WorldWideScience

Sample records for airglow intensities measured

  1. Hydroxyl (6−2 airglow emission intensity ratios for rotational temperature determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lowe

    Full Text Available OH(6–2 Q1/P1 and R1/P1 airglow emission intensity ratios, for rotational states up to j' = 4.5, are measured to be lower than implied by transition probabilities published by various authors including Mies, Langhoff et al. and Turnbull and Lowe. Experimentally determined relative values of j' transitions yield OH(6–2 rotational temperatures 2 K lower than Langhoff et al., 7 K lower than Mies and 13 K lower than Turnbull and Lowe.Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; pressure, density and temperature

  2. Equatorial Spread F structures and associated airglow intensity variations observed over Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Co-ordinated campaigns have been conducted from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, dip lat 6.4° N by operating simultaneously the Indian MST radar in ionospheric coherent backscatter mode and by monitoring thermosphere airglow line emissions (630.0 nm and 777.4 nm using a narrow band multi-wavelength scanning photometer during January-March for the past five years (2003–2007 and also during April 2006, as a special campaign. Simultaneous radar and optical observations reveal optical signatures corresponding to a variety of equatorial spread F (ESF structures. The optical signatures corresponding to ESF structures with wave-like bottomside modulations with plasma plumes, confined bottomside flat and wavelike structures, vertically extended plume structure in the absence of bottomside structure apart from the classical plasma depletions and enhancements are obtained during these campaigns. The plasma depletions and enhancements were identified using optical measurements. In addition, estimations of zonal wavelength of the bottomside structures and the inference of shears in the zonal plasma drift in the presence of confined structures, were carried out using bi-directional airglow measurements. Furthermore, it is found that the vertical columnar intensity of OI 630.0 nm airglow exceeded the slanted columnar intensity in the presence of large bottomside structure. The need for the appropriate physical mechanisms for some of the ESF structures and their characterizations with optical observations are discussed.

  3. Measurements of airglow on Maunakea at Gemini Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Smith, Adam; Stephens, Andrew; Smirnova, Olesja

    2016-07-01

    Gemini Observatory on Maunakea has been collecting optical and infrared science data for almost 15 years. We have begun a program to analyze imaging data from two of the original facility instruments, GMOS and NIRI, in order to measure sky brightness levels in multiple infrared and optical broad-band filters. The present work includes data from mid-2016 back through late-2008. We present measured background levels as a function of several operational quantities (e.g. moon phase, hours from twilight, season). We find that airglow is a significant contributor to background levels in several filters. Gemini is primarily a queue scheduled telescope, with observations being optimally executed in order to provide the most efficient use of telescope time. We find that while most parameters are well-understood, the atmospheric airglow remains challenging to predict. This makes it difficult to schedule observations which require dark skies in these filters, and we suggest improvements to ensure data quality.

  4. Atmospheric wave induced O2 and OH airglow intensity variations: effect of vertical wavelength and damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gobbi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available From nocturnal variations of the airglow O2 (0-1 and OH Meinel (6-2 band emission intensity and the rotational temperature, gravity waves and the damping effect in the MLT region were investigated. The data set was obtained from photometer measurements at Rikubetsu (43.5° N, 143.8° E, Japan, from March 2004 to August 2005. The ratio of the amplitude of oscillation and their phase difference between the two emissions were calculated when simultaneous periodic variations were observed. The ratio showed a linear correlation with the phase difference. The vertical wavelength and damping rate were estimated by using a model calculation carried out by previous works. The results show that the wave damping is significant when the vertical wavelength is shorter than 30–40 km. Krassovsky's parameter η, which represents a ratio between the emission intensity and temperature oscillations, was also calculated. The results show that the η also depends on the damping effect.

  5. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan ultraviolet airglow intensity dependence with solar zenith angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Ajello, J. M.; Holsclaw, G. M.; West, R. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the airglow (dayglow and nightglow) of Titan over a range of solar zenith angles (SZA) from 14 to 150° on five separate observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. The modeling of the solar cycle normalized UVIS observations indicates that a Chapman layer function provides a satisfactory fit to the intensity of the EUV and FUV airglow molecular emissions of the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band system (LBH a1Πg→X1>∑g+), the Carroll-Yoshino band system (c4'1>∑u+→X1>∑g+), and of several atomic multiplets of nitrogen (NI, II) as a function of SZA. This result shows that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by processes (photoelectrons and photodissociation) involving the solar EUV flux rather than magnetospheric particle precipitation that dominates emission excitation in the nightglow.

  6. Partially light-controlled imager based on liquid crystal plate and image intensifier for aurora and airglow measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanhe; Cao, Xiangang; Liu, Hanchen; Shepherd, G G; Liu, Shulin; Gao, Haiyang; Yang, Xusan; Wu, Yong; Wang, Shuiwei

    2012-04-20

    In order to obtain information both of aurora and airglow in one image by the same detector, a PLCI based on liquid crystal plate LCP and super second-generation image intensifier SSGII is proposed in this research. The detection thresholds of the CCD for aurora and airglow are calculated. For the detectable illumination range of 10(4)-10(-2) lx, the corresponding electron count is 1.57×10(5) - 0.2 for every pixel of CCD. The structure and work principle of the PLCI are described. An LC is introduced in the front of CCD to decrease the intensities of aurora in overexposure areas by means of controlling transmittances pixel by pixel, while an image intensifier is set between the LC and CCD to increase the intensity of the weak airglow. The modulation transfer function MTF of this system is calculated as 0.391 at a Nyquist frequency of 15 lp/mm. The curve of transmittance with regard to gray level for the LC is obtained by calibration experiment. Based on the design principle, the prototype is made and used to take photos of objects under strong light greater than 2×10(5) lx. The clear details of [symbols: see text] presented in the image indicate that the PLCI can greatly improve the imaging quality. The theoretical calculations and experiment results prove that this device can extend the dynamic range and it provides a more effective method for upper atmospheric wind measurement.

  7. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at Kolhapur (India)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Ghodpage; Devendraa Siingh; R P Singh; G K Mukherjee; P Vohat; A K Singh

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous photometric measurements of the OI 557.7 nm and OH (7, 2) band from a low latitude station, Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours have been recorded. Some of these waves having subharmonic tidal oscillation periods 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours propagate upward with velocity lying in the range 1.6–11.3 m/s and the vertical wave length lying between 28.6 and 163 kms. The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application of these waves in studying the thermal structure of the region is discussed.

  8. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien T.; Zemcov, Michael; Battle, John; Bock, James J.; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Meek, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using a λ/Δλ = 320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. At low airmasses, the absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 ± 30 nW m-2 sr-1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ˜100 s integrations the noise performance of the instrument does not appear to significantly degrade from expectations, giving a proof of concept that near-infrared line intensity mapping may be feasible from ground-based sites.

  10. A method for the retrieval of atomic oxygen density and temperature profiles from ground-based measurements of the O(+)(2D-2P) 7320 A twilight airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, J. A.; Torr, D. G.; Richards, P. G.; Torr, M. R.; Sharp, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for extracting thermospheric profiles of the atomic-oxygen density and temperature, using ground-based measurements of the O(+)(2D-2P) doublet at 7320 and 7330 A in the twilight airglow. In this method, a local photochemical model is used to calculate the 7320-A intensity; the method also utilizes an iterative inversion procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method described by Press et al. (1986). The results demonstrate that, if the measurements are only limited by errors due to Poisson noise, the altitude profiles of neutral temperature and atomic oxygen concentration can be determined accurately using currently available spectrometers.

  11. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  12. A Method of Inversing the Peak Density of Atomic Oxygen Vertical Distribution in the MLT Region From the OI (557.7nm) Night Airglow Intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Gao; J.Y. Xu; W. Yuan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, using the MSISE-90 model as the reference atmosphere, we discuss the feasibility and method of deducing the peak densities of the undisturbed atomic oxygen profiles in the MLT region (the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region) from OI (557.7 nm) night airglow intersities. The peak densities for different seasons, latitudes and longitudes are deduced from OI (557.7nm) airglow intensities through this expression. We analyze the features of inversion relative errors and discuss the influence of the variations in temperature on inversion errors. The results indicate that all inversion errors are less than 5% except for those at high altitudes in the summer hemisphere. And the impact of the variations in temperature on errors is not significant.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hien T; Battle, John; Bock, James J; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Philip; Meek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using an R=320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. The absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 +/- 30 nW m^-2 sr^-1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ~100s integrations the noise performance of the instrument ...

  14. Long-term ozone decline and its effect on night airglow intensity of Li 6708 Å at Varanasi (25°N, 83°E) and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; I Saha; S Mukhopadhyay

    2011-04-01

    A critical analysis has been made on the long-term yearly and seasonal variations of ozone concentration at Varanasi (25°N, 83°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of Li 6708 Å line at Varanasi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of Li 6708 Å line has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and seasonal variations of intensities of Li 6708 Å line for the above two stations are shown and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of Li 6708 Å line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  15. Ozone decline and its effect on night airglow intensity of Na 5893°A at Dumdum (22.5°N, 88.5° E) and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; S C Nandi

    2006-10-01

    The paper presents the effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of Na 5893 A line at Dumdum (22.5°N, 88.5°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic service station. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of Na 5893 A line will also be affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The nature of yearly variation and seasonal variation of the intensity of Na 5893 A line for the above two stations are shown and compared. It is shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of Na 5893 A line is comparatively more at Halley Bay due to the dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration. A possible explanation for this dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration is also mentioned.

  16. Enhanced airglow at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Emilie; Esposito, Larry; Wahlund, Jan-Erik

    2016-06-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument made thousand of observations of Titan since its arrival in the Saturnian system in 2004, but only few of them have been analyzed yet. Using the imaging capability of UVIS combined to a big data analytics approach, we have been able to uncover an unexpected pattern in this observations: on several occasions the Titan airglow exhibits an enhanced brightness by approximately a factor of 2, generally combined with a lower altitude of the airglow emission peak. These events typically last from 10 to 30 minutes and are followed and preceded by an airglow of regular and expected level of brightness and altitude. Observations made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instrument onboard Cassini allowed us to correlate the enhanced airglow observed on T-32 with an electron burst. The timing of the burst and the level of energetic electrons (1 keV) observed by CAPS correspond to a brighter and lower than typical airglow displayed on the UVIS data. Furthermore, during T-32 Titan was inside the Saturn's magnetosheath and thus more subject to bombardment by energetic particles. However, our analysis demonstrates that the presence of Titan inside the magnetosheath is not a necessary condition for the production of an enhanced airglow, as we detected other similar events while Titan was within Saturn's magnetosphere. The study presented here aims to a better understanding of the interactions of Titan's upper atmosphere with its direct environment.

  17. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  18. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer - BEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D. M.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV airglow rocket spectrometer (BEARS) instrument is described. The instrument was designed in particular to measure the dominant lines of atomic oxygen in the FUV and EUV dayglow at 1356, 1304, 1027, and 989 A, which is the ultimate source of airglow emissions. The optical and mechanical design of the instrument, the detector, electronics, calibration, flight operations, and results are examined.

  19. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub o)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub o)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an insitu intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  20. Venus Night Airglow Distibutions and Variability: NCAR VTGCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Amanda; Bougher, S.; Gerard, J.; Rafkin, S.; Foster, B.

    2008-09-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermospheric general circulation model for Venus (VTGCM) is producing results that are comparative to Pioneer Venus and Venus Express data. The model is a three dimensional model that can calculate temperatures, zonal winds, meridional winds, vertical winds, and concentration of specific species. The VTGCM can also compute the O2-IR and NO-UV night airglow intensity distributions. With a lower boundary set at 70 Km and a range of sensitivity tests, the VTGCM is able to show consistent set of results with the nightside temperature and the night airglows. These results can show possible controlling parameters of the O2-IR, NO-UV night airglow layers, and the nightside hot spot. Being able to understand the night airglow distribution and variability provides valuable insight into the changing circulation of Venus’ upper atmosphere and leads to an overall planetary perception of the atmospheric dynamics.

  1. Simulations of airglow variations induced by the CO2 increase and solar cycle variation from 1980 to 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tai-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Airglow intensity and Volume Emission Rate (VER) variations induced by the increase of CO2 gas concentration and F10.7 variation (used as a proxy for the 11-year solar cycle variation) were investigated for the period from 1980 to 1991, encompassing a full solar cycle. Two airglow models are used to simulate the induced variations of O(1S) greenline, O2(0,1) atmospheric band , and OH(8,3) airglow for this study. The results show that both the airglow intensities and peak VERs correlate positively with the F10.7 solar cycle variation and display a small linear trend due to the increase of CO2 gas concentration. The solar-cycle induced airglow intensity variations show that O(1S) greenline has the largest variation (~26%) followed by the O2(0,1) atmospheric band (~23%) and then OH(8,3) airglow (~8%) over the 11 year timespan. The magnitudes of the induced airglow intensity variations by the increase of CO2 gas concentration are about an order of magnitude smaller than those by the F10.7 solar cycle variation. In general, the F10.7 solar cycle variation and CO2 increase do not seem to systematically alter the VER peak altitude of the airglow emissions, though the OH(8,3) VER peak altitude moves up slightly during the years when the F10.7 value falls under 100 SFU.

  2. Sound intensity and its measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    The paper summarises the basic theory of sound intensity and its measurement and gives an overview of the state of the art with particular emphasis on recent developments in the field. Eighty references are given, most of which to literature published in the past two years. The paper describes...

  3. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations on the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station at Arequipa, Peru (16.2 S, 71.4 W geographic, 3.2 S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridional wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22h LT lasting for 1 to 2 hours. The temperature increases of 100K or more existed only in the poleware (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge. (Author)

  4. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether J.W. Jr.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations of the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station of Arequipa. Peru (16.2/sup 0/S, 71.4/sup 0/W geographic, 3.2/sup 0/S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridonal wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22/sup h/ LT lasting for 1 or 2 hours. The temperature increases of 10 K or more existed only in the poleward (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge.

  5. Mesoscale field-aligned irregularity structures (FAIs) of airglow associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Longchang; Xu, Jiyao; Wang, Wenbin; Yue, Xinan; Yuan, Wei; Ning, Baiqi; Zhang, Donghe; Meneses, F. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report the evolution (generation, amplification, and dissipation) of optically observed mesoscale field-aligned irregularity structures (FAIs) (~150 km) associated with a medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID) event. There have not been observations of mesoscale FAIs of airglow before. The mesoscale FAIs were generated in an airglow-depleted front of southwestward propagating MSTIDs that were simultaneously observed by an all-sky imager, a GPS monitor, and a digisonde around Xinglong (40.4°N, 30.5° magnetic latitude), China, on 17/18 February 2012. A normalized cross-correlation method has been used to obtain the velocities of mesoscale FAIs and MSTIDs. The mesoscale FAIs had an obvious northwestward relative velocity to main-body MSTIDs (about 87.0 m/s on average). The direction of this relative velocity was roughly parallel to the depleted fronts. Furthermore, the evolution of the mesoscale FAIs was mostly controlled by the intensity of the depleted fronts. Occurred in a highly elevated ionosphere that had a total electron content depletion associated with large negative airglow perturbations (-25%), the mesoscale FAIs grew rapidly when they experienced southeastward wind, which had a speed of about 100 m/s and were measured by a Fabry-Perot interferometer. A northeastward polarization electric field within a depleted airglow front can play a controlling role in the development of the mesoscale FAIs. The electric field can significantly elevate the ionosphere and move the mesoscale FAIs northwestward by the E × B drift. The processes for the generation and development of the polarization electric field and the mesoscale FAIs, however, need further study.

  6. Issues in Quantitative Analysis of Ultraviolet Imager (UV) Data: Airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    The GGS Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) has proven to be especially valuable in correlative substorm, auroral morphology, and extended statistical studies of the auroral regions. Such studies are based on knowledge of the location, spatial, and temporal behavior of auroral emissions. More quantitative studies, based on absolute radiometric intensities from UVI images, require a more intimate knowledge of the instrument behavior and data processing requirements and are inherently more difficult than studies based on relative knowledge of the oval location. In this study, UVI airglow observations are analyzed and compared with model predictions to illustrate issues that arise in quantitative analysis of UVI images. These issues include instrument calibration, long term changes in sensitivity, and imager flat field response as well as proper background correction. Airglow emissions are chosen for this study because of their relatively straightforward modeling requirements and because of their implications for thermospheric compositional studies. The analysis issues discussed here, however, are identical to those faced in quantitative auroral studies.

  7. Yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone over New Delhi (29°N, 77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), British Antarctic Survey Station and its effect on night airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) for the period 1979–2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; D K Saha; D Sarkar

    2012-12-01

    A critical analysis made on the long-term monthly, seasonal, yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone (TCO) concentration at New Delhi (29°N,77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station reveals more decline in yearly mean ozone concentration at Halley Bay than at New Delhi from 1979 to 2005. The nature of variations of monthly mean TCO during the months of August and September was the most identical with that of yearly mean ozone values at New Delhi and Halley Bay, respectively, for the same period. Annual cycles of TCO over these stations are completely different for the above period. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of OH(8, 3) line at New Delhi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and annual cycle of intensities of OH(8, 3) line for the above two stations are depicted and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of OH(8, 3) line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  8. OH Airglow and Equatorial Variations Observed by ISUAL Instrument on Board the FORMOSAT 2 Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Bai Nee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OH airglow observed by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning instrument on board the FORMOSAT 2 satellite is reported in this paper. The satellite is sun-synchronous and it returns to the same orbit at the same local time daily. By using this property, we can study the upper atmosphere in detail. With a CCD camera, ISUAL has measured the emission layers of OH Meinel band at 630 nm for several two-week periods in 2004 and 2007 in equatorial regions. ISUAL images are snapshots of the atmosphere 250 km (height _ 1200 km (horizontal distance. These images of OH airglow are analyzed to derive its peak height and latitudinal variations. ISUAL observation is unique in its capability of continuous observation of the upper atmosphere as the satellite travels from south to north along a specific orbit. However, 630 nm filter also measured O(1D at 200 km, and there are interferences between O(1D and OH airglows as as observed from a distance in space. We have studied the overlap of two airglows by simulations, and our final analyses show that OH airglow can be correctly derived with its average peak height of 89 _ 2.1 km usually lying within _ latitude about the equator. ISUAL data reveal detailed structures of equatorial OH airglow such as the existences of a few secondary maxima within the equatorial regions, and the oscillations of the peak latitudes. These results are discussed and compared with previous reports.

  9. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. J. Evans

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 87 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6 % of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A very faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been detected in the night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments. Through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The altitude profile of the new airglow emission has also been measured. The similarity of the altitude profiles of the FeO* and NiO* emissions also suggests the emission is NiO as both can originate from reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone. The observed NiO* to FeO* ratio exhibits considerable variability; possible causes of this observed variation are briefly discussed.

  10. Collocated infrasound/airglow observations of eruptive activity at Etna volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio; Wüst, Sabine; Schmidt, Carsten; Kramer, Ricarda; Bittner, Michael

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the FP7 ARISE design study project, a collocated infrasound and airglow observation campaign has been organized on Etna volcano. The experiment, carried out during the first 2 years of the project (January 2012-December 2013), consists of simultaneous observations with an infrasound array, operated by UNIFI, and a GRIPS airglow spectrometers, operated by DLR. The infrasound array, deployed on the eastern flank of the volcano at ~2000 m elevation and at a distance of ~5 km from the active craters, allows to detect and analyse infrasound radiated by eruptive activity from Etna volcano and provides the detailed time history of the infrasonic pressure related to the Etna explosive activity. The GRIPS spectrometer is deployed in the city of Catania at a distance of ~ 30 km from the craters and targeting the sky above the summit craters, allowing to measure temperature fluctuations of the airglow layer and thus to retrieve pressure fluctuations in the mesopause region. Given the high efficiency of the Etna volcano to radiate infrasound, the campaign aimed to study the infrasound propagation from the ground to the high atmosphere, as well as to investigate relationship between the eruptive plume and the atmospheric dynamics. Mass injection into a stratified atmosphere results into gravity waves controlled by the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. Here volcanic eruption, able to inject rapidly a large quantity of hot material into a stratified atmosphere is able to excite gravity waves into the atmosphere, that in turn will control the evolution of the eruptive umbrella clouds. Moreover, gravity waves generated by atmospheric dynamics can somehow control the evolution and dispersal of eruptive plume. Gravity waves during the 2012-2013 period are detected from GRIPS measurements, and detailed infrasonic time history is derived from infrasound observation. Here activity from Etna volcano during the experiment was very intense, and was punctuated by 30 lava fountain

  11. OH Airglow and Equatorial Variations Observed by ISUAL Instrument on Board the FORMOSAT 2 Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Bai Nee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OH airglow observed by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning instrument on board the FORMOSAT 2 satellite is reported in this paper. The satellite is sun-synchronous and it returns to the same orbit at the same local time daily. By using this property, we can study the upper atmosphere in detail. With a CCD camera, ISUAL has measured the emission layers of OH Meinel band at 630 nm for several two-week periods in 2004 and 2007 in equatorial regions. ISUAL images are snapshots of the atmosphere 250 km (height ¡_ 1200 km (horizontal distance. These images of OH airglow are analyzed to derive its peak height and latitudinal variations. ISUAL observation is unique in its capability of continuous observation of the upper atmosphere as the satellite travels from south to north along a specific orbit. However, 630 nm filter also measured O(1D at 200 km, and there are interferences between O(1D and OH airglows as as observed from a distance in space. We have studied the overlap of two airglows by simulations, and our final analyses show that OH airglow can be correctly derived with its average peak height of 89 ¡_ 2.1 km usually lying within ¡_10¢X latitude about the equator. ISUAL data reveal detailed structures of equatorial OH airglow such as the existences of a few secondary maxima within the equatorial regions, and the oscillations of the peak latitudes. These results are discussed and compared with previous reports.

  12. On applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium approach for retrieval of O and H mesospheric distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the airglow emission and ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Alexander; Belikovich, Mikhail; Kulikov, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Atomic oxygen and hydrogen are known to be among key components for the photochemistry and energy balance of the Earth's atmosphere between approximately 80 and 100 km altitude (mesopause region). Therefore, obtaining information about the vertical distributions of O and H concentrations is an important task in studies of this region. Solving of this problem is rather difficult due to the absence of regular methods which allow one to direct measurements of distributions of these components in mesosphere. However, indirect methods used to retrieve O and H distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the OH and O2(1D) airglow emission, as well as the data of IR and microwave O3 measurements have a sufficiently long development history. These methods are rooted in the use of the condition of photochemical equilibrium of ozone density in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. A significant factor is that an insufficient volume of such measurement data forces researchers to use approximate ("truncated") photochemical-equilibrium conditions. In particular, it is assumed that in the daytime the ozone production reaction is perfectly balanced by ozone photodissociation, whereas during the night the only ozone sink is the reaction of ozone with atomic hydrogen, which, in its turn, leads to formation of excited OH and airglow emission of the latter. The presentation analyzes applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium conditions both in the total and truncated forms for description of the spatio-temporal evolution of mesospheric ozone during a year. The analysis is based on year-long time series generated by a 3D chemical transport model, which reproduces correctly various types of atmosphere dynamics in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. These data are used to determine statistics of the ratio between the correct (calculated dynamically) distributions of the O3 density and its uncontracted and truncated equilibrium values for the conditions of the

  13. Intensive Measurement Designs for Research on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Philippe; Macdonald, Stuart W S; Hofer, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    Intensive measurement burst designs permit analysis of behavioral and biological processes as they unfold over short and long periods of time and providing the opportunity to identify change from an individual's normative level of functioning. The measurement burst design permits statistical decomposition of short-term variation and learning effects that overlay normative aging and provide stronger bases for detecting accelerated change due to pathological processes. We provide an overview of design features and analysis of measurement burst data in Project MIND. The objective of intensive measurement designs is to obtain greater resolution of processes of interest that permit reliable and sensitive assessments of functioning and change in functioning and of key determinants underlying short-term variation and long-term aging and health-related change.

  14. Satellite-based observations of tsunami-induced mesosphere airglow perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ming; Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Meng, Xing; Langley, Richard B.; Hunt, Linda A.

    2017-01-01

    Tsunami-induced airglow emission perturbations were retrieved by using space-based measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broad-band Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics spacecraft. At and after the time of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake on 11 March 2011, and the Chile earthquake on 16 September 2015, the spacecraft was performing scans over the Pacific Ocean. Significant ( 10% relative to the ambient emission profiles) and coherent nighttime airglow perturbations were observed in the mesosphere following Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broad-band Emission Radiometry limb scans intercepting tsunami-induced atmospheric gravity waves. Simulations of emission variations are consistent with the physical characteristics of the disturbances at the locations of the corresponding SABER scans. Airglow observations and model simulations suggest that atmospheric neutral density and temperature perturbations can lead to the observed amplitude variations and multipeak structures in the emission profiles. This is the first time that airglow emission rate perturbations associated with tsunamis have been detected with space-based measurements.

  15. HF-induced airglow structure as a proxy for ionospheric irregularity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility allows scientists to test current theories of plasma physics to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms at work in the lower ionosphere. One powerful technique for diagnosing radio frequency interactions in the ionosphere is to use ground-based optical instrumentation. High-frequency (HF), heater-induced artificial airglow observations can be used to diagnose electron energies and distributions in the heated region, illuminate natural and/or artificially induced ionospheric irregularities, determine ExB plasma drifts, and measure quenching rates by neutral species. Artificial airglow is caused by HF-accelerated electrons colliding with various atmospheric constituents, which in turn emit a photon. The most common emissions are 630.0 nm O(1D), 557.7 nm O(1S), and 427.8 nm N2+(1NG). Because more photons will be emitted in regions of higher electron energization, it may be possible to use airglow imaging to map artificial field-aligned irregularities at a particular altitude range in the ionosphere. Since fairly wide field-of-view imagers are typically deployed in airglow campaigns, it is not well-known what meter-scale features exist in the artificial airglow emissions. Rocket data show that heater-induced electron density variations, or irregularities, consist of bundles of ~10-m-wide magnetic field-aligned filaments with a mean depletion depth of 6% [Kelley et al., 1995]. These bundles themselves constitute small-scale structures with widths of 1.5 to 6 km. Telescopic imaging provides high resolution spatial coverage of ionospheric irregularities and goes hand in hand with other observing techniques such as GPS scintillation, radar, and ionosonde. Since airglow observations can presumably image ionospheric irregularities (electron density variations), they can be used to determine the spatial scale variation, the fill factor, and the lifetime characteristics of

  16. FBCT fast intensity measurement using TRIC cards

    CERN Document Server

    Allica, J C; Belohrad, D; Jensen, L; Lenardon, F; SØby, L

    2015-01-01

    At the CERN PS complex, precise fast intensity measurements are very important in order to optimize the transfer efficiencies between the different accelerators. Over the last two years a complete renovation has been ongoing, where the old electronics, based on analogue integrators, have been replaced by a fully digital system enclosed in a single VME based card. This new system called TRIC (Transformer Integration Card) is based on a 12 bit, 212 MS/s ADC and an FPGA for the signal processing. Also located on the same board one finds a 250 V/1.5 W DCDC converter used to generate precise calibration pulses.

  17. Mesopause region wind, temperature and airglow irradiance above Eureka, Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Samuel; Ward, William E.; Vail, Christopher; Shepherd, Marianna

    2016-07-01

    The PEARL All Sky Imager (PASI, airglow images), the Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI, airglow irradiance and temperature) and the E-Region Wind Interferometer II (ERWIN2, wind, airglow irradiance and temperature) are co-located at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL)in Eureka, Nunavut (80 N, 86 W). These instruments view the wind, temperature and airglow irradiance of hydroxyl (all three) O2 (ERWIN2 and SATI), sodium (PASI), and oxygen green line (PASI and ERWIN2). The viewing locations and specific emissions of the various instruments differ. Nevertheless, the co-location of these instruments provides an excellent opportunity for case studies of specific events and for intercomparison between the different techniques. In this paper we discuss the approach we are using to combine observations from the different instruments. Case studies show that at times the various instruments are in good agreement but at other times they differ. Of particular interest are situations where gravity wave signatures are evident for an extended period of time and one such situation is presented. The discussion includes consideration of the filtering effect of viewing through airglow layers and the extent to which wind, airglow and temperature variations can be associated with the same gravity wave.

  18. Case study of convective instability observed in airglow images over the Northeast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A. J. A.; Paulino, I.; Medeiros, A. F.; Lima, L. M.; Buriti, R. A.; Paulino, A. R.; Wrasse, C. M.; Takahashi, H.

    2017-02-01

    An intense activity of ripples during the nighttime was observed in airglow images over São João do Cariri (36.5° W, 7.4° S) on 10 October 2004 which lasted for two hours. Those ripples appeared simultaneously with the crossing of a mesospheric front and medium scale gravity waves. The ripples occurred ahead of the mesospheric front and their phase front were almost parallel to the phase of the mesospheric front and were almost perpendicular to the phase front of the gravity wave. Using wind measurements from a meteor radar located at São João do Cariri and simultaneous vertical temperature profiles from the TIMED/SABER satellite, on the night of the events and within the imager field of view, the atmospheric background environment in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) was investigated in order to understand the instability process that caused the appearance of the ripples. Dynamic and convective instabilities have been pointed out as responsible for creation of ripples in the MLT. The observed ripples were advected by the neutral wind, they occurred into a region with negative lapse rate of the potential temperature and the Richardson number was negative as well. According to these characteristics, the ripple structures could be generated in the MLT region due to the predominance of convective instability.

  19. Imaging mesospheric winds using the Michelson interferometer for airglow dynamics imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery; Ward, William E.

    2016-07-01

    The first ground based images of mesospheric winds in airglow are presented and discussed in this paper. These were obtained with the Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)a ground based field widened Michelsoin interferometer designed to obtain two dimensional images of the line of sight Doppler wind and irradiance field in the mesosphere. The purpose of this instrument is to measure perturbations in line-of-sight wind and airglow irradiance associated with gravity waves. In its current configuration, the instrument observes an ~80 km x ~80 km region of the night sky in ~33 minutes using the O(1S) emission at 557.73 nm and the OH (6, 2) P1 (2) emission at 839.918 nm. The instrument was installed and tested at a field site outside Fredericton, NB (45.96 N, 66.65 W) during the summer of 2014. Successful measurements over a six hour period were obtained on July 31, 2014. Variations in the meridional and zonal wind were observed that are consistent with a semi-diurnal tide with an amplitude of ˜ 35 m/s. Small scale variations (< 10 m/s) were also observed that indicate the presence of gravity waves. In this paper, the instrument concept will be presented and the field measurements and their precision and accuracy discussed.

  20. Quantization analysis of speckle intensity measurements for phase retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maallo, Anne Margarette S.; Almoro, Percival F.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    Speckle intensity measurements utilized for phase retrieval (PR) are sequentially taken with a digital camera, which introduces quantization error that diminishes the signal quality. Influences of quantization on the speckle intensity distribution and PR are investigated numerically and experimen...

  1. The first coordinated observations of mid-latitude E-region quasi-periodic radar echoes and lower thermospheric 557.7-nm airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamamoto

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first coordinated observations of quasi-periodic (QP radar echoes from sporadic-E (Es field-aligned irregularities (FAIs, OI 557.7-nm airglow, and neutral winds in a common volume over Shigaraki, Japan (34.9° N, 136.1° E on the night of 5 August 2002 during the SEEK-2 campaign. QP echo altitudes of 90-110 km were lower than usual by 10 km, enabling us to make a detailed comparison among QP echoes, airglow intensity, and neutral wind at around 96 km altitude. Eastward movement of the QP echo regions is consistent with the motions of neutral winds, airglow structures, and FAIs, suggesting that the electrodynamics of Es-layers is fundamentally controlled by the neutral atmospheric dynamics. During the QP echo event, the echo altitudes clearly went up (down in harmony with an airglow enhancement (subsidence that also moved to the east. This fact suggests that the eastward-moving enhanced airglow region included an upward (downward component of neutral winds to raise (lower the altitude of the wind-shear node responsible for the Es formation. The airglow intensity, echo intensity, and Doppler velocity of FAIs at around 96 km altitude fluctuated with periods from 10 min to 1h, indicating that these parameters were modulated with short-period atmospheric disturbances. Some QP echo regions below 100km altitude contained small-scale QP structures in which very strong neutral winds exceeding 100 m/s existed. The results are compared with recent observations, theories, and simulations of QP echoes. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; Ionospheric irregularities; Mid-latitude ionosphere

  2. All-reflection interferometer for extreme-ultraviolet airglow studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1993-12-01

    We describe a possible sounding rocket payload consisting of an interferometer that would observe O I 1304 equals angstroms solar and airglow emissions simultaneously and a low-resolution (15-angstroms) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer with a band pass between 250 and 1050 angstroms to measure the solar EUV flux, a primary source for the O I 1304-angstroms dayglow emission. The solar measurements, the first of their kind, could provide detailed information on the column of O along the line of sight of the instrument as well as information on the full disk solar line profile, which is important to planetary as well as cometary physics. The information gained through line profile studies of the dayglow includes the relative contribution of the two main excitation mechanisms, photoelectron impact and solar resonance scattering, and a means to verify cross sections and branching ratios. All such information will substantiate sophisticated models, electron and radiative transport, that can be utilized in the remote sensing of the thermosphere.

  3. On acoustic intensity measurements in the presence of mean flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical analysis demonstrates that the technique of measuring acoustic intensity by means of cross correlation between nearby microphones cannot, in general, be extended to situations in which there is mean flow. However, it may be possible to use this technique to measure intensities in ducts with mean flow at frequencies below their cutoff frequencies.

  4. The estimate and measurement of longitudinal wave intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisen, Ming

    1996-08-01

    Quasi-longitudinal waves are one type of structural waves, which are important at high frequencies. This paper studies the estimate theory and measurement technique of quasi-longitudinal waves, analyzes the bias error due to the effect of bending waves. In a two-dimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity vector is the sum of the effective intensity vector and the intensity variation vector. Its axial component is proportional to two imaginary parts of cross spectral densities and in the measurement, it is measured by a pair of two-transducer arrays. In a onedimensional quasi-longitudinal wave field, the intensity variation is zero, the intensity is proportional to only one imaginary part of a cross spectral density and it can be measured using a two-transducer array. If bending and quasi-longitudinal waves coexist and the contribution from bending waves cannot be eliminated or reduced to a certain extent, the measured quasi-longitudinal wave intensity will contain a large error. The results measured on the three-beam structure show that quasi-longitudinal wave intensity can be accurately measured using the intensity technique when bending waves are negligible in comparison with quasi-longitudinal waves.

  5. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  6. The Nonlinear Model of the Response of Airglow to Gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Xu; H. Gao; A.V. Mikhalev

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we develope a timodependent, nonlinear, photochemical-dynamical 2-D model which is composed of 3 models: dynamical gravity wave model, middle atmospheric photochemical model, and airglow layer photochemical model. We use the model to study the effect of the gravity wave propagation on the airglow layer. The comparison between the effects of the different wavelength gravity wave on the airglow emission distributions is made. When the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave is close to or is shorter than the thickness of the airglow layer, the gravity wave can make complex structure of the airglow layer, such as the double and multi-peak structures of the airglow layer. However, the gravity wave that has long vertical wavelength can make large scale perturbation of the airglow emission distribution.

  7. A comparison of two different sound intensity measurement principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2005-01-01

    The dominating method of measuring sound intensity in air is based on the combination of two pressure microphones. However, a sound intensity probe that combines an acoustic particle velocity transducer with a pressure microphone has recently become available. This paper examines, discusses......, and compares the two measurement principles with particular regard to the sources of error in sound power determination. It is shown that the phase calibration of intensity probes that combine different transducers is very critical below 500 Hz if the measurement surface is very close to the source under test...

  8. Helium 584 Å and H Lyman-α Airglow in Giant Planetary Atmospheres: Modeling, Observations, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-07-01

    The atmosphere of the outer planets is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in their thermospheres. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis of the public archived NASA mission data sets (i.e. Voyager and Cassini) can help solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena. The comparison of observations with results from sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models can also help ameliorate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within planetary upper atmospheres. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. The presentation will discuss the implications of interpretations from comparison of modeling and observations in giant planetary atmospheres.

  9. Transfer function analysis of ultrasonic time-intensity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pai-Chi; Yang, Mei-Ju

    2003-10-01

    Time-intensity measurements of ultrasonic-contrast microbubbles based on the dilution theory have been used to assist blood flow estimation. The compartment model has been employed to describe the dilution process. Under the linear and time-invariant assumption, the time-intensity curve measured at the output of a compartment (i.e., blood mixing chamber) is the convolution of the input time-intensity curve with the compartment's transfer function. Thus, transfer function analysis is possible using deconvolution when the temporal variations in both the input and the output intensities are available. Note that the linear and time-invariant assumption requires a constant flow rate because, with flow pulsation, the flow rate changes with time and the mixing process becomes time varying. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to study the effects of flow pulsation on time-intensity measurements. In addition, a deconvolution technique based on a recursive least squares approach is used for transfer function analysis. Both simulations and experiments were performed; the results from which indicate that the pulsation generally does not affect the validity of time-intensity-based flow estimation. The proposed deconvolution technique is also effective for both constant and pulsatile flows; thus, permitting transfer function analysis in various flow conditions. One potential application of this transfer function analysis is to remove the effects of a noninstantaneous input function. The results from this paper lead to future work in brain-perfusion estimation based on extracranial time-intensity measurements.

  10. Calibration of imaging parameters for space-borne airglow photography using city light positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Yuta; Saito, Akinori; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.

    2016-09-01

    A new method for calibrating imaging parameters of photographs taken from the International Space Station (ISS) is presented in this report. Airglow in the mesosphere and the F-region ionosphere was captured on the limb of the Earth with a digital single-lens reflex camera from the ISS by astronauts. To utilize the photographs as scientific data, imaging parameters, such as the angle of view, exact position, and orientation of the camera, should be determined because they are not measured at the time of imaging. A new calibration method using city light positions shown in the photographs was developed to determine these imaging parameters with high accuracy suitable for airglow study. Applying the pinhole camera model, the apparent city light positions on the photograph are matched with the actual city light locations on Earth, which are derived from the global nighttime stable light map data obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite. The correct imaging parameters are determined in an iterative process by matching the apparent positions on the image with the actual city light locations. We applied this calibration method to photographs taken on August 26, 2014, and confirmed that the result is correct. The precision of the calibration was evaluated by comparing the results from six different photographs with the same imaging parameters. The precisions in determining the camera position and orientation are estimated to be ±2.2 km and ±0.08°, respectively. The 0.08° difference in the orientation yields a 2.9-km difference at a tangential point of 90 km in altitude. The airglow structures in the photographs were mapped to geographical points using the calibrated imaging parameters and compared with a simultaneous observation by the Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager of the Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping mission installed on the ISS. The comparison shows good agreements and supports the validity

  11. First mesospheric wind images using the Michelson interferometer for airglow dynamics imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, J A; Ward, W E; Nakamura, T

    2016-12-10

    The Michelson interferometer for airglow dynamics imaging (MIADI) is a ground-based instrument that combines an imaging capability with the Doppler Michelson interferometry in order to remotely detect motions in the mesopause region using spectrally isolated airglow emissions: the O(S1) emission at 557.73 nm and the OH (6, 2) P1 (2) at 839.918 nm. A measurement and analysis approach has been developed that allows simultaneous images of the line-of-sight Doppler wind field and irradiance field to be obtained. A working field instrument was installed and tested at a field site outside Fredericton, NB (45.96 N, 66.65 W) during the summer of 2014. Successful measurements over a 6 h period were obtained on 31 July 2014. This paper describes the MIADI measurement and analysis approach and presents the work that has been done to extract images of the line-of-sight Doppler wind field and irradiances from these observations. The imaging capability is validated by identifying the presence of large-scale and small-scale geophysical perturbations in the images.

  12. Research on intensity measurement in room impulse field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yueying; SHENG Shengwo; ZHAO Songling

    2008-01-01

    A new system of sound intensity measurement for impulse field in the room was proposed.This measurement system consists of a repeatable inspiriting sound source and a microphone fixed on a slowly rotating platform,which is equivalent to a circle microphone array composed of many perfectly matched microphones.The test principle was presented and typical application was described.Based upon this system the sound intensity measurement for impulse field in the room Was realized.Therefore,not only time but also spatial information of room impulse response can be obtained.

  13. Measurement of Dynamic Light Scattering Intensity in Gels

    CERN Document Server

    Rochas, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    In the scientific literature little attention has been given to the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) as a tool for extracting the thermodynamic information contained in the absolute intensity of light scattered by gels. In this article we show that DLS yields reliable measurements of the intensity of light scattered by the thermodynamic fluctuations, not only in aqueous polymer solutions, but also in hydrogels. In hydrogels, light scattered by osmotic fluctuations is heterodyned by that from static or slowly varying inhomogeneities. The two components are separable owing to their different time scales, giving good experimental agreement with macroscopic measurements of the osmotic pressure. DLS measurements in gels are, however, tributary to depolarised light scattering from the network as well as to multiple light scattering. The paper examines these effects, as well as the instrumental corrections required to determine the osmotic modulus. For guest polymers trapped in a hydrogel the measured intensity...

  14. Exploring Intensive Longitudinal Measures of Student Engagement in Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrie, Curtis R.; Bodily, Robert; Manwaring, Kristine C.; Graham, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study we used an intensive longitudinal approach to measure student engagement in a blended educational technology course, collecting both self-report and observational data. The self-report measure included a simple survey of Likert-scale and open-ended questions given repeatedly during the semester. Observational data were…

  15. An intensity-monitoring technique for measuring ellipsometric transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droog, J.M.M.; Bootsma, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Intensity-monitoring techniques make possible the measurement of rapid changes in the ellipsometric parameters. Methods used hitherto have been suitable for measuring slight changes only and require prior knowledge of the Δ and Ψ values for the initial surface. It is shown that larger changes can al

  16. A Multi-Instrument Measurement of a Mesospheric Bore at the Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, K.; Suzuki, S.; Otsuka, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Nakamura, T.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M., III

    2005-01-01

    We have made a comprehensive measurement of mesospheric bore phenomenon at the equator at Kototabang, Indonesia (0.2 deg S, 100.3 deg E), using an airglow imager, an airglow temperature photometer, a meteor radar, and the SABER instrument on board the TIMED satellite. The bore was detected in airglow images of both OH-band (peak emission altitude: 87 km) and 557.7-nm (96 km) emissions, as east-west front-like structure propagating northward with a velocity of 52-58 m/s. Wave trains with a horizontal wavelength of 30-70 km are observed behind the bore front. The airglow intensity decreases for all the mesospheric emissions of OI (557.7 nm), OH-band, O2-band (altitude: 94 km), and Na (589.3 nm) (90 km) after the bore passage. The rotational temperatures of both OH-band and O2-band also decrease approximately 10 K after the bore passage. An intense shear in northward wind velocity of 80m/s was observed at altitudes of 84-90 km by the meteor radar. Kinetic temperature profile at altitudes of 20-120 km was observed near Kototabang by TIMED/SABER. On the basis of these observations, we discuss generation and ducting of the observed mesospheric bore.

  17. Neonatal intensive care: satisfaction measured from a parent's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, J M; Nelson, E C

    1999-01-01

    Health care systems today are complex, technically proficient, competitive, and market-driven. One outcome of this environment is the recent phenomenon in the health care field of "consumerism." Strong emphasis is placed on customer service, with organized efforts to understand, measure, and meet the needs of customers served. The purpose of this article is to describe the current understanding and measurement of parent needs and expectations with neonatal intensive care services from the time the expectant parents enter the health care system for the birth through the discharge process and follow-up care. Through literature review, 11 dimensions of care were identified as important to parents whose infants received neonatal intensive care: assurance, caring, communication, consistent information, education, environment, follow-up care, pain management, participation, proximity, and support. Five parent satisfaction questionnaires-the Parent Feedback Questionnaire, Neonatal Index of Parent Satisfaction, Inpatient Parent Satisfaction-Children's Hospital Minneapolis, Picker Institute-Inpatient Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survey, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit-Parent Satisfaction Form-are critically reviewed for their ability to measure parent satisfaction within the framework of the neonatal care delivery process. An immense gap was found in our understanding about what matters most and when to parents going through the neonatal intensive care experience. Additional research is required to develop comprehensive parent satisfaction surveys that measure parent perceptions of neonatal care within the framework of the care delivery process.

  18. Peak intensity measurement of relativistic lasers via nonlinear Thomson scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Har-Shemesh, Omri

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of peak laser intensities exceeding $10^{20}\\;\\text{W/cm$^2$}$ is in general a very challenging task. We suggest a simple method to accurately measure such high intensities up to about $10^{23}\\,\\text{W/cm$^2$}$, by colliding a beam of ultrarelativistic electrons with the laser pulse. The method exploits the specific features of the angular distribution of the radiation emitted by ultrarelativistic electrons via nonlinear Thomson scattering. Initial electron energies well within the reach of laser wake-field accelerators are required, allowing in principle for an all-optical setup. Accuracies of the order of 10% are envisaged.

  19. A note on measurement of sound pressure with intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    The effect of scattering and diffraction on measurement of sound pressure with "two-microphone" sound intensity probes is examined using an axisymmetric boundary element model of the probe. Whereas it has been shown a few years ago that the sound intensity estimated with a two-microphone probe...... is reliable up to 10 kHz when using 0.5 in. microphones in the usual face-to-face arrangement separated by a 12 mm spacer, the sound pressure measured with the same instrument will typically be underestimated at high frequencies. It is shown in this paper that the estimate of the sound pressure can...

  20. Simulation and Efficient Measurements of Intensities for Complex Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2014-01-01

    on the sequence to simulate both intensity and mechanical index (MI) according to FDA rules. A 3 MHz BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer is used with the SARUS scanner. An Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone and the Onda AIMS III system measures the pressure field for three imaging schemes: a fixed focus, single...

  1. Sub-Rayleigh limit imaging via intensity correlation measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚旭日; 李龙珍; 刘雪峰; 俞文凯; 翟光杰

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-Rayleigh limit imaging of an object via intensity correlation measurements. The image com-pletely unaffected by the disturbance of diffraction-limit is achieved under the condition that the imaging system has an appropriate field of view. The resolution of this sub-Rayleigh limit imaging system is only tied to the lateral resolution of the illumination light.

  2. A GIANO-TNG high resolution IR spectrum of the airglow emission

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva, E; Maiolino, R; Baffa, C; Biliotti, V; Bruno, P; Falcini, G; Gavriousev, V; Ghinassi, F; Giani, E; Gonzalez, M; Leone, F; Lodi, M; Massi, F; Montegriffo, P; Mochi, I; Pedani, M; Rossetti, E; Scuderi, S; Sozzi, M; Tozzi, A; Valenti, E

    2013-01-01

    A flux-calibrated high resolution spectrum of the airglow emission is a practical lambda-calibration reference for astronomical spectral observations. It is also useful for constraining the molecular parameters of the OH molecule and the physical conditions in the upper mesosphere. methods: We use the data collected during the first technical commissioning of the GIANO spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). The high resolution (R~50,000) spectrum simultaneously covers the 0.95-2.4 micron wavelength range. Relative flux calibration is achieved by the simultaneous observation of spectrophotometric standard star. results: We derive a list of improved positions and intensities of OH infrared lines. The list includes Lambda-split doublets many of which are spectrally resolved. Compared to previous works, the new results correct errors in the wavelengths of the Q-branch transitions. The relative fluxes of OH lines from different vibrational bands show remarkable deviations from theoretical predicti...

  3. Intensity modulation with electrons: calculations, measurements and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M G; Karlsson, M; Zackrisson, B

    1998-05-01

    Intensity modulation of electron beams is one step towards truly conformal therapy. This can be realized with the MM50 racetrack microtron that utilizes a scanning beam technique. By adjusting the scan pattern it is possible to obtain arbitrary fluence distributions. Since the monitor chambers in the treatment head are segmented in both x- and y-directions it is possible to verify the fluence distribution to the patient at any time during the treatment. Intensity modulated electron beams have been measured with film and a plane parallel chamber and compared with calculations. The calculations were based on a pencil beam method. An intensity distribution at the multileaf collimator (MLC) level was calculated by superposition of measured pencil beams over scan patterns. By convolving this distribution with a Gaussian pencil beam, which has propagated from the MLC to the isocentre, a fluence distribution at isocentre level was obtained. The agreement between calculations and measurements was within 2% in dose or 1 mm in distance in the penumbra zones. A standard set of intensity modulated electron beams has been developed. These beams have been implemented in a treatment planning system and are used for manual optimization. A clinical example (prostate) of such an application is presented and compared with a standard irradiation technique.

  4. Intensity modulation with electrons: calculations, measurements and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael [Department of Radiation Physics, Umeaa University, S-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden); Zackrisson, Bjoern [Department of Oncology, Umeaa University, S-901 85 Umeaa (Sweden)

    1998-05-01

    Intensity modulation of electron beams is one step towards truly conformal therapy. This can be realized with the MM50 racetrack microtron that utilizes a scanning beam technique. By adjusting the scan pattern it is possible to obtain arbitrary fluence distributions. Since the monitor chambers in the treatment head are segmented in both x- and y-directions it is possible to verify the fluence distribution to the patient at any time during the treatment. Intensity modulated electron beams have been measured with film and a plane parallel chamber and compared with calculations. The calculations were based on a pencil beam method. An intensity distribution at the multileaf collimator (MLC) level was calculated by superposition of measured pencil beams over scan patterns. By convolving this distribution with a Gaussian pencil beam, which has propagated from the MLC to the isocentre, a fluence distribution at isocentre level was obtained. The agreement between calculations and measurements was within 2% in dose or 1 mm in distance in the penumbra zones. A standard set of intensity modulated electron beams has been developed. These beams have been implemented in a treatment planning system and are used for manual optimization. A clinical example (prostate) of such an application is presented and compared with a standard irradiation technique. (author)

  5. Measuring the Carbon Intensity of the South African Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Davies, Rob; Makrelov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the carbon intensity of industries, products and households in South Africa using data from a high resolution supply-use table. Direct and indirect carbon usage is measured using multiplier methods that capture inter-industry linkages and multi-product supply chains. Carbon intensity...... is found to be high for exports but low for major employing sectors. Middle-income households are the most carbon-intensive consumers. These results suggest that carbon pricing policies (without border tax adjustments) would adversely affect export earnings, but should not disproportionately hurt workers...... or poorer households. Seven percent of emissions arise through marketing margins, implying that carbon pricing should be accompanied by supporting public policies and investments....

  6. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data are processed for positioning solarpanels, in order their efficiency to be maximized.

  7. Intensity measures for seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation of sloping site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志雄; 程印; 肖杨; 卢谅; 阳洋

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the correlation between a large number of widely used ground motion intensity measures (IMs) and the corresponding liquefaction potential of a soil deposit during earthquake loading. In order to accomplish this purpose the seismic responses of 32 sloping liquefiable site models consisting of layered cohesionless soil were subjected to 139 earthquake ground motions. Two sets of ground motions, consisting of 80 ordinary records and 59 pulse-like near-fault records are used in the dynamic analyses. The liquefaction potential of the site is expressed in terms of the the mean pore pressure ratio, the maximum ground settlement, the maximum ground horizontal displacement and the maximum ground horizontal acceleration. For each individual accelerogram, the values of the aforementioned liquefaction potential measures are determined. Then, the correlation between the liquefaction potential measures and the IMs is evaluated. The results reveal that the velocity spectrum intensity (VSI) shows the strongest correlation with the liquefaction potential of sloping site. VSI is also proven to be a sufficient intensity measure with respect to earthquake magnitude and source-to-site distance, and has a good predictability, thus making it a prime candidate for the seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation.

  8. Lessons learnt from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Aas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first EMEP intensive measurement periods were held in June 2006 and January 2007. The measurements aimed to characterize the aerosol chemical compositions, including the gas/aerosol partitioning of inorganic compounds. The measurement program during these periods included daily or hourly measurements of the secondary inorganic components, with additional measurements of elemental- and organic carbon (EC and OC and mineral dust in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. These measurements have provided extended knowledge regarding the composition of particulate matter and the temporal and spatial variability of PM, as well as an extended database for the assessment of chemical transport models. This paper summarise the first experiences of making use of measurements from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods along with EMEP model results from the updated model version to characterise aerosol composition. We investigated how the PM chemical composition varies between the summer and the winter month and geographically.

    The observation and model data are in general agreement regarding the main features of PM10 and PM2.5 composition and the relative contribution of different components, though the EMEP model tends to give slightly lower estimates of PM10 and PM2.5 compared to measurements. The intensive measurement data has identified areas where improvements are needed. Hourly concurrent measurements of gaseous and particulate components for the first time facilitated testing of modelled diurnal variability of the gas/aerosol partitioning of nitrogen species. In general, the modelled diurnal cycles of nitrate and ammonium aerosols are in fair agreement with the measurements, but the diurnal variability of ammonia is not well captured. The largest differences between model and observations of aerosol mass are seen in Italy during winter, which to a large extent may be

  9. Lessons learnt from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Aas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The first EMEP intensive measurement periods were held in June 2006 and January 2007. The measurements aimed to characterize the aerosol chemical compositions, including the gas/aerosol partitioning of inorganic compounds. The measurement program during these periods included daily or hourly measurements of the secondary inorganic components, with additional measurements of elemental- and organic carbon (EC and OC and mineral dust in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. These measurements have provided extended knowledge regarding the composition of particulate matter and the temporal and spatial variability of PM, as well as an extended database for the assessment of chemical transport models. This paper summarise the first experiences of making use of measurements from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods along with EMEP model results from the updated model version to characterise aerosol composition. We investigated how the PM chemical composition varies between the summer and the winter month and geographically.

    The observation and model data are in general agreement regarding the main features of PM10 and PM2.5 composition and the relative contribution of different components, though the EMEP model tends to slightly underestimate PM10 and PM2.5 compared to measurements. The intensive measurement data has identified areas where improvements are needed. In particular, the model description of formation of coarse nitrate on sea salt and dust particles requires further attention. Hourly concurrent measurements of gaseous and particulate components for the first time facilitated testing of modelled diurnal variability of the gas/aerosol partitioning of nitrogen species. In general, the modelled diurnal cycles of nitrate and ammonium aerosols are in good agreement with the measurements. As expected, the diurnal variability of ammonia is not very well captured, but this

  10. Intensive statistical complexity measure of pseudorandom number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrondo, H. A.; González, C. M.; Martín, M. T.; Plastino, A.; Rosso, O. A.

    2005-10-01

    A Statistical Complexity measure has been recently proposed to quantify the performance of chaotic Pseudorandom number generators (PRNG) (Physica A 354 (2005) 281). Here we revisit this quantifier and introduce two important improvements: (i) consideration of an intensive statistical complexity (Physica A 334 (2004) 119), and (ii) following the prescription of Brand and Pompe (Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 174102-1) in evaluating the probability distribution associated with the PRNG. The ensuing new measure is applied to a very well-tested PRNG advanced by Marsaglia.

  11. Identifying meaningful outcome measures for the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elizabeth A; Donelan, Karen; Henneman, Justin P; Berenholtz, Sean M; Miralles, Paola D; Krug, Allison E; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Charnin, Jonathan E; Pronovost, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in measuring the safety of health care delivery in a variety of health care settings, a comprehensive set of metrics for benchmarking is still lacking, especially for patient outcomes. Even in high-risk settings where similar procedures are performed daily, such as hospital intensive care units (ICUs), these measures largely do not exist. Yet we cannot compare safety or quality across institutions or regions, nor can we track whether safety is improving over time. To a large extent, ICU outcome measures deemed valid, important, and preventable by clinicians are unavailable, and abstracting clinical data from the medical record is excessively burdensome. Even if a set of outcomes garnered consensus, ensuring adequate risk adjustment to facilitate fair comparisons across institutions presents another challenge. This study reports on a consensus process to build 5 outcome measures for broad use to evaluate the quality of ICU care and inform quality improvement efforts.

  12. Fizeau Interferometery for THz-Waves' Frequency and Intensity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIDDIQUE Muhammad; YANG Su-hui; LI Zhuo; LI Ping

    2007-01-01

    A terahertz-wave generator based on optical parametric oscillator principle, detection based on combination of Fizeau wedged interferometer and an electro-optical crystal ZnTe has been studied. The analytical solution based on the basic principle of operation of solid wedge Fizeau interferometer has been realized. The mathematical calculations for THz frequency and intensity measurement dependent on wedge angle and fringe spacing have been considered. The efficiency of THz wave detection depends upon optimized wedge angle has been also realized. The feasibility of detection of THz waves' frequency and intensity by solid Fizeau interferometer (THz-waves' range of 1-3THz) has been studied. By optimization of other parameters like thickness of Fizeau film, refractive index, material of Fizeau film, we can proceed towards the design of Fizeau interferometer for required research plans as it is a simple and inexpensive interferometer.

  13. First Light from Triple-Etalon Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Atmospheric OI Airglow (6300 A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchorn, S.; Noto, J.; Pedersen, T.; Betremieux, Y.; Migliozzi, M.; Kerr, R. B.

    2006-05-01

    Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI) has developed a triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) to observe neutral winds in the ionosphere by measuring neutral oxygen (O I) emission at 630.0 nm during the day. This instrument is to be deployed in the SSI airglow building at the Cerro Tololo observatory (30.17S 70.81W) in Chile, in support of the Comm/Nav Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) project. Post-deployment observation will be made in conjunction with two other Clemson University Fabry-Perots in Peru, creating a longitudinal chain of interferometers for thermospheric observations. These instruments will make autonomous day and night observations of thermospheric dynamics. Instruments of this type can be constructed for a global chain of autonomous airglow observatories. The FPI presented in this talk consists of three independently pressure-controlled etalons, fed collimated light by a front optical train headed by an all-sky lens with a 160-degree field of view. It can be controlled remotely via a web-based service which allows any internet-connected computer to mimic the control computer at the instrument site. In fall 2005, the SSI system was first assembled at the Millstone Hill Observatory in Westford, Massachusetts, and made day and evening observations. It was then moved to the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Project (HAARP) site in Gakona, Alaska, to participate in joint optical/ionospheric heating campaigns. Additionally, natural airglow observations were made, both locally and remotely via the internet from Massachusetts. The Millstone and HAARP observations with two etalons yielded strong 630-nm atmospheric Fraunhofer absorption lines, with some suggestion of the Ring effect. By modeling the atmospheric absorption line as the constant times the corresponding solar absorption -- itself modeled as a Gaussian plus a polynomial -- the absorption feature is subtracted, leaving only the emission feature. Software ring-summing tools developed at the

  14. Measuring beam intensity and lifetime in BESSY II

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, R; Kuske, P; Kuszynski, J

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of the intensity of the beam in the transfer lines and the storage ring are based on current transformers. The pulsed current in the transfer lines is measured with passive Integrating Beam Current Transformers (ICT). The bunch charge is transferred to a DC-voltage and sampled with a multifunction I/O-board of a PC. The beam current of the storage ring is measured with a high precision Parametric Current Transformer (PCT) and sampled by a high quality digital volt meter (DVM). A stand alone PC is used for synchronisation, real-time data acquisition and signal processing. Current and lifetime data are updated every second and send via CAN- bus to the BESSY II control system. All PC programs are written in LabVIEW.

  15. Development of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three sets of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Units (HIBEMUs) are being developed at Peking University. They are HIBEMU-2 (slit-wire type, one direction), HIBEMU-3 (Allison scanner type, one direction) and HIBEMU-4 (slit-wire type, two directions). For HIBEMU-2 and HIBEMU-3, more recent work has been done on software redesign in order to measure beam emittance and to draw phase diagram more efficiently and precisely. Software for control and data processing of them were developed in Labveiw environment, trying to improve calculation rationality and to offer user-friendly interface. Mechanical modification was also done for HIBEMU-3, mainly concentrating on the protection of Faraday cups from being overheated by the high intensity beam and also from interference of secondary electrons. This paper will also cover the mechanical structure as well as the software development of HIBEMU-4, which is a two-direction emittance scanner newly designed and manufactured for the high energy beam transport (HEBT) of Peking University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY (PKUNIFTY). At the end of this paper, comparison and analysis of the three HIBEMUs are given to draw forth better design of the future emittance measurement facility.

  16. Characterization of VHF radar observations associated with equatorial Spread F by narrow-band optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF radars have been extensively used to investigate the structures and dynamics of equatorial Spread F (ESF irregularities. However, unambiguous identification of the nature of the structures in terms of plasma depletion or enhancement requires another technique, as the return echo measured by VHF radar is proportional to the square of the electron density fluctuations. In order to address this issue, co-ordinated radar backscatter and thermospheric airglow intensity measurements were carried out during March 2003 from the MST radar site at Gadanki. Temporal variations of 630.0-nm and 777.4-nm emission intensities reveal small-scale ("micro" and large-scale ("macro" variations during the period of observation. The micro variations are absent on non-ESF nights while the macro variations are present on both ESF and non-ESF nights. In addition to the well-known anti-correlation between the base height of the F-region and the nocturnal variation of thermospheric airglow intensities, the variation of the base height of the F-layer, on occasion, is found to manifest as a bottomside wave-like structure, as seen by VHF radar on an ESF night. The micro variations in the airglow intensities are associated with large-scale irregular plasma structures and found to be in correspondence with the "plume" structures obtained by VHF radar. In addition to the commonly observed depletions with upward movement, the observation unequivocally reveals the presence of plasma enhancements which move downwards. The observation of enhancement in 777.4-nm airglow intensity, which is characterized as plasma enhancement, provides an experimental verification of the earlier prediction based on numerical modeling studies.

  17. Current Measurements of Low-Intensity Beams at CRYRING

    CERN Document Server

    Paál, A; Källberg, A

    2003-01-01

    The demand for new ion species leads to an increasing number of cases in which the ions can only be produced in small quantities. Thus, weak ion currents quite often have to be handled in low energy ion storage ring, like CRYRING. Various detector systems have been developed to measure such low intensity coasting and bunched beams by using the overlapping ranges of those systems. We have extended the RMS resolution to 1 nA of the Bergoz Beam Charge Monitor (BCM) by using a low noise 60 dB preamplifier for the Integrating Current Transformer. The sum signal of a capacitive pick-up is integrated by a second gated integrator and the BCM output signal is used for calibration. The RMS resolution is about 100 pA.. To measure the coasting beam intensity, neutral particle detectors have been built. The fast Microchannel plate detector can handle 1 Mc/s, and a 50 Mc/s Secondary Electron Multiplier based detector is under construction. On the magnetic flat top, a time of 100 ms is available to calibrate the count r...

  18. Ptychographic measurements of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Monchocé, S.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Kahaly, S.; Quéré, F.

    2016-04-01

    The extreme intensities now delivered by femtosecond lasers make it possible to drive and control relativistic motion of charged particles with light, opening a path to compact particle accelerators and coherent X-ray sources. Accurately characterizing the dynamics of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions as well as the resulting light and particle emissions is an essential step towards such achievements. This remains a considerable challenge, as the relevant scales typically range from picoseconds to attoseconds in time, and from micrometres to nanometres in space. In these experiments, owing to the extreme prevalent physical conditions, measurements can be performed only at macroscopic distances from the targets, yielding only partial information at these microscopic scales. This letter presents a major advance by applying the concepts of ptychography to such measurements, and thus retrieving microscopic information hardly accessible until now. This paves the way to a general approach for the metrology of extreme laser-plasma interactions on very small spatial and temporal scales.

  19. Generation And Measurement Of High Contrast Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Konoplev, O A

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis, the generation and measurement of high contrast, intense, ultrashort pulses have been studied. Various factors affecting the contrast and pulse shape of ultrashort light pulses from a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system are identified. The level of contrast resulting from influence of these factors is estimated. Methods for improving and controlling the pulse shape and increasing the contrast are discussed. Ultrahigh contrast, 1-ps pulses were generated from a CPA system with no temporal structure up to eleven orders of magnitude. This is eight orders of magnitude higher contrast than the original pulse. This contrast boost was achieved using two techniques. One is the optical pulse cleaning based on the nonlinear birefringence of the chirping fiber and applied to the pulses before amplification. The other is the fast saturable absorber. The fast saturable absorber was placed after amplification and compression of the pulse. The measurements of high-contrast, ultrashort pulse with h...

  20. Automated fat measurement and segmentation with intensity inhomogeneity correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel L.; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2010-03-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Fat measurement by traditional means is often inaccurate and cannot separate subcutaneous and visceral fat. MRI offers a medium to obtain accurate measurements and segmentation between subcutaneous and visceral fat. We present an approach to automatically label the voxels associated with adipose tissue and segment them between subcutaneous and visceral. Our method uses non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities, fuzzy c-means to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate SAT and VAT. Our algorithm has four stages: body masking, preprocessing, SAT and VAT separation, and tissue classification and quantification. The method was validated against a manual method performed by two observers, which used thresholds and manual contours to separate SAT and VAT. We measured 25 patients, 22 of which were included in the final analysis and the other three had too much artifact for automated processing. For SAT and total AT, differences between manual and automatic measurements were comparable to manual inter-observer differences. VAT measurements showed more variance in the automated method, likely due to inaccurate contours.

  1. Measured energy expenditure in pediatric intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, S J; Watkins, S; Tong, T K; Jeevanandam, M

    1989-04-01

    Few data are available on energy requirements of mechanically ventilated, critically ill children. We measured the resting energy expenditure in 18 mechanically ventilated patients between ages 2 and 18 years, using indirect calorimetry. All patients had fractional inspired oxygen concentration less than 0.6, no spontaneous respirations, hemodynamic stability, and no fever or active infection, and were receiving 5% dextrose. All subjects were hypermetabolic, since the measured resting energy expenditure divided by the predicted basal energy expenditure from the Harris-Benedict equations was 1.48 +/- 0.09 (mean +/- SEM). The energy requirements calculated using "injury factors" and "activity factors" adapted for adults is 1.62 times basal energy expenditure. The injury factor for the pediatric multiple trauma patients should be 1.25 compared with 1.35 in adults. In these pediatric intensive care patients 33% +/- 8% of the energy is derived from carbohydrates, 53% +/- 8% from fat, and 14% +/- 2% from protein oxidation. In individual critically ill pediatric patients, energy requirements should be estimated by measuring their resting energy expenditure whenever possible and adding 5% for their activity. In the absence of the actual measurement of resting energy expenditure, the recommended energy requirement is 1.5 times basal energy expenditure. In this acute phase of injury, the daily nitrogen requirement is 250 mg per kilogram of body weight.

  2. On Removing Interloper Contamination from Intensity Mapping Power Spectrum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lidz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Line intensity mapping experiments seek to trace large scale structure by measuring the spatial fluctuations in the combined emission, in some convenient spectral line, from individually unresolved galaxies. An important systematic concern for these surveys is line confusion from foreground or background galaxies emitting in other lines that happen to lie at the same observed frequency as the "target" emission line of interest. We develop an approach to separate this "interloper" emission at the power spectrum level. If one adopts the redshift of the target emission line in mapping from observed frequency and angle on the sky to co-moving units, the interloper emission is mapped to the wrong co-moving coordinates. Since the mapping is different in the line of sight and transverse directions, the interloper contribution to the power spectrum becomes anisotropic, especially if the interloper and target emission are at widely separated redshifts. This distortion is analogous to the Alcock-Paczynski test, but her...

  3. Metal Retrievals in the Mesosphere and lower Thermosphere by remote Sensing of Airglow with SCIAMACHY/Envisat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langowski, M.; von Savigny, C.; Sinnhuber, M.; Aikin, A. C.; Burrows, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Meteors entering the earth atmosphere containing metals ablate in an altitude of approximately 100 km due to frictional heating. The ablated metals undergo a series of chemical processes, which finally leads to a formation of metal layers between 85-95 km and metal ion layers 5 to 15 km above the metal layer. Although the densities of the metals and their ions are only in the magnitude of a few thousands of particles per cubic centimeter, they strongly emit airglow radiation due to their strong absorption cross sections and oscillator strength. This Airglow can be detected e.g. by grating spectrometers and the the density of the metals and ions can be obtained by inversion of a radiative transfer model. Since the Mesosphere and lower Thermosphere can hardly be accessed by in-situ measurement, as ballons fly to low and satellites typically too high and rockets to sparsly, the airglow emission of the metals and ions is one of the few means in this region to obtain information about transport and wave activities. Furthermore the total meteoric input to earth, which is quite uncertain in a range from 2 to 300 t/day can be estimated from the densties in the metal layers. We present metal and ion retrievals from SCIAMACHY/Envisat which is a satellite based grating spectrometer with a wavelength range of 230 to 2300 nm. The presented results are retrieved from the limb MLT states scanning the atmosphere with tangent altitudes from 50 to 150 km every 2 weeks for one day of data since 2008 until 2012.

  4. Hydroxyl temperature and intensity measurements during noctilucent cloud displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Taylor

    Full Text Available Two Fourier transform spectrometers have been used to investigate the properties of the near-infrared hydroxyl (OH nightglow emission under high-latitude summertime conditions and any association with noctilucent clouds (NLCs. The measurements were made from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska (65.1°N, 147.5°W, during August 1986. Simultaneous photographic observations of the northern twilight sky were made from Gulkana, Alaska (62.2°N, 145.5°W, approximately 340 km to the south to establish the presence of NLCs over the spectrometer site. Data exhibiting significant short-term variations in the relative intensity (as much as 50–100% and rotational temperature (typically 5–15 K were recorded on six occasions when NLCs were observed. Joint measurements were also obtained on several "cloud-free" nights. No obvious relationship was found linking the mean OH intensity or its variation with the occurrence of NLCs. However, a clear tendency was found for the mean OH temperature to be lower on NLC nights than on cloud-free nights. In particular, a significant fraction of the OH(3–1 band spectra recorded by each instrument (16–57% exhibited temperatures below ~154 K on NLC nights compared with <3% on cloud-free nights. This result is qualitatively consistent with current models for ice particle nucleation and growth, but the mean OH temperature on NLC nights (~156 K was significantly higher than would be expected for long-term particle growth in this region. These observations raise questions concerning the expected proximity of the high-latitude, summertime OH layer and the NLC growth region.

  5. High Resolution Measurements of OH Infrared Airglow Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    1-2. Interaction of off-axis rays in a conventional Michelson interferometer ESteed 1978. ...... ................ 11 1-3. Isocon camera system...axis rays in conventionalL Michelson intorfwromotor ESteed 19783. 3 .’-+."...v’.. WAVE.....FRONT. h "%’"’"..~- .4 12 of field-widening or optical...with a self - contained preamplifier and load resistor in a liquid- nitrogen dewar. Figure 2-7 is a picture of the detector dewar. The detector is 5 mm in

  6. High-Resolution Measurement of OH Infrared Airglow Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-18

    Interaction of off-axis rays In a conventional Michelson interferometer ESteed 197832................. 11 1-3. Isocon camera system spectral range...had proven effective in the past. The detector selected was an RCA Ltd., solid state germanium device with a self - contained preamplifier and load

  7. Optimal ground motion intensity measure for long-period structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Minsheng; Du, Hongbiao; Cui, Jie; Zeng, Qingli; Jiang, Haibo

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to select the most appropriate ground motion intensity measure (IM) that is used in selecting earthquake records for the dynamic time history analysis of long-period structures. For this purpose, six reinforced concrete frame-core wall structures, designed according to modern seismic codes, are studied through dynamic time history analyses with a set of twelve selected earthquake records. Twelve IMs and two types of seismic damage indices, namely, the maximum seismic response-based and energy-based parameters, are chosen as the examined indices. Selection criteria such as correlation, efficiency, and proficiency are considered in the selection process. The optimal IM is identified by means of a comprehensive evaluation using a large number of data of correlation, efficiency, and proficiency coefficients. Numerical results illustrate that peak ground velocity is the optimal one for long-period structures and peak ground displacement is also a close contender. As compared to previous reports, the spectral-correlated parameters can only be taken as moderate IMs. Moreover, the widely used peak ground acceleration in the current seismic codes is considered inappropriate for long-period structures.

  8. ‘HANGING TEN’: MEASURING BIG WAVE INTENSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Livingston Potter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The entire world is still feeling the effects of the devastating 2011 Honshu earthquake and tsunami. The Cascadia subduction zone, spanning over 800 miles from Vancouver Island to northern California, is soon expected to complete its 500-year quake cycle with a magnitude 8+ tsunamigenic earthquake. Much attention is being given to planning for this potential disaster and its collateral impacts from landslides, fires, hazardous material spills and infrastructure damages. The devastating impact of future tsunami events in this region and elsewhere, may result in millions of deaths and billions of dollars in damages. Over the years numerous attempts have been made to quantify tsunami severity but none of the devised scales have been completely satisfactory. The present study reviews and discusses the scales of magnitude and intensity that have been developed to describe the severity of tsunami events both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, it defines a new quantitative scaling measure of tsunami severity which is an improvement over widely reported current scales, by comparing the ‘Top Ten Lists’ of devastating tsunami as calculated by each of the scales.

  9. Atmospheric Gravity Wave Properties for TOMEX as Observed With Na wind/temperature Lidar and Airglow Instrumentation From Albuquerque, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Tang, J.; Liu, A.; Swenson, G.; Gardner, C.

    2002-12-01

    On the night of October 26, 2000, the TOMEX sounding rocket was launched from White Sands rocket range ~5 hours after sunset. Na lidar, airglow imagers, and a Michelson interferometer observed the perturbations in the mesosphere. In addition, the Na lidar measured the winds which were applied to the observed motion field from which intrinsic wave speeds were resolved. The extracted wave field from combined lidar and airglow observations included waves with periods of 5 hours, 1.5 hours, and 13 minutes present for the period leading to, and during the rocket launch. The vertical structures of the 13-minute and 1.5-hour period waves were determined primarily by the thermal structure, which was characterized by a small Brunt-Vaisala frequency between 90 km and 92 km with a strong gradient above and below. The 5-hour period waves exhibited a standing wave pattern, indicative of strong wave reflection in the mesopause region. In addition to the intrinsic wave parameters, the vertical flux of horizontal momentum and acceleration rate as a function of altitude was calculated for each of the waves. Momentum fluxes and accelerations were dominated by contributions from the 13-minute period waves.

  10. TIME INTENSITY (TI MEASUREMENTS OF SWEETENERS ON GREEN TEA CARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vietoris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was characterize sweet intensity profiles of natural and artificial sweeteners during time interval on taste carrier (green tea. For analysis was selected time intensity (TI methodology during 12 second time interval and assessors group was divided to male and female division. Difference between groups and sweeteners was investigated. Preference testing was done by CATA methodology and processed by correspondent analysis. During time intensity evaluation was observed similar profile shape of natural sweeteners. Different was performance of saccharin. During preference experiment was evaluated that all artificial sweeteners are associated with negative attributes of CATA questionnaire. Perception of sweeteners by male and female assessors was statistically significant.

  11. New approach of gravity wave detection in mesopause temperatures operating an array of airglow spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Paul; Schmidt, Carsten; Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2014-05-01

    GRIPS (Ground based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer) airglow measurements allow the derivation of kinetic temperature in the mesopause region averaged over a field of view of some 10km x 10km. In 2011, three identical GRIPS instruments were setup at Oberpfaffenhofen (11.28°E, 48.09°N), Germany, in a way that their fields of view form an equilateral triangle shape in the mesopause with a horizontal dimension of approximately 70km. Using this setup, GRIPS time series cannot only be analyzed with respect to gravity wave periods, but also spatial wave parameters can be derived. Based on the results of the harmonic analysis the horizontal wavelength, phase speed and the direction of propagation were determined for gravity wave events from February to July 2011. We present distinct relationships between periods, amplitudes, phase speeds and wavelengths, which were identified in this dataset. Further data analysis of the derived wave parameters show preferred directions of propagation and suggest seasonal variations of the wave characteristics. The presentation will be concluded by the introduction of a measurement setup relying on one GRIPS instrument which is equipped with a variably adjustable mirror optic. The capability to scan multiple fields of view during nightly measurements will offer longer-term investigations of mesopause gravity waves.

  12. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit measured by polysomnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J H; Boesen, Hans Christian Toft; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep...

  13. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Broadfoot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 85 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6% of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been identified in night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments and through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The FeO* and NiO* emissions both originate from a reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone and so support the presence of NiO* in the night airglow.

  14. Simulations and observations of plasma depletion, ion composition, and airglow emissions in two auroral ionospheric depletion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Harris, F. R.; Gattinger, R. L.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of plasma depletion, ion composition modification, and airglow emissions in the Waterhole experiments are presented. The detailed ion chemistry and airglow emission processes related to the ionospheric hole formation in the experiment are examined, and observations are compared with computer simulation results. The latter indicate that the overall depletion rates in different parts of the depletion region are governed by different parameters.

  15. Prospects for UT1 Measurements from VLBI Intensive Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Johannes; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Intensives are one-hour single baseline sessions to provide Universal Time (UT1) in near real-time up to a delay of three days if a site is not e-transferring the observational data. Due to the importance of UT1 estimates for the prediction of Earth orientation parameters, as well as any kind of navigation on Earth or in space, there is not only the need to improve the timeliness of the results but also their accuracy. We identify the asymmetry of the tropospheric delays as the major error source, and we provide two strategies to improve the results, in particular of those Intensives which include the station Tsukuba in Japan with its large tropospheric variation. We find an improvement when (1) using ray-traced delays from a numerical weather model, and (2) when estimating tropospheric gradients within the analysis of Intensive sessions. The improvement is shown in terms of reduction of rms of length-of-day estimates w.r.t. those derived from Global Positioning System observations

  16. Iterative reconstruction of digital holograms from three intensity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Wu, Yang; Kelly, Damien P.; Sheridan, John T.

    2016-03-01

    A practical technique is presented based on DH, for the reconstruction of a wavefront from three recorded intensity images. Combining the off-axis Fourier spatial filtering (OFSF) technique with iterative phase retrieval algorithms, it is shown how the twin image can be eliminated. The proposed method overcomes system geometry constraints and improves both the flexibility and resolution associated with OFSF-based DH. It also overcomes the cost problem associated with phase-shifting interferometry-based DH. In order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed DH method, both simulation and experiment results for objects having smooth and rough surfaces are presented.

  17. Phase reconstruction from intensity measurements in linear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaans, Martin J; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2003-06-01

    The phase of a signal at a plane is reconstructed from the intensity profiles at two close parallel screens connected by a small abcd canonical transform; this applies to propagation along harmonic and repulsive fibers and in free media. We analyze the relationship between the local spatial frequency (the signal phase derivative) and the derivative of the squared modulus of the signal under a one-parameter canonical transform with respect to the parameter. We thus generalize to all linear systems the results that have been obtained separately for Fresnel and fractional Fourier transforms.

  18. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  19. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suzuki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3° E, 0.2° S, Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere.

  20. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S. [Univ. of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo (Japan). Sugadaira Space Radio Observatory; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Ogawa, T. [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Solar-Terrestrial Environment Lab.; Liu, A.Z. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Nakamura, T. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Research Inst. for Sustainable Humanosphere

    2009-07-01

    We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km) gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3 E, 0.2 S), Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere. (orig.)

  1. Soil measurements during HAPEX-Sahel intensive observation period.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuenca, R.H.; Brouwer, J.; Chanzy, A.; Droogers, P.; Galle, S.; Gaze, S.R.; Sicot, M.; Stricker, J.N.M.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Boyle, S.A.; Bromley, J.; Chebhouni, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes measurements made at each site and for each vegetation cover as part of the soils program for the HAPEX-Sahel regional scale experiment. The measurements were based on an initial sampling scheme and included profile soil water content, surface soil water content, soil water po

  2. Research on Brightness Measurement of Intense Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Huang; Yang, GuoJun; Li, YiDing; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The mostly research fasten on high emission density of injector to study electron beam's brightness in LIA. Using the injector(2MeV) was built to research brightness of multi-pulsed high current(KA) electron beam, and researchs three measurement method (the pepper-pot method, beam collimator without magnetic field, beam collimator with magnetic field method) to detect beam's brightness with time-resolved measurement system.

  3. Vibration intensity. Evaluation of a remote measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Xavier

    1989-03-01

    Two differential laser vibrometers are compared to more classic vibration measuring instruments. A prototype differential laser vibrometer produced by the Centre Technique des Industries Mechaniques (CETIM) and the Photonetics company is tested. A system made up of two Polytec vibrometers is also tested. The Polytec vibrometer is the most accurate. It is a compact tool and uses fiber optic technology which allows positioning of the receptor heads at two neighboring points at the surface of the liquid studied. This type of differential laser vibrometer is shown to give better results than any inductor capacitor or ultrasound system.

  4. Photometric instrument for studies of ionospheric artificial airglow emission caused by antropogenous disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasyrov, Igor; Gumerov, Rustam; Nasyrov, Albert; Nikonenkov, Andrey

    One of informative methods of ionospheric processes data acquisition is based on registration of artificial airglow emission. In fact, artificial modifications of the ionosphere by powerful decameter radiowaves cause airglow emission on waves lengths 1270, 630, 557.7, 427.8 nm. In these experiments airglow emission were found at long expositions only as the registration systems of low sensitivity were used. It has allowed investigating the stages when developing of thermal parametric instabilities mechanism contribute mainly into the electron acceleration. The increase of artificial airglow emission at 557.7 nm was caused by impulses with 5 ms duration that corresponds to times of development of pondermotive parametric instability of ionosphere. That effect was found for the first time at the Kazan State University in collabora-tion with NIRFI (N. Novgorod) [Gumerov R.I., Kapkov V.B. et al. //Radiophysics and Quant. Electronics. 1999. Vol 42. P. 463.]. A new mobile photometric instrument equipped with a high-sensitive photometer and CCD-camera, system of GPS time-synchronization, system of "SURA"-channel review by HF-receiver, and systems of experimental data automatic registration by computer was engineered in the Kazan University. One makes possible the investigation of physical processes at the ionosphere disturbed by powerful radioemission, injections of chemically active substances and plasmas beams. The authors gratefully acknowledge Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant No 08-02-01188) for the financial support.

  5. Spatial gravity wave characteristics obtained from multiple OH(3-1) airglow temperature time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Paul; Schmidt, Carsten; Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach for the detection of gravity waves in OH-airglow observations at the measurement site Oberpfaffenhofen (11.27°E, 48.08°N), Germany. The measurements were performed at the German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the period from February 4th, 2011 to July 6th, 2011. In this case study the observations were carried out by three identical Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometers (GRIPS). These instruments provide OH(3-1) rotational temperature time series, which enable spatio-temporal investigations of gravity wave characteristics in the mesopause region. The instruments were aligned in such a way that their fields of view (FOV) formed an equilateral triangle in the OH-emission layer at a height of 87 km. The Harmonic Analysis is applied in order to identify joint temperature oscillations in the three individual datasets. Dependent on the specific gravity wave activity in a single night, it is possible to detect up to four different wave patterns with this method. The values obtained for the waves' periods and phases are then used to derive further parameters, such as horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and the direction of propagation. We identify systematic relationships between periods and amplitudes as well as between periods and horizontal wavelengths. A predominant propagation direction towards the East and North-North-East characterizes the waves during the observation period. There are also indications of seasonal effects in the temporal development of the horizontal wavelength and the phase velocity. During late winter and early spring the derived horizontal wavelengths and the phase velocities are smaller than in the subsequent period from early April to July 2011.

  6. Application of tomographic inversion in studying airglow in the mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that observations of periodic nightglow structures give excellent information on atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The periods, the horizontal wavelengths and the phase speeds of the waves can be determined from airglow images and, using several cameras, the approximate altitude of the luminous layer can also be determined by triangulation. In this paper the possibility of applying tomographic methods for reconstructing the airglow structures is investigated using numerical simulations. A ground-based chain of cameras is assumed, two-dimensional airglow models in the vertical plane above the chain are constructed, and simulated data are calculated by integrating the models along a great number of rays with different elevation angles for each camera. After addition of random noise, these data are then inverted to obtain reconstructions of the models. A tomographic analysis package originally designed for satellite radiotomography is used in the inversion. The package is based on a formulation of stochastic inversion which allows the input of a priori information to the solver in terms of regularization variances. The reconstruction is carried out in two stages. In the first inversion, constant regularization variances are used within a wide altitude range. The results are used in determining the approximate altitude range of the airglow structures. Then, in the second inversion, constant non-zero regularization variances are used inside this region and zero variances outside it. With this method reliable reconstructions of the models are obtained. The number of cameras as well as their separations are varied in order to find out the limitations of the method.

    Key words. Tomography · Airglow · Mesopause · Gravity waves

  7. Intensity-value corrections for integrating sphere measurements of solid samples measured behind glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy J; Bernacki, Bruce E; Redding, Rebecca L; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S; Myers, Tanya L; Stephan, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40-60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300-2300 nm range.

  8. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  9. Phase Determination Method to Directly Measure Intensity and Frequency of Temporal Profiles of Attosecond EUV Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Yu-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ A new method of phase determination is presented to directly measure the intensity and frequency temporalprofiles of attosecond EUV pulses. The profiles can be reconstructed from the photoelectron energy spectra measured with two different laser intensities at 0° and 180° with respect to the linear laser polarization using a cross correlation between the femtosecond laser and the attosecond EUV. The method has a temporal measurement range from a quarter to about half of a laser oscillation period. The time resolution depends on the jitter and control precision of laser and EUV pulses. This method improves the time resolution in measuring attosecond EUV pulses.

  10. Oxidative heat release intensity in coal at low temperatures measured by the hot-wire method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-liang; LI Zeng-hua; PAN Shang-kun; GAO Si-yuan; WANG Ya-li

    2009-01-01

    Directly measuring the oxidative heat release intensity at low temperatures is difficult at present. We developed a new method based on heat conduction theory that directly measures heat release intensity of loose coal at low temperatures. Using this method, we calculated the oxidative heat release intensity of differently sized loose coals by comparing the temperature rise of the coal in nitrogen or an air environment. The results show that oxidation heat release intensity of Shenhua coal sized 0-15 mm is 0.001~0.03 W/m3 at 30~90℃ and increases with increasing temperature. The heat release intensity at a given temperature is larger for smaller sized coal. The temperature effect on heat release intensity is muted as the coal size increases. At lower temperature the change in heat release intensity as a function of size becomes smaller. These results show that the test system is usable for practical applications and is easy to operate and is capable of measuring mass samples.

  11. Optimal distribution of integration time for intensity measurements in degree of linear polarization polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Hu, Haofeng; Liu, Tiegen; Huang, Bingjing; Song, Zhanjie

    2016-04-04

    We consider the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) polarimetry system, which performs two intensity measurements at orthogonal polarization states to estimate DOLP. We show that if the total integration time of intensity measurements is fixed, the variance of the DOLP estimator depends on the distribution of integration time for two intensity measurements. Therefore, by optimizing the distribution of integration time, the variance of the DOLP estimator can be decreased. In this paper, we obtain the closed-form solution of the optimal distribution of integration time in an approximate way by employing Delta method and Lagrange multiplier method. According to the theoretical analyses and real-world experiments, it is shown that the variance of the DOLP estimator can be decreased for any value of DOLP. The method proposed in this paper can effectively decrease the measurement variance and thus statistically improve the measurement accuracy of the polarimetry system.

  12. Optimal distribution of integration time for intensity measurements in Stokes polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Liu, Tiegen; Huang, Bingjing; Song, Zhanjie; Hu, Haofeng

    2015-10-19

    We consider the typical Stokes polarimetry system, which performs four intensity measurements to estimate a Stokes vector. We show that if the total integration time of intensity measurements is fixed, the variance of the Stokes vector estimator depends on the distribution of the integration time at four intensity measurements. Therefore, by optimizing the distribution of integration time, the variance of the Stokes vector estimator can be decreased. In this paper, we obtain the closed-form solution of the optimal distribution of integration time by employing Lagrange multiplier method. According to the theoretical analysis and real-world experiment, it is shown that the total variance of the Stokes vector estimator can be significantly decreased about 40% in the case discussed in this paper. The method proposed in this paper can effectively decrease the measurement variance and thus statistically improves the measurement accuracy of the polarimetric system.

  13. Long-term Trends in Mesospheric Temperatures at high and low latitudes derived from OH airglow spectra of Kiruna FTS and Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongha; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Gawon; Lee, Youngsun

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed mesospheric temperatures from OH airglow measurements with Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) in the period of 2003 - 2012 at Kiruna (67.9°N, 21.1°E). We also derived mesospheric temperatures from rotational emission lines of the OH airglow (8-3) band in the sky spectra of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the period of 2000 - 2014. The main objective of SDSS is to make a detailed 3-dimensional map of the universe by observing images and spectra of various celestial objects at Apache Point Observatory (APO, 32°N 105°W). From both temperature sets we first estimated the solar responses of mesospheric temperatures to F10.7 variation and the seasonal variation of mesospheric temperatures. After removing the solar response, we found the long-term mesospheric temperature trends of -4 ˜-6.6 K/decade at Kiruna and -0.02 ± 0.7 K/decade at Apache Point. Our results indicate significant cooling trend at the high latitude but very little or no cooling at the low latitude. Although both trends are comparable and consistent with other studies, the temperature trend from SDSS spectra should be regarded as unique contribution to global monitoring of climate change because the SDSS project is completely independent of climate studies.

  14. Line intensity measurements for acetylene between 8980 and 9420 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguier, S.; Lyulin, O. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Campargue, A.

    2017-03-01

    The absorption spectrum of acetylene is studied by high-resolution Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTS) between 8980 and 9420 cm-1. Positions and intensities of 432 12C2H2 absorption lines are retrieved from a spectrum recorded at room temperature (298.5 K) with a pressure of 87.6 hPa and a 105 m path length. The measured lines belong to 11 bands including three bands observed for the first time. The obtained intensity dataset constitutes the first intensity information in the region. The Herman-Wallis coefficients are derived from a fit of the measured intensity values. The reported results will be valuable to complete the spectroscopic databases of acetylene.

  15. High-Resolution Energy and Intensity Measurements with CVD Diamond at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Wenander, F; Bergoz, J; Bayle, H; Frais-Kölbl, H; Leinweber, J; Aumeyr, T; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    A novel beam instrumentation device for the HIE-REX (High In-tensity and Energy REX) upgrade has been developed and tested at the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE, located at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This device is based on CVD diamond detector technology and is used for measuring the beam intensity, particle counting and measuring the energy spectrum of the beam. An energy resolution of 0.6% was measured at a carbon ion energy of 22.8 MeV. This corresponds to an energy spread of ± 140 keV.

  16. Measurement of the bending wave power flow by the structural intensity technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linjama, Jukka; Lahti, Tapio

    1989-02-01

    Literature on the theory of bending waves and power flow, measurement of the structural intensity, and its applications to machinery and buildings is reviewed. Based on intensity measurement equations, a set of frequency domain expressions is derived for bending wave intensity measurements in a beam. A practical procedure for the general 4-transducer method is developed, using the sequential 1-transducer frequency response technique. Expressions for the determination of the force- and moment-related power components separately are derived. In laboratory experiments the power carried by bending waves was measured in a simple beam, and the developed configurations were tested and compared. The frequency response approach to detect the total power flow is shown to work well. The estimation of the force- and moment-related power components, both in the near and the far field, was also demonstrated.

  17. Measuring cosmic velocities with 21cm intensity mapping and galaxy redshift survey cross-correlation dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of measuring the effects of peculiar velocities in large-scale structure using the dipole of the redshift-space cross-correlation function. We combine number counts of galaxies with brightness-temperature fluctuations from 21cm intensity mapping, demonstrating that the dipole may be measured at modest significance ($\\lesssim 2\\sigma$) by combining the upcoming radio survey CHIME with the future redshift surveys of DESI and Euclid. More significant measurements ($\\lesssim~10\\sigma$) will be possible by combining intensity maps from the SKA with these of DESI or Euclid, and an even higher significance measurement ($\\lesssim 100\\sigma$) may be made by combining observables completely internally to the SKA. We account for effects such as contamination by wide-angle terms, interferometer noise and beams in the intensity maps, non-linear enhancements to the power spectrum, stacking multiple populations, sensitivity to the magnification slope, and the possibility that number counts and...

  18. Measurement of absorption with a p-u sound intensity probe in an impedance tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Jacobsen, Finn

    2005-01-01

    An alternative method of measuring the normal-incidence sound absorption of a sample of material in an impedance tube is examined. The method is based on measurement of the sound pressure and the normal component of the particle velocity using a "p-u" sound intensity probe. This technique...

  19. Measuring the Epoch of Reionization using [CII] Intensity Mapping with TIME-Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, Abigail; Bock, James; Bradford, Matt; Bumble, Bruce; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Cheng, Yun-Ting; Cooray, Asantha R.; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Hunacek, Jonathon; Li, Chao-Te; O'Brient, Roger; Shirokoff, Erik; Staniszewski, Zachary; Shiu, Corwin; Uzgil, Bade; Zemcov, Michael B.; Sun, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    TIME-Pilot (the Tomographic Ionized carbon Intensity Mapping Experiment) is a new instrument designed to probe the epoch of reionization (EoR) by measuring the 158 um ionized carbon emission line [CII] from redshift 5 - 9. TIME-Pilot will also probe the molecular gas content of the universe during the epoch spanning the peak of star formation (z ~ 1 -3) by making an intensity mapping measurement of the CO transitions in the TIME-Pilot band (CO(3-2), CO(4-3), CO(5-4), and CO(6-5)). I will describe the instrument we are building which is an R of ~100 spectrometer sensitive to the 200-300 GHz radiation. The camera is designed to measure the line emission from galaxies using an intensity mapping technique. This instrument will allow us to detect the [CII] clustering fluctuations from faint galaxies during EoR and compare these measurements to predicted [CII] amplitudes from current models. The CO measurements will allow us to constrain models for galaxies at lower redshift. The [CII] intensity mapping measurements that will be made with TIME-Pilot and detailed measurements made with future more sensitive mm-wavelength spectrometers are complimentary to 21-cm measurements of the EoR and complimentary to direct detections of high redshift galaxies with HST, ALMA, and, in the future, JWST.

  20. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Crittenden, Robert; Metcalf, R Benton

    2015-01-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect HI clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the HI density $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$, the HI bias $b_{\\rm HI}$ and the galaxy-HI correlation coefficient $r_{\\rm HI-g}$.

  1. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtsidou, A.; Bacon, D.; Crittenden, R.; Metcalf, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect H I clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21 cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high-precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the H I density Ω _{H I}, the H I bias b_{H I} and the galaxy-H I correlation coefficient r_{H I-g}.

  2. ROI measurement of the signal intensity of precentral cortex in the normal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaarslan, Ercan E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Arslan, Arzu

    2004-12-01

    Objective: It has recently been described that perirolandic cortex generally had a low signal intensity (SI) in neurologically normal brain. The aim of this study was to confirm this finding by an objective quantitative study. Materials and methods: Turbo fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images of 24 neurologically normal patients were evaluated retrospectively. Signal intensity measurements of the precentral and superior frontal cortices (SFCs) were obtained at a manually traced irregular region-of-interest (ROI). t-Test for paired samples was used to evaluate the significance of differences between signal intensity measurements. Results: Mean signal intensities of precentral and superior frontal cortices were 349.5 and 380.7, respectively, on the right, and 351.7 and 374.1 on the left hemisphere. The difference between the mean signal intensities of the side-matched precentral and superior frontal cortices was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: Low signal intensity of the precentral cortex (PCC) in normal brain on turbo FLAIR images is an objective finding, confirmed by ROI measurement.

  3. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  4. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulla, Carlo; Veljanovski, Dimitar; Rechkoska Shikoska, Ustijana; Risteski, Filip A.

    2015-01-01

    This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i) bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii) bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii) monovariate sinc, and (iv) bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i) classic-curvature, (ii) signal resilient to interpolation, (iii) intensity-curvature measure and (iv) intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i) the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii) the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional. PMID:26644943

  5. Simultaneous detection of rotational and translational motion in optical tweezers by measurement of backscattered intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev; Banerjee, Ayan

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple yet powerful technique of simultaneously measuring both translational and rotational motion of mesoscopic particles in optical tweezers by measuring the backscattered intensity on a quadrant photodiode (QPD). While the measurement of translational motion by taking the difference of the backscattered intensity incident on adjacent quadrants of a QPD is well-known, we demonstrate that rotational motion can be measured very precisely by taking the difference between the diagonal quadrants. The latter measurement eliminates the translational component entirely, and leads to a detection sensitivity of around 50 mdeg at S/N of 2 for angular motion of a driven micro-rod. The technique is also able to resolve the translational and rotational Brownian motion components of the micro-rod in an unperturbed trap, and can be very useful in measuring translation-rotation coupling of micro-objects induced by hydrodynamic interactions.

  6. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-23

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  7. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  8. Determination of wave intensity in flexible tubes using measured diameter and velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Khir, A W

    2007-01-01

    Wave intensity (WI) is a hemodynamics index, which is the product of changes in pressure and velocity across the wave-front. Wave Intensity Analysis, which is a time domain technique allows for the separation of running waves into their forward and backward directions and traditionally uses the measured pressure and velocity waveforms. However, due to the possible difficulty in obtaining reliable pressure waveforms non-invasively, investigating the use of wall displacement instead of pressure signals in calculating WI may have clinical merits. In this paper, we developed an algorithm in which we use the measured diameter of flexible tube's wall and flow velocity to separate the velocity waveform into its forward and backward directions. The new algorithm is also used to separate wave intensity into its forward and backward directions. In vitro experiments were carried out in two sized flexible tubes, 12mm and 16mm in diameters, each is of 2 m in length. Pressure, velocity and diameter were taken at three measuring sites. A semi-sinusoidal wave was generated using a piston pump, which ejected 40cc water into each tube. The results show that separated wave intensity into the forward and backward directions of the new algorithm using the measured diameter and velocity are almost identical in shape to those traditionally using the measured pressure and velocity. We conclude that the new algorithm presented in this work, could have clinical advantages since the required information can be obtained non-invasively.

  9. Windowless microfluidic platform based on capillary burst valves for high intensity x-ray measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vig, Asger Laurberg; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Enevoldsen, Nikolaj Brandt;

    2009-01-01

    We propose and describe a microfluidic system for high intensity x-ray measurements. The required open access to a microfluidic channel is provided by an out-of-plane capillary burst valve (CBV). The functionality of the out-of-plane CBV is characterized with respect to the diameter of the window...

  10. Spatially resolved surface topography retrieved from far-field intensity scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrad, Myriam; Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2014-02-01

    A far-field setup based on the fast and simultaneous recording of 1 million intensity angle-resolved-light-scattering patterns allows both to reconstruct surface topography and to cancel local defects in this topography. A spectral analysis is performed on measured data and allows to extract roughness and slopes mapping of a surface taking into account the spectral bandpass.

  11. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  12. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement of electron momentum density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B L Ahuja; N L Heda

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a new design and construction of a low intensity (100 mCi) 241Am -ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design. The measured profile is in good agreement with the existing theoretical data and our density functional calculations.

  13. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  14. A conceptual framework for analysing and measuring land-use intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Jepsen, Martin Rudbeck

    2013-01-01

    Large knowledge gaps currently exist that limit our ability to understand and characterise dynamics and patterns of land-use intensity: in particular, a comprehensive conceptual framework and a system of measurement are lacking. This situation hampers the development of a sound understanding...... intensity, and (c) the associated system-level impacts of land-based production (e.g. changes in carbon storage or biodiversity). The systematic development of indicators across these dimensions would provide opportunities for the systematic analyses of the trade-offs, synergies and opportunity costs...

  15. Tune measurements with high intensity ion beams at GSI SIS-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rahul [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); TEMF, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Forck, Peter; Kowina, Piotr; Kaufmann, Wolfgang [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Weiland, Thomas [TEMF, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A precise tune measurement during a full accelerating cycle is required to achieve stable high current operation. A new system has been commissioned at GSI for position, orbit and tune measurements. It consists of three distinct parts; an exciter which provides power to excite coherent betatron oscillations in the bunched beam; Fast ADCs to digitize the BPM signals at 125 MSa/s; the post processing electronics uses digitized BPM signals to acquire one position value per bunch. Subsequently the baseband tune is determined by Fourier transformation of the position data. Experiments were conducted to understand the effects of high beam intensity on tune at injection plateau (11.4 MeV/u) and during acceleration ramp (11.4-600 MeV/u). These experiments were performed with U{sup 73+} and Ar{sup 18+} ion beam at highest achievable intensities of 2.10{sup 9} and 2.5.10{sup 10} respectively. Tune shift with increased intensity was observed. The working principle of the tune measurement system and observed high intensity effects on tune will be reported in this contribution.

  16. Efficiency of scalar and vector intensity measures for seismic slope displacements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Ground motion intensity measures are usually used to predict the earthquake-induced displacements in earth dams,soil slopes and soil structures.In this study,the efficiency of various single ground motion intensity measures (scalar IMs) or a combination of them (vector IMs) are investigated using the PEER-NGA strong motion database and an equivalent-linear sliding-mass model.Although no single intensity measure is efficient enough for all slope conditions,the spectral acceleration at 1.5 times of the initial slope period and Arias intensity of the input motion are found to be the most efficient scalar IMs for flexible slopes and stiff slopes respectively.Vector IMs can incorporate different characteristics of the ground motion and thus significantly improve the efficiency over a wide range of slope conditions.Among various vector IMs considered,the spectral accelerations at multiple spectral periods achieve high efficiency for a wide range of slope conditions.This study provides useful guidance to the development of more efficient empirical prediction models as well as the ground motion selection criteria for time domain analysis of seismic slope displacements.

  17. The enhanced measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wang, Qin

    2016-09-01

    We put forward a new scheme for implementing the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) with weak coherent source, while using only two different intensities. In the new scheme, we insert a beam splitter and a local detector at both Alice's and Bob's side, and then all the triggering and non-triggering signals could be employed to process parameter estimations, resulting in very precise estimations for the two-single-photon contributions. Besides, we compare its behavior with two other often used methods, i.e., the conventional standard three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent QKD and the passive measurement-device-independent QKD. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate that our new approach can exhibit outstanding characteristics not only in the secure transmission distance, but also in the final key generation rate.

  18. Measuring anisotropy ellipse of atmospheric turbulence by intensity correlations of laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Toselli, Italo; Li, Jia; Korotkova, Olga

    2017-03-15

    An experimental study has been performed of a laser beam propagating horizontally through the near-ground atmosphere above a grassy field at the University of Miami (UM) Coral Gables campus. The average intensity, scintillation index, and intensity correlation function are measured in the receiver plane for three channels with different turbulent conditions and at three different heights above the ground. Our results reveal that along short links (210 m) only the intensity correlation function captures the anisotropic information of turbulence, corresponding to the refractive index anisotropy ellipse of atmospheric fluctuations. In addition, we report an interesting phenomenon relating to turbulence eddy orientation near the ground. We confirmed that the experimental results are in agreement with the numerical simulations based on the multiple phase-screen method. Our findings provide an efficient method of determining the anisotropic parameters of atmospheric turbulence.

  19. Single vs composite measures of pain intensity: relative sensitivity for detecting treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Hu, Xiaojun; Potts, Susan L; Gould, Errol M

    2013-04-01

    Assay sensitivity remains a significant issue in pain clinical trials. One possible method for increasing assay sensitivity for detecting changes in pain intensity is to increase the reliability of pain intensity assessment by increasing the number of intensity ratings obtained, and combining these ratings into composite scores. The current study performed secondary analyses from a published clinical trial to test this possibility. The reliability and assay sensitivity pain intensity scores made up of 1 to 9 24-hour pain intensity recall ratings were compared. Although the reliability of the outcome measures improved as the number of items increased, this increase in reliability was not associated with an increase in assay sensitivity. A single 24-hour recall rating was about as valid (sensitive) for detecting treatment effects as composite scores made up of 2 to 9 different ratings. If this finding replicates in other pain populations, it has significant implications for the design and conduct of pain clinical trials. Specifically, it suggests the possibility that assessment burden (and associated costs and problems related to missing data) might be greatly reduced by specifying a single recall rating as the primary outcome variable. Research is needed to explore this possibility further.

  20. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jida Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared

  1. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  2. Fast and thermal neutron intensity measurements at the KFUPM PGNAA setup

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Jarallah, M I; Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Abu-Jarad, F A

    2002-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron intensity distributions have been measured at an accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup. The setup is built at the 350 keV accelerator laboratory of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The setup is mainly designed to carry out PGNAA elemental analysis via thermal neutron capture. In this study relative intensity of fast and thermal neutrons was measured as a function of the PGNAA moderator assembly parameters using nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The relative intensity of the neutrons was measured inside the sample region as a function of front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Measurements were carried out at the KFUPM 350 keV accelerator using 2.8 MeV pulsed neutron beam from D(d,n) reaction. The pulsed deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 30 kHz frequency was used to produce neutrons. Experimental results were compared with results of Monte Carlo design calculations of the PGNAA setup. A good agreement has bee...

  3. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  4. Measuring and accounting for the intensity of nursing care: is it worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Steven A

    2008-05-01

    In June 2007, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation sponsored a conference titled "The Economics of Nursing: Paying for Quality Nursing Care." The second topic at the conference was "the appropriateness and feasibility of measuring and accounting for the intensity of nursing care." Drs. Welton and Sermeus presented papers on that topic. This response to those papers focuses on why the hospital industry has not always accounted for and measured nursing intensity. Then it asks, "Why do we want more accurate information about nursing resources used by different patients?" It is not sufficient to say the data regarding nursing costs are not accurate. Nor is it sufficient to say that we now can improve the accuracy of the data. To move forward in this area, we need to develop compelling evidence and arguments that indicate that nursing-cost data of greater accuracy have a benefit that will exceed the costs of that data collection.

  5. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  6. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis....... It is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments......, and it is an attractive alternative to particle tracking and particle image velocimetry for quantifying acoustophoretic performance in microchannels....

  7. Rapid Measurements of Intensities for Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2014-01-01

    faster (minutes rather than hours) and the nal intensity level calculation can be made generic and reused for any kind of scan sequence by just knowing the number of imaging lines and the pulse repetition time. The scheme has been implemented on the Acoustic Intensity Measurement System AIMS III (Onda......, Sunnyvale, California, USA). The research scanner SARUS is used for the experiments, where one of the channels is used for the hydrophone signal. A 3 MHz BK 8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array with 192 elements is used along with an Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone connected to a AH-2010 pre......-amplier (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, USA). A single emission sequence is employed for testing and calibrating the approach. The measurements using the AIMS III and SARUS systems after calibration agree within a relative standard deviation of 0.24%. A duplex B-mode and ow sequence is also investigated...

  8. RADIATION DOSE MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-INTENSITY LASER INTERACTIONS WITH SOLID TARGETS AT SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Bauer, J; Cimeno, M; Ferrari, A; Galtier, E; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Liu, J; Nagler, B; Prinz, A; Rokni, S; Tran, H; Woods, M

    2016-12-01

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source's (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 10(18) and 7.1 × 10(19) W cm(-2) are presented.

  9. X-ray-boosted photoionization for the measurement of an intense laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng; He Hai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Investigations show that X-ray-boosted photoionization (XBP) has the following advantages for in-situ measurements of ultrahigh laser intensity Ⅰ and field envelope F(t) (time t,pulse duration τL,carrier-envelope-phase Φ):accuracy,dynamic range,and rapidness.The calculated XBP spectra resemble inversely proportional functions of the photoelectron momentum shift.The maximum momentump9 and the observable value Q (defined as a double integration of a normalized photoelectron energy spectrum,PES) linearly depend on I1/2 and τL,respectively.Φ and F(t) can be determined from the PES cut-off energy and peak positions.The measurable laser intensity can be up to and over 1018 W/cm2 by using high energy X-rays and highly charged inert gases.

  10. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  11. Measuring Galaxy Clustering and the Evolution of [CII] Mean Intensity with far-IR Line Intensity Mapping During 0.5 < z < 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Uzgil, Bade D; Bradford, Charles M; Lidz, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3-D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3-D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. Total line emission, when compared to the total star formation activity and/or other line intensities reveals evolution of the interstellar conditions of galaxies in aggregate. As a case study, we consider measurement of [CII] autocorrelation in th...

  12. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadian S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simin Asadian,1 Alireza Khatony,1 Gholamreza Moradi,2 Alireza Abdi,1 Mansour Rezaei,3 1Nursing and Midwifery School, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Biostatistics & Epidemiology Department, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran Introduction: An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods: In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results: There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001. Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%. Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132, left (P=0.18 and right (P=0.318 tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00, and axillary (P=1.00 methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion: The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left for

  13. Measuring Galaxy Clustering and the Evolution of [C II] Mean Intensity with Far-IR Line Intensity Mapping during 0.5 < z < 1.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzgil, Bade; Aguirre, James E.; Bradford, Charles; Lidz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. As a case study, we consider measurement of [C II] autocorrelation in the 0.5 < z < 1.5 epoch, where interloper lines are minimized, using far-IR/submillimeter balloon-borne and future space-borne instruments with moderate and high sensitivity, respectively. In this context, we compare the intensity mapping approach to blind galaxy surveys based on individual detections. We find that intensity mapping is nearly always the best way to obtain the total line emission because blind, wide-field galaxy surveys lack sufficient depth and deep pencil beams do not observe enough galaxies in the requisite luminosity and redshift bins. Also, intensity mapping is often the most efficient way to measure the power spectrum shape, depending on the details of the luminosity function and the telescope aperture.

  14. Interpretation of satellite airglow observations during the March 22, 1979, magnetic storm, using the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere model developed at University College, London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, H. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Chakrabarti, S.

    1994-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley, extreme ultraviolet spectrometer aboard the U.S. Air Force STP 78-1 satellite measured emission features in the Earth's dayglow due to neutral and ionized species in the atmosphere, in the 35 to 140-nm range. The spectrometer was operating between March 1979 and March 1980, including the period of the magnetic storm on March 22, 1979. Some of these measurements are interpreted using the predictions of the three-dimensional time-dependent coupled ionosphere-thermosphere model developed at University College, London. The observations show a reduction in the atomic oxygen 130.4-nm airglow emission at high northern latitudes following the storm. Model simulations show that this reduction in 130.4-nm emission is associated with an increase in the O2/O ratio. Analysis of model results using electron transport and radiative transport codes show that the brightness of 130.4-nm emission at high latitudes due to resonantly scattered sunlight is approximately twice that due to photoelectron impact excitation. However, the observed decrease in the brightness at high northern latitudes is mainly due to a change in the photoelectron impact source, which contributes approximately 75% of the total, as well as its multiple scattering component; for the photoelectron impact source at 70 deg latitude and 200 km altitude, the reduction in multiple scattering is 1.5 times greater than the reduction in the initial excitation. The reduction in the airglow emission is visible only in the norther n hemisphere because the south pole was not sunlit over the storm period. The comparison of model results with observations suggests that 130.4-nm emission may be useful as a tracer for global changes in the concentration of atomic energy.

  15. Measurement of Concentration Distribution of Hydrogen Gas Flow by Measuring the Intensity of Raman Scattering Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Ippei; Ninomiya, Hideki

    An experimental study to visualize and measure the concentration distribution of hydrogen gas flow using the Raman scattering was performed. A Nd:YAG laser of wavelength at 355 nm was used, and the beam pattern was transformed into a rectangle and a sheet beam was formed. The Raman scattered light was observed at a right angle with respect to the laser beam axis using a gated ICCD camera and an interference filter. Shadowgraph images were obtained at the same condition. The Raman scattering light image from atmospheric nitrogen was first acquired and the function of Raman scattering light acquisition and the background light suppression was confirmed. Next, images of the Raman scattering light image and shadowgraph of hydrogen gas discharged from a nozzle into the atmosphere were acquired. The two obtained Raman images were compared and the spatial concentration distribution of the flow of the hydrogen gas at different flow rates was calculated. This method is effective for visualizing the gas flow and measuring the concentration distribution of the Raman active molecules, such as hydrogen gas.

  16. Low-cost vibration sensor based on dual fiber Bragg gratings and light intensity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xueqing; Wang, Yongjiao; Yuan, Bo; Yuan, Yinquan; Dai, Yawen; Xu, Gang

    2013-09-20

    A vibration monitoring system based on light intensity measurement has been constructed, and the designed accelerometer is based on steel cantilever frame and dual fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). By using numerical simulations for the dual FBGs, the dependence relationship of the area of main lobes on the difference of initial central wavelengths is obtained and the most optimal choice for the initial value and the vibration amplitude of the difference of central wavelengths of two FBGs is suggested. The vibration monitoring experiments are finished, and the measured data are identical to the simulated results.

  17. Comparison of multimicrophone probe design and processing methods in measuring acoustic intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Curtis P; Gee, Kent L; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Giraud, Jarom H

    2014-05-01

    Three multimicrophone probe arrangements used to measure acoustic intensity are the four-microphone regular tetrahedral, the four-microphone orthogonal, and the six-microphone designs. Finite-sum and finite-difference processing methods can be used with such probes to estimate pressure and particle velocity, respectively. A numerical analysis is performed to investigate the bias inherent in each combination of probe design and processing method. Probes consisting of matched point sensor microphones both embedded and not embedded on the surface of a rigid sphere are considered. Results are given for plane wave fields in terms of root-mean-square average bias and maximum bias as a function of angle of incidence. An experimental verification of the analysis model is described. Of the combinations considered and under the stated conditions, the orthogonal probe using the origin microphone for the pressure estimate is shown to have the lowest amount of intensity magnitude bias. Lowest intensity direction bias comes from the six-microphone probe using an average of the 15 intensity components calculated using all microphone pairs. Also discussed are how multimicrophone probes can advantageously use correction factors calculated from a numerical analysis and how the results of such an analysis depend on the chosen definition of the dimensionless frequency.

  18. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure.

  19. Associations between objectively measured physical activity intensity in childhood and measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Grøntved, Anders; Møller, Niels Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: No prospective studies have investigated the association between physical activity (PA) and carotid subclinical cardiovascular disease across childhood. Therefore, the primary aim was to investigate the association between PA intensity across childhood and carotid intima media...... thickness (cIMT) and stiffness in adolescence. Second, we included a clustered cardiovascular disease risk score as outcome. METHODS: This was a prospective study of a sample of 254 children (baseline age 8-10 years) with a 6-year follow-up. The mean exposure and the change in minutes of moderate......-and-vigorous and vigorous PA intensity were measured using the Actigraph activity monitor. Subclinical cardiovascular disease was expressed as cIMT, carotid arterial stiffness and secondarily as a metabolic risk z-score including the homoeostasis model assessment score of insulin resistance, triglycerides, total...

  20. Modeling of Na airglow emission and first results on the nocturnal variation at midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, T.; Sunil Krishna, M. V.; Singh, Vir

    2015-12-01

    A model for sodium airglow emission is developed by incorporating all the known reaction mechanisms. The neutral, ionic, and photochemical mechanisms are successfully implemented into this model. The values of reaction rate coefficients are based upon the theoretical calculations as well as from experimental observations. The densities of major species are calculated using the continuity equations, whereas for the minor, intermediating, and short-lived species steady state approximation method is used. The modeled results are validated with the rocket, lidar, and photometer observations for a branching ratio of 0.04 for the production of Na(2P) in the reaction NaO + O → Na(2P, 2S). The inputs have been obtained from other physics-based models and ground- and satellite-based observations to give the combined volume emission rate (VER) of Na airglow between 80 and 110 km altitude. In the present study, the model is used to understand the nocturnal variation of Na VER during the solstice conditions. The model results suggest a variation of peak emission layer between 85 and 90 km during summer solstice condition, indicating a lower value of peak emission rate during summer solstice. The emission rates bear a strong correlation with the O3 density during summer solstice, whereas the magnitude of VER follows the Na density during winter solstice. The altitude of peak VER shows an upward shift of 5 km during winter solstice.

  1. Monitoring Saturn's Upper Atmosphere Density Variations Using Helium 584 Å Airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The study of He 584 Å brightness of Saturn is interesting as the EUV planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in its thermosphere. Resonance scattering of sunlight by He atoms is the principal source of the planetary emission of He 585 Å. The helium is embedded in an absorbing atmosphere of H2 and since it is heavier than the background atmosphere, it's concentration falls off rapidly above the homopause. The scattering region (i.e. where the absorption optical depth in H2 is greatly improved estimate of the mixing ratio of He in the upper atmosphere and below. The second topic addressed is regarding constraining the dynamics in the atmosphere by using the estimate of the He mixing ratio from the main objective. Once we have an estimate of the He mixing ratio in the lower atmosphere that agrees with both occultations and airglow, helium becomes an effective tracer species as any variations in the Cassini UVIS helium data are direct indicator of changes in Kzz i.e., dynamics.

  2. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  3. The negative event scale: measuring frequency and intensity of adult hassles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybery, D J; Neale, Jason; Arentz, Alex; Jones-Ellis, Jenny

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the structure, concurrent validity, and reliability of a hassle measure for middle-aged adults in both event frequency and intensity recordings. The measure included a range of interpersonal day-to-day events and re-examined aspects of the primary appraisal confounding debate between Lazarus and colleagues (Lazarus, Delongis, Folkman, & Gruen, 1985) and Dohrenwend and Shrout (1985). Of the 373 participants, 73% were female, 72% were in paid work, 69% were in permanent relationships and 62% had children. Principal component analyses of separate hassle frequency and intensity scores highlighted components consistent with previous research. There were seven interpersonal and four non-interpersonal subscales associated with negative events with family and friends, work, health, money, and household. The subscales had very good reliability and concurrent validity and there were generally strong correlations (i.e. up .84) between frequency and intensity scores for each subscale. Given some important sampling limitations (e.g. female overrepresentation) the findings show a psychometrically sound hassle scale for adults.

  4. Using real time process measurements to reduce catheter related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, R; Ely, E; Elasy, T; Dittus, R; Foss, J; Wilkerson, K; Speroff, T

    2005-01-01

    

Problem: Measuring a process of care in real time is essential for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Our inability to measure the process of central venous catheter (CVC) care in real time prevented CQI efforts aimed at reducing catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) from these devices. Design: A system was developed for measuring the process of CVC care in real time. We used these new process measurements to continuously monitor the system, guide CQI activities, and deliver performance feedback to providers. Setting: Adult medical intensive care unit (MICU). Key measures for improvement: Measured process of CVC care in real time; CR-BSI rate and time between CR-BSI events; and performance feedback to staff. Strategies for change: An interdisciplinary team developed a standardized, user friendly nursing checklist for CVC insertion. Infection control practitioners scanned the completed checklists into a computerized database, thereby generating real time measurements for the process of CVC insertion. Armed with these new process measurements, the team optimized the impact of a multifaceted intervention aimed at reducing CR-BSIs. Effects of change: The new checklist immediately provided real time measurements for the process of CVC insertion. These process measures allowed the team to directly monitor adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Through continuous process measurement, the team successfully overcame barriers to change, reduced the CR-BSI rate, and improved patient safety. Two years after the introduction of the checklist the CR-BSI rate remained at a historic low. Lessons learnt: Measuring the process of CVC care in real time is feasible in the ICU. When trying to improve care, real time process measurements are an excellent tool for overcoming barriers to change and enhancing the sustainability of efforts. To continually improve patient safety, healthcare organizations should continually measure their key clinical processes in real

  5. Measuring Gas Concentration and Wind Intensity in a Turbulent Wind Tunnel with a Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the measurement of gas concentration and wind intensity performed with a mobile robot in a custom turbulent wind tunnel designed for experimentation with customizable wind and gas leak sources. This paper presents the representation in different information layers of the measurements obtained in the turbulent wind tunnel under different controlled environmental conditions in order to describe the plume of the gas and wind intensities inside the experimentation chamber. The information layers have been generated from the measurements gathered by individual onboard gas and wind sensors carried out by an autonomous mobile robot. On the one hand, the assumption was that the size and cost of these specialized sensors do not allow the creation of a net of sensors or other measurement alternatives based on the simultaneous use of several sensors, and on the other hand, the assumption is that the information layers created will have application on the development and test of automatic gas source location procedures based on reactive or nonreactive algorithms.

  6. Analysis of the sources of error in the determination of sound power based on sound intensity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    the resulting measurement uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of the most common sources of error in sound power determination based on sound intensity measurements. In particular the influence of the scanning procedure used in approximating the surface integral of the intensity...

  7. Measuring galaxy clustering and the evolution of [C II] mean intensity with far-IR line intensity mapping during 0.5 < z < 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzgil, B. D.; Aguirre, J. E.; Lidz, A. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bradford, C. M., E-mail: badeu@sas.upenn.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. Total line emission, when compared to the total star formation activity and/or other line intensities, reveals evolution of the interstellar conditions of galaxies in aggregate. As a case study, we consider measurement of [C II] autocorrelation in the 0.5 < z < 1.5 epoch, where interloper lines are minimized, using far-IR/submillimeter balloon-borne and future space-borne instruments with moderate and high sensitivity, respectively. In this context, we compare the intensity mapping approach to blind galaxy surveys based on individual detections. We find that intensity mapping is nearly always the best way to obtain the total line emission because blind, wide-field galaxy surveys lack sufficient depth and deep pencil beams do not observe enough galaxies in the requisite luminosity and redshift bins. Also, intensity mapping is often the most efficient way to measure the power spectrum shape, depending on the details of the luminosity function and the telescope aperture.

  8. A robust co-localisation measurement utilising z-stack image intensity similarities for biological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhai Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-localisation is a widely used measurement in immunohistochemical analysis to determine if fluorescently labelled biological entities, such as cells, proteins or molecules share a same location. However the measurement of co-localisation is challenging due to the complex nature of such fluorescent images, especially when multiple focal planes are captured. The current state-of-art co-localisation measurements of 3-dimensional (3D image stacks are biased by noise and cross-overs from non-consecutive planes. METHOD: In this study, we have developed Co-localisation Intensity Coefficients (CICs and Co-localisation Binary Coefficients (CBCs, which uses rich z-stack data from neighbouring focal planes to identify similarities between image intensities of two and potentially more fluorescently-labelled biological entities. This was developed using z-stack images from murine organotypic slice cultures from central nervous system tissue, and two sets of pseudo-data. A large amount of non-specific cross-over situations are excluded using this method. This proposed method is also proven to be robust in recognising co-localisations even when images are polluted with a range of noises. RESULTS: The proposed CBCs and CICs produce robust co-localisation measurements which are easy to interpret, resilient to noise and capable of removing a large amount of false positivity, such as non-specific cross-overs. Performance of this method of measurement is significantly more accurate than existing measurements, as determined statistically using pseudo datasets of known values. This method provides an important and reliable tool for fluorescent 3D neurobiological studies, and will benefit other biological studies which measure fluorescence co-localisation in 3D.

  9. Electric Field Measurement of the Living Human Body for Biomedical Applications: Phase Measurement of the Electric Field Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Hieda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors are developing a technique for conducting measurements inside the human body by applying a weak electric field at a radio frequency (RF. Low RF power is fed to a small antenna, and a similar antenna located 15–50 cm away measures the electric field intensity. Although the resolution of the method is low, it is simple, safe, cost-effective, and able to be used for biomedical applications. One of the technical issues suggested by the authors' previous studies was that the signal pattern acquired from measurement of a human body was essentially different from that acquired from a phantom. To trace the causes of this difference, the accuracy of the phase measurements was improved. This paper describes the new experimental system that can measure the signal phase and amplitude and reports the results of experiments measuring a human body and a phantom. The results were analyzed and then discussed in terms of their contribution to the phase measurement.

  10. Provision of protein and energy in relation to measured requirements in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Esmailzadeh, Negar; Knudsen, Anne Wilkens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adequacy of nutritional support in intensive care patients is still a matter of investigation. This study aimed to relate mortality to provision, measured requirements and balances for energy and protein in ICU patients. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study of 113 ICU......, also when adjusted for baseline prognostic variables (APACHE II, SOFA scores and age). Provision of energy, measured resting energy expenditure or energy and nitrogen balance was not related to mortality. The possible cause-effect relationship is discussed after a more detailed analysis of the initial...... part of the admission. CONCLUSION: In these severely ill ICU patients, a higher provision of protein and amino acids was associated with a lower mortality. This was not the case for provision of energy or measured resting energy expenditure or energy or nitrogen balances. The hypothesis that higher...

  11. Temperature- and Intensity-Dependent Photovoltaic Measurements to Identify Dominant Recombination Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Riley E.; Mangan, Niall M.; Li, Jian V.; Kurchin, Rachel C.; Milakovich, Timothy; Levcenco, Sergiu; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Unold, Thomas; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-11-21

    In novel photovoltaic absorbers, it is often difficult to assess the root causes of low open-circuit voltages, which may be due to bulk recombination or sub-optimal contacts. In the present work, we discuss the role of temperature- and illumination-dependent device electrical measurements in quantifying and distinguishing these performance losses - in particular, for determining bounds on interface recombination velocities, band alignment, and minority carrier lifetime. We assess the accuracy of this approach by direct comparison to photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, we demonstrate how more computationally intensive model parameter fitting approaches can draw more insights from this broad measurement space. We apply this measurement and modeling approach to high-performance III-V and thin-film chalcogenide devices.

  12. Input energy measurement toward warm dense matter generation using intense pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, R.; Ito, T.; Ishitani, T.; Tamura, F.; Kudo, T.; Takakura, N.; Kashine, K.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, Nob.; Jiang, W.; Tokuchi, A.

    2016-05-01

    In order to investigate properties of warm dense matter (WDM) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), evaluation method for the WDM with isochoric heating on the implosion time-scale using an intense pulsed power generator ETIGO-II (∼1 TW, ∼50 ns) has been considered. In this study, the history of input energy into the sample is measured from the voltage and the current waveforms. To achieve isochoric heating, a foamed aluminum with pore sizes 600 μm and with 90% porosity was packed into a hollow glass capillary (ø 5 mm × 10 mm). The temperature of the sample is calculated from the numerical calculation using the measured input power. According to the above measurements, the input energy into a sample and the achievable temperature are estimated to be 300 J and 6000 K. It indicates that the WDM state is generated using the proposed method with ICF implosion time-scale.

  13. Upgrade of the Fast Beam Intensity Measurement System for the CERN PS Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Allica, JC; Andreazza, W; Belohrad, D; Favre, G; Favre, N; Jensen, L; Lenardon, F; Vollenberg, W

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Proton Synchrotron complex (CPS) has been operational for over 50 years. During this time the Fast Beam Current Transformers (FBCTs) have only been repaired when they ceased to function, or individually modified to cope with new requests. This strategy resulted in a large variation of designs, making their maintenance difficult and limiting the precision with which comparisons could be made between transformers for the measurement of beam intensity transmission. During the first long shutdown of the CERN LHC and its injectors (LS1) these systems have undergone a major consolidation, with detectors and acquisition electronics upgraded to provide a uniform measurement system throughout the PS complex. This paper discusses the solutions used and analyses the first beam measurement results.

  14. A compact x-ray beam intensity monitor using gas amplified sample current measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Gohshi, Yohichi

    2000-01-01

    Development of a compact beam intensity monitor using gas amplified sample current measurement is described. The monitor can be a powerful tool for x-ray spectroscopy and microscopy when the beam is defined by a small pinhole or slits and when the workspace around the sample is limited. The thickness of the monitor is as small as approximately 3 mm, and the dimension is 10 mm square. The photon flux is monitored by measuring x-ray excited current from an Al foil under atmospheric conditions. Emitted electrons from the Al foil can ionize surrounding air molecules, and the gas amplified current can be measured with the use of a biased grid that prevents created ion pairs from recombination.

  15. Success factors of energy management in energy-intensive industries. Energy performance measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivill, L.

    2011-10-15

    This thesis explores energy performance measurement in support of energy management in the energy-intensive industries. In general, performance measurement is used in management for raising awareness, evaluating performance, setting targets and offering decision support. These purposes also apply to energy management, defined here as the management of all activities related to the economic and responsible use of energy in an organisation. This thesis answers the following three questions: 1) what is the concept of energy performance in a business organisation? 2) what is the importance of energy performance measurement to energy management in the energy-intensive industries? and 3) what are the subsequent needs for future research and development? A variety of methods are used, ranging from qualitative research to the modelling of energy systems and case demonstrations. The findings indicate that energy management should focus on improving energy performance, not energy efficiency, because this broader view is able to capture both the operational and strategic perspectives of energy management. This is in line with the trends of managerial integration and the adoption of sustainable development into management practice. The domain of energy performance indicators should entail organisational, systemic and temporal dimensions. From the perspective of operational management, performance measurement should address all the three means to improve energy performance, namely technology, operation and process integration. In addition to the operational management, future research and development should define the role of energy performance measurement in all the other management functions. These recommendations provide a wide spectrum of opportunities for the development of energy performance indicators, energy performance measurement systems and their underlying deployment processes in different industrial sectors, organisations and systems. (orig.)

  16. Analysis and comparison model for measuring tropospheric scintillation intensity for Ku-band frequency in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep JS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has been based on understanding local propagation signal data distribution characteristics and identifying and predicting the overall impact of significant attenuating factors regarding the propagation path such as impaired propagation for a signal being transmitted. Predicting propagation impairment is important for accurate link budgeting, thereby leading to better communication network system designation. This study has thus used sample data for one year concerning beacon satellite operation in Malaysia from April 2008 to April 2009. Data concerning 12GHz frequency (Ku-band and 40° elevation angle was collected and analysed, obtaining average signal amplitude value, ÷ and also standard deviation ó which is normally measured in dB to obtain long-term scintillation intensity distribution. This analysis showed that scintillation intensity distribution followed Gaussian distribution for long-term data distribution. A prediction model was then selected based on the above; Karasawa,
    ITU-R, Van de Kamp and Otung models were compared to obtain the best prediction model performance for selected data regarding specific meteorological conditions. This study showed that the Karasawa model had the best performance for predicting scintillation intensity for the selected da ta.

  17. Identification of critical intensity from a single lactate measure during a 3-min, submaximal cycle-ergometer test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Federico Y; Colosio, Alessandro L; Keir, Daniel A; Murias, Juan M; Pogliaghi, Silvia

    2016-12-06

    We tested the hypothesis that critical intensity in cycling can be determined from a single delta blood lactate in the third minute of a submaximal cycle ergometer trial. Fourteen healthy young men performed four to six constant-power-output trials on a cycle ergometer to the limit of tolerance. Critical intensity was calculated via a linear model and subsequently validated. Lactate was measured at baseline and at 3 min from exercise onset. Delta lactate was the difference between these measures. Based on individual trials, we obtained the delta lactate-% validated critical intensity relationship and thereafter an estimate of critical intensity was computed. Validated and estimated critical intensity were compared by effects sizes, paired-sample t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. Delta lactate was a linear function of the intensity of exercise, expressed as % validated critical intensity (R(2) = 0.89). Estimated critical intensity was not different from (d = 0.03, P = 0.98) and highly correlated with (R(2) = 0.88) validated critical intensity. The bias between measures was 0.03 W (≠0) with a precision of 7 W. The results suggest that critical intensity in cycling can be accurately and precisely determined from delta lactate during a sub-maximal trial and so provides a practical and valid alternative to direct determination.

  18. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization′s (WHO guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  19. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  20. Precise and accurate measurements of strong-field photoionisation and a transferrable laser intensity calibration standard

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, W C; Khurmi, C; U., Satya Sainadh; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-01-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percentlevel accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferrable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much-needed benchmark for testing models of ionisation in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  1. Review of intense-ion-beam propagation with a view toward measuring ion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.

    1982-08-25

    The subject of this review is intense ion beam propagation and the possibilities of measuring time dependent ion energy in the beam. Propagation effects discussed include charge separation, charge and current autoneutralization, electron thermalization and current neutralization decay. The interaction of a plasma beam with material obstacles, like collimators, and with transverse magnetic fields is also described. Depending on beam energy, density and pulse length, these interactions can include material ablation with plasmadynamic flow and undeflected propagation across transverse magnetic fields by a polarization drift. On the basis of this review I conclude that three diagnostics: a single floating potential probe, net current probes (Faraday cups) and a Rutherford scattering spectrometer appear capable of giving prompt, time dependent ion energy measurements.

  2. Distribution measurement of radiation intensity with optical fiber at narrow space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Chizuo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1998-07-01

    Recently, in the field or radiation measurement, optical fiber and scintillation fiber are also begun to use. In order to investigate a new application method of the optical fiber to radiation measurement, a lithium compound for neutron converter and a ZnS(Ag) scintillator are kneaded with epoxy type adhesives, and much few weight of them is coated at an end of optical fiber with 1 to 2 mm in diameter, which is further overcoated with black paint or an aluminum cap for its shielding light to produce a thermal neutron detector. The thermal neutron detector is found to be measurable to neutron flux distribution very rapidly and in high position resolution by moving with computer automatically. This method can be measured selctively aimed radiation such as thermal neutron, rapid neutron, {gamma}-ray, and so forth by means of changing the neutron converter. And, the developed fiber method could be widely used for measurement of neutron and {gamma}-ray intensity distribution at fine interval in the nuclear radiation facilities such as neighbors of accelerator facilities, medical radiation facilities. (G.K.)

  3. Measurement of Rapid Protein Diffusion in the Cytoplasm by Photo-Converted Intensity Profile Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Gura Sadovsky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence microscopy methods presently used to characterize protein motion in cells infer protein motion from indirect observables, rather than measuring protein motion directly. Operationalizing these methods requires expertise that can constitute a barrier to their broad utilization. Here, we have developed PIPE (photo-converted intensity profile expansion to directly measure the motion of tagged proteins and quantify it using an effective diffusion coefficient. PIPE works by pulsing photo-convertible fluorescent proteins, generating a peaked fluorescence signal at the pulsed region, and analyzing the spatial expansion of the signal. We demonstrate PIPE’s success in measuring accurate diffusion coefficients in silico and in vitro and compare effective diffusion coefficients of native cellular proteins and free fluorophores in vivo. We apply PIPE to measure diffusion anomality in the cell and use it to distinguish free fluorophores from native cellular proteins. PIPE’s direct measurement and ease of use make it appealing for cell biologists.

  4. Measuring the fusion cross-section of light nuclei with low-intensity beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T.K.; Rudolph, M.J.; Gosser, Z.Q.; Brown, K.; Floyd, B.; Hudan, S. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Souza, R.T. de, E-mail: desouza@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Liang, J.F.; Shapira, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Famiano, M. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2014-04-11

    We demonstrate an approach to measure the total fusion cross-section for beams of low-intensity light nuclei. Fusion residues resulting from the fusion of {sup 20,16}O+{sup 12}C are directly measured and distinguished from unreacted beam particles on the basis of their energy and time-of-flight. The time-of-flight is measured between a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, which serves as a start, and a segmented silicon detector, which provides a stop. The two main difficulties associated with the initial implementation of this approach are charge trapping in the silicon detector and slit scattering in the MCP detector. Both these obstacles have been characterized and overcome. To reduce atomic slit scattering in the measurement we have eliminated wires from the beam path by developing a gridless MCP detector. The total fusion cross-section for {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C in the energy range E{sub CM}=8.0–12.0 MeV has been measured in agreement with established literature values (down to the 100 mb level)

  5. Construction and psychometric testing of the EMPATHIC questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; van Dam, Nicolette A. M.; Dullaart, Eugenie; van Heerde, Marc; de Neef, Marjorie; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; van Vught, Elise M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    To construct and test the reliability and validity of the EMpowerment of PArents in THe Intensive Care (EMPATHIC) questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Structured development and psychometric testing of a parent satisfaction-with-care instrument wit

  6. Construction and psychometric testing of the EMPATHIC questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Latour (Jos); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); M.J.I.J. Albers (Marcel); N.A.M. van Dam (Nicolette); E. Dullaart (Eugenie); M. van Heerde (Marc); M. de Neef (Marjorie); C.W.M. Verlaat (Carin); E.M. van Vught (Elise); J.A. Hazelzet (Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract PURPOSE: To construct and test the reliability and validity of the EMpowerment of PArents in THe Intensive Care (EMPATHIC) questionnaire measuring parent satisfaction in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). METHODS: Structured development and psychometric testing of a paren

  7. Critical Zone Services as a Measure for Evaluating the Trade-offs in Intensively Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Critical Zone includes the range of biophysical processes occurring from the top of the vegetation canopy to the weathering zone below the groundwater table. These services (Field et al. 2015) provide a measure to value processes that support the goods and services from our landscapes. In intensively managed landscapes the provisioning and regulating services are being altered through anthropogenic energy inputs so as to derive more agricultural productivity from the landscapes. Land use change and other alterations to the environment result in positive and/or negative net Critical Zone services. Through studies in the Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes (IMLCZO), this research seeks to answer questions such as: Are perennial bioenergy crops or annual replaced crops better for the land and surrounding environment? How do we evaluate the products and services from the land for the energy and resources we put in? Before the economic valuation of Critical Zone services, these questions seemed abstract. However, with developments such as Critical Zone services and life cycle assessments, they are more concrete. To evaluate the trade-offs between positive and negative impacts, life cycle assessments are used to create an inventory of all the energy inputs and outputs in a landscape management system. Total energy is computed by summing the mechanical energy used to construct tile drains, fertilizer, and other processes involved in intensely managed landscapes and the chemical energy gained by the production of biofuels from bioenergy crops. A multi-layer canopy model (MLCan) computes soil, water, and nutrient outputs for each crop type, which can be translated into Critical Zone services. These values are then viewed alongside the energy inputs into the system to show the relationship between agricultural practices and their corresponding ecosystem and environmental impacts.

  8. Measurement of muscle strength with handheld dynamometer in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi R Samosawala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intensive Care Unit (ICU acquired weakness is a common complication in critically ill patients affecting their prognosis. The handheld dynamometry is an objective method in detecting minimum muscle strength change, which has an impact on the physical function of ICU survivors. The minimal change in the force can be measured in units of weight such as pounds or kilograms. Aim of the Study: To detect the changes in peripheral muscle strength with handheld dynamometer in the early stage of ICU stay and to observe the progression of muscle weakness. Methodology: Three upper and three lower limb muscles force measured with handheld dynamometer during ICU stay. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA to detect changes in force generated by muscle on alternate days of ICU stay. Results: There was a reduction in peripheral muscle strength from day 3 to day 5 as well from day 5 to day 7 of ICU stay (P < 0.01. The average reduction in peripheral muscle strength was 11.8% during ICU stay. Conclusion: This study showed a progressive reduction in peripheral muscle strength as measured by handheld dynamometer during early period of ICU stay.

  9. Transient Sound Intensity Measurements for Evaluating the Spatial Information of Sound Fields in Reverberant Enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdov, Adel Abdel-Moneim

    Over the last twenty years, new subjectively relevant objective room-acoustic indicators for evaluating the acoustical quality of an enclosure have been introduced. While these indicators give new insight into the acoustical "Goodness" of a listener position, in order to design halls, assess or to correct an acoustical defect in an existing enclosure, there is a need to understand to what extent they are influenced by the physical design features of the enclosure. To meet such a need, information about the directional characteristics of sound is required. The spatial distribution of sound energy is usually not considered due to lack of an efficient, accurate and easy to perform measurement method. The main objectives of the present study are, first; to review known and speculative room-acoustic indicators for use in assessing reverberant spaces such as concert halls, opera houses, multi-purpose halls and churches. Second, to introduce an easy to perform measurement method for directional sensing in sound fields. Third, to develop a simple and inexpensive PC-based instrument primarily for the measurement of sound fields directional characteristics as well as contemporary room-acoustic indicators. Fourth, to propose new room-acoustic indicators which have relevance to directional information. This study introduces a three-dimensional sound intensity measurement technique for obtaining spatial information of sound fields in an enclosure. The technique has been validated and its accuracy investigated. The method gives results that provide valuable information regarding the directional behaviour of sound in enclosures. Subsequently both the system and the measurement method were applied to known spaces as example applications in order to assess sound quality, to detect the effect of the surrounding interior features of the space, and to assess potential diagnostic capability with respect to interior physical changes. The study has validated the measurement procedure as

  10. The effect of foreground subtraction on cosmological measurements from intensity mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz, L.; Abdalla, F. B.; Blake, C.; Shaw, J. R.; Chapman, E.; Rawlings, S.

    2014-07-01

    We model a 21-cm intensity mapping survey in the redshift range 0.01 fast independent component analysis technique. We present the power spectrum of the large-scale matter distribution, C(ℓ), before and after the application of this foreground removal method and calculate the systematic errors. Our simulations show a certain level of bias remains in the power spectrum at all scales ℓ < 400. At large-scales ℓ < 30 this bias is particularly significant. We measure the impact of these systematics in two ways: first we fit cosmological parameters to the broad-band shape of the C(ℓ) where we find that the best fit is significantly shifted at the 2-3σ level depending on masking and noise levels. However, secondly, we recover cosmic distances without biases at all simulated redshifts by fitting the baryon acoustic oscillations in the C(ℓ). We conclude that further advances in foreground removal are needed in order to recover unbiased information from the broad-band shape of the C(ℓ), however, intensity mapping experiments will be a powerful tool for mapping cosmic distances across a wide redshift range.

  11. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  12. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  13. Measurement of high-power microwave pulse under intense electromagnetic noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Roy; S K Singh; R Menon; D Senthil Kumar; R Venkateswaran; M R Kulkarni; P C Saroj; K V Nagesh; K C Mittal; D P Chakravarthy

    2010-01-01

    KALI-1000 pulse power system has been used to generate single pulse nanosecond duration high-power microwaves (HPM) from a virtual cathode oscillator (VIRCATOR) device. HPM power measurements were carried out using a transmitting–receiving system in the presence of intense high frequency (a few MHz) electromagnetic noise. Initially, the diode detector output signal could not be recorded due to the high noise level persisting in the ambiance. It was found that the HPM pulse can be successfully detected using wide band antenna, RF cable and diode detector set-up in the presence of significant electromagnetic noise. Estimated microwave peak power was ∼ 59.8 dBm (∼ 1 kW) at 7 m distance from the VIRCATOR window. Peak amplitude of the HPM signal varies on shot-to-shot basis. Duration of the HPM pulse (FWHM) also varies from 52 ns to 94 ns for different shots.

  14. Correlation study between ground motion intensity measure parameters and deformation demands for bilinear SDOF systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The correlation between ground motion intensity measures (IM) and single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) deformation demands is described in this study. Peak ground acceleration (APG), peak ground velocity (VPG), peak ground displacement (DPG), spectral acceleration at the first-mode period of vibration [As(T1)] and ratio of VPG to APG are used as IM parameters, and the correlation is characterized by correlation coefficients ρ. The numerical results obtained by nonlinear dynamic analyses have shown good correlation between As(T1) or VPG and deformation demands. Furthermore, the effect of As(T1) and VPG as IM on the dispersion of the mean value of deformation demands is also investigated for SDOF systems with three different periods T=0.3 s, 1.0 s, 3.0 s respectively.

  15. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  16. On inconsistency of experimental data on primary nuclei spectra with sea level muon intensity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lagutin, A A; Yushkov, A V

    2004-01-01

    For the first time a complete set of the most recent direct data on primary cosmic ray spectra is used as input into calculations of muon flux at sea level in wide energy range $E_\\mu=1-3\\cdot10^5$ GeV. Computations have been performed with the CORSIKA/QGSJET and CORSIKA/VENUS codes. The comparison of the obtained muon intensity with the data of muon experiments shows, that measurements of primary nuclei spectra conform to sea level muon data only up to several tens of GeV and result in essential deficit of muons at higher energies. As it follows from our examination, uncertainties in muon flux measurements and in the description of nuclear cascades development are not suitable to explain this contradiction, and the only remaining factor, leading to this situation, is underestimation of primary light nuclei fluxes. We have considered systematic effects, that may distort the results of the primary cosmic ray measurements with the application of the emulsion chambers. We suggest, that re-examination of these me...

  17. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Optical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Beat; Michalsky, J.; Slater, D.; Barnard, J.; Halthore, R.; Liljegren, J.; Holben, B.; Eck, T.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997 the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program conducted an intensive Observation Period (IOP) to study water vapor at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among the large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring solar transmittance in the 0.94-micrometer water vapor absorption band. As one of the steps in the CWV retrievals the aerosol component is subtracted from the total transmittance, in the 0.94-micrometer band. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers are presented elsewhere. We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. Without attempting to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy we found the CWV to agree within 0.13 cm (rms) for CWV values ranging from 1 to 5 cm. Preliminary results obtained when using the same updated radiative transfer model with updated spectroscopy for all instruments will also be shown. Comparisons to the microwave radiometer results will be included in the comparisons.

  18. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  19. Measurements and theory for transport layer structure in intense bed-load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccarollo, L.; Capart, H.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on sediment laden flows driven by turbulent open-channel flows where the bed surface is fully mobilized and nonetheless the thickness of the bedload layer is conveniently smaller than the flow depth. This regime presents dynamic and kinematic features which persist in the range of applied Shields stress between about 0.3 and 3. Below the lower limit the moving grains do not develop significant stresses compared to the applied ones; above the upper limit, debris-flow type frictional contacts develop in a non negligible portion of the bedload layer. We report laboratory experiments in which, using high-speed cameras and a laser light sheet, detailed profiles of granular velocity and concentration have been measured. We checked that the transversal bed profile is flat and that the sidewall measurements are representative of the interior domain. The profiles provide new information on transport layer structure and its relation to the applied Shields stress. Contrary to expectations, we find that intense bed-load layers respond to changes in flow conditions by adjusting their granular concentration at the base. Two mechanisms account for the resulting behavior: stresses generated by immersed granular collisions, and equilibration by density stratification. Without parameter adjustment, the deduced constitutive relations capture the responses of velocity, concentration, and layer thickness in the above reported ten-fold increase Shields-stress range. Away from this intermediate range, in both directions, we show how the flow features rapidly change and the theoretical inferences decay.

  20. Ultrasound modulated light blood flow measurement using intensity autocorrelation function: a Monte-Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalach, A.; Metzger, Y.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Development of techniques for continuous measurement of regional blood flow, and in particular cerebral blood flow (CBF), is essential for monitoring critical care patients. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133 Xe SPECT1 and laser Doppler2. Coherent light is introduced into the tissue concurrently with an Ultrasound (US) field. Displacement of scattering centers within the sampled volume induced by Brownian motion, blood flow and the US field affects the photons' temporal correlation. Hence, the temporal fluctuations of the obtained speckle pattern provide dynamic information about the blood flow. We developed a comprehensive simulation, combining the effects of Brownian motion, US and flow on the obtained speckle pattern. Photons trajectories within the tissue are generated using a Monte-Carlo based model. Then, the temporal changes in the optical path due to displacement of scattering centers are determined, and the corresponding interference pattern over time is derived. Finally, the light intensity autocorrelation function of a single speckle is calculated, from which the tissue decorrelation time is determined. The simulation's results are compared with in-vitro experiments, using a digital correlator, demonstrating decorrelation time prediction within the 95% confidence interval. This model may assist in the development of optical based methods for blood flow measurements and particularly, in methods using the acousto-optic effect.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a neonatal intensive care unit: molecular epidemiology and infection control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triassi Maria

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a non-fermentative, gram-negative rod, is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes in NICU patients, including sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and skin infections. An increased number of infections and colonisations by P. aeruginosa has been observed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of our university hospital between 2005 and 2007. Methods Hand disinfection compliance before and after an educational programme on hand hygiene was evaluated. Identification of microrganisms was performed using conventional methods. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by MIC microdilution. Genotyping was performed by PFGE analysis. Results The molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the NICU of the Federico II University hospital (Naples, Italy and the infection control measures adopted to stop the spreading of P. aeruginosa in the ward were described. From July 2005 to June 2007, P. aeruginosa was isolated from 135 neonates and caused severe infections in 11 of them. Macrorestriction analysis of clinical isolates from 90 neonates identified 20 distinct genotypes, one major PFGE type (A being isolated from 48 patients and responsible for 4 infections in 4 of them, four other distinct recurrent genotypes being isolated in 6 to 4 patients. Seven environmental strains were isolated from the hand of a nurse and from three sinks on two occasions, two of these showing PFGE profiles A and G identical to two clinical isolates responsible for infection. The successful control of the outbreak was achieved through implementation of active surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in the ward together with environmental microbiological sampling and an intense educational programme on hand disinfection among the staff members. Conclusion P. aeruginosa infections in the NICU were caused by the cross-transmission of an epidemic clone in 4 neonates, and by the selection

  2. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  3. Continuous record of geomagnetic field intensity between 4.7 and 2.7 Ma from downhole measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibal, J.; Pozzi, J.-P.; Barthès, V.; Dubuisson, G.

    1995-12-01

    A continuous record of the geomagnetic field intensity from 4.7 to 2.7 Ma has been obtained, together with a precise magnetostratigraphy, from downhole magnetic measurements at Site 884 of ODP Leg 145 in the North Pacific. The record confirms the saw-tooth pattern of geomagnetic field intensity proposed by Valet et Meynadier [10]. Reversals are characterized by a steep intensity decrease followed by a quick regeneration. Over each polarity interval, rapid variations are superimposed over a progressive decrease in the mean intensity. We find that the duration of each polarity interval is inversely proportional to the mean rate of decrease in the field intensity over this period, and thus this duration seems to be pre-determined.

  4. Method for screening prevention and control measures and technologies based on groundwater pollution intensity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Juan, E-mail: lijuan@craes.org.cn [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Yang, Yang [College of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Huan, Huan; Li, Mingxiao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Xi, Beidou, E-mail: xibd413@yeah.net [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Lv, Ningqing [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Wu, Yi [Guizhou Academy of Environmental Science and Designing, Guizhou 550000 (China); Xie, Yiwen, E-mail: qin3201@126.com [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan, 523808 (China); Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinjin [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a system for determining the evaluation and gradation indices of groundwater pollution intensity (GPI). Considering the characteristics of the vadose zone and pollution sources, the system decides which anti-seepage measures should be implemented at the contaminated site. The pollution sources hazards (PSH) and groundwater intrinsic vulnerability (GIV) are graded by the revised Nemerow Pollution Index and an improved DRTAS model, respectively. GPI is evaluated and graded by a double-sided multi-factor coupling model, which is constructed by the matrix method. The contaminated sites are categorized as prior, ordinary, or common sites. From the GPI results, we develop guiding principles for preventing and removing pollution sources, procedural interruption and remediation, and end treatment and monitoring. Thus, we can select appropriate prevention and control technologies (PCT). To screen the technological schemes and optimize the traditional analytical hierarchy process (AHP), we adopt the technique for order preference by the similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method. Our GPI approach and PCT screening are applied to three types of pollution sites: the refuse dump of a rare earth mine development project (a potential pollution source), a chromium slag dump, and a landfill (existing pollution sources). These three sites are identified as ordinary, prior, and ordinary sites, respectively. The anti-seepage materials at the refuse dump should perform as effectively as a 1.5-m-thick clay bed. The chromium slag dump should be preferentially treated by soil flushing and in situ chemical remediation. The landfill should be treated by natural attenuation technology. The proposed PCT screening approach was compared with conventional screening methods results at the three sites and proved feasible and effective. The proposed method can provide technical support for the monitoring and management of groundwater pollution in China. - Highlights: • An

  5. The design and application of large area intensive lens array focal spots measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingzhen; Yao, Shun; Yang, Guanghui; Dai, Mingchong; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) modules are getting thinner and using smaller cells now days. Correspondingly, large area intensive lens arrays with smaller unit dimension and shorter focal length are wanted. However, the size and power center of lens array focal spots usually differ from the design value and are hard to measure, especially under large area situation. It is because the machining error and deformation of material of the lens array are hard to simulate in the optical design process. Thus the alignment error between solar cells and focal spots in the module assembly process will be hard to control. Under this kind of situation, the efficiency of CPV module with thinner body and smaller cells is much lower than expected. In this paper, a design of large area lens array focal spots automatic measurement system is presented, as well as its prototype application results. In this system, a four-channel parallel light path and its corresponding image capture and process modules are designed. These modules can simulate focal spots under sunlight and have the spots image captured and processed using charge coupled devices and certain gray level algorithm. Thus the important information of focal spots such as spot size and location will be exported. Motion control module based on grating scale signal and interval measurement method are also employed in this system in order to get test results with high speed and high precision on large area lens array no less than 1m×0.8m. The repeatability of the system prototype measurement is +/-10μm with a velocity of 90 spot/min. Compared to the original module assembled using coordinates from optical design, modules assembled using data exported from the prototype is 18% higher in output power, reaching a conversion efficiency of over 31%. This system and its design can be used in the focal spot measurement of planoconvex lens array and Fresnel lens array, as well as other kinds of large area lens array application

  6. Measurement of Frequency Shift Characteristics Based on LiNbO3 Waveguide Electro-Optic Intensity Modulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Meng; Hui-Juan Zhou; Yi Liao; Qiong Yao

    2008-01-01

    High-speed and wide-band LiNbO3 waveguide electro-optic intensity modulator has drawn great attention in the field of optical fiber communi-cation and sensor. This paper reports the research results on the measurement of frequency shift character-istics of Mach-Zehnder electro-optic intensity modulator. Two measurement methods of frequency shift character-istics for high and low frequency modulations are studied in theory and experiment and demonstrate different results. The realization of a multi-wavelength optical source based on Mach-Zehnder electro-optic intensity modulator has been introduced. The technique to reach the maximum intensity for interesting shift frequency, particularly for heterodyne detection of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensing, has been given.

  7. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujii, N., E-mail: tsujii@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  8. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, J.; Crowley, J.; Fischer, H.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPACOPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyyti¨al¨a, Finland from 12 July–12 Augu

  9. Overview of the trace gas measurements on board the Citation aircraft during the intensive field phase of INDOEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gouw, JA; Warneke, C; Scheeren, HA; van der Veen, C; Bolder, M; Scheele, MP; Williams, J; Wong, S; Lange, L; Fischer, H; Lelieveld, J

    2001-01-01

    During the intensive field phase of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), measurements of the atmospheric chemical and aerosol composition over the Indian Ocean were performed from a Cessna Citation aircraft. Measurements were performed during February and March 1999 over the northern Indian Ocean f

  10. Validity and reliability of measuring activities, movement intensity and energy expenditure with the DynaPort MoveMonitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Nieuwenhuizen, Mieke G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of assessing activities, movement intensity (MI) and energy expenditure (EE) measured by accelerometry. 28 Able-bodied participants performed standardized tasks while an accelerometer was worn and oxygen uptake was measured. Afte

  11. Bremsstrahlung measurements for characterization of intense short-pulse, laser produced fast electrons with OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi; Chen, Cliff; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Patel, Pravesh; Tommasini, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Understanding relativistic fast electron generation and transport inside solids is important for applications such as generation of high energy x-ray sources and fast ignition. An experiment was carried out to study the scaling of the fast electron spectrum and bremsstrahlung generation in multi-pico second laser interactions using 1 ps and 10 ps OMEGA EP short-pulse beam to generate fast electrons at a similar peak intensity of 5x1018 W/cm2. The bremsstrahlung produced by collisions of the fast electrons with background ions was recorded using differential filter stacked spectrometers. A preliminary analysis with a Monte Carlo Code ITS shows that the electrons injection having an electron slope 1.8 MeV matched well with the high energy component of the 1 ps and 10 ps bremsstrahlung measurements. Details of the data analysis and modeling with Monte Carlo and a hybrid particle-in-cell codes will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contracts No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and No. DE-FG-02-05ER54834.

  12. [Control measures against Serratia marcescens colonization at the neonatal intensive care unit of UOEH hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Takako; Tanabe, Tadao; Muratani, Tetsuro; Nakano, Noriko; Kotake, Tomoko; Shirakawa, Yoshitsugu; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2003-03-01

    In September 2001, twelve neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients were found to be colonized with pigment-producing strains of Serratia marcescens. The UOEH Infection Control Group (ICG) committee investigated the source of this epidemic and carried out several remedial measures. Immediate investigation of both the environment and the hands of health care workers were enforced. The most likely means of transmission was thought to be from the hands contaminated with S. marcescens that was found on antiseptic cotton, kept in shared stainless steel canisters, used for wiping the patients' buttocks. Therefore, we suggested the following interventions: 1) abolish the stainless steel canisters, and prepare antiseptic cottons for each patient, 2) monitor cultures with some specimens for all patients in the NICU, 3) periodically investigate the environment, 4) enforce workers to wash and disinfect their hands before and after patient care, 5) use new gloves for each treatment, 6) re-examine and modify the caring procedures for inpatients by the nursing staff. In January 2002, this nosocomial colonization came to an end without any serious infection. One of the key points of this success was the quick response by the clinical staff and ICG committee members to the laboratory results of bacteriological examinations. Furthermore, the early investigation of reservoir and good communication between the clinical staff and ICG committee members mostly prevented this nosocomial colonization from becoming worse.

  13. MR intensity measurements of nondenervated muscle in patients following severe forearm trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viddeleer, A. R.; Sijens, P. E.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Kuypers, P. D. L.; Hovius, S. E. R.; Oudkerk, M.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid increases resulting in higher MRI signal intensities in T(2)-weighted and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences can be used to diagnose nerve injury. By comparing the signal intensities over time, MRI may become a new method for monitoring the healing process. Muscle edema is assessed

  14. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  15. Non-destructive profile measurement of intensive heavy ion beams; Zerstoerungsfreie Profilmessung intensiver Schwerionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Frank

    2010-02-08

    Within the framework of the FAIR-project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI (Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research), high intensity beams from protons to uranium ions with kinetic energies up to 30 AGeV are foreseen. Present GSI-accelerators like the UNILAC and the Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS-18) with a magnetic rigidity of 18 Tm will be used as injectors for the future synchrotron (SIS-100). Their beam current will be increased by up to two orders of magnitude. An accurate beam position and beam profile measurement is mandatory for a safe operation of transport sections, in particular in front of production targets (Fragment Separator (FRS)-target, anti p-production-target and Warm Dense Matter (WDM)-targets). Conventional intercepting profile monitors will not withstand the thermal stress of intensive ion beams, particularly for low energy applications or focused beams. For transverse profile determination a non-intercepting Beam Induced Fluorescence (BIF)-monitor was developed, working with residual gas. The BIF-monitor exploits fluorescence light emitted by residual gas molecules after atomic collisions with beam ions. Fluorescence-images were recorded with an image-intensified camera system, and beam profiles were obtained by projecting these images. Within the scope of this dissertation the following topics have been investigated: The photon yield, profile shape and background contribution were determined for different ion species (H{sup +}, S{sup 6+}, Ar{sup 18+}, K{sup +}, Ni{sup 9+}, Xe{sup 48+}, Ta{sup 24+}, Au{sup 65+}, U{sup 73+}), beam energies (7.7 AkeV-750 AMeV), gas pressures (10{sup -6}-3 mbar) and gas species (N{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Applying an imaging spectrograph and narrowband 10 nm interference filters, the spectral response was mapped and associated with the corresponding gas transitions. Spectrally resolved beam profiles were also obtained form the spectrographic images. Major results are the light yield showing a

  16. Method for screening prevention and control measures and technologies based on groundwater pollution intensity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Yang, Yang; Huan, Huan; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Lv, Ningqing; Wu, Yi; Xie, Yiwen; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinjin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a system for determining the evaluation and gradation indices of groundwater pollution intensity (GPI). Considering the characteristics of the vadose zone and pollution sources, the system decides which anti-seepage measures should be implemented at the contaminated site. The pollution sources hazards (PSH) and groundwater intrinsic vulnerability (GIV) are graded by the revised Nemerow Pollution Index and an improved DRTAS model, respectively. GPI is evaluated and graded by a double-sided multi-factor coupling model, which is constructed by the matrix method. The contaminated sites are categorized as prior, ordinary, or common sites. From the GPI results, we develop guiding principles for preventing and removing pollution sources, procedural interruption and remediation, and end treatment and monitoring. Thus, we can select appropriate prevention and control technologies (PCT). To screen the technological schemes and optimize the traditional analytical hierarchy process (AHP), we adopt the technique for order preference by the similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method. Our GPI approach and PCT screening are applied to three types of pollution sites: the refuse dump of a rare earth mine development project (a potential pollution source), a chromium slag dump, and a landfill (existing pollution sources). These three sites are identified as ordinary, prior, and ordinary sites, respectively. The anti-seepage materials at the refuse dump should perform as effectively as a 1.5-m-thick clay bed. The chromium slag dump should be preferentially treated by soil flushing and in situ chemical remediation. The landfill should be treated by natural attenuation technology. The proposed PCT screening approach was compared with conventional screening methods results at the three sites and proved feasible and effective. The proposed method can provide technical support for the monitoring and management of groundwater pollution in China.

  17. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  18. The Total Work Measured During a High Intensity Isokinetic Fatigue Test Is Associated With Anaerobic Work Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosquet, Laurent; Gouadec, Kenan; Berryman, Nicolas; Duclos, Cyril; Gremeaux, Vincent; Croisier, Jean Louis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether total work measured during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test (TWFAT) could be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (AWC), such as determined by total work measured during a Wingate Anaerobic Test (TWWAnT). Twenty well-trained cyclists performed 2 randomly ordered sessions involving a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test consisting in 30 reciprocal maximal concentric contractions of knee flexors and extensors at 180°·s-1, and a Wingate Anaerobic Test. We found that TWFAT of knee extensors was largely lower than TWWAnT (4151 ± 691 vs 22313 ± 2901 J, respectively, p knee flexors (2151 ± 540 J) was largely lower than TWWAnT (p knee flexors and knee extensors into a single measure (6302 ± 818 J) did not changed neither improved these observations. We still found a large difference with TWWAnT (p knee extensors could be considered as a valid measure of AWC, since both measure were highly associated. However, the mean difference between both measures and their 95% LoA were too large to warrant interchangeability. Key points Total work performed during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test can be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (as determined by total work performance during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test). The 95% limits of agreement are two large to allow a direct comparison between both measures. In other words, it is not possible to estimate the magnitude of performance improvement during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test from that observed during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test. In addition to provide sport scientists and coaches with measures of peak torque and ratios between agonists and antagonists muscles in a perspective of injury prevention, isokinetic dynamometry can also be used in the physiological assessment of athletes. However, some precautions should be taken in the interpretation of data. PMID:26957935

  19. Measuring fast electron distribution functions at intensities up to 10{sup 21} W cm{sup -2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, N., E-mail: nicola.booth@stfc.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.J. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Doria, D. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT1 4NN (United Kingdom); Gizzi, L.A. [ILIL-IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, Pisa (Italy); Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford OX4 1PJ (United Kingdom); Hakel, P. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0208 (United States); Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Levato, T. [ILIL-IPCF, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, Pisa (Italy); Li, B. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Makita, M. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT1 4NN (United Kingdom); Mancini, R.C. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0208 (United States); Pasley, J. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Rajeev, P.P. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Riley, D. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT1 4NN (United Kingdom); Robinson, A.P.L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QN (United Kingdom); Wagenaars, E.; Waugh, J.N.; Woolsey, N.C. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-11

    Here we present results from ultra-intense experiments demonstrating the viability of polarization spectroscopy as a diagnostic of the electron return current and spatial anisotropy and distribution function of the fast electron beam. The measurements extend to ultra-relativistic intensities of 10{sup 21} W cm{sup -2}, including laser-plasma interaction regimes important for fast ignition studies, for example HiPER, and the development of secondary sources from next generation ultra-short pulse, ultra-intense laser facilities such as Astra-Gemini and ELI. As an in situ diagnostic, spectroscopic measurements are vital to understanding fast electron beams, enabling extrapolation of results to define fast ignition inertial confinement fusion and secondary source facilities.

  20. Measurement of Acoustic Intensity Distribution and Radiation Power of Flat-Plate Phased-Array Sound Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomoki; Takahashi, Kumiko; Seki, Daizaburou; Hasegawa, Akio

    2002-05-01

    The acoustic intensity distribution and radiation power of a flat-plate phased-array sound source consisting of Tonpilz-type transducers were measured. This study shows that the active acoustic intensity is skewed in the direction of wave propagation. In addition, it clarifies that if the measurement is carried out in the immediate vicinity of the sound source, the reactive acoustic intensity distribution is effective for identifying the positions of the individual sound source elements. Experimental values of active radiation power agree well with theoretical values. Conversely, experimental values of reactive radiation power do not agree with theoretical values; it is clear that they fluctuate significantly with distance from the radiating surface. The reason for this is explained in the case of a point sound source.

  1. Phase Noise and Intensity Noise of the Pulse Train Generated from Mode-locked Lasers in the Demodulation Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Kan WU; Shum, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The phase noise and intensity noise of a pulse train are theoretically analyzed in the demodulation measurement. The effect of pulse asymmetry is discussed for the first time using Fourier series. Experimentally, photodetectors with different bandwidth and incident power levels are compared to achieve minimum pulse distortion.

  2. Reliability of Reagent Strips for Semi-quantitative Measurement of Glucosuria in a Neonatal Intensive Care Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhof, Jolita; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van de Leur, Sjef; Kok, Joke H.; van Straaten, Irma H. L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucosuria in preterm infants is often measured using a visually readable reagent strip, e.g., when monitoring total parenteral nutrition or during sepsis or when treating with corticosteroids. However, the specific circumstances in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), such as the use

  3. Non-uniform sound intensity distributions when measuring absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers using a phased beam tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Measured absorption coefficients in reverberation chambers often differ from theoretical random incidence absorption coefficients, because ideal assumptions for the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient are not fulfilled during measurements in actual reverberation chambers. Therefore...... sound intensity distributions on absorber under measurement conditions have been simulated using a phased beam tracing, and used as correction functions for reducing discrepancies between the measured and theoretical absorption coefficients. Two reverberation rooms were investigated by assuming...... that a test specimen was attached to a vertical surface and the floor. The frequency-dependent sound intensity distributions on absorbers were found to be affected by the reverberation chamber geometry and dimensions, the absorption capability of the specimen, and the placement of the specimen. High frequency...

  4. Measurement and compensation schemes for the pulse front distortion of ultra-intensity ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenxiang; Xu, Yi; Yu, Linpeng; Yang, Xiaojun; Li, Wenkai; Lu, Jun; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-11-01

    Pulse front distortion (PFD) is mainly induced by the chromatic aberration in femtosecond high-peak power laser systems, and it can temporally distort the pulse in the focus and therefore decrease the peak intensity. A novel measurement scheme is proposed to directly measure the PFD of ultra-intensity ultra-short laser pulses, which can work not only without any extra struggle for the desired reference pulse, but also largely reduce the size of the required optical elements in measurement. The measured PFD in an experimental 200TW/27fs laser system is in good agreement with the calculated result, which demonstrates the validity and feasibility of this method effectively. In addition, a simple compensation scheme based on the combination of concave lens and parabolic lens is also designed and proposed to correct the PFD. Based on the theoretical calculation, the PFD of above experimental laser system can almost be completely corrected by using this compensator with proper parameters.

  5. A sound intensity probe for measuring from 50 Hz to 10 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Cutanda, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    1996-01-01

    The upper frequency limit of a p-p sound intensity probe with a certain microphone separation distance is generally considered to be the frequency at which an ideal p-p probe with the same separation distance would exhibit an acceptably small finite difference error in a plane wave of axial...

  6. A sound intensity probe for measuring from 50 Hz to 10 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Cutanda, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    1996-01-01

    The upper frequency limit of a p-p sound intensity probe with a certain microphone separation distance is generally considered to be the frequency at which an ideal p-p probe with the same separation distance would exhibit an acceptably small finite difference error in a plane wave of axial incid...

  7. Three-dimensional shape measurement technique for shiny surfaces by adaptive pixel-wise projection intensity adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; Zhang, Guanjin; He, Yunbo; Chen, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Conventional methods based on analyses of the absolute gray levels of pixels in fringe pattern images are affected by the problems of image saturation, interreflection, and high sensitivity to noise when obtaining three-dimensional (3D) shape measurements of shiny surfaces. This study presents a robust, adaptive, and fast 3D shape measurement technique, which adaptively adjusts the pixel-wise intensity of the projected patterns, thus it avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) during 3D shape measurement for shiny surfaces. Compared with previous time-consuming methods using multiple exposures and the projection of fringe patterns with multiple intensities, where a large number of fringe pattern images need to be captured, the proposed technique needs to capture far fewer pattern images for measurement. In addition, it can greatly reduce the time costs to obtain the optimal projection intensities by the fusion of uniform gray level patterns and coordinates mapping. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve highly accurate and efficient 3D shape measurement for shiny surfaces.

  8. Measurement of turbulence intensity in the center of the canine ascending aorta with a hot-film anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Kikkawa, S; Yoshikawa, T; Tanishita, K; Sugawara, M

    1983-05-01

    The blood flow velocity near the central axis of the canine ascending aorta was measured with a hot-film anemometer. The cardiac output and the heart rate were controlled at will by means of an extracorporeal circulation and by atrial pacing. The turbulent component of the blood flow velocity was calculated using an ensemble average technique. Ensemble average turbulent intensity was also calculated to show the time course of turbulence in the aorta. The ratio of the mean turbulence intensity to the time mean sectional average velocity in the aorta was constant in most animals regardless of the changes in fluid mechanical parameters. The correlation between the frequency parameter and the relative mean turbulence intensity was weakly positive. The power spectrum of the turbulence was also calculated.

  9. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  10. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  11. Influence of ring-down cavity parameters on intensity transmission property in trace gas concentration measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-quan; YAN Ju-bing; SUN Yu-chao; LI Wen-chao

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we describe the basic principles and system design of continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CWCRDS).We also particularly study the nature and the behavior of a novel method to detune a laser and apply it to a cavity ring-down spectroscopy experiment.Both simulations and experiments are completed on the relation between the transmission characteristic and different reflectivities,as well as scanning speed.Output electric field equation is deduced.It has been investigated that how photons are coupled to the cavity and how to accumulate the intensity and leak out of the cavity as a function of time.It is noted that both accumulation of intensity and decay times decrease,and the oscillation amplitude increases as the reflectivity increases.Relative intensity increases with decreasing scanning velocity.Additionally,the simulations show that a non-detuned cavity displays the transmitted signals which are highly dependent on the mirror reflectivity and piezoelectric translator (PZT) modulation speed.Simulations also display that the laser switching off is different from detuning.

  12. Spatial characteristics of airglow and solar-scatter radiance from the earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguenin, R.; Wohlers, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R.; Eastes, R.

    1989-08-09

    Data measured by the Polar BEAR/AIRS UV Experiment were processed to extract spatial-radiance characteristics. Photometer-mode 1304A dayside data measured on Julian Day 219, 1987, near mid-day were analyzed. The spatial structure of thermospheric dayside radiance at 1304A appeared to be controlled principally by turbulence over spatial scales of 10 million - 100 meters, with modifications imposed by Rayleigh-scattering effects and magnetospherically forced phenomena. Spatial structure can be adequately modeled fractally, using dimensions based on Kolmogorov formalism modified by the Rayleigh scattering phase function. Mean radiance can be modeled using existing models of radiant intensity, resonance scattering, and absorption combined with thermospheric composition and general circulation models, such as MSIS-83, scaled to the mean and RHS intensities measured by Polar BEAR. The results can be incorporated in a background radiance simulation model that will provide a means for testing and refining phenomenological models of the structured earth background. This will be important not only for improving physical and chemical models of atmospheric features and processes, but it will allow parametric predictions of spatial structure and clutter to be developed for sensor applications.

  13. TMS effects on subjective and objective measures of vision: stimulation intensity and pre- versus post-stimulus masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Tom A; Cornelsen, Sonja; Jacobs, Christianne; Sack, Alexander T

    2011-12-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to mask visual stimuli, disrupting visual task performance or preventing visual awareness. While TMS masking studies generally fix stimulation intensity, we hypothesized that varying the intensity of TMS pulses in a masking paradigm might inform several ongoing debates concerning TMS disruption of vision as measured subjectively versus objectively, and pre-stimulus (forward) versus post-stimulus (backward) TMS masking. We here show that both pre-stimulus TMS pulses and post-stimulus TMS pulses could strongly mask visual stimuli. We found no dissociations between TMS effects on the subjective and objective measures of vision for any masking window or intensity, ruling out the option that TMS intensity levels determine whether dissociations between subjective and objective vision are obtained. For the post-stimulus time window particularly, we suggest that these data provide new constraints for (e.g. recurrent) models of vision and visual awareness. Finally, our data are in line with the idea that pre-stimulus masking operates differently from conventional post-stimulus masking.

  14. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2° N, 117.4° E in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60 m s−1. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the non-uniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter.

  15. Measurements of Electric and Magnetic Field Intensities at 50 Hz Mains Frequency and Comparison of Measurement Results to ICNIRP's Reference Levels for General Public Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Cansız

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP accepted by many countries as well as Turkey is a commission which determines reference levels for general public and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and has intensive works on these issues. ICNIRP has published separately a low frequency band (0-100 kHz and a high frequency band (100 kHz-300 GHz guidelines which investigate the biological and potential health hazard effects of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields. In this study, measurements of low frequency electric and magnetic fields were taken in 30 different locations in the city center of Diyarbakir. Some locations exceeding the reference levels for general public exposure specified by ICNIRP were determined in the measurements of low frequency electric and magnetic fields and then some assessments were made about them. Low frequency electric and magnetic field meter device which is named EHP-50C was used in the measurements. The measurement results were calculated as an average value of 6 minute measurements. In addition, under a high voltage power line during 60 minutes, electric and magnetic field intensity values were recorded in the same manner. As a result of recordings, changes in the electric and magnetic field intensity values were observed, and then these changes were shown on the charts.

  16. A New Ground Motion Intensity Measure, Peak Filtered Acceleration (PFA), to Estimate Collapse Vulnerability of Buildings in Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shiyan

    In this thesis, we develop an efficient collapse prediction model, the PFA (Peak Filtered Acceleration) model, for buildings subjected to different types of ground motions. For the structural system, the PFA model covers modern steel and reinforced concrete moment-resisting frame buildings (potentially reinforced concrete shear wall buildings). For ground motions, the PFA model covers ramp-pulse-like ground motions, long-period ground motions, and short-period ground motions. To predict whether a building will collapse in response to a given ground motion, we first extract long-period components from the ground motion using a Butterworth low-pass filter with suggested order and cutoff frequency. The order depends on the type of ground motion, and the cutoff frequency depends on the building's natural frequency and ductility. We then compare the filtered acceleration time history with the capacity of the building. The capacity of the building is a constant for 2-dimentional buildings and a limit domain for 3-dimentional buildings. If the filtered acceleration exceeds the building's capacity, the building is predicted to collapse. Otherwise, it is expected to survive the ground motion. The parameters used in PFA model, which include fundamental period, global ductility and lateral capacity, can be obtained either from numerical analysis or interpolation based on the reference building system proposed in this thesis. The PFA collapse prediction model greatly reduces computational complexity while archiving good accuracy. It is verified by FEM simulations of 13 frame building models and 150 ground motion records. Based on the developed collapse prediction model, we propose to use PFA (Peak Filtered Acceleration) as a new ground motion intensity measure for collapse prediction. We compare PFA with traditional intensity measures PGA, PGV, PGD, and Sa in collapse prediction and find that PFA has the best performance among all the intensity measures. We also provide a

  17. Using real time process measurements to reduce catheter related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, R; Ely, E; Elasy, T; Dittus, R; Foss, J.; Wilkerson, K; Speroff, T

    2005-01-01

    

Problem: Measuring a process of care in real time is essential for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Our inability to measure the process of central venous catheter (CVC) care in real time prevented CQI efforts aimed at reducing catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) from these devices.

  18. Sub-cycle measurement of intensity correlations in the Terahertz range

    CERN Document Server

    Benea-Chelmus, Ileana-Cristina; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The Terahertz frequency range bears intriguing opportunities, beyond very advanced applications in spectroscopy and matter control. Peculiar quantum phenomena are predicted to lead to light emission by non-trivial mechanisms. Typically, such emission mechanisms are unraveled by temporal correlation measurements of photon arrival times, as demonstrated in their pioneering work by Hanbury Brown and Twiss. So far, the Terahertz range misses an experimental implementation of such technique with very good temporal properties and high sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a room-temperature scheme to measure photon correlations at THz frequencies based on electro-optic sampling. The temporal resolution of 146 fs is faster than one cycle of oscillation and the sensitivity is so far limited to ~1500 photons. With this technique, we measure the photon statistics of a THz quantum cascade laser. The proposed measurement scheme allows, in principle, the measurement of ultrahigh bandwidth photons and paves the way toward...

  19. Measurement of the neutron intensity data using the HANARO four circle diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Ho; Lee, Chang Hee; Seong, Baek Seok; Lee, Jeong Soo; Shim, Hae Seop; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Song, Su Ho; Suh, Il Hwan

    1999-04-01

    As the four circle diffractometer(FCD) has been set up in HANARO, it has become possible to study single crystal structures by means of the neutron diffraction. By introducing the constitution and characteristics of FCD, it has been shown that the feature of neutron diffraction experiment are different from that of X-ray or electronic beam. Besides we have explained the processes of determining experimental information in order to acquire intensity data and constructed the experimental system based on geometry of the FCD. As the computer programme performing all experimental processes automatically has been installed and the accuracy of experimental processes were confirmed by KCl single crystal experiment, the original experimental system for single crystal experiments and analyses by the neutron diffraction method using FCD has been established. (Author). 12 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  20. Cosmological Results from Five Years of 30 GHz CMB Intensity Measurements with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, J L; Weintraub, L; Achermann, C; Altamirano, P; Bond, J R; Bronfman, L; Bustos, R; Contaldi, C; Dickinson, C; Jones, M E; May, J; Myers, S T; Oyarce, N; Padin, S; Pearson, T J; Pospieszalski, M; Readhead, A C S; Reeves, R; Shepherd, M C; Taylor, A C; Torres, S

    2009-01-01

    We present final results on the angular power spectrum of total intensity anisotropies in the CMB from the CBI. Our analysis includes all primordial anisotropy data collected between January 2000 and April 2005, and benefits significantly from an improved maximum likelihood analysis pipeline. It also includes results from a 30 GHz foreground survey conducted with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) which places significant constraints on the possible contamination due to foreground point sources. We improve on previous CBI results by about a factor of two in the damping tail. These data confirm, at ~3-sigma, the existence of an excess of power over intrinsic CMB anisotropy on small angular scales (l > 1800). Using the GBT survey, we find currently known radio source populations are not capable of generating the power; a new population of faint sources with steeply rising spectral indices would be required to explain the excess with sources... We also present a full cosmological parameter analysis of the new CBI po...

  1. Sample Entropy and Traditional Measures of Heart Rate Dynamics Reveal Different Modes of Cardiovascular Control During Low Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear parameters of heart rate variability (HRV have proven their prognostic value in clinical settings, but their physiological background is not very well established. We assessed the effects of low intensity isometric (ISO and dynamic (DYN exercise of the lower limbs on heart rate matched intensity on traditional and entropy measures of HRV. Due to changes of afferent feedback under DYN and ISO a distinct autonomic response, mirrored by HRV measures, was hypothesized. Five-minute inter-beat interval measurements of 43 healthy males (26.0 ± 3.1 years were performed during rest, DYN and ISO in a randomized order. Blood pressures and rate pressure product were higher during ISO vs. DYN (p < 0.001. HRV indicators SDNN as well as low and high frequency power were significantly higher during ISO (p < 0.001 for all measures. Compared to DYN, sample entropy (SampEn was lower during ISO (p < 0.001. Concluding, contraction mode itself is a significant modulator of the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. Compared to DYN, ISO evokes a stronger blood pressure response and an enhanced interplay between both autonomic branches. Non-linear HRV measures indicate a more regular behavior under ISO. Results support the view of the reciprocal antagonism being only one of many modes of autonomic heart rate control. Under different conditions; the identical “end product” heart rate might be achieved by other modes such as sympathovagal co-activation as well.

  2. Study on signal intensity of low field nuclear magnetic resonance via an indirect coupling measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Feng-Ying; Wang Ning; Jin Yi-Rong; Deng Hui; Tian Ye; Lang Pei-Lin; Li Jie

    2013-01-01

    We carry out an ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment based on high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs).The measurement field is in a micro-tesla range (~10 μT-100 μT) and the experiment is conducted in a home-made magnetically-shielded-room (MSR).The measurements are performed by the indirect coupling method in which the signal of nuclei precession is indirectly coupled to the SQUID through a tuned copper coil transformer.In such an arrangement,the interferences of applied measurement and polarization field to the SQUID sensor are avoided and the performance of the SQUID is not destroyed.In order to compare the detection sensitivity obtained by using the SQUID with that achieved using a conventional low-noise-amplifier,we perform the measurements using a connercial room temperature amplifier.The results show that in a wide frequency range (~1 kHz-10 kHz) the measurements with the SQUID sensor exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio,Further,we discuss the dependence of NMR peak magnitude on measurement frequency.We attribute the reduction of the peak magnitude at high frequency to the increased field inhomogeneity as the measurement field increases.This is verified by compensating the field gradient using three sets of gradient coils.

  3. Thin laser beam wandering and intensity fluctuations method for evapotranspiration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Antonin; Fernandez, Angel; Perez, Dario G.; Barille, Regis; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2016-06-01

    We compare in this study two simple optical setups to measure the atmospheric turbulence characterized by the refractive index structure parameter Cn2. The corresponding heat flux values sensed by the laser beam propagation are calculated leading to the plant evapotranspiration. The results are discussed and compared to measurements obtained with a well-known and calibrated eddy-covariant instrument. A fine analysis gives a good insight of the accuracy of the optical devices proposed here to measure the crop evapotranspiration. Additional evapotranspiration values calculated with meteorological sensor data and the use of different models are also compared in parallel.

  4. Theoretical and experimental limitations of accelerometric measurements of vibrational intensity in beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Xavier

    1988-06-01

    Error sources and their influence on the precision of bending wave measurements of beams are reviewed. Optimal transducer spacings for various wavelengths and structure geometries are presented. It is found that the accuracy of the transducers is limited primarily by phase mismatch, particularly in low-frequency regions where phase gradients are weak. Problems in the phase calibration of accelerometers are pointed out. The results allow spatial and frequency parameters to be determined for a given structure and required measurement precision.

  5. Probe shapes that measure time-averaged streamwise momentum and cross-stream turbulence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for directly measuring the time-averaged streamwise momentum in a turbulent stream use a probe which has total head response which varies as the cosine-squared of the angle of incidence. The probe has a nose with a slight indentation on its front face for providing the desired response. The method of making the probe incorporates unique design features. Another probe may be positioned in a side-by-side relationship to the first probe to provide a direct measurement of the total pressure. The difference between the two pressures yields the sum of the squares of the cross-stream components of the turbulence level.

  6. Vibrational power flow and structural intensity: Measurements and limitations at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    1991-01-01

    The cross-spectral methods and their sensitivity to phase errors are investigated for the two and four-accelerometer arrays. From experiments on a beam structure it is attempted to verify the influence of phase errors and to determine the usable frequency ranges of the two methods. Measurements a...

  7. Examining Rubrics Used to Measure Writing Performance in U.S. Intensive English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A scoring rubric acts as a useful guide for evaluating the quality of students' written responses. In second language writing, scoring rubrics can be used to measure a variety of discourse and linguistic features. However, certain advantages and disadvantages are associated with particular rubrics (see Hamp-Lyons, 2003; Weigle, 2002). Therefore,…

  8. INTENSIVE ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MEASUREMENTS AT TERRA NOVA BAY IN ANTARCTICA DURING NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is well known that due to its long atmospheric residence time, mercury is distributed on a global scale and aeolian transport is believed to be the major contributor to mercury in polar environments. No measurements of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) at all have ever been pe...

  9. Mesopause temperatures calculated from the O2(a1Δg twilight airglow emission recorded at Maynooth (53.2°N, 6.4°W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Galligan

    Full Text Available Spectra of the O2(a1Δg airglow emission band at 1.27 µm have been recorded during twilight at Maynooth (53.2°N, 6.4°W using a Fourier transform spectrometer. Synthetic spectra have been generated for comparison with the recorded data by assuming a particular temperature at the emitting altitude, and modelling the absorption of each line in the band as it propagates downward through the atmosphere. The temperature used in generating the synthetic spectra was varied until an optimum fit was obtained between the recorded and synthetic data; this temperature was then attributed to the altitude of the emitting layer. Temperatures derived using this technique for 91 twilight periods over an 18-month period exhibit a strong seasonal behaviour with a maximum in winter and minimum in summer. Results from this study are compared with temperatures calculated from the OH(3, 1 Meinel band recorded simultaneously. In winter OH temperatures exceed O2 values by about 10 K, whereas the opposite situation pertains in summer; this result is interpreted in terms of a possible change in the altitude of the mesopause as a function of season. Estimates of the twilight O2(0, 0 total band intensity indicate that its intensity is lower and that its decay is more rapid in summer than in winter, in agreement with earlier observations.

  10. Rapid directional change degrades GPS distance measurement validity during intermittent intensity running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Rawstorn

    Full Text Available Use of the Global Positioning System (GPS for quantifying athletic performance is common in many team sports. The effect of running velocity on measurement validity is well established, but the influence of rapid directional change is not well understood in team sport applications. This effect was systematically evaluated using multidirectional and curvilinear adaptations of a validated soccer simulation protocol that maintained identical velocity profiles. Team sport athletes completed 90 min trials of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle-running Test movement pattern on curvilinear, and multidirectional shuttle running tracks while wearing a 5 Hz (with interpolated 15 Hz output GPS device. Reference total distance (13 200 m was systematically over- and underestimated during curvilinear (2.61±0.80% and shuttle (-3.17±2.46% trials, respectively. Within-epoch measurement uncertainty dispersion was widest during the shuttle trial, particularly during the jog and run phases. Relative measurement reliability was excellent during both trials (Curvilinear r = 1.00, slope = 1.03, ICC = 1.00; Shuttle r = 0.99, slope = 0.97, ICC = 0.99. Absolute measurement reliability was superior during the curvilinear trial (Curvilinear SEM = 0 m, CV = 2.16%, LOA ± 223 m; Shuttle SEM = 119 m, CV = 2.44%, LOA ± 453 m. Rapid directional change degrades the accuracy and absolute reliability of GPS distance measurement, and caution is recommended when using GPS to quantify rapid multidirectional movement patterns.

  11. Prediction of rainfall intensity measurement errors using commercial microwave communication links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zinevich

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Commercial microwave radio links forming cellular communication networks are known to be a valuable instrument for measuring near-surface rainfall. However, operational communication links are more uncertain relatively to the dedicated installations since their geometry and frequencies are optimized for high communication performance rather than observing rainfall. Quantification of the uncertainties for measurements that are non-optimal in the first place is essential to assure usability of the data.

    In this work we address modeling of instrumental impairments, i.e. signal variability due to antenna wetting, baseline attenuation uncertainty and digital quantization, as well as environmental ones, i.e. variability of drop size distribution along a link affecting accuracy of path-averaged rainfall measurement and spatial variability of rainfall in the link's neighborhood affecting the accuracy of rainfall estimation out of the link path. Expressions for root mean squared error (RMSE for estimates of path-averaged and point rainfall have been derived. To verify the RMSE expressions quantitatively, path-averaged measurements from 21 operational communication links in 12 different locations have been compared to records of five nearby rain gauges over three rainstorm events.

    The experiments show that the prediction accuracy is above 90% for temporal accumulation less than 30 min and lowers for longer accumulation intervals. Spatial variability in the vicinity of the link, baseline attenuation uncertainty and, possibly, suboptimality of wet antenna attenuation model are the major sources of link-gauge discrepancies. In addition, the dependence of the optimal coefficients of a conventional wet antenna attenuation model on spatial rainfall variability and, accordingly, link length has been shown.

    The expressions for RMSE of the path-averaged rainfall estimates can be useful for integration of measurements from multiple

  12. First dose-map measured with a polycrystalline diamond 2D dosimeter under an intensity modulated radiotherapy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaringella, M., E-mail: scaringella@gmail.com [Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, Firenze (Italy); Zani, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Baldi, A. [Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Pace, E.; Sio, A. de [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of bidimensional dosimeter made on a 2.5×2.5 cm{sup 2} active area polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited (pCVD) diamond film, equipped with a matrix of 12×12 contacts connected to the read-out electronics, has been used to evaluate a map of dose under Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields for a possible application in pre-treatment verifications of cancer treatments. Tests have been performed under a 6–10 MVRX beams with IMRT fields for prostate and breast cancer. Measurements have been taken by measuring the 144 pixels in different positions, obtained by shifting the device along the x/y axes to span a total map of 14.4×10 cm{sup 2}. Results show that absorbed doses measured by our pCVD diamond device are consistent with those calculated by the Treatment Planning System (TPS)

  13. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  14. Challenges and prospects for better measurements of the CMB intensity spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Sironi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) offer the possibility of probing processes which occurred during the evolution of our Universe going back up to Z$\\simeq 10^7$. Unfortunately all the attempts so far carried out for detecting distortions failed. All of them were based on comparisons among absolute measurements of the CMB temperature at different frequencies. We suggest a different approach: measurements of the frequency derivative of the CMB temperature over large frequency intervals instead of observations of the absolute temperature at few, well separated, frequencies as frequently done in the past. The best observing conditions can be found in space. We discuss therefore the perspectives of new observations in the next years from the ground, at very special sites, and in space as independent missions or as part of other CMB projects

  15. Intercomparison of ammonia measurement techniques at an intensively managed grassland site (Oensingen, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Norman

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of a field campaign in the framework of the NitroEurope project, three different instruments for atmospheric ammonia (NH3 measurements were operated side-by-side on a managed grassland site in Switzerland: a modified Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, a GRadient of AErosol and Gases Online Registrator (GRAEGOR, and an Automated Ammonia Analyzer (AiRRmonia. The modified PTR-MS approach is based on chemical ionization of NH3 using O2+ instead of H3O+ as ionizing agent, GRAEGOR and AiRRmonia measure NH4+ in liquids after absorption of gaseous NH3 in a rotating wet-annular denuder and through a gas permeable membrane, respectively. Bivariate regression slopes using uncorrected data from all three instruments ranged from 0.78 to 0.97 while measuring ambient NH3 levels between 2 and 25 ppbv during a 5 days intercomparison period. Correlation coefficients r2 were in the range of 0.79 to 0.94 for hourly average concentrations. Observed discrepancies could be partly attributed to temperature effects on the GRAEGOR calibration. Bivariate regression slopes using corrected data ranged 0.92 to 0.95 with offsets ranging from 0.22 to 0.58 ppbv. The intercomparison demonstrated the potential of PTR-MS to resolve short-time NH3 fluctuations which could not be measured by the two other slow-response instruments. During conditions favoring condensation in inlet lines, the PTR-MS underestimated NH3 concentrations, underlining the importance of careful inlet designs as an essential component for any inlet-based instrument.

  16. Intercomparison of ammonia measurement techniques at an intensively managed grassland site (Oensingen, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Norman

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of a field campaign in the framework of the NitroEurope project, three different instruments for atmospheric ammonia (NH3 measurements were operated side-by-side on a managed grassland site in Switzerland: a modified Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS, a GRadient of AErosol and Gases Online Registrator (GRAEGOR, and an Automated Ammonia Analyzer (AiRRmonia. The modified PTR-MS approach is based on chemical ionization of NH3 using O2+ instead of H3O+ as ionizing agent, GRAEGOR and AiRRmonia measure NH4+ in liquids after absorption of gaseous NH3 in a rotating wet-annular denuder and through a gas permeable membrane, respectively. Bivariate regression slopes using uncorrected data from all three instruments ranged from 0.78 to 0.97 while measuring ambient NH3 levels between 2 and 25 ppbv during a 5 days intercomparison period. Correlation coefficients r2 were in the range of 0.79 to 0.94 for hourly average mixing ratios. Observed discrepancies could be partly attributed to temperature effects on the GRAEGOR calibration. Bivariate regression slopes using corrected data were >0.92 with offsets ranging from 0.22 to 0.58 ppbv. The intercomparison demonstrated the potential of PTR-MS to resolve short-time NH3 fluctuations which could not be measured by the two other slow-response instruments. During conditions favoring condensation in inlet lines, the PTR-MS underestimated NH3 mixing ratios, underlining the importance of careful inlet designs as an essential component for any inlet-based instrument.

  17. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  18. Multipass beam position, profile, and polarization measurements using intense photon target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabekov, I.P.; Neil, G.R. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Karabekian, S.; Musakhanian, V. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Erevan (Armenia)

    1994-05-01

    The Compton scattering of a circularly polarized laser beam condensed by an optical resonator can be used for multipass measurement of beam profile, position, and polarization in CEBAF`s 250-m-long linac straight sections. The position and profile of the beam will be measured with an accuracy of {approximately}10 {mu}m in about 200 seconds and beam polarization with 10% accuracy in 100 seconds when the lowest beam energy is 500 MeV and the beam current is 100 {mu}A. For higher energies the times for measurement are much less. The photon target is within an optical resonator having a quality factor of 50. The Nd:Yag 5 W CW laser photon beam at wavelength {lambda} = 0.532 nm will have a waist {omega}{sub o} {approximately}30 {mu}m and a Rayleigh range of about 10 mm. Scanning the electron beams in the linac sections by this photon beam at a crossing angle of 0.1 rad will send to a proportional detector installed after the spreader magnet scattered photons with energies sharply correlated with the energy of the electrons.

  19. Analysis of measurement deviations for the patient-specific quality assurance using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Hsi, Wen C.

    2017-04-01

    To analyze measurement deviations of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) using intensity-modulated spot-scanning particle beams, a commercial radiation dosimeter using 24 pinpoint ionization chambers was utilized. Before the clinical trial, validations of the radiation dosimeter and treatment planning system were conducted. During the clinical trial 165 measurements were performed on 36 enrolled patients. Two or three fields of particle beam were used for each patient. Measurements were typically performed with the dosimeter placed at special regions of dose distribution along depth and lateral profiles. In order to investigate the dosimeter accuracy, repeated measurements with uniform dose irradiations were also carried out. A two-step approach was proposed to analyze 24 sampling points over a 3D treatment volume. The mean value and the standard deviation of each measurement did not exceed 5% for all measurements performed on patients with various diseases. According to the defined intervention thresholds of mean deviation and the distance-to-agreement concept with a Gamma index analysis using criteria of 3.0% and 2 mm, a decision could be made regarding whether the dose distribution was acceptable for the patient. Based measurement results, deviation analysis was carried out. In this study, the dosimeter was used for dose verification and provided a safety guard to assure precise dose delivery of highly modulated particle therapy. Patient-specific QA will be investigated in future clinical operations.

  20. Measurement of gamma-ray intensities of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th using semiconductor detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chatani, H

    1999-01-01

    Nuclide sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th was yielded by the sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th(n, 2n) reaction with neutron irradiation in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Moreover, the thorium was purified chemically. Gamma-ray spectra of thorium have been measured using low-energy photon spectrometers and a high-purity germanium detector. Relative gamma-ray intensities ranging from 25 to 352 keV in the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th have been determined with satisfactory accuracy. The results are in very good agreement with those of earlier studies. We observe two new gamma-rays at 77.69 and 177.66 keV, whose intensities are found to be (0.063+-0.010)% and (0.00095+-0.00020)%, respectively, relative to that of 84.21 keV taken as 100%. Absolute intensity of 84.21 keV gamma-ray which is the most prominent one from the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th and that of 185.739 keV following the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U are also determined from the secular equilibrium for sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U- sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th. The results obtained in t...

  1. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) intensity gradients in the heliotail during year 2003, using Cassini/INCA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, K.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we use all-sky energy-resolved (5-55 keV) energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps obtained by the Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) on board Cassini during the time period DOY 265/2003 to 268/2003, to investigate the properties of the peak-to-basin ENA emissions in the direction of the heliotail. Our conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) a relatively smooth boundary (called "transition region") between the very low (basin) and high (tail) ENA emissions from the heliosheath, with a spatial width of ~30° deg in ecl. longitude, that no theory had predicted to date, is identified in the energy range of 5-55 keV; (2) the ENA intensity gradient in this transition region is almost invariant as a function of both ecl. Latitude and energy, with an average value of ~2.4% per degree; (3) the deduced partial plasma pressure distributions in the 5-55 keV energy range are consistent with the ENA intensity distributions in the same energy range, while the ENA intensity gradient translates to a corresponding partial pressure gradient that occurs in the transition region; and (4) this partial pressure gradient is possibly not consistent with a tail magnetic field configuration that is similar to the measured magnetic fields by the Voyagers in the nose hemisphere.

  2. Mean velocity, turbulence intensity and turbulence convection velocity measurements for a convergent nozzle in a free jet wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccolgan, C. J.; Larson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of light on the mean flow and turbulence properties of a 0.056 m circular jet were determined in a free jet wind tunnel. The nozzle exit velocity was 122 m/sec, and the wind tunnel velocity was set at 0, 12, 37, and 61 m/sec. Measurements of flow properties including mean velocity, turbulence intensity and spectra, and eddy convection velocity were carried out using two linearized hot wire anemometers. Normalization factors were determined for the mean velocity and turbulence convection velocity.

  3. [A new method for the transcutaneous measurement of deep body temperature during anaesthesia and intensive care (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, U; Hanf, K; Köhler, C O; Just, O H

    1978-04-01

    A new method for monitoring deep body temperature is described. It is based on the establishment, by means of electronic appliances, of a zone without heatflow from the deep tissues. The method is simple and the results compare favourably with those obtained by other procedures for measuring core temperature. The uses of this transcutaneous mehtod are discussed and its advantages and reliability in the operating theatre and intensive care unit are emphasized. It becomes less reliable if it is employed during and after extracorporeal circulation in hypothermia on account of the temperature gradient.

  4. Exploring measurement biases associated with esophageal Doppler monitoring in critically ill patients in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stawicki Peter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Esophageal Doppler monitoring (EDM is utilized in numerous clinical settings. This study examines the relationship between pulmonary artery catheter (PAC and EDM-derived hemodynamic parameters, concentrating on gender- and age-related EDM measurement biases. Materials and Methods : Prospective study of EDM use in ventilated surgical ICU patients. Parameters examined included demographics, diagnosis, resuscitation endpoints, cardiac output (CO and stroke volume from both devices, number of personnel and time needed to place equipment, time to data acquisition, duration of use, complications of placement. Results : Fifteen patients (11 men, 4 women, mean age 47 years were included. Most common diagnoses included trauma (7/15 and sepsis (4/15. Insertion time and time to data acquisition were shorter for EDM than for PAC ( P < 0.001. The EDM required an average of 1.1 persons to place (2.4 for PAC, P =0.002. Mean EDM utilization time was 12.4 h. There was a fair CO correlation between EDM and PAC (r = 0.647, P < 0.001. Overall, the EDM underestimated CO relative to PAC (bias -1.42 ± 2.08, 95% CI: -5.58-2.74, with more underestimation in women (mean bias difference of -1.16, P < 0.001. No significant age-related measurement bias differences between PAC and EDM were noted. Significant reductions in lactate and norepinephrine requirement were noted following EDM monitoring periods. Conclusions : This study found that the EDM significantly underestimated cardiac output in women when compared to PAC. Clinicians should be aware of this measurement bias when making therapeutic decision based on EDM data. Significant reductions in lactate and norepinephrine requirement during EDM monitoring periods support the clinical usefulness of EDM technology.

  5. Multidisciplinary group performance – measuring integration intensity in the context of the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Harris

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidisciplinary Group meeting (MDGs are seen as key facilitators of integration, moving from individual to multi-disciplinary decision making, and from a focus on individual patients to a focus on patient groups.  We have developed a method for coding MDG transcripts to identify whether they are or are not vehicles for delivering the anticipated efficiency improvements across various providers and apply it to a test case in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot.  Methods:  We defined 'integrating' as the process within the MDG meeting that enables or promotes an improved collaboration, improved understanding, and improved awareness of self and others within the local healthcare economy such that efficiency improvements could be identified and action taken.  Utterances within the MDGs are coded according to three distinct domains grounded in concepts from communication, group decision-making, and integrated care literatures - the Valence, the Focus, and the Level.  Standardized weighted integrative intensity scores are calculated across ten time deciles in the Case Discussion providing a graphical representation of its integrative intensity. Results: Intra- and Inter-rater reliability of the coding scheme was very good as measured by the Prevalence and Bias-adjusted Kappa Score.  Standardized Weighted Integrative Intensity graph mirrored closely the verbatim transcript and is a convenient representation of complex communication dynamics. Trend in integrative intensity can be calculated and the characteristics of the MDG can be pragmatically described. Conclusion: This is a novel and potentially useful method for researchers, managers and practitioners to better understand MDG dynamics and to identify whether participants are integrating.  The degree to which participants use MDG meetings to develop an integrated way of working is likely to require management, leadership and shared values.

  6. Multidisciplinary group performance – measuring integration intensity in the context of the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Harris

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidisciplinary Group meeting (MDGs are seen as key facilitators of integration, moving from individual to multi-disciplinary decision making, and from a focus on individual patients to a focus on patient groups.  We have developed a method for coding MDG transcripts to identify whether they are or are not vehicles for delivering the anticipated efficiency improvements across various providers and apply it to a test case in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot. Methods:  We defined 'integrating' as the process within the MDG meeting that enables or promotes an improved collaboration, improved understanding, and improved awareness of self and others within the local healthcare economy such that efficiency improvements could be identified and action taken.  Utterances within the MDGs are coded according to three distinct domains grounded in concepts from communication, group decision-making, and integrated care literatures - the Valence, the Focus, and the Level.  Standardized weighted integrative intensity scores are calculated across ten time deciles in the Case Discussion providing a graphical representation of its integrative intensity.Results: Intra- and Inter-rater reliability of the coding scheme was very good as measured by the Prevalence and Bias-adjusted Kappa Score.  Standardized Weighted Integrative Intensity graph mirrored closely the verbatim transcript and is a convenient representation of complex communication dynamics. Trend in integrative intensity can be calculated and the characteristics of the MDG can be pragmatically described.Conclusion: This is a novel and potentially useful method for researchers, managers and practitioners to better understand MDG dynamics and to identify whether participants are integrating.  The degree to which participants use MDG meetings to develop an integrated way of working is likely to require management, leadership and shared values.

  7. Intensive sound speed monitoring in ocean and its impact on the GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) technique, based on GPS positioning and acoustic ranging, is now getting a popular tool to measure seafloor crustal movement. Several groups in the world have been intensively conducted campaign surveys in the region of scientifically interest. As the technology of measurement has been matured and plenty of data are accumulated, researchers are now aware of the limit of its precision mainly due to unexpected undulation of sound speed in ocean, which significantly degrades acoustic ranging. If sound speed structure keeps its figure during survey period, e.g., more than a couple of hours, it can be estimated by a moving survey to get sufficient paths from various directions to illustrate the structure. However the sound speed structure often varies quickly with in a hour due to internal gravitational wave excited by interaction of tidal current and seafloor topography. In this case one cannot separate temporal and spatial variations. We revisited our numerous sound speed profile data derived from numbers of XBT measurements, which were concurrently carried out with GPS/A survey along the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench. Among the measurements, we found notably short-period variation in sound speed profile through intensive XBT survey repeatedly cast every 6 minutes for one hour, which also appeared in residuals in traveltime of acoustic ranging. The same feature is also found in more moderate rate for semidiurnal undulation, in which vertical oscillation of the middle of the profile can be clearly seen rather than variation of absolute sound speed. This also reflects traveltime residuals in the GPS/A measurement. These typical frequencies represent dominant wavelengths of spatial sound speed variation. In the latter, local horizontal variation can be negligible in the vicinity of a point survey area and the traditional analysis can be applicable that assumes time-varying stratified sound speed structure. In the former case, on the contrary, local

  8. Radiation force on absorbing targets and power measurements of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analytic expressions for the radiated field of a circular concave piston given by Hasegawa et al.,an integral for calculation of the radiation force on a plane absorbing target in a spherically focused field is derived.A general relation between acoustic power P and normal radiation force Fn is obtained under the condition of kr 1.Numerical computation is carried out by using the symbolic computation program for practically focused sources and absorbing circular targets.The results show that,for a given source,there is a range of target positions where the radiation force is independent of the target’s position under the assumption that the contribution of the acoustic field behind the target to the radiation force can be neglected.The experiments are carried out and confirm that there is a range of target positions where the measured radiation force is basically independent of the target’s position even at high acoustic power (up to 700 W).It is believed that when the radiation force method is used to measure the acoustic power radiated from a focused source,the size of the target must be selected in such a way that no observable sound can be found in the region behind the target.

  9. Outbreak of Ampicillin/Piperacillin-Resistant Klebsiella Pneumoniae in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU: Investigation and Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Farruggia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequent cause of infectious outbreaks in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. The aim of this paper is to describe an outbreak occurred in a 13-bed NICU and the control measures adopted in order to interrupt the chain of transmission. We described the microbiological investigations, the NICU staff compliance to the infection control measures by means of a specifically designed check-list and the control measures adopted. Six cases of primary bloodstream infections sustained by ampicillin/piperacillin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae were observed over a two-month period. One culture obtained from a 12% saccarose multiple-dose solution allowed the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae. During the inspections performed by the Hospital Infection Control Team, using the check-list for the evaluation of the NICU staff compliance to the infection control measures, several breaches in the infection control policy were identified and control measures were adopted. In our case the definition of a specific check-list led to the adoption of the correct control measures. Further studies would be helpful in order to develop a standard check-list able to identify critical flows in the adhesion to the guidelines. It could be used in different NICUs and allow to obtain reproducible levels of infection control.

  10. Recognition of the noise sources and measurement in educational hospital s General Intensive Care Unit (GICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Abolhasannejad

    2014-11-01

    Results: Mean sound pressure level for GICU was 60.9±1/6 dBA that is more than the standard level. The mean of maximum noise level was obtained 82.5±2 dBA and the highest noise level was measured at nursing station. There was significant difference in Noise Pollution level based on different months, level of patient's conciseness and number of ventilator using (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Being more noise pollution in the ICU and stations on all shifts may cause to diminish health and well-being of the staff in long-term and produce some problems for the patient. According to the highest level of noise produced in nursing stations and the different activities doing by the staff as a main noise pollution factor, it's necessary to perform required training in relationship with doing the works in right manner so that we can produce quiet and silence environment for patience.

  11. Measurements of Accelerations of Large Neutrally-buoyant Particles in Intense Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Rachel D; Voth, Greg A

    2009-01-01

    We measure acceleration statistics of neutrally buoyant spherical particles with diameter 0.4 , clearly resolve the transition from the tracer like behavior of small particles to the much smaller accelerations of large particles. For d>5 eta, decreases with diameter as d^{-2/3} in agreement with inertial range scaling arguments. A model relating to the pressure structure functions matches the transition from small to large particle behavior if the particles respond to pressure differences over (1.7 +- 0.3) d. A model relating to the fluid acceleration averaged over the particle diameter predicts the transition with no free parameters, but does not show clean inertial range scaling in the size range studied. Consistent with earlier work, we find that the scaled acceleration probability density function shows very little dependence on particle size.

  12. Measurements of the Intensity and Polarization of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus molecular complex with QUIJOTE

    CERN Document Server

    Génova-Santos, R; Rebolo, R; Peláez-Santos, A; López-Caraballo, C H; Harper, S; Watson, R A; Ashdown, M; Barreiro, R B; Casaponsa, B; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Fernández-Cobos, R; Grainge, K J B; Herranz, D; Hoyland, R; Lasenby, A; López-Caniego, M; Martínez-González, E; McCulloch, M; Melhuish, S; Piccirillo, L; Perrott, Y C; Poidevin, F; Razavi-Ghods, N; Scott, P F; Titterington, D; Tramonte, D; Vielva, P; Vignaga, R

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed in numerous sky regions, in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. One of the most scrutinized regions is G159.6-18.5, located within the Perseus molecular complex. In this paper we present further observations of this region (194 hours in total over ~250 deg^2), both in intensity and in polarization. They span four frequency channels between 10 and 20 GHz, and were gathered with QUIJOTE, a new CMB experiment with the goal of measuring the polarization of the CMB and Galactic foregrounds. When combined with other publicly-available intensity data, we achieve the most precise spectrum of the AME measured to date, with 13 independent data points being dominated by this emission. The four QUIJOTE data points provide the first independent confirmation of the downturn of the AME spectrum at low frequencies, initially unveiled by the COSMOSOMAS experiment in this region. We accomplish an accurate fit of these data using models based on electric dipole emission from spin...

  13. Measurement of the turbulence intensity behind a two-dimensional cascade and in a three-stage axial blower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiock, R.

    1978-01-01

    Turbulence intensity (Tu) measurements were made in two-dimensional and rotating cascades of blades in a low-speed cascade wind tunnel using hot-wire probes as sensors. The local Tu at Re = 1.6x100000 was determined in the wake zone behind a two-dimensional cascade. Then the values were recomputed for a rotating cascade, giving a mean turbulence intensity of 6.5% at 1/10 chord downstream and 2.9% at one chord. Fans were used for measurements on the rotating cascade. Re was equal to 7x100000. Frequency analysis was employed to separate the actual Tu of the entry flow from the effects caused by interaction with the rotor blades, showing that the true Tu increased from a few tenths of a percent to 6.6% in the 1st rotor, and from 7.2 to 9.3% in the 2d rotor. The Tu behind the 3d rotor was equal to 8.9%.

  14. Measuring intensity correlations of a THz quantum cascade laser around its threshold at sub-cycle timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Chelmus, Ileana Cristina Benea; Maissen, Curdin; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    The quantum nature of photonic systems is reflected in the photon statistics of the light they emit. Therefore, the development of quantum optics tools with single photon sensitivity and excellent temporal resolution is paramount to the development of exotic sources, and is particularly challenging in the THz range where photon energies approach kbT at T=300 K. Here, we report on the first room temperature measurement of field g1({\\tau}) and intensity correlations g2({\\tau}) in the THz range with sub-cycle temporal resolution (146 fs) over the bandwidth 0.3-3 THz, based on electro-optic sampling. With this system, we are able to measure the photon statistics at threshold of a THz Quantum Cascade Laser.

  15. A comparison of radar measurements of atmospheric turbulence intensities by both C sub n sup 2 and spectral width methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, W. K.; Lawry, K.; Neudegg, D.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main techniques by which turbulence intensities in the atmosphere can be measured by radars. One is to utilize the absolute backscattered power received by the radar, and use this to deduce C sub n sup 2 (refractivity turbulence structure constant). With appropriate assumptions, this parameter can then be converted to an energy dissipation rate. The second method utilizes the width of the spectrum of the signal received by the radar. Neither of these techniques have been used a great deal, and they have never been properly compared. Thus it was not possible to determine the validity of the assumptions made in applying each technique, nor was it possible to determine the limitations of each method. The first comparisons of the two techniques are presented. Measurements were made with the Adelaide VHF ST radar, and the results of the comparison are discussed.

  16. Two-dimensional direction finding for low altitude target based on intensity measurement using an acoustic vector-sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huawei; ZHAO Junwei

    2004-01-01

    A method of two-dimensional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for low altitude target, which is based on intensity measurement using a three-dimensional differential pressure acoustic vector-sensor, is presented. With the perfect characteristics of acoustic vector sensor in the low frequency band, accurate DOA estimation is achieved under small array size. The validity of the proposed method was assessed by experiments on the noise signals radiated by a helicopter. The influence of acoustic sensor size, integral time and signal to noise ratio to the accuracy of DOA estimation were investigated, respectively. The performance comparisons demonstrated that it outperformed the traditional time-delay measurement based method for a small acoustic array.

  17. Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings' EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

  18. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Solar Transmittance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Michalsky, J. J.; Slater, D. W.; Barnard, J. C.; Halthore, R. N.; Liljegren, J. C.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997, during an Intensive Observation Period (IOP), the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program conducted a study of water vapor abundance measurement at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among a large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring total solar transmittance in the 0.94-gm water vapor absorption band and subtracting contributions due to Rayleigh, ozone and aerosol transmittances. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers has been presented elsewhere (Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 17, 2725-2728, 1999). We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. In a first round of comparison no attempt was made to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy. In the second round of comparison we used the same line-by-line code (which includes recently corrected H2O spectroscopy) to retrieve CAN from all four suntracking radiometers. This decreased the mean CWV by 8% or 13%. The spread of 8% in the solar radiometer results found when using the same model is an indication of the other-than-model uncertainties involved in determining CWV from solar transmittance measurements with current instrumentation.

  19. Accuracy of GPS devices for measuring high-intensity running in field-based team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampinini, E; Alberti, G; Fiorenza, M; Riggio, M; Sassi, R; Borges, T O; Coutts, A J

    2015-01-01

    We compared the accuracy of 2 GPS systems with different sampling rates for the determination of distances covered at high-speed and metabolic power derived from a combination of running speed and acceleration. 8 participants performed 56 bouts of shuttle intermittent running wearing 2 portable GPS devices (SPI-Pro, GPS-5 Hz and MinimaxX, GPS-10 Hz). The GPS systems were compared with a radar system as a criterion measure. The variables investigated were: total distance (TD), high-speed distance (HSR>4.17 m·s(-1)), very high-speed distance (VHSR>5.56 m·s(-1)), mean power (Pmean), high metabolic power (HMP>20 W·kg(-1)) and very high metabolic power (VHMP>25 W·kg(-1)). GPS-5 Hz had low error for TD (2.8%) and Pmean (4.5%), while the errors for the other variables ranged from moderate to high (7.5-23.2%). GPS-10 Hz demonstrated a low error for TD (1.9%), HSR (4.7%), Pmean (2.4%) and HMP (4.5%), whereas the errors for VHSR (10.5%) and VHMP (6.2%) were moderate. In general, GPS accuracy increased with a higher sampling rate, but decreased with increasing speed of movement. Both systems could be used for calculating TD and Pmean, but they cannot be used interchangeably. Only GPS-10 Hz demonstrated a sufficient level of accuracy for quantifying distance covered at higher speeds or time spent at very high power.

  20. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and time intensity perceptual measurement of flavor release from lipid emulsions using trained human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Damian; Appelqvist, Ingrid; Piyasiri, Udayasika; Wooster, Tim J; Delahunty, Conor

    2011-05-11

    The effect of the fat component of liquid emulsions on dynamic "in-nose" flavor release was examined using a panel of trained human subjects (n = 6), proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), and time intensity (TI) sensory evaluation. A rigorous breathing and consumption protocol was developed, which synchronized subjects' breathing cycles and also the timing of sample introduction. Temporal changes in volatile release were measured in exhaled nostril breath by real-time PTR-MS. Corresponding changes in the perceived odor intensity could also be simultaneously measured using a push button TI device. The method facilitated accurate examination of both "preswallow" and "postswallow" phases of volatile release and perception. Volatile flavor compounds spanning a range of octanol/water partition coefficient (K(o/w)) values (1-1380) were spiked into water (0% fat) or lipid emulsions with various fat contents (2, 5, 10, and 20% fat). Replicate samples for each fat level were consumed according to the consumption protocol by six subjects. Statistical comparisons were made at the individual level and across the group for the effects of changes in the food matrix, such as fat content, on both pre- and postswallow volatile release. Significant group differences in volatile release parameters including area under the concentration curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (I(max)) were measured according to the lipid content of emulsions and volatile K(o/w). In a second experiment, using single compounds (2-heptanone, ethyl butanoate, and ethyl hexanoate), significant decreases in both in-nose volatile release and corresponding perceived odor intensities were measured with increasing fat addition. Overall, the effect of fat on in vivo release conformed to theory; fat had little effect on compounds with low K(o/w) values, but increased for volatiles with higher lipophilicity. In addition, significant pre- and postswallow differences were observed in AUC and I(max), as

  1. Measurements of M and L X-ray energies and relative intensities emanating from (241)Am source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, H R

    2017-04-01

    Energies and relative Intensities of 13 X-ray transitions in the M X-ray spectrum (per 100 disintegrations of (241)Am) viz. M4N1, Mξ1,2, M3N1, Mα, Mβ, Mγ, M2N1, M3O4,5+M3P1, M3Q1, M1N3, M2N4+M1N3, M2O1 and M1O2,3 lines along with L1-L3 have been measured in addition to the 21L X-ray lines viz. Lℓ, Lt, Ls, Lα2, Lα1, Lη, Lβ6, Lβ2,15, Lβ4, Lβ5,7, Lβ1, Lβ3, Lβ9,10, Lγ5, Lγ1, Lγ2,8, Lγ3,6, Lγ4,4, Lγ13 including two new lines at 19.63 and 23.17keV, have been measured. Since the M and L X-ray lines of 93Np in the decay of (241)Am source are frequently used for energy and efficiency calibration of the Si(Li)/HpGe detectors, the present measurements have been undertaken with an objective to update the data since there are either no concrete data available (even in the Table of Radioactive Isotopes and Table of Radionuclides) or there exist inconsistencies/disparities in the data available in the earlier publications. We confirm the existence of L1-L3 X-ray transition (falling in the region of M X-ray energy range) and Lt, Ls and Lβ9,10 (forbidden transitions as per selection rules). However, the origin of the two new L X-ray lines at 19.63 and 23.17keV, both with intensities of 0.05±0.01%, could not be ascertained.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  3. QUIJOTE scientific results - I. Measurements of the intensity and polarisation of the anomalous microwave emission in the Perseus molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rebolo, R.; Peláez-Santos, A.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Harper, S.; Watson, R. A.; Ashdown, M.; Barreiro, R. B.; Casaponsa, B.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gutiérrez, C. M.; Herranz, D.; Hoyland, R.; Lasenby, A.; López-Caniego, M.; Martínez-González, E.; McCulloch, M.; Melhuish, S.; Piccirillo, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Poidevin, F.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Scott, P. F.; Titterington, D.; Tramonte, D.; Vielva, P.; Vignaga, R.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present Q-U-I JOint Tenerife Experiment (QUIJOTE) 10-20 GHz observations (194 h in total over ≈250 deg2) in intensity and polarisation of G159.6-18.5, one of the most widely studied regions harbouring anomalous microwave emission (AME). By combining with other publicly available intensity data, we achieve the most precise spectrum of the AME measured to date in an individual region, with 13 independent data points between 10 and 50 GHz being dominated by this emission. The four QUIJOTE data points provide the first independent confirmation of the downturn of the AME spectrum at low frequencies, initially unveiled by the COSMOlogical Structures On Medium Angular Scales experiment in this region. Our polarisation maps, which have an angular resolution of ≈1° and a sensitivity of ≈ 25 μK beam-1, are consistent with zero polarisation. We obtain upper limits on the polarisation fraction of Π < 6.3 and <2.8 per cent (95 per cent C.L.), respectively, at 12 and 18 GHz (ΠAME < 10.1 and <3.4 per cent with respect to the residual AME intensity), a frequency range where no AME polarisation observations have been reported to date. The combination of these constraints with those from other experiments confirm that all the magnetic dust models based on single-domain grains, and most of those considering randomly oriented magnetic inclusions, predict higher polarisation levels than is observed towards regions with AME. Also, neither of the two considered models of electric dipole emission seems to be compatible with all the observations together. More stringent constraints of the AME polarisation at 10-40 GHz are necessary to disentangle between different models, to which future QUIJOTE data will contribute.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometer at 1.57 Micrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the earth's carbon cycle is essential for diagnosing current and predicting future climates, which requires precise global measurements of atmospheric CO2 through space missions. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission will provide accurate global atmospheric CO2 measurements to meet carbon science requirements. The joint team of NASA Langley Research Center and ITT Exelis, Inc. proposes to use the intensity-modulated, continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach for the ASCENDS mission. Prototype LAS instruments have been developed and used to demonstrate the power, signal-to-noise ratio, precision and accuracy, spectral purity, and stability of the measurement and the instrument needed for atmospheric CO2 observations from space. The ranging capability from laser platform to ground surfaces or intermediate backscatter layers is achieved by transmitted range-encoded IM laser signals. Based on the prototype instruments and current lidar technologies, space LAS systems and their CO2 column measurements are analyzed. These studies exhibit a great potential of using IM-CW LAS system for the active space CO2 mission ASCENDS.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of a biomarker of Alzheimer disease in an intensity measurement mode with a bimetallic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-duk; Jang, Dae-ho

    2016-09-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor system with a bimetallic chip has been utilized to sense the very low concentration of amyloid-beta (A β)(1-42) by measurement of the reflectance variation. The bimetallic chip was comprised of Au (10 nm) and Ag (40 nm) on Cr (2 nm)-coated BK-7 glass substrate. Protein A was used to efficiently immobilize the antibody of A β(1-42) on the surface of the bimetallic chip. The reflectance curve of the bimetallic chip represented a narrower linewidth compared to that of the conventional gold (Au) chip. The SPR sensor using the bimetallic chip in the intensity interrogation mode acquired the response of A β(1-42) at concentrations of 250, 500, 750 and 1,000 pg/ml. The calibration plot showed a linear relationship between the mean reflectance variation and the A β(1-42) concentration. The results proved that the SPR sensor system with the bimetallic chip in the intensity interrogation mode can successfully detect various concentrations of A β(1-42), including critical concentration, to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Intensity-only measurement of partially uncontrollable transmission matrix: demonstration with wave-field shaping in a microwave cavity

    CERN Document Server

    del Hougne, Philipp; Daudet, Laurent; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    Transmission matrices (TMs) have become a powerful and widely used tool to describe and control wave propagation in complex media. In certain scenarios the TM is partially uncontrollable, complicating its identification and use. In standard optical wavefront shaping experiments, uncontrollable reflections or additional sources may be the cause; in reverberating cavities, uncontrollable reflections off the walls have that effect. Here we employ phase retrieval techniques to identify such a partially uncontrollable system's TM solely based on random intensity-only reference measurements. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by focusing both on a single target as well as on multiple targets in a microwave cavity, using a phase-binary Spatial-Microwave-Modulator.

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in neonatal intensive care unit: Impact of infection control measures plus palivizumab use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Camila de A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU is related to unfavorable outcomes, as this infection can lead to respiratory distress and death in premature in infants. Report the successful control of an outbreak that occurred in April 2010 in a NICU. Methods After the index case, of 18 premature infants placed in the same room 10 infants were infected. Of those 10, 6 developed mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, 4 persisted asymptomatic and no death occurred. Contact and respiratory precautions were rapidly initiated, the infants were cohorted in 3 different rooms and palivizumab was administered to all contacts. Results The outbreak was controlled and no new cases were subsequently indentified. Conclusion Standard infection control measures plus palivizumab prophylaxis were efficient in rapid control of the outbreak.

  8. Preliminary observations and simulation of nocturnal variations of airglow temperature and emission rates at Pune (18.5°N), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadnavis, S.; Feng, W.; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Plane, J. M. C.; Sonbawne, S.; Roy, Chaitri; Dhomse, S.; Ghude, S. D.

    2016-11-01

    Preliminary observations of the nocturnal variations of the OH(6-2) and O2b(0-1) nighttime airglow in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere are investigated in the context of tidal influence for the tropical latitude station Pune (18.5°N, 73.85°E). This is the only tropical Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI) station where the tidal variations of mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) temperature have been determined from ground based SATI observations. The SATI observations obtained since October 2012 reveal the influence of the migrating semidiurnal tides during solstice at this tropical station. There is variability in amplitude and phase obtained from SATI observations. In this paper, SATI observations on 10 Dec 2012 and 3 March 2013 are compared with Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) simulations. The amplitude of semidiurnal tides is ~25 K/30 K on 10 Dec 2012 during solstice for OH/O2 temperature. During equinox SATI data indicates existence of semidiurnal tide also. The airglow observations are compared with simulations from the WACCM. The model underestimates the amplitude of the semi diurnal tide during equinox (1.6 K/2.7 K at 87 km/96 km) and solstice (~3.8 K/4.8 K at 87 km/96 km) for these days. The reason may be related to dampening of tides in the model due to the effect of strong latitudinal shear in zonal wind. The diurnal variation of airglow emission - which the model simulates well - is related to the vertical advection associated with the tides and downward mixing of atomic oxygen.

  9. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 using the MAX-DOAS method combined with relative intensity measurements for aerosol correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Levelt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS is a technique to measure trace gas amounts in the lower troposphere from ground-based scattered sunlight observations. MAX-DOAS observations are especially suitable for validation of tropospheric trace gas observations from satellite, since they have a representative range of several kilometers, both in the horizontal and in the vertical dimension. A two-step retrieval scheme is presented here, to derive aerosol corrected tropospheric NO2 columns from MAX-DOAS observations. In a first step, boundary layer aerosols, characterized in terms of aerosol optical thickness (AOT, are estimated from relative intensity observations, which are defined as the ratio of the sky radiance at elevation α and the sky radiance in the zenith. Relative intensity measurements have the advantage of a strong dependence on boundary layer AOT and almost no dependence on boundary layer height. In a second step, tropospheric NO2 columns are derived from differential slant columns, based on AOT-dependent air mass factors. This two-step retrieval scheme was applied to cloud free periods in a twelve month data set of observations in De Bilt, The Netherlands. In a comparison with AERONET (Cabauw site a mean difference in AOT (AERONET minus MAX-DOAS of −0.01±0.08 was found, and a correlation of 0.85. Tropospheric-NO2 columns were compared with OMI-satellite tropospheric NO2. For ground-based observations restricted to uncertainties below 10%, no significant difference was found, and a correlation of 0.88.

  10. Relationship between propagation direction of gravity waves in OH and OI airglow images and VHF radar echo occurrence during the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Onoma

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We report simultaneous observations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW in OI (557.7nm and OH airglow images and VHF radar backscatter from field-aligned irregularities (FAI in the E-region during the SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 campaign period from 29 July to 9 August 2002. An all-sky imager was operated at Nishino-Omote (30.5 N, 130.1 E, Japan. On 14 nights, 17 AGW events were detected in OI and OH airglow images. AGW propagated mostly toward the northeast or southeast. From comparison with the E-region FAI occurrence, which is detected by a nearby VHF radar (31.57MHz, we found that AGW tended to propagate southeastward during FAI events. This result suggests that the interaction between AGW and E-region plasma plays an important role in generating FAI. Furthermore, polarization electric fields generated directly by AGW may contribute to the FAI generation.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora, Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities, Mid-latitude ionosphere

  11. Measurement Properties and Implementation of a Checklist to Assess Leadership Skills during Interdisciplinary Rounds in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsbeth C. M. Ten Have

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs. Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85 and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74. Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65. The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of “no” and “yes” scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

  12. Measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess leadership skills during interdisciplinary rounds in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Have, Elsbeth C M; Nap, Raoul E; Tulleken, Jaap E

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs). Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85) and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74). Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65). The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of "no" and "yes" scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

  13. Diffuse optical tomography using intensity measurements and the a priori acquired regions of interest: theory and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanmani, B; Vasu, R M [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2005-01-21

    Light transmission data collected around an object show large variation with source-detector separation owing to the presence of single or multiple inhomogeneous regions in the object. This variation in the measured intensity is made use of to reconstruct regions of the inhomogeneous inclusions. In addition, it is possible to select a set of data from the above which is most likely least affected by the presence of the inhomogeneity, and estimate reasonably accurately the background optical properties from it. The reconstructed region is found to always contain the inhomogeneity and is of size approximately 140% by area of the inhomogeneity. With the regions to be reconstructed a priori known, a model-based iterative reconstruction procedure for reconstructing the optical properties of the region converged five times faster than without such information. It is also shown that whereas for the full object, a view-based propagation-backpropagation reconstruction procedure failed to converge, owing to large underdeterminacy of the problem, a smaller problem attempting to reconstruct a priori specified regions of interest converged and did so faster than a non-view-based approach for similar objects. Reconstruction results are presented from simulated transmitted intensity data from the following objects with regions of inhomogeneity in both absorption and scattering: (i) single centrally located inhomogeneity, (ii) two off-centred inhomogeneous regions of equal size and contrast (iii) two off-centred inhomogeneous regions of unequal size and equal contrast and (iv) two off-centred inhomogeneous regions of unequal size and contrast. Whereas the model-based iterative image reconstruction procedure gave good convergence in the first, second and third cases, in the fourth case the reconstructions failed to recover the exact numerical value of the optical properties in the higher contrast region.

  14. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  15. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  16. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  17. Statistical power of intensity- and feature-based similarity measures for registration of multimodal remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uss, M.; Vozel, B.; Lukin, V.; Chehdi, K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates performance characteristics of similarity measures (SM) used in image registration domain to discriminate between aligned and not-aligned reference and template image (RI and TI) fragments. The study emphasizes registration of multimodal remote sensing images including optical-to-radar, optical-to-DEM, and radar-to- DEM scenarios. We compare well-known area-based SMs such as Mutual Information, Normalized Correlation Coefficient, Phase Correlation, and feature-based SM using SIFT and SIFT-OCT descriptors. In addition, a new SM called logLR based on log-likelihood ratio test and parametric modeling of a pair of RI and TI fragments by the Fractional Brownian Motion model is proposed. While this new measure is restricted to linear intensity change between RI and TI (assumption somewhat restrictive for multimodal registration), it takes explicitly into account noise properties of RI and TI and multivariate mutual distribution of RI and TI pixels. Unlike other SMs, distribution of logLR measure for the null hypothesis does not depend on registration scenario or fragments size and follows closely chi-squared distribution according to Wilks's theorem. We demonstrate that a SM utility for image registration purpose can be naturally represented in (True Positive Rate, Positive Likelihood Rate) coordinates. Experiments on real images show that overall the logLR SM outperforms the other SMs in terms of area under the ROC curve, denoted AUC. It also provides the highest Positive Likelihood Rate for True Positive Rate values below 0.4-0.6. But for certain registration problem types, logLR can be second or third best after MI or SIFT SMs.

  18. High solubility of SO2: evidence in an intensive fog event measured in the NCP region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted in a heavy SO2 pollution area located in north China plain (NCP. During the experiment, SO2 and other air pollutants, liquid water content (LWC of fog droplets, and basic meteorological parameters were measured. During the experiment, an intensive fog event occurred between 5 and 8 November 2009. During the fog period, the concentrations of SO2 showed a strong variability, and the variability was closely correlated to the appearances of fogs and LWC. For example, the averaged concentration of SO2 during the non-fog period was about 25 ppbv. By contrast, during the fog period, the concentration of SO2 reduced to about 4–7 ppbv. The large reduction of SO2 suggests that a majority of SO2 (about 70–80% had been converted from gas-phase to aqueous-phase, showing a high solubility of SO2. However, according to the value of Henry Law constant, the solubility of SO2 is modest, which cannot explain the measured large reduction of SO2. This study highlights that the aqueous reactions of SO2 in the droplets of fogs play important roles to enhance the solubility of SO2. To account for the effect of aqueous reactions on the solubility of SO2, an "effective" Henry Law constant of SO2 is proposed in this study. The study shows that without considering aqueous reactions of SO2 in fog droplets, the estimate of the partitioning of SO2 in droplets is significantly lower than the measured values. By contrast, when the "effective" Henry Law constant is applied in the calculation, the calculated SO2 concentrations are significantly improved, showing that the aqueous reactions of SO2 play important roles in controlling the solubility of SO2, and should be considered in model calculations.

  19. Origin of particulate matter and gaseous precursors in the Paris Megacity: Results from intensive campaigns, long term measurements and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekmann, Matthias; Petetin, Hervé; Zhang, Qijie; Prevot, André S. H.; Sciare, Jean; Gros, Valérie; Ghersi, Véronique; Rosso, Amandine; Crippa, Monica; Zotter, Peter; Freutel, Fredericke; Poulain, Laurent; Freney, Evelyne; Sellegri, Karine; Drewnick, Frank; Borbon, Agnès; Wiedensohler, Aflred; Pandis, Spyros N.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainties on the origin of primary and secondary particulate matter and its gaseous precursors in megacities is still large and needs to be reduced. A detailed characterization of air quality in Paris (France), a megacity of more than 10 million inhabitants, during two one month intensive campaigns (MEGAPOLI) and from additional one year observations (PARTICULATE and FRANCIPOL), revealed that about 70% of the fine particulate matter (PM) at urban background is transported on average into the megacity from upwind regions. While advection of sulfate is well documented for other megacities, there was a surprisingly high contribution from long-range transport for both nitrate and organic aerosol. The data set of urban local and advected PM concentrations in the Paris area were used for a thorough evaluation of the CHIMERE model and revealed error compensation for the local and advected components of organic matter and nitrate. During spring time, CHIMERE simulations overestimate the sensitivity of ammonium nitrate peaks to NH3, because (i) they underestimate the urban background NH3 levels, probably due to neglecting enhanced NH3 emissions for larger temperatures, and because they overestimate HNO3. However, from an ensemble of mobile Max-DOAS NO2 column and airborne NOy measurements around Paris, no clear sign on a NOx emission bias in the TNO-Airparif data set was made evident. The origin of organic PM was investigated by a comprehensive analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), radiocarbon and tracer measurements during two intensive campaigns. Primary fossil fuel combustion emissions contributed less than 20% in winter and 40% in summer to carbonaceous fine PM, unexpectedly little for a megacity. Cooking activities and, during winter, residential wood burning are the major primary organic PM sources. This analysis suggests that the major part of secondary organic aerosol is of modern origin, i.e. from biogenic precursors and from wood burning. Implementation

  20. Implementation of a High-Altitude Balloon Payload to Study Thermospheric Wind Speeds through Redline Airglow Emissions of Atomic Oxygen at 630 nm via a Split-field Etalon Doppler Imager Utilizing a Fabry-Perot Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, L. B.; Fullmer, R.; Swenson, C.; Marchant, A.; Hooser, P.; Victors, J.; Muchmore, K.; Yin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Little data exists on the wind velocity characteristics of the upper atmosphere. The Red Line Air Glow Experiment is designed to measure the relative density and velocity of the thermosphere at altitudes approximately ranging between 250 and 350 km. To accomplish this, a Split-Field Etalon Imager will make doppler shift interferometry measurements of the oxygen redline at 630 nm wavelength airglow a using a high altitude balloon platform floating at 36 km. The imager collects up to 10 images per hour. Velocity resolution is within a 5 m/s. The Etalon is thermally controlled to within 1 deg C to achieve this goal. The pointing direction of the sensor is determined post-filght using GPS, IMU and three sun imaging sensors. An experimental star camera is included with a potential pointing accuracy of under 5 arc-min. The instrument first flew from Fort Sumner N,M., on August 26, 2014. Due to the short duration (3.5 hours) of the data collection period on this flight, a second flight was requested and awarded, to take place around September 10, 2015. This flight will allow for data collection over a 24 hour period. Both flight results will be included in the final presentation. This project was designed and built by an undergraduate team including students from physics, aerospace, electrical and mechanical engineering and management at both Utah State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shores as a NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP).

  1. Optimal matching of 3D film-measured and planned doses for intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Dong Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2007-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is one of the most complex applications of radiotherapy that requires patient-specific quality assurance (QA). Here, we describe a novel method of 3-dimensional (3D) dose-verification using 12 acrylic slabs in a 3D phantom (30 x 30 x 12 cm(3)) with extended dose rate (EDR2) films, which is both faster than conventionally used methods, and clinically useful. With custom-written software modules written in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Application, the measured and planned dose distributions for the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were superimposed by matching their origins, and the point doses were compared at all matched positions. Then, an optimization algorithm was used to correct the detected setup errors. The results show that this optimization method significantly reduces the average maximum dose difference by 7.73% and the number of points showing dose differences of more than 5% by 8.82% relative to the dose differences without an optimization. Our results indicate that the dose difference was significantly decreased with optimization and this optimization method is statistically reliable and effective. The results of 3D optimization are discussed in terms of various patient-specific QA data obtained from statistical analyses.

  2. Barriers to internal rotation from relative intensity measurements as a function of temperature on microwave absorption lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, G.

    1972-01-01

    A variant is presented of the relative intensity method (RIM) in microwave spectroscopy to determine barriers to internal rotation. In this method torsional energies are determined directly from the slope of the straight line relating the logarithm of the intensity ratio and the reciprocal of the te

  3. Influence of the turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation on the sound intensity measurement in a mean flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SHI, Xiao-jun; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    overwhelm the true source pressure in some cases. In this paper, the model of the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is described firstly. Based upon the developed model, the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is calculated using the available models of the wave...

  4. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee,C.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in

  5. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Gong, Ping; Harbers, Gregory M.; Grainger, David W.; Castner, David G.; Gamble, Lara J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s → π* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in complex

  6. Surface coverage and structure of mixed DNA/alkylthiol monolayers on gold: characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and fluorescence intensity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Gong, Ping; Harbers, Gregory M; Grainger, David W; Castner, David G; Gamble, Lara J

    2006-05-15

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s --> pi* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in complex

  7. Measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess leadership skills during interdisciplinary rounds in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Have, Elsbeth C M; Nap, Raoul E; Tulleken, Jaap E

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs). Although IDRs

  8. The N_2 c_4'-X (0,v") Airglow on Titan: What is Required to fit the UVS Observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M. H.

    1999-09-01

    The N_2 Carroll-Yoshino (CY) c_4'(1Sigma_u ^+-X^1Sigma_g ^+) (0,0) and (0,1) Rydberg bands between 95 and 99 nm were observed to be the most prominent N_2 emission features in Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) airglow spectra of Titan. In order to study both the observed bright limb peak and the observed variation of CY(0,v") over the sunlit disk, a radiative transfer model is employed which considers both photoelectron excitation and magnetospheric particle precipitation. The resonant (0,0) band is known to be optically thick so multiple scattering and all known loss processes to the CY(0,v") system are included. Results show that only 23-33% of c_4'(0) source excitation appears in (0,0)+(0,1), primarily due to the effects of predissociation compounded over multiple scatterings. Such loss rules out photoelectrons as the only source and requires a flux of 1 keV magnetospheric electrons that is between 0.02-0.04 erg/cm(2) s to fit the disk observations. The relative variation of (0,0)+(0,1) over the sunlit disk can be explained by the variation of solar zenith angle (SZA) specific to each observation. Lower SZAs place photoelectron excitation at lower altitudes where (0,1) optical depths are greater, yielding less emission. The magnitude of the UVS bright limb peak can be accounted for with the same input fluxes, after taking into account the lower incidence angle of precipitating electrons.

  9. Turbulence intensity measurements using particle image velocimetry in diseased carotid artery models: effect of stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity, and ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision-making for the treatment of patients with diseased carotid artery is mainly based on the severity of the stenosis. However, stenosis severity alone is not a sensitive indicator, and other local factors for the assessment of stroke risk are required. Flow disturbance is of particular interest due to its proven association with increased thromboembolic activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of turbulence intensity (TI) with regards to certain geometrical features of the plaque - namely stenosis severity, eccentricity, and ulceration. A family of eight carotid-artery bifurcation models was examined using particle image velocimetry. Results showed a marked difference in turbulence intensity among these models; increasing degree of stenosis severity resulted in increased turbulence intensity, going from 0.12 m/s for mild stenosis to 0.37 m/s for severe stenosis (with concentric geometry). Moreover, independent of stenosis severity, eccentricity led to further elevations in turbulence intensity, increasing TI by 0.05-0.10 m/s over the counterpart concentric plaque. The presence of ulceration (in a 50% eccentric plaque) produced a larger portion of moderate turbulence intensity (~0.10 m/s) compared to the non-ulcerated model, more proximal to the bifurcation apex in the post-stenotic recirculation zone. The effect of plaque eccentricity and ulceration in enhancing the downstream turbulence has potential clinical implications for a more sensitive assessment of stroke risk beyond stenosis severity alone.

  10. Measurements of Line Positions and Intensities of 14NH_3 in the 1.5 μm Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-06-01

    In the atmosphere of outer planets, low mass brown dwarfs, and possibly extrasolar planets, ammonia (NH_3) is one of the major opacity sources particularly in the 1.5 μm region (the H-band). However, the spectroscopic information of NH_3 in the region is completely missing in the HITRAN database. NH_3 has four infrared active fundamental modes, with the well-known inversion doubling for {ν_2} band, in addition to the usual vibrational degeneracies. Its strong bands, {ν_1}, {ν_3} and 2{ν_4}, dominate the spectrum at 3 μm, while their corresponding overtone and combination bands (e.g., 2{ν_1}, 2{ν_3}, {ν_1}+{ν_3}, {ν_1}+2{ν_4} and {ν_3}+2{ν_4}) are prominent in the 1.5 μm region. As part of an effort to provide a complete set of NH_3 spectroscopic information in the 1.5 μm region, we are analyzing the laboratory spectra recorded at various temperatures (200 - 299 K) with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) on Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona. Line positions and strengths have been measured from the laboratory spectra, from which lower state energies and quantum assignments are being determined by adopting intensity ratios at two different temperatures and combination differnces. A theoretical IR linelist built upon the recent HSL-2 potential energy surface (nonadiabatic corrections included) is complementarily used for the quantum assignments. Preliminary results are presented for {ν_1}+{ν_3}, 2{ν_3}, {ν_1}+2{ν_4} and {ν_3}+{2ν_4} bands and compared with those from early work available. X. Huang, D.W. Schwenke, and T.J. Lee J. Chem. Phys. 134, (2011) 044320/044321 The research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology and the Ames Research Center under contracts with National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Measuring quality of life after intensive care using the Arabic version for Morocco of the EuroQol 5 Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoudri Ibtissam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQL is a relevant outcome measures in intensive care unit (ICU. The aim of this study was to evaluate HRQL of ICU patients 3 months after discharge using the Arabic version for Morocco of the EuroQol-5-Dimension (EQ-5D, and to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Results The Arabic version for Morocco of the EQ-5D was approved by the EuroQol group. A prospective cohort study was conducted after medical ICU discharge. At 3-month follow up, the EQ-5D (self classifier and EQ-VAS was administered in consultation or by telephone. EQ-VAS varies from 0 (better HRQL to 100 (worst HRQL. An unweighted scoring for EQ5D-index was calculated. EQ5D-index ranges from -0.59 to 1. Test-retest reliability of the EQ-5D was tested using Kappa coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Criterion validity was assessed by correlating EQ-VAS and EQ5D-index with the Short Form 36 (SF-36. Construct validity was tested using simple and multiple liner regression to assess factors influencing patients'HRQL. 145 survivors answered the EQ-5D. Median EQ5D-index was 0.52 [0.20-1]. Mean EQ-VAS was 62 ± 20. Test-retest reliability was conducted in 83 patients. ICCs of EQ5D-index and EQ-VAS were 0.95 and 0.92 respectively. For EQ-5D self classifier, agreement by kappa was above 0.40. Significant correlations were noted between EQ5D-index, EQ-VAS and SF-36 (p p = 0.017 and higher educational level (β = -0.2; p = 0.001. For EQ-VAS men were associated with better HRQL (β = 6.5; p = 0.048. Conclusions The Arabic version for Morocco of the EQ-5D is reliable and valid. Women, high educational level and longer ICU length of stay were associated with poorer HRQL.

  12. A nonlinear model coupling rockfall and rainfall intensity based ewline on a four year measurement in a high Alpine rock wall (Reintal, German Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krautblatter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A total of more than 140 000 kg of small-magnitude rockfall deposits was measured in eight rockfall collectors of altogether 940 m2 in size between 1999–2003 below a 400–600 m high rock face in the Reintal, German Alps. Measurements were conducted with a temporal resolution up to single days to attribute rockfall intensity to observed triggering events. Precipitation was assessed by a rain gauge and high-resolution precipitation radar. Intense rainstorms triggered previously unreported rockfall intensities of up to 300 000 g/(m2h that we term "secondary rockfall event." In comparison to dry periods without frost (10−2g/(m2h, rockfall deposition increased by 2–218 times during wet freeze-thaw cycles and by 56-thousand to 40-million times during secondary rockfall events. We obtained three nonlinear logistic growth models that relate rockfall intensity [g/(m2h] to rainfall intensity [mm/h]. The models account for different rock wall intermediate storage volumes, triggering thresholds and storage depletion. They apply to all rockfall collector positions with correlations from R2=0.89 to 0.99. Thus, the timing of more than 90% of the encountered rockfall is explained by the triggering factor rainfall intensity. A combination of rockfall response models with radar-supported storm cell forecast could be used to anticipate hazardous rockfall events, and help to reduce the exposure of individuals and mobile structures (e.g. cable cars to the hazard. According to meteorological recordings, the frequency of these intense rockfall events is likely to increase in response to global warming.

  13. Advances in remote sensing of the daytime ionosphere with EUV airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper summarizes recent progress in developing a method for characterizing the daytime ionosphere from limb profile measurements of the OII 83.4 nm emission. This extreme ultraviolet emission is created by solar photoionization of atomic oxygen in the lower thermosphere and is resonantly scattered by O+ in the ionosphere. The brightness and shape of the measured altitude profile thus depend on both the photoionization source in the lower thermosphere and the ionospheric densities that determine the resonant scattering contribution. This technique has greatly matured over the past decade due to measurements by the series of Naval Research Laboratory Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) instruments flown on Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) missions and the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) on the International Space Station. The volume of data from these missions has enabled a better approach to handling specific biases and uncertainties in both the measurement and retrieval process that affect the accuracy of the result. This paper identifies the key measurement and data quality factors that will enable the continued evolution of this technique into an advanced method for characterization of the daytime ionosphere.

  14. Quantum assignments and intensity measures for methane between 1100 and 1800 per cm - A comparison between theory and experiment. [in outer planets atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, B. L.; Pierre, C.; Pierre, G.; Champion, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The paper analyzes line positions and absolute line strengths of Blatherwick et al. (1979), based on moderately high resolution spectra of methane between 1100 and 1800 per cm, obtained using the Fourier transform spectrometer and the multiple-pass cold cell at the NASA Ames Research Center. Hamiltonian models are used to calculate theoretical relative line strengths, which, in combination with measured line strengths, yield integrated band strengths for the fundamentals v2 and v4. Ratios of calculated intensities to experimental intensities are analyzed, and the systematic deviations in the P- and R-branches of the v2 band are found to be represented by a Herman-Wallis type factor for Coriolis interactions. An analysis of ratios of calculated to experimental intensities of the v4 band yields a small correction to the Herman-Wallis factor.

  15. Spectral wave analysis at the mesopause from SCIAMACHY airglow data compared to SABER temperature spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Space-time spectral analysis of satellite data is an important method to derive a synoptic picture of the atmosphere from measurements sampled asynoptically by satellite instruments. In addition, it serves as a powerful tool to identify and separate different wave modes in the atmospheric data. In our work we present space-time spectral analyses of chemical heating rates derived from Scanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY hydroxyl nightglow emission measurements onboard Envisat for the years 2002–2006 at mesopause heights.

    Since SCIAMACHY nightglow hydroxyl emission measurements are restricted to the ascending (nighttime part of the satellite orbit, our analysis also includes temperature spectra derived from 15 μm CO2 emissions measured by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER instrument. SABER offers better temporal and spatial coverage (daytime and night-time values of temperature and a more regular sampling grid. Therefore SABER spectra also contain information about higher frequency waves.

    Comparison of SCIAMACHY and SABER results shows that SCIAMACHY, in spite of its observational restrictions, provides valuable information on most of the wave modes present in the mesopause region. The main differences between wave spectra obtained from these sensors can be attributed to the differences in their sampling patterns.

  16. Arsenic-induced intensity oscillations in reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements. [during MBE of GaAs and InAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. F.; Fernandez, R.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Madhukar, A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique of arsenic-induced RHEED intensity oscillations has been used to accurately measure arsenic incorporation rates as a function of substrate temperature during the homoepitaxial growths of both GaAs and InAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Measurements were made at growth temperatures from 350 to 650 C and at arsenic fluxes of 0.1 to 10.0 monolayer/s. The method measures only the arsenic actually incorporated into the growing film and does not include the arsenic lost in splitting the arsenic tetramers or lost by evaporation from the sample.

  17. Measurement of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-emittance of an intense uranium beam at 11.4 MeV/u

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Gerhard, P.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Vormann, H.

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-parameters is essential for applications that involve lattice elements that couple the two transverse degrees of freedom (planes). Usually pepper-pots are used for measuring these beam parameters. However, for ions their application is limited to energies below 150 keV/u. This contribution is on measurements of the full transverse four-dimensional second-moments beam matrix of high intensity uranium ions at an energy of 11.4 MeV/u. The combination of skew quadrupoles with a slit/grid emittance measurement device has been successfully applied.

  18. Multiple Linear Regression Analysis Indicates Association of P-Glycoprotein Substrate or Inhibitor Character with Bitterness Intensity, Measured with a Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kentaro; Mita, Suzune; Morimoto, Kaori; Haraguchi, Tamami; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Miyako; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Uchida, Takahiro; Ogihara, Takuo

    2015-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) regulates absorption of many drugs in the gastrointestinal tract and their accumulation in tumor tissues, but the basis of substrate recognition by P-gp remains unclear. Bitter-tasting phenylthiocarbamide, which stimulates taste receptor 2 member 38 (T2R38), increases P-gp activity and is a substrate of P-gp. This led us to hypothesize that bitterness intensity might be a predictor of P-gp-inhibitor/substrate status. Here, we measured the bitterness intensity of a panel of P-gp substrates and nonsubstrates with various taste sensors, and used multiple linear regression analysis to examine the relationship between P-gp-inhibitor/substrate status and various physical properties, including intensity of bitter taste measured with the taste sensor. We calculated the first principal component analysis score (PC1) as the representative value of bitterness, as all taste sensor's outputs shared significant correlation. The P-gp substrates showed remarkably greater mean bitterness intensity than non-P-gp substrates. We found that Km value of P-gp substrates were correlated with molecular weight, log P, and PC1 value, and the coefficient of determination (R(2) ) of the linear regression equation was 0.63. This relationship might be useful as an aid to predict P-gp substrate status at an early stage of drug discovery.

  19. Far-infrared 14NH3 line positions and intensities measured with a FT-IR and AILES beamline, Synchrotron SOLEIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Keeyoon; Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John; Pirali, Olivier; Kwabia Tchana, Fridolin; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Extensive measurements of line positions and intensities are reported for the inversion-rotation and rovibrational transitions of 14NH3 in the 50-660 cm-1 region. This study analyzes high-resolution (0.00167 cm-1, unapodized) Fourier-transform spectra of high purity (99.5%) normal ammonia sample obtained using the AILES beamline of Synchrotron SOLEIL. The experimental conditions are designed to study transitions with intensities weaker than 1 × 10-22 cm-1/(molecule cm-2) at room temperature. Line positions and intensities of more than 2830 transitions of 14NH3 are measured and compiled after proper quality control; the features from minor isotopologues (15NH3 and NH2D) and H2O are identified and excluded. Based on the predictions of recent work from the empirical Hamiltonian modeling, systematic quantum assignments are made for 2047 transitions from eight bands including four inversion-rotation (gs, v2, 2v2, and v4) and four ro-vibrational bands (v2-gs, 2v2-v2, v4-v2, and 2v2-v4), as well as covering their ΔK = 3 forbidden transitions. The measured line positions for the assigned transitions are in an excellent agreement (typically better than 0.001 cm-1) with the predictions in a wide range of J and K for all the eight bands. The comparison with the HITRAN 2012 database is also satisfactory, although systematic offsets are seen for transitions with high J and K and those from weak bands. Also we note that out of the eight bands, the 2v2-v4 has not been listed in the HITRAN 2012 database. Differences of 20% are seen between our measured and calculated intensities depending on the bands. For line positions, greater differences are found for some NH3 bands in HITRAN 2012 than recent predictions. Measurements of the individual line positions and intensities are presented for the eight bands, and the final spectroscopic line positions and intensities are compiled as an electronic supplement.

  20. On the opportunity of spectroscopic determination of absolute atomic densities in non-equilibrium plasmas from measured relative intensities within resonance multiplets distorted by self-absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, B P

    2007-01-01

    The opportunities of the application of the recently proposed approach in optical emission spectroscopy of non-equilibrium plasmas have been studied. The approach consists of several methods of the determination of {\\em absolute} particle densities of atoms from measured {\\em relative} intensities within resonance multiplets distorted by self-absorption. All available spectroscopic data concerning resonance spectral lines of atoms having multiplet ground states from boron up to gallium were analyzed. It is found that in the case of C, O, F, S and Cl atoms an application of the methods needs VUV technique, while densities of B, Al, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Co, Ni, Ga atoms may be obtained by means of the intensity measurements in UV and visible parts of emission spectra suitable for ordinary spectrometers used for optical diagnostics and monitoring of non-equilibrium plasmas including industrial plasma technologies.

  1. Measurement of signal intensity depth profiles in rat brains with cardiac arrest maintaining primary temperature by wide-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Nomura, Daisuke; Tsunenari, Takashi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2010-09-10

    We have already reported that after an injection for euthanasia, the signal intensity of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are 2.7 times increased before cardiac arrest (CA) using OCT and rat brains without temperature control to show the potential of OCT to monitor tissue viability in brains [Appl. Opt.48, 4354 (2009)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.48.004354]. In this paper, we similarly measured maintaining the primary temperature of rat brains. It was confirmed that when maintaining the primary temperature, the time courses of the ratios of signal intensity (RSIs) were almost the same as those without temperature control. RSIs after CA varied from 1.6 to 4.5 and depended on positions measured in tissues. These results mean that the OCT technique has clinical potential for applications to monitor or diagnose a focal degraded area, such as cerebral infarctions due to focal ischemia in brains.

  2. Measurement of water column primary production using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical chlorophyll profile, and underwater light intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, A. B.; Gagarin, V. I.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A method has been developed to measure water column integrated primary production (PPint) in the water column using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical profile of chlorophyll a concentration, and the underwater light intensity. Good correlation has been found for the results calculated with this method and light dependences in situ. The advantages of this method are the independence of PPint calculation from CTD profiling and water sampling, and thus optimization (reduction) of the station working time.

  3. Quantitative measurements on the paleo-weathering intensity of the loess-soil sequences and implication on paleomonsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝青振; 郭正堂

    2001-01-01

    The loess-soil sequences in northern China provide a near continuous record of Quaternary paleoclimate. The pedogenetic intensity of the sequences is closely linked with the variations of the East Asian summer monsoon. In this study, 2181 samples from the Changwu and Xifeng loess sections are analyzed and two high-resolution paleo-weathering timeseries of the last 1.2 Ma are generated, using the ratio of CBD extractable free Fe2O3 (FeD) versus the total iron (FeT). This new index is compared with micromorphological features, low-frequency magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, and the Rb/Sr ratio[5,6]. The results suggest that the FeD/FeT ratio is able to better reflect the degree of soil development. Since the chemical weather-ing of loess in the Loess Plateau region mainly depends upon the summer precipitation and tem-perature under modern climate condition, which are closely associated with strength of summer monsoon, and the chemical weathering intensity of loess primarily reflects the variations of the summer monsoon circulation.

  4. {sup 124}Sb - Activity measurement and determination of photon emission intensities; {sup 124}Sb - Mesure de l'activite et determination des intensites photoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chauvenet, B.

    2009-07-15

    The international traceability of antimony 124, in term of activity, is very limited. The results of {sup 124}Sb activity measurements sent to the SIR (BIPM - International System of Reference, BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sb-124.) are scarce. Up to now, only three laboratories have contributed. Two of them carried out measurements using the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence counting technique and the third one using the 4pigamma method with a well-type crystal detector. The first two results are in agreement but the last one differs significantly from them, by 2 %. The decay scheme consistency cannot be excluded when trying to explain those discrepancies. In other respects, this nuclide emits high-energy gamma rays, and then could be selected as a valuable standard radionuclide for the calibration of gamma-ray detectors in that energy range, given well known photon intensities. Those considerations led to the proposal of an international exercise and to the realisation of this Euromet project, registered as project no. 907, coordinated by CEA-List-LNE/LNHB. The first part of this exercise was dedicated to activity measurements and to their comparison. For this purpose, participants were asked to make use of all the direct measurement techniques available in their laboratory in order to confirm or not the existence of possible biases specific to some measuring methods. In addition, this exercise offered the opportunity of improving the uncertainties of the gamma-ray intensities. Then, participants were asked, in the second part of the exercise, to carry out X-ray and gamma-ray intensity measurements. These results have been compared to previous published values and new decay scheme data are proposed. Eight international laboratories participated in this exercise. (authors)

  5. Polarizing Michelson interferometer for measuring thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Polarizing Atmospheric Michelson Interferometer, PAMI, a new version of the Wide Angle Michelson Interferometer, is used to measure winds in the termosphere. In the polarizing instrument, the optical path difference is changed simply by rotating a polarizing filter external to the interferometer. This allows a very simple scanning mechanism. PAMI is similar to other instruments such as WAMDII that measure thermospheric winds and temperatures, retaining the benefits of high light throughput, while offering advantages including lower cost, simplicity, and portability. The instrument is highly sensitive and thus is designed to be used for field measurements at locations far from city lights. Results are shown from the AIDA observation campaign in Puerto Rico where coordinated observations were made by PAMI along with other optical and radio measurements during April and May 1989. Intensities of the green line layer at 95 km were compared to those observed by several other instruments. For example, MORTI (Mesopause Oxygen Rotational Temperature Imager), a colocated instrument which was looking at the 94 km 867.6 nm molecular oxygen emission. MORTI and PAMI emission rates were found to show the same trends. On the brightest night recorded during April, the zenith emission rate reached over 400 Rayleighs; emission enhancements were sometimes related to auroral events. During the observing period of April 4 to April 11, 1989, most of the observations of the 94 km airglow were after midnight where the winds were found to be generally towards the north east at about 50 to 100 m/s. During auroral activity this wind vector always turned counterclockwise, towards the west. During the nights of May 2 and May 6 these wind vectors follow a wave-like variation in magnitude and direction. It is concluded that auroral activity changes the global circulation in a way that sometimes transports increased amounts of oxygen atoms over Arecibo.

  6. VOC measurements within a boreal forest during spring 2005: the role of monoterpenes and sulphuric acid in selected intense nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Eerdekens

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present measurements of selected trace gases and aerosol made in a boreal forest during the BACCI-QUEST IV intensive field campaign in Hyytiälä, Finland in April 2005. Several clear aerosol "nucleation events" were observed and characterized. One type of "event" occurred synchronously with huge increases in monoterpenes, while a second event type correlated instead with sulphuric acid. Here we elucidate the origin of these two distinct forms of aerosol production at the Hyytiälä site using the measurement data, airmass back trajectories and the optical stereoisomery of monoterpenes.

  7. Aerosol measurements at 60 m during April 1994 remote cloud study intensive operating period (RCS/IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifer, R.; Albert, B.; Lee, N.; Knuth, R.H. [Department of Energy, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Aerosol measurements were made at the Southern Great Plains Site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Many types of air masses pass over this area, and on the data acquisition day, extremly low aerosol scattering coefficients were seen. A major effort was placed on providing some characterization of the aerosol size distribution. Data is currently available from the experimental center.

  8. Dimer formation in radiation-irradiated aqueous solution of lysozyme studied by light-scattering-intensity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, S.; Masuda, T.; Kondo, M. (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science); Seki, H.; Imamura, M. (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    The reaction of lysozyme with OH radical, Br/sub 2/ anion radical, and e/sup -/sub(aq), produced in an aqueous solution by pulsed electrons and ..gamma..-rays, were investigated. Irradiated enzymes showed an increase in the light scattering intensity (LSI) which is proportional to the absorbed dose. Results obtained from SDS gel electrophoresis confirm dimerization of lysozyme, which is considered to be responsible for the increase in LSI. It was found that the rate constant of the dimerization of protein radicals produced in the reaction with OH radical is 2k = (1.0+-0.3) x 10/sup 6/M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ and the yield of the dimerization is 0.6 in G. The enzymatic activity of the dimer is shown to be reduced to about 30 per cent of that of the intact enzyme. It is concluded that the radiation-induced inactivation of lysozyme is largely due to dimerization.

  9. Dimer formation in radiation-irradiated aqueous solution of lysozyme studied by light-scattering-intensity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, S; Seki, H; Masuda, T; Imamura, M; Kondo, M

    1981-07-01

    The reaction of lysozyme with OH., Br.-2 and e-aq, produced in an aqueous solution by pulsed electrons and gamma-rays, were investigated. Irradiated enzymes showed an increase in the light scattering intensity (LSI) which is proportional to the absorbed dose. Results obtained from SDS gel electrophoresis confirm dimerization of lysozyme, which is considered to be responsible for the increase in LSI. It was found that the rate constant of the dimerization of protein radicals produced in the reaction with OH. is 2K=(1.0 +/- 0.3) X 10(6)M-1 s-1 and the yield of the dimerization is 0.6 in G. The enzymatic activity of the dimer is shown to be reduced to about 30 per cent of that of the intact enzyme. It is concluded that the radiation-induced inactivation of lysozyme is largely due to dimerization.

  10. Upper-mesospheric temperatures measured during intense substorms in the declining phase of the January 2005 solar proton events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nesse Tyssøy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature measurements from the ALOMAR Weber Na lidar together with cosmic radio noise absorption measurements from IRIS and particle measurements from NOAA 15, 16 and 17 are used to study effects of geomagnetic activity on the polar winter upper-mesospheric temperature. On 21–22 January 2005 we have 14 h of continuous temperature measurement with the Na lidar coinciding with strong geomagnetic activity in the declining phase of one of the hardest and most energetic Solar Proton Event (SPE of solar cycle 23. According to measurements by the imaging riometer IRIS in northern Finland, the temperature measurements coincide with two periods of increased cosmic radio noise absorption. Particle measurements from the three satellites, NOAA 15, 16 and 17 that pass through and near our region of interest confirm that the absorption events are probably due to particle precipitation and not due to changes in e.g. the electron recombination coefficient.

    The measured temperature variation at 85 and 90 km is dominated by a 7.6-h wave with downward phase propagation and a vertical wavelength of approximately 10 km. Assuming that the wave is due to a lower altitude source independent of the particle precipitation, we do not find any temperature modification that seems to be related to the absorption events. The average temperature is larger than expected above 90 km based on MSIS and the monthly mean from falling spheres, which could be due to particle precipitation and Joule heating prior to our measurement period. There is also a possibility that the identified wave phenomenon is an effect of the geomagnetic activity itself. Earlier studies have reported of similar wavelike structures in wind observations made by the EISCAT VHF radar during SPEs, and found it conceivable that the wave could be excited by the effect of energetic particles precipitating into the mesosphere.

  11. Measurements of intensity correlations in the transverse plane of the output from a confocal optical parametric oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Buchhave, Preben

    We describe simultaneous measurements of signal/idler near field and far field patterns of a 2nd order nonlinear multi-mode parametric downconverter. We also describe the use of auto- and cross correlation techniques to obtain statistical data.......We describe simultaneous measurements of signal/idler near field and far field patterns of a 2nd order nonlinear multi-mode parametric downconverter. We also describe the use of auto- and cross correlation techniques to obtain statistical data....

  12. Using the geometric mean fluorescence intensity index method to measure ZAP-70 expression in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YJ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jie Wu, Hui Wang, Jian-Hua Liang, Yi Miao, Lu Liu, Hai-Rong Qiu, Chun Qiao, Rong Wang, Jian-Yong Li Department of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Expression of ζ-chain-associated protein kinase 70 kDa (ZAP-70 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is associated with more aggressive disease and can help differentiate CLL from cases expressing mutated or unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IgHV genes. However, standardizing ZAP-70 expression by flow cytometric analysis has proved unsatisfactory. The key point is that ZAP-70 is weakly expressed with a continuous expression pattern rather than a clear discrimination between positive and negative CLL cells, which means that the resulting judgment is subjective. Thus, in this study, we aimed at assessing the reliability and repeatability of ZAP-70 expression using the geometric mean fluorescence intensity (geo MFI index method based on flow cytometry with 256-channel resolution in a series of 402 CLL patients and to compare ZAP-70 with other biological and clinical prognosticators. According to IgHV mutational status, we were able to confirm that the optimal cut-off point for the geo MFI index was 3.5 in the test set. In multivariate analyses that included the major clinical and biological prognostic markers for CLL, the prognostic impact of ZAP-70 expression appeared to have stronger discriminatory power when the geo MFI index method was applied. In addition, we found that ZAP-70-positive patients according to the geo MFI index method had shorter time to first treatment or overall survival (P=0.0002, P=0.0491. This is the first report showing that ZAP-70 expression can be evaluated by a new approach, the geo MFI index, which could be a useful prognostic method as it is more reliable, less subjective, and therefore better associated with improvement of CLL prognostication

  13. The large-scale energetic ion layer in the high latitude Jovian magnetosphere as revealed by Ulysses/HI-SCALE cross-field intensity-gradient measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Anagnostopoulos, G C; Marhavilas, P K; Sarris, E T

    2012-01-01

    Ulysses investigated the high latitude Jovian magnetosphere for a second time after Pioneer 11 mission and gave us the opportunity to search the structure and the dynamics of this giant magnetosphere above the magnetodisc. Kivelson(1976) and Kennel & Coroniti(1979) reported that Pioneer 11 observed energetic particle intensities at high latitudes at the same level with those measured in the plasma sheet and inferred that they were not consistent with the magnetodisc model. Ulysses observations supported the idea about a large-scale layer of energetic ions and electrons in the outer high latitude Jovian magnetosphere (Cowley et al.1996; Anagnostopoulos et al. 2001). This study perform a number of further tests for the existence of the large scale layer of energetic ions in the outer high latitude Jovian magnetosphere by studying appropriate cross-B field anisotropies in order to monitor the ion northward/southward intensity gradients. In particular, we examined Ulysses/HI-SCALE observations of energetic io...

  14. Passive coherent discriminator using phase diversity for the simultaneous measurement of frequency noise and intensity noise of a continuous-wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Belleau, V.; Bergeron, H.; Light, P. S.; Hébert, N. B.; Deschênes, J. D.; Luiten, A. N.; Genest, J.

    2016-10-01

    The frequency noise and intensity noise of a laser set the performance limits in many modern photonics applications and, consequently, must often be characterized. As lasers continue to improve, the measurement of these noises however becomes increasingly challenging. Current approaches for the characterization of very high-performance lasers often call for a second laser with equal or higher performance to the one that is to be measured, an incoherent interferometer having an extremely long delay-arm, or an interferometer that relies on an active device. These instrumental features can be impractical or problematic under certain experimental conditions. As an alternative, this paper presents an entirely passive coherent interferometer that employs an optical 90° hybrid coupler to perform in-phase and quadrature detection. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the frequency noise power spectral density of a highly-stable 192 THz (1560 nm) fiber laser over five frequency decades. Simultaneously, we are able to measure its relative intensity noise power spectral density and characterize the correlation between its amplitude noise and phase noise. We correct some common misconceptions through a detailed theoretical analysis and demonstrate the necessity to account for normal imperfections of the optical 90° hybrid coupler. We finally conclude that this passive coherent discriminator is suitable for reliable and simple noise characterization of highly-stable lasers, with bandwidth and dynamic range benefits but susceptibility to additive noise contamination.

  15. Inferring electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave intensity from low altitude POES proton flux measurements: A detailed case study with conjugate Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing; Fu, Song; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the magnetospheric particle dynamics and can lead to resonant pitch-angle scattering and ultimate precipitation of ring current protons. Commonly, the statistics of in situ EMIC wave measurements is adopted for quantitative investigation of wave-particle interaction processes, which however becomes questionable for detailed case studies especially during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Here we establish a novel technique to infer EMIC wave amplitudes from low-altitude proton measurements onboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). The detailed procedure is elaborated regarding how to infer the EMIC wave intensity for one specific time point. We then test the technique with a case study comparing the inferred root-mean-square (RMS) EMIC wave amplitude with the conjugate Van Allen Probes EMFISIS wave measurements. Our results suggest that the developed technique can reasonably estimate EMIC wave intensities from low-altitude POES proton flux data, thereby providing a useful tool to construct a data-based, near-real-time, dynamic model of the global distribution of EMIC waves once the proton flux measurements from multiple POES satellites are available for any specific time period.

  16. Multilayered samples reconstructed by measuring Kα/Kβ or Lα/Lβ X-ray intensity ratios by EDXRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesareo, Roberto; de Assis, Joaquim T.; Roldán, Clodoaldo; Bustamante, Angel D.; Brunetti, Antonio; Schiavon, Nick

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a general method based on energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis has been tested to assess its possible use as a tool to reconstruct the structure and determine the thickness of two and/or multi-layered materials. The method utilizes the X-ray intensity ratios of Kα/Kβ or Lα/Lβ peaks (or the ratio of these peaks) for selected elements present in multi-layered objects of various materials (Au alloys, gilded Cu, gilded Ag, gilded Pb, Ag-Au Tumbaga, stone surfaces with protective treatments, Zn or Nickel plating on metals). Results show that, in the case of multi-layered samples, a correct calculation of the peak ratio (Kα /Kβ and/or Lα/Lβ) of relevant elements from energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra, can provide important information in assessing the exact location of each layer and for calculating its thickness. The methodological approach shown may have important applications not only in materials science but also when dealing with the conservation and restoration of multi-layered cultural heritage objects where the use of a Non-Destructive techniques to determine slight chemical and thickness variations in the layered structure is often of paramount importance to achieve the best results.

  17. Molecular line intensities as measures of cloud masses - I. Sensitivity of CO emissions to physical parameter variations

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, T A; Viti, S; Williams, D A

    2006-01-01

    A reliable estimate of the molecular gas content in galaxies plays a crucial role in determining their dynamical and star-forming properties. However, H2, the dominant molecular species, is difficult to observe directly, particularly in the regions where most molecular gas is thought to reside. Its mass is therefore commonly inferred by assuming a direct proportionality with the integrated intensity of the CO(J=1-0) emission line, using a CO-to-H2 conversion factor, X. Although a canonical value for X is used extensively in such estimates, there is increasing evidence, both theoretical and observational, that the conversion factor may vary by over an order of magnitude under conditions different to those of the local neighbourhood. In an effort to understand the influence of changing environmental conditions on the conversion factor, we derive theoretical estimates of X for a wide range of physical parameters using a photon-dominated region (PDR) time-dependent chemical model, benchmarking key results against...

  18. Observation of the June 22, 2015 G4 storm by HiT&MiS: an Echelle Spectrograph for Auroral and Airglow Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, S.; Hewawasam, K.; Maguire, R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Martel, J.; Baumgardner, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the June 22, 2015 G4 storm by HiT&MiS: an Echelle Spectrograph for Auroral and Airglow Studies Saurav Aryal1 , Kuravi Hewawasam1, Ryan Maguire1, Supriya Chakrabarti1, Timothy Cook1, Jason Martel1 and Jeffrey L Baumgardner2, (1) University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, United States, (2)Boston University, Boston, MA, United StatesA High-Throughput and Multi-slit Imaging Spectrograph (HiT&MIS) has been developed by our group. The spectrograph uses an echelle grating that operates at high dispersion orders (28-43) such that extended sources for airglow and auroral emissions can be observed at high resolution (about 0.02 nm). By using four slits (instead of the conventional one slit setup), with the appropriate foreoptics it images extended emissions along a long field of view of about 0.1° × 50°. It observes spectral regions around six prominent atmospheric emission lines (HI 656.3 nm, HI 486.1 nm, OI 557.7 nm, OI 630.0 nm, OI 777.4 nm and N+2 427.8 nm) using order sorting interference filters at the entrance slits and a filter mosaic on an image plane. We present observations from the instrument during the June 22, 2015 G4 storm. OI 557.7 nm (green line) and OI 630.0 nm (red line) showed strong brightness enhancements that lasted throughout the night from 8 P.M June 22, 2015 to 3 AM June 23,2015 when compared to the same times after the storm had passed.

  19. Neutron spectral measurements in an intense photon field associated with a high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeman, G R; Price, K W; Friedman, L F; Nath, R

    1977-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines in the supermegavoltage region generate complex neutron energy spectra which make an exact evaluation of neutron shielding difficult. Fast neutrons resulting from photonuclear reactions in the x-ray target and collimators undergo successive collisions in the surrounding materials and are moderated by varying amounts. In order to examine the neutron radiation exposures quantitatively, the neutron energy spectra have been measured inside and outside the treatment room of a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (25-MV x rays) located at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The measurements were made using a Bonner spectrometer consisting of 2-, 3-, 5-, 8-, 10- and 12-in.-diameter polyethylene spheres with 6Li and 7Li thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips at the centers, in addition to bare and cadmium-covered chips. The individual TLD chips were calibrated for neutron and photon response. The spectrometer was calibrated using a known PuBe spectrum Spectrometer measurements were made at Yale Electron Accelerator Laboratory and results compared with a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer and an activation technique. The agreement between the results from these independent methods is found to be good, except for the measurements in the direct photon beam. Quality factors have been inferred for the neutron fields inside and outside the treatment room. Values of the inferred quality factors fall primarily between 4 and 8, depending on location.

  20. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning.

  1. A Measure of Intense in West and Central Java Through Manifestation of River Basin Morphometry Development on Quaternary Volcanic Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febri Hirnawan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v4i4.88Indications exhibiting active tectonic movements in Java occur in many places, characterized by unstable regions, such as active faults, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, etc. The results of researches conducted at several areas in West and Central Java on tectonic morphometry developments of river basins both in Quaternary deposits and Tertiary sediments exhibit a degree of active tectonic intensity. Such the researches are very important regarding to the spatial development design that is related to a region of active tectonism that should be well understood by planners for decision making mainly through comprehensive approach, in which the phenomena involved explaining the characteristics of the region as part of an active plate margin. Statistic approach as the chosen methodology had been utilized to gain meaningful conclusions through the verification of hypotheses, which are based on valid and reliable tested data obtained from the fields and satellite imagery. Results of regression-correlation tests between azimuths of river segment and lineaments in both chronostratigraphic systems mentioned earlier are significant with several large values of correlation coefficients r of no less than 0.9. On the other hand, results of t-tests are not a significant difference of means of bifurcation ratio (Rb and drainage density (Dd from many to river basins. The results of all tests have verified the effect of active tectonic control on the morphometry development process regarding to river segments and density of drainage patterns development in Tertiary and Quaternary deposits.

  2. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program May 2003 Intensive Operations Period Examining Aerosol Properties and Radiative Influences: Preface to Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, Richard; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Ogren, John; Schmid, Beat; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Sheridan, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate by scattering and absorbing radiation in clear air (direct effects) and by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, modifying the microphysical properties of clouds, influencing radiation and precipitation development (indirect effects). Much of present uncertainty in forcing of climate change is due to uncertainty in the relations between aerosol microphysical and optical properties and their radiative influences (direct effects) and between microphysical properties and their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei at given supersaturations (indirect effects). This paper introduces a special section that reports on a field campaign conducted at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in North Central Oklahoma in May, 2003, examining these relations using in situ airborne measurements and surface-, airborne-, and space-based remote sensing.

  3. Is there a systematic disagreement between intensity-based and pressure-based sound transmission loss measurements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machimbarrena, Maria; Jacobsen, Finn

    1999-01-01

    in a very limited frequency range. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate with experimental data that excellent agreement can be obtained in a fairly large frequency range (80 Hx to 6.3 kHz) provided that the measurement are carried out in adequate facilities. As pointed out by several researchers......, the only reason for systematic deviations between the two methods is the effect of having a partition that is highly absorbing in the receiving room....

  4. Correlation and causal relationship between GPS water vapor measurements and rainfall intensities in a tropical region (Tahiti-French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, J.; Sichoix, L.; Barriot, J.-P.; Fadil, A.

    2011-11-01

    We processed a eight-year time series (2001-2008) of zenith wet delay and associated precipitable water (PW) contents from the permanent GPS station THTI (OGT) and a corresponding precipitation time series from the pluviometer of the Matatia valley (7 km South East from the GPS receiver). Daily GPS data were obtained (including zenith total delay and North and East gradients) by applying the PPP strategy of the GIPSY-OASIS II package w.r.t. IGS final products. We used the Saastamoinen model to extract the hydrostatic part of the delay. Taking into account surface meteorological measurements, we transformed the resulting wet delay into an estimate of PW above the receiver. The precipitation dataset consisted of rainfall gauge measurements spanning the same period provided by the "Direction de l'Equipement" (GEGDP). This work poses a preliminary diagnostic on the evolution of PW and precipitations over French Polynesia with emphasis on a broad range of timescales, from seasonal to diurnal components. Before this study, no monitoring system had provided accurate and quasi continuous measures of PW in French Polynesia.

  5. Performance of microhaematuria and proteinuria as measured by urine reagent strips in estimating intensity and prevalence ofSchistosoma haematobium infection in Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Houmsou RS; Kela SL; Suleiman MM

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To assess if microhaematuria and proteinuria as measured by reagent strips could estimate intensity ofSchistosoma haematobium (S. haematobium) infection in endemic areas and evaluate their screening performance among children in Benue State, Nigeria.Methods: A total of1 124urine samples were collected, screened for microhaematuria and proteinuria using reagent strips (Combi9) and results were compared to filtration technique, the gold standard method.Results: A significant correlation was observed between microhaematuria (rho=0.66, P<0.01), proteinuria (rho =0.71,P<0.01) and intensity ofS. haematobium eggs. Proteinuria had sensitivity of95.7% and specificity of67.2%, while microhaematuria had sensitivity of64.8% and specificity of89.6%. The proportion of false positive diagnoses was higher in proteinuria(19.2%) than microhaematuria(6.0%).Conclusions: The findings suggest that use of urine reagent strips could potentially estimate intensity ofS. haematobiuminfection and their performance to screen urinary schistosomiasis agreed with previous observations.

  6. High-Intensity Cycling Training: The Effect of Work-to-Rest Intervals on Running Performance Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaliauskas, Mykolas; Aspe, Rodrigo R; Babraj, John

    2015-08-01

    The work-to-rest ratio during cycling-based high-intensity interval training (HIT) could be important in regulating physiological and performance adaptations. We sought to determine the effectiveness of cycling-based HIT with different work-to-rest ratios for long-distance running. Thirty-two long-distance runners (age: 39 ± 8 years; sex: 14 men, 18 women; average weekly running training volume: 25 miles) underwent baseline testing (3-km time-trial, V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and time to exhaustion, and Wingate test) before a 2-week matched-work cycling HIT of 6 × 10-second sprints with different rest periods (30 seconds [R30], 80 seconds [R80], 120 seconds [R120], or control). Three-kilometer time trial was significantly improved in the R30 group only (3.1 ± 4.0%, p = 0.04), whereas time to exhaustion was significantly increased in the 2 groups with a lower work-to-rest ratio (R30 group 6.4 ± 6.3%, p = 0.003 vs. R80 group 4.4 ± 2.7%, p = 0.03 vs. R120 group 1.9 ± 5.0%, p = 0.2). However, improvements in average power production were significantly greater with a higher work-to-rest ratio (R30 group 0.3 ± 4.1%, p = 0.8 vs. R80 group 4.6 ± 4.2%, p = 0.03 vs. R120 group 5.3 ± 5.9%, p = 0.02), whereas peak power significantly increased only in the R80 group (8.5 ± 8.2%, p = 0.04) but not in the R30 group (4.3 ± 6.1%, p = 0.3) or in the R120 group (7.1 ± 7.9%, p = 0.09). Therefore, cycling-based HIT is an effective way to improve running performance, and the type and magnitude of adaptation is dependent on the work-to-rest ratio.

  7. 14NH_3 Line Positions and Intensities in the Far-Infrared Comparison of Ft-Ir Measurements to Empirical Hamiltonian Model Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Keeyoon; Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John; Pirali, Olivier; Kwabia Tchana, F.; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed multiple spectra of high purity (99.5%) normal ammonia sample recorded at room temperatures using the FT-IR and AILES beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL, France. More than 2830 line positions and intensities are measured for the inversion-rotation and rovibrational transitions in the 50 - 660 wn region. Quantum assignments were made for 2047 transitions from eight bands including four inversion-rotation bands (gs(a-s), νb{2}(a-s), 2νb{2}(a-s), and νb{4}(a-s)) and four ro-vibrational bands (νb{2} - gs, 2νb{2} - gs, νb{4} - νb{2}, and 2νb{2} -νb{4}), as well as covering more than 300 lines of ΔK = 3 forbidden transitions. Out of the eight bands, we note that 2νb{2} - νb{4} has not been listed in the HITRAN 2012 database. The measured line positions for the assigned transitions are in an excellent agreement (typically better than 0.001 wn) with the predictions from the empirical Hamiltonian model [S. Yu, J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin, et al.(2010)] in a wide range of J and K for all the eight bands. The comparison with the HITRAN 2012 database is also satisfactory, although systematic offsets are seen for transitions with high J and K and those from weak bands. However, differences of 20% or so are seen in line intensities for allowed transitions between the measurements and the model predictions, depending on the bands. We have also noticed that most of the intensity outliers in the Hamiltonian model predictions belong to transitions from gs(a-s) band. We present the final results of the FT-IR measurements of line positions and intensities, and their comparisons to the model predictions and the HITRAN 2012 database. Research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Mean Velocity, Turbulence Intensity and Turbulence Convection Velocity Measurements for a Convergent Nozzle in a Free Jet Wind Tunnel. Comprehensive Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccolgan, C. J.; Larson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of flight on the mean flow and turbulence properties of a 0.056m circular jet were determined in a free jet wind tunnel. The nozzle exit velocity was 122 m/sec, and the wind tunnel velocity was set at 0, 12, 37, and 61 m/sec. Measurements of flow properties including mean velocity, turbulence intensity and spectra, and eddy convection velocity were carried out using two linearized hot wire anemometers. This report contains the raw data and graphical presentations. The final technical report includes a description of the test facilities, test hardware, along with significant test results and conclusions.

  9. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  10. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  11. Measurement of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acids from TROSY intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying Jinfa [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Wang Jinbu [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Structural Biophysics Laboratory (United States); Grishaev, Alex [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Yu Ping; Wang Yunxing [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Structural Biophysics Laboratory (United States); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Analogous to the recently introduced ARTSY method for measurement of one-bond {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in large perdeuterated proteins, we introduce methods for measurement of base {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H RDCs in protonated nucleic acids. Measurements are based on quantitative analysis of intensities in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H TROSY-HSQC spectra, and are illustrated for a 71-nucleotide adenine riboswitch. Results compare favorably with those of conventional frequency-based measurements in terms of completeness and convenience of use. The ARTSY method derives the size of the coupling from the ratio of intensities observed in two TROSY-HSQC spectra recorded with different dephasing delays, thereby minimizing potential resonance overlap problems. Precision of the RDC measurements is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio, S/N, achievable in the 2D TROSY-HSQC reference spectrum, and is approximately given by 30/(S/N) Hz for {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H and 65/(S/N) Hz for {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H. The signal-to-noise ratio of both {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C spectra greatly benefits when water magnetization during the experiments is not perturbed, such that rapid magnetization transfer from bulk water to the nucleic acid, mediated by rapid amino and hydroxyl hydrogen exchange coupled with {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H NOE transfer, allows for fast repetition of the experiment. RDCs in the mutated helix 1 of the riboswitch are compatible with nucleotide-specifically modeled, idealized A-form geometry and a static orientation relative to the helix 2/3 pair, which differs by ca 6 Degree-Sign relative to the X-ray structure of the native riboswitch.

  12. Importance of re-calibration time on pulse contour analysis agreement with thermodilution measurements of cardiac output: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Christopher G; Gomatam, Shanti; Forrest, Shawn; Strauss, David G

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of re-calibration time on cardiac output estimation and trending performance in a retrospective analysis of an intensive care unit patient population using error grid analyses. Paired thermodilution and arterial blood pressure waveform measurements (N = 2141) from 222 patient records were extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. Pulse contour analysis was performed by implementing a previously reported algorithm at calibration times of 1, 2, 8 and 24 h. Cardiac output estimation agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman and error grid analyses. Trending was assessed by concordance and a 4-Quadrant error grid analysis. Error between pulse contour and thermodilution increased with longer calibration times. Limits of agreement were -1.85 to 1.66 L/min for 1 h maximum calibration time compared to -2.70 to 2.41 L/min for 24 h. Error grid analysis resulted in 74.2 % of points bounded by 20 % error limits of thermodilution measurements for 1 h calibration time compared to 65 % for 24 h. 4-Quadrant error grid analysis showed analysis method and thermodilution showed poor agreement to monitor changes in cardiac output.

  13. Measured commercial load shapes and energy-use intensities and validation of the LBL end-use disaggregation algorithm. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Rainer, L.; Heinemeier, K.; Huang, J.; Franconi, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has conducted an extensive metering project in which electricity end use in 53 commercial buildings in Southern California has been measured. The building types monitored include offices, retail stores, groceries, restaurants, and warehouses. One year (June 1989 through May 1990) of the SCE measured hourly end-use data are reviewed in this report. Annual whole-building and end-use energy use intensities (EUIs) and monthly load shapes (LSs) have been calculated for the different building types based on the monitored data. This report compares the monitored buildings` EUIs and LSs to EUIs and LSs determined using whole-building load data and the End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm (EDA). Two sets of EDA determined EUIs and LSs are compared to the monitored data values. The data sets represent: (1) average buildings in the SCE service territory and (2) specific buildings that were monitored.

  14. Quantitative measurements on the paleo-weathering intensity of the loess-soil sequences and implication on paleomonsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO; Qingzhen

    2001-01-01

    [1]Liu, T. S., Loess and the Environment, Beijing: China Ocean Press, 1985, 1-251.[2]Chen, L. X., Zhu, Q. G., Luo, H. B. et al., East Asian Monsoon, Beijing: China Meteorology Press, 1991, 28-61.[3]An, Z. S., Liu, T. S., Lu, Y. C. et al., The long-term palaeomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-palaeosol sequence in central China, Quaternary International, 1990, (7/8): 91-95.[4]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Shift of the monsoon intensity on the Loess Plateau at ca. 0.85 MaBP, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1993, 38(2): 586-591.[5]Chen, J., An, Z. S., Wang, Y. J. et al., Distributions of Rb and Sr in the Luochuan loess-paleosol sequence of China during the last 800 ka: Implications for paleomonsoon variations, Science in China, Ser. D, 1999, 42(3): 225-232.[6]Chen, J., Wang, Y. J., Ji, J. F. et al., Rb/Sr variations and its climatic stratigraphical significance of a loess-paleosol profile from Luochuan, Shaanxi Province, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 19(4): 350-356.[7]Guo, Z. T.,Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Climate extremes in loess of China coupled with the strength of deep-water for-mation in the North Atlantic, Global and Planetary Change, 1998, 18: 113-128.[8]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., An, Z. S., Paleosols of the last 0.15 Ma in the Weinan loess section and their paleoclimate signifi-cance, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1994, 14(3): 256-269.[9]Guo, Z, T,, Fedoroff, N., Liu, T. S., Micromorphology of the loess-paleosol sequence of the last 130 ka in China and pa-leoclimatic event, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1996, 26(3): 392-398.[10]Guo, Z., Liu, T., Guiot, J., et al., High frequency pulses of East Asian monsoon climate in the last two glaciations: Link with the North Atlantic, Climate Dynamics, 1996, 12: 701-709.[11]Guo, Z. T., Peng, S. Z., Wei, L. Y. et al., Weathering signals of Millennial-Scale oscillations of the East Asian Summer monsoon over the last 220 ka, Chinese Science

  15. Measurement of event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations using strongly intensive measures $\\Delta[P_T, N]$ and $\\Sigma[P_T, N]$ in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T; Bartke, J; Beck, H; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Book, J; Botje, M; Buncic, P; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J; Eckardt, V; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gazdzicki, M; Grebieszkow, K; Hohne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kolesnikov, V; Kowalski, M; Kresan, D; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; van Leeuwen, M; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A; Melkumov, G; Mitrovski, M; Mrowczynski, S; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Puhlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Rustamov, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Seyboth, P; Sikler, F; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Strobele, H; Susa, T; Szuba, M; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A

    2015-01-01

    Results from the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS are presented on event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations of charged particles, produced at forward rapidities in central Pb+Pb interactions at beam momenta 20$A$, 30$A$, 40$A$, 80$A$, and 158$A$ GeV/c, as well as in systems of different size ($p+p$, C+C, Si+Si, and Pb+Pb) at 158$A$ GeV/c. This publication extends the previous NA49 measurements of the strongly intensive measure $\\Phi_{p_T}$ by a study of the recently proposed strongly intensive measures of fluctuations $\\Delta[P_T, N]$ and $\\Sigma[P_T, N]$. In the explored kinematic region transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations show no significant energy dependence in the SPS energy range. However, a remarkable system size dependence is observed for both $\\Delta[P_T, N]$ and $\\Sigma[P_T, N]$, with the largest values measured in peripheral Pb+Pb interactions. The results are compared with NA61/SHINE measurements in $p+p$ collisions, as well as with predictions of the UrQMD and ...

  16. Comparison of UV-RSS spectral measurements and TUV model runs for clear skies for the May 2003 ARM aerosol intensive observation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Michalsky

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The first successful deployment of the fully-operational ultraviolet rotating shadow-band spectroradiometer occurred during the May 2003 U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Aerosol Intensive Observation Period. The aerosol properties in the visible range were characterized using redundant measurements with several instruments to determine the column aerosol optical depth, the single scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter needed as input for radiative transfer calculations of the downwelling direct normal and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance in clear-sky conditions. The Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV radiative transfer model developed by Madronich and his colleagues at the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research was used for the calculations of the spectral irradiance between 300–360 nm. Since there are few ultraviolet measurements of aerosol properties, most of the input aerosol data for the radiative transfer model are based on the assumption that UV input parameters can be extrapolated from the visible portion of the spectrum. Disagreements between available extraterrestrial spectra, which are discussed briefly, suggested that instead of comparing irradiances that measured and modeled spectral transmittances between 300–360 nm should be compared for the seven cases studied. These cases included low to moderate aerosol loads and low to high solar-zenith angles. A procedure for retrieving single scattering albedo in the ultraviolet based on the comparisons of direct and diffuse transmittance is outlined.

  17. Optimization of nitrogen plasma source parameters by measurements of emitted light intensity for growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klosek, K.; Sobanska, M.; Tchutchulashvili, G.; Zytkiewicz, Z.R., E-mail: zytkie@ifpan.edu.pl; Teisseyre, H.; Klopotowski, L.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of operating parameters of Addon RF nitrogen plasma source was made in order to determine how a ratio of different active nitrogen species depends on operating parameters of the source such as supplied power and nitrogen flow. We show that output signal of the optical sensor that measures intensity of the light emitted by the plasma is a direct measure of the amount of active nitrogen available for growth. Results of optical emission spectroscopy and measurements of growth kinetics show that nitrogen excited metastable molecules are the species mainly contributing to the growth of GaN under Ga-rich conditions. A procedure is presented allowing to find an optimal conditions of the plasma cell for high-quality GaN growth. Under these conditions the nitrogen flux contains maximum amount of excited metastable molecules and minimal amount of ionic and atomic nitrogen species to minimize GaN lattice damage, even at high growth rates. - Highlights: ► Operating parameters of Addon radio-frequency nitrogen plasma source studied ► Their influence on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaN analyzed ► MBE growth rate of GaN well correlates with output of the plasma emission sensor. ► Optical emission spectroscopy measurements of the nitrogen plasma made ► Nitrogen excited molecules mainly contribute to plasma-assisted MBE growth of GaN.

  18. Invoking the frequency dependence in square modulated light intensity techniques for the measurement of electron time constants in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaithan, Hamid M.; Qaid, Saif M.; Hezam, Mahmoud; Siddique, Muhemmad B.; Bedja, Idriss M.; Aldwayyana, Abdullah S.

    2015-08-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been considered as one of the most promising new generation solar cells. Enormous research efforts have been invested to improve the efficiency of solar energy conversion which is determined by the light harvesting efficiency, electron injection efficiency and undesirable electron lifetime. A simple, cheap and trustable laser-induced photovoltage and photocurrent decay (LIPVCD) technique is adopted in this work in order to determine the electron lifetime (τe) and electron transport (τtr) in DSSCs. In LIPVCD technique, DSSC is illuminated by a small squared intensity-modulated laser beam. Time-based response of the DSSC is recorded using a transient digitized oscilloscope for further analysis. Frequency-based response was also investigated in this work. The frequency-dependent measurements turned out to be a powerful method to determine electron time constants in a fast, real-time fashion. Measurements were carried out using a standard dye-sensitized solar cell, and results were in excellent agreement with results obtained from traditional IMVS-MPS measurements. Measurements were also performed for a variety of DSSCs, having various electrodes including TiO2 nanoparticles, TiO2 nanosheets with exposed {001} facets and ZnO vertically aligned nanowires. Results will also be presented and discussed in this work.

  19. Absolute Intensities Measurements in the nu(4) + nu(5) Band of (12)C(2)H(2): Analysis of Herman-Wallis Effects and Forbidden Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Auwera J

    2000-05-01

    We measured absolute line intensities in two bands of (12)C(2)H(2) near 7.5 µm, namely the nu(4) + nu(5)(Sigma(+)(u))-0(Sigma(+)(g)) and nu(4) + nu(5)(Delta(u))-0(Sigma(+)(g)) bands, using Fourier transform spectroscopy with an accuracy estimated to be better than 2%. Using theoretical predictions from Watson [J. K. G. Watson, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 188, 78 (1998)], the observation of the forbidden nu(4) + nu(5)(Delta(u))-0(Sigma(+)(g)) band and the Herman-Wallis behavior exhibited by its rotational lines were studied quantitatively in terms of two types of interactions affecting the levels involved by the band: l-type resonance and Coriolis interaction. In the case of the nu(4) + nu(5)(Sigma(+)(u))-0(Sigma(+)(g)) band, the influence of l-type resonance is also confirmed. We also attributed the intensity asymmetry observed between the R and P branches of that latter band to a Coriolis interaction with l = 1 levels. We did not observe the nu(4) + nu(5)(Sigma(-)(u))-0(Sigma(+)(g)) band, consisting only of a Q branch, in agreement with Watson's prediction. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Atmospheric CO2 Column Measurements with an Airborne Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave 1.57-micron Fiber Laser Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Jeremy T.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Browell, Edward V.; Lin, Bing; McGregor, Doug; Kooi, Susan; Choi, Yonghoon; Ismail, Syed

    2013-01-01

    The 2007 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space recommended Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term, Tier II, NASA space mission. ITT Exelis, formerly ITT Corp., and NASA Langley Research Center have been working together since 2004 to develop and demonstrate a prototype Laser Absorption Spectrometer for making high-precision, column CO2 mixing ratio measurements needed for the ASCENDS mission. This instrument, called the Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), operates in an intensity-modulated, continuous-wave mode in the 1.57- micron CO2 absorption band. Flight experiments have been conducted with the MFLL on a Lear-25, UC-12, and DC-8 aircraft over a variety of different surfaces and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Very high-precision CO2 column measurements resulting from high signal-to-noise (great than 1300) column optical depth measurements for a 10-s (approximately 1 km) averaging interval have been achieved. In situ measurements of atmospheric CO2 profiles were used to derive the expected CO2 column values, and when compared to the MFLL measurements over desert and vegetated surfaces, the MFLL measurements were found to agree with the in situ-derived CO2 columns to within an average of 0.17% or approximately 0.65 ppmv with a standard deviation of 0.44% or approximately 1.7 ppmv. Initial results demonstrating ranging capability using a swept modulation technique are also presented.

  1. PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China, in June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Kato, S.; Suthawaree, J.; Kanaya, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2010-08-01

    Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we performed on-line measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006), using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z17 to m/z 300 during 12-30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. In combination with non-methane hydrocarbon data obtained by a gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, it was found that oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. Diurnal variations depending mainly on local photochemistry were observed during 24-28 June. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The ΔNMVOCs/ΔCO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode (with biomass burning (BB) plume) and during 16-23 June (without BB plume) are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001) and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007) and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007).

  2. Comparison of UV-RSS spectral measurements and TUV model runs for clear skies for the May 2003 ARM aerosol intensive observation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Kiedron

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The first successful deployment of the fully-operational ultraviolet rotating shadow-band spectroradiometer occurred during the May 2003 US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Aerosol Intensive Observation Period. The aerosol properties in the visible range were characterized using redundant measurements with several instruments to determine the column aerosol optical depth, the single scattering albedo, and the asymmetry parameter needed as input for radiative transfer calculations of the downwelling direct normal and diffuse horizontal solar irradiance in clear-sky conditions. The Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV radiative transfer model developed by Madronich and his colleagues at the US National Center for Atmospheric Research was used for the calculations of the spectral irradiance between 300–360 nm. Since there are few ultraviolet measurements of aerosol properties, most of the input aerosol data for the radiative transfer model are based on the assumption that UV input parameters can be extrapolated from the visible portion of the spectrum. Disagreements among available extraterrestrial spectra, which are discussed briefly, suggested that instead of comparing irradiances, measured and modeled spectral transmittances between 300–360 nm should be compared for the seven cases studied. Transmittance was calculated by taking the ratios of the measured irradiances to the Langley-derived, top-of-the-atmosphere irradiances. The cases studied included low to moderate aerosol loads and low to high solar-zenith angles. A procedure for retrieving single scattering albedo in the ultraviolet based on the comparisons of direct and diffuse transmittance is outlined.

  3. Response measurement of single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond radiation detector for intense X-rays aiming at neutron bang-time and neutron burn-history measurement on an inertial confinement fusion with fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, T., E-mail: t.shimaoka@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Kaneko, J. H.; Tsubota, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kojima, S.; Abe, Y.; Sakata, S.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H. [Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Sato, Y. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chayahara, A.; Umezawa, H.; Shikata, S. [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    A neutron bang time and burn history monitor in inertial confinement fusion with fast ignition are necessary for plasma diagnostics. In the FIREX project, however, no detector attained those capabilities because high-intensity X-rays accompanied fast electrons used for plasma heating. To solve this problem, single-crystal CVD diamond was grown and fabricated into a radiation detector. The detector, which had excellent charge transportation property, was tested to obtain a response function for intense X-rays. The applicability for neutron bang time and burn history monitor was verified experimentally. Charge collection efficiency of 99.5% ± 0.8% and 97.1% ± 1.4% for holes and electrons were obtained using 5.486 MeV alpha particles. The drift velocity at electric field which saturates charge collection efficiency was 1.1 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 7} cm/s and 1.0 ± 0.3 × 10{sup 7} cm/s for holes and electrons. Fast response of several ns pulse width for intense X-ray was obtained at the GEKKO XII experiment, which is sufficiently fast for ToF measurements to obtain a neutron signal separately from X-rays. Based on these results, we confirmed that the single-crystal CVD diamond detector obtained neutron signal with good S/N under ion temperature 0.5–1 keV and neutron yield of more than 10{sup 9} neutrons/shot.

  4. Interferometric coherence measurement and radio frequency noise characterization of the 1.3 μm femtosecond intense Stokes continuum from a TZDW source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuhong; Knox, Wayne H.

    2015-02-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with two closely spaced zero dispersion wavelengths (TZDW) offers a unique route to efficient energy transfer to two spectrally localized continua beyond either side of the ZDWs, which we have employed in previous work for mid-IR difference frequency generation and speckle-free red-green-blue generation. In this manuscript, we report the interferometric coherence characterization and radio frequency (RF) noise measurements of the Stokes side TZDW component. With a custom-built 1.3 W, 1035 nm, 40 MHz, 240 fs Yb:fiber chirped pulse amplifier as the pump source, we use 12 cm of commercially available TZDW PCF to excite the dual narrow-band continua from which the Stokes pulse is filtered out with a 1180 nm long wave pass filter. We achieve 0.8 to 3 nJ of narrow-band pulses within the spectral range of 1200 - 1315 nm at an average power conversion efficiency of 33%. Employing an un-balanced Michelson interferometer, measured mutual spectral coherence of the Stokes pulse is in excess of 0.76 with pump Soliton order as high as N ~70. Its measured RF noise spectrum at the first harmonic of the laser repetition rate shows less than 8 dBc/Hz increase in relative intensity noise (RIN) compared to that of the power amplifier, which is consistent with reported studies employing sub-100 fs pulses from relatively low noise oscillators. In contrast to the broadband continuum from a single ZDW PCF wherein severe de-coherence is found with pumping at high soliton order and longer pump pulse width, the reported TZDW fiber source shows preservation of intensity stability and phase coherence against variation in pump pulse parameters, which not only attests to the stability of our reported method for mid-IR generation, but also shows promising potential towards an all-fiber, efficient and low noise ultrafast source that can be helpful for applications such as biomedical deep-tissue imaging.

  5. Standardized Application of Laxatives and Physical Measures in Neurosurgical Intensive Care Patients Improves Defecation Pattern but Is Not Associated with Lower Intracranial Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kieninger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inadequate bowel movements might be associated with an increase in intracranial pressure in neurosurgical patients. In this study we investigated the influence of a structured application of laxatives and physical measures following a strict standard operating procedure (SOP on bowel movement, intracranial pressure (ICP, and length of hospital stay in patients with a serious acute cerebral disorder. Methods. After the implementation of the SOP patients suffering from a neurosurgical disorder received pharmacological and nonpharmacological measures to improve bowel movements in a standardized manner within the first 5 days after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU starting on day of admission. We compared mean ICP levels, length of ICU stay, and mechanical ventilation to a historical control group. Results. Patients of the intervention group showed an adequate defecation pattern significantly more often than the patients of the control group. However, this was not associated with lower ICP values, fewer days of mechanical ventilation, or earlier discharge from ICU. Conclusions. The implementation of a SOP for bowel movement increases the frequency of adequate bowel movements in neurosurgical critical care patients. However, this seems not to be associated with reduced ICP values.

  6. Localization of rainfall and determination its intensity in the lower layers of the troposphere from the measurements of local RF transmitter characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podhorský, Dušan; Fabo, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The article deals with a method of acquiring the temporal and spatial distribution of local precipitation from measurement of performance characteristics of local sources of high frequency electromagnetic radiation in the 1-3GHz frequency range in the lower layers of the troposphere up to 100 m. The method was experimentally proven by monitoring the GSM G2 base stations of cell phone providers in the frequency range of 920-960MHz using methods of frequential and spatial diversity reception. Modification of the SART method for localization of precipitation was also proposed. The achieved results allow us to obtain the timeframe of the intensity of local precipitation in the observed area with a temporal resolution of 10 sec. A spatial accuracy of 100m in localization of precipitation is expected, after a network of receivers is built. The acquired data can be used as one of the inputs for meteorological forecasting models, in agriculture, hydrology as a supplementary method to ombrograph stations and measurements for the weather radar network, in transportation as part of a warning system and in many other areas.

  7. Comparative study of temperature measurements in ex vivo swine muscle and a tissue-mimicking material during high intensity focused ultrasound exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruvada, S.; Liu, Y.; Pritchard, W. F.; Herman, B. A.; Harris, G. R.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) can provide a convenient, stable, and reproducible means for testing high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices. When TMMs containing thermal sensors are used to measure ultrasound-induced temperature rise, it is important that measurement results reasonably represent those that occur in biological tissue. Therefore the aim of this paper is to compare the thermal behavior of the TMM under HIFU exposure to that of ex vivo tissue. This was accomplished using both a previously developed TMM and fresh ex vivo swine muscle that were instrumented with bare 50 µm thin wire thermocouples. HIFU at 825 kHz was focused at the thermocouple junction. 30 s exposures of increasing peak negative pressure (1 to 5 MPa) were applied and the temperature profile during and after sonication was recorded. B-mode imaging was used to monitor bubble activity during sonication. If bubble formation was noted during the sonication, the sonication was repeated at the same pressure levels two more times at 20 min intervals. Temperature traces obtained at various pressure levels demonstrated similar types of heating profiles in both the tissue and TMM, the exact nature of which depended on whether bubbles formed during the HIFU exposure. The onset of bubble activity occurred at lower ultrasonic pressures in the TMM, but the basic temperature rise features due to HIFU exposure were essentially the same for both materials.

  8. Combination of signal intensity measurements of lesions in the peripheral zone of prostate with MRI and serum PSA level for differentiating benign disease from prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, K.; Kreckel, M. [Department of Radiology, Martha-Maria Hospital Nuernberg (Germany); Hollenbach, H.P.; Deimling, M. [Siemens Medical Engineering Group, Erlangen (Germany); Riedl, C. [Dept. of Urology, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the benign or malignant nature of a prostatic lesion by defining a threshold value of signal intensity ratio and a limiting value of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with elevated PSA level. Twenty-six patients with elevated PSA level and no hypoechogenic lesions at endosonography underwent MR imaging using an endorectal body phased-array coil at 1.5 T (Siemens Magnetom Symphony). A T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) pulse sequence was applied in a transverse orientation. Two radiologists evaluated the images. In the presence of a pathological finding they defined regions of interest (ROI) in the suspicious pathological area of the peripheral zone and in muscle for reference. The quotient of the two ROIs was calculated and then correlated with the actual PSA level. Diagnosis was confirmed by prostate biopsy. Ten of 12 patients with quotients smaller than 4 showed cancer at histology. Nine of 12 men with cancer proven by biopsy had PSA levels higher than 10 ng/ml. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found between the quotients of cancer and quotients of chronic prostatitis, fibrosis, or glandular atrophy. The accuracy of tumor differentiation of the method was 77 %. Measurement of signal intensity quotients in the peripheral zone of the prostate in combination with knowledge of defined limits of PSA levels the technique could be helpful in detecting additional cancer areas for prostate biopsy. False-negative tumor results of standard sextant biopsy can be reduced. In men with high PSA values the method has a role in differentiating between patients who require prostate biopsy and those of clinical observation. (orig.)

  9. Intensive mobilities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of facto....... By exploring how experiences of long-distance workers become constituted by a range of different material forces enables us to more sensitively consider the practical, technical, and political implications of this increasingly prevalent yet underexplored regime of work....... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  10. UV-Visible intensity ratio (aggregates/single particles) as a measure to obtain stability of gold nanoparticles conjugated with protein A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Corripio, M. A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, CIBA-Tlaxcala (Mexico); Garcia-Perez, B. E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Inmunologia, ENCB (Mexico); Jaramillo-Flores, M. E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, ENCB (Mexico); Gayou, V. L.; Rojas-Lopez, M., E-mail: marlonrl@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, CIBA-Tlaxcala (Mexico)

    2013-05-15

    We have analyzed the titration process of gold nanoparticles with several amounts of protein A (0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, 6, and 9 {mu}g/ml) in the presence of NaCl, which induces aggregation if the surface of particles is not fully covered with protein A. The colloidal solutions with different particle size (16, 18, 20, 33 nm) were synthesized by citrate reduction to be conjugated with protein A. UV-Visible spectroscopy was used to measure the absorption of the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles as a function of the concentration of protein A. Such dependence shows an aggregation region (0 < x<6 {mu}g/ml), where the amount of protein A was insufficient to cover the surface of particles, obtaining aggregation caused by NaCl. The next part is the stability region (x {>=} 6 {mu}g/ml), where the amount of protein used covers the surface of particles and protects it from the aggregation. In addition to that the ratio between the intensities of both: the aggregates and of the gold nanoparticle bands was plotted as a function of the concentration of protein A. It was determined that 6 {mu}g/ml is a sufficient value of protein A to stabilize the gold nanoparticle-protein A system. This method provides a simple way to stabilize gold nanoparticles obtained by citrate reduction, with protein A.

  11. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF CENTRAL VENOUS VERSUS ARTERIAL BLOOD SAMPLE FOR REPETITIVE MEASUREMENTS IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS ADMITTED IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukhsana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of present study was to evaluate the reliability of central venous blood gas monitoring as an alternative to arterial blood gas monitoring and to assess that the central venous catheter is convenient and reliable source of blood for repetitive measurement of pH bicarbonate and PCO2 in critically ill patients admitted in surgical intensive care unit (SICU. METHODS: We took one hundred patients who required ABG analysis between 20 - 60 years of age. The cases were divided in four groups which constituted major admissions in SICU in one year. Out of one hundred patients for the study there were 19 Poisoning patients, 15 Trauma patients, 40 Major abdominal surgery patients, 26 Hypovolemic shock patients and others. Central Venous blood drawn within 5 min of an ABG measurement and the samples analyzed immediately on automated ABG analyzer were compared. RESULTS: Bland Altman plots demonstrated a high degree of agreement between the two corresponding sets of measurements of arterial and venous blood with coefficient of correlation 0.979 for pH. The coefficient of correlation was highly positive i.e. 0.926 for PCO 2 and 0.955 for HCO 3 - which is statistically significant. There was also positive correlation for saturation between arterial and venous blood i.e. 0.57 with clinically acceptable difference and is statistically significant. The difference in pO 2 measurements was however higher with correlation coefficient of 0.259 although the arterial saturation and finger oximetry reveals a good degree of agreement with clinically acceptable bias. CONCLUSION: Venous blood gas (VBG analysis clearly does not replace ABG analysis in determining exact pO 2 status and arterial puncture may still be required for invasive arterial BP monitoring. With positive correlation and regression plots obtained, venous samples can be used as an alternative to arterial samples depending on the significant positive correlation values obtained for

  12. Quantitative Measurements of Photocatalytic CO-Oxidation as a Function of Light Intensity and Wavelength over TiO2 Nanotube Thin Films in mu-Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; In, Su-il; Olsen, Jacob L.;

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase photooxidation of CO over TiO2 catalysts (P25 and TiO2 nanotubes) in mu-reactors with quantitative product detection was used to study turnover as a function of illumination intensity over 4 orders of magnitude. Turnover was found to be of order 0.84 in illumination intensity. A CO phot...

  13. Simulation and measurement of complete dye sensitised solar cells: including the influence of trapping, electrolyte, oxidised dyes and light intensity on steady state and transient device behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Piers R F; Anderson, Assaf Y; Durrant, James R; O'Regan, Brian C

    2011-04-07

    A numerical model of the dye sensitised solar cell (DSSC) is used to assess the importance of different loss pathways under various operational conditions. Based on our current understanding, the simulation describes the processes of injection, regeneration, recombination and transport of electrons, oxidised dye molecules and electrolyte within complete devices to give both time dependent and independent descriptions of performance. The results indicate that the flux of electrons lost from the nanocrystalline TiO(2) film is typically at least twice as large under conditions equivalent to 1 sun relative to dark conditions at matched TiO(2) charge concentration. This is in agreement with experimental observations (Barnes et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. [DOI: 10.1039/c0cp01855d]). The simulated difference in recombination flux is shown to be due to variation in the concentration profile of electron accepting species in the TiO(2) pores between light and dark conditions and to recombination to oxidised dyes in the light. The model is able to easily incorporate non-ideal behaviour of a cell such as the variation of open circuit potential with light intensity and non-first order recombination of conduction band electrons. The time dependent simulations, described by the multiple trapping model of electron transport and recombination, show good agreement with both small and large transient photocurrent and photovoltage measurements at open circuit, including photovoltage rise measurements. The simulation of photovoltage rise also suggests the possibility of assessing the interfacial resistance between the TiO(2) and substrate. When cells with a short diffusion length relative to film thickness were modelled, the simulated small perturbation photocurrent transients at short circuit (but not open circuit) yielded significantly higher effective diffusion coefficients than expected from the mean concentration of electrons and the electrolyte in the cell. This implies that

  14. A Uniform Analysis of the Lyα Forest at z=0-5. II. Measuring the Mean Intensity of the Extragalactic Ionizing Background Using the Proximity Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jennifer; Bechtold, Jill; Dobrzycki, Adam; Kulkarni, Varsha P.

    2000-09-01

    Moderate-resolution data for 40 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) at z~2 were combined with spectra of comparable resolution of 59 QSOs with redshifts greater than 1.7 found in the literature to form a large, homogeneous sample of moderate-resolution (~1 Å) QSO spectra. These spectra were presented and the statistics of the Lyα forest were discussed in Paper I. In this analysis, we demonstrate that a proximity effect is present in the data; i.e., there exists a significant (5.5 σ) deficit of lines at zabs~zem. Within 1.5 h-1 Mpc of the QSO emission redshift, the significance does depend on QSO luminosity, in accordance with the theory that this effect is caused by enhanced ionization of hydrogen in the vicinity of the QSO from UV photons from the QSO itself. The photoionization model of Bajtlik, Duncan, & Ostriker permits an estimate of the mean intensity of the extragalactic background radiation at the Lyman limit. We compare the results of this standard analysis with those obtained using a maximum likelihood technique. If the spectrum of the background is assumed to be identical to that of each individual QSO, and if this background is assumed to be constant over the redshift range 1.7measured and adding 400 km s-1 to the remaining QSO Lyα redshifts gives a lower value of J(ν0), 7.0+3.4-4.4×10-22 ergs s-1 cm-2 Hz-1 sr-1. This value is in reasonable agreement with the predictions of various models of the ionizing background based on the integrated quasar luminosity function. Allowing for the fact that individual QSOs have different spectral indices that may also be

  15. High intensity interval training in a real world setting: a randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lunt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. METHODS: Participants were allocated into one of three groups. The two interventions, aerobic interval training and maximal volitional interval training, were compared with an active control group undertaking walking based exercise. Supervised group sessions (36 per intervention were held outdoors. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using VO2max (maximal oxygen uptake, results expressed in ml/min/kg, before and after the 12 week interventions. RESULTS: On ITT (intention to treat analyses, baseline (N = 49 and exit (N = 39 [Formula: see text]O2 was 25.3±4.5 and 25.3±3.9, respectively. Participant allocation and baseline/exit VO2max by group was as follows: Aerobic interval training N =  16, 24.2±4.8/25.6±4.8; maximal volitional interval training N = 16, 25.0±2.8/25.2±3.4; walking N = 17, 26.5±5.3/25.2±3.6. The post intervention change in VO2max was +1.01 in the aerobic interval training, -0.06 in the maximal volitional interval training and -1.03 in the walking subgroups. The aerobic interval training subgroup increased VO2max compared to walking (p = 0.03. The actual (observed, rather than prescribed time spent exercising (minutes per week, ITT analysis was 74 for aerobic interval training, 45 for maximal volitional interval training and 116 for walking (p =  0.001. On descriptive analysis, the walking subgroup had the fewest adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to earlier studies, the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness in a

  16. CCN in the marine environment: Results from two intensive measurement campaigns - The Eastern North Atlantic (Mace Head) and The Southern Ocean (PEGASO cruise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Fossum, Kirsten; Ceburnis, Darius; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Simo, Rafel; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Marine aerosol occurring in cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) sizes suggest that it may contribute notably to the CCN population [1, 2], but further cloud droplet number concentration would strongly depend on the ambient (cloud) conditions, such as available water content, supersaturation and competition between the CCN of different composition [3]. Since the global importance of marine aerosol particles to the cloud formation was postulated several decades ago [4], it has progressed from the evaluation of the nss-sulphate and sea salt effects to an acknowledgement of the significant role of organic aerosol [5]. It was demonstrated that primary marine organics, despite its hydrophobic nature, can possess the high CCN activation efficiency, resulting in the efficient cloud formation [6]. Results from two intensive measurement campaigns in The Eastern North Atlantic (Mace Head) and The Southern Ocean (PEGASO cruise) is presented here with the main focus on ssCCN dependence on aerosol chemical composition and, especially, origin and sources of marine organic. We investigate the activation of sea spray composed of the sea salt and externally mixed with nss-sulphate as well as the sea spray highly enriched in organics, stressing the importance of the latter to the formation of the cloud droplets. We also explore the suitability of existing theories to explain the marine aerosol activation to CCN. Acknowledgments The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) project BACCHUS under grant agreement n° 603445; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) as part of the PEGASO (Ref.: CTM2012-37615) and BIO-NUC (Ref.: CGL2013-49020-R); HEA-PRTLI4;EC ACTRIS. [1] Meskhidze & Nenes (2006) Science 314, 1419-1423. [2] Sorooshian et al. (2009) Global Biogeochemical Cycles 23, GB4007. [3] O'Dowd et al. (1999) Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 125, 1295-1313. [4] Charlson

  17. Using an onboard kilovoltage imager to measure setup deviation in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechalakos, James G; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, Nancy Y; Hong, Linda X; Ling, C Clifton; Amols, Howard I

    2007-09-24

    The purpose of the present study was to use a kilovoltage imaging device to measure interfractional and intrafractional setup deviations in patients with head-and-neck or brain cancers receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment. Before and after IMRT treatment, approximately 3 times weekly, 7 patients were imaged using the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI: Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), a kilovoltage imaging device permanently mounted on the gantry of a Varian 21EX LINAC (Varian Medical Systems). Because of commissioning of the remote couch correction of the OBI during the study, online setup corrections were performed on 2 patients. For the other 5 patients, weekly corrections were made based on a sliding average of the measured data. From these data, we determined the interfractional setup deviation (defined as the shift from the original setup position suggested by the daily image), the residual error associated with the weekly correction protocol, and the intrafractional setup deviation, defined as the difference between the post-treatment and pretreatment images. We also used our own image registration software to determine interfractional and intrafractional rotational deviations from the images based on the template-matching method. In addition, we evaluated the influence of inter-observer variation on our results, and whether the use of various registration techniques introduced differences. Finally, translational data were compared with rotational data to search for correlations. Translational setup errors from all data were 0.0 +/- 0.2 cm, -0.1 +/- 0.3 cm, and -0.2 +/- 0.3 cm in the right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively. Residual error for the 5 patients with a weekly correction protocol was -0.1 +/- 0.2 cm (RL), 0.0 +/- 0.3 cm (AP), and 0.0 +/- 0.2 cm (SI). Intrafractional translation errors were small, amounting to 0.0 +/- 0.1 cm, -0.1 +/- 0.2 cm, and 0.0 +/- 0.1 cm in the RL

  18. Effects of infection control measures on acquisition of five antimicrobial drug-resistant microorganisms in a tetanus intensive care unit in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultsz, C.; Bootsma, M.C.J.; Loan, H.T.; Nga, T.T.; le Thao, T.P.; Thuy, T.T.; Campbell, J.; le Vien, M.; Hoa, N.T.; Hoang, N.V.; Wit, F.; Chau, N.V.; Farrar, J.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Yen, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the effects of barrier precautions and antibiotic mixing on prevalence and acquisition of five drug-resistant microorganisms within a single tetanus intensive care unit at a tertiary referral hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. METHODS: All patients admitted within the study

  19. Evaluation of Ionospheric Densities Using Coincident OII 83.4 nm Airglow and the Millstone Hill Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Ewan S; Stephan, Andrew W; Cashman, Lauren; Bishop, Rebecca L; Budzien, Scott A; Christensen, Andrew B; Hecht, James H; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2016-01-01

    We test the utility of the OII 83.4 nm emission feature as a measure of ionospheric parameters. Observed with the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph on the International Space Station (ISS), limb profiles of 83.4 nm emissions are compared to predicted dayglow emission profiles from a theoretical model incorporating ground-based electron density profiles measured by the Millstone Hill radar and parameterized by a best-fit Chapman-{\\alpha} function. Observations and models are compared for periods of conjunction between Millstone Hill and the RAIDS fields-of-view. These RAIDS observations show distinct differences in topside morphology between two days, 15 January and 10 March 2010, closely matching the forward model morphology and demonstrating that 83.4 nm emission is sensitive to changes in the ionospheric density profile from the 340 km altitude of the ISS during solar minimum. We find no significant difference between 83.4 nm emission profiles model...

  20. Measurement of Verdet constants with light intensity equipment%用光强分布测试仪测量费尔德常数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段江峰; 王晓坤; 刘竹琴

    2012-01-01

    利用激光,利用光强分布测试仪测量光强,采用数字检流计采集数据,并通过马吕斯定律计算出磁致旋光度,从而求出费尔德常数,并测量了水的费尔德常数.实验具有精度高、操作简单等优点.%This paper uses light intensity equipment to survey light intensity, the digital galvanometer to gather data, calculates the optical rotation through the Malus' law, and thus obtains specific rotation and concentration of the sucrose solution. It has the advantages of easy operation and precision and so on.

  1. Behavior of testosterone and cortisol during an intensity-controlled high-volume training period measured by a training task-specific test in men rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämson, Raul; Jürimäe, Jaak; Jürimäe, Toivo; Mäestu, Jarek

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the stress hormones testosterone and cortisol after a task-specific exercise during a high-volume endurance training cycle in men rowers. Eight highly trained men rowers were investigated during a high-volume, low-intensity training period. A 2-hour, low-intensity, long-distance rowing (LDT) test was conducted at baseline, after a high-volume period, and after the recovery period. Training and performance intensities were obtained at the graded incremental test, were preset individually, and were the same during all LDTs. Fasting blood samples were taken during the same days as the LDTs. Exercise-induced blood samples were taken before, 5 minutes after, and 30 minutes after (post 30') the completion of each LDT. There were no significant changes in fasting cortisol and testosterone values during the whole study period, and there were no significant changes in cortisol and testosterone concentrations during the LDT. However, testosterone concentration was significantly decreased at post 30' compared with posttest values during the second LDT that was held after the 2-week high-training-volume period, and, during the second LDT, post 30' values of cortisol tended to be decreased compared with posttest values (p = 0.063). In conclusion, changes in the concentrations of testosterone and cortisol after long-distance rowing indicate decreased adaptivity after the training-specific performance test.

  2. Characteristics of a miniature parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for measuring the intensity of synchrotron radiation from an undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2004-09-01

    In order to develop an absolute intensity monitor for synchrotron radiation from an undulator, the characteristics of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber with a plate separation of 4.2 mm, which was considered to be as narrow as possible, were investigated using 8-30 keV monoenergetic photons at SPring-8. Using a Si-PIN photodiode as the reference monitor, saturation was confirmed at 8-30 keV at a photon intensity of an order of 1013 photons/s. The collection efficiency became almost unity at 8 and 10 keV within 3.8% and 1.1%, respectively, which gradually decreased with increasing energy and attained 0.52 at 30 keV because some of the high-energy electrons escaped from the sensitive volume. When the pair of electrodes was transferred from the upper and lower sides to the left and right sides of the beam axis in order to investigate the influence of linear polarization of synchrotron radiation, a decrease in the collection efficiency was observed. Monte Carlo simulations considering linear polarization showed that the plate separation required for no electron loss was 26, 14, and 8 mm for 30, 20, and 15 keV photons, respectively. For 20 keV photons, saturation characteristics were investigated using an ionization chamber with 14 mm plate separation.

  3. Homogenizing and diversifying effects of intensive agricultural land-use on plant species beta diversity in Central Europe - A call to adapt our conservation measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhk, Constanze; Alt, Martin; Steinbauer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    independent processes that need to be addressed separately to halt biodiversity loss in agricultural land. There is a need to conserve semi-natural open habitat patches of diverse size to favor poor dispersers and specialist species. At the same time, we stress the importance of mediating biotic......The prevention of biodiversity loss in agricultural landscapes to protect ecosystem stability and functions is of major importance to stabilize overall diversity. Intense agriculture leads to a loss in species richness and homogenization of species pools, but the processes behind are poorly...... understood due to a lack of systematic case studies: The specific impacts by agriculture in contrast to other land-use creating open habitat are not studied as such landscapes hardly exist in temperate regions. Applying systematic grids, we compared the plant species distribution at the landscape scale...

  4. 强辐射条件下应变测量的抗干扰技术研究%Research on anti-interference technique in strain measurement under intense radiation conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张从和

    2001-01-01

    在强辐射强电磁脉冲干扰环境条件下,为保证应变测量的实现,经模拟试验研究,应变测量采用一系列抗干扰技术措施,包括所用元器件材料的选择,传感应变计安装方式,组桥接线方式,密封屏蔽等技术。还介绍了这些技术措施在某试验现场应变测试试验中的应用概况。%This paper emphatically describes a series of anti-interference technical measures adopted in the strain measurement under the environment conditions of intense radiation and intense electromagnetic pulse interference,including techniques in the selection of the components and materials,the installation pattern of the sensing strain gauges,bridge combination and wire connection pattern,sealing and shielding etc.In order to realize the strain measurement under such an environment,a number of simulated tests and researches have been made.The paper also gives a brief description of the application of aforesaid technical measures in the strain measurement test on a test site.

  5. Measurements of photon and neutron leakage from medical linear accelerators and Monte Carlo simulation of tenth value layers of concrete used for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Adnan Khalaf

    The x ray leakage from the housing of a therapy x ray source is regulated to be bubble detector of type BD-PND and using Track-Etch detectors. The highest neutron dose equivalent per unit electron dose was at 0° for all electron energies. The neutron leakage from photon beams was the highest between all the machines. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery consists of a summation of small beamlets having different weights that make up each field. A linear accelerator room designed exclusively for IMRT use would require different, probably lower, tenth value layers (TVL) for determining the required wall thicknesses for the primary barriers. The first, second, and third TVL of 60Co gamma rays and photons from 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x ray beams by concrete have been determined and modeled using a Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for cone beams of half-opening angles of 0°, 3°, 6°, 9°, 12°, and 14°.

  6. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on 18F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Araujo Valadares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on 18FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and Methods: A total of 254 18F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH, right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF, and first lumbar vertebra (LV1 in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1. Results: Mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: The three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation.

  7. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Woellner, Eduardo Bechtloff; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: agnesvaladares@me.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Coura-Filho, George Barberio [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo Octavio Frias de Oliveira (ICESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on {sup 18}FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and methods: a total of 254 {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Results: mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: the three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation. (author)

  8. Analysis of Limiting Measures of Three-phase Short-circuit Current of 500kV Intensive Receiving-end Power Grid in the Early Stage of UHV Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiao Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper took the intensive receiving-end power grid as the research object and analysed the problems of three-phase short-circuit current over-limited of 500kV intensive power grid in the early stage of UHV construction. Firstly, this paper analysed the influence factors of the short-circuit current based on self-impedance analysis model of two-port network theory and the equivalent model of UHV power grid. Then, the applicable current-limiting measures were put forward. Finally, this paper proposed one scheme to solve the problems of three-phase short-circuit current over-limited of 500kV buses in one practical receiving-end power grid and verified the feasibility of this scheme from three different aspects. Aiming at the over-limited influential factors, the applicable current-limiting measures can be taken as follows: separating the 500kV bus at UHV substation, lapping the lines outside the substation and decentralizing the power supplies. The proposed measures can effectively solve the problems of short-circuit current over-limited in the early stage of UHV construction and provide reference for other power grid.

  9. Results from an intensive measurement programme for suspended particulate matter in a region of the Irish Sea between Anglesey and the Isle of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher N.; Stewart, T. Henry; McDonald, Paul

    2003-06-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) plays an important role in the transport of metals and other contaminants in the marine environment. To varying degrees dissolved metals are scavenged by suspended particles and this can have a significant impact on the transport and dispersion of the metal. In contaminated areas, such as the Irish Sea, the SPM becomes increasingly important in understanding the transport and fate of contaminants. Despite its importance, measurements of SPM in the Irish Sea are sparse. This paper presents measured SPM concentrations from a long-term sampling campaign from 25 sites in an area of the Irish Sea between Anglesey and the Isle of Man which were sampled over 14 months (July 1998-August 1999) at 5 and 30 m depth. In total 585 measurements were made. A transmissometer was also deployed on some occasions to look at the depth dependence of SPM. Results showed an average SPM concentration of 2.14 mg l -1 with a maximum value of 6.28 mg l -1 and a minimum of 0.30 mg l -1. The strongest relationship found was between the SPM and the spring-neap tidal cycle, which outweighed any seasonal variation. Spatially, the SPM was highest in the south and east of the region sampled and is probably due to higher tidal velocities and greater availability of fine sediment in these areas. There was no evidence of SPM varying with depth in the water column.

  10. Recovery of 150-250 MeV Cosmic Ray Proton Intensities Between 2004-2010 as Measured Near the Earth, at Voyager 2 and also in the Heliosheath at Voyager 1 - A Two Zone Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R; Higbie, P R; Heikkila, B

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of cosmic ray protons of energy ~150-250 MeV/nuc in solar cycle #23 from 2004 to 2010 has been followed at the Earth using IMP, ACE and balloon data and also at V2 between 74-92 AU and at V1 beyond the heliospheric termination shock (91-113 AU). The correlation coefficient between the intensities the Earth and V1 during this time period, is 0.936, allowing for a ~0.9 year delay due to the solar wind propagation time from the Earth to the outer heliosphere. To describe these intensity changes and to predict the absolute intensities measured at all three locations we have used a simple spherically symmetric (no drift) two-zone heliospheric transport model with specific values for the diffusion coefficient in both the inner and outer zones. The diffusion coefficient in the outer zone, from about 90 to 120 (130) AU, is determined to be ~5-10 times smaller than that in the inner zone out to 90 AU. This means that the outer zone acts much like a diffusing barrier in this model. The absolute magnitude o...

  11. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  12. Exposure to light and darkness and its influence on physiological measures of intensive care unit patients-a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B; Spies, C; Piazena, H; Penzel, T; Fietze, I; Luetz, A

    2016-09-01

    Sleep-wake patterns are often significantly disturbed in critically ill patients. This disturbance is closely linked to secondary brain dysfunctions in these patients. Sedation not only impairs sleep quality in ICU patients but also has detrimental effects on short- and long-term outcome. In other contexts, light therapy has been proven to be effective in maintaining and resynchronizing circadian rhythmicity in humans. The objective of this systematic review was to analyse studies that investigated the effect of exposure to light or darkness on physiological measures and clinical outcomes of adult ICU patients. Studies were systematically identified by searching electronic bibliographic databases (The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2002) and MEDLINE via PubMed). The search algorithm identified a total of 156 articles, 10 of which were taken into final review. These 10 selected articles included 3 were monocentric RCTs, five prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, and one manuscript that included a partial systematic review of the literature. Included trials were published between 2007 and 2015. Five of these studies used multiple intervention approaches while four trials used a single intervention approach. Among all studies, 1,278 patients were analysed (489 prospectively). There was a high heterogeneity among the studies in terms of applied intervention and outcome measures. The most frequent methodological limitations were a lack of precise definitions regarding the illuminance and the light spectrum utilised. The analyses indicate that further studies including clearly defined interventions with objective outcome measures, as these are currently lacking, would add significant knowledge to this new field of research.

  13. A technique for inferring zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of intensity (S4) and phase (σφ) scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Rino, Charles L.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    2016-08-01

    The zonal drift of ionospheric irregularities at low latitudes is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of a scintillating satellite signal made with a pair of closely spaced antennas. The Air Force Research Laboratory-Scintillation Network Decision Aid (AFRL-SCINDA) network operates a small number of very high frequency (VHF) spaced-receiver systems at low latitudes for this purpose. A far greater number of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) scintillation monitors are operated by the AFRL-SCINDA network (25-30) and the Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are too widely separated from each other for cross-correlation techniques to be effective. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of S4, σφ, and the propagation geometry. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this approach requires assumptions regarding the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment suggest that the ratio of σφ to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift. We validate the technique using VHF spaced-receiver measurements of zonal irregularity drift obtained from the AFRL-SCINDA network. While the spaced-receiver technique remains the preferred way to monitor the drift when closely spaced antenna pairs are available, our technique provides a new opportunity to monitor zonal irregularity drift using regional or global networks of widely separated GNSS scintillation monitors.

  14. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, R; Imai, T; Kariya, T; Numakura, T; Eguchi, T; Kawarasaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Kato, T; Sato, F; Nanzai, H; Uehara, M; Endo, Y; Ichimura, M

    2014-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  15. Comparison of the reliability of subjective evaluation and quantitative measurements of MR signal intensity in inflammations of the intratemporal facial nerve; Vergleich der Reliabilitaet von subjektiver Beurteilung und quantitativer Messung der MR-Signalintensitaet bei Entzuendungen des intratemporalen N. facialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abt. Neuroradiologie (Germany); Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Griesbeck, F. [Abt. Neurologie/Psychiatrie, Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany); Stippich, C.; Sartor, K. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Baehren, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abt. Neuroradiologie (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare in a single-blind study the reliability of quantitative measurements and subjective evaluations of contrast enhancement of the facial nerve in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis. Materials and Methods: Magnetic resonance images with a 0.7 mm slice thickness (surface coil) were obtained in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis before and after administration of Gd-DTPA, 0.1 mmol/kg. The five intratemporal segments of the facial nerve were quantitatively measured and subjectively assessed by five radiologists as to the degree of enhancement. The results were compared as to the reliability of both methods. Results: Using the quantitative measuring method, 175 measurements were calculated from a total of 350 regions of interest. At all 35 measured sites, the five quantitative measurements produced identical results. In contrast, the subjective assessment of the five radiologists arrived at a majority consensus in only 16 sites. A complete agreement was not reached for any measured site. Conclusion: The measured quantitative increase in signal intensity after administration of contrast medium is more reliable than subjective assessment. The quantitative method enables reproducible signal intensity measurements even for different window settings and can be easily and swiftly performed at the workstation. (orig.) [German] Untersuchungsziel: In einer einfach geblindeten Untersuchung sollte geprueft werden, wie hoch die Reliabilitaet der quantitativen Messung des Kontrastmittelanstieges im N. facialis bei idiopathischer Fazialisparese im Vergleich zur subjektiven Einschaetzung ist. Methodik: Bei 7 Patienten mit idiopathischer Fazialisparese wurde eine MRT in Duennschichttechnik (0,7 mm, nativ und nach Gabe von 0,1 mmol GdDTPA/kg) unter Verwendung einer Oberflaechenspule durchgefuehrt. 5 intratemporale Abschnitte des N. facialis wurden sowohl quantitativ als auch subjektiv durch 5 Radiologen beurteilt, und die Methoden wurden im Hinblick auf

  16. 极量强度运动NIRS组织氧检测最佳耦合参数的仿真研究%Simulation of optimal coupling parameter for NIRS tissue oxygenation measurement in extreme intensity sports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王培勇; 王攀

    2012-01-01

    Objective Based on the introduction of the theory of relative tissue oxygenation measurement using near-infrared spectroscopy(NIRS),we built a three-layered optical model composed of skin,fat and muscle,which was applicative to simulate the photon migration in extreme intensity sports.Methods Taking the advantage of MATLAB powerful functionality in data analysis and graphical display,we developed an application of Monte Carlo simulation using C#programming language and MATLAB engine technology.Results We investigated the optimal light source-detector separation of NIRS relative tissue oxygenation measurement in extreme intensity sports and provided an empirical formula with the developed application.Conclusions This simulation research was of certain application value in extrenle intensity sports.%目的 在介绍近红外光谱法(near-infrared spectroscopy,NIRS)检测组织氧相对量原理的基础上,建立极量强度运动中用以仿真光子迁移的人体股四头肌三层光学模型(皮肤、脂肪和肌肉).方法 利用MATLAB强大的数据分析和图形显示功能,在C#中结合MATLAB引擎技术,开发Monte Carlo仿真应用程序.结果 利用该应用程序,研究了极量强度运动领域近红外组织氧检测法中光源探测器最优间距的确定问题,给出光源探测器最优间距选取的经验公式.结论 该仿真研究在极量强度运动领域具有一定应用价值.

  17. 润滑薄膜测量的双色光干涉强度调制技术%Dichromatic Interference Intensity Modulation Approach for Thin Lubricating Film Thickness Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国垒; 郭峰; 刘海超; 洪政豪

    2014-01-01

    光干涉技术是润滑薄膜厚度测量最有效的方法之一。双色光干涉法在保证较大膜厚测量范围及高测量分辨力的同时,避免了繁琐的干涉级次人工计数。传统的双色光干涉测量依赖于严格的静态标定和观测者。本文提出使用双色光干涉强度调制技术对微纳米润滑薄膜进行测量。通过干涉图像中红、绿分量强度值的线性叠加得到调制信号,根据信号特性分析得到特征位置膜厚,进而由干涉强度得到任一点膜厚。为验证所提出测量方法的正确,对静态球-盘赫兹接触表面间隙进行了测量,与经典理论有很好的一致性。结果表明:选用合适的红绿双色光波长,测量量程可达2μm。%Optical interferometry is an effective way for lubricating film thickness measurement. The dichromatic interferometry can avoid artificial fringe order counting, while operates with a fair resolution and a large film thickness measurement range. However, the traditional dichromatic interferometry depends on strict calibration processes and the observer. In this paper, a dichromatic interference intensity modulation approach is proposed for micro/nano lubricating film thickness measurement, whereby linear superposition of the intensities of the red and the green components is carried out and a modulated signal is obtained to infer the film thickness at its local maximum/minimum. Thereafter the film thickness of other points can be obtained by the interference intensity of the red or green light. To validate this approach, contact gap between a steel ball and a glass disc was measured, and the results were well correlated with the theoretical calculation. A measurement range of 2μm can be achieved by an optimum selection of the wavelengths of the red and green lights.

  18. 固体激光远场瞬时光斑时空分布测量技术%Measuring far-field instantaneous facula intensity space-time distribution of solid-state laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳娜; 唐力铁; 谢翔云; 尹飞; 于志闯; 沈丽娟

    2016-01-01

    A simple system of measuring solid-state laser instantaneous facula intensity space-time distribution was established, based on the principle of CCD diffused transmission imaging. Experiments of verifying the feasibility of this system were carried out, and the pulse laser spot images were obtained with precision, and the laser intensity space-time distribution parameters such as beam radius, facula dithering, beam quality, light distributions and average power were obtained through CCD measuring data which were processed by Matlab soft ware. At last, the experiment result show that the method of CCD diffused transmission imaging for measuring laser instantaneous distribution is feasible, and the system acquisition frequency could reach 120 Hz. This system had advantage of high resolution, high frame frequency, low-cost and easy to use, which could realize the synchronous measurement between large laser spot intensity distribution and power, with less than 2 percent power measured error.%基于漫透射CCD成像法原理,建立了固体激光瞬时光斑时空分布测量系统。开展了该测量方法的可行性验证实验,能够精确地获得激光远场光斑图像,并运用Matlab软件对测量数据进行处理,得到激光远场光斑半径、光束质量、质心位置、光轴抖动、光强分布以及平均功率密度等参数。实验结果表明:利用漫透射CCD成像法测量固体激光远场瞬时光斑时空分布是可行的,测试系统采集频率可达120 Hz。该方法具有高分辨率、高帧频、低成本、使用方便的突出优点,能同时实现激光强度分布和功率的测量,测量功率误差小于2%。

  19. 低强度脉冲中子束的数字式n/γ分辨测量%Digital n/γ discrimination measurement of low intensity pulsed neutron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田耕; 欧阳晓平; 渠红光; 张显鹏; 刘金良; 李海涛

    2015-01-01

    Background: The traditional measurement methods in which the detectors are working in counting mode or current mode all have limitations in the measurement of low intensity pulsed neutron.Purpose: We aim to establish a method for low intensity pulsed neutron measurement to acquire the spectra of energy and time by digitalizing and analyzing the fast current pulse generated by detector as each single neutron induced.Methods: A digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system for low intensity pulsed neutron measurement has been developed, which employs wideband digital oscilloscope as data acquisition device. With BC501A liquid scintillator detector, the system can acquire and store the waveforms of neutrons andγ-rays, and discriminate neutrons from all waveforms by DPSD algorithms. The system has two operation modes as “continuous acquisition” and “acquisition window with time stamp” for different event rates according to the intensity of pulsed neutron.Results: The function of pulse height analysis of neutrons is achieved, and time information of neutron’s arriving can be acquired by the analysis of the position of the waveform in the record or the time stamps. Experiment has been carried out with Am-Be neutron source with the operation mode of acquisition window, and the neutron pulse height spectrum, time spectrum and n/γ discrimination spectrum have been acquired.Conclusion: The spectra of energy and time of low intensity pulsed neutron can be measured by the digital method which employees wideband digital oscilloscope and digital signal processing algorithms, and has the advantage that all original waveforms of neutrons andγ-rays can be stored for further analysis.%针对低强度脉冲中子束测量,使用高速数字示波器作为数据采集设备,配合BC501A液体闪烁体探测器组建了数字式脉冲形状甄别(Digital Pulse Shape Discrimination, DPSD)测量系统,实现了中子的n/γ分辨测量。系统工作时采集并存

  20. 基于声压—质点速度声强探头的材料吸声系数的测量%Measurements of the absorption coefficients with a combined particle velocity-pressure sound intensity probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凌志; 程攻; 刘英杰; 卢炳武

    2012-01-01

    通过由一个声压换能器和一个质点速度换能器所构成的传感器(p-u声强探头)同时测量材料表面附近的声压和质点振动速度,可直接得到其声学阻抗,进而得到材料的反射因子、吸声系数.本文利用一个p-u探头声强测量系统,在半消声室内测量了三聚氰胺泡沫的吸声系数,分析了声源高度和入射角度、材料样本尺寸和厚度对吸声系数测量的影响,并和阻抗管中测量得到的法向吸声系数进行了对比.最后分析了声阻抗率的幅值和相位误差对吸声系数的影响,推导了它们的误差传递公式.%Using a combined particle velocity-pressure sensor (p-u sound intensity probe), the acoustic impedance of an absorbing materials, and consequently its reflection factor and absorption coefficient, can be determined by simultaneous measurements of sound pressure and particle velocity at a position near the surface of the materials. Using a p-u intensity probe system in a semi-anechoic room, we measured the acoustic impedance of melamine, and analyzed how the source height, incidence angle, the size and thickness of the materials sample affect the measurement, and compared to the normal impedance measured using a standing wave tube. We also analyzed how the amplitude and phase error of the acoustic impedance affect the absorption coefficient, and derived an error propagation formula.

  1. Iowa Intensive Archaeological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file contains intensive level archaeological survey areas for the state of Iowa. All intensive Phase I surveys that are submitted to the State Historic...

  2. Rainfed intensive crop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jørgen E

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the importance of intensive cropping systems in contributing to the world supply of food and feed. The impact of climate change on intensive crop production systems is also discussed....

  3. FT-IR measurements of NH3 in the 1.5 μm region: line positions, intensities and their quantum assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Huang, X.; Schwenke, D. W.; Lee, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    As part of an effort to provide a complete set of spectroscopic line parameters of NH3 in the 1.5 μm region, we have analyzed the laboratory spectra recorded at various temperatures (200 - 299 K) with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) on Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona. The integrated sum of observed line strengths is measured to be 4.7×10-19 cm/molecule in the 6300 - 7000 cm-1 region. In this poster, we present line positions and strengths for the lines from four strong bands (2v1, 2v3, v1+v3, v1+2v4 and v3+2v4), which contribute more than 65% of opacity in the region. Lower state energies and quantum assignments determined by constructing combination differences are also presented. A theoretical IR linelist (X. Huang, D. W. Schwenke, and T. J. Lee. J. Chem. Phys., 134, 044320/044321, 2011) built upon the recent HSL-2 potential energy surface (nonadiabatic corrections included) is complementarily used for the quantum assignments. This work will support spectroscopic studies of atmospheres of outer planets, low mass brown dwarfs, and possibly extrasolar planets, in the 1.5 μm region (the H-band), where ammonia is one of significant opacity sources. (Research described in this talk was performed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was supported by the Planetary Atmospheric Research Program under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The AMES group acknowledges support from the NASA APRA & Herschel GO Program, and X.H. acknowledges the support by NASA/SETI Institute Co-operative Agreement.)

  4. Ruído em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva neonatal: mensuração e percepção de profissionais e pais Noise in a neonatal Intensive Care Unit: measurement and perception of professionals and parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Soares Aurélio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Conhecer a percepção dos profissionais atuantes em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal e dos pais dos recém-nascidos internados sobre o ruído existente, além de compará-la aos níveis de ruído mensurados. MÉTODOS: Por meio de questionário, investigou-se a percepção dos profissionais que atuam na unidade, bem como a dos pais dos recém-nascidos internados, quanto ao ruído existente no ambiente. Os níveis sonoros das três salas e do corredor da unidade foram registrados 24 horas/dia, por nove dias em cada local, com dosímetro Quest 400, e analisados pelo software QuestSuíteMR. Para comparar os níveis de ruído nos diferentes locais, aplicaram-se os testes de Kruskal-Wallis e Mann-Whitney, sendo significante pOBJECTIVE: To study the perception about environmental noise of professionals and parents of neonates assisted in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU, and to compare the findings with the measured noise levels. METHODS: The perception of parents and professionals that work in the NICU in relation to the presence of noise was evaluated by a questionnaire. Sound levels in three rooms and in the corridor of that environment were registered 24 hours/day during 9 days by the Quest Q-400 Noise Dosimeter and analyzed by QuestSuíteMR software. Kruskal-Wallis e Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare the noise levels in different places, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The average noise levels in the intensive, intermediary care, isolation rooms and in the corridor of the unit were 64.8, 62.1, 63.8 and 61.9dBA, respectively (p<0.001. Health professionals qualified the noise as present and intense, but parents evaluated the noise as moderate. Health professionals judged their own behaviors as noisy, and parents believe that they do not contribute to the existent noise at the place. Health professionals believed that newborns and professionals who work in the NICU may be injured by the noise, but this was not true for

  5. High intensity protons in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  6. Real-time monitoring of longitudinal electron bunch parameters by intensity-integrated and spectroscopic measurements of single coherent THz pulses; Echtzeitbestimmung longitudinaler Elektronenstrahlparameter mittels absoluter Intensitaets- und Spektralmessung einzelner kohaerenter THz Strahlungspulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesch, Stephan

    2012-12-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) generate intense and monochromatic photon pulses with few tens of femtosecond duration. For this purpose, electron beams are accelerated to relativistic energies and shrunk longitudinally down to micrometer size.The diagnosis of theses compressed electron bunches is a challenge especially for MHz bunch repetition rates as provided by the FEL FLASH in Hamburg. In this thesis, coherently emitted THz radiation of single electron bunches were investigated, on which the longitudinal structure is imprinted. Two instruments were used: First, the FLASH bunch compression monitors, relying on the integrated intensity measurement of diffraction radiation, were modified to determine the overall length of every bunch behind the two bunch compressors (BC). A model was developed showing that their response is independent of the exact bunch shape for lengths below 200 {mu}m (rms). This could experimentally be verified in the range between 50 and 190 {mu}m within 7% accuracy for themonitor behind the last BC by comparison with measurements with the transverse deflecting structure (TDS). Second, a single-shot spectrometer with five staged reflective blazed gratings has been designed, build and commissioned. With its two grating sets, the wavelength ranges from 5.5 to 44 {mu}m and 45 to 440 {mu}m can be simultaneously detected by 118 fast pyroelectric elements. Measurements based on transition radiation spectra were compared with profiles recorded by the TDS.The shape of the spectra as well as the reconstructed temporal profiles (using the Kramers-Kronig relation for phase retrieval) are in excellent agreement. For bunches with a charge of 50 pC, bunch lengths down to 5 {mu}m (fhwm) could be detected.

  7. Sound intensity radiated by Gaohu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gaohu is one of the main bowed stringed instruments used in Guangdong music and Chinese native Orchestra. However its sound intensity has never been carefully measured. In this paper the sound power measurements of Gaohu were performed in a reverberation chamber according to the Chinese national standard. Two qualified musicians performed on their own instruments. The mean sound power levels and the dynamic ranges of Gaohu were investigated by four channel acoustic measuring equipments when single notes, music scale and melodies were performed under pp, mp, f and ff dynamics. Great differences were found when Gaohu performed single notes, while the sound power levels were quite close when music scale were performed under f dynamic to those when melodies were performed under normal dynamic mark, the sound power levels of Gaohu when music scale was performed under f dynamics were suggested as the typical and representative value of the sound intensities of Gaohu instrument.

  8. Fast Beam Intensity Measurements for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Belohrad, D

    Particle accelerators are constructed and operated for a wide variety of applications. In particle physics - the branch of physics that studies the elementary constituents of matter and forces between them - high energy accelerators are used to look deep into the structure of matter. Medical particle accelerators are used for example in medicine to treat tumours [31], in imaging techniques such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) [24], or for the radio-isotopes production. They also serve in many other industrial branches, e.g. geology, radiocarbon dating [39], molecular complex spectroscopy, lithography, food preservation etc. The eld of accelerator technology draws knowledge and expertise from a wide range of scientic disciplines and uses the latest technical knowledge. The incomplete list of covered disciplines includes mathematics, physics, electronics, computing, electromagnetic eld technology, microwave technology, cryogenics, vacuum technology, special materials, mechanical engineering or civil engin...

  9. Measuring Coding Intensity in Medicare Advantage - SUPP.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In 2004, Medicare implemented a risk-adjustment system that pays Medicare Advantage (MA) plans based on diagnoses reported for their enrollees, giving the plans an...

  10. A multi-intensity measurement phase recovery method based on spatial light modulator%基于空间光调制器的多强度测量相位恢复方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁彬彬; 王辉; 邓丽军

    2011-01-01

    提出了一种基于相位型空间光调制器(SLM)的相位恢复方法。利用相位型SLM快速准确的相位调制特性,对待测物体的物光波前进行相位调制。每次相位调制后,在物光波的频谱面记录下强度分布。运用GS迭代算法,通过频谱面光强信息反演出相位信息,并且提出了内-外层迭代的思想,进一步提高了相位恢复精度。对一维相位光栅进行了相位恢复试验,实验证实了本方法的正确性。%Liquid crystal phase-only spatial light modulator (Phase-only LCSLM) can modulate the phase of light wave fast and accurately. Utilizing this characteristic, an effective phase retrieval method is put forward. By changing input parameters of phase-only LCSLM, the phase of the incident light wave in front of the measured object can be adjusted easily. The spatial frequency spectrum intensity distribution of the object light wave is recorded after each phase modulation. For increasing the accuracy of measurement, an idea of inner and outer GS iterative algorithm is also presented to inverse the phase information from the intensity data. The experiment for the phase of one-dimensional phase grating being retrieved proves the validity of this method.

  11. 彩色CCD比色测温的灰度值融合处理方法研究%An Intensity Fusion Method Applied To Color CCD-based Colorimetric Temperature Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李进军

    2012-01-01

    设计了基于两个彩色CCD通道的比色测温系统,提出了用于比色测温时彩色CCD的R、G、B亮度(灰度)值融合处理方法,解决了在不同快门下利用两个通道的灰度值进行比色测温计算的问题;黑体炉实验结果表明,与常用的基于面阵CCD的简化比色测温方法相比较,基于两个彩色CCD通道的比色测温方法系统虽稍显复杂,但由于采用了经融合处理后的亮度值进行比色测量计算使得测温精度较高.%This paper designs a colorimetric temperature measurement method based on two color CCD. And presents an effective method applied to Colorimetric Temperature Measurement, which uses the intensity of the tuo CCD Camera images under different shutter. The experiment demonstrates that compared with the traditional methods, the simplified Dichromatic method , the proposed method obtained higher accuracy in the Temprature Measurement.

  12. Stochastic conditional intensity processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauwens, Luc; Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the so-called stochastic conditional intensity (SCI) model by extending Russell’s (1999) autoregressive conditional intensity (ACI) model by a latent common dynamic factor that jointly drives the individual intensity components. We show by simulations that the proposed...... model allows for a wide range of (cross-)autocorrelation structures in multivariate point processes. The model is estimated by simulated maximum likelihood (SML) using the efficient importance sampling (EIS) technique. By modeling price intensities based on NYSE trading, we provide significant evidence...

  13. Measuring $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  14. Pediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintire, D K

    1999-07-01

    To provide optimal care, a veterinarian in a pediatric intensive care situation for a puppy or kitten should be familiar with normal and abnormal vital signs, nursing care and monitoring considerations, and probable diseases. This article is a brief discussion of the pediatric intensive care commonly required to treat puppies or kittens in emergency situations and for canine parvovirus type 2 enteritis.

  15. 不同环境温度和活动强度下人体出汗率测定%The Measurement of Sweat Rate under Different Ambient Temperature and Activity Intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏洋; 王革辉

    2011-01-01

    A new method which was called clothing weight gain was put forward for measuring the amount of sweat produced by human body. With this method the amount of sweat produced by human body was measured after 8 subjects ran on a treadmill for 15 min at speeds of 2,4,6mi/b (54, 107, 161 m/rain) and in the ambient temperature of 20, 25, 28℃ respectively. By carrying out paired-samples t test, the measurement results of sweat rate were analyzed. It was found that both ambient temperature and activity intensity had significant effects on sweat rate per unit area. When the ambient temperature was 20, 25, 28 ℃ and activity intensity was 2, 4, 6mi/h respectively, the sweat rate per unit area was in the range of 1.605-681.100 g/(h· m^2) .%提出了一种测定人体出汗量的方法一衣物增重法,并利用该法分别测定20、25、28℃环境温度下.8名受试者在跑步机上分别以2、4、6mi/h(54、107、161m/min)的速度跑步15min后的出汗量。运用配对样本t检验,并对出汗率测定结果进行分析后发现,环境温度和活动强度对人体单位面积出汗率均有显著影响。环境温度分别为20、25、28℃以及活动强度分别为2、4、6mi/h时,人体单位面积出汗率的范围为1.605-681.100g/(h·m^2)。

  16. Quantum Cascade Laser Measurements of Line Intensities, N2-, O2- and Ar- Collisional Broadening Coefficients of N2O in the  3 Band Near 4.5  m

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, E.-t.

    2016-04-19

    This study deals with precise measurements of absolute line intensities, N2-, O2- and Ar- collisional broadening coefficients of N2O in the P-branch of the ν3 vibrational band near 4.5 μm. Collisional broadening coefficients of N2O-air are derived from the N2- and O2- broadening contributions by considering an ideal atmospheric composition. Studies are performed at room temperature for 10 rotational transitions over 2190-2202 cm-1 spectral range using a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. To retrieve spectroscopic parameters for each individual transition, measured absorption line shape is simulated within Voigt and Galatry profiles. The obtained results compare well with previous experimental data available in the literature: the discrepancies being less than 4% for most of the probed transitions. The spectroscopic data reported here are very useful for the design of sensors used to monitor the abundance of N2O in earth\\'s atmosphere. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Cross-field gradients: general concept, importance of multi-spacecraft measurements and study at 1 AU of the source intensity gradient for E > 30 keV solar event electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Chaizy

    Full Text Available Three main physical processes (and associated properties are currently used to describe the flux and anisotropy time profiles of solar energetic par- ticle events, called SEP profiles. They are (1 the particle scattering (due to magnetic waves, (2 the particle focusing (due to the decrease of the amplitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF with the radial distance to the Sun and (3 the finite injection profile at the source. If their features change from one field line to another, i.e. if there is a cross IMF gradient (CFG, then the shape of the SEP profiles will depend, at onset time, on the relative position of the spacecraft to the IMF and might vary significantly on small distance scale (e.g. 106 km. One type of CFG is studied here. It is called intensity CFG and considers variations, at the solar surface, only of the intensity of the event. It is shown here that drops of about two orders of magnitude over distances of ~104 km at the Sun (1° of angular distance can influence dramatically the SEP profiles at 1 AU. This CFG can lead to either an under or overestimation of both the parallel mean free path and of the injection parameters by factor up to, at least, ~2-3 and 18, respectively. Multi-spacecraft analysis can be used to identify CFG. Three basic requirements are proposed to identify, from the observation, the type of the CFG being measured.

    Key words: Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections - Space plasma physics (transport processes

  18. [Intensive medicine in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Intensive care medicine is a medical specialty that was officially established in our country in 1978, with a 5-year training program including two years of common core training followed by three years of specific training in an intensive care unit accredited for training. During this 32-year period, intensive care medicine has carried out an intense and varied activity, which has allowed its positioning as an attractive and with future specialty in the hospital setting. This document summarizes the history of the specialty, its current situation, the key role played in the programs of organ donation and transplantation of the National Transplant Organization (after more than 20 years of mutual collaboration), its training activities with the development of the National Plan of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, with a trajectory of more than 25 years, its interest in providing care based on quality and safety programs for the severely ill patient. It also describes the development of reference registries due to the need for reliable data on the care process for the most prevalent diseases, such as ischemic heart disease or ICU-acquired infections, based on long-term experience (more than 15 years), which results in the availability of epidemiological information and characteristics of care that may affect the practical patient's care. Moreover, features of its scientific society (SEMICYUC) are reported, an organization that agglutinates the interests of more than 280 ICUs and more than 2700 intensivists, with reference to the journal Medicina Intensiva, the official journal of the society and the Panamerican and Iberian Federation of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care Societies. Medicina Intensiva is indexed in the Thompson Reuters products of Science Citation Index Expanded (Scisearch(®)) and Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition. The important contribution of the Spanish intensive care medicine to the scientific community is also analyzed, and in relation to

  19. Measurement of two-dimensional Doppler wind fields using a field widened Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery A; Ward, William E; Scott, Alan; Arsenault, Dennis L

    2013-03-10

    An implementation of the field widened Michelson concept has been applied to obtain high resolution two-dimensional (2D) images of low velocity (<50 m/s) Doppler wind fields in the lab. Procedures and techniques have been developed that allow Doppler wind and irradiance measurements to be determined on a bin by bin basis with an accuracy of less than 2.5 m/s from CCD images over the observed field of view. The interferometer scanning mirror position is controlled to subangstrom precision with subnanometer repeatability using the multi-application low-voltage piezoelectric instrument control electronics developed by COM DEV Ltd.; it is the first implementation of this system as a phase stepping Michelson. In this paper the calibration and characterization of the Doppler imaging system is described and the planned implementation of this new technique for imaging 2D wind and irradiance fields using the earth's airglow is introduced. Observations of Doppler winds produced by a rotating wheel are reported and shown to be of sufficient precision for buoyancy wave observations in airglow in the mesopause region of the terrestrial atmosphere.

  20. Neutron intensity of fast reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    Neutron intensity of spent fuel of the JOYO Mk-II core with a burnup of 62,500 MWd/t and cooling time of 5.2 years was measured at the spent fuel storage pond. The measured data were compared with the calculated values based on the JOYO core management code system `MAGI`, and the average C/E approximately 1.2 was obtained. It was found that the axial neutron intensity didn`t simply follow the burnup distribution, and the neutron intensity was locally increased at the bottom end of the fuel region due to an accumulation of {sup 244}Cm. (author)

  1. Data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Critchlow, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Data-intensive science has the potential to transform scientific research and quickly translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, and economic success. But this collaborative science is still lacking the effective access and exchange of knowledge among scientists, researchers, and policy makers across a range of disciplines. Bringing together leaders from multiple scientific disciplines, Data-Intensive Science shows how a comprehensive integration of various techniques and technological advances can effectively harness the vast amount of data being generated and significan

  2. Towards higher intensities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 weeks, commissioning of the machine protection system has advanced significantly, opening up the possibility of higher intensity collisions at 3.5 TeV. The intensity has been increased from 2 bunches of 1010 protons to 6 bunches of 2x1010 protons. Luminosities of 6x1028 cm-2s-1 have been achieved at the start of fills, a factor of 60 higher than those provided for the first collisions on 30 March.   The recent increase in LHC luminosity as recorded by the experiments. (Graph courtesy of the experiments and M. Ferro-Luzzi) To increase the luminosity further, the commissioning crews are now trying to push up the intensity of the individual proton bunches. After the successful injection of nominal intensity bunches containing 1.1x1011 protons, collisions were subsequently achieved at 450 GeV with these intensities. However, half-way through the first ramping of these nominal intensity bunches to 3.5 TeV on 15 May, a beam instability was observed, leading to partial beam loss...

  3. On the role of secondary extinction in the measurement of the integrated intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks and in the determination of the thickness of damaged epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyutt, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    The integrated intensity of X-ray diffraction reflections has been measured for a series of epitaxial layers of AIII nitrides (GaN, AlN, AlGaN) grown on different substrates (sapphire, SiC) and characterized by different degrees of structural perfection. It has been shown that, despite a high density of dislocations and a significant broadening of the diffraction peaks, the obtained values are not described by the kinematic theory of X-ray diffraction and suggest the existence of extinction. The results have been analyzed on the basis of the Darwin and Zachariasen extinction models. The secondary extinction coefficients and the thicknesses of epitaxial layers have been determined using two orders of reflection both in the Bragg geometry (0002 and 0004) and in the Laue geometry (10bar 10) and 10bar 20). It has been demonstrated that the secondary extinction coefficient is the greater, the smaller is the broadening of the diffraction peaks and, consequently, the dislocation density. It has been found that, for epitaxial layers with a regular system of threading dislocations, the secondary extinction coefficient for the Laue reflections is substantially greater than that for the Bragg reflections.

  4. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  5. Measurement of K-X-rays fluorescence cross-sections, fluorescence yields and intensity ratios for elements in the atomic range 21 < Z < 74 excited by 59 keV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Avila, J.; Lopez-Pino, N.; Padilla-Cabal, F.; Van Espen, P.; Cabal, A.; Pena, M. Ruiz; Alessandro, K.D.; Maidana, N.L. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologia y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Antwerp Univ. (Belgium). Micro Trace Analytical Center; CEADEN, La Habana (Cuba); Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Using 59 keV photons, we measured the K{sub {alpha}}, K{sub {beta}} and total K X-rays fluorescence cross sections of 17 elements in the atomic range 21 < Z < 74. Furthermore, the fluorescence yields and the I{sub K{beta}} / I{sub K{alpha}} intensity ratios for these elements were also determined. An annular radioactive source of {sup 241}Am (activity 1 Ci) was employed to excite the elements in targets with the shape of foils or pellets (99% purity and 20 mm, in diameter). The pellets were formed with a mixture of cellulose and a chemical compound containing the element of interest, pressed at 15 tons. The K X-rays emitted from the irradiated samples were detected by a Si(Li) detector with a frontal Pb collimator, coupled to conventional electronics, with dead time below 10%. The fluxes reaching the targets and the crystal detector were determined by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the MCNPX V 2.6 code. The input geometries included the detector, the sample-source holder and the Pb collimator. The optimal diameter for the samples as well as the collimator dimensions were estimated by means of MC simulations. Using several elements (Ti, Ni, Br, Ag, Cs, Dy and W) a calibration curve for the effective flux of photons (I{sub 0}G{sub {epsilon}}) as function of the K X-rays energy was measured. Correction by different sizes and self-absorption coefficients of the samples were also performed. The data obtained for the X-rays fluorescence cross sections were compared with semi-empirical calculations and with experimental values reported by other authors; the relative deviations were less than 10%. Keywords: fluorescence cross section, fluorescence yields, Monte Carlo (author)

  6. Intensive temperature and quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Acin, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We consider quantum systems of coupled harmonic oscillators and study the question of whether temperature is an intensive quantity, in the sense that a block of a thermal state can be approximated by an effective thermal state at the same temperature as the whole system. We identify instances in which this approximation is not valid, as the block state and the reference thermal state are distinguishable. Contrary to the standard thermodynamic intuition, this distinguishability may even increase with the block size. However, we also show that the two states do become less distinguishable with the block size for standard coarse-grained measurements. Finally, we point out the role entanglement plays in this problem: in general, the thermodynamic paradigm of local intensive temperature applies whenever entanglement is not present in the system.

  7. 输电走廊工频电磁场的测量和解决方案%Electromagnetic Field Intensity Measurement and Solution for Unsafe Environment along Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊兰; 宋道军; 张又力; 唐涛; 肖波; 杨帆; 何为

    2011-01-01

    With the development of extra high voltage power grid, electromagnetic radiation arouses people' s intensive concern. With an engineering example: physical discomfort of teachers and students in primary school near a 500 kV AC transmission lines,distribution of power frequency electric field and power frequency magnetic field under the lines is analyzed with program based on charge simulation method (CSM) and simulation current method (SCM) respectively. Moreover, measured data indicate that electric field intensity on the roof of the teaching building partially approaches national public exposure limit in good weather condition; it exceeds the limit in bad weather condition (high relative humidity). The solution proposal for unsafe electric field environment is to fix three shielding lines (LGJ-50/30) to reduce electric field strength from 3.43 kV/m to 1.35 kV/m. Even in rainy weather condition, electric field strength also meets the national standards' request.%随着超高压电网的迅速发展,输电线路走廊的电磁辐射问题引起越来越多的关注.结合工程实例—某500 kV交流线路靠近小学校园引起师生身体不适,运用模拟电荷法和模拟电流法,分别分析了该线路走廊的工频电场和工频磁场的空间分布特性.同时,现场测量数据表明:在晴朗天气条件下,教学楼顶部分区域的电场强度接近国标限值;在阴雨(湿度较大)天气条件下,电场强度确已超标.针对电场超标问题,通过架设3根LGJ-50/30-地屏蔽线将电场强度最大值由3.75 kV/m降至1.35 kV/m,阴雨天气条件下亦满足国家标准要求.

  8. Wide angle Michelson Doppler imaging interferometer. [measuring atmospheric emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    The optical system, stepping control, phase and modulation depth, array detector, and directions sensor are described for a specialized type of Michelson interferometer which works at sufficiently high resolution to measure the line widths and Doppler shifts of naturally occurring atmospheric emissions. With its imaging capability, the instrument can potentially supply this data independently for each element of the 100 x 100 detector array. The experiment seeks: (1) to obtain vertical profiles of atmospheric winds and temperatures as functions of latitude by observing near the limb; (2) to acquire exploratory wind and temperature data on smaller scale structures in airglow irregularities and in auroral forms; and (3) to collaborate with other Spacelab experiments, such as barium cloud releases, in providing wind and temperature data.

  9. The intense neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W.B

    1966-07-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through {mu}-, {pi}- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  10. Government expenditure and energy intensity in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuxiang, Karl [School of Economics and Business Administration, Room 230 of the 11th Dormitory at Campus B, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Zhongchang [Center for Population, Resources, and Environment Research, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2010-02-15

    The recent economic stimulus package of China has raised growing concern about its potential impact on energy demand and efficiency. To what extent does such expansion of government expenditure influence energy intensity? This question has not been well answered by the previous research. Using provincial panel data, this paper provides some evidence of a link between government expenditure and energy intensity in China. The empirical results demonstrate that the expansion of government expenditure since Asian financial crisis has exerted a significant influence on energy intensity. An increase in government expenditure in China leads to an increase in energy intensity. Further analysis compares such relationships in different economic situations. The comparison shows that such positive effect of government expenditure remains significant after the alteration in economic situation. Therefore, the results suggest introducing some measures to consolidate China's existing gains in energy efficiency. The analysis also explains why the downward trend in energy intensity is reversed in China since 2002. (author)

  11. Associations of objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity and sedentary time with all-cause mortality in a population of adults at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrania, Kishan; Edwardson, Charlotte L; Khunti, Kamlesh; Henson, Joseph; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Hamer, Mark; Davies, Melanie J; Yates, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The relationships of physical activity and sedentary time with all-cause mortality in those at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are unexplored. To address this gap in knowledge, we examined the associations of objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time with all-cause mortality in a population of adults at high risk of T2DM. In 2010-2011, 712 adults (Leicestershire, U.K.), identified as being at high risk of T2DM, consented to be followed up for mortality. MVPA and sedentary time were assessed by accelerometer; those with valid data (≥ 10 hours of wear-time/day with ≥ 4 days of data) were included. Cox proportional hazards regression models, adjusted for potential confounders, were used to investigate the independent associations of MVPA and sedentary time with all-cause mortality. 683 participants (250 females (36.6%)) were included and during a mean follow-up period of 5.7 years, 26 deaths were registered. Every 10% increase in MVPA time/day was associated with a 5% lower risk of all-cause mortality [Hazard Ratio (HR): 0.95 (95% Confidence Interval (95% CI): 0.91, 0.98); p = 0.004]; indicating that for the average adult in this cohort undertaking approximately 27.5 minutes of MVPA/day, this benefit would be associated with only 2.75 additional minutes of MVPA/day. Conversely, sedentary time showed no association with all-cause mortality [HR (every 10-minute increase in sedentary time/day): 0.99 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.03); p = 0.589]. These data support the importance of MVPA in adults at high risk of T2DM. The association between sedentary time and mortality in this population needs further investigation.

  12. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates.

  13. In-focus quantitative intensity and phase imaging with the numerical focusing transport of intensity equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaolin; Meng, Xin; Yu, Wei; Song, Xiaojun; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shouyu

    2016-10-01

    Microscopy combined with the transport of intensity equation is capable of retrieving both intensity and phase distributions of samples from both in-focus and defocus intensities. However, during measurements, the focal plane is often decided artificially and the improper choice may induce errors in quantitative intensity and phase retrieval. In order to obtain accurate in-focus information, quantitative intensity and phase imaging with the numerical focusing transport of intensity equation method combined with cellular duty ratio criterion and numerical wavefront propagation is introduced in this paper. Both numerical simulations and experimental measurements are provided proving this designed method can increase both retrieved in-focus intensity and phase accuracy and reduce dependence of focal plane determination in transport of intensity equation measurements. It is believed that the proposed method can be potentially applied in various fields as in-focus compensation for quantitative phase imaging and automatic focal plane determination, etc.

  14. Power curve report - with turbulence intensity normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn; Vesth, Allan

    , additional shear and turbulence intensitity filters are applied on the measured data. Secondly, the method for normalization to a given reference turbulence intensity level (as described in Annex M of the draft of IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2 [3]) is applied. The measurements have been performed using DTU...

  15. A metho d of measuring the incidence angle of intense electron b eam%强流电子束入射角二维分布测量方法∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杨; 杨海亮; 孙剑锋; 孙江; 张鹏飞

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a great many of effect data obtained from the high current pulsed electron beam play an impor-tant role in the studying of X-ray thermal-mechanical effects. Energy deposition profile is the criterion to measure the equivalence of thermal-mechanical effects between high-current electron beam and X-rays. To adjust the energy deposi-tion profiles to improve the equivalence of the simulations of X-ray and thermal-mechanical effect, the intense electron beam energy deposition profile measurement should be studied. Two-dimensional distribution measurement which is an important part of the energy deposition profile is to obtain a two-dimension (r, θ) incidence angle distribution. A new method of measuring the incidence angle based on small Faraday cup array covered with aluminum films, called modified multi-layer stacking, is presented in this paper. With the help of the filtered Faraday cups, the transmission fraction of the electron beam confined at a specific position and time is stored. Two-dimension incidence angle distribution on the anode target that changes over the working time is obtained with these transmission fractions by computer calculation. The result indicates that the two-dimension incidence angle distribution has a close relationship with the pinch of the beam. The electrons tend to move vertically to the equipotential line when the diode is under Child-Langmuir flow, then they hit the target in a small angle range (<40◦). When the beam starts to pinch, as a consequence of the E × B drift, the trajectory of the electrons becomes a slanted helix with pitch changing. The incidence angle then increases to about 60◦ from small angle.%电子束与靶物质相互作用时的入射角测量是强流电子束热-力学效应研究中的难点问题。提出了一种新的基于覆盖不同厚度衰减片微型法拉第筒阵列的电子束入射角测量方法,与现有方法相比,可获得具有时域特性和位置分布的强流电

  16. Clinical usefulness of wave intensity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Motoaki; Niki, Kiyomi; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Okada, Takashi; Harada, Akimitsu

    2009-02-01

    Wave intensity (WI) is a hemodynamic index, which can evaluate the working condition of the heart interacting with the arterial system. It can be defined at any site in the circulatory system and provides a great deal of information. However, we need simultaneous measurements of blood pressure and velocity to obtain wave intensity, which has limited the clinical application of wave intensity, in spite of its potential. To expand the application of wave intensity in the clinical setting, we developed a real-time non-invasive measurement system for wave intensity based on a combined color Doppler and echo-tracking system. We measured carotid arterial WI in normal subjects and patients with various cardiovascular diseases. In the coronary artery disease group, the magnitude of the first peak of carotid arterial WI (W (1)) increased with LV max. dP/dt (r = 0.74, P WI can be obtained non-invasively using an echo-Doppler system in the clinical setting. This method will increase the clinical usefulness of wave intensity.

  17. Depletion of intense fields

    CERN Document Server

    Seipt, D; Marklund, M; Bulanov, S S

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of charged particles and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multi-photon Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. These are usually described in the framework of the external field approximation, where the electromagnetic field is assumed to have infinite energy. However, the multi-photon nature of these processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons, which scales as the external field amplitude cubed. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. We provide relevant estimates for this depletion and find it to become important in the interaction between fields of amplitude $a_0 \\sim 10^3$ and electron bunches with charges of the order of nC.

  18. Intensities of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissell, David; Vannini, Phillip; Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the intensities of long-distance commuting journeys in order to understand how bodily sensibilities become attuned to the regular mobilities which they undertake. More people are travelling farther to and from work than ever before, owing to a variety of factors which relate...... to complex social and geographical dynamics of transport, housing, lifestyle, and employment. Yet, the experiential dimensions of long-distance commuting have not received the attention that they deserve within research on mobilities. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in Australia, Canada, and Denmark...... this paper aims to further develop our collective understanding of the experiential particulars of long-distance workers or ‘supercommuters’. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in broad social patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions...

  19. Intensive culture”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2012-01-01

    Scott Lash argumenterer i bogen Intensive Culture for en vending fra ”ekstensiv” til ”intensiv” i den nutidige globalisering. Bogens udgangspunkt er en stadig mere ekstensiv og gennemtrængende globalisering af kultur, forbrugs- og vareformer, ”comtemporary culture, today’s capitalism – our global...... information society – is ever more extensive”. Dette medfører imidlertid et paradoks, fordi den ekstensive kultur slår om i intensive kulturformer: ”Given this growing extensification of contemporary culture, on another level and at the same time, we seem to be experiencing a parallel phenomenon whose colours......, samlivsmøstre etc.; ”the sheer pace of life in the streets of today’s mega-city would seem somehow to be intensive”....

  20. CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

  1. Mesospheric temperatures from observations of the hydroxyl (6–2 emission above Davis, Antarctica: A comparison of rotational and Doppler measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available We present observations of the hydroxyl (6–2 airglow lines from ~ 87 km altitude obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, in the austral winter of 1999. Nine nights of observations were made of the P-branch near λ840 nm with a Czerny-Turner scanning spectrometer (CTS; at the same time, high-resolution Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS spectra were collected of the Q1(1 doublet at λ834 nm. Rotational temperatures were determined from the CTS observations, while Doppler temperatures were derived from the line-widths of the FPS Q1(1 spectra. Absolute temperatures determined by these methods are uncertain by ~ 2 and ~ 20 K, respectively. For the comparison we set the value of the reflective finesse of the FPS at λ834 nm so the mean FPS temperature from one night of simultaneous data was equal to that from the CTS, and then looked at the measured variations in each data set for the other eight nights. Both instruments show the upper mesosphere temperature to vary in a similar manner to within the observational errors of the measurements, implying an equivalence of the rotational and Doppler temperatures. We believe that this is the first published simultaneous, same-site, comparison of rotational and Doppler temperatures from the OH emission.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; pressure density and temperature; instruments and techniques

  2. Cryogenic semiconductor high-intensity radiation monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Palmieri, V G; Borer, K; Casagrande, L; Da Vià, C; Devine, S R H; Dezillie, B; Esposito, A; Granata, V; Hauler, F; Jungermann, L; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; O'Shea, V

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel technique to monitor high-intensity particle beams by means of a semiconductor detector. It consists of cooling a semiconductor detector down to cryogenic temperature to suppress the thermally generated leakage current and to precisely measure the integrated ionization signal. It will be shown that such a device provides very good linearity and a dynamic range wider than is possible with existing techniques. Moreover, thanks to the Lazarus effect, extreme radiation hardness can be achieved providing in turn absolute intensity measurements against precise calibration of the device at low beam flux.

  3. Intensive treatment of leg lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy Jose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of all the problems caused by lymphedema, this disease continues to affect millions of people worldwide. Thus, the identification of the most efficacious forms of treatment is necessary. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel intensive outpatient treatment for leg lymphedema. Methods: Twenty-three legs of 19 patients were evaluated in a prospective randomized study. The inclusion criteria were patients with Grade II and III lymphedema, where the difference, measured by volumetry, between the affected limb below the knee and the healthy limb was greater than 1.5 kg. Intensive treatment was carried out for 6- to 8-h sessions in the outpatient clinic. Analysis of variance was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P-value < 0.05 being considered significant. Results: All limbs had significant reductions in size with the final mean loss being 81.1% of the volume of edema. The greatest losses occurred in the first week (P-value < 0.001. Losses of more than 90% of the lymphedema occurred in 9 (39.13% patients; losses of more than 80% in 13 (56.52%, losses of more than 70% in 17 (73.91% and losses of more than 50% were recorded for 95.65% of the patients; only 1 patient lost less than 50% (37.9% of the edema. Conclusion: The intensive treatment of lymphedema in the outpatient clinic can produce significant reductions in the volume of edema over a short period of time and can be recommended for any grade of lymphedema, in particular the more advanced degrees.

  4. The Intensity Profile of the Solar Supergranulation

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbaum, N J; Ermolli, I; Sands, J S; Berrilli, F

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the average radial (cell center to network boundary) profile of the continuum intensity contrast associated with supergranular flows using data from the Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). After removing the contribution of the network flux elements by the application of masks based on Ca II K intensity and averaging over more than 10^5 supergranular cells, we find a ~ 0.1% decrease in red and blue continuum intensity from the supergranular cell centers outward, corresponding to a ~ 1.0 K decrease in brightness temperature across the cells. The radial intensity profile may be caused either by the thermal signal associated with the supergranular flows or a variation in the packing density of unresolved magnetic flux elements. These are not unambiguously distinguished by the observations, and we raise the possibility that the network magnetic fields play an active role in supergranular scale selection by enhancing the radiative cooling of the ...

  5. Blood Pulsation Intensity Video Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Pedro Henrique de M

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we make non-invasive, remote, passive measurements of the heart beat frequency and determine the map of blood pulsation intensity in a region of interest (ROI) of skin. The ROI used was the forearm of a volunteer. The method employs a regular video camera and visible light, and the video acquisition takes less than 1 minute. The mean cardiac frequency found in our volunteer was within 1 bpm of the ground-truth value simultaneously obtained via earlobe plethysmography. Using the signals extracted from the video images, we have determined an intensity map for the blood pulsation at the surface of the skin. In this paper we present the experimental and data processing details of the work and well as limitations of the technique. ----------------------------------------- Neste estudo medimos a frequ\\^encia card\\'iaca de forma n\\~ao invasiva, remota e passiva e determinamos o mapa da atividade de pulsa\\c{c}\\~ao sangu\\'inea numa regi\\~ao de interesse (ROI) da pele. A ROI utilizada foi o antebra\\c{c}o...

  6. HI intensity mapping with FAST

    CERN Document Server

    Bigot-Sazy, Marie-Anne; Battye, Richard A; Browne, Ian W A; Chen, Tianyue; Dickinson, Clive; Harper, Stuart; Maffei, Bruno; Olivari, Lucas C; Wilkinson, Peter N

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST $19$-beam L-band receivers ($1.05$--$1.45$ GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters ($w_{0},w_{a}$) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is $6000\\,{\\rm deg}^2$. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift ($0.95$--$1.35$ GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than $2~\\sigma$ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  7. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Peng Kian; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement scheme...

  8. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  9. Field and intensity correlation in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbah; Pnini; Genack

    2000-11-01

    We have obtained the spectral and spatial field correlation functions, C(E)(Deltaomega) and C(E)(Deltax), respectively, from measurement of the microwave field spectrum at a series of points along a line on the output of a random dielectric medium. C(E)(Deltaomega) and C(E)(Deltax) are shown to be the Fourier transforms, respectively, of the time of flight distribution, obtained from pulsed measurements, and of the specific intensity. Unlike C(E)(Deltaomega), the imaginary part of C(E)(Deltax) is shown to vanish as a result of the isotropy of the correlation function in the output plane. The complex square of the field correlation function gives the short-range or C1 contribution to the intensity correlation function C. Longer-range contributions to the intensity correlation function are obtained directly by subtracting C1 from C and are in good agreement with theory.

  10. Mesospheric minor species determinations from rocket and ground-based i.r. measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulwick, J. C.; Baker, K. D.; Baker, D. J.; Steed, A. J.; Pendleton, W. R.; Grossmann, K.; Brückelmann, H. G.

    As part of the MAP/WINE campaign the infrared hydroxyl airglow layer was investigated at Kiruna, Sweden, by simultaneous measurements with rocket probes of OH ≠ and O2( a1Δg) infrared emissions and concentrations of odd oxygen species (O and O 3). Coordinated measurements of OH ≠ and O2( a1Δg) zenith radiance and emission spectra and their time histories were made from the ground. The rocket-borne Λ = 1.55 μm radiometer ( ΔΛ ≊ 0.23 μm) provided volume emission rates for OH for both rocket ascent and descent, showing a peak near 87 km with a maximum of nearly 10 6 photons sec -1 cm -3. The atomic oxygen distribution showed a concentration of about 10 11 cm -3 between 88 and 100 km, dropping off sharply below 85 km. The ground-based radiometer at Λ = 1.56 μm, which had a similar filter bandpass to the rocket-borne instrument, yielded an equivalent of 130 kR for the total OH Δv = 2 sequence, which is consistent with the zenith-corrected rocket-based sequence radiance value of ≌ 110 kR. The rotational temperature of the OH night airglow obtained from the rotational structure of the OH M (3,1) band observed by the ground-based interferometer was about 195K at the time of the rocket measurement. Atomic oxygen concentrations were calculated from the OH profile and show agreement with the directly measured values. Atomic hydrogen concentrations of a few times 10 7 cm -3 near 85 km were inferred from the data set.

  11. 20-125 mev/nuc cosmic ray carbon nuclei intensities between 2004-2010 in solar cycle #23 as measured near the earth, at voyager 2 and also in the heliosheath at voyager 1 - modulation in a two zone heliospehre

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R; Stone, E C; McDonald, F B; Mewaldt, R A; Leske, R; Wiedenbeck, M; Higbie, P R; Heikkila, B

    2012-01-01

    The recovery of cosmic ray Carbon nuclei of energy ~20-125 MeV/nuc in solar cycle #23 from 2004 to 2010 has been followed at three locations, near the Earth using ACE data and at V2 between 74-92 AU and also at V1 beyond the heliospheric termination shock at between 91-113 AU. To describe the observed intensity changes and to predict the absolute intensities measured at all three locations we have used a simple spherically symmetric (no drift) two-zone heliospheric transport model with specific values for the diffusion coefficient in both the inner and outer zones. The diffusion coefficient in the outer zone is determined to be ~5-10 times smaller than that in the inner zone out to 90 AU. For both V1 and V2 the calculated C nuclei intensities agree within an average of \\pm 10% with the observed intensities. Because of this agreement between V1 and V2 observations and predictions there is no need to invoke an asymmetrical squashed heliosphere or other effects to explain the V2 intensities relative to V1 as is ...

  12. Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Asantha; Burgarella, Denis; Chary, Ranga; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Fazio, Giovanni; Ferrara, Andrea; Gong, Yan; Santos, Mario; Silva, Marta; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper is a "Probe Class" mission concept for reionization studies of the universe. It will be capable of spectroscopic imaging observations between 0.7 to 6-7 microns in the near-Infrared. The primary observational objective is pioneering observations of spectral emission lines of interest throughout the cosmic history, but especially from the first generation of distant, faint galaxies when the universe was less than 800 million years old. With spectro-imaging capabilities, using a set of linear variable filters (LVFs), CDIM will produce a three-dimensional tomographic view of the epoch of reionization (EoR). CDIM will also study galaxy formation over more than 90% of the cosmic history and will move the astronomical community from broad-band astronomical imaging to low-resolution (R=200-300) spectro-imaging of the universe.

  13. 21 cm Intensity Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Jeffrey B; Ansari, Reza; Bandura, Kevin; Bond, Dick; Bunton, John; Carlson, Kermit; Chang, Tzu-Ching; DeJongh, Fritz; Dobbs, Matt; Dodelson, Scott; Darhmaoui, Hassane; Gnedin, Nick; Halpern, Mark; Hogan, Craig; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Legrouri, Ahmed; Loeb, Avi; Loudiyi, Khalid; Magneville, Christophe; Marriner, John; McGinnis, David P; McWilliams, Bruce; Moniez, Marc; Palanque-Delabruille, Nathalie; Pasquinelli, Ralph J; Pen, Ue-Li; Rich, Jim; Scarpine, Vic; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sigurdson, Kris; Seljak, Uros; Stebbins, Albert; Steffen, Jason H; Stoughton, Chris; Timbie, Peter T; Vallinotto, Alberto; Wyithe, Stuart; Yeche, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Using the 21 cm line, observed all-sky and across the redshift range from 0 to 5, the large scale structure of the Universe can be mapped in three dimensions. This can be accomplished by studying specific intensity with resolution ~ 10 Mpc, rather than via the usual galaxy redshift survey. The data set can be analyzed to determine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation wavelengths, in order to address the question: 'What is the nature of Dark Energy?' In addition, the study of Large Scale Structure across this range addresses the questions: 'How does Gravity effect very large objects?' and 'What is the composition our Universe?' The same data set can be used to search for and catalog time variable and transient radio sources.

  14. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit p

  15. High-intensity training in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaia, F Marcello; Rampinini, Ermanno; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-09-01

    This article reviews the major physiological and performance effects of aerobic high-intensity and speed-endurance training in football, and provides insight on implementation of individual game-related physical training. Analysis and physiological measurements have revealed that modern football is highly energetically demanding, and the ability to perform repeated high-intensity work is of importance for the players. Furthermore, the most successful teams perform more high-intensity activities during a game when in possession of the ball. Hence, footballers need a high fitness level to cope with the physical demands of the game. Studies on football players have shown that 8 to 12 wk of aerobic high-intensity running training (> 85% HR(max)) leads to VO2(max) enhancement (5% to 11%), increased running economy (3% to 7%), and lower blood lactate accumulation during submaximal exercise, as well as improvements in the yo-yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test performance (13%). Similar adaptations are observed when performing aerobic high-intensity training with small-sided games. Speed-endurance training has a positive effect on football-specific endurance, as shown by the marked improvements in the YYIR test (22% to 28%) and the ability to perform repeated sprints (approximately 2%). In conclusion, both aerobic and speed-endurance training can be used during the season to improve high-intensity intermittent exercise performance. The type and amount of training should be game related and specific to the technical, tactical, and physical demands imposed on each player.

  16. The Taxonomy of Intervention Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Malone, Amelia S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the Taxonomy of Intervention Intensity, which articulates 7 dimensions for evaluating and building intervention intensity. We explain the Taxonomy's dimensions of intensity. In explaining the Taxonomy, we rely on a case study to illustrate how the Taxonomy can systematize the process by which special…

  17. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...

  18. First measurement of helium on Mars: Implications for the problem of radiogenic gases on the terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Bowyer, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Mcdonald, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    108 +/- 11 photons of the martian He 584-A airglow detected by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite during a 2-day exposure (January 22-23, 1993) correspond to the effective disk average intensity of 43 +/- 10 Rayleigh (Ra). Radiative transfer calculations, using a model atmosphere appropriate to the conditions of the observation and having an exospheric temperature of 210 +/- 20 K, result in a He mixing ratio of 1.1 +/- 0.4 ppm in the lower atmosphere. Nonthermal escape of helium is due to electron impact ionization and pickup of He(+) by the solar wind, to collisions with hot oxygen atoms, and to charge exchange with molecular species with corresponding column loss rates of 1.4 x 10(exp 5), 3 x 10(exp 4), and 7 x 10(exp 3)/sq cm/s, respectively. The lifetime of helium on Mars is 5 x 10(exp 4) years. the He outgassing rate, coupled with the Ar-40 atmospheric abundance and with the K:U:Th ratio measured in the surface rocks, is used as input to a single two-reservoir degassing model which is applied to Mars and then to Venus. A similar model with known abundances if K, U, and Th is applied to Earth. The models for Earth and Mars presume loss of all argon accumulated in the atmospheres during the first billion years by large-scale meteorite and planetesimal impacts. The models show that the degassing coefficients for all three planets may be approximated by function delta = delta(sub 0) x (t(sub 0)/t)(exp 1/2) with delta(sub 0) = 0.1, 0.04, and 0.0125 Byr for Earth, Venus, and Mars, respectively. After a R(exp 2) correction this means that outgassing processes on Venus and Mars are weaker than on Earth by factors of 3 and 30, respectively. Mass ratios of U and Th are almost the same for all three planets, while potassiumis depleted by a factor of 2 in Venus and Mars. Mass ratio of helium and argon are close to 5 x 10(exp -9) and 2 x 10(exp -8) g/g in the interiors of all three planets. The implications of these results are discussed.

  19. SALIVARY CORTISOL RESPONSES AND PERCEIVED EXERTION DURING HIGH INTENSITY AND LOW INTENSITY BOUTS OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison D. Egan

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure the salivary cortisol response to different intensities of resistance exercise. In addition, we wanted to determine the reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE scale to monitor resistance exercise intensity. Subjects (8 men, 9 women completed 2 trials of acute resistance training bouts in a counterbalanced design. The high intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of six, ten-repetition sets using 75% of one repetition maximum (RM on a Smith machine squat and bench press exercise (12 sets total. The low intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of three, ten-repetition sets at 30% of 1RM of the same exercises as the high intensity protocol. Both exercise bouts were performed with 2 minutes of rest between each exercise and sessions were repeated to test reliability of the measures. The order of the exercise bouts was randomized with least 72 hours between each session. Saliva samples were obtained immediately before, immediately after and 30 mins following each resistance exercise bout. RPE measures were obtained using Borg's CR-10 scale following each set. Also, the session RPE for the entire exercise session was obtained 30 minutes following completion of the session. There was a significant 97% increase in the level of salivary cortisol immediately following the high intensity exercise session (P<0.05. There was also a significant difference in salivary cortisol of 145% between the low intensity and high intensity exercise session immediately post-exercise (P<0.05. The low intensity exercise did not result in any significant changes in cortisol levels. There was also a significant difference between the session RPE values for the different intensity levels (high intensity 7.1 vs. low intensity 1.9 (P<0.05. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the session RPE measure was 0.95. It was concluded that the session RPE method is a valid and reliable method of

  20. Use of palivizumab and infection control measures to control an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus in a neonatal intensive care unit confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, K

    2011-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a potentially life-threatening infection in premature infants. We report an outbreak involving four infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our hospital that occurred in February 2010. RSV A infection was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Palivizumab was administered to all infants in the NICU. There were no additional symptomatic cases and repeat RSV surveillance confirmed that there was no further cross-transmission within the unit. The outbreak highlighted the infection control challenge of very high bed occupancy in the unit and the usefulness of molecular methods in facilitating detection and management.

  1. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  2. Whistler intensities above thunderstorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fiser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a study of penetration of the VLF electromagnetic waves induced by lightning to the ionosphere. We compare the fractional hop whistlers recorded by the ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER satellite with lightning detected by the EUCLID detection network. To identify the fractional hop whistlers, we have developed software for automatic detection of the fractional-hop whistlers in the VLF spectrograms. This software provides the detection times of the fractional hop whistlers and the average amplitudes of these whistlers. Matching the lightning and whistler data, we find the pairs of causative lightning and corresponding whistler. Processing data from ~200 DEMETER passes over the European region we obtain a map of mean amplitudes of whistler electric field as a function of latitudinal and longitudinal difference between the location of the causative lightning and satellite magnetic footprint. We find that mean whistler amplitude monotonically decreases with horizontal distance up to ~1000 km from the lightning source. At larger distances, the mean whistler amplitude usually merges into the background noise and the whistlers become undetectable. The maximum of whistler intensities is shifted from the satellite magnetic footprint ~1° owing to the oblique propagation. The average amplitude of whistlers increases with the lightning current. At nighttime (late evening, the average amplitude of whistlers is about three times higher than during the daytime (late morning for the same lightning current.

  3. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

    2013-09-24

    The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

  4. Near-infrared thermal emissivity from ground based atmospheric dust measurements at ORM

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardi, G; Ortolani, S; Melnick, J; Ghedina, A; Garcia, A; Molinari, E; Gatica, C

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the atmospheric content of aerosols measured at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM; Canary Islands). Using a laser diode particle counter located at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) we have detected particles of 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 um size. The seasonal behavior of the dust content in the atmosphere is calculated. The Spring has been found to be dustier than the Summer, but dusty conditions may also occur in Winter. A method to estimate the contribution of the aerosols emissivity to the sky brightness in the near-infrared (NIR) is presented. The contribution of dust emission to the sky background in the NIR has been found to be negligible comparable to the airglow, with a maximum contribution of about 8-10% in the Ks band in the dusty days.

  5. Using ACT arrays as Intensity Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bohec, S

    2005-01-01

    The Narrabri intensity interferometer was successfully used until 1974 to observe 32 stars, all brighter than B=+2.5, among which some were found to have an angular diameter as small as 0.41+/-0.03 milli-arc-seconds (mas). The technique was then abandoned in favor of Michelson interferometry. Here we consider the technical feasibility and scientific potential of implementing intensity interferometry on Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope arrays. The scientific motivations are varied, including stellar diameter measurements and investigations of the circumstellar environment. Long baselines and short wavelengths are easily accesible to this technique, making it uniquely suited for some applications.

  6. Ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quane, Steven L.; Russell, James K.

    2005-02-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits involves flattening of glassy pyroclasts under a compactional load at temperatures above the glass transition temperature. Progressive welding is recorded by changes in the petrographic (e.g., fabric) and physical (e.g., density) properties of the deposits. Mapping the intensity of welding can be integral to studies of pyroclastic deposits, but making systematic comparisons between deposits can be problematical. Here we develop a scheme for ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits on the basis of petrographic textural observations (e.g., oblateness of pumice lapilli and micro-fabric orientation) and measurements of physical properties, including density, porosity, point load strength and uniaxial compressive strength. Our dataset comprises measurements on 100 samples collected from a single cooling unit of the Bandelier Tuff and parallel measurements on 8 samples of more densely welded deposits. The proposed classification comprises six ranks of welding intensity ranging from unconsolidated (Rank I) to obsidian-like vitrophyre (Rank VI) and should allow for reproducible mapping of subtle variations in welding intensity between different deposits. The application of the ranking scheme is demonstrated by using published physical property data on welded pyroclastic deposits to map the total accumulated strain and to reconstruct their pre-welding thicknesses.

  7. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  8. Intense terahertz radiation and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, H. A.; Chai, X.; Ibrahim, A.; Mondal, S.; Férachou, D.; Ropagnol, X.; Ozaki, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we will review both past and recent progresses in the generation, detection and application of intense terahertz (THz) radiation. We will restrict the review to laser based intense few-cycle THz sources, and thus will not include sources such as synchrotron-based or narrowband sources. We will first review the various methods used for generating intense THz radiation, including photoconductive antennas (PCAs), optical rectification sources (especially the tilted-pulse-front lithium niobate source and the DAST source, but also those using other crystals), air plasma THz sources and relativistic laser-plasma sources. Next, we will give a brief introduction on the common methods for coherent THz detection techniques (namely the PCA technique and the electro-optic sampling), and point out the limitations of these techniques for measuring intense THz radiation. We will then review three techniques that are highly suited for detecting intense THz radiation, namely the air breakdown coherent detection technique, various single-shot THz detection techniques, and the spectral-domain interferometry technique. Finally, we will give an overview of the various applications that have been made possible with such intense THz sources, including nonlinear THz spectroscopy of condensed matter (optical-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/optical-probe), nonlinear THz optics, resonant and non-resonant control of material (such as switching of superconductivity, magnetic and polarization switching) and controlling the nonlinear response of metamaterials. We will also provide a short perspective on the future of intense THz sources and their applications.

  9. VISUAL ACUITY IN DIFFERENT INTENSITIES OF LIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Visual acuity is the resolving power of eyes which enables to distinguish the details and shapes of the objects. It is influenced by the intensity (illumination of light falling on the object. Measuring visual acuity is a simple test in assessing-health of the eyes, the pathway and visual brain. Intact normal vision is mandatory for selection of posts related to driving and traffic services. Intactness of visual acuity is influenced by a number of factors and one among them is intensity of ambient light. Hence, this study is undertaken to assess optimum light intensity for better visual perception. AIM: To evaluate the association between visual acuity and intensity of light and the optimum intensity of light to carry out for better perception of vision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 100 literate subjects - 50 males and 50 females between 15-45 years, act both as cases and controls. Subjects, instructed to read alphabets and numbers from Snellen chart in 15 watts, 20 watts, 40 watts, 60 watts, 100 watts, 200 watts were considered as the study group and the same subjects in this study in day light as controls. Chart was placed at 6m distance. Both right and left eyes were tested separately in dark room illuminated with controlled light intensities. Number of correct characters read were noted for different illuminations and compared with that of controls. RESULTS: Reduced illumination significantly increased the no of incorrect choices and was statistically significant (P < 0.05 between 15 - 100 W. Visual acuity was best in 200 W in comparison with day light but was not statistically significant. However Visual acuity showed no significant difference between males and females for different intensities of light.

  10. Low-intensity beam diagnostics with particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovelli, A.; Ciavola, G.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Raia, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 44/A Catania, 95125 (Italy); De Martinis, C.; Giove, D. [INFN-LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201 Segrate (Midway Islands), 20090 (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    The measure of low intensity beams at low-medium energy is one of the major challenge in beam diagnostics. This subject is of great interest for the design of accelerator-based medical and radioactive beam facilities. In this paper we discuss new developments in image-based devices to measure low-intensity beams. All the investigated devices must guarantee measurement of the total beam current and its transverse distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Effects of solar zenith angles on CO Cameron bands emission intensities in the dayside atmosphere of Mars: MEX/SPICAM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothuraju, Thirupathaiah; Haider, Syed A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a model to calculate the photoelectron energy fluxes and emission intensities of the CO Cameron bands in the upper atmosphere of Mars between solar zenith angles 0° to 90°. The production and loss mechanisms of CO (a ^{3}Π) are incorporated in the model. The atmospheric neutral parameters are adopted from the Mars Climate Database (v5.2). The required solar EUV fluxes are taken from the Solar2000 model (v2.37) and scaled to Mars. The photoelectron fluxes are calculated at different solar zenith angles using an analytical yield spectrum approach based on the Monte Carlo method. In this model we have assumed that crustal magnetic fields are horizontal in direction. Thus, photoelectrons are losing their energy at the same height where they are produced. This assumption is valid at mid and high latitudes where magnetic fields are mostly horizontal. We have also developed a coupled chemistry model to calculate the ion and electron density at different solar zenith angles, which are used in the airglow model. The model results are compared with the observations provided by the SPICAM onboard MEX. Our model reproduces the observed intensity profiles quite well. The CO (a ^{3}Π) is produced due to photoelectron excitation/dissociation, photodissociation, and dissociative recombination processes. It is destroyed by CO _{2}, CO and radiative decay. It is found that photon and photoelectron dissociation are dominant production processes of CO (a ^{3}Π), while radiative decay is a major loss mechanism of this state. The estimated photoelectron fluxes, production rates and intensities are decreasing with increasing solar zenith angles.

  12. Handbook of data intensive computing

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2011-01-01

    Data Intensive Computing refers to capturing, managing, analyzing, and understanding data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies. The challenge of data intensive computing is to provide the hardware architectures and related software systems and techniques which are capable of transforming ultra-large data into valuable knowledge. Handbook of Data Intensive Computing is written by leading international experts in the field. Experts from academia, research laboratories and private industry address both theory and application. Data intensive computing demands a fund

  13. Catfish production using intensive aeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the last 3 years, researchers at UAPB and NWAC have been monitoring and verifying production yields in intensively aerated catfish ponds with aeration rates greater than 6 hp/acre. We now have three years of data on commercial catfish production in intensively aerated ponds. With stocking densi...

  14. Multilayered samples reconstructed by measuring K{sub α}/K{sub β} or L{sub α}/L{sub β} X-ray intensity ratios by EDXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesareo, Roberto, E-mail: cesareo@uniss.it [Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nano Strutturati, CNR-Montelibretti, via Salaria km. 29.5, 00015 Monterotondo (Romania); Assis, Joaquim T. de, E-mail: joaquim.iprj@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto Politécnico, P.O. Box 97282, 28625-570 Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Roldán, Clodoaldo, E-mail: Clodoaldo.Roldan@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, P.O. Box 22085, E46071 Valencia (Spain); Bustamante, Angel D., E-mail: angelbd1@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima (Peru); Brunetti, Antonio, E-mail: brunetti@uniss.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Politiche, Scienza della Comunicazione e Ingegneria dell’ Informazione, Università di Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Schiavon, Nick [Hercules Laboratory and Évora Geophysical Centre, University of Evora (Portugal)

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a general method based on energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis has been tested to assess its possible use as a tool to reconstruct the structure and determine the thickness of two and/or multi-layered materials. The method utilizes the X-ray intensity ratios of K{sub α}/K{sub β} or L{sub α}/L{sub β} peaks (or the ratio of these peaks) for selected elements present in multi-layered objects of various materials (Au alloys, gilded Cu, gilded Ag, gilded Pb, Ag–Au Tumbaga, stone surfaces with protective treatments, Zn or Nickel plating on metals). Results show that, in the case of multi-layered samples, a correct calculation of the peak ratio (K{sub α} /K{sub β} and/or L{sub α}/L{sub β}) of relevant elements from energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra, can provide important information in assessing the exact location of each layer and for calculating its thickness. The methodological approach shown may have important applications not only in materials science but also when dealing with the conservation and restoration of multi-layered cultural heritage objects where the use of a Non-Destructive techniques to determine slight chemical and thickness variations in the layered structure is often of paramount importance to achieve the best results.

  15. MRI intensity inhomogeneity correction by combining intensity and spatial information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovk, Uros; Pernus, Franjo; Likar, Bostjan [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2004-09-07

    We propose a novel fully automated method for retrospective correction of intensity inhomogeneity, which is an undesired phenomenon in many automatic image analysis tasks, especially if quantitative analysis is the final goal. Besides most commonly used intensity features, additional spatial image features are incorporated to improve inhomogeneity correction and to make it more dynamic, so that local intensity variations can be corrected more efficiently. The proposed method is a four-step iterative procedure in which a non-parametric inhomogeneity correction is conducted. First, the probability distribution of image intensities and corresponding second derivatives is obtained. Second, intensity correction forces, condensing the probability distribution along the intensity feature, are computed for each voxel. Third, the inhomogeneity correction field is estimated by regularization of all voxel forces, and fourth, the corresponding partial inhomogeneity correction is performed. The degree of inhomogeneity correction dynamics is determined by the size of regularization kernel. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on simulated and real MR brain images. The obtained results show that the proposed method does not corrupt inhomogeneity-free images and successfully corrects intensity inhomogeneity artefacts even if these are more dynamic.

  16. Intense electron and ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Molokovsky, Sergey Ivanovich

    2005-01-01

    Intense Ion and Electron Beams treats intense charged-particle beams used in vacuum tubes, particle beam technology and experimental installations such as free electron lasers and accelerators. It addresses, among other things, the physics and basic theory of intense charged-particle beams; computation and design of charged-particle guns and focusing systems; multiple-beam charged-particle systems; and experimental methods for investigating intense particle beams. The coverage is carefully balanced between the physics of intense charged-particle beams and the design of optical systems for their formation and focusing. It can be recommended to all scientists studying or applying vacuum electronics and charged-particle beam technology, including students, engineers and researchers.

  17. Intensive insulin therapy in the intensive cardiac care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Tal; Eldor, Roy; Hammerman, Haim

    2006-01-01

    Treatment in the intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) enables rigorous control of vital parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, oxygen saturation, serum electrolyte levels, urine output and many others. The importance of controlling the metabolic status of the acute cardiac patient and specifically the level of serum glucose was recently put in focus but is still underscored. This review aims to explain the rationale for providing intensive control of serum glucose levels in the ICCU, especially using intensive insulin therapy and summarizes the available clinical evidence suggesting its effectiveness.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation intensities in cognitive paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob A Kaminski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has become an important experimental tool for exploring the brain's functional anatomy. As TMS interferes with neural activity, the hypothetical function of the stimulated area can thus be tested. One unresolved methodological issue in TMS experiments is the question of how to adequately calibrate stimulation intensities. The motor threshold (MT is often taken as a reference for individually adapted stimulation intensities in TMS experiments, even if they do not involve the motor system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether it is reasonable to adjust stimulation intensities in each subject to the individual MT if prefrontal regions are stimulated prior to the performance of a cognitive paradigm. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Repetitive TMS (rTMS was applied prior to a working memory task, either at the 'fixed' intensity of 40% maximum stimulator output (MSO, or individually adapted at 90% of the subject's MT. Stimulation was applied to a target region in the left posterior middle frontal gyrus (pMFG, as indicated by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI localizer acquired beforehand, or to a control site (vertex. Results show that MT predicted the effect size after stimulating subjects with the fixed intensity (i.e., subjects with a low MT showed a greater behavioral effect. Nevertheless, the individual adaptation of intensities did not lead to stable effects. CONCLUSION: Therefore, we suggest assessing MT and account for it as a measure for general cortical TMS susceptibility, even if TMS is applied outside the motor domain.

  19. Caregiving intensity and retirement status in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Josephine C; Laporte, Audrey; Van Houtven, Courtney H; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-02-01

    A number of OECD countries have implemented policies encouraging longer labour force participation in tandem with policies encouraging informal care provision in the community. To better understand how these policies may affect the available pool of caregivers and labour force participants, we need more evidence about how informal caregiving is related to retirement status and timing. We assessed the association between caregiving intensity and retirement status for individuals aged 55 to 69 using the Canadian 2007 General Social Survey, a cross-sectional survey with 23,404 individuals. We used multinomial logistic regressions to determine whether providing different intensities of informal care (i.e. hours of weekly care) was significantly associated with the likelihood that an individual was fully retired, had retired and returned to work, had never retired and was working part-time or full-time, or was a labour market non-participant. We found that higher intensity caregiving was associated with being fully retired (relative to working full-time) for men and women (relative risk ratios, 2.93 and 2.04, respectively). For women, high intensity caregiving was also associated with working part-time (1.84) and being a labour force non-participant (1.99). Male and female high intensity caregivers were more likely to be retired before age 65. Our results highlight the importance of measuring caregiving intensity and multiple paths to retirement, which are often overlooked in the caregiving and retirement literature. They also indicate that a policy context encouraging both later retirement and more informal care may not be reasonable without flexible work arrangement options.

  20. CARES: Completely Automated Robust Edge Snapper for carotid ultrasound IMT measurement on a multi-institutional database of 300 images: a two stage system combining an intensity-based feature approach with first order absolute moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Filippo; Acharya, Rajendra; Zeng, Guang; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-03-01

    The carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is the most used marker for the progression of atherosclerosis and onset of the cardiovascular diseases. Computer-aided measurements improve accuracy, but usually require user interaction. In this paper we characterized a new and completely automated technique for carotid segmentation and IMT measurement based on the merits of two previously developed techniques. We used an integrated approach of intelligent image feature extraction and line fitting for automatically locating the carotid artery in the image frame, followed by wall interfaces extraction based on Gaussian edge operator. We called our system - CARES. We validated the CARES on a multi-institutional database of 300 carotid ultrasound images. IMT measurement bias was 0.032 +/- 0.141 mm, better than other automated techniques and comparable to that of user-driven methodologies. Our novel approach of CARES processed 96% of the images leading to the figure of merit to be 95.7%. CARES ensured complete automation and high accuracy in IMT measurement; hence it could be a suitable clinical tool for processing of large datasets in multicenter studies involving atherosclerosis.pre-

  1. Intensive measurements of gas, water, and energy exchange between vegetation and troposphere during the MONTES Campaign in a vegetation gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in the NW Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONTES (“Woodlands”) was a multidisciplinary international field campaign aimed at measuring energy, water and especially gas exchange between vegetation and atmosphere in a gradient from short semi-desertic shrublands to tall wet temperate forests in NE Spain in the North Wester...

  2. Muscle interstitial potassium kinetics during intense exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Mohr, Magni; Pedersen, Lasse Dannemann;

    2003-01-01

    Interstitial K+ ([K+]i) was measured in human skeletal muscle by microdialysis during exhaustive leg exercise, with (AL) and without (L) previous intense arm exercise. In addition, the reproducibility of the [K+]i determinations was examined. Possible microdialysis-induced rupture of the sarcolemma...... that microdialysis can be used to determine muscle [K+]i kinetics during intense exercise, when low-intensity exercise is performed before the intense exercise. The high [K+]i levels reached at exhaustion can be expected to cause fatigue, which is supported by the finding that a faster accumulation of interstitial K...

  3. 集约化重型拖拉机对土壤的影响及缓释措施%Effect of Power-Intensive Tractor on Soil and Relief Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Slus.,VV; Rusi.,AV

    2000-01-01

    集约化重型拖拉机的使用有利于发展农业生产,但由于拖位机轮胎对土壤的冲击,对土壤水分、通气性、肥力和植物生物活性条件等的不利影响,又反过来影响了作物的产量.推导了轮式拖拉机下土壤的应力公式,并进行了履带分散传导挤压实验,结果表明 ,拖拉机履带能够降低土内应力及对土壤的压实,从而减少了冬春小麦的产量损失.%Utilization of Power-intensive tractor is benificial to agricultural p roduction, but also produces a side-influence to the soil on moisture, ventilat ion, fertility and plant biological activity conditions, which turn back to impa ir the yield of the crops cultivated, due to the impact from tractor wheels on s oil. The expression of normal stress in soil under the tractor wheels was derive d and the experiments with bandage application for relieving the impact were con ducted. The results indicate that bandage application on tractor wheels leads to the decrease of normal stress in soil, compression on soil, etc. and the decrea se of yield losses for winter and spring wheat.

  4. Intensity standardisation of 7T MR images for intensity-based segmentation of the human hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jan; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Trampel, Robert; Anwander, Alfred; Geyer, Stefan; Schönknecht, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The high spatial resolution of 7T MRI enables us to identify subtle volume changes in brain structures, providing potential biomarkers of mental disorders. Most volumetric approaches require that similar intensity values represent similar tissue types across different persons. By applying colour-coding to T1-weighted MP2RAGE images, we found that the high measurement accuracy achieved by high-resolution imaging may be compromised by inter-individual variations in the image intensity. To address this issue, we analysed the performance of five intensity standardisation techniques in high-resolution T1-weighted MP2RAGE images. Twenty images with extreme intensities in the GM and WM were standardised to a representative reference image. We performed a multi-level evaluation with a focus on the hypothalamic region—analysing the intensity histograms as well as the actual MR images, and requiring that the correlation between the whole-brain tissue volumes and subject age be preserved during standardisation. The results were compared with T1 maps. Linear standardisation using subcortical ROIs of GM and WM provided good results for all evaluation criteria: it improved the histogram alignment within the ROIs and the average image intensity within the ROIs and the whole-brain GM and WM areas. This method reduced the inter-individual intensity variation of the hypothalamic boundary by more than half, outperforming all other methods, and kept the original correlation between the GM volume and subject age intact. Mixed results were obtained for the other four methods, which sometimes came at the expense of unwarranted changes in the age-related pattern of the GM volume. The mapping of the T1 relaxation time with the MP2RAGE sequence is advertised as being especially robust to bias field inhomogeneity. We found little evidence that substantiated the T1 map’s theoretical superiority over the T1-weighted images regarding the inter-individual image intensity homogeneity. PMID

  5. Design of Greenhouse Temperature and Light Intensity Control Circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    In view of domestic scientific and technological achievements at present,real-time control circuit for greenhouse temperature and light intensity has been designed in line with the principle of cost saving and easy control.With advanced temperature sensor and light sensor applied to measure the temperature and light intensity,an execution unit is controlled by single-chip microcomputer(SCM)to regulate the temperature and light intensity,creating a hardware design scheme and software design idea.In case of high temperature and high light intensity in greenhouse,the sunshade net will be put down and the blower will be started automatically;in case of low temperature and light intensity,the sunshade net will be folded up and the heating valve will be turned up automatically.In this way,the temperature and light intensity in greenhouse will be controlled within the designed range.

  6. The high intensity neutron source FRANZ

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Frankfurt neutron source of Stern Gerlach Zentrum FRANZ is currently under construction at the University of Frankfurt. At FRANZ, a high intensity neutron beam in the keV energy region will be produced by bombarding a $^7$Li target with a proton beam of several mA. These unprecedented high neutron fluxes will allow a number of neutron induced cross section measurements for the first time. Measurements can be performed by the time-of-flight and by the activation technique.

  7. TASKS OF THE "INTENSIVE READING"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍向梅

    1984-01-01

    @@ To Chinese students who are learning English as a foreign language, the "intensive reading" course is of great practical value,especially in the intermediate stage,i.e.senior-middle school or the second or third year in college. "Intensive reading"implies the recognition of the configuration, pronunciation, grammatical inflexion and structure of words, sentences, paragraphs, and the whole text. It strength ens listening and speaking, affords language, content, and models for writing.It helps the student lay a solid foundation of the language. Thus, the tasks assigned to the "intensive reading" are worth studying.

  8. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  9. Assessment of liquefaction potential during earthquakes by arias intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, R.E.; Mitchell, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    An Arias intensity approach to assess the liquefaction potential of soil deposits during earthquakes is proposed, using an energy-based measure of the severity of earthquake-shaking recorded on seismograms of the two horizontal components of ground motion. Values representing the severity of strong motion at depth in the soil column are associated with the liquefaction resistance of that layer, as measured by in situ penetration testing (SPT, CPT). This association results in a magnitude-independent boundary that envelopes initial liquefaction of soil in Arias intensity-normalized penetration resistance space. The Arias intensity approach is simple to apply and has proven to be highly reliable in assessing liquefaction potential. The advantages of using Arias intensity as a measure of earthquake-shaking severity in liquefaction assessment are: Arias intensity is derived from integration of the entire seismogram wave form, incorporating both the amplitude and duration elements of ground motion; all frequencies of recorded motion are considered; and Arias intensity is an appropriate measure to use when evaluating field penetration test methodologies that are inherently energy-based. Predictor equations describing the attenuation of Arias intensity as a function of earthquake magnitude and source distance are presented for rock, deep-stiff alluvium, and soft soil sites.

  10. Measurements of emission rates of hydrocarbons from sunflower as a function of temperature, light intensity and stress (ozone levels); Bestimmung von Emissionsraten pflanzlicher Kohlenwasserstoffe bei Sonnenblumen in Abhaengigkeit von Temperatur, Lichtintensitaet und Stress, insbesondere von der Belastung mit Ozon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuh, G.; Wildt, J.; Kley, D.

    1996-08-01

    The emission rates of isoprene, mono- and sesquiterpenes from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. giganteus) were determined in an environmental chamber, a continuously stirred tank reactor. {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-caryophyllene and two oxygenated compounds were emitted. The emission rates of all terpenes increased exponentially with temperature. Substance specific differences of the rate of increase of the emission rates were observed. For all substances the dependence of their emission rates on temperature increased with increasing light intensity. Increasing lightflux resulted in an increase of the emission rates for all substances. The raise of emission rates with lightflux was dependent on temperature and increased with increasing temperature. During periods without plant stress the emission rates exhibited a good correlation with the rate of transpiration as well as with the rate of net photosynthesis. Sunflowers emitted higher amounts of terpenes when they were stressed by mechanical, wounding and ozone treatment as well as nutrient- or water deficiency. The emission rates increased by a factor of 5-300. Exposure with ozone had an effect on hydrocarbon emission rates with a delay-time. 3-4 h after exposure with 25-120 ppb ozone the emission rates increased by factor of 5-100. This increase was only observed on the first day of exposure. Nutrient deficiency resulted in an increase of emission rates by a factor of 10-300. In situations of mechanical, wounding and ozone stress, substance specific changes in the emission spectrum were observed. A model was developed to explain the observed phenomena. The main pathway of ozone loss in the chamber is caused by the uptake through the stomata of the plants. However, up to 50% of the ozone loss must be explained by other processes indirectly caused by the plants. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] In Laborversuchen wurden Emissionsraten biogener Kohlenwasserstoffe von Sonnenblumen gemessen. Die groessten Emissionsraten wiesen die

  11. A Methodological Approach to Quantifying Plyometric Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Mark M; Graham-Smith, Phil; Comfort, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Jarvis, MM, Graham-Smith, P, and Comfort, P. A Methodological approach to quantifying plyometric intensity. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2522-2532, 2016-In contrast to other methods of training, the quantification of plyometric exercise intensity is poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of a range of neuromuscular and mechanical variables to describe the intensity of plyometric exercises. Seven male recreationally active subjects performed a series of 7 plyometric exercises. Neuromuscular activity was measured using surface electromyography (SEMG) at vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF). Surface electromyography data were divided into concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) phases of movement. Mechanical output was measured by ground reaction forces and processed to provide peak impact ground reaction force (PF), peak eccentric power (PEP), and impulse (IMP). Statistical analysis was conducted to assess the reliability intraclass correlation coefficient and sensitivity smallest detectable difference of all variables. Mean values of SEMG demonstrate high reliability (r ≥ 0.82), excluding ECC VL during a 40-cm drop jump (r = 0.74). PF, PEP, and IMP demonstrated high reliability (r ≥ 0.85). Statistical power for force variables was excellent (power = 1.0), and good for SEMG (power ≥0.86) excluding CON BF (power = 0.57). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in CON SEMG between exercises. Eccentric phase SEMG only distinguished between exercises involving a landing and those that did not (percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction [%MVIC] = no landing -65 ± 5, landing -140 ± 8). Peak eccentric power, PF, and IMP all distinguished between exercises. In conclusion, CON neuromuscular activity does not appear to vary when intent is maximal, whereas ECC activity is dependent on the presence of a landing. Force characteristics provide a reliable and sensitive measure enabling precise description of intensity

  12. Phase difference enhancement with classical intensity interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2016-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that, as a novel function of classical intensity interferometry, a phase difference distribution recorded in the form of an interferogram can be enhanced by a factor of 2 on the basis of the classical intensity correlation. Such phase difference enhancement which is also referred to as phase difference amplification is, in general, known to be practically important since it increases sensitivity and accuracy in interferometric measurements. The method proposed in this study prevails over the existing methods in the sense that it can be readily implemented without difficulty in comparison with all other methods so far proposed, although the phase difference enhancement is limited to a factor of 2 in our method and thus so is the improvement of sensitivity and accuracy.

  13. Energetic particle pressure in intense ESP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We study three intense energetic storm particle (ESP) events in which the energetic particle pressure PEP exceeded both the pressure of the background thermal plasma Pth and the pressure of the magnetic field PB. The region upstream of the interplanetary shocks associated with these events was characterized by a depression of the magnetic field strength coincident with the increase of the energetic particle intensities and, when plasma measurements were available, a depleted solar wind density. The general feature of cosmic-ray mediated shocks such as the deceleration of the upstream background medium into which the shock propagates is generally observed. However, for those shocks where plasma parameters are available, pressure balance is not maintained either upstream of or across the shock, which may result from the fact that PEP is not included in the calculation of the shock parameters.

  14. Influence of the intensity gradient upon HHG from free electrons scattered by an intense laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ankang; Ren, Na; Wang, Pingxiao; Zhu, Wenjun; Li, Xiaoya; Hoehn, Ross; Kais, Sabre

    2013-01-01

    When an electron is scattered by a tightly-focused laser beam in vacuum, the intensity gradient is a critical factor to influence the electron dynamics, for example, the electron energy exchange with the laser fields as have been explored before [P.X.Wang et al.,J. Appl. Phys. 91, 856 (2002]. In this paper, we have further investigated its influence upon the electron high-harmonic generation (HHG) by treating the spacial gradient of the laser intensity as a ponderomotive potential. Based upon perturbative QED calculations, it has been found that the main effect of the intensity gradient is the broadening of the originally line HHG spectra. A one-to-one relationship can be built between the beam width and the corresponding line width. Hence this finding may provides us a promising way to measure the beam width of intense lasers in experiments. In addition, for a laser pulse, we have also studied the different influences from transverse and longitudinal intensity gradients upon HHG.

  15. Training intensities for aerobic exercise determined on untrained healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura,Mochiyoshi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the aerobic training intensity from the maximal and submaximal running exercise in 21 untrained adult men. To accomplish this, we evaluated the relationship between physiological (oxygen intake and heart rate and physical parameters (running speed of training intensity, and determined the training intensity at the submaximal exercise. Oxygen intake and heart rate were measured by a treadmill test. The maximal oxygen intake (VO2 max, and the aerobic threshold (AerT and anaerobic threshold (AT were measured to determine respiratory gas exchange. Running capacity was measured by a 12-min running and treadmill test. For the maximal exercise, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.88, P < 0.01 between VO2 max and 12-min running distance (speed. In addition, the oxygen intake and heart rate at AerT and AT in the submaximal exercise were linearly correlated with running speed. Three levels of training intensity at the submaximal exercise were termed: light, moderate, and heavy. Since AerT was the lower limit intensity and AT was the upper limit, we took the middle of their values as the moderate intensity. The end point for the determination of the training intensity at the submaximal exercise was estimated to be 85% VO2 max and 180 beats.min-1.

  16. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  17. [The future of intensive medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia Herrejón, E; González Díaz, G; Mancebo Cortés, J

    2011-05-01

    Although Intensive Care Medicine is a young specialty compared with other medical disciplines, it currently plays a key role in the process of care for many patients. Experience has shown that professionals with specific training in Intensive Care Medicine are needed to provide high quality care to critically ill patients. In Europe, important steps have been taken towards the standardization of training programs of the different member states. However, it is now necessary to take one more step forward, that is, the creation of a primary specialty in Intensive Care Medicine. Care of the critically ill needs to be led by specialists who have received specific and complete training and who have the necessary profession