-region irregularities, the spread of the traces in a night-time equatorial ionogram – hence its name – and all other manifestations of the same. It was observed for the first time as an abnormal ionogram in Huancayo, about 70 years ago. But only recently are we coming to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for its occurrence and its capricious day to day variability. Several additional techniques have been used to reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of the F-region irregularities responsible for the phenomenon. Among them we have, in chronological order, radio star scintillations, trans-equatorial radio propagation, satellite scintillations, radar backscatter, satellite and rocket in situ measurements, airglow, total electron content techniques using the propagation of satellite radio signals and, recently, radar imaging techniques. Theoretical efforts are as old as the observations. Nevertheless, 32 years after their discovery, Jicamarca radar observations showed that none of the theories that had been put forward could explain them completely. The observations showed that irregularities were detected at altitudes that were stable according to the mechanisms proposed. A breakthrough came a few years later, again from Jicamarca, by showing that some of the "stable" regions had become unstable by the non-linear propagation of the irregularities from the unstable to the stable region of the ionosphere in the form of bubbles of low density plasma. A problem remained, however; the primary instability mechanism proposed, an extended (generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, was too slow to explain the rapid development seen by the observations. Gravity waves in the neutral background have been proposed as a seeding mechanism to

  9. Exploring the interior structure of Venus with balloons and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimoun, David; Cutts, Jim; Stevenson, Dave

    2015-04-01

    Although present daily in our sky as the brightest object at dusk and dawn, many characteristics of Venus remains a mystery. Its dense atmosphere hides the surface from orbital viewing, and the extreme conditions experienced at its surface (460°C, almost 100 bar of pressure at the surface) pose a formidable challenge to the sustained survival and operation of planetary landers. Despite their sharply contrasting atmospheres, Venus is not very different from Earth in size, its composition should be very similar, its orbit is very close to be circular and it is only a little closer to the Sun ( 0.7 A.U). So what are the processes that turned the twin sister of our planet into such a different object? And how can we better understand the processes that have shaped the terrestrial planets, and to understand their formation history? With its harsh surface environment, conventional seismology on Venus, requiring seismometers to be deployed at the surface for months or even years seems impractical. In June 2014, the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) at the California Institute of Technology sponsored a one-week workshop with 30 specialists in the key techniques and technologies relevant to investigating Venus's interior structure focusing on alternative approaches to seismology . As the vertical component of surface motion on Venus is very efficiently coupled into the atmosphere as infrasonic waves, especially at low frequency, several alternative approaches to detecting seismic events can be considered. Seismo-acoustic waves propagate upwards producing pressure fluctuations in the middle atmosphere of Venus and the seismic wave energy is ultimately dissipated by local heating, ionospheric perturbation, or airglow. These atmospheric perturbations can therefore be recorded either in-situ (with a barometer network, deployed on balloons floating in the cloud layer near 55 km) or remotely via optical imaging or electromagnetic sounding deployed on a spacecraft. A report

  10. Advanced Ionospheric Sensing using GROUP-C and LITES aboard the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.; Finn, S. C.; Cook, T.; Powell, S. P.; O'Hanlon, B.; Bishop, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) and Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are manifested for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016 as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 payload. The two experiments provide technical development and risk-reduction for future DoD space weather sensors suitable for ionospheric specification, space situational awareness, and data products for global ionosphere assimilative models. In addition, the combined instrument complement of these two experiments offers a unique opportunity to study structures of the nighttime ionosphere. GROUP-C includes an advanced GPS receiver providing ionospheric electron density profiles and scintillation measurements and a high-sensitivity far-ultraviolet photometer measuring horizontal ionospheric gradients. LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans 60-140 nm and will obtain high-cadence limb profiles of the ionosphere and thermosphere from 150-350 km altitude. In the nighttime ionosphere, recombination of O+ and electrons produces optically thin emissions at 91.1 and 135.6 nm that can be used to tomographically reconstruct the two-dimensional plasma distribution in the orbital plane below ISS altitudes. Ionospheric irregularities, such as plasma bubbles and blobs, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the ISS would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry, vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, and recent advancements in UV tomography, high-fidelity tomographic reconstruction of

  11. Ultraviolet Observations of the Earth and Moon during the Juno Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, R.; Versteeg, M. H.; Davis, M.; Greathouse, T. K.; Gerard, J. M.; Grodent, D. C.; Bonfond, B.

    2013-12-01

    observations of the lunar surface to improve flux and wavelength calibration at EUV wavelengths λ<91 nm (for which there are few stellar calibration options); 2) test the Juno spacecraft nadir-pulse system (which will be used at Jupiter to control scan mirror movements); 3) observe Earth airglow, aurora, and geocoronal emissions (for science interest); and 4) determine the effectiveness of the Ta shielding to high-energy particles (using dark observations made during Juno's passage through Earth's radiation belts). Preliminary results for each of these objectives will be presented.

  12. On the temporal variability of the OH* emission layer at the mesopause: a study based on SD-WACCM4 and SABER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kowalewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airglow observations are a fundamental tool to study the mesospheric part of the atmosphere. In particular the OH* emission layer is subject of many theoretical and observational studies. The choice of different transition bands of the OH* emission can introduce systematic differences between these studies, hence a profound knowledge of these differences is required for comparison. One systematic difference is given by the vertical displacements between OH* profiles due to different transition bands. A previous study has shown that the vertical displacement is highly sensitive to quenching with atomic oxygen. In this work we follow up this idea by investigating the diurnal as well as the seasonal response of OH* to changes in concentrations of atomic and molecular oxygen, the two most effective quenching species of OH*. For this task we employ a quenching model to calculate vertical OH* concentration profiles from simulations made with the SD-WACCM4 chemistry transport model. From this approach we find that despite the strong impact of O and O2 quenching on the vertical OH* structure, a considerable variability between the vertical displacements of different OH* transition bands is also induced by the natural variability of the O3 and H profiles, which primarily participate in the formation of the mesospheric OH* layer. This in particular applies for the diurnal evolution of the vertical displacements, which cannot be explained by changes in abundances of OH* quenching species only. On the other hand, vertical displacements between OH* transition bands and the amount of effective O and O2 quenching show a coherent semi-annual oscillation at lower latitudes that is in phase with the seasonal variability of the diurnal migrating tide. In particular the role of O2 quenching shows a new aspect of the semi-annual oscillation that, to our knowledge, has not been discussed before. By comparison with limb radiance observations from the SABER

  13. Human Settlements in the South-Central U.S., Viewed at Night from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Melissa; Evans, Cynthia; Stefanov, William; Wilkinson, M. Justin; Willis, Kimberly; Runco, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A recent innovation of astronauts observing Earth from the International Space Station (ISS) is documenting human footprints by photographing city lights at night time. One of the earliest night-time images from the ISS was the US-Mexico border at El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. The colors, patterns and density of city lights document the differences in the cultural settlement patterns across the border region, as well as within the urban areas themselves. City lights help outline the most populated areas in settlements around the world, and can be used to explore relative population densities, changing patterns of urban/suburban development, transportation networks, spatial relationship to geographic features, and more. The data also provides insight into parameters such as surface roughness for input into local and regional climate modeling and studies of light pollution. The ground resolution of night-time astronaut photography from the ISS is typically an order of magnitude greater than current Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) data, and therefore can serve as a "zoom lens" for selected urban areas. Current handheld digital cameras in use on the ISS, optimized for greater light sensitivity, provide opportunities to obtain new detailed imagery of atmospheric phenomena such as airglow, aurora, and noctilucent clouds in addition to documenting urban patterns. ISS astronauts have taken advantage of increasingly sensitive digital cameras to document the world at night in unprecedented detail. In addition, the capability to obtain time-lapse imagery from fixed cameras has been exploited to produce dynamic videos of both changing surface patterns around the world and atmospheric phenomena. We will profile some spectacular images of human settlements over the South-Central U.S., and contrast with other images from around the world. More data can be viewed at http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/Videos/CrewEarthObservationsVideos/. US-Mexico border is obvious by the different

  14. Geomagnetism and climate V: general conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörner, N.-A.; Nevanlinna, H.; Dergachev, V.; Shumilov, O.; Raspopov, O.; Abrahamsen, N.; Pilipenko, O.; Trubikhin, V.; Gooskova, E.

    2003-04-01

    The shielding capacity of the Earth’s geomagnetic field is a prime factor regulating the flux into the atmosphere of galactic cosmic ray (in its turn controlling the 14C and 10Be production). This shielding capacity is controlled both by the Earth’s own geomagnetic field variability and by the Solar Wind variations. The Solar Wind interaction with the magnetosphere also affects the Earth’s rate of rotation (as recorded in the correlation between LOD and Sunspot activity). This opens for three possible lines of Solar Terrestrial interaction. (1) Changes in the total irradiance (known to be very small, however, over a full sun spot cycle). (2) Changes in cosmic ray flux reaching into the Earth’s atmosphere where it has the potential of affecting airglow and cloudiness (especially the cloudiness at a height in the order of 15 km). (3) Changes in the Earth’s rate of rotation affecting the oceanic circulation redistributing ocean-stored heat and water masses. The Spörer, Maunder and Dalton sun spot minima seem all to have led to periods of rotational acceleration pulling Arctic water down the European coasts and displacing the warm Gulf Stream towards Gibraltar. The geomagnetic field as regulator of cosmic ray flux and rotational potential is likely to have played a significant role even over longer time periods. It should be noted, however, the geometry of the Earth’s geomagnetic field cannot have differed very much due to frozen plasma conditions even at excursions and reversals. If the recorded sunspot and geomagnetic cycles are extrapolated into the future they predict a new low (“Little Ice Age”) in the years 2050 2100 (i.e. a scenario very different from that presented by IPCC). Our study of the relation between geomagnetism and climate has shown that geomagnetic field changes have played an important role in modulation Earth’s climate. These changes may originate from internal planetary sources (i.e. the Earth’s own geomagnetic field) as well

  15. Results from the SolACES instrument onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Gerhard; Eparvier, Francis; Brunner, Raimund; Woods, Thomas; Jacobi, Christoph; Thuillier, Gerard; Nikutowski, Bernd; Erhardt, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The SolACES instrument has to be seen in the context of more than 50 years of intensive research in EUV spectroscopy in space with solar, terrestrial and planetary airglow and auroral emissions included. The results from four years of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) recordings performed by SolACES will be presented. The first part will cover the instrumental performance with respect to the primary capability of frequent in-orbit re-calibration in the ISS environment. Among the advantages of the measuring system there are multiple instrumental possibilities to cross-check the results providing a high degree of reliability to the spectral irradiance derived. The results from an inter-comparison of the global TEC variability with modelled global TEC using TIMED/SEE and SolACES EUV data and modelled global TEC using F10.7 data will be presented beyond the last solar minimum. The correlation of global TEC data with models using EUV data is higher than the correlation of global TEC with models using F10.7. Deviations of the modelled global TEC data from the modelled ones with SSI EUV data are pointing to geomagnetic disturbances e.g. as caused by solar wind and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Similar to the short-term recordings exhibiting different temporal intensity changes in phase and amplitude with wavelength also the long-term SSI data show temporal shifts with wavelength during the extended solar minimum 2008-2009. Data from the ISS SOLAR instruments SOLSPEC and SolACES are suggesting that each solar emission reaches its own solar minimum. Finally a proposal will be explained to develop SSI indices from the data acquired so far. For the spectral region from 121-400 nm the reconstruction of SSI indices could be performed using the Mg II index and neutron-monitor measurements. The data available from the latest and still on-going space missions could provide the data sets to cover the wavelength range shorter than 121 nm. The path of the data analysis and the results

  16. Photoelectron fluxes observed by FAST compared with model predictions incorporating SNOE observations of the solar soft X-ray irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Solomon, S. C.; Carlson, C. W.; McFadden, J. P.

    2001-12-01

    Photoelectrons are those electrons produced when atoms or molecules in the upper atmosphere are photoionized. These electrons carry the excess energy of the photon remaining from the ionization and can have energies up to and greater than 1 keV. Photoelectrons are important in that they play a significant role in the energetics of the upper atmosphere, resulting in ionization, dissociation, and excitation of atoms and molecules. There have been long standing issues with regard to understanding the magnitude of the terrestrial photoelectron flux as models have not been able to reproduce the observations without scaling the solar soft X-ray irradiance by factors of two to four. The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) spacecraft was launched in August of 1996. While its primary goals focus on the study of auroral energetic particles, in January of 1999 it began making low-latitude observations. From measurements by the FAST energetic electron sensor, upward flowing photoelectron fluxes in the energy range of 50 eV to 1 keV have been obtained. These measurements are in agreement with earlier measurements of the terrestrial photoelectron flux. The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) spacecraft was launched in February of 1998. Since then it has been making daily observations of the solar soft X-ray irradiance in bandpasses of 2 - 7, 6 - 19, and 17 - 20 nm. SNOE observes larger values of the solar soft X-ray irradiance than reported by earlier observations or predicted by empirical models; however, the SNOE observations are in agreement with many suggestions of the solar soft X-ray irradiance obtained from geophysical observations such as airglow and electron densities. These irradiance measurements are used in a photoelectron model that includes transport. Observations of photoelectron fluxes for the first solar rotation of 1999 are modeled. The model photoelectron spectra are in good agreement with the observed photoelectron spectra over most of the 50 eV to 1 keV energy

  17. Detection of Callisto's oxygen atmosphere with the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Spencer, John R.; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; France, Kevin; Osterman, Steven N.

    2015-07-01

    We report the result of a search for evidence of an O2-dominated atmosphere on Callisto, using the high far-ultraviolet sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). Observations of Callisto's leading/Jupiter-facing hemisphere show, for the first time, variable-strength atomic oxygen (O I) emissions with brightness up to 4.7 ± 0.7 Rayleighs for the O I 1304 Å triplet and 1.9 ± 0.4 Rayleighs for the O I 1356 Å doublet, averaged over the 2.5 arcsec. diameter COS aperture. Because the observations were made in Earth's shadow, and are brighter than expected emission from nighttime geocoronal airglow or other plausible sources, we are confident that they originate from Callisto or its immediate vicinity. In addition, COS's limited (∼1 arcsec) spatial resolution implies a 2σ detection of excess 1356 Å emission concentrated on the disk of Callisto itself, with brightness 3.2 ± 1.6 Rayleighs. The (O I 1356 Å)/(O I 1304 Å) emission ratio from Callisto's disk favors dissociative excitation of O2, suggesting that O2 is the dominant atmospheric component rather than other possible oxygen-bearing alternatives. Photoelectrons, rather than magnetospheric electrons, are the most likely source of the dissociative excitation. This detection yields an O2 column density of ∼4 × 1015 cm-2 on the leading/Jupiter facing hemisphere, which implies that Callisto's atmosphere is collisional and is the fourth-densest satellite atmosphere in the Solar System, in addition to being the second-densest O2-rich collisional atmosphere in the Solar System, after Earth. Longitudinal variations in published densities of ionospheric electrons suggest that O2 densities in Callisto's trailing hemisphere, which we did not observe, may be an order of magnitude greater. The aperture-filling emissions imply that there is also an extended corona of predominantly O I 1304 Å emission around Callisto, with observed strength of 1-4 Rayleighs, likely due to solar

  18. Observations of day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to equatorial F-region plasma depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Fagundes

    its behaviour.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora · Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities

  19. Dynamics and Predictability of Deep Propagating Atmospheric Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    An overview will be provided of the first field campaign that attempts to follow deeply propagating gravity waves (GWs) from their tropospheric sources to their mesospheric breakdown. The DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE-NZ) is a comprehensive, airborne and ground-based measurement and modeling program focused on providing a new understanding of GW dynamics and impacts from the troposphere through the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This program will employ the new NSF/NCAR GV (NGV) research aircraft from a base in New Zealand in a 6-week field measurement campaign in June-July 2014. The NGV will be equipped with new lidar and airglow instruments for the DEEPWAVE measurement program, providing temperatures and vertical winds spanning altitudes from immediately above the NGV flight altitude (~13 km) to ~100 km. The region near New Zealand is chosen since all the relevant GW sources occur strongly here, and upper-level winds in austral winter permit GWs to propagate to very high altitudes. Given large-amplitude GWs that propagate routinely into the MLT, the New Zealand region offers an ideal natural laboratory for studying these important GW dynamics and effects impacting weather and climate over a much deeper atmospheric layer than previous campaigns have attempted (0-100 km altitude). The logistics of making measurements in the vicinity of New Zealand are potentially easier than from the Andes and Drake Passage region. A suite of GW-focused modeling and predictability tools will be used to guide NGV flight planning to GW events of greatest scientific significance. These models will also drive scientific interpretation of the GW measurements, together providing answers to the key science questions posed by DEEPWAVE about GW dynamics, morphology, predictability and impacts from 0-100 km. Preliminary results will be presented from high-resolution and adjoint models applied over areas featuring deep wave propagation. The high

  20. Undergraduate Student-built Experiments in Sounding-Rocket and Balloon Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Christian, J. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Lindon, M.; Lusk, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Space physics and aerospace engineering experiments are becoming readily accessible to STEM undergraduates. A number of ionospheric physics experiments and guidance and navigation components were designed, built, integrated, and tested by STEM students at West Virginia University in the 2013-2014 academic year. A main payload was flown on NASA's annual RockSat-C two-stage rocket launched from Wallops Flight Facility in Chincoteague, VA on the morning of June 26, 2014. A high-altitude balloon with a reduced payload was released from Bruceton Mills, WV, prior to the rocket and reached 30,054 m. The geographic distance between the two launch points is small compared to the footprint of geomagnetic and solar-terrestrial disturbances. Aerospace sensors provided flight profiles for each of the two platforms. Daytime E region electron density was measured via a Langmuir probe as a function of altitude from 90 km to the apogee of 117 km. Geomagnetic activity was low (Dst>-7 nT, AEactivity included two high-plasma-density regions measured by NASA's ACE which impacted the magnetosphere producing two sudden impulses at midlatitudes (Dst=+19 and +13 nT). In an airglow experiment, the altitude range of the sodium layer was estimated to be 75-110 km based on in situ measurements of the D2emission line intensity. Acceleration, rotation-rate, and magnetic-field data are useful in reconstructing the trajectory and flight dynamics of the two vehicles and comparing with video from onboard cameras. Participation in RockSat and similar programs is useful in ushering space science and spaceflight concepts in the classroom and lab experience of STEM undergraduates. Lectures, homework, and progress reports were used to connect advanced topics of Earth's space environment and spaceflight to the students' core courses. In several cases the STEM students were guided by graduate students during lab work. Development of the flight payloads was supported by NASA's Undergraduate Student

  1. Distributions of TEC Fluctuations and Losses of Lock Associated with Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, H.; Kikuchi, H.; Tsugawa, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Takano, T.; Shimakura, S.; Shiokawa, K.; Ogawa, T.

    2009-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are local depletions of the electron density in the ionosphere. Due to field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) with various spatial scales, EPBs affect wide-band radio waves and cause scintillations in GPS navigation system. Strong scintillation can cause a GPS receiver to lose lock on GPS signals because of rapid variations of signal amplitude and phase, and limit the availability of carrier phase measurements. Since the scintillation is caused by Fresnel diffraction, the spatial scale of FAIs that causes the scintillation of GPS signals is about 2-300 m. Therefore, loss of phase lock (LOL) on GPS signals is a reference of hundred-meter-scale FAIs. As EPBs are also associated with fluctuations of the total electron content (TEC), the enhancement of Rate of TEC change index (ROTI) occurs around EPBs. Assuming that the altitude of the ionosphere is about 400 km, the velocity of the pierce point of the GPS radio wave at the ionospheric altitude is approximately 70 m/s around the zenith. Thus, ROTI averaged during 5 minutes is a reference of ten-kilometer-scale fluctuations. In this study, we analyzed LOL and 5-min. ROTI associated with EPBs to examine the spatial and temporal scales of electron density disturbances associated with EPBs. We selected 11 EPBs from 630-nm airglow images obtained by all-sky imager at Sata, Japan, in 2001. LOL and ROTI are obtained from GPS data from GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) of Japan, which consists of more than 1000 GPS receivers. As a result, it is shown that both LOL and the enhancement of ROTI are observed in 8 events out of 11 events. The distributions of LOL are approximately consistent with the areas in which the ionospheric electron density is depleted. The enhancements of ROTI are observed in the vicinities of EPBs. The enhancement of ROTI expands especially in the west side of EPBs. After the EPBs pass through, therefore, LOLs are vanished but the enhancements of ROTI last a while. This

  2. The S-NPP VIIRS Day-Night Band On-Orbit Calibration/Characterization and Current State of SDR Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihyan Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The launch of VIIRS on-board the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP on 28 October 2011, marked the beginning of the next chapter on nighttime lights observation started by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s (DMSP OLS sensor more than two decades ago. The VIIRS observes the nighttime lights on Earth through its day-night band (DNB, a panchromatic channel covering the wavelengths from 500 nm to 900 nm. Compared to its predecessors, the VIIRS DNB has a much improved spatial/temporal resolution, radiometric sensitivity and, more importantly, continuous calibration using on-board calibrators (OBCs. In this paper, we describe the current state of the NASA calibration and characterization methodology used in supporting mission data quality assurance and producing consistent mission-wide sensor data records (SDRs through NASA’s Land Product Evaluation and Analysis Tool Element (Land PEATE. The NASA calibration method utilizes the OBCs to determine gains, offset drift and sign-to-noise ratio (SNR over the entire mission. In gain determination, the time-dependent relative spectral response (RSR is used to correct the optical throughput change over time. A deep space view acquired during an S-NPP pitch maneuver is used to compute the airglow free dark offset for DNB’s high gain stage. The DNB stray light is estimated each month from new-moon dark Earth surface observations to remove the excessive stray light over the day-night terminators. As the VIIRS DNB on-orbit calibration is the first of its kind, the evolution of the calibration methodology is evident when the S-NPP VIIRS’s official calibrations are compared with our latest mission-wide reprocessing. In the future, the DNB calibration methodology is likely to continue evolving, and the mission-wide reprocessing is a key to providing consistently calibrated DNB SDRs for the user community. In the meantime, the NASA Land PEATE provides an alternative source to obtain

  3. Identification of gravity wave sources using reverse ray tracing over Indian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pramitha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Reverse ray tracing method is successfully implemented for the first time in the Indian region for identification of the sources and propagation characteristics of the gravity waves observed using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.5° E. Wave amplitudes are also traced back for these wave events by including both radiative and diffusive damping. Background temperature and wind data obtained from MSISE-90 and HWM-07 models, respectively, are used for the ray tracing. For Gadanki region suitability of these models is tested. Further, a climatological model of background atmosphere for Gadanki region has been developed using a long-term of nearly 30 years of observations available from a variety of ground-based (MST radar, radiosonde, MF radar, rocket-, and satellite-borne measurements. For considering real-time atmospheric inputs, ERA-Interim products are utilized. By this reverse ray method, the source locations for nine wave events could be identified to be in the upper troposphere, whereas, for five other events the waves seem to have been ducted in the mesosphere itself. Uncertainty in locating the terminal points in the horizontal direction is estimated to be within 50–100 and 150–300 km for Gadanki and Hyderabad wave events, respectively. This uncertainty arises mainly due to non-consideration of the day-to-day variability in tidal amplitudes. As no convection in-and-around the terminal points are noticed, it is unlikely to be the source. Interestingly, large (~9 m s−1 km−1 vertical shear in the horizontal wind is noted near the ray terminal points (at 10–12 km altitude and is identified to be the source for generating the nine wave events. Conditions prevailing at the terminal points for each of the 14 events are also provided. These events provide leads to a greater understanding of the tropical lower and upper atmospheric coupling through gravity waves.

  4. Tle Triangulation Campaign by Japanese High School Students as a Space Educational Project of the Ssh Consortium Kochi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Okamoto, Sumito; Miyoshi, Terunori; Takamura, Yuzaburo; Aoshima, Akira; Hinokuchi, Jin

    and sprite halos with stripes like wave structures on airglow were successfully imaged in January 2010. In this talk, four years activities of the SSH consortium Kochi will be presented by participating high-school students and teachers with their own impressions.

  5. Recent Activities on the Embrace Space Weather Regional Warning Center: the New Space Weather Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Dal Lago, Alisson; Mendes, Odim; Batista, Inez S.; SantAnna, Nilson; Gatto, Rubens; Takahashi, Hisao; Costa, D. Joaquim; Banik Padua, Marcelo; Campos Velho, Haroldo

    2016-07-01

    the ionospheric profiles in two equatorial sites and in two low latitude sites; (b) several solar radio telescopes to monitor solar activity (under development); (c) the matrix of the GNSS TEC map over South America; (d) the Embrace Airglow All-sky Imagers Network (Embrace GlowNet); and (d) the Embrace Magnetometer Network (Embrace Magnet), all of them in South America. Also, the system allows subscription to space weather alerts and reports. Contacting Author: C. M. Denardini (clezio.denardin@inpe.br)

  6. First measurement of helium on Mars: Implications for the problem of radiogenic gases on the terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Bowyer, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Mcdonald, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    108 +/- 11 photons of the martian He 584-A airglow detected by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite during a 2-day exposure (January 22-23, 1993) correspond to the effective disk average intensity of 43 +/- 10 Rayleigh (Ra). Radiative transfer calculations, using a model atmosphere appropriate to the conditions of the observation and having an exospheric temperature of 210 +/- 20 K, result in a He mixing ratio of 1.1 +/- 0.4 ppm in the lower atmosphere. Nonthermal escape of helium is due to electron impact ionization and pickup of He(+) by the solar wind, to collisions with hot oxygen atoms, and to charge exchange with molecular species with corresponding column loss rates of 1.4 x 10(exp 5), 3 x 10(exp 4), and 7 x 10(exp 3)/sq cm/s, respectively. The lifetime of helium on Mars is 5 x 10(exp 4) years. the He outgassing rate, coupled with the Ar-40 atmospheric abundance and with the K:U:Th ratio measured in the surface rocks, is used as input to a single two-reservoir degassing model which is applied to Mars and then to Venus. A similar model with known abundances if K, U, and Th is applied to Earth. The models for Earth and Mars presume loss of all argon accumulated in the atmospheres during the first billion years by large-scale meteorite and planetesimal impacts. The models show that the degassing coefficients for all three planets may be approximated by function delta = delta(sub 0) x (t(sub 0)/t)(exp 1/2) with delta(sub 0) = 0.1, 0.04, and 0.0125 Byr for Earth, Venus, and Mars, respectively. After a R(exp 2) correction this means that outgassing processes on Venus and Mars are weaker than on Earth by factors of 3 and 30, respectively. Mass ratios of U and Th are almost the same for all three planets, while potassiumis depleted by a factor of 2 in Venus and Mars. Mass ratio of helium and argon are close to 5 x 10(exp -9) and 2 x 10(exp -8) g/g in the interiors of all three planets. The implications of these results are discussed.

  7. 铟镓砷焦平面阵列在微光夜视应用中的潜力及前景%The Potential and Prospect of Indium Gallium Arsenide Focal Plane Array Applied to Low Light Level Night Vision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘京生; 孙建宁; 金戈; 任玲; 毛汉祺; 顾燕; 郭一亮; 苏德坦

    2014-01-01

    得益于夜气辉在短波红外(SWIR)0.9~1.7μm波段的自然辐射数十倍强于夜天空在可见光和近红外(NIR)0.4~0.9μm波段的辐射,SWIR成像成为应用于微光条件下的成像探测的最佳选择,由晶格匹配In0.53Ga0.47As/InP制作InGaAs焦平面阵列(Focal Plane Array,FPA),灵敏于0.9~1.7μm波段,在整个响应波段具有超过70%的量子效率,和室温非制冷工作的极低的暗电流。通过减薄基底,还可将InGaAs FPA的短波限延伸至可见光波段的0.4μm。最近几年,超低暗电流、低读出噪声、大面阵和小像素尺寸的InGaAs FPA的开发取得了实质性的进展,特别是暗电流得到了数量级的降低,InGaAs FPA探测器已经显露出应用于微光夜视的极大潜力,并且还通过采用更复杂的温度相关的非均匀校正算法实现了无TEC的低功耗工作,基于超低噪声的密集阵列InGaAs FPA的SWIR成像技术有望成为新一代夜视技术的一个重要组成部份。%The shortwave infrared(SWIR)spectral irradiance in the 0.9μm to 1.7μm band which caused by night airglow is several ten times stronger than the irradiance in the visible and near infrared realm of 0.4μm to 0.9μm of the night sky, so SWIR imaging is the best choice for the imaging detection under low light level condition. The Indium Gallium Arsenide(InGaAs)focal plane array(FPA)sensors based on lattice matched In0.53Ga0.47As/InP is sensitive to SWIR light whose wavelength is from 0.9μm to 1.7μm, matching the spectral irradiance caused by night airglow, and have exceeded quantum efficiency of 70%over whole response spectral range, as well as with very low dark current while working at room temperature. Removing the InP substrate from the FPA allows extending cutoff wavelength to visible region of 0.4μm. The work on InGaAs FPA with ultra low dark current, low readout noise, large format and small pixel size has been progressing substantially in

  8. Multi-wavelength imaging observations of plasma depletions over Kavalur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. S. Sinha

    small regions in the northern part of the image and then in about 90 min time, they attain their peak brightness and encompass the entire field-of-view in about 2 hrs 30 min. In some cases, brightness patterns contain one or two well developed plasma depletions within them. (f The brightness patterns reported here differ from the earlier observations in that they do not show any differential behaviour in the direction of movement before and after the midnight, and that they are present for extended periods of time as large as 6 hrs.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (air-glow and aurora; Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities

  9. A Balloon-Borne Telescope System for Planetary Atmosphere and Plasma Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kanazawa, T.; Shoji, Y.; Sawakami, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Sato, T.; Sakanoi, T.

    2007-12-01

    A telescope floating in the polar stratosphere can continuously monitor planets for more than 24 hours. Thin, clear and stable air of the stratosphere makes it possible to observe planets in a condition free from cloud with fine seeing and high atmospheric transmittance. Moreover, a balloon-borne telescope system is less expensive compared with a huge terrestrial telescope or a direct planetary probe mission. Targets of a balloon-borne telescope system will extend over various atmospheric and plasma phenomena on almost all the planets, i.e., a sodium tail of Mercury, lightning, airglow and aurora in the atmospheres of Venus, Jupiter and Saturn, escaping atmospheres of the Earth-type planets, satellite-induced luminous events in the Jovian atmosphere, etc. The first target is global dynamics of the Venusian atmosphere by detecting cloud motion in UV and NIR imagery. A decoupling mechanism and a pair of control moment gyros (CMGs) are mounted at the top of the gondola. The decoupling mechanism isolates the gondola from a balloon and also transfers an excess angular momentum of the CMGs to the balloon. The attitude of the gondola is stabilized at a constant sun azimuthal angle so that a solar cell panel faces to the sun. A 300 mm F30 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope is installed at the bottom of the gondola. DC/DC converters, a PC, a high voltage power supply for a piezo-electrically moving mirror and digital video recorders are contained in a sealed cell. The azimuthal angle is detected by a sun-sensor. A PC processes sensor output to control DC motors used in the decoupling mechanism and CMGs with an accuracy in azimuthal attitude of about 0.5 deg. The two-axis gimbal mount of the telescope is controlled by the same PC, guiding an object within a field-of-view of a guide telescope. Residual tracking error is detected by a position sensitive photomultiplier tube and corrected by the two-axis moving mirror installed in the optical system. The optical path is divided into

  10. Subauroral red arcs as a conjugate phenomenon: comparison of OV1-10 satellite data with numerical calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available This study compares the OV1-10 satellite measurements of the integral airglow intensities at 630 nm in the SAR arc regions observed in the northern and southern hemisphere as a conjugate phenomenon, with the model results obtained using the time-dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth ionosphere and plasmasphere (the IZMIRAN model during the geomagnetic storm of the period 15–17 February 1967. The major enhancements to the IZMIRAN model developed in this study are the inclusion of He+ ions (three major ions: O+, H+, and He+, and three ion temperatures, the updated photochemistry and energy balance equations for ions and electrons, the diffusion of NO+ and O2+ ions and O(1D and the revised electron cooling rates arising from their collisions with unexcited N2, O2 molecules and N2 molecules at the first vibrational level. The updated model includes the option to use the models of the Boltzmann or non-Boltzmann distributions of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen. Deviations from the Boltzmann distribution for the first five vibrational levels of N2 were calculated. The calculated distribution is highly non-Boltzmann at vibrational levels v > 2 and leads to a decrease in the calculated electron density and integral intensity at 630 nm in the northern and southern hemispheres in comparison with the electron density and integral intensity calculated using the Boltzmann vibrational distribution of N2. It is found that the intensity at 630 nm is very sensitive to the oxygen number densities. Good agreement between the modelled and measured intensities is obtained provided that at all altitudes of the southern hemisphere a reduction of about factor 1.35 in MSIS-86 atomic oxygen densities is included in the IZMIRAN model with the non-Boltzmann vibrational distribution of N2

  11. NCU-SWIP Space Weather Instrumentation Payload - Intelligent Sensors On Efficient Real-Time Distributed LUTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tse-Liang; Dmitriev, Alexei; Chu, Yen-Hsyang; Jiang, Shyh-Biau; Chen, Li-Wu

    The NCU-SWIP - Space Weather Instrumentation Payload is developed for simultaneous in-situ and remote measurement of space weather parameters for cross verifications. The measurements include in-situ electron density, electron temperature, magnetic field, the deceleration of satellite due to neutral wind, and remotely the linear cumulative intensities of oxygen ion air-glows at 135.6nm and 630.0nm along the flight path in forward, nader, and backward directions for tomographic reconstruction of the electron density distribution underneath. This instrument package is suitable for micro satellite constellation to establish nominal space weather profiles and, thus, to detect abnormal variations as the signs of ionospheric disturbances induced by severe atmospheric weather, or earth quake - mantle movement through their Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Mechanism. NCU-SWIP is constructed with intelligent sensor modules connected by common bus with their functionalities managed by an efficient distributed real-time system LUTOS. The same hierarchy can be applied to the level of satellite constellation. For example SWIP's in a constellation in coordination with the GNSS Occultation Experiment TriG planned for the Formosa-7 constellation, data can be cross correlated for verification and refinement for real-time, stable and reliable measurements. A SWIP will be contributed to the construction of a MAI Micro Satellite for verification. The SWIP consists of two separate modules: the SWIP main control module and the SWIP-PMTomo sensor module. They are respectively a 1.5kg W120xL120xH100 (in mm) box with forward facing 120mmPhi circular disk probe on a boom top edged at 470mm height and a 7.2kg W126xL590x372H (in mm) slab containing 3 legs looking downwards along the flight path, while consuming the maximum electricity of 10W and 12W. The sensors are 1) ETPEDP measuring 16bits floating potentials for electron temperature range of 1000K to 3000K and 24bits electron

  12. Obituary: Herbert Gursky, 1930-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doschek, George; Dahlburg, Jill

    2007-12-01

    imaging telescope (EIT) on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. These experiments have shed considerable light on how solar activity affects the near-Earth environment with many potential space weather applications. In high-energy astronomy, Dr. Gursky made many contributions. He provided scientific oversight for the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) Space Test Program spacecraft that contained five NRL instruments: the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment, the Global Imaging Monitor of the Ionosphere (GIMI), the High Resolution Airglow/Aurora Spectroscopy (HIRAAS) experiment, the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Photometer (EUVIP), and the Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) instrument. He continued his interest in X-ray astronomy with the USA experiment, which obtained observations of many celestial sources such as galactic binary X-ray sources and pulsars. Always with an eye toward applications, Dr. Gursky was interested in using X-ray sources, specifically X-ray pulsars, as precise clocks to provide spacecraft with autonomous timing and navigation. Dr. Gursky also supported research in gamma ray astrophysics, such as the development of NRL's Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) for the NASA Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite, and analysis of solar flare gamma ray spectra obtained from the NASA Solar Maximum Mission. In atmospheric science, Dr. Gursky particularly encouraged practical applications of basic research. He recognized the importance of remote sensing for space weather, which resulted in the development at NRL of operational ultraviolet sensors on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft that are now providing environmental data products to the Air Force Space Weather Agency. He initiated a program in middle atmosphere research that has been enormously successful and has spawned numerous experimental and theoretical advances, such as the Middle Atmosphere