WorldWideScience

Sample records for airglow intensities measured

  1. Heater-induced ionization inferred from spectrometric airglow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, D. L.; Miceli, R. J.; Varney, R. H.; Schlatter, N.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Spectrographic airglow measurements were made during an ionospheric modification experiment at HAARP on March 12, 2013. Artificial airglow enhancements at 427.8, 557.7, 630.0, 777.4, and 844.6 nm were observed. On the basis of these emissions and using a methodology based on the method of Backus and Gilbert [1968, 1970], we estimate the suprathermal electron population and the subsequent equilibrium electron density profile, including contributions from electron impact ionization. We find that the airglow is consistent with significant induced ionization in view of the spatial intermittency of the airglow.

  2. Hydroxyl (6−2 airglow emission intensity ratios for rotational temperature determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lowe

    Full Text Available OH(6–2 Q1/P1 and R1/P1 airglow emission intensity ratios, for rotational states up to j' = 4.5, are measured to be lower than implied by transition probabilities published by various authors including Mies, Langhoff et al. and Turnbull and Lowe. Experimentally determined relative values of j' transitions yield OH(6–2 rotational temperatures 2 K lower than Langhoff et al., 7 K lower than Mies and 13 K lower than Turnbull and Lowe.Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; pressure, density and temperature

  3. Thermospheric airglow emissions - A comparison of measurements from Atlas-1 and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torr, Douglas G.; Torr, Marsha R.; Richards, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive thermospheric model is presently used to derive conditions appropriate to the time of the Atlas-1 Space Shuttle mission, comparing the slant-path intensities thus computed as a function of altitude, latitude, and local time with a dozen major emissions measured in the course of a specific observing sequence. The agreement thus obtained is found to be reasonably good, implying that the major thermospheric airglow-controlling processes are essentially understood.

  4. Global temperature distributions from OGO-6 6300 A airglow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamont, J. E.; Luton, J. M.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The OGO-6 6300 A airglow temperature measurements have been used to develop models of the global temperature distributions under solstice and equinox conditions for the altitude region from 240 to 300 km and for times ranging from dawn in this altitude region to shortly after sunset. The distributions are compared with models derived from satellite orbital decay and incoherent scatter sounding. The seasonal variation of the temperature as a function of latitude is shown to be very different from that derived from static diffusion models with constant boundary conditions.

  5. Atmospheric wave induced O2 and OH airglow intensity variations: effect of vertical wavelength and damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gobbi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available From nocturnal variations of the airglow O2 (0-1 and OH Meinel (6-2 band emission intensity and the rotational temperature, gravity waves and the damping effect in the MLT region were investigated. The data set was obtained from photometer measurements at Rikubetsu (43.5° N, 143.8° E, Japan, from March 2004 to August 2005. The ratio of the amplitude of oscillation and their phase difference between the two emissions were calculated when simultaneous periodic variations were observed. The ratio showed a linear correlation with the phase difference. The vertical wavelength and damping rate were estimated by using a model calculation carried out by previous works. The results show that the wave damping is significant when the vertical wavelength is shorter than 30–40 km. Krassovsky's parameter η, which represents a ratio between the emission intensity and temperature oscillations, was also calculated. The results show that the η also depends on the damping effect.

  6. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at Kolhapur (India)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Ghodpage; Devendraa Siingh; R P Singh; G K Mukherjee; P Vohat; A K Singh

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous photometric measurements of the OI 557.7 nm and OH (7, 2) band from a low latitude station, Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours have been recorded. Some of these waves having subharmonic tidal oscillation periods 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours propagate upward with velocity lying in the range 1.6–11.3 m/s and the vertical wave length lying between 28.6 and 163 kms. The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application of these waves in studying the thermal structure of the region is discussed.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien T.; Zemcov, Michael; Battle, John; Bock, James J.; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Meek, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using a λ/Δλ = 320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. At low airmasses, the absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 ± 30 nW m‑2 sr‑1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ∼100 s integrations the noise performance of the instrument does not appear to significantly degrade from expectations, giving a proof of concept that near-infrared line intensity mapping may be feasible from ground-based sites.

  8. Spectral measurements of atmospheric OH and O2 NIR airglow with a Michelson FTS and InGaAs detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments and the integration of and InGaAs detector with a precision, compact Michelson interferometer have provided a very sensitive, reliable, and portable measurement tool for studying near infrared upper atmospheric emissions. Spectrically resolved and calibrated line intensity measurements of major portions of the Δν = 2 and the Δν = 3 band sequences of the OH Meinel airglow emissions are obtainable from ground based sites. Typically, the spectrometer provides signal-to-noise rations of 50/1 in one minute measurement time. Time resolved rotational OH temperatures and therefore ambient temperatures corresponding to the 80 to 95 Km OH emission region can be obtained from the data

  9. A novel approach for the extraction of cloud motion vectors using airglow imager measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Satheesh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the possibility of implementing an advanced photogrammetric technique, generally employed for satellite measurements, on airglow imager, a ground-based remote sensing instrument primarily used for upper atmospheric studies, measurements of clouds for the extraction of cloud motion vectors (CMVs. The major steps involved in the algorithm remain the same, including image processing for better visualization of target elements and noise removal, identification of target cloud, setting a proper search window for target cloud tracking, estimation of cloud height, and employing 2-D cross-correlation to estimate the CMVs. Nevertheless, the implementation strategy at each step differs from that of satellite, mainly to suit airglow imager measurements. For instance, climatology of horizontal winds at the measured site has been used to fix the search window for target cloud tracking. The cloud height is estimated very accurately, as required by the algorithm, using simultaneous collocated Lidar measurements. High-resolution, both in space and time (4 min, cloud imageries are employed to minimize the errors in retrieved CMVs. The derived winds are evaluated against MST radar-derived winds by considering it as a reference. A very good correspondence is seen between these two wind measurements, both showing similar wind variation. The agreement is also found to be good in the both zonal and meridional wind velocities with RMSEs −1. At the end, the strengths and limitations of the algorithm are discussed, with possible solutions, wherever required.

  10. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. In general, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (non local thermodynamic equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1Σg+−X3Σg− atmospheric band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3Σg− infrared atmospheric band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  11. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  12. Measurement of mesospheric winds using the Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery; Ward, William E.; Nakamura, Takuji

    MIADI images the wind and irradiance fields present in mesospheric airglow signatures using a new implementation of the field widened Michelson technique. The system is unique in its ability to image the mean wind and irradiance as well as the perturbation quantities, allowing for unambiguous gravity wave parameters to be derived using a single optical element. MIADI was installed and tested at the MU radar field site in Shigaraki Japan in 2009. Several nights of observations have been obtained and the initial analysis has been completed. In this presentation, the instrument technique, calibration process and installation/testing will be described and the analysis of the initial wind and irradiance measurements will be presented.

  13. Limb Viewing Hyper Spectral Imager (LiVHySI) for airglow measurements onboard YOUTHSAT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, R. S.; Hait, A. K.; Babu, P. N.; Sarkar, S. S.; Benerji, A.; Biswas, A.; Saji, A. K.; Samudraiah, D. R. M.; Kirankumar, A. S.; Pant, T. K.; Parimalarangan, T.

    2014-08-01

    The Limb Viewing Hyper Spectral Imager (LiVHySI) is one of the Indian payloads onboard YOUTHSAT (inclination 98.73°, apogee 817 km) launched in April, 2011. The Hyper-spectral imager has been operated in Earth’s limb viewing mode to measure airglow emissions in the spectral range 550-900 nm, from terrestrial upper atmosphere (i.e. 80 km altitude and above) with a line-of-sight range of about 3200 km. The altitude coverage is about 500 km with command selectable lowest altitude. This imaging spectrometer employs a Linearly Variable Filter (LVF) to generate the spectrum and an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) area array of 256 × 512 pixels, placed in close proximity of the LVF as detector. The spectral sampling is done at 1.06 nm interval. The optics used is an eight element f/2 telecentric lens system with 80 mm effective focal length. The detector is aligned with respect to the LVF such that its 512 pixel dimension covers the spectral range. The radiometric sensitivity of the imager is about 20 Rayleigh at noise floor through the signal integration for 10 s at wavelength 630 nm. The imager is being operated during the eclipsed portion of satellite orbits. The integration in the time/spatial domain could be chosen depending upon the season, solar and geomagnetic activity and/or specific target area. This paper primarily aims at describing LiVHySI, its in-orbit operations, quality, potential of the data and its first observations. The images reveal the thermospheric airglow at 630 nm to be the most prominent. These first LiVHySI observations carried out on the night of 21st April, 2011 are presented here, while the variability exhibited by the thermospheric nightglow at O(1D) 630 nm has been described in detail.

  14. A mesospheric airglow multichannel photometer and an optical method to measure mesospheric AGW intrinsic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangognia, Anthony; Swenson, Gary; Vargas, Fabio; Liu, Alan

    2016-05-01

    A multichannel photometer (MCP) instrument, designed with filters for three specific airglow emissions, OH Meinel (5-1), (6-2), 840 nm; O2 (b) (0,1), 865 nm; and O(1S), 557.7 nm, as well as background, is used to observe atmospheric wave perturbations to layers in the local zenith with high temporal resolution (∼5 s). By measuring the relative phase of propagating waves through the layers, with known altitude separation, we deduce the vertical wavelength. We describe here the instrument attributes, a unique background subtraction technique, and the validation of a new method for determining intrinsic wave parameters via MCP and imager data that can be taken from various platforms, including ground-based and spacecraft platforms. Vertical wavelengths deduced using this method are in close agreement with those measured using LIDAR temperatures as well as those calculated with the dispersion relation using a combination of all-sky imager (horizontal wavelength) and meteor radar (winds) data.

  15. Solar measurements from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the solar spectral irradiance from the Airglow-Solar Spectrometer Instrument (ASSI) on the San Marco 5 satellite is the focus for this research grant. A pre-print copy of the paper describing the calibrations of and results from the San Marco ASSI is attached to this report. The calibration of the ASSI included (1) transfer of photometric calibration from a rocket experiment and the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME), (2) use of the on-board radioactive calibration sources, (3) validation of the ASSI sensitivity over its field of view, and (4) determining the degradation of the spectrometers. We have determined that the absolute values for the solar irradiance needs adjustment in the current proxy models of the solar UV irradiance, and the amount of solar variability from the proxy models are in reasonable agreement with the ASSI measurements. This research grant also has supported the development of a new solar EUV irradiance proxy model. We expected that the magnetic flux is responsible for most of the heating, via Alfen waves, in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. From examining time series of solar irradiance data and magnetic fields at different levels, we did indeed find that the chromospheric emissions correlate best with the large magnetic field levels.

  16. Seasonal hemispherical SWIR airglow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeffrey; Dayton, David C.; Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael M.; Nolasco, Rudolph

    2011-09-01

    Airglow luminescence in the SWIR region due to upper atmospheric recombination of solar excited molecules is a well accepted phenomenon. While the intensity appears broadly uniform over the whole sky hemisphere, we are interested in variations in four areas: 1) fine periodic features known as gravity waves, 2) broad patterns across the whole sky, 3) temporal variations in the hemispheric mean irradiance over the course of the night, and 4) long term seasonal variations in the mean irradiance. An experiment is described and results presented covering a full year of high resolution hemispheric SWIR irradiance images. An automated gimbal views 45 hemispheric positions, using 30 second durations, and repeats approximately every half hour through out the night. The gimbal holds co-mounted and bore-sighted visible and SWIR cameras. Measuring airglow with respect to spatial, temporal, and seasonal variations will facilitate understanding its behavior and possible benefits, such as night vision and predicting upper atmosphere turbulence. The measurements were performed in a tropical marine location on the island of Kauai Hi.

  17. The O2 night airglow in Venus atmosphere from VIRTIS VEX measurements: local time and temporal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, Ludmila; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Shakun, Alexey; Altieri, Francesca; Gorinov, Dmitry

    Observation of the O2 1.27 µm airglow intensity distribution on the night side of Venus is one of the methods of study of the circulation in upper mesosphere 90-100 km. VIRTIS-M on board Venus Express made these observations in nadir and limb modes in Southern and Northern hemispheres respectively. To avoid high noisy data we use for analysis only those, obtained with exposure > 3 s. It was found that intensity of emission decreases to poles and to terminators in both hemispheres which gives evidence for existence of SS-AS circulation with transport of the air masses through poles and terminators with ascending/descending flows at SS/AS areas. Asymmetry of distribution of intensity of airglow is observed in both hemispheres. Global map for southern hemisphere (from nadir data) has good statistics at φ > 10-20°S and pretty poor at lower latitudes. Maximum emission was found shifted from midnight by 1 - 2 hours to the evening (22-23h) and deep minimum of emission is found at LT=2-4 h at φ > 20°S. This asymmetry is extended up to equatorial region, however statistic is poor there. No evident indication for existence of the Retrograde Zonal Superrotation (RZS) is found: maximum emission in this case, which is resulting from downwards flow, should be shifted to the morning. VIRTIS limb observations cover the low northern latitudes and they are more sparse at higher latitudes. Intensity of airglow at φ = 0 - 20° N shows wide maximum, which is shifted by 1- 2 h from midnight to morning terminator. This obviously indicates that observed O2 night glow distribution in low North latitudes is explained by a superposition of SS-AS flow and RZS circulation at 95-100 km. This behavior is similar to the NO intensity distribution, obtained by SPICAV. Temporal wariation was found at low latitudes of the Northern hemisphere: during 820 days observations three maxima were observed separated by 150 - 200 days approximately.

  18. Simultaneous temperature measurements of the upper mesosphere obtained by lidar and airglow in the Brazilian low latitude sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. We present temperature measurements of the upper mesosphere obtained by lidar and airglow in the Brazilian low latitude sector over a period of two years. In the 80-110 km region, free sodium atoms are abundant enough to allow probing of the Doppler broadened hyperfine structure of the D2 resonance transition by ground-based lidar. The lidar technique consists in detection of the resonance transition at two wavelengths, one at the D2a peak, and another at the minimum between the D2a and D2b peaks, making it possible to calculate the density and temperature profiles. At the same time, rotational temperatures obtained from the airglow OH (6-2) emission using photometer data were determined. Given the lidar-derived temperature profile, we adjusted the height of an empirical OH emission profile so as to minimize the difference between the observed OH temperatures and the lidar data. This procedure was carried out using lidar data from Sao Jose dos Campos (23 deg S, 46 deg W) and photometer data from Cachoeira Paulista (22,7 deg S, 45 deg W), about 100 km away. In general, the OH temperatures were higher than those derived from the lidar measurements, and it was not always possible to fine an emission profile giving good agreement between the two. On some occasions we observed oscillations in the estimated OH emission height, which we believe to be caused by gravity waves.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hien T; Battle, John; Bock, James J; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Philip; Meek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using an R=320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. The absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 +/- 30 nW m^-2 sr^-1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ~100s integrations the noise performance of the instrument ...

  20. Solar energy deposition rates in the mesosphere derived from airglow measurements: Implications for the ozone model deficit problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-07-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-μm oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat.budget.gats.inc.com.

  1. Solar Energy Deposition Rates in the Mesosphere Derived from Airglow Measurements: Implications for the Ozone Model Deficit Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Roble, Raymond G.; Hagan, Maura

    2000-01-01

    We derive rates of energy deposition in the mesosphere due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone. The rates are derived directly from measurements of the 1.27-microns oxygen dayglow emission, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance, the ozone absorption cross sections, and the ultraviolet solar irradiance in the ozone Hartley band. Fifty-six months of airglow data taken between 1982 and 1986 by the near-infrared spectrometer on the Solar-Mesosphere Explorer satellite are analyzed. The energy deposition rates exhibit altitude-dependent annual and semi-annual variations. We also find a positive correlation between temperatures and energy deposition rates near 90 km at low latitudes. This correlation is largely due to the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and is consistent with model calculations. There is also a suggestion of possible tidal enhancement of this correlation based on recent theoretical and observational analyses. The airglow-derived rates of energy deposition are then compared with those computed by multidimensional numerical models. The observed and modeled deposition rates typically agree to within 20%. This agreement in energy deposition rates implies the same agreement exists between measured and modeled ozone volume mixing ratios in the mesosphere. Only in the upper mesosphere at midlatitudes during winter do we derive energy deposition rates (and hence ozone mixing ratios) consistently and significantly larger than the model calculations. This result is contrary to previous studies that have shown a large model deficit in the ozone abundance throughout the mesosphere. The climatology of solar energy deposition and heating presented in this paper is available to the community at the Middle Atmosphere Energy Budget Project web site at http://heat-budget.gats-inc.com.

  2. Measurements of the helium 584 Å airglow during the Cassini flyby of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Gustin, J.; Hubert, B.; Gladstone, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-10-01

    The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity. The brightness was measured along the disk from the morning terminator up to the bright limb near local noon. The mean disk intensity was ∼320 R, reaching ∼700 R at the bright limb. These values are slightly higher than those determined from previous observations. The sensitivity of the 584 Å intensity to the helium abundance is analyzed using recent cross-sections and solar irradiance measurements at 584 Å. The intensity distribution along the UVIS footprint on the disk is best reproduced using the EUVAC solar flux model and the helium density distribution from the VTS3 empirical model. It corresponds to a helium density of 8×106 cm-3 at the level of where the CO2 is 2×1010 cm-3.

  3. Lyman alpha airglow observations from SORCE SOLSTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinar, E.; Snow, M.; Holsclaw, G.; Thomas, G. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instrument on board the Solar Radiation Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft in low Earth orbit observes stars every orbit for in-flight calibration. It also observes several star-free regions of the sky near the wavelength of Lyman alpha to correct for airglow emission in the stellar measurements. Although the airglow measurements are only taken during the eclipse portion of the orbit, the look directions cover nearly the entire anti-sunward hemisphere. This seven-year record of Lyman alpha airglow observations (2003-2010) shows the response of the Hydrogen geocorona to changes in the solar Lyman alpha irradiance over the solar cycle.

  4. The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging: Instrument Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Jeffery; Ward, William E.; Gault, William A.; Miller, Ian; Scott, Alan

    The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI) is a new implementation of the imaging field-widened Michelson interferometer concept. Airglow signatures in the mesopause region are imaged through the interferometer and wind and intensity images are simultaneously recorded. The field-of-view for this instrument is a 30 degree square region. This field will be divided into 100 bins (10 by 10) and measurements of intensity and line-of-sight wind taken for each bin. Two emissions (oxygen green line and hydroxyl) will be viewed simultaneously. The scientific purpose of this instrument is to provide unambiguous information on gravity waves since the background horizontal wind, and wind and irradiance variations will be simultaneously obtained. In the paper, the measurement principle and the characteristics of the instrument will be described and some initial results presented.

  5. Solar cycle variation of gravity waves observed in OH airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Reid, I. M.; Woithe, J.; Vincent, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Airglow imaging provides a unique means by which to study many wave-related phenomena in the 80 to 100 km altitude regime. Two-dimensional image observations reveal quasi-monochromatic disturbances associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) as well as small-scale instabilities, often called ripples. Image-averaged temperature and intensity measurements can be used to study the response of the airglow layer to tides and planetary waves, as well as monitor longer-term climatological variations. Here we present results of low and mid-latitude OH airglow observations beginning near solar max of solar cycle 23 and continuing through solar max of cycle 24. Aerospace imagers deployed at Alice Springs (23o42'S, 133o53'E) and Adelaide (34o55'S, 138o36'E) have been operating nearly continuously since ~2001. The imagers employ filters measuring OH Meinel (6, 2) and O2 Atmospheric (0, 1) band emission intensities and temperatures, as well as atmospheric gravity wave parameters. The Aerospace Corporation's Infrared Camera deployed at Maui, HI (20.7N,156.3W), collected more than 700 nights of airglow images from 2002-2005. The camera measures the OH Meinel (4,2) emission at 1.6 um using a 1 second exposure at a 3 second cadence, which allows the study of AGW and ripple features over very short temporal and spatial scales. The camera was relocated to Cerro Pachon, Chile (30.1 S, 70.8 W) and has been operating continuously since 2010. Temperature, intensity and gravity wave climatologies derived from the two Australian airglow imagers span a full solar cycle (solar max to solar max). Emission intensities have been calibrated using background stars, and temperatures have been calibrated with respect to TIMED/SABER temperatures, reducing the influence of instrument degradation on the solar cycle climatology. An automated wave detection algorithm is used to identify quasi monochromatic wave features in the airglow data, including wavelength, wave period and propagation

  6. The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ward, W. E.

    2009-05-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Airglow Dynamics Imaging (MIADI) is a new implementation of the imaging field-widened Michelson interferometer concept which images airglow signatures in the mesopause region and simultaneously records wind and intensity images. The scientific purpose of this instrument is to provide unambiguous information on gravity waves since the background horizontal wind and irradiance variations will be simultaneously obtained. Calibration and characterization of instrument parameters has been completed at a field site in Shigaraki Japan and initial observations have been taken. Co-located alongside MIADI are the MU radar, Na Lidar and several All-Sky Imagers. Observation campaigns are ongoing to acquire simultaneous data sets from these instruments. In this paper, the calibration and characterization results will be summarized. The initial measurements of winds and intensity will be presented and the scientific goals of the current observing campaign outlined.

  7. Long-term ozone decline and its effect on night airglow intensity of Li 6708 Å at Varanasi (25°N, 83°E) and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; I Saha; S Mukhopadhyay

    2011-04-01

    A critical analysis has been made on the long-term yearly and seasonal variations of ozone concentration at Varanasi (25°N, 83°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of Li 6708 Å line at Varanasi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of Li 6708 Å line has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and seasonal variations of intensities of Li 6708 Å line for the above two stations are shown and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of Li 6708 Å line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  8. Ozone decline and its effect on night airglow intensity of Na 5893°A at Dumdum (22.5°N, 88.5° E) and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; S C Nandi

    2006-10-01

    The paper presents the effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of Na 5893 A line at Dumdum (22.5°N, 88.5°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic service station. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of Na 5893 A line will also be affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The nature of yearly variation and seasonal variation of the intensity of Na 5893 A line for the above two stations are shown and compared. It is shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of Na 5893 A line is comparatively more at Halley Bay due to the dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration. A possible explanation for this dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration is also mentioned.

  9. Measurements of the helium 584 Å airglow during the Cassini flyby of Venus

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Gustin, Jacques; Hubert, Benoît; Gladstone, G. R.; Esposito, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity. The brightness was measured along the disk from the morning terminator up to the bright limb near local noon. The mean disk intensity was ˜320 R, reaching ˜700 R at the bright limb. These values are slightly higher than those determined from previous observations. The sensitivity of the 584 Å ...

  10. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  11. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub o)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub o)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an insitu intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  12. Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Airglow Rocket Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Stanley C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes work done in support of the Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Air-glow Rocket Experiments at the University of Colorado for NASA grant NAG5-5021 under the direction of Dr. Stanley C. Solomon. (The overall rocket program is directed by Dr. Thomas N. Woods, formerly at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and now also at the University of Colorado, for NASA grant NAG5-5141.) Grant NAG5-5021 provided assistance to the overall program through analysis of airglow and solar data, support of two graduate students, laboratory technical services, and field support. The general goals of the rocket program were to measure the solar extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance, measure the terrestrial far-ultraviolet airglow, and analyze their relationship at various levels of solar activity, including near solar minimum. These have been met, as shown below. In addition, we have used the attenuation of solar radiation as the rocket descends through the thermosphere to measure density changes. This work demonstrates the maturity of the observational and modeling methods connecting energetic solar photon fluxes and airglow emissions through the processes of photoionization and photoelectron production and loss. Without a simultaneous photoelectron measurement, some aspects of this relationship remain obscure, and there are still questions pertaining to cascade contributions to molecular and atomic airglow emissions. However, by removing the solar irradiance as an "adjustable parameter" in the analysis, significant progress has been made toward understanding the relationship of far-ultraviolet airglow emissions to the solar and atmospheric conditions that control them.

  13. Equatorial enhancement of the nighttime OH mesospheric infrared airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. J.; Thurgood, B. K.; Harrison, W. K.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    Global measurements of the hydroxyl mesospheric airglow over an extended period of time have been made possible by the NASA SABER infrared sensor aboard the TIMED satellite which has been functioning since December of 2001. The orbital mission has continued over a significant portion of a solar cycle. Experimental data from SABER for several years have exhibited equatorial enhancements of the nighttime mesospheric OH (Δv=2) airglow layer consistent with the high average diurnal solar flux. The brightening of the OH airglow typically means more H+O3 is being reacted. At both the spring and autumn seasonal equinoxes when the equatorial solar UV irradiance mean is greatest, the peak volume emission rate (VER) of the nighttime Meinel infrared airglow typically appears to be both significantly brighter plus lower in altitude by several kilometres at low latitudes compared with midlatitude findings.

  14. Equatorial enhancement of the nighttime OH mesospheric infrared airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D J [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Thurgood, B K [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Harrison, W K [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Mlynczak, M G [NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 401-B, Hampton, VA 23665-5225 (United States); Russell, J M [Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Hampton University, 23 Tyler Street Hampton, VA 23668 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Global measurements of the hydroxyl mesospheric airglow over an extended period of time have been made possible by the NASA SABER infrared sensor aboard the TIMED satellite which has been functioning since December of 2001. The orbital mission has continued over a significant portion of a solar cycle. Experimental data from SABER for several years have exhibited equatorial enhancements of the nighttime mesospheric OH ({delta}v=2) airglow layer consistent with the high average diurnal solar flux. The brightening of the OH airglow typically means more H+O{sub 3} is being reacted. At both the spring and autumn seasonal equinoxes when the equatorial solar UV irradiance mean is greatest, the peak volume emission rate (VER) of the nighttime Meinel infrared airglow typically appears to be both significantly brighter plus lower in altitude by several kilometres at low latitudes compared with midlatitude findings.

  15. Discovery of a new orange feature from FeO in the night airglow with the OSIRIS spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W. F.; Gattinger, R.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Degenstein, D. A.; Slanger, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of a new airglow feature in the earth’s atmosphere is presented. The FeO orange feature has been detected in the night airglow spectrum with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the ODIN spacecraft. The orange chemiluminescent airglow has been measured in the spectral region from 530 nm to 650 nm. The OSIRIS imaging spectrograph measures the airglow spectrum over the 275 to 815 nm wavelength range. At the spectral resolution of OSIRIS, the band systems of FeO appear as a weak continuum-like structure in the 600 nm region at 85 km in the upper mesosphere. As the satellite scans, spectra are obtained of the terrestrial limb with tangent altitudes ranging between 5 km and 110 km. Since the instrument is a CCD spectrograph, all wavelengths are exposed simultaneously thus avoiding the effect of temporal intensity variations inherently present in spectrally scanning instruments. The relative spectral sensitivity over the entire wavelength range has been quantified to yield an estimated 5% precision. In order to maintain accurate on-orbit spectral calibrations an atmospheric radiation model with multiple Rayleigh scattering is employed to regularly update the OSIRIS spectral response. Averages of spectra at a series of tangent limb altitudes were assembled from numerous limb scans at low latitudes. Limb radiance altitude profiles for a number of observed spectral features were obtained from these averaged spectra. These radiance profiles were inverted to obtain volume emission rate altitude profiles. Synthetic spectra for the hydroxyl and O2 Herzberg airglow emission bands were generated and scaled with the observed band intensities to remove the known airglow components in order to isolate the underlying airglow feature. Tropical latitudes were chosen to minimize the classic green airglow continuum from the reaction of nitric oxide with atomic oxygen since nitric oxide is small at 90 km in the tropics. Other potential photochemical sources of the orange glow are

  16. HF-enhanced 4278-Å airglow: evidence of accelerated ionosphere electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallen, C. T.; Watkins, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    We report calculations from a one-dimensional physics-based self-consistent ionosphere model (SCIM) demonstrating that HF-heating of F-region electrons can produce 4278-Å airglow enhancements comparable in magnitude to those reported during ionosphere HF modification experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory in Alaska. These artificial 'blue-line' emissions, also observed at the EISCAT ionosphere heating facility in Norway, have been attributed to arise solely from additional production of N2+ ions through impact ionization of N2 molecules by HF-accelerated electrons. Each N2+ ion produced by impact ionization or photoionization has a probability of being created in the N2+(1N) excited state, resulting in a blue-line emission from the allowed transition to its ground state. The ionization potential of N2 exceeds 18 eV, so enhanced impact ionization of N2 implies that significant electron acceleration processes occur in the HF-modified ionosphere. Further, because of the fast N2+ emission time, measurements of 4278-Å intensity during ionosphere HF modification experiments at HAARP have also been used to estimate artificial ionization rates. To the best of our knowledge, all observations of HF-enhanced blue-line emissions have been made during twilight conditions when resonant scattering of sunlight by N2+ ions is a significant source of 4278-Å airglow. Our model calculations show that F-region electron heating by powerful O-mode HF waves transmitted from HAARP is sufficient to increase N2+ ion densities above the shadow height through temperature-enhanced ambipolar diffusion and temperature-suppressed ion recombination. Resonant scattering from the modified sunlit region can cause a 10-20 R increase in 4278-Å airglow intensity, comparable in magnitude to artificial emissions measured during ionosphere HF-modification experiments. This thermally-induced artificial 4278-Å aurora occurs independently of any artificial

  17. Byurakan sky night airglow observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data on sky night airglow are obtained by Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory of the Acadamy of Sciences of the Armenian SSR. (BAO). The picfures of brightness distribution of BAO sky night airglow are presented. The observations were carried out with the help of one-channel electrophotometre placed at the 0.5 metre A 3T-14A telescope in U, B, V bands of the international photometric system in moonless nights of the 1st/2nd October, 1976 and 22nd/23d February, 1977. Presented are also the U, B, V values of BAO sky night airglow brightness from one sguare second in zenith. The ilumination of Erevan and Byurakan is the cause of the increase of airglow brightness of BAO sky night, particularly in the town and village direction

  18. Airglow study of ionospheric plasma irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. An instrument for all-sky spectrophotometric imaging was developed for airglow measurements. A 630.0 nm airglow imaging system has been developed for ground-based studies of the optical signatures of tropical plasma irregularities in the F-region. The system was designed for narrowband interference filters (10 angstrom full width at half power) with all-sky (180deg) lenses and records images photographically by using a standard Nikon D300 camera. A field test of the apparatus was conducted on Cachoeira Paulista close to the southern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (22.7degS, 45.0 degW, dip angle = -28deg) from March 20 to March 29, 2009. The optical signature of plasma irregularities are airglow depletion bands in the OI 630 nm emission like plasma bubbles or MSTIDs. The production of the OI 630.o nm emission depends on the molecular oxygen density [O2] and on the oxygen ion density [O+]. The oxygen ion density [O+] is approximately equal to the electron density in the F-region. The height of the F-layer peak electron density is around 350-400 km, while the molecular oxygen density [O2] increases with decreasing height. Thus, the OI 630 nm emission peak occurs in the bottomside of the F region around 220-300 km. The initial results to come from these observations show the presence of airglow depletions in the OI 630 nm. In this work, the characteristics and resolution of the all-sky developed is present and discuss.

  19. Sound intensity and its measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    The paper summarises the basic theory of sound intensity and its measurement and gives an overview of the state of the art with particular emphasis on recent developments in the field. Eighty references are given, most of which to literature published in the past two years. The paper describes and...... discusses the sources of error in measurement of sound intensity and the resulting limitations imposed on various applications of such measurements. Finally, some unresolved problems are mentioned, and the possibility of improving the instrumentation is discussed....

  20. Simulations of airglow variations induced by the CO2 increase and solar cycle variation from 1980 to 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tai-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Airglow intensity and Volume Emission Rate (VER) variations induced by the increase of CO2 gas concentration and F10.7 variation (used as a proxy for the 11-year solar cycle variation) were investigated for the period from 1980 to 1991, encompassing a full solar cycle. Two airglow models are used to simulate the induced variations of O(1S) greenline, O2(0,1) atmospheric band , and OH(8,3) airglow for this study. The results show that both the airglow intensities and peak VERs correlate positively with the F10.7 solar cycle variation and display a small linear trend due to the increase of CO2 gas concentration. The solar-cycle induced airglow intensity variations show that O(1S) greenline has the largest variation (~26%) followed by the O2(0,1) atmospheric band (~23%) and then OH(8,3) airglow (~8%) over the 11 year timespan. The magnitudes of the induced airglow intensity variations by the increase of CO2 gas concentration are about an order of magnitude smaller than those by the F10.7 solar cycle variation. In general, the F10.7 solar cycle variation and CO2 increase do not seem to systematically alter the VER peak altitude of the airglow emissions, though the OH(8,3) VER peak altitude moves up slightly during the years when the F10.7 value falls under 100 SFU.

  1. Mesospheric hydroxyl airglow signatures of acoustic and gravity waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Numerical model results demonstrate that acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may produce cylindrical "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer. They may arrive as precursors to upward propagating gravity waves, generated simultaneously by the same sources, and produce strong temperature perturbations in the thermosphere above. Transient and short-lived, the acoustic wave airglow intensity and temperature signatures are predicted to be detectable by ground-based airglow imaging systems and may provide new insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  2. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether J.W. Jr.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations of the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station of Arequipa. Peru (16.2/sup 0/S, 71.4/sup 0/W geographic, 3.2/sup 0/S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridonal wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22/sup h/ LT lasting for 1 or 2 hours. The temperature increases of 10 K or more existed only in the poleward (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge.

  3. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations on the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station at Arequipa, Peru (16.2 S, 71.4 W geographic, 3.2 S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridional wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22h LT lasting for 1 to 2 hours. The temperature increases of 100K or more existed only in the poleware (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge. (Author)

  4. TIMED GUVI and SEE Observations of Solar Irradiance Variations and the Terrestrial Airglow Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolven, B.; Paxton, L.; Morrison, D.; Woods, T.

    2004-12-01

    Since the launch of the TIMED mission in 2001, the SEE and GUVI instruments have observed solar radiance changes during numerous solar flares, and measured their short-term impact on the terrestrial airglow, manifested as changes in both resonantly scattered and photoelectron excited emissions. The continuous coverage and higher time resolution of the GUVI airglow observations, in conjunction with the multispectral (5-color) image format, constitute a unique source of information on the time variation of the solar irradiance in different spectral regions. GUVI limb observations provide additional data on heating and composition changes in the thermosphere in response to these energy inputs. We examine changes in the observed airglow between quiet and flare conditions, and attempt to understand the differences between SEE measurements and the radiances inferred from GUVI airglow data.

  5. Yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone over New Delhi (29°N, 77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), British Antarctic Survey Station and its effect on night airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) for the period 1979–2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; D K Saha; D Sarkar

    2012-12-01

    A critical analysis made on the long-term monthly, seasonal, yearly variation and annual cycle of total column ozone (TCO) concentration at New Delhi (29°N,77°E), India and Halley Bay (76°S, 27°W), a British Antarctic Service Station reveals more decline in yearly mean ozone concentration at Halley Bay than at New Delhi from 1979 to 2005. The nature of variations of monthly mean TCO during the months of August and September was the most identical with that of yearly mean ozone values at New Delhi and Halley Bay, respectively, for the same period. Annual cycles of TCO over these stations are completely different for the above period. The effect of O3 depletion on night airglow emission of OH(8, 3) line at New Delhi and Halley Bay has been studied. Calculations based on chemical kinetics show that the airglow intensity of OH(8, 3) has also been affected due to the depletion of O3 concentration. The yearly variations and annual cycle of intensities of OH(8, 3) line for the above two stations are depicted and compared. It has been shown that the rate of decrease of intensity of OH(8, 3) line was comparatively more at Halley Bay due to dramatic decrease of Antarctic O3 concentration.

  6. OH Airglow and Equatorial Variations Observed by ISUAL Instrument on Board the FORMOSAT 2 Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Bai Nee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OH airglow observed by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning instrument on board the FORMOSAT 2 satellite is reported in this paper. The satellite is sun-synchronous and it returns to the same orbit at the same local time daily. By using this property, we can study the upper atmosphere in detail. With a CCD camera, ISUAL has measured the emission layers of OH Meinel band at 630 nm for several two-week periods in 2004 and 2007 in equatorial regions. ISUAL images are snapshots of the atmosphere 250 km (height _ 1200 km (horizontal distance. These images of OH airglow are analyzed to derive its peak height and latitudinal variations. ISUAL observation is unique in its capability of continuous observation of the upper atmosphere as the satellite travels from south to north along a specific orbit. However, 630 nm filter also measured O(1D at 200 km, and there are interferences between O(1D and OH airglows as as observed from a distance in space. We have studied the overlap of two airglows by simulations, and our final analyses show that OH airglow can be correctly derived with its average peak height of 89 _ 2.1 km usually lying within _ latitude about the equator. ISUAL data reveal detailed structures of equatorial OH airglow such as the existences of a few secondary maxima within the equatorial regions, and the oscillations of the peak latitudes. These results are discussed and compared with previous reports.

  7. Near-infrared oxygen airglow from the Venus nightside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, D.; Meadows, V. S.; Allen, D. A.; Bezard, B.; Debergh, C.; Maillard, J.-P.

    1992-01-01

    Groundbased imaging and spectroscopic observations of Venus reveal intense near-infrared oxygen airglow emission from the upper atmosphere and provide new constraints on the oxygen photochemistry and dynamics near the mesopause (approximately 100 km). Atomic oxygen is produced by the Photolysis of CO2 on the dayside of Venus. These atoms are transported by the general circulation, and eventually recombine to form molecular oxygen. Because this recombination reaction is exothermic, many of these molecules are created in an excited state known as O2(delta-1). The airglow is produced as these molecules emit a photon and return to their ground state. New imaging and spectroscopic observations acquired during the summer and fall of 1991 show unexpected spatial and temporal variations in the O2(delta-1) airglow. The implications of these observations for the composition and general circulation of the upper venusian atmosphere are not yet understood but they provide important new constraints on comprehensive dynamical and chemical models of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere of Venus.

  8. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, T.N.; Rottman, G.J. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory); Bailey, S.M.; Solomon, S.C. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics)

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution.

  9. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution

  10. OECD Energy Intensity: Measures, Trends, and Convergence

    OpenAIRE

    Liddle, Brantley

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on several different measures of OECD countries’ energy intensity levels, plots their trends, applies a number of techniques to determine whether those intensities are converging, explores the importance of that convergence, and estimates the future steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the OECD. The paper finds that OECD energy intensity typically is declining, and a number of parametric and nonparametric methods indicate a strong degree of converge...

  11. A new perspective on the molecular oxygen and hydroxyl airglow emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.

    The mesospheric molecular oxygen and hydroxyl airglow emissions have traditionally been measured in order to derive minor species abundances or to diagnose dynamical phenomena. We present a new interpretation of these airglow emissions and show them to be fundamental measures of energy deposition from which rates of atmospheric heating are readily derived. The heating rate due to absorption of ultraviolet radiation in the Hartley band of ozone may be derived from simultaneous measurements of the oxygen atmospheric band and infrared atmospheric band volume emission rates independent of knowledge of the ozone density, the solar irradiance, and the ozone absorption cross sections. The heating rates due to key exothermic reactions may be derived directly from appropriate airglow observations independent of the reactant concentrations and the temperature-dependent reaction rates. The accuracy of heating rates derived directly from airglow measurements is also inherently higher than that obtained in standard approaches. We suggest that heating rates derived in this manner be treated as data products and that they be compared with numerical model computations to enhance understanding of atmospheric thermodynamics. An initial comparison of airglow-derived energy deposition rates with deposition rates traditionally computed from numerical models shows agreement to within 20% for the Hartley band of ozone in the lower and upper mesosphere.

  12. Night airglows in Venus atmosphere and dynamics around 100 km from VIRTIS-M VEX data. Comparison with the Earth atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L.; Khatuntsev, I.; Shakun, A.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.

    2012-04-01

    Analysis of the O2 1.27um night airglow in the Venus atmosphere is presented. Night glow is extremely variable in space and local time. However, averaged over all nadir observations for Southern hemisphere and over all nadir observations for Northern hemisphere it allows to study a global circulation around 100 km altitude. The global circulation at these levels may be presented by SS-AS, zonal retrograde, as well tides and waves may influence nightglow distribution. In Southern hemisphere in the latitude range 20-60S a maximum emission is found at 22 - 23 h local time, which correlates with minimum horizontal wind speed (downward flow) and minimum emission is observed at 2-4 h, which correlates with maximum of horizontal wind speed. In Northern hemisphere maximum emission is observed at 1 h in latitude range from equator to 40-50°N. It indicates to existence of superposition of SS-AS and zonal retrograde circulation (in the case of SS-AS maximum emission should be found at midnight). For Northern hemisphere there is no simultaneous wind measurements. Thin O3 layer (Montmessin et al. 2011) from SPICAV data was found in Southern hemisphere for latitudes and local time where high O2 airglow (and consequently OH) intensity was also found by VIRTIS. The O2 night airglow of Venus and Earth are compared.

  13. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. J. Evans

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 87 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6 % of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A very faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been detected in the night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments. Through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The altitude profile of the new airglow emission has also been measured. The similarity of the altitude profiles of the FeO* and NiO* emissions also suggests the emission is NiO as both can originate from reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone. The observed NiO* to FeO* ratio exhibits considerable variability; possible causes of this observed variation are briefly discussed.

  14. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with approximately 15-nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy, providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates.

  15. OECD energy intensity. Measures, trends, and convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, B. [Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, Victoria University, Level 13, 300 Flinders Street, Melbourne, VIC, 8001 (Australia)

    2012-11-15

    This paper focuses on several different measures of Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries' energy intensity levels, plots their trends, applies a number of techniques to determine whether those intensities are converging, explores the importance of that convergence, and estimates the future steady-state or long-run distribution of energy intensity for the OECD. The paper finds that OECD energy intensity typically is declining, and a number of parametric and nonparametric methods indicate a strong degree of convergence. However, convergence is conditioned on country specific factors since differences in individual energy/GDP ratios persist. These findings suggest limits to the general decline in developed country energy intensity.

  16. Almost Phase Retrieval with Few Intensity Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhong

    2014-01-01

    In signal processing, the phases of the measurements are often unknown. To recover a signal of length N, Balan, Casazza, and Edidin showed that it suffices to know at least 2N-1 intensity measurements. We give another characterization of frames which give phase retrieval for almost all signals with only N+1 intensity measurements. We provide a method to test if a frame has this property or not. With our method, we can construct tight frames or modify any frames such that they give almost phas...

  17. Low Cost Earth Sensor Based on Oxygen Airglow (AIRES)

    OpenAIRE

    Scheidegger, N.; Shea, H.; Charbon, E.; Rugi-Grond, E

    2008-01-01

    This project has demonstrated the feasibility of a low-cost Earth sensor based on imaging oxygen airglow, allowing 0.4° accuracy from GEO under any illumination condition. Available Earth Sensor (ES) are based on the measurement of the earth’s infrared radiation to determine the vector to the Earth’s centre. These designs provide excellent accuracies over a large field of view, but are often heavy, large, require cooling or temperature stabilization and are power hungry. In addition, the sens...

  18. On applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium approach for retrieval of O and H mesospheric distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the airglow emission and ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Alexander; Belikovich, Mikhail; Kulikov, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Atomic oxygen and hydrogen are known to be among key components for the photochemistry and energy balance of the Earth's atmosphere between approximately 80 and 100 km altitude (mesopause region). Therefore, obtaining information about the vertical distributions of O and H concentrations is an important task in studies of this region. Solving of this problem is rather difficult due to the absence of regular methods which allow one to direct measurements of distributions of these components in mesosphere. However, indirect methods used to retrieve O and H distributions from the satellite-based measurements of the OH and O2(1D) airglow emission, as well as the data of IR and microwave O3 measurements have a sufficiently long development history. These methods are rooted in the use of the condition of photochemical equilibrium of ozone density in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. A significant factor is that an insufficient volume of such measurement data forces researchers to use approximate ("truncated") photochemical-equilibrium conditions. In particular, it is assumed that in the daytime the ozone production reaction is perfectly balanced by ozone photodissociation, whereas during the night the only ozone sink is the reaction of ozone with atomic hydrogen, which, in its turn, leads to formation of excited OH and airglow emission of the latter. The presentation analyzes applicability of the photochemical-equilibrium conditions both in the total and truncated forms for description of the spatio-temporal evolution of mesospheric ozone during a year. The analysis is based on year-long time series generated by a 3D chemical transport model, which reproduces correctly various types of atmosphere dynamics in the range of altitudes from 50 to 100 km. These data are used to determine statistics of the ratio between the correct (calculated dynamically) distributions of the O3 density and its uncontracted and truncated equilibrium values for the conditions of the

  19. Single vs multi-level quenching of the hydroxyl airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Christoph; Espy, Patrick J.; Hibbins, Robert; Djupvik, Anlaug Amanda

    2016-04-01

    The reaction in the upper mesosphere between atomic hydrogen and ozone results in hydroxyl (OH) that is produced in excited vibrational levels 6 through 9. The vibrationally excited OH radiates in a thin (~8 km thick) layer near 87 km, giving rise to the strong near infrared airglow emission that has been used for remote sensing of the mesopause region. The interpretation of the emission relies on accurate knowledge of the population and quenching of the upper states, and open questions remain as to whether the quenching takes place through single- or multi-quantum deactivation. Here we will demonstrate how high quality spectral observations of OH (9,7) and (8,6) airglow emissions are available as background measurements during standard K-band astronomical observations from the Nordic Optical Telescope (18°W, 29°N). These emissions have been analysed to ascertain the quenching of the upper vibrational populations. Together with a steady-state model of these emissions, an estimate of the ratio of single to multi-quantum quenching efficiency and the impact on the populations of the lower vibrational levels will be presented.

  20. First spaceborne observation of the entire concentric airglow structure caused by tropospheric disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiya, Y.; Saito, A.; Sakanoi, T.; Hozumi, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Nishioka, M.; Tsugawa, T.

    2014-10-01

    Spaceborne imagers are able to observe the airglow structures with wide field of views regardless of the tropospheric condition that limits the observational time of the ground-based imagers. Concentric wave structures of the O2 airglow in 762 nm wavelength were observed over North America on 1 June 2013 from the International Space Station. This was the first observation in which the entire image of the structure was captured from space, and its spatial scale size was determined to be 1200 km radius without assumptions. The apparent horizontal wavelength was 80 km, and the amplitude in the intensity was approximately 20% of the background intensity. The propagation velocity of the structure was derived as 125 ± 62 m/s and atmospheric gravity waves were estimated to be generated for 3.5 ± 1.7 h. Concentric structures observed in this event were interpreted to be generated by super cells that caused a tornado in its early phase.

  1. Calibration of the Berkeley EUV Airglow Rocket Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Daniel M.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Siegmund, Oswald

    1989-01-01

    The Berkeley Extreme-ultraviolet Airglow Rocket Spectrometer (BEARS), a multiinstrument sounding rocket payload, made comprehensive measurements of the earth's dayglow. The primary instruments consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers: one channel to measure several atomic oxygen features at high spectral resolution (about 1.5 A) in the band passes 980-1040 and 1300-1360 A, and the other to measure EUV dayglow and the solar EUV simultaneously in a much broader bandpass (250-1150 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A). The payload also included a hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer to monitor the solar irradiance and goecoronal emissions. The instrument was calibrated at the EUV calibration facility at the University of California at Berkeley, and was subsequently launched successfully on September 30, 1988 aboard a four-stage experimental sounding rocket, Black Brant XII flight 12.041 WT. The calibration procedure and resulting data are presented.

  2. FBCT fast intensity measurement using TRIC cards

    CERN Document Server

    Allica, J C; Belohrad, D; Jensen, L; Lenardon, F; SØby, L

    2015-01-01

    At the CERN PS complex, precise fast intensity measurements are very important in order to optimize the transfer efficiencies between the different accelerators. Over the last two years a complete renovation has been ongoing, where the old electronics, based on analogue integrators, have been replaced by a fully digital system enclosed in a single VME based card. This new system called TRIC (Transformer Integration Card) is based on a 12 bit, 212 MS/s ADC and an FPGA for the signal processing. Also located on the same board one finds a 250 V/1.5 W DCDC converter used to generate precise calibration pulses.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1993-08-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far ultraviolet (FUV) were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiment also includes EUV instruments from Boston University (Supriya Chakrabarti), but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/University of Colorado (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed here. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 1/4 meter Rowland circle EUV spectrograph which has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2 nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon XUV photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. This photodiode system provides a spectral coverage from 0.1 to 80 nm with about 15 nm resolution. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. This avalanche photodiode package measures the XUV photon energy providing a solar spectrum from 50 to 12,400 eV (25 to 0.1 nm) with an energy resolution of about 50 eV. The fourth solar instrument is an XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc-seconds. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2 nm spectral resolution. The photon-counting CODACON detectors are used for three of these instruments and consist of coded arrays of anodes behind microchannel plates. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional CODACON detectors were developed at CU by Dr. George Lawrence. The pre-flight and post-flight photometric calibrations were performed at our calibration laboratory and at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet

  4. HF-induced airglow structure as a proxy for ionospheric irregularity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility allows scientists to test current theories of plasma physics to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms at work in the lower ionosphere. One powerful technique for diagnosing radio frequency interactions in the ionosphere is to use ground-based optical instrumentation. High-frequency (HF), heater-induced artificial airglow observations can be used to diagnose electron energies and distributions in the heated region, illuminate natural and/or artificially induced ionospheric irregularities, determine ExB plasma drifts, and measure quenching rates by neutral species. Artificial airglow is caused by HF-accelerated electrons colliding with various atmospheric constituents, which in turn emit a photon. The most common emissions are 630.0 nm O(1D), 557.7 nm O(1S), and 427.8 nm N2+(1NG). Because more photons will be emitted in regions of higher electron energization, it may be possible to use airglow imaging to map artificial field-aligned irregularities at a particular altitude range in the ionosphere. Since fairly wide field-of-view imagers are typically deployed in airglow campaigns, it is not well-known what meter-scale features exist in the artificial airglow emissions. Rocket data show that heater-induced electron density variations, or irregularities, consist of bundles of ~10-m-wide magnetic field-aligned filaments with a mean depletion depth of 6% [Kelley et al., 1995]. These bundles themselves constitute small-scale structures with widths of 1.5 to 6 km. Telescopic imaging provides high resolution spatial coverage of ionospheric irregularities and goes hand in hand with other observing techniques such as GPS scintillation, radar, and ionosonde. Since airglow observations can presumably image ionospheric irregularities (electron density variations), they can be used to determine the spatial scale variation, the fill factor, and the lifetime characteristics of

  5. Precision measurements of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine relative intensities of gamma rays in the region of 280 to 2750 keV, Ge(Li) detectors were calibrated with standard sources and cascade gamma-ray sources. Decay rates of the standard sources were determined by means of the 4πβ-γ or 4πX-γ coincidence method. Experimental conditions were improved and spectra were carefully analyzed. Relative gamma-ray intensities of 56Co, 88Y, sup(110m)Ag, 133Ba, 134Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 192Ir and 207Bi were determined within the accuracy of about 0.5% for strong gamma rays. Intensities per decays were obtained from the relative intensities for most of the nuclides. (author)

  6. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Mishin; Burke, W. J.; Pedersen, T.

    2005-01-01

    International audience Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line) and 557.7nm (green line) during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume a...

  7. Longitudinal difference of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere structures observed with ground-based lidar, airglow and radar measurements between Japan (∼135E) and Colorado (∼105W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Ground and satellite observations, as well as modeling studies, have indicated that there is a significant longitudinal variability in the mesosphere and the upper atmosphere. One of the sources of such zonal variability, especially at the equatorial and low/mid- latitude region, is the tropospheric convection or latent heat release and non-migrating tides generated by these conditions. The outstanding structure of non-migrating tides in the low/mid latitudes is an eastward propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 3 (DE3), which causes a wave-4 structure in zonal direction, when sampled at the same local time. This would suggest that when we compare the dynamical (and chemical) structures, such as atmospheric instability/stability, wave ducts, and critical layers at the same local time, significant zonal variability could exist. In order to study such longitudinal variability, we have compared ground-based observations at two locations; Shigaraki, Japan (135E) and Fort Collins, CO (∼105W). The former is the site of the MU radar, where OMTI (Optical Mesosphere Thermosphere Imagers) is collocated. A sodium temperature lidar is also operated at Uji, within 30 km distance. The latter is the site of CSU sodium temperature and wind lidar, with an airglow imager operated nearby. Seasonal and height cross-section of lidar temperature in the MLT region were different between the two sites. At Ft. Collins, annual variation was dominant, but at Shigaraki, semiannual variation seems to be more significant, which suggests stronger effect of low latitude SAO. The airglow imaging data at the two sites are also being compared in detail, for both gravity waves and ripple structures (the latter indicating existence of instability).

  8. Quantization analysis of speckle intensity measurements for phase retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maallo, Anne Margarette S.; Almoro, Percival F.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    Speckle intensity measurements utilized for phase retrieval (PR) are sequentially taken with a digital camera, which introduces quantization error that diminishes the signal quality. Influences of quantization on the speckle intensity distribution and PR are investigated numerically and experimen...

  9. Radiometric modulation measuring device of intensity of optical radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Yanenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The paper proposed a block diagram of radiometric measuring the intensity of optical radiation from modulation conversion parameter input . To assess the intensity of use periodically comparing the reference signal (shaded and measurement (open photodi-odes. Studies. The proposed radiometric modulation meter provides increased sensitivity and measurement accuracy by reducing the influence of dark current measurement and reference photodiodes and compensation intrinsic noise measuring channel through their periodic anti-phase comparison.

  10. Upgrade of the CERN PSB/CPS Fast Intensity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Monera Martinez, A; Belohrad, D; Jensen, L; Soby, L; Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) and Proton Synchrotron (CPS) complex fast intensity measurement is undergoing a major upgrade. The old analogue electronics no longer provides enough accuracy, resolution and versatility to perform accurate beam intensity measurements. It has also become less reliable due to the ageing equipment. A new measurement system - Transformer Integrator Card (TRIC) - replaces these obsolete acquisition systems. TRIC is a generic platform used to measure the intensity in different transfer lines at CERN. Five TRICs were installed during the year 2010 in order to evaluate their performance with different beam types, from the low intensity pilot (5×10 9 charges per bunch) to high intensity beams (1×10 13 charges per bunch). The aim of this article is to present the technical aspects of the new system and the different measurement scenarios. It discusses possible sources of measurement errors and presents some statistical data acquired during this period.

  11. Measurement of intensity distribution of CSR in LEBRA PXR beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last year, the intensity of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) in LEBRA PXR beamline was measured. As a result, it turned out that the intensity of CSR was stronger than anticipation. It is suggested that Coherent Edge Radiation (CER) is mixed with CSR. Then, in order to confirm whether CER is contained, the intensity distribution of CSR was measured. The result of the experiment is reported in this paper. (author)

  12. BIOSECURITY MEASURES IN INTENSIVE PIG PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Antunović; Laura Vargović; Dalibor Cvrković; Katarina Kundih; Robert Spajić; Velimir Sili; Dražen Hižman; Željko Pavičić; Mario Ostović

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary pig production requires high demand on breeding large number of animals/pigs in a relatively small space while attaining maximum productivity. Their productivity is related to their health and ever-growing concern about less use of antibiotics in pig production. Measures have been taken to prevent diseases rather than cure them. Biosecurity measures prevent entry of pathogens into farm and their transmission between buildings. There are many critical points that must be taken car...

  13. BIOSECURITY MEASURES IN INTENSIVE PIG PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Antunović

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary pig production requires high demand on breeding large number of animals/pigs in a relatively small space while attaining maximum productivity. Their productivity is related to their health and ever-growing concern about less use of antibiotics in pig production. Measures have been taken to prevent diseases rather than cure them. Biosecurity measures prevent entry of pathogens into farm and their transmission between buildings. There are many critical points that must be taken care of: location, workers, farm entrance, breeding progeny, semen, transport animals, food, dead animals, feces, waste water, DDD, biosecurity in buildings etc. Standardized rules of biosecurity on farms need to be strictly followed to maintain high production.

  14. Berkeley extreme-ultraviolet airglow rocket spectrometer: BEARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Chakrabarti, S

    1992-09-20

    We describe the Berkeley extreme-UV airglow rocket spectrometer, which is a payload designed to test several thermospheric remote-sensing concepts by measuring the terrestrial O I far-UV and extreme-UV dayglow and the solar extreme-UV spectrum simultaneously. The instrument consisted of two near-normal Rowland mount spectrometers and a Lyman-alpha photometer. The dayglow spectrometer covered two spectral regions from 980 to 1040 A and from 1300 to 1360 A with 1.5-A resolution. The solar spectrometer had a bandpass of 250-1150 A with an ~ 10-A resolution. All three spectra were accumulated by using a icrochannel-plate-intensified, two-dimensional imaging detector with three separate wedge-and strip anode readouts. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha photometer was included to monitor the solar Lyman-alpha irradiance and geocoronal Lyman-alpha emissions. The instrument was designed, fabricated, and calibrated at the University of California, Berkeley and was successfully launched on 30 September 1988 aboard the first test flight of a four-stage sounding rocket, Black Brant XII. PMID:20733778

  15. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  16. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, L A [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Bailey, M R [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Kaczkowski, P [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); McAteer, J A [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University, 635 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Pishchalnikov, Y A [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M V Lomosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Sapozhnikov, O A [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M V Lomosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data.

  17. Measuring the Carbon Intensity of the South African Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Davies, Rob; Makrelov, Konstantin;

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the carbon intensity of industries, products and households in South Africa using data from a high resolution supply-use table. Direct and indirect carbon usage is measured using multiplier methods that capture inter-industry linkages and multi-product supply chains. Carbon intensity ...

  18. Three-dimensional broadband intensity probe for measuring acoustical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Khalid Hossain

    Measuring different acoustical properties have been the key in reducing noise and improving the sound quality from various sources. In this report, a broadband (200 Hz -- 6.5 kHz) three-dimensional seven-microphone intensity probe system is developed to measure the sound intensity, and total energy density in different acoustical environments. Limitations of most commercial intensity probes in measuring the three-dimensional intensity for a broadband sound field was the main motivation in developing this probe. The finite-difference error and the phase mismatch error which are the two main errors associated with the intensity measurements are addressed in this report. As for the physical design, seven microphones were arranged in a two-concentric arrays with one microphone located at the center of the probe. The outer array is for low-frequencies (200 Hz -- 1.0 kHz), and the inner one is for high-frequencies (1.0 kHz -- 6.5 kHz). The screw adjustable center microphone is used for the microphone calibration, and as the reference microphone of the probe. The simultaneous calibrations of all the microphones in the probe were done in the anechoic room. Theories for the intensity and the energy densities calculations for the probe were derived from the existing four-microphone probe configuration. Reflection and diffraction effects on the intensity measurements due to the presence of the microphones, and the supporting structures were also investigated in this report. Directivity patterns of the calculated intensity showed the omnidirectional nature of the probe. The intensity, and total energy density were calculated and compared with the ideal values in the anechoic room environment. Characterization of sound fields in a reverberant enclosed space, and sound source identification are some applications that were investigated using this probe. Results of different measurements showed effectiveness of the probe as a tool to measure key acoustical properties in many

  19. The Nonlinear Model of the Response of Airglow to Gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Xu; H. Gao; A.V. Mikhalev

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we develope a timodependent, nonlinear, photochemical-dynamical 2-D model which is composed of 3 models: dynamical gravity wave model, middle atmospheric photochemical model, and airglow layer photochemical model. We use the model to study the effect of the gravity wave propagation on the airglow layer. The comparison between the effects of the different wavelength gravity wave on the airglow emission distributions is made. When the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave is close to or is shorter than the thickness of the airglow layer, the gravity wave can make complex structure of the airglow layer, such as the double and multi-peak structures of the airglow layer. However, the gravity wave that has long vertical wavelength can make large scale perturbation of the airglow emission distribution.

  20. Laboratory Investigation of the Airglow Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Brian; Yu, Shanshan; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of oxygen A-band night glow simulated using a static discharge cell. Our static discharge system reproduces the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(^1D) + O_2 as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for rare molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b-Xvibrational bands were observed with a Bruker 125 HR for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were observed also for the main isotopologue. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for (16-17, 17-17, and 17-18), enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state in the global fit of Yu et al. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1) and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.6 and I(0,0)/I(1,1) = 60 are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data. S. Yu, C.E. Miller, B.J. Drouin, H.S.P. Müller, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024304, 2012

  1. A note on measurement of sound pressure with intensity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    reliable up to 10 kHz when using 0.5 in. microphones in the usual face-to-face arrangement separated by a 12 mm spacer, the sound pressure measured with the same instrument will typically be underestimated at high frequencies. It is shown in this paper that the estimate of the sound pressure can be......The effect of scattering and diffraction on measurement of sound pressure with "two-microphone" sound intensity probes is examined using an axisymmetric boundary element model of the probe. Whereas it has been shown a few years ago that the sound intensity estimated with a two-microphone probe is...... improved under a variety of realistic sound field conditions by applying a different weighting of the two pressure signals from the probe. The improved intensity probe can measure the sound pressure more accurately at high frequencies than an ordinary sound intensity probe or an ordinary sound level meter...

  2. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  3. Calibration of the San Marco airglow-solar spectrometer instrument in the extreme ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, John; Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Tai, Hongsheng; Doll, Harry G.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1996-02-01

    The San Marco 5 carried the airglow-solar spectrometer instrument (ASSI). This 18-channel spectrometer measured the solar and terrestrial radiation in the wavelength region between 20 and 700 nm for 9 months in 1988. The ASSI extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels showed significant sensitivity changes during the mission. The sensitivity changes of the EUV channels are quantified by comparing ASSI solar EUV irradiance measurements to the solar EUV irradiance derived from a solar proxy model. A sensitivity change model is developed that shows that exponential curves can adequately describe the sensitivity changes of the ASSI optics and detectors. The November 10 calibration parameters and the sensitivity change model can be used to derive the EUV terrestrial airglow brightness for the time period of the ASSI mission. Analysis of the solar Lyman-(alpha) irradiance measured by the ASSI, the solar mesospheric explorer (SME), and the upper atmosphere research satellite has led to a revised Lyman-(alpha) irradiance for the San Marco mission. For example, the ASSI November 10, 1988, Lyman-(alpha) measurement is 5.3 X 1011 photons cm-2 s-1 versus the reported SME measurement of 3.35 X 1011 photons cm-2 s-1.

  4. Measurement of Dynamic Light Scattering Intensity in Gels

    CERN Document Server

    Rochas, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    In the scientific literature little attention has been given to the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) as a tool for extracting the thermodynamic information contained in the absolute intensity of light scattered by gels. In this article we show that DLS yields reliable measurements of the intensity of light scattered by the thermodynamic fluctuations, not only in aqueous polymer solutions, but also in hydrogels. In hydrogels, light scattered by osmotic fluctuations is heterodyned by that from static or slowly varying inhomogeneities. The two components are separable owing to their different time scales, giving good experimental agreement with macroscopic measurements of the osmotic pressure. DLS measurements in gels are, however, tributary to depolarised light scattering from the network as well as to multiple light scattering. The paper examines these effects, as well as the instrumental corrections required to determine the osmotic modulus. For guest polymers trapped in a hydrogel the measured intensity...

  5. A comparison of two different sound intensity measurement principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2005-01-01

    compares the two measurement principles with particular regard to the sources of error in sound power determination. It is shown that the phase calibration of intensity probes that combine different transducers is very critical below 500 Hz if the measurement surface is very close to the source under test...

  6. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    OpenAIRE

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu; GORDAN Ioan Mircea

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer) sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation) with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data ar...

  7. Measuring energy efficiency: Is energy intensity a good evidence base?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Energy intensity measure reflects consumption, not energy efficiency. • Thermodynamic indicators should describe energy efficiency at all levels. • These indicators should have no reference to economic or financial parameters. • A set of energy efficiency indicators should satisfy several basic principles. • There are trade-offs between energy efficiency, power and costs. - Abstract: There is a widespread assumption in energy statistics and econometrics that energy intensity and energy efficiency are equivalent measures of energy performance of economies. The paper points to the discrepancy between the engineering concept of energy efficiency and the energy intensity as it is understood in macroeconomic statistics. This double discrepancy concerns definitions (while engineering concept of energy efficiency is based on the thermodynamic definition, energy intensity includes economic measures) and use. With regard to the latter, the authors conclude that energy intensity can only provide indirect and delayed evidence of technological and engineering energy efficiency of energy conversion processes, which entails shortcomings for management and policymaking. Therefore, we suggest to stop considering subsectoral, sectoral and other levels of energy intensities as aggregates of lower-level energy efficiency. It is suggested that the insufficiency of energy intensity indicators can be compensated with the introduction of thermodynamic indicators describing energy efficiency at the physical, technological, enterprise, sub-sector, sectoral and national levels without references to any economic or financial parameters. Structured statistical data on thermodynamic efficiency is offered as a better option for identifying break-through technologies and technological bottle-necks that constrain efficiency advancements. It is also suggested that macro-level thermodynamic indicators should be based on the thermodynamic first law efficiency and the energy

  8. Simulation and Efficient Measurements of Intensities for Complex Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo;

    2014-01-01

    on the sequence to simulate both intensity and mechanical index (MI) according to FDA rules. A 3 MHz BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer is used with the SARUS scanner. An Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone and the Onda AIMS III system measures the pressure field for three imaging schemes: a fixed focus, single...

  9. Contributions of the OH airglow to space object irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruninger, John; Duff, James W.; Brown, James H.

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the contributions of the hydroxyl (OH) airglow to the illumination of resident space objects. During nighttime, in a moonless sky, the airglow is the largest contributor to the sky brightness in the visible (vis), the near-infrared (NIR) and short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral region. The dominant contributors to the airglow are vibrationally excited hydroxyl radicals, OH(ν). The radicals are formed in vibrational states up to υ=9 by the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ozone. The strong emissions, known as Meinel emissions, are sequences with σν= 1-6. Emissions with υ = 3, 4, 5 and 6 occur in the visible and NIR between .4 and 1.0 µm. From 1.0 to 2.5 µm there are very strong emissions from the δν= 2 sequences. The σν= 1 emissions extend into the thermal infrared to 4.5 μm. In this work, we considered four band passes, a vis-NIR band pass, two SABER band passes centered at 1.6 and 2.0 μm, respectively, and a broad band pass around 2.7 µm. SAMM2 was utilized to compute spectra and line of sight radiances. We used line of sight (LOS) radiances to compute the irradiance on a space object that was taken as a flat plate with a Lambertian surface reflectance. Profiles of irradiance versus orientation were calculated. The OH airglow will illuminate a facet even if it is pointing somewhat upward. However, the irradiance in the 2.7 μm band pass comes almost entirely from the atmosphere in the low altitude and the earth emission.

  10. Metrology of Electromagnetic Intensity Measurement in Near Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Slížik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dealing with measurement of a near-field strength in the region around a source, which is supply of radiation. Electromagnetic field is distributed inhomogeneously in this case. The field consists of two components field, vectors of electric and magnetic field. The intensity of the components of the electric field is calculated using the modified Maxwell equation. Also intensity is calculated by averaging the results of the Maxwell`s equations. The calculation of the components of the electric field intensity using two methods are different. The method of calculating electric field (averaging, which represents real measurement, is loaded by error. The real measurement is loaded by the averaging error, too. The paper is also dealing with problem of mentioned field components measurement using multiple sensors – electrical short dipoles. Impact of size of the electromagnetic field sensor on a measurement accuracy of individual components, such as impact on the resulting vector of the electrical field, is expressed in this paper. We achieve better results of joinder and less measurement uncertainty of electric field at the exercise of joinder units of the electric field in metrological laboratories

  11. A GIANO-TNG high resolution IR spectrum of the airglow emission

    CERN Document Server

    Oliva, E; Maiolino, R; Baffa, C; Biliotti, V; Bruno, P; Falcini, G; Gavriousev, V; Ghinassi, F; Giani, E; Gonzalez, M; Leone, F; Lodi, M; Massi, F; Montegriffo, P; Mochi, I; Pedani, M; Rossetti, E; Scuderi, S; Sozzi, M; Tozzi, A; Valenti, E

    2013-01-01

    A flux-calibrated high resolution spectrum of the airglow emission is a practical lambda-calibration reference for astronomical spectral observations. It is also useful for constraining the molecular parameters of the OH molecule and the physical conditions in the upper mesosphere. methods: We use the data collected during the first technical commissioning of the GIANO spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). The high resolution (R~50,000) spectrum simultaneously covers the 0.95-2.4 micron wavelength range. Relative flux calibration is achieved by the simultaneous observation of spectrophotometric standard star. results: We derive a list of improved positions and intensities of OH infrared lines. The list includes Lambda-split doublets many of which are spectrally resolved. Compared to previous works, the new results correct errors in the wavelengths of the Q-branch transitions. The relative fluxes of OH lines from different vibrational bands show remarkable deviations from theoretical predicti...

  12. Dynamics of the polar mesopause and lower thermosphere region as observed in the night airglow emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work utilizes night airglow emissions to deduce temperatures, dynamics, energetics, transport and photochemistry of the polar 80-110 km atmospheric region. The morphological behaviour of the polar 80-110 km region as seen in the night airglow emissions is best described by quasi regular to regular variations in the temperature and in the intensities of the emissions with periods ranging from minutes to a few days. Temperature amplitudes are seen from a few degrees up to ±50 K. Intensity changes up to several hundred percent may occur. Gravity waves from below are generally found to be present in the region, being responsible for much of the short period variations. The long period variations are seen to be related to circulation changes in the lower atmosphere. Stratospheric warmings are generally associated by a cooling of the 80-110 km region by a ratio approximately twice as large in amplitude as the heating at the 10 mbar level. The semidiurnal tide is found to be dominant with a peak to peak amplitude of about 5 K, in contrast to model calculations. Effects from geomagnetic phenomena on the energetics and dynamics of the region are not seen and, if present, have to be small or rare as compared to the influence from below. There is a mesopause temperature maximum at winter solstice. Pronounced differences in the day to day and seasonal behaviour of the odd oxygen associated nightglows at the North and South Pole are found. This may indicate fundamental differences at the two poles in the winter mesopause region circulation and energetics

  13. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data are processed for positioning solarpanels, in order their efficiency to be maximized.

  14. Intensity measures for seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation of sloping site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志雄; 程印; 肖杨; 卢谅; 阳洋

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the correlation between a large number of widely used ground motion intensity measures (IMs) and the corresponding liquefaction potential of a soil deposit during earthquake loading. In order to accomplish this purpose the seismic responses of 32 sloping liquefiable site models consisting of layered cohesionless soil were subjected to 139 earthquake ground motions. Two sets of ground motions, consisting of 80 ordinary records and 59 pulse-like near-fault records are used in the dynamic analyses. The liquefaction potential of the site is expressed in terms of the the mean pore pressure ratio, the maximum ground settlement, the maximum ground horizontal displacement and the maximum ground horizontal acceleration. For each individual accelerogram, the values of the aforementioned liquefaction potential measures are determined. Then, the correlation between the liquefaction potential measures and the IMs is evaluated. The results reveal that the velocity spectrum intensity (VSI) shows the strongest correlation with the liquefaction potential of sloping site. VSI is also proven to be a sufficient intensity measure with respect to earthquake magnitude and source-to-site distance, and has a good predictability, thus making it a prime candidate for the seismic liquefaction hazard evaluation.

  15. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  16. Real-time wavefront reconstruction from intensity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, C.; Marinica, R.; Verhaegen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an efficient approximation to the nonlinear phase diversity method for wavefront reconstruction from intensity measurements. The new method, iterative linear phase diversity (ILPD), assumes that the residual phase aberration is small and makes use of a first order Taylor expansion of the point spread function (PSF) performed for an arbitrary (large) diversity in order to optimize the phase retrieval. For static aberrations, ILPD makes use of two images collected at each iteration o...

  17. 124Sb - Activity measurement and determination of photon emission intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international traceability of antimony 124, in term of activity, is very limited. The results of 124Sb activity measurements sent to the SIR (BIPM - International System of Reference, BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sb-124.) are scarce. Up to now, only three laboratories have contributed. Two of them carried out measurements using the 4πβ-γ coincidence counting technique and the third one using the 4πγ method with a well-type crystal detector. The first two results are in agreement but the last one differs significantly from them, by 2 %. The decay scheme consistency cannot be excluded when trying to explain those discrepancies. In other respects, this nuclide emits high-energy gamma rays, and then could be selected as a valuable standard radionuclide for the calibration of gamma-ray detectors in that energy range, given well known photon intensities. Those considerations led to the proposal of an international exercise and to the realisation of this Euromet project, registered as project no. 907, coordinated by CEA-List-LNE/LNHB. The first part of this exercise was dedicated to activity measurements and to their comparison. For this purpose, participants were asked to make use of all the direct measurement techniques available in their laboratory in order to confirm or not the existence of possible biases specific to some measuring methods. In addition, this exercise offered the opportunity of improving the uncertainties of the gamma-ray intensities. Then, participants were asked, in the second part of the exercise, to carry out X-ray and gamma-ray intensity measurements. These results have been compared to previous published values and new decay scheme data are proposed. Eight international laboratories participated in this exercise. (authors)

  18. A reanalysis of rocket measurements of the ultraviolet dayglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, R.; Gladstone, G. R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Mcconnell, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    Rocket measurements of O I 989, 1304, 1356 A and N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band emission in the midlatitude dayglow reported by Gentieu et al. (1979) and Eastes et al. (1985) are reexamined. MSIS-83 atomic oxygen densities, the 1304 and 1356 A excitation cross sections of Zipf and Erdman (1985), and SMM solar 1304 A irradiance measurements are consistent with the observed O I and N2 emission intensities. Atmosphere Explorer E (AE-E) measurements of the solar EUV irradiance near solar maximum are consistent with the 1980 rocket airglow data, but the solar EUV irradiance required to explain the 1978 airglow data is a factor of 1.5 larger than indicated by AE-E. Enhancement of the 1304 A excitation cross section due to radiative entrapment of cascade-feeding photons is much less than the factor of two predicted by the cascade model of Julienne and Davis (1976).

  19. Measuring beam intensity and lifetime in BESSY II

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, R; Kuske, P; Kuszynski, J

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of the intensity of the beam in the transfer lines and the storage ring are based on current transformers. The pulsed current in the transfer lines is measured with passive Integrating Beam Current Transformers (ICT). The bunch charge is transferred to a DC-voltage and sampled with a multifunction I/O-board of a PC. The beam current of the storage ring is measured with a high precision Parametric Current Transformer (PCT) and sampled by a high quality digital volt meter (DVM). A stand alone PC is used for synchronisation, real-time data acquisition and signal processing. Current and lifetime data are updated every second and send via CAN- bus to the BESSY II control system. All PC programs are written in LabVIEW.

  20. Toroidal AC transformer for beam intensity measurements in CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of a pulsed beam of charged particles in the Cooling Storage Ring Project of Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) will be measured with a toroidal current transformer. By comparing and analyzing the properties of kinds of magnetic cores, a strip wound toroidal core is adopted, which is made of a high-permeability alloy and can measure a pulsed beam with frequency range of 0.2 to 2 MHz. The permeability of Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy varying with frequency is measured and the noises in the circuit are analyzed. By adding a low-noise operational amplifier into the circuit, the current down to 1 μA can be detected

  1. Development of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three sets of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Units (HIBEMUs) are being developed at Peking University. They are HIBEMU-2 (slit-wire type, one direction), HIBEMU-3 (Allison scanner type, one direction) and HIBEMU-4 (slit-wire type, two directions). For HIBEMU-2 and HIBEMU-3, more recent work has been done on software redesign in order to measure beam emittance and to draw phase diagram more efficiently and precisely. Software for control and data processing of them were developed in Labveiw environment, trying to improve calculation rationality and to offer user-friendly interface. Mechanical modification was also done for HIBEMU-3, mainly concentrating on the protection of Faraday cups from being overheated by the high intensity beam and also from interference of secondary electrons. This paper will also cover the mechanical structure as well as the software development of HIBEMU-4, which is a two-direction emittance scanner newly designed and manufactured for the high energy beam transport (HEBT) of Peking University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY (PKUNIFTY). At the end of this paper, comparison and analysis of the three HIBEMUs are given to draw forth better design of the future emittance measurement facility.

  2. Gravity Wave Energetics Determined From Coincident Space-Based and Ground-Based Observations of Airglow Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the goals of this proposal in a number of areas during the covered period. Section 5.1 contains a copy of the originally proposed schedule. The tasks listed below have been accomplished: (1) Construction of space-based observing geometry gravity wave model. This model has been described in detail in the paper accompanying this report (Section 5.2). It can simulate the observing geometry of both ground-based, and orbital instruments allowing comparisons to be made between them. (2) Comparisons of relative emission intensity, temperatures, and Krassovsky's ratio for space- and ground-based observing geometries. These quantities are used in gravity wave literature to describe the effects of the waves on the airglow. (3) Rejection of Bates [1992], and Copeland [1994] chemistries for gravity wave modeling purposes. Excessive 02(A(sup 13)(Delta)) production led to overproduction of O2(b(sup 1)(Sigma)), the state responsible for the emission of O2. Atmospheric band. Attempts were made to correct for this behavior, but could not adequately compensate for this. (4) Rejection of MSX dataset due to lack of coincident data, and resolution necessary to characterize the waves. A careful search to identify coincident data revealed only four instances, with only one of those providing usable data. Two high latitude overpasses and were contaminated by auroral emissions. Of the remaining two mid-latitude coincidences, one overflight was obscured by cloud, leaving only one ten minute segment of usable data. Aside from the statistical difficulties involved in comparing measurements taken in this short period, the instrument lacks the necessary resolution to determine the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave. This means that the wave cannot be uniquely characterized from space with this dataset. Since no observed wave can be uniquely identified, model comparisons are not possible.

  3. First Light from Triple-Etalon Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Atmospheric OI Airglow (6300 A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchorn, S.; Noto, J.; Pedersen, T.; Betremieux, Y.; Migliozzi, M.; Kerr, R. B.

    2006-05-01

    Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI) has developed a triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) to observe neutral winds in the ionosphere by measuring neutral oxygen (O I) emission at 630.0 nm during the day. This instrument is to be deployed in the SSI airglow building at the Cerro Tololo observatory (30.17S 70.81W) in Chile, in support of the Comm/Nav Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) project. Post-deployment observation will be made in conjunction with two other Clemson University Fabry-Perots in Peru, creating a longitudinal chain of interferometers for thermospheric observations. These instruments will make autonomous day and night observations of thermospheric dynamics. Instruments of this type can be constructed for a global chain of autonomous airglow observatories. The FPI presented in this talk consists of three independently pressure-controlled etalons, fed collimated light by a front optical train headed by an all-sky lens with a 160-degree field of view. It can be controlled remotely via a web-based service which allows any internet-connected computer to mimic the control computer at the instrument site. In fall 2005, the SSI system was first assembled at the Millstone Hill Observatory in Westford, Massachusetts, and made day and evening observations. It was then moved to the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Project (HAARP) site in Gakona, Alaska, to participate in joint optical/ionospheric heating campaigns. Additionally, natural airglow observations were made, both locally and remotely via the internet from Massachusetts. The Millstone and HAARP observations with two etalons yielded strong 630-nm atmospheric Fraunhofer absorption lines, with some suggestion of the Ring effect. By modeling the atmospheric absorption line as the constant times the corresponding solar absorption -- itself modeled as a Gaussian plus a polynomial -- the absorption feature is subtracted, leaving only the emission feature. Software ring-summing tools developed at the

  4. Ptychographic measurements of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Monchocé, S.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Kahaly, S.; Quéré, F.

    2016-04-01

    The extreme intensities now delivered by femtosecond lasers make it possible to drive and control relativistic motion of charged particles with light, opening a path to compact particle accelerators and coherent X-ray sources. Accurately characterizing the dynamics of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions as well as the resulting light and particle emissions is an essential step towards such achievements. This remains a considerable challenge, as the relevant scales typically range from picoseconds to attoseconds in time, and from micrometres to nanometres in space. In these experiments, owing to the extreme prevalent physical conditions, measurements can be performed only at macroscopic distances from the targets, yielding only partial information at these microscopic scales. This letter presents a major advance by applying the concepts of ptychography to such measurements, and thus retrieving microscopic information hardly accessible until now. This paves the way to a general approach for the metrology of extreme laser-plasma interactions on very small spatial and temporal scales.

  5. Exploring Intensive Longitudinal Measures of Student Engagement in Blended Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis R Henrie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this exploratory study we used an intensive longitudinal approach to measure student engagement in a blended educational technology course, collecting both self-report and observational data. The self-report measure included a simple survey of Likert-scale and open-ended questions given repeatedly during the semester. Observational data were student activity data extracted from the learning management system. We explored how engagement varied over time, both at the course level and between students, to identify patterns and influences of student engagement in a blended course. We found that clarity of instruction and relevance of activities influenced student satisfaction more than the medium of instruction. Student engagement patterns observed in the log data revealed that exploring learning tools and previewing upcoming assignments and learning activities can be useful indicators of a successful learning experience. Future work will investigate these findings on a larger scale.

  6. Aerosol classification using EARLINET measurements for an intensive observational period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network) organized an intensive observation period during summer 2012. This campaign aimed at the provision of advanced observations of physical and chemical aerosol properties, at the delivery of information about the 3D distribution of European atmospheric aerosols, and at the monitoring of Saharan dust intrusions events. EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) participated in the ACTRIS campaign through the addition of measurements according to the EARLINET schedule as well as daily lidar-profiling measurements around sunset by 11 selected lidar stations for the period from 8 June - 17 July. EARLINET observations during this almost two-month period are used to characterize the optical properties and vertical distribution of long-range transported aerosol over the broader area of Mediterranean basin. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, Angstrom exponents) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on EARLINET observations of frequently observed aerosol types is used to classify aerosols into seven separate types. The summertime Mediterranean basin is prone to African dust aerosols. Two major dust events were studied. The first episode occurred from the 18 to 21 of the June and the second one lasted from 28 June to 6 July. The lidar ratio within the dust layer was found to be wavelength independent with mean values of 58±14 sr at 355 nm and 57±11 sr at 532 nm. For the particle linear depolarization ratio, mean values of 0.27±0.04 at 532 nm have been found. Acknowledgements. The financial support for EARLINET in the ACTRIS Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 654169 and previously under grant agreement no. 262254 in the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Characterization of VHF radar observations associated with equatorial Spread F by narrow-band optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sekar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The VHF radars have been extensively used to investigate the structures and dynamics of equatorial Spread F (ESF irregularities. However, unambiguous identification of the nature of the structures in terms of plasma depletion or enhancement requires another technique, as the return echo measured by VHF radar is proportional to the square of the electron density fluctuations. In order to address this issue, co-ordinated radar backscatter and thermospheric airglow intensity measurements were carried out during March 2003 from the MST radar site at Gadanki. Temporal variations of 630.0-nm and 777.4-nm emission intensities reveal small-scale ("micro" and large-scale ("macro" variations during the period of observation. The micro variations are absent on non-ESF nights while the macro variations are present on both ESF and non-ESF nights. In addition to the well-known anti-correlation between the base height of the F-region and the nocturnal variation of thermospheric airglow intensities, the variation of the base height of the F-layer, on occasion, is found to manifest as a bottomside wave-like structure, as seen by VHF radar on an ESF night. The micro variations in the airglow intensities are associated with large-scale irregular plasma structures and found to be in correspondence with the "plume" structures obtained by VHF radar. In addition to the commonly observed depletions with upward movement, the observation unequivocally reveals the presence of plasma enhancements which move downwards. The observation of enhancement in 777.4-nm airglow intensity, which is characterized as plasma enhancement, provides an experimental verification of the earlier prediction based on numerical modeling studies.

  8. I. Airglow on Mars: Model predictions for the oxygen IR atmospheric band at 1.27 micrometers, the hydroxyl radical Meinel bands and the hydroxyl radical A-X band system. II. Physical and chemical aeronomy of HD 209458b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Munoz, Antonio

    The first part of this dissertation is concerned with model predictions of airglow from the O2 IR atmospheric band at 1.27 mum, the OH Meinel bands and the OH A-X band system in the low-latitude neutral atmosphere of Mars. As an observable feature, airglow provides a means to remotely probe the composition, dynamics and energetics of the Martian atmosphere. The daytime emission from the O2 IR atmospheric band, a direct result of ozone photodissociation, has long been known to be a prominent emission of the Martian airglow. The motivation for pursuing the modelling of the nighttime components of the O2 IR atmospheric band and the OH Meinel bands is the potential of these two processes for characterizing the atomic oxygen profile in the 50-80 km region of the atmosphere. Likewise, the OH A-X band system may be useful to constrain the abundance of the hydroxyl radical on the illuminated side of the planet below 60 km. Both, O and OH are indicators of the photochemical state of the atmosphere. The results reported herein are expected to serve as guidelines for prospective observations of the atmosphere of Mars. The second part of the dissertation investigates the physical and chemical aeronomy of HD 209458b. The discovery of this extrasolar planet by radial velocity measurements was announced in 2000. Shortly afterwards, the inference of the mean planetary density from transit observations indicated the plausible gaseous nature of the planet. Later in-transit spectrally-resolved photometric observations revealed a cloud of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen atoms extending to a few planetary radii above the surface of the planet, which has been interpreted as evidence for an escaping atmosphere around HD 209458b. At an orbital distance of 0.05 AU, intense EUV stellar irradiation may lead to the massive escape of the atmosphere. In this work, the composition, escape and energy balance of the atmosphere are consistently modelled. Escape rates and abundances of the main hydrogen

  9. On Removing Interloper Contamination from Intensity Mapping Power Spectrum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lidz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Line intensity mapping experiments seek to trace large scale structure by measuring the spatial fluctuations in the combined emission, in some convenient spectral line, from individually unresolved galaxies. An important systematic concern for these surveys is line confusion from foreground or background galaxies emitting in other lines that happen to lie at the same observed frequency as the "target" emission line of interest. We develop an approach to separate this "interloper" emission at the power spectrum level. If one adopts the redshift of the target emission line in mapping from observed frequency and angle on the sky to co-moving units, the interloper emission is mapped to the wrong co-moving coordinates. Since the mapping is different in the line of sight and transverse directions, the interloper contribution to the power spectrum becomes anisotropic, especially if the interloper and target emission are at widely separated redshifts. This distortion is analogous to the Alcock-Paczynski test, but her...

  10. Hydroxyl temperature and intensity measurements during noctilucent cloud displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Taylor

    Full Text Available Two Fourier transform spectrometers have been used to investigate the properties of the near-infrared hydroxyl (OH nightglow emission under high-latitude summertime conditions and any association with noctilucent clouds (NLCs. The measurements were made from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska (65.1°N, 147.5°W, during August 1986. Simultaneous photographic observations of the northern twilight sky were made from Gulkana, Alaska (62.2°N, 145.5°W, approximately 340 km to the south to establish the presence of NLCs over the spectrometer site. Data exhibiting significant short-term variations in the relative intensity (as much as 50–100% and rotational temperature (typically 5–15 K were recorded on six occasions when NLCs were observed. Joint measurements were also obtained on several "cloud-free" nights. No obvious relationship was found linking the mean OH intensity or its variation with the occurrence of NLCs. However, a clear tendency was found for the mean OH temperature to be lower on NLC nights than on cloud-free nights. In particular, a significant fraction of the OH(3–1 band spectra recorded by each instrument (16–57% exhibited temperatures below ~154 K on NLC nights compared with <3% on cloud-free nights. This result is qualitatively consistent with current models for ice particle nucleation and growth, but the mean OH temperature on NLC nights (~156 K was significantly higher than would be expected for long-term particle growth in this region. These observations raise questions concerning the expected proximity of the high-latitude, summertime OH layer and the NLC growth region.

  11. About gamma-ray intensity measurement in manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy setup at Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) is being used for the various properties like re-estimation of capture cross-sections, absolute intensity measurements, etc in different isotopes. The facility comprises a collimated thermal neutron beam having a flux of ∼2·l06 n/cm2/s at the target position about two meters away from the reactor wall. The measurement system consists of well-shielded anti-Compton/pair spectrometer assembly containing high-resolution HPGe detector surrounded by two large Nal crystals. The spectrometer was calibrated using standard radioactive sources up to 1.5 MeV. In the higher energy region (up to 10 MeV), the energy calibration was performed with prompt gamma rays from thermal neutron capture in chlorine. Spec pure powder and 5N pure Mn metal pieces were used for this study. Chlorine was used a comparator for calculation of Ko factor. The results have been tabulate for all interference free gamma-rays from manganese

  12. TIME INTENSITY (TI) MEASUREMENTS OF SWEETENERS ON GREEN TEA CARRIER

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Vietoris; Peter Czako; Peter Zajác,Jozef Čapla; Andrea Mendelová; Dagmar Kozelová; Hana Balková

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was characterize sweet intensity profiles of natural and artificial sweeteners during time interval on taste carrier (green tea). For analysis was selected time intensity (TI) methodology during 12 second time interval and assessors group was divided to male and female division. Difference between groups and sweeteners was investigated. Preference testing was done by CATA methodology and processed by correspondent analysis. During time intensity evaluation was observed simila...

  13. TIME INTENSITY (TI MEASUREMENTS OF SWEETENERS ON GREEN TEA CARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vietoris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was characterize sweet intensity profiles of natural and artificial sweeteners during time interval on taste carrier (green tea. For analysis was selected time intensity (TI methodology during 12 second time interval and assessors group was divided to male and female division. Difference between groups and sweeteners was investigated. Preference testing was done by CATA methodology and processed by correspondent analysis. During time intensity evaluation was observed similar profile shape of natural sweeteners. Different was performance of saccharin. During preference experiment was evaluated that all artificial sweeteners are associated with negative attributes of CATA questionnaire. Perception of sweeteners by male and female assessors was statistically significant.

  14. On Removing Interloper Contamination from Intensity Mapping Power Spectrum Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidz, Adam; Taylor, Jessie

    2016-07-01

    Line intensity mapping experiments seek to trace large-scale structures by measuring the spatial fluctuations in the combined emission, in some convenient spectral line, from individually unresolved galaxies. An important systematic concern for these surveys is line confusion from foreground or background galaxies emitting in other lines that happen to lie at the same observed frequency as the “target” emission line of interest. We develop an approach to separate this “interloper” emission at the power spectrum level. If one adopts the redshift of the target emission line in mapping from observed frequency and angle on the sky to co-moving units, the interloper emission is mapped to the wrong co-moving coordinates. Because the mapping is different in the line of sight and transverse directions, the interloper contribution to the power spectrum becomes anisotropic, especially if the interloper and target emission are at widely separated redshifts. This distortion is analogous to the Alcock–Paczynski test, but here the warping arises from assuming the wrong redshift rather than an incorrect cosmological model. We apply this to the case of a hypothetical [C ii] emission survey at z∼ 7 and find that the distinctive interloper anisotropy can, in principle, be used to separate strong foreground CO emission fluctuations. In our models, however, a significantly more sensitive instrument than currently planned is required, although there are large uncertainties in forecasting the high-redshift [C ii] emission signal. With upcoming surveys, it may nevertheless be useful to apply this approach after first masking pixels suspected of containing strong interloper contamination.

  15. New measurements by the TIMED solar extreme-ultraviolet experiment: Implications for thermospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bailey, S. M.; Eparvier, F. G.; Gladstone, G. R.; Paxton, L. J.; Woods, T. N.

    2003-04-01

    The Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite, launched in December 2001, is now performing comprehensive new measurements of the solar irradiance spectrum in the extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions. The TIMED solar EUV experiment (SEE) consists of an ultraviolet spectrometer and an X-ray photometer, and performs a full-disk spectral measurement once per orbit. Comparison of TIMED/SEE measurements to contemporaneous satellite observations from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) and a calibration rocket shows that solar irradiance in the XUV spectral range, from about 1 to 25 nm, is significantly more intense than previous observations. SEE solar spectra can be used as inputs to thermosphere/ionosphere models, including photoelectron/airglow models, thermosphere global mean models, and general circulation models. The resulting revisions to predicted photoelectron fluxes, ionization rates, electron density, ion composition, odd-nitrogen composition, and airglow emission rates show improved agreement with observations. We compare predictions to measurements for some of these, including ground based measurements of ionospheric parameters and airglow measurements by the TIMED global ultraviolet imager.

  16. Precision evaluation for intensive GPS acoustic measurements along Japan trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Osada, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Tadokoro, K.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Yasuda, K.; Okuda, T.; Yamamoto, J.

    2013-12-01

    After the Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011, researchers recognized the importance of the state of inter-plate coupling close to the trench for giant earthquakes, in where seafloor geodetic surveys were few or not available. To overcome this limitation, we have developed GPS/acoustic instrument for greater depth up to 6000m, which can cover the region close to the trench for most subduction zones. MEXT, Japan promotes to construct a network of GPS/acoustic survey sites along the Japan trench to elucidate post-seismic behavior after the giant earthquake. In 2012, research group in Tohoku and Nagoya Universities constructed 20 new survey sites along the Japan trench and started their initial positioning. Three to six transponders were installed for each site, which were 86 transponders in total. The network covers large portion of the Japan trench, mainly along the deep land-side of the trench, covering the region of expected significant afterslip as well as of the large coseismic slip. In this year second phase surveys are planned to detect displacement of roughly 1-yesr since the last survey. These are the first intensive surveys that we have never been experienced, and with new survey style. Therefore, in advance to the second phase survey, we summarize the first phase survey in 2012 in the presentation. As one of the most important key to obtain precise positioning of seafloor transponders is how to estimate horizontal variation of sound speed in ocean, which are neglected in the past analysis. For this purpose, some of the sites consist of six transponders, with which such variation can be potentially estimated. For this context, in the second phase surveys, we are going to introduce automatic surface vehicle to enable simultaneous measurement from two points from sea surface, which will provide information of the horizontal variation in sound speed even for three or four transponders. In addition we have made both moving and stationary surveys, in which we can

  17. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit measured by polysomnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J H; Boesen, Hans Christian Toft; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep...

  18. A light intensity measuring system for sedimentation measurements on KM3NeT optical modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure variations of zenith dependence of sedimentation/bio-fouling on the optical modules (OMs) as considered by the KM3NeT consortium in the deep sea, we have used a grid of photodiodes distributed inside the glass sphere to measure the light intensity of two light sources located outside the glass sphere on a fixed position. The method is described and the data collected during the last three years in depths from 3100 m down to 5100 m, in the southeast Ionian sea, at sites near Pylos, Peloponnese, Greece, are discussed.

  19. A light intensity measuring system for sedimentation measurements on KM3NeT optical modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anassontzis, E.G. [Physics Department, University of Athens (Greece); Belias, A., E-mail: belias@nestor.org.g [NESTOR Institute for Astroparticle Physics, National Observatory of Athens, 24001 Pylos (Greece); Fotiou, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Markopoulos, E.; Psallidas, A. [NESTOR Institute for Astroparticle Physics, National Observatory of Athens, 24001 Pylos (Greece); Resvanis, L.K. [Physics Department, University of Athens (Greece); NESTOR Institute for Astroparticle Physics, National Observatory of Athens, 24001 Pylos (Greece); Stavropoulos, G. [NESTOR Institute for Astroparticle Physics, National Observatory of Athens, 24001 Pylos (Greece)

    2011-01-21

    To measure variations of zenith dependence of sedimentation/bio-fouling on the optical modules (OMs) as considered by the KM3NeT consortium in the deep sea, we have used a grid of photodiodes distributed inside the glass sphere to measure the light intensity of two light sources located outside the glass sphere on a fixed position. The method is described and the data collected during the last three years in depths from 3100 m down to 5100 m, in the southeast Ionian sea, at sites near Pylos, Peloponnese, Greece, are discussed.

  20. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Broadfoot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 85 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6% of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been identified in night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments and through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The FeO* and NiO* emissions both originate from a reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone and so support the presence of NiO* in the night airglow.

  1. Prospects for UT1 Measurements from VLBI Intensive Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Johannes; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Intensives are one-hour single baseline sessions to provide Universal Time (UT1) in near real-time up to a delay of three days if a site is not e-transferring the observational data. Due to the importance of UT1 estimates for the prediction of Earth orientation parameters, as well as any kind of navigation on Earth or in space, there is not only the need to improve the timeliness of the results but also their accuracy. We identify the asymmetry of the tropospheric delays as the major error source, and we provide two strategies to improve the results, in particular of those Intensives which include the station Tsukuba in Japan with its large tropospheric variation. We find an improvement when (1) using ray-traced delays from a numerical weather model, and (2) when estimating tropospheric gradients within the analysis of Intensive sessions. The improvement is shown in terms of reduction of rms of length-of-day estimates w.r.t. those derived from Global Positioning System observations

  2. The near wall TIRFM measurement of nano-tracer's statistical intensity distribution (SID) and determining the base intensity I0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu; LNM Team

    2015-11-01

    The total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is an evanescent-wave-based technique for measuring nanoparticle dynamics very close to wall. The intensity of the evanescent wave decays exponentially (i.e. I(z) =I0exp(z/zp)) , which can provide information of the tracer particle position not just parallel but also normal to wall. However, considering the z information is encoded in tracer intensity, it is critical to determine the base intensity I0. In this study, we will first establish a model to describe the statistical intensity distribution (SID) of the nano-tracers observed in the evanescent field inspired by the works of Huang et al. A different function of particle-wall interaction and a term of the influence of the objective focal plane thickness are introduced in the present SID method. Then, TIRFM experiments are performed to measure the histogram of SID. The experimental histogram of SID is then fitted by the theoretical curve to determine I0 which is the only one fit parameter. By near wall velocity measurement, we will show that the SID method has a very high precision in determining I0 and the vertical z position of every nanotracer. Further tests show that the PDF of nano-tracers can reveal more information about how nanoparticles interact with the charged solid wall. This provides a promising method to detect the physical properties near interface.

  3. Phase reconstruction from intensity measurements in linear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaans, Martin J; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2003-06-01

    The phase of a signal at a plane is reconstructed from the intensity profiles at two close parallel screens connected by a small abcd canonical transform; this applies to propagation along harmonic and repulsive fibers and in free media. We analyze the relationship between the local spatial frequency (the signal phase derivative) and the derivative of the squared modulus of the signal under a one-parameter canonical transform with respect to the parameter. We thus generalize to all linear systems the results that have been obtained separately for Fresnel and fractional Fourier transforms. PMID:12801172

  4. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations

  5. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  6. Dynamic vacuum in synchrotrons as intensity limitation and counter measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce high intensity heavy ion beams, intermediate charge states are used for acceleration. Such ions are exposed to a high probability of charge exchange due to interactions with residual gas particles. Ions which underwent a charge change are separated from the circulating beam in dispersive elements and hit the beam pipe at acceptance limiting devices. At the point of impact an energy-dependent gas desorption takes place which increases the local pressure and the probability for further charge exchange. Thereby, the pressure rise in the machine becomes dependent on the intensity of the ion beam and is referred to as dynamic vacuum. The amount of desorbed gases and thus the beam loss can be reduced drastically by providing special low desorption ion catcher, which reduce the pressure rise compared to standard vacuum chambers. A warm ion catcher system has been successfully installed in the existing SIS18 at GSI stabilizing the residual gas pressure during operation with intermediate charge state uranium. A cold system is also foreseen for the planned superconducting SIS100 at FAIR. A prototype of a cryo-ion-catcher is presently under construction and will be tested soon.

  7. Primary nursing in Intensive Care Unit: measuring nurses' attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetta, S.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive Care Units have been identified as having advantages for the use of primary nursing. Nursing staff play an important role οn the successful implementation of primary nursing. It is important to know in advance of the implementation plan the attitudes and opinions of the nurses. Such knowledge would adequately inform the management and enable them to use the right approaches to achieve successful implementation. Aim and Method The current study is a non-experimental, cross-sectional descriptive research design aiming to identify nurses’ attitudes towards primary nursing. The study was conducted in an 8-beded Intensive Care Unit (ICU part of a University Hospital in Scotland. The sample consisted of all 38 registered and enrolled nurse working at the unit at the time. Results Results indicated that nurses were aware and identified benefits and shortcomings of primary nursing which have been seen in the primary care literature. Nurses’ attitudes towards implementation of primary nursing were positive and appeared to agree with the positive impact of primary nursing to the patients either in term of patient satisfaction or patient autonomy. Conclusions Primary nursing advocates a shift away from the traditional system of hierarchical task allocation. Nurses are willing to change and want to learn more in order to improve patients’ outcomes.

  8. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suzuki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3° E, 0.2° S, Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere.

  9. THE METHOD OF CAR HEADLIGHTS LUMINOUS INTENSITY MEASURING FOR NON-POINT SOURCES OF LIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kupko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the measurements of luminous intensity of car headlights luminous intensity for non-point sources have pecularities. A simplified method for correction the luminous intensity at various distances is developed. The applicability of the given method with possible measurement errors is studied. The results were obtained, using a stand of the National Scientific Center “Institute of Metroligy”.

  10. Research on Brightness Measurement of Intense Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Huang; Yang, GuoJun; Li, YiDing; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The mostly research fasten on high emission density of injector to study electron beam's brightness in LIA. Using the injector(2MeV) was built to research brightness of multi-pulsed high current(KA) electron beam, and researchs three measurement method (the pepper-pot method, beam collimator without magnetic field, beam collimator with magnetic field method) to detect beam's brightness with time-resolved measurement system.

  11. Gravity waves in mesopause region induced by thunderstorms over Northern China observed by a no-gap OH airglow imager network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiyao

    2016-07-01

    A no-gap OH airglow all-sky imager network was established in northern China in February 2012. The network is composed of 6 all-sky airglow imagers that make observations of OH airglow gravity waves and cover an area of about 2000 km east and west and about 1400 km south and north. A large number of gravity wave events in the mesopause region induced by thunderstorms were observed by the network during the past 4 years. A comparison of the observations in 2012, 2013, and 2014 are made, which shows that there were more strong thunderstorms take place in 2013 in the northern China and produce more Concentric Gravity Wave (CGW) events. Especially, a series of CGW events were observed by the network nearly every night during the first half of August 2013. These events were also observed by satellite sensors from FY-2, AIRS/Aqua, and VIIRS/Suomi NPP. Combination of the ground imager network with satellites provides multi-level observations of the CGWs from the stratosphere to the mesopause region. In this talk, two representative CGW events in August 2013 are studied in detail and movies of the two events are displayed. One is the CGW on the night of 13 August 2013, likely launched by a single thunderstorm. The temporal and spatial analyses indicate that the CGW horizontal wavelengths agree with the GW dispersion relation within 300 km from the storm center. A gravity wave with horizontal wavelength of about 20 km propagates horizontally to more than 800 km in the mesopause region, probably due to a ducting layer. Another CGW event was induced by two very strong thunderstorms on 09 August 2013. Multi-scale waves with horizontal wavelengths ranging from less than 10 km to 200 km were observed. Many ripples were found, probably due to the breaking of strong gravity waves with large relative OH intensity perturbations of 10%.

  12. Measuring malaria endemicity from intense to interrupted transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Simon I; Smith, David L; Snow, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The quantification of malaria transmission for the classification of malaria risk has long been a concern for epidemiologists. During the era of the Global Malaria Eradication Programme, measurements of malaria endemicity were institutionalised by their incorporation into rules outlining defined action points for malaria control programmes. We review the historical development of these indices and their contemporary relevance. This is at a time when many malaria-endemic countries are ...

  13. Techniques for intense-proton-beam profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    In a collaborative effort with industry and several national laboratories, the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) facility and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac are presently being designed and developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The APT facility is planned to accelerate a 100-mA H{sup +} cw beam to 1.7 GeV and the SNS linac is planned to accelerate a 1- to 4-mA-average, H{sup {minus}}, pulsed-beam to 1 GeV. With typical rms beam widths of 1- to 3-mm throughout much of these accelerators, the maximum average-power densities of these beams are expected to be approximately 30- and 1-MW-per-square millimeter, respectively. Such power densities are too large to use standard interceptive techniques typically used for acquisition of beam profile information. This paper summarizes the specific requirements for the beam profile measurements to be used in the APT, SNS, and the Low Energy Development Accelerator (LEDA)--a facility to verify the operation of the first 20-MeV section of APT. This paper also discusses the variety of profile measurement choices discussed at a recent high-average-current beam profile workshop held in Santa Fe, NM, and will present the present state of the design for the beam profile measurements planned for APT, SNS, and LEDA.

  14. Application of tomographic inversion in studying airglow in the mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that observations of periodic nightglow structures give excellent information on atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The periods, the horizontal wavelengths and the phase speeds of the waves can be determined from airglow images and, using several cameras, the approximate altitude of the luminous layer can also be determined by triangulation. In this paper the possibility of applying tomographic methods for reconstructing the airglow structures is investigated using numerical simulations. A ground-based chain of cameras is assumed, two-dimensional airglow models in the vertical plane above the chain are constructed, and simulated data are calculated by integrating the models along a great number of rays with different elevation angles for each camera. After addition of random noise, these data are then inverted to obtain reconstructions of the models. A tomographic analysis package originally designed for satellite radiotomography is used in the inversion. The package is based on a formulation of stochastic inversion which allows the input of a priori information to the solver in terms of regularization variances. The reconstruction is carried out in two stages. In the first inversion, constant regularization variances are used within a wide altitude range. The results are used in determining the approximate altitude range of the airglow structures. Then, in the second inversion, constant non-zero regularization variances are used inside this region and zero variances outside it. With this method reliable reconstructions of the models are obtained. The number of cameras as well as their separations are varied in order to find out the limitations of the method.

    Key words. Tomography · Airglow · Mesopause · Gravity waves

  15. Coordinated airglow observations between IMAP/VISI and a ground-based all-sky imager on concentric gravity wave in the mesopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Hozumi, Y.; Akiya, Y.; Saito, A.; Shiokawa, K.; Kawamura, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of concentric gravity waves (CGWs) event from the coordinated observation between Ionosphere, Mesosphere, upper Atmosphere, and Plasmasphere mapping (IMAP)/Visible and near-Infrared Spectral Imager (VISI), all-sky camera at Rikubetsu, Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and MF radar at Wakkanai combined with Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application data. IMAP/VISI is the first space-based imager that capable of imaging the airglow in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region in the nadir-looking direction. Therefore, it has a unique ability to observe a great extend of CGWs propagation. Arc-like shaped, part of CGWs pattern was observed around the mesopause (~95 km) in the O2 762 nm airglow emission obtained by IMAP/VISI at 1204 UT on 18 October 2012. Similar patterns were also observed by the all-sky imager at Rikubetsu (43.5°N, 143.8°E) in OI 557.7 nm and OH band airglow emissions from ~1100 to 1200 UT. Horizontal wavelengths of the observed small-scale gravity waves are ~50 km (OH band and OI 557.7 nm) and ~67 km (O2 762 nm). The source is suggested to be a deep convective activity over Honshu Island which likely was an enhanced convective activity related to a typhoon in the south of Japan. The data showed that the CGWs could propagate up to ~1400-1500 km horizontally from the source to the mesopause but not farther away. Using atmospheric temperature profiles obtained by Thermospheric Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, we conclude that this long-distance propagation of the waves could be caused by thermal duct in the middle atmosphere. The arc-like shaped instead of full circle pattern points out that the wind filtering effect is significant for the particular direction of wave propagation.

  16. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  17. Characterizing the intensity of heavy ion beam by measuring its high frequency electromagnetic component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As any particle accelerator, GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) must be controlled and particularly monitored in real time. This monitoring of the beam is done by measuring its intensity. This measurement is carried out by means of Low Frequency Intensity Transformers (TI-BF). The operation mode of this beam catchers entails a 9% beam loss. In addition, such catchers are not able to measure easily low intensities. More an more the search for rare events requires higher beam intensity to raise the event occurrence probability. The projects THI (Transport des Hautes Intensities), Transport of High Intensity, and S.P.I.R.A.L. (Source de Production d'Ions Radioactifs Acceleres en Ligne), Source of On-Line Accelerated Radioactive Ions, provide beams of 6 kW power, usually limited to 400 W. Such powers can entail in case of high energy beams a degradation of materials. The emergency warning systems must be triggered instantaneously. Mechanical shock - sensitive (low frequency) TI-BF transformers are not compatible with such requirements. The High Frequency Intensity Transformers (TI-HF) are able of measuring ion packages. This characteristic allows avoiding the 9% loss of beam. Moreover, the response time fulfill the requirements of emergency triggering. Finally, the TI-HF have a dynamic better than TI-BF

  18. Calibration of HIFU intensity fields measured using an infra-red camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, A [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Khokhlova, V; Bobkova, S [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, L [N.N. Andreev Acoustics Institute, 117036 Moscow (Russian Federation); Hand, J, E-mail: vera@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (Hammersmith Hospital Campus), London W12 0NN (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    A trend in HIFU technologies is to use 2D phased arrays that offer electronic steering of a single focus and formation of patterns of multiple foci. Conventional methods to characterize array fields using scanned hydrophone would be prohibitively slow given the potentially large number of focusing conditions. An alternative technique for rapid qualitative assessment of intensity distributions was recently developed. The method is based on infrared camera measurements of the temperature rises induced by low amplitude short ultrasonic bursts in a thin absorber. Here, the method is extended to estimate the absolute values of intensity in a field of a 2D 1-MHz randomized phased array. Two approaches were implemented. In the first approach it was assumed that the measured temperature rise at the surface of the absorber is proportional to the free field intensity. The second approach correlated the temperature rise measured in an absorber and calculated from the modelled acoustic field and the heat transfer equation. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature was obtained and introduced in the conversion of temperature images to intensity. Free field distributions in water and focusing through ribs were recorded and simulated. Good correlation between the measured and modeled results in both spatial distributions and the absolute values of intensity was demonstrated.

  19. Calibration of HIFU intensity fields measured using an infra-red camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trend in HIFU technologies is to use 2D phased arrays that offer electronic steering of a single focus and formation of patterns of multiple foci. Conventional methods to characterize array fields using scanned hydrophone would be prohibitively slow given the potentially large number of focusing conditions. An alternative technique for rapid qualitative assessment of intensity distributions was recently developed. The method is based on infrared camera measurements of the temperature rises induced by low amplitude short ultrasonic bursts in a thin absorber. Here, the method is extended to estimate the absolute values of intensity in a field of a 2D 1-MHz randomized phased array. Two approaches were implemented. In the first approach it was assumed that the measured temperature rise at the surface of the absorber is proportional to the free field intensity. The second approach correlated the temperature rise measured in an absorber and calculated from the modelled acoustic field and the heat transfer equation. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature was obtained and introduced in the conversion of temperature images to intensity. Free field distributions in water and focusing through ribs were recorded and simulated. Good correlation between the measured and modeled results in both spatial distributions and the absolute values of intensity was demonstrated.

  20. Rapid measurements of intensities for safety assessment of advanced imaging sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav G.

    2014-03-01

    FDA requires that intensity and safety parameters are measured for all imaging schemes for clinical imaging. This is often cumbersome, since the scan sequence has to broken apart, measurements conducted for the individually emitted beams, and the final intensity levels calculated by combining the intensities from the individual beams. This paper suggests a fast measurement scheme using the multi-line sampling capability of modern scanners and research systems. The hydrophone is connected to one sampling channel in the research system, and the intensity is measured for all imaging lines in one emission sequence. This makes it possible to map out the pressure field and hence intensity level for all imaging lines in a single measurement. The approach has several advantages: the scanner does not have to be re-programmed and can use the scan sequence without modification. The measurements are orders of magnitude faster (minutes rather than hours) and the final intensity level calculation can be made generic and reused for any kind of scan sequence by just knowing the number of imaging lines and the pulse repetition time. The scheme has been implemented on the Acoustic Intensity Measurement System AIMS III (Onda, Sunnyvale, California, USA). The research scanner SARUS is used for the experiments, where one of the channels is used for the hydrophone signal. A 3 MHz BK 8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array with 192 elements is used along with an Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone connected to a AH-2010 pre-amplifier (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, USA). A single emission sequence is employed for testing and calibrating the approach. The measurements using the AIMS III and SARUS systems after calibration agree within a relative standard deviation of 0.24%. A duplex B-mode and flow sequence is also investigated. The complex intensity map is measured and the time averaged spatial peak intensity is found. A single point measurement takes 3.43 seconds and the whole sequence can

  1. An energy and intensity monitor for X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonge, Martin D. de, E-mail: martin.dejonge@synchrotorn.org.a [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Paterson, David [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); McNulty, Ian [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4856 (United States); Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Brandes, Jay A. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, 10 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, GA 31411 (United States); Ingall, Ellery [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0340 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    An in-line X-ray beam energy and intensity monitor has been developed for use in focussed X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements. The monitor uses only the X-ray intensity that would otherwise bypass our zone-plate focussing optic and relies on a measurement of photoemission current. The monitor is inexpensive, easy to align, and provides valuable feedback about the X-ray energy. Operation of the monitor is demonstrated for measurements of phosphorus XANES. The precision of the energy determination is around 0.5 eV.

  2. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, S; Anghinolfi, M; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bouhadef, B; Bozza, C; Cacopardo, G; Calamai, M; Calì, C; Capone, A; Caruso, F; Ceres, A; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Cocimano, R; Coniglione, R; Costa, M; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Luca, V; Deniskina, N; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Distefano, C; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Garufi, F; Giordano, V; Gmerk, A; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Hugon, C; Imbesi, M; Kulikovskiy, V; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Leismueller, K P; Leonora, E; Litrico, P; Lonardo, A; Longhitano, F; Presti, D Lo; Maccioni, E; Margiotta, A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C M; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Papaleo, R; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Pugliatti, C; Pulvirenti, S; Orselli, A; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Sciacca, V; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Speziale, F; Spina, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Stellacci, S M; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Ventura, C; Vicini, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D

    2014-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  3. High-Resolution Energy and Intensity Measurements with CVD Diamond at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Wenander, F; Bergoz, J; Bayle, H; Frais-Kölbl, H; Leinweber, J; Aumeyr, T; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    A novel beam instrumentation device for the HIE-REX (High In-tensity and Energy REX) upgrade has been developed and tested at the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE, located at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This device is based on CVD diamond detector technology and is used for measuring the beam intensity, particle counting and measuring the energy spectrum of the beam. An energy resolution of 0.6% was measured at a carbon ion energy of 22.8 MeV. This corresponds to an energy spread of ± 140 keV.

  4. An energy and intensity monitor for X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in-line X-ray beam energy and intensity monitor has been developed for use in focussed X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements. The monitor uses only the X-ray intensity that would otherwise bypass our zone-plate focussing optic and relies on a measurement of photoemission current. The monitor is inexpensive, easy to align, and provides valuable feedback about the X-ray energy. Operation of the monitor is demonstrated for measurements of phosphorus XANES. The precision of the energy determination is around 0.5 eV.

  5. Relativistic laser-plasma intensity measurement by nuclear-activation based diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Marc; Sonnabend, Kerstin; Harres, Knut; Alber, Ina; Otten, Anke; Schuetrumpf, Joerg; Roth, Markus [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Vogt, Karsten; Witte, Klaus [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Brambrink, Erik [Ecole Polytechnique, LULI, Palaiseau (France)

    2009-07-01

    The recent progress in ultra-intense lasers induces focused intensities (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) in the highly relativistic regime. During the laser-solid interaction for such high intensities, an intense relativistic electron current is injected from the plasma created on the laser focal spot inside the target. The laser absorption and the laser peak intensity during the laser-solid interaction are still unknown. The measurement of the laser peak intensity within the relativistic range with conventional techniques is not directly possible, mainly because the laser intensity is determined by the laser-plasma interaction itself. In order to determine the ''temperature'' of the hot electron distribution by nuclear pyrometry we use novel activation targets as a kind of calorimeter consisting of a composition of several isotopes with different photon-neutron disintegration cross sections in the preferred ({gamma},n) reaction type. The consequence is a relatively high reaction yield for a wide range of photon energies. The determination of the relativistic electron distribution in a wide range of laser intensities will be possible.

  6. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Crittenden, Robert; Metcalf, R Benton

    2015-01-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect HI clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the HI density $\\Omega_{\\rm HI}$, the HI bias $b_{\\rm HI}$ and the galaxy-HI correlation coefficient $r_{\\rm HI-g}$.

  7. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtsidou, A.; Bacon, D.; Crittenden, R.; Metcalf, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect H I clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21 cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high-precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the H I density Ω _{H I}, the H I bias b_{H I} and the galaxy-H I correlation coefficient r_{H I-g}.

  8. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  9. Long-term Trends in Mesospheric Temperatures at high and low latitudes derived from OH airglow spectra of Kiruna FTS and Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongha; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Gawon; Lee, Youngsun

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed mesospheric temperatures from OH airglow measurements with Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) in the period of 2003 - 2012 at Kiruna (67.9°N, 21.1°E). We also derived mesospheric temperatures from rotational emission lines of the OH airglow (8-3) band in the sky spectra of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the period of 2000 - 2014. The main objective of SDSS is to make a detailed 3-dimensional map of the universe by observing images and spectra of various celestial objects at Apache Point Observatory (APO, 32°N 105°W). From both temperature sets we first estimated the solar responses of mesospheric temperatures to F10.7 variation and the seasonal variation of mesospheric temperatures. After removing the solar response, we found the long-term mesospheric temperature trends of -4 ˜-6.6 K/decade at Kiruna and -0.02 ± 0.7 K/decade at Apache Point. Our results indicate significant cooling trend at the high latitude but very little or no cooling at the low latitude. Although both trends are comparable and consistent with other studies, the temperature trend from SDSS spectra should be regarded as unique contribution to global monitoring of climate change because the SDSS project is completely independent of climate studies.

  10. Orientation-independent, nongeometric-mean measures of seismic intensity from two horizontal components of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, David M.

    2010-01-01

    New measures of spectral intensity based on the horizontal components of ground shaking are introduced. These new measures are independent of the in situ orientation of the recordings and encompass the full range of spectral amplitudes over all possible rotation angles. Unlike previously introduced measures that are also orientation independent, no geometric means are used in the computation of the new measures. The new measures based on fiftieth percentile values of the response spectra show small but systematic increases (to a factor of about 1.07 at a 10 sec period) compared to the comparable geometric-mean measure.

  11. The RHIC p-Carbon CNI Polarimeter Upgrade For The Beam Polarization And Intensity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton polarization measurements in the AGS and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at the beam energies 24-250 GeV) are based on proton-carbon and proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region. Polarimeter operation in the scanning mode also gives polarization profile and beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. Bunch by bunch emittance measurement is a very powerful tool for machine setup. Presently, the polarization and beam intensity profile measurements (in both vertical and horizontal planes) are restricted by the long target switching time and possible target destruction during this complicated motion. The RHIC polarimeters were operated near the limit of the counting rate for present silicon strip detectors. The ongoing polarimeter upgrade for the 2009 run will address all these problems. The upgrade should allow significant reduction of the polarization measurement errors by making feasible the complete polarization measurements, which includes polarization profiles in both the horizontal and vertical planes.

  12. Global Distribution of Chorus Wave Intensity Directly Measured By Van Allen Probes and Themis and Inferred from Poes Electron Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves play a fundamental role in accelerating seed electrons to highly relativistic energies, as well as causing energetic electron precipitation into the upper atmosphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data and THEMIS high-resolution wave data, which provide extensive coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we construct an empirical global model of chorus wave intensity categorized by various levels of geomagnetic activity. Recently, we have developed a physics-based technique of linking chorus wave intensity and two-directional electron fluxes (30-100 keV) measured at the conjugate low altitudes by POES satellites to show that the inferred chorus wave intensity provides reasonable estimates on the averaged chorus wave intensity. We apply these two different methods, namely (1) the empirical chorus wave model dependent on geomagnetic activity, and (2) the inferred chorus wave intensity from two-directional POES electron measurements, to a few interesting events and evaluate their performance by comparing against in-situ observations of chorus wave intensity from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. The developed global chorus wave model is critical in quantitatively evaluating the role of chorus waves in radiation belt and ring current electron dynamics.

  13. Measurement of electric-field intensities using scanning near-field microwave microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    SHVETS, IGOR; KANTOR, ROMAN

    2003-01-01

    PUBLISHED In this paper, we propose methods for the measurement of electric intensities of a microwave field above the surface of microwave circuits. Using miniaturized coaxial antennas, we measure all spatial components of the induced field above device-under-test. A special position/signal difference method is used to better localize the measured field and increase the spatial resolution of the field mapping. During the scanning process, the antenna is driven at the defined distance abov...

  14. Physical outcome measure for critical care patients following intensive care discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; McPeake, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the most suitable physical outcome measures to be used with critical care patients following discharge. ICU survivors experience physical problems such as reduced exercise capacity and intensive care acquired weakness. NICE guideline ‘Rehabilitation after critical illness’ (1) recommends the use of outcome measures however does not provide any specific guidance. A recent Cochrane review noted wide variability in measures...

  15. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis. It...... is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments...

  16. Silver activated counter detector for measurements of high intensity fast neutron burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fusion facilities, such as Z pinch, plasma focus or laser driven experiments, fast neutrons are produced in the form of a burst of radiation. For these kinds of sources, moderation of the neutron energy and silver activation is one of the most common techniques for measurement of the neutron yield. In the recent years, the study of this detection system has been revisited in order to improve the calibration methodologies, and to study the effects of moderator geometry for measurements in low intensity burst neutron sources. In this work, the design, construction and characterization of a silver activated neutron counter for measurements in high intensity neutron burst sources are reported. For such sources (Y4π > 109 n/burst), the effects of moderator geometry, as well as, the systematic effects introduced in the measurement by dead time, after irradiation of the detector by a burst of neutrons, are discussed and included in the measurement methodology

  17. Measuring fast electron distribution functions at intensities up to 1021 W cm-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we present results from ultra-intense experiments demonstrating the viability of polarization spectroscopy as a diagnostic of the electron return current and spatial anisotropy and distribution function of the fast electron beam. The measurements extend to ultra-relativistic intensities of 1021 W cm-2, including laser-plasma interaction regimes important for fast ignition studies, for example HiPER, and the development of secondary sources from next generation ultra-short pulse, ultra-intense laser facilities such as Astra-Gemini and ELI. As an in situ diagnostic, spectroscopic measurements are vital to understanding fast electron beams, enabling extrapolation of results to define fast ignition inertial confinement fusion and secondary source facilities.

  18. Associations between objectively measured physical activity intensity in childhood and measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Grøntved, Anders; Møller, Niels Christian;

    2014-01-01

    -and-vigorous and vigorous PA intensity were measured using the Actigraph activity monitor. Subclinical cardiovascular disease was expressed as cIMT, carotid arterial stiffness and secondarily as a metabolic risk z-score including the homoeostasis model assessment score of insulin resistance, triglycerides, total...

  19. Activity measurements and gamma emission intensities determination in the decay of Zn65

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last twenty years, a number of laboratories have participated to the Systeme International de Reference (SIR BIPM) and it appeared that the mass activity of 65Zn determined by the gamma-ray spectrometry was less by about 2% than the one determined by using 4πβ-γ coincidence counting. An international exercise EUROMET, action 721, was organized with the objective of improving the knowledge of decay data in the 65Zn disintegration. Nine laboratories participated, sending results for the activity measurement and the 1115 keV gamma emission intensity. For the activity measurement, the participants used the 4πβ-γ coincidence method mainly, resulting values and uncertainty budgets are described. From the new gamma emission intensities measured in this exercise and, taking into account previous published values, the intensity of the 1115 keV gamma emission has been determined being equal to: 50.22 (11) %. This new value must lead to derive activity values higher than those previously obtained, reducing the difference, with other techniques of measurement, to 1 %. Moreover, the uncertainty on the emission intensity value has been divided by a factor of two. (authors)

  20. Wigner Distribution Moments Measured as Intensity Moments in Separable First-Order Optical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Alieva

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available It is shown how all global Wigner distribution moments of arbitrary order can be measured as intensity moments in the output plane of an appropriate number of separable first-order optical systems (generally anamorphic ones. The minimum number of such systems that are needed for the determination of these moments is derived.

  1. Measurement of guided light-mode intensity: An alternative waveguide sensing principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, R.; Skivesen, N.; Pedersen, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative transduction mechanism for planar optical waveguide sensors is reported. Based on a simple measurement of the mode intensity, the presented transduction is an interesting alternative to the conventional mode-angle transduction, because the expensive, high-precision angular rotation...

  2. The measurement and interpretation of Ne VII spectral line intensity ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented for the measurement, using the branching ratios calibration method, of the spectral intensities of Ne VII lines emitted from a theta-pinch plasma whose electron temperature and density have been found by laser scattering and alternate techniques. (author)

  3. Exact invariant measures: How the strength of measure settles the intensity of chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegeroles, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how to extract dynamical behavior and ergodic properties from deterministic chaos with the assistance of exact invariant measures. On the one hand, we provide an approach to deal with the inverse problem of finding nonlinear interval maps from a given invariant measure. Then we show how to identify ergodic properties by means of transitions along the phase space via exact measures. On the other hand, we discuss quantitatively how infinite measures imply maps having subexponential Lyapunov instability (weakly chaotic), as opposed to finite measure ergodic maps, which are fully chaotic. In addition, we provide general solutions of maps for which infinite invariant measures are exactly known throughout the interval (a demand from this field). Finally, we give a simple proof that infinite measure implies universal Mittag-Leffler statistics of observables, rather than narrow distributions typically observed in finite measure ergodic maps. PMID:26172779

  4. Recent Results from Broad-Band Intensity Mapping Measurements of Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemcov, Michael B.; CIBER, Herschel-SPIRE

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping integrates the total emission in a given spectral band over the universe's history. Tomographic measurements of cosmic structure can be performed using specific line tracers observed in narrow bands, but a wealth of information is also available from broad-band observations performed by instruments capable of capturing high-fidelity, wide-angle images of extragalactic emission. Sensitive to the continuum emission from faint and diffuse sources, these broad-band measurements provide a view on cosmic structure traced by components not readily detected in point source surveys. After accounting for measurement effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the angular power spectra of such data can be compared to predictions from models to yield powerful insights into the history of cosmic structure formation. This talk will highlight some recent measurements of large scale structure performed using broad-band intensity mapping methods that have given new insights on faint, distant, and diffuse components in the extragalactic background light.

  5. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  6. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement of electron momentum density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B L Ahuja; N L Heda

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a new design and construction of a low intensity (100 mCi) 241Am -ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design. The measured profile is in good agreement with the existing theoretical data and our density functional calculations.

  7. Development of a scale to measure perceived intensity of sponsorship activities

    OpenAIRE

    Edo Rajh; Ljiljana Božić

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of research was the development of a scale to be used in measuring perceived intensity of sponsorship activities. Psychometric adequacy of the initial set of items is analyzed by assessing reliability, convergent validity and dimensionality of the initial set of items. The Cronbach alpha coefficient, explorative and confirmative factor analysis are applied. Results indicate that the measurement scale developed in such a way has satisfactory psychometric characteristics. The develo...

  8. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.N., E-mail: sophia.chen@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Atzeni, S [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D.P [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Mangia, F. [Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); Marques, J-R; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-11

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  9. Phase shift errors in the theory and practice of surface intensity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgary, M. C.; Crocker, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The surface acoustical intensity method (sometimes known as the microphone-accelerometer cross-spectral method) is a relatively new noise source/path identification tool. Several researchers have had difficulties implementing this method because of instrumentation phase mis-match. A simple technique for measuring and correcting instrumentation phase mis-match has been developed. This new technique has been tested recently on a noise source identification problem of practical interest. The results of the experiments indicate that the surface acoustic intensity method produces reliable data and can be applied to a variety of noise source/path problems.

  10. Efficiency of scalar and vector intensity measures for seismic slope displacements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Ground motion intensity measures are usually used to predict the earthquake-induced displacements in earth dams,soil slopes and soil structures.In this study,the efficiency of various single ground motion intensity measures (scalar IMs) or a combination of them (vector IMs) are investigated using the PEER-NGA strong motion database and an equivalent-linear sliding-mass model.Although no single intensity measure is efficient enough for all slope conditions,the spectral acceleration at 1.5 times of the initial slope period and Arias intensity of the input motion are found to be the most efficient scalar IMs for flexible slopes and stiff slopes respectively.Vector IMs can incorporate different characteristics of the ground motion and thus significantly improve the efficiency over a wide range of slope conditions.Among various vector IMs considered,the spectral accelerations at multiple spectral periods achieve high efficiency for a wide range of slope conditions.This study provides useful guidance to the development of more efficient empirical prediction models as well as the ground motion selection criteria for time domain analysis of seismic slope displacements.

  11. Development and application of integrated optical sensors for intense E-field measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Bo; Niu, Ben; Yu, Zhanqing

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of intense E-fields is a fundamental need in various research areas. Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and applications of several types of IOESs over the last 30 years, including the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), coupler interferometer (CI) and common path interferometer (CPI). The features of the different types of IOESs are compared, showing that the MZI has higher sensitivity, the CI has a controllable optical bias, and the CPI has better temperature stability. More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated. Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics. PMID:23112663

  12. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Calamai, M.; Calí, C.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Luca, V.; Deniskina, N.; De Rosa, G.; Di Capua, F.; Distefano, C.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Hugon, C.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leismueller, K. P.; Leonora, E.; Litrico, P.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Orselli, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sciacca, V.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Speziale, F.; Spina, M.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stellacci, S. M.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Ventura, C.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2015-06-01

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Čerenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  13. Third-order optical intensity correlation measurements of pseudo-thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Hao; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shao-Ying; Li, Ming-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Third-order Hanbrury Brown—Twiss and double-slit interference experiments with a pseudo-thermal light are performed by recording intensities in single, double and triple optical paths, respectively. The experimental results verifies the theoretical prediction that the indispensable condition for achieving a interference pattern or ghost image in Nth-order intensity correlation measurements is the synchronous detection of the same light field by each reference detector, no matter the intensities recorded in one, or two, or N optical paths. It is shown that, when the reference detectors are scanned in the opposite directions, the visibility and resolution of the third-order spatial correlation function of thermal light is much better than that scanned in the same direction, but it is no use for obtaining the Nth-order interference pattern or ghost image in the thermal Nth-order interference or ghost imaging.

  14. Methodological possibilities for using the electron and ion energy balance in thermospheric complex measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination of ground based measurements for determination of basic thermospheric characteristics is proposed . An expression for the energy transport between components of space plasma is also derived and discussed within the framework of the presented methodology which could be devided into the folowing major sections: 1) application of ionosonde, absorption measurements, TEC-measurements using Faradey radiation or the differential Doppler effect; 2) ground-based airglow measurements; 3) airglow and palsma satelite measurements. 9 refs

  15. Studies of OI 630.0 nm night airglow and GPS-TEC observations during the geomagnetic storm at low latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Ground based photometric observations of OI 630.0 nm emission line have been carried out from Kolhapur station (Geog. Lat.16.8degN , Geo. Long 74.2degE) and GPS data processed by UNB Ionospheric Modeling Technique and RDRINEX software used to get both TEC and variation in TEC i.e d(TEC)/dT from Hyderabad (17.41degN, 78.55degE) and Bangalore (13.02degN, 77.57degE) station, India during the period of the largest geomagnetic storm of the solar cycle 23 which occurred on 20 November 2003, with minimum Dst index -472 nT occurring around mid-night hours. We observed that on 19 November 2003 which was geomagnetically quiet day, the airglow activity of OI 630 nm emission and d(TEC)/dT were subdued and it was decreasing monotonically. However, on the night of November 20, 2003 the enhancement is observed during geomagnetic storm due to the increased electron density at the altitude of the F region which is related to the downward transport of electrons from the plasmasphere to the F-region. Airglow intensity at OI 630.0 nm and d(TEC)/dt showed increase around midnight on November 21, 2003 but comparatively on a smaller scale. On this night the Dst index was about -100 nT. This implies that the effect of the geomagnetic storm persisted on that night also. These observations have been explained by the penetration of magnetospheric electric field to the low latitude region and the subsequent modulation of meridional wind during the magnetic disturbance at night.

  16. Development of a scale to measure perceived intensity of sponsorship activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Rajh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research was the development of a scale to be used in measuring perceived intensity of sponsorship activities. Psychometric adequacy of the initial set of items is analyzed by assessing reliability, convergent validity and dimensionality of the initial set of items. The Cronbach alpha coefficient, explorative and confirmative factor analysis are applied. Results indicate that the measurement scale developed in such a way has satisfactory psychometric characteristics. The developed measurement scale possesses very good reliability, convergent validity while it dimensionality fits the conceptualized dimensionality.

  17. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jida Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared

  18. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nibur, Kevin A.

    2010-11-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  19. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  20. Analytical study of terahertz wave intensity measurements by ZnTe electro-optic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Muhammad; Yang, Suhui; Li, Zhuo; Li, Ping

    2008-03-01

    An analytical study of THz-waves' intensity measurement generated by Terahertz Parametric Oscillator (TPO) and detection of the THz pulses occurs via free-space electro optic detection by ZnTe crystal has been studied. The pump-probe technique has been used to observe the dynamics of an optically excited ZnTe electro-optic crystal. THz wave will be used as modulation source for electro-optical phenomena in ZnTe crystal. The THz pulses generated by TPO are 10-25 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 1Hz. ZnTe crystal is being used for intensity measurement of THz-waves. In this theoretical proposed experiment, a short pump pulse (THz-wave) and probe pulse (near IR laser) with duration of typically 10 to 25 ns interacts in the ZnTe. In electro-optic sampling the two effects namely Pockels effect and Kerr effect have been discussed and interaction of two beams from or transmission through the ZnTe, the probe pulse Intensity contains information about the THz-waves' intensity and so on.

  1. Fast and thermal neutron intensity measurements at the KFUPM PGNAA setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarallah, M. I.; Naqvi, A. A.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Abu-jarad, F.

    2002-10-01

    Fast and thermal neutron intensity distributions have been measured at an accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup. The setup is built at the 350 keV accelerator laboratory of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The setup is mainly designed to carry out PGNAA elemental analysis via thermal neutron capture. In this study relative intensity of fast and thermal neutrons was measured as a function of the PGNAA moderator assembly parameters using nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The relative intensity of the neutrons was measured inside the sample region as a function of front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Measurements were carried out at the KFUPM 350 keV accelerator using 2.8 MeV pulsed neutron beam from D(d,n) reaction. The pulsed deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 30 kHz frequency was used to produce neutrons. Experimental results were compared with results of Monte Carlo design calculations of the PGNAA setup. A good agreement has been found between the experimental results and the calculations.

  2. Fast and thermal neutron intensity measurements at the KFUPM PGNAA setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast and thermal neutron intensity distributions have been measured at an accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup. The setup is built at the 350 keV accelerator laboratory of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The setup is mainly designed to carry out PGNAA elemental analysis via thermal neutron capture. In this study relative intensity of fast and thermal neutrons was measured as a function of the PGNAA moderator assembly parameters using nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The relative intensity of the neutrons was measured inside the sample region as a function of front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Measurements were carried out at the KFUPM 350 keV accelerator using 2.8 MeV pulsed neutron beam from D(d,n) reaction. The pulsed deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 30 kHz frequency was used to produce neutrons. Experimental results were compared with results of Monte Carlo design calculations of the PGNAA setup. A good agreement has been found between the experimental results and the calculations

  3. Fast and thermal neutron intensity measurements at the KFUPM PGNAA setup

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Jarallah, M I; Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Abu-Jarad, F A

    2002-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron intensity distributions have been measured at an accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup. The setup is built at the 350 keV accelerator laboratory of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). The setup is mainly designed to carry out PGNAA elemental analysis via thermal neutron capture. In this study relative intensity of fast and thermal neutrons was measured as a function of the PGNAA moderator assembly parameters using nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The relative intensity of the neutrons was measured inside the sample region as a function of front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Measurements were carried out at the KFUPM 350 keV accelerator using 2.8 MeV pulsed neutron beam from D(d,n) reaction. The pulsed deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 30 kHz frequency was used to produce neutrons. Experimental results were compared with results of Monte Carlo design calculations of the PGNAA setup. A good agreement has bee...

  4. Practical measurements of radiation dose in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smans, K.; Vanhavere, F.; Bosmans, H.

    2006-07-01

    The EURATOM directive 97/43 and the Belgian Royal Decree of July 20, 2001 impose today the application of the ALARA principle in medical practices. Priority should be given to paediatric examinations, especially for X-ray examinations undertaken in neonatal intensive care units. Within this framework, a dose study was started to assess the patient doses in one neonatal intensive care unit for the most common examinations. Direct measurement of radiation dose was done using highly sensitive thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The ESD was on average 66 {mu}Gy. Also DAP-measurements were performed. For RX-thorax an average DAP-value of 1,27 cGy.cm{sub w}as calculated. (Author)

  5. Rapid Measurements of Intensities for Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo;

    2014-01-01

    faster (minutes rather than hours) and the nal intensity level calculation can be made generic and reused for any kind of scan sequence by just knowing the number of imaging lines and the pulse repetition time. The scheme has been implemented on the Acoustic Intensity Measurement System AIMS III (Onda......, Sunnyvale, California, USA). The research scanner SARUS is used for the experiments, where one of the channels is used for the hydrophone signal. A 3 MHz BK 8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array with 192 elements is used along with an Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone connected to a AH-2010 pre......-amplier (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, USA). A single emission sequence is employed for testing and calibrating the approach. The measurements using the AIMS III and SARUS systems after calibration agree within a relative standard deviation of 0.24%. A duplex B-mode and ow sequence is also investigated...

  6. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  7. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polee, C.; Chankow, N.; Srisatit, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2015-05-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  8. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis. It is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments, and it is an attractive alternative to particle tracking and particle image velocimetry for quantifying acoustophoretic performance in microchannels. PMID:22522812

  9. Median Algorithm for Sector Spectra Calculation from Images Registered by the Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2011-01-01

    The Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager is an instrument, specially designed for investigation of the wave processes in the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere. In order to determine the kinematic parameters of a wave, the values of a physical quantity in different space points and their changes in the time should be known. As a result of the possibilities of the SATI instrument for space scanning, different parts of the images (sectors of spectrograms) correspond to the respective mesopause areas (where the radiation is generated). An approach is proposed for sector spectra determination from SATI images based on ordered statistics instead of meaning. Comparative results are shown.

  10. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadian S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simin Asadian,1 Alireza Khatony,1 Gholamreza Moradi,2 Alireza Abdi,1 Mansour Rezaei,3 1Nursing and Midwifery School, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Biostatistics & Epidemiology Department, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran Introduction: An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods: In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results: There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001. Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%. Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132, left (P=0.18 and right (P=0.318 tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00, and axillary (P=1.00 methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion: The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left for

  11. Measurement of Intensity Profile in the Focal Region of Microscope Objective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerý, Mojmír; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Jonáš, Alexandr; Zemánek, Pavel; Liška, M.

    Vol. 2. Brno : Vysoké učení technické v Brně, 2001 - (Štrunc, M.; Hradilová, E.), s. 410-414 ISBN 80-214-1992-X. [Nové trendy ve fyzice. Brno (CZ), 15.11.2001-16.11.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : two-photon fluorescence * focused beam * intensity measurement Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  12. SMS Fibre Structure for Temperature Measurement Using a Simple Intensity-Based Interrogation System

    OpenAIRE

    Hatta, Agus; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    A singlemode–multimode–singlemode (SMS) fibre structure for temperature measurement that utilises a simple intensity-based interrogation system is proposed. The temperature dependence of the SMS fibre structure utilised as a sensor is investigated numerically and experimentally. It is found that a strong temperature dependence for the SMS fibre structure exists at selected wavelengths. The temperature characteristic at such wavelengths is linear in nature and can be used for temperature measu...

  13. Measuring and Managing Answer Quality for Online Data-Intensive Services

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Jaimie; Stewart, Christopher; Morris, Nathaniel; Tiwari, Devesh; He, Yuxiong; Elnikety, Sameh

    2015-01-01

    Online data-intensive services parallelize query execution across distributed software components. Interactive response time is a priority, so online query executions return answers without waiting for slow running components to finish. However, data from these slow components could lead to better answers. We propose Ubora, an approach to measure the effect of slow running components on the quality of answers. Ubora randomly samples online queries and executes them twice. The first execution ...

  14. The Saturne beam measurement system for orbit corrections and high and low intensity beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the dipolar and multipolar correction system and the main beam diagnostics of Saturne II: wide-band RF electrostatic pick-up electrode for observation of bunches, beam position and tune measurement systems, special electrodes for observation of emittance blow-up when particles cross a resonance line. For low intensity beams, special electrodes and electronics have been developed. All this instrumentation is computer controlled

  15. Intensity measurements in the (A-X) band system of CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahllad, U. D.; Murthy, N. S.

    1983-07-01

    Relative integrated intensities of 18 bands of the CO 4th positive (A 1Π-X 1σ +) band system have been measured by photographic photometry. The variation of the electronic transition moment Re( r) with the internuclear separation r has been found to be Re( r) = constantx (0.757 r - 1) in the range 1.456 Å⩽r⩽1.575 Å. Smoothed relative band strengths and the effective vibrational temeperature of the source are derived.

  16. Fabrication and Measurement of Foam Optical Components for Intensity Mapping Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Colclough, Adam John

    2016-01-01

    An investigation into the fabrication and measurement of foam optical components is presented. The thesis will concentrate on the solution to some of the practical challenges faced when constructing an instrument for intensity mapping. The work presented is based around a project entitled BINGO. A challenge for this project is the large size and number of feed horns required. As an alternative to conventional fabrication methods, foam and copper tape has been used to build a prototype consist...

  17. An intensive Alpine climbing expedition and its influence on some anthropometric measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an intensive 4 week Alpine climbing expedition on percentage body fat, absolute body fat and lean body mass was investigated in 14 adult male students. Anthropometric measures were taken on two occasions during the training period prior to the expedition, twice during the expedition and finally eight weeks after the expedition had returned home. There was a 3% reduction in percentage body fat between the first testing occasion and the fourth taken towards the end of the expedit...

  18. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, C W, E-mail: careyking@mail.utexas.edu [Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1100, Austin, TX 78712-0254 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  19. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  20. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C. W.

    2010-10-01

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. /Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  1. On the inversion of O+(2D-2P) 7320 Angstrom twilight airglow observations: A method for recovering both the ionization frequency and the thermospheric oxygen atom densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate that it is possible to invert twilight observations of the O+(2D-2P)-7320 Angstrom airglow emission to obtain information about both the thermospheric atomic oxygen densities and the unattenuated O+(2P) ionization frequency. The efficacy of the proposed approach, which relies upon making twilight observations in more than one viewing direction, is illustrated using a synthetic data set and an inversion algorithm based on a simple photochemical model. The results of this study show that day-to-day variations in the thermospheric oxygen atom densities may be monitored from the ground without requiring complementary measurements of the solar EUV flux. The study also shows that twilight observations may be used to monitor variations in the solar flux components that are responsible for O+(2P) production and EUV heating of the upper thermosphere

  2. Imaging informatics based on method of MR temperature measurement in high-intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangjiao; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-03-01

    MR imaging has been used to perform imaging guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and meanwhile can also be used precisely to measure tissue temperature in theory. But in practice, the temperature environment and target are complex. Therefore, it is difficult to measure targeted temperature just by simply using the theory of numerical calculation based on MR image information. In this presentation, we presented new MR temperature measurement, based on imaging informatics, to measure the targeted tissue temperature in MR imaging guided HIFU therapeutic procedure. By heating up the water phantom experiments under HIFU, the new algorithm gives a satisfactory result compared with existing algorithm. Based on experimental data, we can see the accuracy increase 37.5% from 0.4048℃ up to 0.2530℃ when we choose new algorithms.

  3. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  4. The negative event scale: measuring frequency and intensity of adult hassles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybery, D J; Neale, Jason; Arentz, Alex; Jones-Ellis, Jenny

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the structure, concurrent validity, and reliability of a hassle measure for middle-aged adults in both event frequency and intensity recordings. The measure included a range of interpersonal day-to-day events and re-examined aspects of the primary appraisal confounding debate between Lazarus and colleagues (Lazarus, Delongis, Folkman, & Gruen, 1985) and Dohrenwend and Shrout (1985). Of the 373 participants, 73% were female, 72% were in paid work, 69% were in permanent relationships and 62% had children. Principal component analyses of separate hassle frequency and intensity scores highlighted components consistent with previous research. There were seven interpersonal and four non-interpersonal subscales associated with negative events with family and friends, work, health, money, and household. The subscales had very good reliability and concurrent validity and there were generally strong correlations (i.e. up .84) between frequency and intensity scores for each subscale. Given some important sampling limitations (e.g. female overrepresentation) the findings show a psychometrically sound hassle scale for adults. PMID:17999222

  5. Beam profile measurement on HITU transducers using a thermal intensity sensor technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal intensity sensors based on the transformation of the incident ultrasonic energy into heat inside a small cylindrical absorber have been developed at PTB in the past, in particular to determine the acoustic output of medical diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Currently, this sensor technique is being expanded to match the measurement challenges of high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) fields. At the high acoustic power levels as utilized in the clinical application of HITU transducers, beam characterization using hydrophones is critical due to the possible damage of the sensitive and expensive measurement devices. Therefore, the low-cost and robust thermal sensors developed offer a promising alternative for the determination of high intensity output beam profiles. A sensor prototype with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm was applied to the beam characterization of an HITU transducer operated at several driving amplitude levels. Axial beam plots and lateral profiles at focus were acquired. The absolute continuous wave output power was, in addition, determined using a radiation force balance.

  6. Modeling of Na airglow emission and first results on the nocturnal variation at midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, T.; Sunil Krishna, M. V.; Singh, Vir

    2015-12-01

    A model for sodium airglow emission is developed by incorporating all the known reaction mechanisms. The neutral, ionic, and photochemical mechanisms are successfully implemented into this model. The values of reaction rate coefficients are based upon the theoretical calculations as well as from experimental observations. The densities of major species are calculated using the continuity equations, whereas for the minor, intermediating, and short-lived species steady state approximation method is used. The modeled results are validated with the rocket, lidar, and photometer observations for a branching ratio of 0.04 for the production of Na(2P) in the reaction NaO + O → Na(2P, 2S). The inputs have been obtained from other physics-based models and ground- and satellite-based observations to give the combined volume emission rate (VER) of Na airglow between 80 and 110 km altitude. In the present study, the model is used to understand the nocturnal variation of Na VER during the solstice conditions. The model results suggest a variation of peak emission layer between 85 and 90 km during summer solstice condition, indicating a lower value of peak emission rate during summer solstice. The emission rates bear a strong correlation with the O3 density during summer solstice, whereas the magnitude of VER follows the Na density during winter solstice. The altitude of peak VER shows an upward shift of 5 km during winter solstice.

  7. Measurements of energetic electrons from the high-intensity laser ionization of gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons ionized from tightly bound atomic states by a high-intensity laser pulse can gain energies from one to millions of electron volts dependent on the intensity of the pulse. We have currently been investigating hundreds of kilovolt to megavolt electrons produced by ionization of krypton and argon with terawatt laser pulses. Angular and energy distributions have been measured to determine the usability of this electron source as an injector for higher energy accelerators. Studies have included pressure dependence, angular ejection angle energy dependence, and polarization dependence. In particular, the energy-dependent ejection angle of electrons has been used to produce electron beams with energies peaked at 600 keV. Numerical simulations of these electrons show that 4 MV electron beams with excellent beam quality and femtosecond pulse widths can be produced from this electron source using higher power laser pulses

  8. An Industrial Radipgraphy Exposure Device Based on Measurement of Transmitted Gamma-Ray Intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking knowledge of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a D3372 Hamamatsu small GM tube. Application software is developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display the counting data via Bluetooth. Prior to placing film, the device is placed behind the specimen to be radiographed to determine the exposure time from the transmitted intensity which is independent on source activity, source-to-film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  9. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 103 compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second

  10. Wavenumber Processing Techniques to Determine Structural Intensity and Its Divergence from Optical Measurements without Leakage Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Pascal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of processing data in the wavenumber domain based on the Spatial Fourier Transform (SFT, is a powerful tool to compute higher-order partial derivatives occurred in the expressions of the structural intensity and its divergence. However, performing directly the SFT usually results in great distortions if a discontinuity occurs in spatial periodicity (leakage effect. The worst thing is that the divergence of a free plate cannot correctly be estimated by existing wavenumber processing such as the STF and zero padding method. In this paper, a new algorithm -- mirror processing, is developed. By the use of vibrating velocity measured from the technique of laser scanning vibrometry, the structural intensity, its divergence and the force distribution are evaluated by different techniques of wavenumber processing. It is shown that the distortions caused by leakage effects can be removed by using advanced algorithms.

  11. Measuring galaxy clustering and the evolution of [C II] mean intensity with far-IR line intensity mapping during 0.5 < z < 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzgil, B. D.; Aguirre, J. E.; Lidz, A. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bradford, C. M., E-mail: badeu@sas.upenn.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. Total line emission, when compared to the total star formation activity and/or other line intensities, reveals evolution of the interstellar conditions of galaxies in aggregate. As a case study, we consider measurement of [C II] autocorrelation in the 0.5 < z < 1.5 epoch, where interloper lines are minimized, using far-IR/submillimeter balloon-borne and future space-borne instruments with moderate and high sensitivity, respectively. In this context, we compare the intensity mapping approach to blind galaxy surveys based on individual detections. We find that intensity mapping is nearly always the best way to obtain the total line emission because blind, wide-field galaxy surveys lack sufficient depth and deep pencil beams do not observe enough galaxies in the requisite luminosity and redshift bins. Also, intensity mapping is often the most efficient way to measure the power spectrum shape, depending on the details of the luminosity function and the telescope aperture.

  12. Measuring galaxy clustering and the evolution of [C II] mean intensity with far-IR line intensity mapping during 0.5 < z < 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared fine-structure emission lines from trace metals are powerful diagnostics of the interstellar medium in galaxies. We explore the possibility of studying the redshifted far-IR fine-structure line emission using the three-dimensional (3D) power spectra obtained with an imaging spectrometer. The intensity mapping approach measures the spatio-spectral fluctuations due to line emission from all galaxies, including those below the individual detection threshold. The technique provides 3D measurements of galaxy clustering and moments of the galaxy luminosity function. Furthermore, the linear portion of the power spectrum can be used to measure the total line emission intensity including all sources through cosmic time with redshift information naturally encoded. Total line emission, when compared to the total star formation activity and/or other line intensities, reveals evolution of the interstellar conditions of galaxies in aggregate. As a case study, we consider measurement of [C II] autocorrelation in the 0.5 < z < 1.5 epoch, where interloper lines are minimized, using far-IR/submillimeter balloon-borne and future space-borne instruments with moderate and high sensitivity, respectively. In this context, we compare the intensity mapping approach to blind galaxy surveys based on individual detections. We find that intensity mapping is nearly always the best way to obtain the total line emission because blind, wide-field galaxy surveys lack sufficient depth and deep pencil beams do not observe enough galaxies in the requisite luminosity and redshift bins. Also, intensity mapping is often the most efficient way to measure the power spectrum shape, depending on the details of the luminosity function and the telescope aperture.

  13. Measuring Gas Concentration and Wind Intensity in a Turbulent Wind Tunnel with a Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the measurement of gas concentration and wind intensity performed with a mobile robot in a custom turbulent wind tunnel designed for experimentation with customizable wind and gas leak sources. This paper presents the representation in different information layers of the measurements obtained in the turbulent wind tunnel under different controlled environmental conditions in order to describe the plume of the gas and wind intensities inside the experimentation chamber. The information layers have been generated from the measurements gathered by individual onboard gas and wind sensors carried out by an autonomous mobile robot. On the one hand, the assumption was that the size and cost of these specialized sensors do not allow the creation of a net of sensors or other measurement alternatives based on the simultaneous use of several sensors, and on the other hand, the assumption is that the information layers created will have application on the development and test of automatic gas source location procedures based on reactive or nonreactive algorithms.

  14. Analysis of the sources of error in the determination of sound power based on sound intensity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Sound intensity measurements make it possible to determine the sound power of a source in situ, even in the presence of other sources. However, the very fact that intensity-based sound power measurements can take place under widely different conditions makes it extremely difficult to evaluate the...

  15. Intensity of play behavior as a potential measure of welfare: A novel method for quantifying the integrated intensity of behavior in African elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicino, Greg A; Marcacci, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    To the authors' knowledge there is currently no discrete index to measure the integrated intensity of a play bout in mammals, despite the potential for using intensity and duration of play bouts as a measure of physical activity and welfare. This study was developed to test an equation that quantified the intensity and duration of play bouts in a particularly gregarious mammal, African elephants (Loxodonta africana) housed at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in Escondido, CA. To quantify these behaviors, we created a scale of intensity and a subsequent equation that produces an index value, giving each unique bout a score. A compilation of these scores provides a range of intensity of play behavior that is a representative value for that particular herd at that point in time, and thus a database to which later bouts can be compared. It can be argued that play behavior is an indicator of positive welfare, and if quantifiable, it is our belief that it can be used as an additional measure of positive welfare in zoo housed animals. Here we present the methods and technique used to calculate a standardized Integrated Play Index (IPI) that has potential for use in other socially living species that are known to exhibit play behavior. PMID:26251201

  16. High-effective position time spectrometer in actual measurements of low intensity region of electron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic position-time spectrometer was proposed in previous work, where not only electron coordinates in focal plane are measured by position sensitive detector (PSD) but places of their birth in beta source plane of a large area are fixed using another PSD, situated behind it, by quick effects, accompanying radioactive decay. PSD on the basis of macro-channel plates are used. It is succeeded in position-time spectrometer to combine beta sources of a large area with multichannel registration for a wide energy interval, that efficiency of measurements was two orders of magnitude increase d in comparison magnetic apparatus having PSD only in focal plane. Owing to two detectors' switching on coincidence the relation effect/background in increased minimum on two orders of magnitude in comparison with the same apparatus. At some complication of mathematical analysis it was obtained, that high characteristics of position-time spectrometer are kept during the use the magnetic field, providing double focusing. Owning to this focusing the gain the efficiency of measurements will make one more order of magnitude. Presented high-effective position-time spectrometer is supposed to use in the measurements of low-intensity region of electron spectra, which are important for development of fundamental physics. This is the first of all estimation of electron anti-neutrino mass by the form of beta spectrum of tritium in the region of boundary energy. Recently here there was problem of non physical negative values. This problem can be solved by using in measurement of different in principle high-effective spectrometers, which possess improved background properties. A position-time spectrometers belongs to these apparatus, which provides the best background conditions at very large effectiveness of the measurements of tritium beta spectrum in the region of boundary energy with acceptable high resolution. An important advantage of position-time spectrometer is the possibility of

  17. Public attitudes toward nuclear power generation. Focusing on measurement of attitude intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study was to 1) examine the differences of the perception between nuclear power generation (NPG) and electric power generation by nuclear fusion, 2) find the structural characteristics of the attitude toward NPG, 3) shed light on the characteristics of knowledge about NPG, and 4) develop a scale to measure the intensity in attitude toward NPG. Subjects (N = 1,582) were randomly assigned into 4 groups and were asked to answer a questionnaire including public attitudes toward NPG and related matters. The results were as follows: 1) the perception of electric power generation by nuclear fusion was less favorable than that of NPG; 2) Items which correlated with attitudes toward NPG were: 'sense of anxiety,' sensitivity to risk,' 'trust in science and technology,' 'evaluation of Japan's nuclear policy', 'evaluation of electric power companies,' and interest in life and environmental issues.' Moreover, people with a strong attitude tended to be rational and had a better knowledge of NPG; 3) The evaluation of the amount of subjective knowledge concerning nuclear power and electric power generation was reliable as a measure of objective knowledge; 4) The measurement method used in this study was characterized by the use of biased questions(ten positively and ten negatively biased questions) which were shown to the subjects using the split-half method. An attempt was made to measure the attitude and its intensity taking into consideration gender, positive or negative attitude toward NPG, level of knowledge about NPG, age, and occupation. As a result, differences in intensity between different attributes were found. (author)

  18. SWIR Hemispherical Air-Glow Plotting System SHAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael M.; Dayton, David C.; Fertig, Gregory; Allen, Jeffrey; Nolasco, Rudolph; Maia, Franscisco

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band of wave length 0.9 to 1.7 μm. Numerous studies of these phenomena have demonstrated that the irradiance shows significant temporal and spatial variations in the night sky. Changes in weather patterns, seasons, sun angle, moonlight, etc have the propensity to alter the SWIR air glow irradiance pattern. By performing multiple SWIR measurements a mosaic representation of the celestial hemisphere was constructed and used to investigate these variations over time and space. The experimental setup consisted of two sensors, an InGaAs SWIR detector and a visible astronomical camera, co-located and bore sighted on an AZ-EL gimbal. This gimbal was programmed to view most of the sky using forty five discrete azimuth and elevation locations. The dwell time at each location was 30 seconds with a total cycle time of less than 30 minutes. The visible astronomical camera collected image data simultaneous with the SWIR camera in order to distinguish SWIR patterns from clouds. Data was reduced through batch processing producing polar representations of the sky irradiance as a function of azimuth, elevation, and time. These spatiotemporal variations in the irradiance, both short and long term, can be used to validate and calibrate physical models of atmospheric chemistry and turbulence. In this paper we describe our experimental setup and present some results of our measurements made over several months in a rural marine environment on the Island of Kauai Hawaii.

  19. A new resonance based method for the measurement of magnetic field intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Park, Jinhyuk; Zhang, Haifeng; Umapathy, Mangalanathan; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-04-01

    A new magnetic field intensity measurement method using resonance principle is proposed in this paper. The proposed magnetic field sensor consists of magneto rheological (MR) fluid placed between two collocated, piezo-bounded, metallic, circular disc mounted face to face in the z-axis. The resonant frequency of the disc is changed by the magnetic field dependent viscosity of the MR fluid. The key enabling concept in this work is stiffening the circular metal disc using the rheological effect of MR fluid i.e. resonant frequency varies with respect to magnetic field strength. The change in resonant frequency is measured using simple closed loop electronics connected between the two piezo crystals. The analytical model of the vibrating circular discs with MR fluid placed at the center is derived and the results are validated with experimentation. The proposed magnetic flux density measurement concept is novel and it is found to have better sensitivity and linearity.

  20. Measurement of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation at 3.0 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) has been measured at a wavelength of 3.0 cm as part of a program to measure th Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths between 0.33 cm and 12 cm. The instrument used is a dual-antenna Dicke-switched radiometer with a double-sideband noise temperature of 490 K and a sensitivity of 46 mK/Hz/sup 1/2/. The entire radiometer is mounted on bearings. The atmospheric emission was measured by rotating the radiometer, and thus directing one antenna to zenith angles of +- 300 and +- 400. 61 references, 24 figures, 18 tables

  1. Input energy measurement toward warm dense matter generation using intense pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, R.; Ito, T.; Ishitani, T.; Tamura, F.; Kudo, T.; Takakura, N.; Kashine, K.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, Nob.; Jiang, W.; Tokuchi, A.

    2016-05-01

    In order to investigate properties of warm dense matter (WDM) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), evaluation method for the WDM with isochoric heating on the implosion time-scale using an intense pulsed power generator ETIGO-II (∼1 TW, ∼50 ns) has been considered. In this study, the history of input energy into the sample is measured from the voltage and the current waveforms. To achieve isochoric heating, a foamed aluminum with pore sizes 600 μm and with 90% porosity was packed into a hollow glass capillary (ø 5 mm × 10 mm). The temperature of the sample is calculated from the numerical calculation using the measured input power. According to the above measurements, the input energy into a sample and the achievable temperature are estimated to be 300 J and 6000 K. It indicates that the WDM state is generated using the proposed method with ICF implosion time-scale.

  2. Provision of protein and energy in relation to measured requirements in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Esmailzadeh, Negar; Knudsen, Anne Wilkens;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adequacy of nutritional support in intensive care patients is still a matter of investigation. This study aimed to relate mortality to provision, measured requirements and balances for energy and protein in ICU patients. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study of 113 ICU......, also when adjusted for baseline prognostic variables (APACHE II, SOFA scores and age). Provision of energy, measured resting energy expenditure or energy and nitrogen balance was not related to mortality. The possible cause-effect relationship is discussed after a more detailed analysis of the initial...... part of the admission. CONCLUSION: In these severely ill ICU patients, a higher provision of protein and amino acids was associated with a lower mortality. This was not the case for provision of energy or measured resting energy expenditure or energy or nitrogen balances. The hypothesis that higher...

  3. Underwater measurement of narrowband sound power and directivity using Supersonic Intensity in Reverberant Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Andrew R.; Hambric, Stephen A.; Maynard, Julian D.

    2012-08-01

    A laboratory underwater acoustic measurement technique, Supersonic Intensity in Reverberant Environments (SIRE), is developed analytically and validated experimentally and numerically. Unlike standard free or diffuse field techniques, SIRE enables the measurement of narrowband sound power and directivity in an environment with inexact field conditions. The technique takes advantage of underwater vector sensors, measuring only acoustic pressure and the normal component of particle velocity/acceleration, and supersonic wavenumber filtering in the near field of a source. The result is outward-propagating acoustic waves separated from interfering incoming and/or evanescent waves. The SIRE technique was experimentally applied to monopole and dipole sources and the results are compared with theory and standard methods. SIRE is shown to accurately measure radiated sound power to within the limits of ANSI S12.51 and to accurately measure the directivity indices of simple sources to within ±3 dB. A coupled finite element/boundary element model of a point-driven, thin-walled cylinder is also developed to establish the limitations of the SIRE technique. The model results show that the measurement standoff distance should be less than the reciprocal of the largest wavenumber in the frequency band of interest. Furthermore, the maximum measurement grid spacing must be less than twice the standoff distance.

  4. Analysis and comparison model for measuring tropospheric scintillation intensity for Ku-band frequency in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep JS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has been based on understanding local propagation signal data distribution characteristics and identifying and predicting the overall impact of significant attenuating factors regarding the propagation path such as impaired propagation for a signal being transmitted. Predicting propagation impairment is important for accurate link budgeting, thereby leading to better communication network system designation. This study has thus used sample data for one year concerning beacon satellite operation in Malaysia from April 2008 to April 2009. Data concerning 12GHz frequency (Ku-band and 40° elevation angle was collected and analysed, obtaining average signal amplitude value, ÷ and also standard deviation ó which is normally measured in dB to obtain long-term scintillation intensity distribution. This analysis showed that scintillation intensity distribution followed Gaussian distribution for long-term data distribution. A prediction model was then selected based on the above; Karasawa,
    ITU-R, Van de Kamp and Otung models were compared to obtain the best prediction model performance for selected data regarding specific meteorological conditions. This study showed that the Karasawa model had the best performance for predicting scintillation intensity for the selected da ta.

  5. Measurement for titanium density distribution on Ti:sapphire rods for high intensity pump source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Ti:sapphire rod of 190 mm length made by Czochralski (CZ) technique was used in the flashlamp pumped high intensity laser for Yb:glass chirped pulse amplification. In the absorption spectroscopy of the rod immersed in an index matching liquid of methylene iodide, heterogeneous Ti3+ density distribution was measured along the direction of length. It has been first clarified that the Ti:sapphire rod grown by the CZ technique has 20% difference of the Ti3+ density at the both ends. (author)

  6. Measurement of the K X-ray intensity ratios in muonic hydrogen at low gas densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the K X-ray transitions of muonic hydrogen (μ-p and μ-d) were performed at H2 or D2 gas pressures between 17 and 533 hPa (T∼293 K). The intensity ratios Kα/Ktotal and Kβ/Ktotal depend on the gas density because the strength of excited state collisional interactions increases at higher densities. The data are compared with the results of a cascade calculation. They are sensitive to the collisional Stark mixing rates at the main quantum levels n=4,.., 8. (orig.)

  7. Intensity-measurement bend sensors based on periodically tapered soft glass fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.; Richardson, D. J.; Brambilla, G; Feng, X.; Petrovich, M.N.; Ding, M.; Song, Z.(Central China Normal University, Wuhan, China)

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel technique for tapering periodically an all-solid soft glass fiber, consisting of two types of lead silicate glasses, by the use of a focused CO2 laser beam and investigate the bend sensing applications of the periodically-tapered soft glass fiber. Such a soft glass fiber with periodic microtapers could be used to develop promising bend sensors with a sensitivity of -27.75 ?W/m^-1 by means of measuring the bend-induced change of light intensity. The proposed bend sensor ...

  8. Evaluating A New Proxy For Spectral Shape To Be Used As An Intensity Measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to use a new vector-valued ground motion intensity measure (IM) is analyzed; it is based on the spectral acceleration at first mode (Sa) and a parameter proxy for the spectral shape, namely Np. The potential of the vector p> is explored by efficiency comparison with other IMs. It will be illustrated how the form of the vector p may represent an improvement in predicting the seismic response in terms of ductility, dissipated hysteretic energy and Park and Ang damage index for nonlinear single degree of freedom (SDOF) structures subjected to ordinary, narrow-band and near-source pulse-like records

  9. Measurements of deep heating generated by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure 300 eV thermal temperatures at near-solid densities by x-ray spectroscopy of tracer layers buried up to 30 pm inside CH slabs which are irradiated by a 0.5 kJ, 5 ps laser. X-ray imaging data suggest that collimated electron transport produces comparable temperatures as deep as 200 pm, and unexpectedly show the heated regions to be 50-120 pm-diameter rings. The data indicate that intense lasers can directionally heat solid matter to high temperatures over large distances; the results are relevant for fast-ignition inertial-confinement fusion and hot, dense plasma research

  10. Measurement for titanium density distribution on Ti:sapphire rods for high intensity pump source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Akihiko; Sugiyama, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    A Ti:sapphire rod of 190 mm length made by Czochralski (CZ) technique was used in the flashlamp pumped high intensity laser for Yb:glass chirped pulse amplification. In the absorption spectroscopy of the rod immersed in an index matching liquid of methylene iodide, heterogeneous Ti{sup 3+} density distribution was measured along the direction of length. It has been first clarified that the Ti:sapphire rod grown by the CZ technique has 20% difference of the Ti{sup 3+} density at the both ends. (author)

  11. Open-Path FTIR Spectral Radiation Intensity Of Hot Combustion Gases – Measurement And Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cięszczyk Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectral remote sensing is a very popular method in atmospheric monitoring. The paper presents an approach that involves mid-infrared spectral measurements of combustion processes. The dominant feature in this spectral range is CO2 radiation, which is used to determine the maximum temperature of nonluminous flames. Efforts are also made to determine the temperature profile of hot CO2, but they are limited to the laboratory conditions. The paper presents an analysis of the radiation spectrum of a non-uniform-temperature gas environment using a radiative transfer equation. Particularly important are the presented experimental measurements of various stages of the combustion process. They allow for a qualitative description of the physical phenomena involved in the process and therefore permit diagnostics. The next step is determination of a non-uniform-temperature profile based on the spectral radiation intensity with the 8 m optical path length.

  12. Precise and accurate measurements of strong-field photoionisation and a transferrable laser intensity calibration standard

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, W C; Khurmi, C; U., Satya Sainadh; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-01-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percentlevel accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferrable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much-needed benchmark for testing models of ionisation in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  13. First measurement of low intensity fast neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tziaferi, E; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lerner, R; Lightfoot, P K; Paling, S M; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C

    2006-01-01

    A technique to measure low intensity fast neutron flux has been developed. The design, calibrations, procedure for data analysis and interpretation of the results are discussed in detail. The technique has been applied to measure the neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, a site used for dark matter and other experiments, requiring shielding from cosmic ray muons. The experiment was performed using a liquid scintillation detector. A 6.1 litre volume stainless steel cell was filled with an in-house made liquid scintillator loaded with Gd to enhance neutron capture. A two-pulse signature (proton recoils followed by gammas from neutron capture) was used to identify the neutron events from much larger gamma background from PMTs. Suppression of gammas from the rock was achieved by surrounding the detector with high-purity lead and copper. Calibrations of the detector were performed with various gamma and neutron sources. Special care was taken to eliminate PMT afterpulses and correlated...

  14. Review of intense-ion-beam propagation with a view toward measuring ion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this review is intense ion beam propagation and the possibilities of measuring time dependent ion energy in the beam. Propagation effects discussed include charge separation, charge and current autoneutralization, electron thermalization and current neutralization decay. The interaction of a plasma beam with material obstacles, like collimators, and with transverse magnetic fields is also described. Depending on beam energy, density and pulse length, these interactions can include material ablation with plasmadynamic flow and undeflected propagation across transverse magnetic fields by a polarization drift. On the basis of this review I conclude that three diagnostics: a single floating potential probe, net current probes (Faraday cups) and a Rutherford scattering spectrometer appear capable of giving prompt, time dependent ion energy measurements

  15. Intensity offset and correction of solid spectral library samples measured behind glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2013-05-18

    Accurate and calibrated diffuse reflectance spectra libraries of solids are becoming more important for hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing exploitation. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and in order to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass or quartz for the UV, visible or near-infrared spectral regions to prevent their unwanted dispersal into the instrument or laboratory environment. Using both experimental and theoretical methods we have found that for the case of fused quartz this leads to an intensity offset in the reflectance values. Although expected dispersive effects were observed for the fused quartz window in the UV, the measured hemispherical reflectance values are predominantly vertically shifted by the reflectance from the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces with intensity dependent offsets leading to measured values up to nearly 6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, 3.8% too high for 10% reflecting materials, approximately correct (to within experimental error) for 40% to 60% diffuse reflecting surfaces, and 2% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon surfaces. For the diffuse reflectance case, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the glass, with differences nearly 6% too high for reflectance values approaching 99%. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces as verified by theory, modeling and experiment. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300 nm to 2300 nm range.

  16. Fluctuations of the electron temperature measured by intensity interferometry on the W7-AS stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluctuations of the electron temperature can cause a significant amount of the anomalous electron heat conductivity observed on fusion plasmas, even with relative amplitudes below one per cent. None of the standard diagnostics utilized for measuring the electron temperature in the confinement region of fusion plasmas is provided with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution and the sensitivity for small fluctuation amplitudes. In this work a new diagnostic for the measurement of electron temperature fluctuations in the confinement region of fusion plasmas was developed, built up, tested and successfully applied on the W7-AS Stellarator. Transport relevant fluctuations of the electron temperature can in principle be measured by radiometry of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE), but they might be buried completely in natural fluctuations of the ECE due to the thermal nature of this radiation. Fluctuations with relative amplitudes below one per cent can be measured with a temporal resolution in the μs-range and a spatial resolution of a few cm only with the help of correlation techniques. The intensity interferometry method, developed for radio astronomy, was applied here: two independent but identical radiometers are viewing the same emitting volume along crossed lines of sight. If the angle between the sightlines is chosen above a limiting value, which is determined by the spatial coherence properties of thermal radiation, the thermal noise is uncorrelated while the temperature fluctuations remain correlated. With the help of this technique relative amplitudes below 0.1% are accessible to measurement. (orig.)

  17. Seasonal dependence of MSTIDs obtained from 630.0 nm airglow imaging at Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, C.; Baumgardner, J.; Wroten, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2010-06-01

    All-sky imaging data of 630.0 nm airglow emissions are used to study the seasonal and solar activity dependence of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) over Arecibo, Puerto Rico (18.3° N, 66.7° W, 28° N mag lat). MSTIDs are typical F-region signatures at midlatitudes, yet limited statistical results in the American sector hindered the progress in our understanding of these dynamical structures. This study compiles data from 2002 to 2007 and shows for the first time that optically-determined MSTIDs at Arecibo present a semiannual pattern with peak occurrence at both solstices. In the Japanese longitude sector, a similar pattern has been found, but one with a main peak during local summer. This paper explains the high occurrence rate during local winter at Arecibo via E-layer/F-layer coupling and inter-hemispheric coupling, thus accounting for a consistent morphology between the two longitude sectors.

  18. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm3) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  19. Optimized point dose measurement: An effective tool for QA in intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Alok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT point dose measurement, there exists significant deviation between calculated and measured dose at isocenter, sometimes greater than ±3%. This may be because IMRT fields generate complex profiles at the reference point. The deviation arises due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium for small fields, and other factors such as leakage and scatter contribution. Measurements were done using 0.125-cc ion chamber and Universal IMRT phantom (both from PTW-Freiburg. The aim is to find a suitable point of measurement for the chamber to avoid discrepancy between calculated and measured dose. Various beam profiles were generated in the plane of the chamber for each field by implementing patient plan on the IMRT phantom. The profiles show that for the fields which are showing deviation, the ion chamber lies in the steep-gradient region. To rectify the problem, the TPS (Treatment Planning System calculated dose is found out at various points in the measurement plane of the chamber at isocenter. The necessary displacement to the chamber, as noted from the TPS, was given to obtain the optimum result. Twenty cases were studied for optimization, whose percentage deviation was more than ±3%. The results were well within tolerance criteria of ±3% after optimization. The mean percentage deviation value for the 20 cases studied, with standard deviation of 2.33 under 95% confidence interval, was found out to be 2.10% ± 1.14. Those cases that have significant variation even after optimization are further studied with film dosimetry.

  20. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  1. Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Evans, K.D. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Melfi, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goldsmith, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.

  2. Measurement of high-power microwave pulse under intense electromagnetic noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Roy; S K Singh; R Menon; D Senthil Kumar; R Venkateswaran; M R Kulkarni; P C Saroj; K V Nagesh; K C Mittal; D P Chakravarthy

    2010-01-01

    KALI-1000 pulse power system has been used to generate single pulse nanosecond duration high-power microwaves (HPM) from a virtual cathode oscillator (VIRCATOR) device. HPM power measurements were carried out using a transmitting–receiving system in the presence of intense high frequency (a few MHz) electromagnetic noise. Initially, the diode detector output signal could not be recorded due to the high noise level persisting in the ambiance. It was found that the HPM pulse can be successfully detected using wide band antenna, RF cable and diode detector set-up in the presence of significant electromagnetic noise. Estimated microwave peak power was ∼ 59.8 dBm (∼ 1 kW) at 7 m distance from the VIRCATOR window. Peak amplitude of the HPM signal varies on shot-to-shot basis. Duration of the HPM pulse (FWHM) also varies from 52 ns to 94 ns for different shots.

  3. Correlation study between ground motion intensity measure parameters and deformation demands for bilinear SDOF systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The correlation between ground motion intensity measures (IM) and single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) deformation demands is described in this study. Peak ground acceleration (APG), peak ground velocity (VPG), peak ground displacement (DPG), spectral acceleration at the first-mode period of vibration [As(T1)] and ratio of VPG to APG are used as IM parameters, and the correlation is characterized by correlation coefficients ρ. The numerical results obtained by nonlinear dynamic analyses have shown good correlation between As(T1) or VPG and deformation demands. Furthermore, the effect of As(T1) and VPG as IM on the dispersion of the mean value of deformation demands is also investigated for SDOF systems with three different periods T=0.3 s, 1.0 s, 3.0 s respectively.

  4. Measurements of deep heating generated by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure 300 eV thermal temperatures at near-solid densities by x-ray spectroscopy of tracer layers buried up to 30 μm inside CH slabs which are irradiated by a 0.5 kJ, 5 ps laser. X-ray imaging data suggest that collimated electron transport produces comparable temperatures as deep as 200 μm, and unexpectedly show the heated regions to be 50-120 μm-diameter rings. The data indicate that intense lasers can directionally heat solid matter to high temperatures over large distances; the results are relevant for fast-ignition inertial-confinement fusion and hot, dense plasma research. (authors)

  5. Measurement of the direction and intensity of the marketing attitude of employees – a compromise between marketing theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Escher

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this paper refers to the questions of the measurement of various dimensions of attitudes (especially theirs direction and intensity) and differences which in that matter exist in the area of theory and practice. The main purpose of the article is to give proposals of methods and scales which can be used to measure the direction and intensity of the marketing attitude of employee, and which join expectations of marketing theorists and marketing researchers.

  6. Measurements of [O I] λ 6300/Hα Intensity Ratios in Four H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, N. R.; Reynolds, R. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Tufte, S. L.

    2000-05-01

    Reynolds et al. (1998, ApJ, 494, L99) measured the [O I] λ 6300/Hα line intensity ratio for the O star H II region NGC 7000 and found it to be almost ten times lower than the [O I]/Hα ratios of three directions which sampled the warm ionized medium. In order to investigate whether the [O I]/Hα ratios of other discrete H II regions are similar to that of NGC 7000, the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM) facility has now been used to measure [O I]/Hα intensity ratios for four additional H II regions surrounding O stars. These regions are S252 (observation coordinates l = 190.1o, b = +0.6o), S261 (194.1o, --1.9o), S27 (6.3o, +23.6o), and S264 (195.1o, --12.0o). The [O I]/Hα ratios for these four regions range from approximately 0.001 to 0.005. This is consistent with the NGC 7000 result of [O I]/Hα = 0.0033, and hence indicates a large, systematic difference between the [O I]/Hα ratios in bright H II regions in the vicinity of O stars and the ratios in the diffuse ionized component of the interstellar medium. This difference implies either a significantly lower hydrogen ionization fraction n(H+)/n(Ho) or higher electron temperature in the diffuse ionized gas compared to the O star H II regions. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation through grant AST 96-19424.

  7. On inconsistency of experimental data on primary nuclei spectra with sea level muon intensity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lagutin, A A; Yushkov, A V

    2004-01-01

    For the first time a complete set of the most recent direct data on primary cosmic ray spectra is used as input into calculations of muon flux at sea level in wide energy range $E_\\mu=1-3\\cdot10^5$ GeV. Computations have been performed with the CORSIKA/QGSJET and CORSIKA/VENUS codes. The comparison of the obtained muon intensity with the data of muon experiments shows, that measurements of primary nuclei spectra conform to sea level muon data only up to several tens of GeV and result in essential deficit of muons at higher energies. As it follows from our examination, uncertainties in muon flux measurements and in the description of nuclear cascades development are not suitable to explain this contradiction, and the only remaining factor, leading to this situation, is underestimation of primary light nuclei fluxes. We have considered systematic effects, that may distort the results of the primary cosmic ray measurements with the application of the emulsion chambers. We suggest, that re-examination of these me...

  8. Measurement of the total ionisation intensity near the ground and separation of the various components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to measure the total amount of ion-pairs produced in the air per unit time and unit volume. It is possible, furthermore, by using continuous recording to study the variations in the ionisation due to α, β and γ radiation at a height of one metre. The apparatus which has been developed consists of two chambers of 120 litres: one, hermetically sealed detects the γ component, the other with a circulation of the ambient air detects the α and γ; it is thus possible by difference to evaluate the α component. The chambers and the associated electronic equipment have been designed for continuous operation in the open air. Another chamber without walls can be used for measuring directly the total ionisation intensity and from this an approximate calculation may be made of the β component. A series of recordings has been made near Saclay where the natural radio-activity level is moderate, and in regions of low and high activity (near the sea and in the CEA's mining divisions). It has thus been possible to show the variation in the γ component as a function of the geographic position of the measurement (from 3.7 to 6.3 l/cm3.s), the very large variations of the α component at a given place with changing meteorological conditions (from 1.5 to 45 l/cm3.s at Saclay for example) an the far smaller variations in the β component. (author)

  9. Windowless microfluidic platform based on capillary burst valves for high intensity x-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose and describe a microfluidic system for high intensity x-ray measurements. The required open access to a microfluidic channel is provided by an out-of-plane capillary burst valve (CBV). The functionality of the out-of-plane CBV is characterized with respect to the diameter of the windowless access hole, ranging from 10 to 130 μm. Maximum driving pressures from 22 to 280 mbar corresponding to refresh rates of the exposed sample from 300 Hz to 54 kHz is demonstrated. The microfluidic system is tested at beamline ID09b at the ESRF synchrotron radiation facility in Grenoble, and x-ray scattering measurements are shown to be feasible and to require only very limited amounts of sample, <1 ml/h of measurements without recapturing of sample. With small adjustments of the present chip design, scattering angles up to 30 deg. can be achieved without shadowing effects and integration on-chip mixing and spectroscopy appears straightforward.

  10. The measurement of rain kinetic energy and rain intensity using an acoustic disdrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave engineers and geomorphologists require rainfall data with a much greater temporal resolution and a better representation of the numbers of large raindrops than is available from current commercial instruments. This paper describes an acoustic instrument that determines rain parameters from the sound of raindrops falling into a tank of water. There is a direct relationship between the kinetic energy (KE) of a raindrop and the acoustic energy that it creates upon impact. Rain KE flux density is estimated from measurements of the sound field in the tank, and these have been compared to measurements from a co-sited commercial disdrometer. Eight months of data have been collected in the eastern UK. Comparisons of rain KE estimated by the two instruments are presented and links between the KE and rainfall intensity are discussed. The sampling errors of the two instruments are analysed to show that the acoustic instrument can produce rain KE measurements with a 1 s integration time with sampling uncertainty of the same size as commercial instruments using a 1 min integration time

  11. An intensity correction for pole figure measurements by grazing incident and grazing exit angle X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pole figure measurement by X-ray diffraction, the intensity must be corrected for geometric factors entering into the intensity. For the grazing (often, also called glancing) angle diffraction mode, the irradiated area changes with the grazing angle. A theoretical analysis of this effect was made and compared with measured data from a texture-free silver sample. An intensity correction factor is given as the ratio of the detector slit width and the width of the irradiated sample area as seen from the detector. As an application, the texture of thin copper film was studied

  12. PIV measurement of the attached plane jet velocity field at a high turbulence intensity level in a room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of an attached plane jet at high turbulence intensity (>20%) is not completely understood, especially at relatively low Reynolds numbers (<2000) in a room. This study focuses on the detailed mean and instantaneous jet flow field using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement technique in a full-scale climate chamber. Three isothermal conditions at different Reynolds numbers based on the jet slot height and slot average velocity, 960, 1320 and 1680, were measured, having a turbulence intensity of 44%, 30% and 22%, respectively. The results show that the measured jet velocity was able to match the earlier empirical turbulent jet results when the turbulence intensity was of the order of 40%. Incomplete self-similarity occurs when the turbulence intensity is less than 30%. After a few slot heights downstream from the jet slot, most of the data of the jet at the Reynolds number 960 present self-similarity characteristics.

  13. Influence of the turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation on the sound intensity measurement in a mean flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SHI, Xiao-jun; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    overwhelm the true source pressure in some cases. In this paper, the model of the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is described firstly. Based upon the developed model, the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is calculated using the available models of the wave-vector...... frequency spectra of the TBL pressure fluctuation. In order to validate the model and the numerical results, a serious of measurements were carried out. It is shown that the calculated results of the TBL pressure fluctuation agree fairly well with the measured results which are corrected with the estimated...... spatial response function of the microphone. Also, the characteristics of the measured sound intensity are consistent with that of the calculated sound intensity....

  14. Calibration Of X-Ray Imaging Devices For Accurate Intensity Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  15. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  16. On inconsistency of experimental data on primary nuclei spectra with sea level muon intensity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time a complete set of the most recent direct data on primary cosmic ray spectra is used as input into calculations of muon flux at sea level in a wide energy range Eμ = 1 - (3 x 105) GeV. Computations have been performed with the CORSIKA/QGSJET and CORSIKA/VENUS codes. Comparison of the obtained muon intensity with the data of muon experiments shows that measurements of primary nuclei spectra conform to sea level muon data only up to several tens of GeV and result in essential deficit of muons at higher energies. As it follows from our examination, uncertainties in muon flux measurements and in the description of nuclear cascades development are not suitable to explain this contradiction, and the only remaining factor, leading to this situation, is underestimation of primary light nuclei fluxes. We have considered systematic effects, that may distort the results of the primary cosmic-ray measurements with the application of the emulsion chambers. We suggest, that re-examination of these measurements is required with the employment of different hadronic interaction models. Also, in our point of view, it is necessary to perform estimates of the possible influence of the fact that a sizable fraction of events, identified as protons, actually are antiprotons. Study of this cosmic-ray component begins to draw much attention, but today nothing definite is known for the energies >40 GeV. In any case, to realize whether the mentioned, or some other reasons are the sources of disagreement of the data on primaries with the data on muons, the indicated effects should be thoroughly analysed

  17. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion beam-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented. Three refinements to existing models have been added. (1) The beam creates ions by charge exchange as well as by ionization. (2) In the ionization process most of the ions are born at rest but some of the ions are born through a molecular dissociation process which provides them with substantial energy. (3) Electrons are trapped in the potential well of the system. Their distribution will be truncated by the well and the usual Boltzmann relation for the density variation with potential will be altered slightly. Analytical expressions for these effects are obtained and included in the computer generated solution. The model and data are in good agreement only when locally determined beam current profiles are used in the solution. These profiles are broader than those determined from beam dump calorimetry

  18. Climatology of planetary wave type oscillations with periods of 2–20 days derived from O2 atmospheric and OH(6-2) airglow observations at mid-latitude with SATI

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. López-González; Rodríguez, E.; M. García-Comas; Costa, V; Shepherd, M G; Shepherd, G. G.; Aushev, V. M.; S. Sargoytchev

    2009-01-01

    The presence of planetary wave type oscillations at mid-latitudes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region has been investigated using airglow observations. The observations were taken with a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI) installed at Sierra Nevada Observatory (37.06° N, 3.38° W) at 2900 m height. Airglow data of the column emission rate of the O2 Atmospheric (0-1) band and of the OH Meinel (6-2) band and deduced rotational temperatur...

  19. Temperature Measurements in the Solar Transition Region Using N III Line Intensity Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, R.; Doschek, G. A.; Laming, J. M.; Feldman, U.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    UV emission from B-like N and O ions a rather rare opportunity for recording spectral lines in a narrow wavelength range that can potentially be used to derive temperatures relevant to the solar transition region. In these ions, the line intensity ratios of the type (2s2p(sup 2) - 2p(sup 3)) / (2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2)) are very sensitive to the electron temperature. Additionally, the lines involving the ratios fall within a range of only - 12 A; in N III the lines fall in the 980 - 992 A range and in O IV in the 780 - 791 A range. In this work, we explore the use of these atomic systems, primarily in N III, for temperature diagnostics of the transition region by analyzing UV spectra obtained by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer flown on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The N III temperature-sensitive line ratios are measured in more than 60 observations. Most of the measured ratios correspond to temperatures in the range 5.7x10(exp 4) - 6.7x10(exp 4) K. This range is considerably lower than the calculated temperature of maximum abundance of N III, which is approx. 7.6x10(exp 4) K. Detailed analysis of the spectra further indicates that the measured ratios are probably somewhat overestimated due to resonant scattering effects in the 2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2) lines and small blends in the 2s2p(sup 2) - 2p3 lines. Actual lower ratios would only increase the disagreement between the ionization balance calculations and present temperature measurements based on a collisional excitation model. In the case of the O IV spectra, we determined that due to the close proximity in wavelength of the weak line (2s2p(sup 2)-2p3 transitions) to a strong Ne VIII line, sufficiently accurate ratio measurements cannot be obtained. Subject headings: atomic data --- atomic processes --- Sun: transition region --- Sun: U V radiation --- techniques: spectroscopic

  20. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  1. Infrastructure for quality transformation: measurement and reporting in veterans administration intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Render, Marta L; Freyberg, Ron W; Hasselbeck, Rachael; Hofer, Timothy P; Sales, Anne E; Deddens, James; Levesque, Odette; Almenoff, Peter L

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND Veterans Health Administration (VA) intensive care units (ICUs) develop an infrastructure for quality improvement using information technology and recruiting leadership. METHODS Setting Participation by the 183 ICUs in the quality improvement program is required. Infrastructure includes measurement (electronic data extraction, analysis), quarterly web-based reporting and implementation support of evidence-based practices. Leaders prioritise measures based on quality improvement objectives. The electronic extraction is validated manually against the medical record, selecting hospitals whose data elements and measures fall at the extremes (10th, 90th percentile). results are depicted in graphic, narrative and tabular reports benchmarked by type and complexity of ICU. RESULTS The VA admits 103 689±1156 ICU patients/year. Variation in electronic business practices, data location and normal range of some laboratory tests affects data quality. A data management website captures data elements important to ICU performance and not available electronically. A dashboard manages the data overload (quarterly reports ranged 106-299 pages). More than 85% of ICU directors and nurse managers review their reports. Leadership interest is sustained by including ICU targets in executive performance contracts, identification of local improvement opportunities with analytic software, and focused reviews. CONCLUSION Lessons relevant to non-VA institutions include the: (1) need for ongoing data validation, (2) essential involvement of leadership at multiple levels, (3) supplementation of electronic data when key elements are absent, (4) utility of a good but not perfect electronic indicator to move practice while improving data elements and (5) value of a dashboard. PMID:21345859

  2. A thermal technique for local ultrasound intensity measurement: part 2. Application to exposimetry on a medical diagnostic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acoustic output measurements on medical ultrasound equipment are usually performed using radiation force balances to determine the output power and using hydrophones to determine pressure and intensity parameters. The local temporal-average ultrasound intensity can be measured alternatively by thermal sensors. The technique was described and prototype sensors were characterized in a preceding paper. Here, the application of such a thermal intensity sensor to the output beam characterization of a typical medical diagnostic device is described. Two transducers, a 7.5 MHz linear array and a 3.5 MHz convex array were investigated in different operating modes. For comparison, hydrophone measurements were also performed. If the spatial averaging effect is taken into account, good agreement is found between both measurement methods. The maximum deviations of the spatial-peak temporal-average intensities ISPTA obtained with the thermal sensor from the corresponding hydrophone-based results were below 12%. The simple thermal technique offers advantages for intensity measurements especially in the case of scanning and combined modes of the diagnostic device, where the synchronization between hydrophone measurements and the complex pulse emission pattern can be difficult

  3. Measurements of output intensities at cone tip using six dental x-ray generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Output intensities (air-absorbed doses in air: Gy) were measured at the cone tip using six dental x-ray generators. The type 660 ionizing dosimeter (Victoreen, Inc.) was used. The flat probe, type 660-3, was set at the cone tip of each dental x-ray generator. Measurements at three exposure times, of approx. 0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 s were repeated five times. The exposure time versus air-absorbed dose relationship and the air-absorbed dose rate, were obtained for each generator. The number of exposure time settings required to give an air-absorbed dose of less than 2.00 mGy at the cone tip was evaluated for each generator. Outputs of two generators which were furnished with a short cone (20 cm focal spot to cone tip distance) were 3.38 and 6.95 mGy/sec at 60 kV, and 4.67 and 9.82 mGy/sec at 70 kV. Outputs of four generators with a long cone (30-35 cm) were distributed in the range of either 1.50-1.68 mGy/sec or 3.06-3.57 mGy/sec at 60 kV, and either 1.95-2.29 or 4.06-4.73 mGy/sec at 70 kV, respectively. The calculated outputs at 10 cm beyond the cone tip with two generators with a short cone were included in this range. The number of exposure time settings to give absorbed doses of less than 2.00 mGy was in the range of 43 to 70% for five generators. One of the six generators had the low output rate. This experiment using six dental generators clarified that there were two kinds of generators which were distinguished by the x-ray output intensity. Some dental x-ray generators had outputs in the range of approximately 1.5-1.7 mGy/sec at 60 kV, and approx. 2.0-2.3 mGy/sec at 70 kV at the tip of the long cone. Outputs with other generators were approximately twice of these values. These findings are useful to evaluate the doses absorbed by the patient's skin surface, which is the maximum for the patient at the intraoral radiographic examination. (author)

  4. The design and application of large area intensive lens array focal spots measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingzhen; Yao, Shun; Yang, Guanghui; Dai, Mingchong; Wang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) modules are getting thinner and using smaller cells now days. Correspondingly, large area intensive lens arrays with smaller unit dimension and shorter focal length are wanted. However, the size and power center of lens array focal spots usually differ from the design value and are hard to measure, especially under large area situation. It is because the machining error and deformation of material of the lens array are hard to simulate in the optical design process. Thus the alignment error between solar cells and focal spots in the module assembly process will be hard to control. Under this kind of situation, the efficiency of CPV module with thinner body and smaller cells is much lower than expected. In this paper, a design of large area lens array focal spots automatic measurement system is presented, as well as its prototype application results. In this system, a four-channel parallel light path and its corresponding image capture and process modules are designed. These modules can simulate focal spots under sunlight and have the spots image captured and processed using charge coupled devices and certain gray level algorithm. Thus the important information of focal spots such as spot size and location will be exported. Motion control module based on grating scale signal and interval measurement method are also employed in this system in order to get test results with high speed and high precision on large area lens array no less than 1m×0.8m. The repeatability of the system prototype measurement is +/-10μm with a velocity of 90 spot/min. Compared to the original module assembled using coordinates from optical design, modules assembled using data exported from the prototype is 18% higher in output power, reaching a conversion efficiency of over 31%. This system and its design can be used in the focal spot measurement of planoconvex lens array and Fresnel lens array, as well as other kinds of large area lens array application

  5. Consideration of fluctuation in secondary beam intensity of heavy ion beam probe measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion beam probes have capability to detect local electron density fluctuation in the interior of plasmas through the detected beam intensity fluctuation. However, the intensity fluctuation should suffer a certain degree of distortion from electron density and temperature fluctuations on the beam orbits, and as a result the signal can be quite different from the local density fluctuation. This paper will present a condition that the intensity fluctuation can be regarded as being purely local electron density fluctuation, together with discussion about the contamination of the fluctuation along the beam orbits to the beam intensity fluctuation. (author)

  6. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna

  7. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujii, N., E-mail: tsujii@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Green, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, California (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  8. Overview of the trace gas measurements on board the Citation aircraft during the intensive field phase of INDOEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gouw, JA; Warneke, C; Scheeren, HA; van der Veen, C; Bolder, M; Scheele, MP; Williams, J; Wong, S; Lange, L; Fischer, H; Lelieveld, J

    2001-01-01

    During the intensive field phase of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), measurements of the atmospheric chemical and aerosol composition over the Indian Ocean were performed from a Cessna Citation aircraft. Measurements were performed during February and March 1999 over the northern Indian Ocean f

  9. Validity and reliability of measuring activities, movement intensity and energy expenditure with the DynaPort MoveMonitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Nieuwenhuizen, Mieke G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of assessing activities, movement intensity (MI) and energy expenditure (EE) measured by accelerometry. 28 Able-bodied participants performed standardized tasks while an accelerometer was worn and oxygen uptake was measured. Afte

  10. The effect of foreground subtraction on cosmological measurements from Intensity Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Wolz, L; Blake, C; Shaw, J R; Chapman, E; Rawlings, S

    2013-01-01

    We model a 21 cm intensity mapping survey in the redshift range 0.01measure the impact of these systematic effects in two different ways: firstly we fit cosmological parameters to the broadband shape of the power spectrum a...

  11. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  12. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  13. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  14. New Solar Extreme-Ultraviolet and Soft X-ray Measurements: Model Comparisons with Thermosphere and Ionosphere Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bailey, S. M.; Christensen, A. B.; Eparvier, F. G.; Gladstone, G. R.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Woods, T. N.

    2002-05-01

    The Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) spacecraft is performing the first comprehensive measurements of the extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray region of the solar spectrum since the end of the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) mission in 1981. Comparison of TIMED/SEE measurements to contemporaneous satellite observations and a calibration rocket shows that solar irradiance in the soft X-ray and hard EUV spectral ranges, from about 2 to 25 nm, is much more intense than the AE-era observations. Using these new results as inputs to thermosphere/ionosphere models causes revisions to predicted photoelectron fluxes, ionization rates, electron density, ion composition, odd-nitrogen composition, and airglow emission rates. We compare predictions to measurements for some of these, including ground based measurements of ionospheric parameters during the first phase of the TIMED mission and far-ultraviolet dayglow limb profiles measured by the GUVI instrument.

  15. HiT&MIS: Instrumentation for Auroral and Ionospheric Airglow Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewawasam, K.; Maguire, R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Baumgardner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high-throughput imaging spectrograph that uses an echelle grating operating at a high dispersion order to observe extended sources such as atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions at high spectral resolution. Instead of the conventional single slit this instrument uses four with appropriate foreoptics to image a long, narrow field of view of approximately 0.1 × 50 deg. By using interference filters for order sorting, this instrument can simultaneously observe multiple spectral features located anywhere in the visible band (approximately 300 to 1000 nm) at high resolution. The current implementation images the scene at 6 wavelengths (427.8, 486.1, 557.7, 630.0, 656.3 and 777.4 nm), but the flexibility of the design of the instrument allows varying the wavelengths of interest with minimal modifications. We have constructed two spectrographs to be located at different geomagnetic locations. This will enable tomography of atmospheric phenomena for full 3-D rendering of the volume emission. We will combine HiT&MIS data with data from LITES, GROUP-C (on ISS) and other ground based sources such as GIRO, HiTIES, HIRISE and CHIMES along with the 13 all-sky imagers operated by Boston University to form a more complete picture of the ionosphere.This work is supported by the NSF grant AGS1315354

  16. Estimation of Rain Intensity Spectra over the Continental US Using Ground Radar-Gauge Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution surface rainfall product is used to estimate rain characteristics over the continental US as a function of rain intensity. By defining each data at 4-km horizontal resolutions and 1-h temporal resolutions as an individual precipitating/nonprecipitating sample, statistics of rain occurrence and rain volume including their geographical and seasonal variations are documented. Quantitative estimations are also conducted to evaluate the impact of missing light rain events due to satellite sensors' detection capabilities. It is found that statistics of rain characteristics have large seasonal and geographical variations across the continental US. Although heavy rain events (> 10 mm/hr.) only occupy 2.6% of total rain occurrence, they may contribute to 27% of total rain volume. Light rain events (rain events, can also make important contributions (15%) to the total rain volume. For minimum detectable rain rates setting at 0.5 and 0.2 mm/hr which are close to sensitivities of the current and future space-borne precipitation radars, there are about 43% and 11% of total rain occurrence below these thresholds, and they respectively represent 7% and 0.8% of total rain volume. For passive microwave sensors with their rain pixel sizes ranging from 14 to 16 km and the minimum detectable rain rates around 1 mm/hr., the missed light rain events may account for 70% of train occurrence and 16% of rain volume. Statistics of rain characteristics are also examined on domains with different temporal and spatial resolutions. Current issues in estimates of rain characteristics from satellite measurements and model outputs are discussed.

  17. Far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet rocket instrumentation for measuring the solar spectral irradiance and terrestrial airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment is being developed for the study of EUV spectral irradiance and its effects on the upper atmosphere, using three solar EUV instruments devised by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. These include a 25-cm Rowland circle EUV spectrograph, an array of Si X-UV photodiodes, and an X-UV imager with 20 arcsec resolution of the sun.

  18. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  19. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  20. Space charge measurements with a high intensity bunch at the Fermilab Main Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For Project X, the Fermilab Main Injector will be required to operate with 3 times higher bunch intensity. The plan to study the space charge effects at the injection energy with intense bunches will be discussed. A multi-MW proton facility has been established as a critical need for the U.S. HEP program by HEPAP and P5. Utilization of the Main Injector (MI) as a high intensity proton source capable of delivering in excess of 2 MW beam power will require a factor of three increase in bunch intensity compared to current operations. Instabilities associated with beam loading, space charge, and electron cloud effects are common issues for high intensity proton machines. The MI intensities for current operations and Project X are listed in Table 1. The MI provides proton beams for Fermilab's Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider and MINOS neutrino experiments. The proposed 2MW proton facility, Project X, utilizes both the Recycler (RR) and the MI. The RR will be reconfigured as a proton accumulator and injector to realize the factor 3 bunch intensity increase in the MI. Since the energy in the RR and the MI at injection will be 6-8 GeV, which is relatively low, space charge effects will be significant and need to be studied. Studies based on the formation of high intensity bunches in the MI will guide the design and fabrication of the RF cavities and space-charge mitigation devices required for 2 MW operation of the MI. It is possible to create the higher bunch intensities required in the MI using a coalescing technique that has been successfully developed at Fermilab. This paper will discuss a 5 bunch coalescing scheme at 8 GeV which will produce 2.5 x 1011 protons in one bunch. Bunch stretching will be added to the coalescing process. The required RF parameters were optimized with longitudinal simulations. The beam studies, that have a goal of 85% coalescing efficiency, were started in June 2010.

  1. Measurement errors in tipping bucket rain gauges under different rainfall intensities and their implication to hydrologic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements from tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs) consist of systematic and random errors as an effect of external factors, such as mechanical limitations, wind effects, evaporation losses, and rainfall intensity. Two different models of TBRs, viz. ISCO-674 and TR-525 (TexasInstr., Inc.), being us...

  2. Phase Noise and Intensity Noise of the Pulse Train Generated from Mode-locked Lasers in the Demodulation Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kan; Shum, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The phase noise and intensity noise of a pulse train are theoretically analyzed in the demodulation measurement. The effect of pulse asymmetry is discussed for the first time using Fourier series. Experimentally, photodetectors with different bandwidth and incident power levels are compared to achieve minimum pulse distortion.

  3. Feasibility of tropical cyclone intensity estimation using satellite-borne radiometer measurements: An observing system simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieron, Scott B.; Zhang, Fuqing; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    2013-10-01

    study evaluates the potential of a proposed technique in using satellite-borne radiometer measurements and weather analyses to estimate the intensity of tropical cyclones. This theory shows that intensity is essentially directly related to the temperature deficit of cloud top versus sea surface, and the surplus in saturation entropy in the eyewall versus its surroundings. The eyewall entropy estimate comes from measurements of cloud top temperature and pressure, and the analysis provides the environmental saturation entropy. An Observing Systems Simulation Experiment was conducted, and the results were compared to those from previous studies using cloud-profiling radar altimetry measurements. The use of cloud top pressure measurements may produce more accurate results. Inherent challenges still require caution in considering operational implementation.

  4. Objectively Measured Sedentary Time May Predict Insulin Resistance Independent of Moderate- and Vigorous-Intensity Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Helmerhorst, Hendrik J. F.; Wijndaele, Katrien; Brage, Søren; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ekelund, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the prospective association between objectively measured time spent sedentary and insulin resistance and whether this association is independent of moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and other relevant confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a population-based study (Medical Research Council Ely study) in 376 middle-aged adults (166 men; 210 women) over 5.6 years of follow-up. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively ...

  5. Measurement of plasma density from the ratio of intensities of resonance and intercombination lines of a He-like ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-collision model of He-like ions of CV, FVIII, MgXI, PXIV is made. Radiation-collision coefficients of ionization and recombination and intensity ratio of resonance and intercombination lines at different Ne, Te are calculated. It is demonstrated, that the stage transitions play an important role in the formation of triplet level population density at essentially more lower densities than those for singlet levels. It is shown that possibility of Ne measurement concerning intensities of resonance and intercombination line of He-like ion is caused by knowledge of ion composition and temperature

  6. Measurement of K and L x-ray intensity ratios for Nd and Ho elements in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K and L x-ray intensity ratios for Nd and Ho are measured by using 59.54 keV incident photon energy at 110 degrees and 130 degrees scattering geometry by an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence systems. The samples are located in the external magnetic field of intensities 0.75 T. The experimental results obtained for B=0 are compared with theoretical values calculated using Scotfield's tables based on the Hartree-Slater theory. The contribution to the alignment of the external magnetic field is discussed

  7. Measuring skill intensity of occupations with imperfect substitutability across skill types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pertold-Gebicka, Barbara

    -, č. 421 (2010), s. 1-33. ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 35209 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : occupations * skill -intensity * elasticity of labor substitution * technological progress Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp421.pdf

  8. Measuring skill intensity of occupations with imperfect substitutability across skill types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pertold-Gebicka, Barbara

    -, č. 421 (2010), s. 1-33. ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MPS HC195/10; GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : occupations * skill -intensity * elasticity of labor substitution * technological progress Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp421.pdf

  9. A conceptual framework for analysing and measuring land-use intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Jepsen, Martin Rudbeck;

    2013-01-01

    intensity, and (c) the associated system-level impacts of land-based production (e.g. changes in carbon storage or biodiversity). The systematic development of indicators across these dimensions would provide opportunities for the systematic analyses of the trade-offs, synergies and opportunity costs of...

  10. Intensity modulated irradiation of a thorax phantom: comparisons between measurements, Monte Carlo calculations and pencil beam calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Wolfram U.; Bakai, Annemarie; Nüsslin, Fridtjof

    2001-06-01

    The present study investigates the application of compensators for the intensity modulated irradiation of a thorax phantom. Measurements are compared with Monte Carlo and standard pencil beam algorithm dose calculations. Compensators were manufactured to produce the intensity profiles that were generated from the scientific version of the KonRad IMRT treatment-planning system for a given treatment plan. The comparison of dose distributions calculated with a pencil beam algorithm, with the Monte Carlo code EGS4 and with measurements is presented. By measurements in a water phantom it is demonstrated that the method used to manufacture the compensators reproduces the intensity profiles in a suitable manner. Monte Carlo simulations in a water phantom show that the accelerator head model used for simulations is sufficient. No significant overestimations of dose values inside the target volume by the pencil beam algorithm are found in the thorax phantom. An overestimation of dose values in lung by the pencil beam algorithm is also not found. Expected dose calculation errors of the pencil beam algorithm are suppressed, because the dose to the low density region lung is reduced by the use of a non-coplanar beam arrangement and by intensity modulation.

  11. Statistical Comparison of Gravity Wave Characteristics Obtained from Airglow All-Sky Observation at Mt. Bohyun, Korea and Shigaraki, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Previously, all-sky airglow images observed at Shigaraki (34.9° N, 136.1° E), Japan, during 2004 and 2005 were analyzed in relation to those observed at Mt. Bohyun (36.2° N, 128.9° E) for a comparison of their gravity wave characteristics (Kim et al. 2010). By applying the same selection criteria of waves and cloud coverages as in the case of Mt. Bohyun all-sky images, we derived apparent wavelengths, periods, phase velocities, and monthly occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki in this study. The distributions of wavelengths, periods, and speeds derived for Shigaraki were found to be roughly similar to those for Mt. Bohyun. However, the overall occurrence rates of gravity waves at Shigaraki were 36% and 34% for OI 557.7 nm and OH Meinel band airglow layers, respectively, which were significantly higher than those at Mt. Bohyun. The monthly occurrence rates did not show minima near equinox months, unlike those for Mt. Bohyun. Furthermore, the seasonal preferential directions that were clearly apparent for Mt. Bohyun were not seen in the wave propagation trends for Shigaraki. These differences between the two sites imply different origins of the gravity waves near the Korean peninsula and the Japanese islands. The gravity waves over the Japanese islands may originate from sources at various altitudes; therefore, wind filtering may not be effective in causing any seasonal preferential directions in the waves in the airglow layers. Our analysis of the Shigaraki data supports recent theoretical studies, according to which gravity waves can be generated from in situ sources, such as mesosphere wind shear or secondary wave formation, in the mesosphere.

  12. Study on ion irradiation response of Gafchromic films for the intensity distribution measurement of a large-area beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuri, Yosuke, E-mail: yuri.yosuke@jaea.go.jp; Ishizaka, Tomohisa; Yuyama, Takahiro; Ishibori, Ikuo; Okumura, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    It is required to precisely evaluate the large-area transverse intensity distribution of various ion beams applied to materials and biological research at an azimuthally-varying-field cyclotron in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The response of radiochromic films, Gafchromic HD-810 and EBT2, was, therefore, investigated using proton and several heavy-ion beams for developing a measurement technique of the transverse beam intensity distribution. The optical density of the films increased linearly with the particle fluence of the beam in a low-fluence region. The linear-response range of the fluence was strongly dependent on ion species. By analyzing the film response to absorbed dose, it was found that the sensitivity of the film decreased for heavy-ion beams. The practical fluence range of the Gafchromic film HD-810 for an arbitrary ion beam was determined from the measurement result. The present technique with the use of the two types of Gafchromic films enables us to measure the intensity distribution of a large-area ion beam easily in a wide fluence range. Using the technique, we measured the relative intensity distribution of a large-area ion beam focused by multipole magnets and evaluated its size and uniformity. -- Highlights: • We investigated the response of Gafchromic radiochromic films to various ion beams. • The film's optical density was proportional to the fluence in a low-fluence region. • The sensitivity and practical fluence range of the films was analyzed using LET. • The large-area uniform beam intensity distribution was evaluated using the films.

  13. Temporally and spatially resolved measurements of multi-megagauss magnetic fields in high intensity laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report spatially and temporally resolved measurements of self-generated multi-megagauss magnetic fields produced during ultrahigh intensity laser plasma interactions. Spatially resolved measurements of the magnetic fields show an asymmetry in the distribution of field with respect to the angle of laser incidence. Temporally resolved measurements of the self-generated third harmonic suggest that the strength of the magnetic field is proportional to the square root of laser intensity (i.e., the laser B-field) during the rise of the laser pulse. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code which also shows clear asymmetry of the field profile and similar magnetic field growth rates and scalings.

  14. Spatial characteristics of airglow and solar-scatter radiance from the earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguenin, R.; Wohlers, R.; Weinberg, M.; Huffman, R.; Eastes, R.

    1989-08-09

    Data measured by the Polar BEAR/AIRS UV Experiment were processed to extract spatial-radiance characteristics. Photometer-mode 1304A dayside data measured on Julian Day 219, 1987, near mid-day were analyzed. The spatial structure of thermospheric dayside radiance at 1304A appeared to be controlled principally by turbulence over spatial scales of 10 million - 100 meters, with modifications imposed by Rayleigh-scattering effects and magnetospherically forced phenomena. Spatial structure can be adequately modeled fractally, using dimensions based on Kolmogorov formalism modified by the Rayleigh scattering phase function. Mean radiance can be modeled using existing models of radiant intensity, resonance scattering, and absorption combined with thermospheric composition and general circulation models, such as MSIS-83, scaled to the mean and RHS intensities measured by Polar BEAR. The results can be incorporated in a background radiance simulation model that will provide a means for testing and refining phenomenological models of the structured earth background. This will be important not only for improving physical and chemical models of atmospheric features and processes, but it will allow parametric predictions of spatial structure and clutter to be developed for sensor applications.

  15. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  16. Time-resolved measurements with intense ultrashort laser pulses: a 'molecular movie' in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the high-resolution multidimensional real-time mapping of H2+ and D2+ nuclear wave packets performed employing time-resolved three-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging with intense laser pulses. Exploiting a combination of a 'reaction microscope' spectrometer and a pump-probe setup with two intense 6-7 fs laser pulses, we simultaneously visualize both vibrational and rotational motion of the molecule, and obtain a sequence of snapshots of the squared ro-vibrational wave function with time-step resolution of ∼ 0.3 fs, allowing us to reconstruct a real-time movie of the ultrafast molecular motion. We observe fast dephasing, or 'collapse' of the vibrational wave packet and its subsequent revival, as well as signatures of rotational excitation. For D2+ we resolve also the fractional revivals resulting from the interference between the counter-propagating parts of the wave packet

  17. Measurement of absorption with a p-u sound intensity probe in an impedance tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Jacobsen, Finn

    2005-01-01

    compared with the traditional, well-established "transfer function method" based on two pressure microphones. The results suggest that the new method can be as accurate as the established method, but whereas the influence of transducer mismatch on the transfer function method can be eliminated using a...... simple "sensor-switching technique," the method based on a p-u intensity probe relies on accurate calibration of the probe....

  18. Results of 2-Year Concurrent Measurements of Attenuation at 58 GHz and Rain Intensities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvičera, V.; Grábner, M.; Fišer, Ondřej

    Budapešť: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 2003, s. 77-80. ISBN 963-212-166-X. [11th MICROCOLL. Budapešť (HU), 10.09.2003-11.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/01/0029; GA MŠk OC 280.002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : atmospheric attenuation * rain intensity * cummulative attenuation distribution Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  19. The Relationship between MALDI IMS Intensity and Measured Quantity of Selected Phospholipids in Rat Brain Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    MALDI IMS positive ion images of rat brain show a regional distribution of phosphocholine species that is striking in the apparent distinctiveness, and reproducibility of such depictions. The interpretation of these images, specifically the relationship between MALDI IMS ion intensity and the amount of the phosphocholine (PC) species in the tissue is complicated by numerous factors such as ion suppression, ion molecule chemistry, and effects of tissue structure. This study was designed to tes...

  20. Thin chamber for profile measuring intensive beams of high-energy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-coordinate profile meter developed on the basis of the multichnnel chamber of secondary emission (MCSE) for operation in intense (1010-3x1012 cm-2s-1) 70 GeV proton beams is described. MCSE electrodes are produced by spraying metal at thickness equal to several hundreds angstrem on 10-micron polyamide film. Resource tests have revealed high workability of MCSE when passing 6.5x1017 protons through it

  1. The impact of fiscal and other measures on new passenger car sales and CO2 emissions intensity. Evidence from Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the impact of national fiscal measures in the EU (EU15) on passenger car sales and the CO2 emissions intensity of the new car fleet over the period 1995-2004. CO2 emissions and energy consumption from road transport have been increasing in the EU and as a result since 1999 the EU has attempted to implement a high profile policy strategy to address this problem at European level. Less prominent is the fact that Member States apply vehicle and fuel taxes, which may also be having an impact on the quantity of passenger cars sold and their CO2 emissions intensity. Diesel vehicle sales have increased appreciably in many countries over the same period and this study makes a first attempt to examine whether Member State fiscal measures have influenced this phenomenon. This work uses a panel dataset to investigate the relationship between national vehicle and fuel taxes on new passenger car sales and the fleet CO2 emissions intensity in EU15 over a 10-year period. Our results show that national vehicle and fuel taxes have had an impact on passenger car sales and fleet CO2 emissions intensity and that different taxes have disparate effects. (author)

  2. Wake Measurements at alpha ventus - Dependency on Stability and Turbulence Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhellweg, Annette; Cañadillas, Beatriz; Kinder, Friederike; Neumann, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Wind and power deficit in the wake are assessed for the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus. Operational data are evaluated for the power deficit in the wake of a single wind turbine and in a row of wind turbines. The wake of a single wind turbine is described by the maximum power deficit and expansion width of the wake. The impact of atmospheric stability in respect to vertical wind shear and turbulence intensity is assessed showing that wake effects are more pronounced under stable conditions.

  3. Weathering model in paleomagnetic field intensity measurements on ancient fired clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinearities observed in Thellier's plots are explained in terms of a weathering model. This model is based on the reduction in size of the originaly present iron oxide particles, due to leaching. In the general case, the slope of the Thellier's plot is a function of the particle size destributions of the magnetic particles, both newly formed and leached ones. In the special case in which the newly formed magnetic particles are superparamagnetic, the limiting value of the slope of th Thellier's plot towards the magnetic ordering temperature is equal to the ratio of the ancient field intensity to the modern one

  4. Effect of the quantum nature of detecting low-intensity radiation on the distance measurement error in pulsed laser ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dispersion of estimates of the time position of low-intensity radiation pulses is studied as a function of their duration and detection parameters. Simulations showed that the error of distance measuring to an object in one ranging cycle can be 0.05-0.10 m. The method for obtaining precision estimates of a distance to objects without corner reflectors is proposed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Measurement Properties and Implementation of a Checklist to Assess Leadership Skills during Interdisciplinary Rounds in the Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ten Have, Elsbeth C. M.; Nap, Raoul E; Tulleken, Jaap E.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs). Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of...

  6. Identifying the Impact of Individual Differences on the Basis of Affect Intensity Measure on Consumers Response to Advertising Appeals

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This study aims (i) to find out the individuals scoring on Larsen Affect intensity measurement Scale (AIM) for emotional ads and (ii) to know whether the individual differences of response diminishes when they are exposed to the nonemotional (rational) advertisements, (iii) to know whether the cultural differences among other countries and Pakistan mediate the applicability and implications of AIM scale in the field of advertising research. Variety of researchers including consumers behavior,...

  7. Lack of agreement between bioimpedance and continuous thermodilution measurement of cardiac output in intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Ben N; Mallick, Abhiram; Bodenham, Andrew R; Vucevic, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background: Bolus thermodilution is the standard bedside method of cardiac output measurement in the intensive care unit (ICU). The Baxter Vigilance monitor uses a modified thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter with a thermal filament to give a continuous read-out of cardiac output. This has been shown to correlate very well with both the 'gold standard' dye dilution method and the bolus thermodilution method. Bioimpedance cardiography using the Bomed NCCOM 3 offers a noninvasive means of ...

  8. Effects of intensity of forest regeneration measures on some ecosystem services in a nationwide Swedish field experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Ulvcrona, Kristina; Hallsby, Göran; Erefur, Charlotta; Bergsten, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Effects on important ecosystem services (total and species-wise biomass production, distributed on tree fractions), of three regimes with different intensities of forest regeneration measures after clear-cutting were evaluated 24-27 years after initiation of a field experiment at 14 sites across Sweden. The three treatments, designated high (HI), normal (NI) and low (LI) respectively consisted of: mechanical site preparation and planting of large seedlings at 2 x 2 m spacing, with supplementa...

  9. Polymer Optical Fiber Intensity-Based Sensor for Liquid-Level Measurements in Volumetric Flasks for Industrial Application

    OpenAIRE

    D. S. Montero; C. Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost intensity-based polymer optical fiber (POF) sensor for liquid detection applied to volumetric flasks is presented. Experimental results demonstrate the viability of the POF-based sensor system in a high-accuracy liquid level measurement scenario. Moreover, a wireless mesh sensor network based on ZigBee specification protocol to address multiplexed POF-based sensor is also developed. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility to address a high number of optical sensors in an i...

  10. Energy intensity ratios as net energy measures of United States energy production and expenditures - article no. 044006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, C.W. [University of Texas Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In this letter I compare two measures of energy quality, energy return on energy invested (EROI) and energy intensity ratio (EIR) for the fossil fuel consumption and production of the United States. All other characteristics being equal, a fuel or energy system with a higher EROI or EIR is of better quality because more energy is provided to society. I define and calculate the EIR for oil, natural gas, coal, and electricity as measures of the energy intensity (units of energy divided by money) of the energy resource relative to the energy intensity of the overall economy. EIR measures based upon various unit prices for energy (e.g. $/Btu of a barrel of oil) as well as total expenditures on energy supplies (e.g. total dollars spent on petroleum) indicate net energy at different points in the supply chain of the overall energy system. The results indicate that EIR is an easily calculated and effective proxy for EROI for US oil, gas, coal, and electricity. The EIR correlates well with previous EROI calculations, but adds additional information on energy resource quality within the supply chain. Furthermore, the EIR and EROI of oil and gas as well as coal were all in decline for two time periods within the last 40 years, and both time periods preceded economic recessions.

  11. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2° N, 117.4° E in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60 m s−1. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the non-uniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter.

  12. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Q.; Yuan, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Graduate Univ.; Xu, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Yue, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory; Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang (China). College of Mathematics and Information Science

    2011-07-01

    An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI) was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2 N, 117.4 E) in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60ms{sup -1}. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the nonuniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of the K-line intensity ratios in muonic hydrogen between 0. 25 and 150 torr gas pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderhub, H.; Arb, H.P. von; Boecklin, J.; Dittus, F.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Hofer, H.; Kottmann, F.; Taqqu, D.; Unternaehrer, J.

    1984-08-09

    Precise measurements of the K X-ray energy spectrum of muonic hydrogen (..mu../sup -/p) were made at H/sub 2/ gas pressures between 0.25 and 150 torr (T = 300 K). The measured intensity ratios I(Ksub(..cap alpha..))/I(Ksub(tot)) and I(Ksub(..beta..))/I(Ksub(..gamma..delta)...) are compared with the results of new cascade calculations. The pressure dependence of the relative (..mu..p)sub(2S) population was investigated. Its value is (4.24+-0.14)% at 10 torr and (2.21+-0.22)% at 0.25 torr.

  14. Measurement of the K-line intensity ratios in muonic hydrogen between 0.25 and 150 torr gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise measurements of the K X-ray energy spectrum of muonic hydrogen (μ-p) were made at H2 gas pressures between 0.25 and 150 torr (T = 300 K). The measured intensity ratios I(Ksub(α))/I(Ksub(tot)) and I(Ksub(β))/I(Ksub(γdelta)...) are compared with the results of new cascade calculations. The pressure dependence of the relative (μp)sub(2S) population was investigated. Its value is (4.24+-0.14)% at 10 torr and (2.21+-0.22)% at 0.25 torr. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation in the zones of works on 'Shelter' stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Aleshin, A M; Egorov, V V; Zakrevskij, Y A

    2002-01-01

    The procedures, designed for measuring angular distributions a gamma radiation from aggregations of radioactive materials located in object 'Shelter' are described. The first procedure is based on application of the original multidetector device DB1, permitting to get the data on an angular distribution in a complete solid angle (4 pi). The second procedure is based on application of the modernized dosimeter DKS-04 with the collimated detector. The main observed data on the angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation in the zones of the works on 'Shelter' stabilization (the measurements have been carried out in frameworks of the exploratory design) are presented. 9 refs., 49 figs.

  16. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ON R&D PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT PRACTICES: A SURVEY OF ITALIAN R&D-INTENSIVE FIRMS

    OpenAIRE

    VITTORIO CHIESA; FEDERICO FRATTINI; VALENTINA LAZZAROTTI; RAFFAELLA MANZINI

    2009-01-01

    Although measuring the performance of a firm's R&D activities is a very challenging task, the critical role played by R&D in creating and sustaining a firm's competitive advantage has raised the need to adopt appropriate performance measurement systems (PMSs) in R&D units. Therefore, management scholars have been studying this issue and PMSs have diffused in the R&D departments of most R&D-intensive companies. Nevertheless, empirical investigations into the diffusion and practical use of PMSs...

  17. Semi-quantitative gallium-67 lung scanning as a measure of the intensity of alveolitis in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) lung scanning has been applied for some years in pulmonary sarcoidosis to assess the activity of the alveolitis. Interpreting the scans, however, is difficult due to the low uptake of 67Ga in the disease process relative to background activity. In this study we have measured the mean parenchymal lung activity of 67Ga and have compared the lung activity to that at three remote sites, the liver, the abdomen and the high. The results obtained were compared with the percentage of lymphocytes in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid. There was a very good correlation with the lung-to-thigh uptake measurements and a much poorer correlation with the lung-to-liver and the lung-to-abdomen measurements. It was observed that steroid therapy reduced dramatically the correlation between the broncho-alveolar lavage findings and the 67Ga scan measurements. The results suggest that in patients not on steroid therapy, the 67Ga lung-to-thigh measurements may be used, similarly to the broncho-alveolar lavage lymphocyte counts, to identify those with high-intensity alveolitis from those with low-intensity alveolitis. (orig.)

  18. Sample Entropy and Traditional Measures of Heart Rate Dynamics Reveal Different Modes of Cardiovascular Control During Low Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear parameters of heart rate variability (HRV have proven their prognostic value in clinical settings, but their physiological background is not very well established. We assessed the effects of low intensity isometric (ISO and dynamic (DYN exercise of the lower limbs on heart rate matched intensity on traditional and entropy measures of HRV. Due to changes of afferent feedback under DYN and ISO a distinct autonomic response, mirrored by HRV measures, was hypothesized. Five-minute inter-beat interval measurements of 43 healthy males (26.0 ± 3.1 years were performed during rest, DYN and ISO in a randomized order. Blood pressures and rate pressure product were higher during ISO vs. DYN (p < 0.001. HRV indicators SDNN as well as low and high frequency power were significantly higher during ISO (p < 0.001 for all measures. Compared to DYN, sample entropy (SampEn was lower during ISO (p < 0.001. Concluding, contraction mode itself is a significant modulator of the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. Compared to DYN, ISO evokes a stronger blood pressure response and an enhanced interplay between both autonomic branches. Non-linear HRV measures indicate a more regular behavior under ISO. Results support the view of the reciprocal antagonism being only one of many modes of autonomic heart rate control. Under different conditions; the identical “end product” heart rate might be achieved by other modes such as sympathovagal co-activation as well.

  19. Sub-cycle measurement of intensity correlations in the Terahertz range

    CERN Document Server

    Benea-Chelmus, Ileana-Cristina; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The Terahertz frequency range bears intriguing opportunities, beyond very advanced applications in spectroscopy and matter control. Peculiar quantum phenomena are predicted to lead to light emission by non-trivial mechanisms. Typically, such emission mechanisms are unraveled by temporal correlation measurements of photon arrival times, as demonstrated in their pioneering work by Hanbury Brown and Twiss. So far, the Terahertz range misses an experimental implementation of such technique with very good temporal properties and high sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a room-temperature scheme to measure photon correlations at THz frequencies based on electro-optic sampling. The temporal resolution of 146 fs is faster than one cycle of oscillation and the sensitivity is so far limited to ~1500 photons. With this technique, we measure the photon statistics of a THz quantum cascade laser. The proposed measurement scheme allows, in principle, the measurement of ultrahigh bandwidth photons and paves the way toward...

  20. The Total Work Measured During a High Intensity Isokinetic Fatigue Test Is Associated With Anaerobic Work Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bosquet, Kenan Gouadec, Nicolas Berryman, Cyril Duclos, Vincent Gremeaux, Jean Louis Croisier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine whether total work measured during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test (TWFAT could be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (AWC, such as determined by total work measured during a Wingate Anaerobic Test (TWWAnT. Twenty well-trained cyclists performed 2 randomly ordered sessions involving a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test consisting in 30 reciprocal maximal concentric contractions of knee flexors and extensors at 180°·s-1, and a Wingate Anaerobic Test. We found that TWFAT of knee extensors was largely lower than TWWAnT (4151 ± 691 vs 22313 ± 2901 J, respectively, p < 0.05, Hedge’s g = 4.27. Both measures were highly associated (r = 0.83, and the 95% limits of agreement (LoA represented 24.5% of TWWAnT. TWFAT of knee flexors (2151 ± 540 J was largely lower than TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 9.52. By contrast, both measures were not associated (r = 0.09, and the 95% LoA represented 31.1% of TWWAnT. Combining TWFAT of knee flexors and knee extensors into a single measure (6302 ± 818 J did not changed neither improved these observations. We still found a large difference with TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 5.26, a moderate association (r = 0.65 and 95% LoA representing 25.5% of TWWAnT. We concluded that TWFAT of knee extensors could be considered as a valid measure of AWC, since both measure were highly associated. However, the mean difference between both measures and their 95% LoA were too large to warrant interchangeability.

  1. Using BPCA and pyrolysis-GC/MS patterns as a measure of charring intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaal, Joeri; Schneider, Maximilian P. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2010-05-01

    Many questions remain on the molecular properties of Black C (organic fire residues such as charcoal and soot). Here we compare parameters from two methods that have recently shown to be related to the degree of thermal modification ("charring intensity") of charcoal-Black C: i) the proportion of mellitic acid (B6CA) among benzenepolycarboxylic acids in the BPCA method [1,2,3] and ii) the relative proportions and degree of alkylation of pyrolysis products from Black C in pyrolysis-GC/MS [4]. For that purpose we used laboratory chars from rice straw (grass) and chestnut wood (wood) produced at 200-1000 °C under N2 flow. The chars obtained at 450 °C are reference materials of the Black Carbon Ring Trial [5]. Positive correlations between the charring temperature and BPCA and pyrolysis patterns confirm that these methods can be used to study the degree of thermal impact of charred remains. Pyrolysis-GC/MS allowed us to track the thermal degradation of the major biocomponents lignin, polysaccharides, tannin, aliphatic chain lipids, triterpenoids, chlorophyll and proteins, mostly between 250 and 450 °C. The proportions of the pyrolysis products of Black C (benzene, toluene, benzonitrile, PAHs, etc.) and also the ratios that reflect the abundance of aliphatic cross-linkages between aromatic moieties (benzene/toluene, naphthalene/alkylnaphthalenes, benzofuran/alkylbenzofurans), increase with charring intensity. Nonetheless, chars obtained at T > 600 °C (especially for wood) gave low quality pyrograms and poor reproducibility because of high thermal stability. The relative contributions of B6CA, one of the molecular markers used for the BPCA method, are indicative for the degree of condensation of the chars. The BPCA approach showed a clear increase in the relative contribution of B6CA from ca. 5 % at 200 °C to ca. 95 % at 1000 °C, confirming the ability of this parameter to assess charring intensity. The relative contribution of B6CA remains almost constant at ca

  2. Cosmological Results from Five Years of 30 GHz CMB Intensity Measurements with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Sievers, J L; Weintraub, L; Achermann, C; Altamirano, P; Bond, J R; Bronfman, L; Bustos, R; Contaldi, C; Dickinson, C; Jones, M E; May, J; Myers, S T; Oyarce, N; Padin, S; Pearson, T J; Pospieszalski, M; Readhead, A C S; Reeves, R; Shepherd, M C; Taylor, A C; Torres, S

    2009-01-01

    We present final results on the angular power spectrum of total intensity anisotropies in the CMB from the CBI. Our analysis includes all primordial anisotropy data collected between January 2000 and April 2005, and benefits significantly from an improved maximum likelihood analysis pipeline. It also includes results from a 30 GHz foreground survey conducted with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) which places significant constraints on the possible contamination due to foreground point sources. We improve on previous CBI results by about a factor of two in the damping tail. These data confirm, at ~3-sigma, the existence of an excess of power over intrinsic CMB anisotropy on small angular scales (l > 1800). Using the GBT survey, we find currently known radio source populations are not capable of generating the power; a new population of faint sources with steeply rising spectral indices would be required to explain the excess with sources... We also present a full cosmological parameter analysis of the new CBI po...

  3. Measurement of the neutron intensity data using the HANARO four circle diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the four circle diffractometer(FCD) has been set up in HANARO, it has become possible to study single crystal structures by means of the neutron diffraction. By introducing the constitution and characteristics of FCD, it has been shown that the feature of neutron diffraction experiment are different from that of X-ray or electronic beam. Besides we have explained the processes of determining experimental information in order to acquire intensity data and constructed the experimental system based on geometry of the FCD. As the computer programme performing all experimental processes automatically has been installed and the accuracy of experimental processes were confirmed by KCl single crystal experiment, the original experimental system for single crystal experiments and analyses by the neutron diffraction method using FCD has been established. (Author). 12 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  4. Experimental demonstration of tomographic slit technique for measurement of arbitrary intensity profiles of light beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, José; Rendón, Manuel; Martín, Manuel

    1997-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally an optical imaging method that makes use of a slit to collect tomographic projection data of arbitrarily shaped light beams; a tomographic backprojection algorithm is then used to reconstruct the intensity profiles of these beams. Two different implementations of the method are presented. In one, a single slit is scanned and rotated in front of the laser beam. In the other, the sides of a polygonal slit, which is linearly displaced in a x-y plane perpendicular to the beam, are used to collect the data. This latter version is more suitable than the other for adaptation at micrometer-size scale. A mathematical justification is given here for the superior performance against laser-power fluctuations of the tomographic slit technique compared with the better-known tomographic knife-edge technique.

  5. Study on signal intensity of low field nuclear magnetic resonance via an indirect coupling measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng-Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Yi-Rong; Deng, Hui; Tian, Ye; Lang, Pei-Lin; Li, Jie; Chen, Ying-Fei; Zheng, Dong-Ning

    2013-04-01

    We carry out an ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment based on high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The measurement field is in a micro-tesla range (~10 μT-100 μT) and the experiment is conducted in a home-made magnetically-shielded-room (MSR). The measurements are performed by the indirect coupling method in which the signal of nuclei precession is indirectly coupled to the SQUID through a tuned copper coil transformer. In such an arrangement, the interferences of applied measurement and polarization field to the SQUID sensor are avoided and the performance of the SQUID is not destroyed. In order to compare the detection sensitivity obtained by using the SQUID with that achieved using a conventional low-noise-amplifier, we perform the measurements using a commercial room temperature amplifier. The results show that in a wide frequency range (~1 kHz-10 kHz) the measurements with the SQUID sensor exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Further, we discuss the dependence of NMR peak magnitude on measurement frequency. We attribute the reduction of the peak magnitude at high frequency to the increased field inhomogeneity as the measurement field increases. This is verified by compensating the field gradient using three sets of gradient coils.

  6. Study on signal intensity of low field nuclear magnetic resonance via an indirect coupling measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Feng-Ying; Wang Ning; Jin Yi-Rong; Deng Hui; Tian Ye; Lang Pei-Lin; Li Jie

    2013-01-01

    We carry out an ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment based on high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs).The measurement field is in a micro-tesla range (~10 μT-100 μT) and the experiment is conducted in a home-made magnetically-shielded-room (MSR).The measurements are performed by the indirect coupling method in which the signal of nuclei precession is indirectly coupled to the SQUID through a tuned copper coil transformer.In such an arrangement,the interferences of applied measurement and polarization field to the SQUID sensor are avoided and the performance of the SQUID is not destroyed.In order to compare the detection sensitivity obtained by using the SQUID with that achieved using a conventional low-noise-amplifier,we perform the measurements using a connercial room temperature amplifier.The results show that in a wide frequency range (~1 kHz-10 kHz) the measurements with the SQUID sensor exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio,Further,we discuss the dependence of NMR peak magnitude on measurement frequency.We attribute the reduction of the peak magnitude at high frequency to the increased field inhomogeneity as the measurement field increases.This is verified by compensating the field gradient using three sets of gradient coils.

  7. Thin laser beam wandering and intensity fluctuations method for evapotranspiration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Antonin; Fernandez, Angel; Perez, Dario G.; Barille, Regis; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2016-06-01

    We compare in this study two simple optical setups to measure the atmospheric turbulence characterized by the refractive index structure parameter Cn2. The corresponding heat flux values sensed by the laser beam propagation are calculated leading to the plant evapotranspiration. The results are discussed and compared to measurements obtained with a well-known and calibrated eddy-covariant instrument. A fine analysis gives a good insight of the accuracy of the optical devices proposed here to measure the crop evapotranspiration. Additional evapotranspiration values calculated with meteorological sensor data and the use of different models are also compared in parallel.

  8. Pulse oximeter and transcutaneous arterial oxygen measurements in neonatal and paediatric intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, D P; Bignall, S; Stebbens, V A; Alexander, J R; Rivers, R P; Lissauer, T

    1987-01-01

    Pulse oximeter (SaO2P) measurements were compared with direct arterial line oxygen saturation (SaO2) from co-oximeters in 92 instances in 43 patients, and with arterial line oxygen measurements (PaO2) in 169 instances in 81 patients. The mean (SD) absolute difference between SaO2P and SaO2 was 2.6% (2.4) after attempt to correct for the co-oximeter falsely measuring a proportion of fetal haemoglobin as carboxy haemoglobin. For 19 infants and children greater than or equal to 5 months old, who...

  9. Development of automated measurement system for radioactive intensities of sealed small radiation sources (iodine-125 seed source) for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed full automated measurement system for radioactive intensities of sealed small radiation sources (iodine-125 seed source) for brachytherapy in this work. Today, quality assurance (QA) of I-125 seed radioactive sources for brachytherapy following AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) Society's guideline is one of important subjects for hospitals that operate on patients for prostate cancer and medical companies that manufacture and sell these radioactive sources. In order to survey defective seed products into all the number of I-125 seed sources (there are usually fifteen seeds, one seed of dimensions is 0.8 mm φ × 4.5 mm length) within a cartridge, we have applied the method of single slit collimator with moving a radiation detector to measure each radioactive intensity of these I-125 seeds. As a result, it was found that our developed system in the present work has good performance of surveying the defective products manufactured with radioactive intensities out of about ±15% error (p < 0.05). (author)

  10. High resolution spectral analysis of oxygen. III. Laboratory investigation of the airglow bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan; Elliott, Ben M.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of simulated oxygen A-band night glow. Our static discharge system approximates the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(1D) + O2 (X ^3Σ _g^-) → O(3P) + O2 (b ^1Σ _g^+) → O2 (X ^3Σ _g^-) + hν as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for all six molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b - X vibrational bands were observed for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were also observed for 16O2. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for 16O17O, 17O2, and 17O18O, enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state global fit. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.53(24); I(1,1)/I(1,0) = 11.9(65); I(0,0)/I(0,2) = 503(197); and I(1,1)/I(1,2) = 5.6(19) are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data and calculated Franck-Condon factors.

  11. Single-shot measurement of the complete temporal intensity and phase of supercontinuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tsz Chun; Rhodes, Michelle; Trebino, Rick

    2016-03-01

    We solve the problem of single-shot complete temporal measurement of continuum using cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating, achieving the necessary large spectral range using a polarization-gating geometry and the necessary large temporal range by significantly tilting the reference pulse. In addition, we simultaneously cancel the previously unavoidable longitudinal geometrical temporal smearing by using a carefully chosen combination of pulse tilt and beam-crossing angle, thus simultaneously achieving the required temporal resolution. The result is that we are able to make a complete measurement of an individual complex continuum pulse generated in photonic-crystal fiber. By enabling measurement of single optical rogue waves, this technique could provide insight and perhaps even lead to the prediction of when mathematically similar, destructive, oceanic rogue waves may occur.

  12. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Sanjari, M S; Hülsmann, P; Litvinov, Yu A; Nolden, F; Piotrowski, J; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate for existing limitations in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results.

  13. Vibrational power flow and structural intensity: Measurements and limitations at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    1991-01-01

    The cross-spectral methods and their sensitivity to phase errors are investigated for the two and four-accelerometer arrays. From experiments on a beam structure it is attempted to verify the influence of phase errors and to determine the usable frequency ranges of the two methods. Measurements are...

  14. Rapid directional change degrades GPS distance measurement validity during intermittent intensity running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Rawstorn

    Full Text Available Use of the Global Positioning System (GPS for quantifying athletic performance is common in many team sports. The effect of running velocity on measurement validity is well established, but the influence of rapid directional change is not well understood in team sport applications. This effect was systematically evaluated using multidirectional and curvilinear adaptations of a validated soccer simulation protocol that maintained identical velocity profiles. Team sport athletes completed 90 min trials of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle-running Test movement pattern on curvilinear, and multidirectional shuttle running tracks while wearing a 5 Hz (with interpolated 15 Hz output GPS device. Reference total distance (13 200 m was systematically over- and underestimated during curvilinear (2.61±0.80% and shuttle (-3.17±2.46% trials, respectively. Within-epoch measurement uncertainty dispersion was widest during the shuttle trial, particularly during the jog and run phases. Relative measurement reliability was excellent during both trials (Curvilinear r = 1.00, slope = 1.03, ICC = 1.00; Shuttle r = 0.99, slope = 0.97, ICC = 0.99. Absolute measurement reliability was superior during the curvilinear trial (Curvilinear SEM = 0 m, CV = 2.16%, LOA ± 223 m; Shuttle SEM = 119 m, CV = 2.44%, LOA ± 453 m. Rapid directional change degrades the accuracy and absolute reliability of GPS distance measurement, and caution is recommended when using GPS to quantify rapid multidirectional movement patterns.

  15. Prediction of rainfall intensity measurement errors using commercial microwave communication links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zinevich

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Commercial microwave radio links forming cellular communication networks are known to be a valuable instrument for measuring near-surface rainfall. However, operational communication links are more uncertain relatively to the dedicated installations since their geometry and frequencies are optimized for high communication performance rather than observing rainfall. Quantification of the uncertainties for measurements that are non-optimal in the first place is essential to assure usability of the data.

    In this work we address modeling of instrumental impairments, i.e. signal variability due to antenna wetting, baseline attenuation uncertainty and digital quantization, as well as environmental ones, i.e. variability of drop size distribution along a link affecting accuracy of path-averaged rainfall measurement and spatial variability of rainfall in the link's neighborhood affecting the accuracy of rainfall estimation out of the link path. Expressions for root mean squared error (RMSE for estimates of path-averaged and point rainfall have been derived. To verify the RMSE expressions quantitatively, path-averaged measurements from 21 operational communication links in 12 different locations have been compared to records of five nearby rain gauges over three rainstorm events.

    The experiments show that the prediction accuracy is above 90% for temporal accumulation less than 30 min and lowers for longer accumulation intervals. Spatial variability in the vicinity of the link, baseline attenuation uncertainty and, possibly, suboptimality of wet antenna attenuation model are the major sources of link-gauge discrepancies. In addition, the dependence of the optimal coefficients of a conventional wet antenna attenuation model on spatial rainfall variability and, accordingly, link length has been shown.

    The expressions for RMSE of the path-averaged rainfall estimates can be useful for integration of measurements from multiple

  16. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  17. First dose-map measured with a polycrystalline diamond 2D dosimeter under an intensity modulated radiotherapy beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringella, M.; Zani, M.; Baldi, A.; Bucciolini, M.; Pace, E.; de Sio, A.; Talamonti, C.; Bruzzi, M.

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of bidimensional dosimeter made on a 2.5×2.5 cm2 active area polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited (pCVD) diamond film, equipped with a matrix of 12×12 contacts connected to the read-out electronics, has been used to evaluate a map of dose under Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields for a possible application in pre-treatment verifications of cancer treatments. Tests have been performed under a 6-10 MVRX beams with IMRT fields for prostate and breast cancer. Measurements have been taken by measuring the 144 pixels in different positions, obtained by shifting the device along the x/y axes to span a total map of 14.4×10 cm2. Results show that absorbed doses measured by our pCVD diamond device are consistent with those calculated by the Treatment Planning System (TPS).

  18. First dose-map measured with a polycrystalline diamond 2D dosimeter under an intensity modulated radiotherapy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaringella, M., E-mail: scaringella@gmail.com [Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, Firenze (Italy); Zani, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Baldi, A. [Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Pace, E.; Sio, A. de [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of bidimensional dosimeter made on a 2.5×2.5 cm{sup 2} active area polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited (pCVD) diamond film, equipped with a matrix of 12×12 contacts connected to the read-out electronics, has been used to evaluate a map of dose under Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields for a possible application in pre-treatment verifications of cancer treatments. Tests have been performed under a 6–10 MVRX beams with IMRT fields for prostate and breast cancer. Measurements have been taken by measuring the 144 pixels in different positions, obtained by shifting the device along the x/y axes to span a total map of 14.4×10 cm{sup 2}. Results show that absorbed doses measured by our pCVD diamond device are consistent with those calculated by the Treatment Planning System (TPS)

  19. Challenges and prospects for better measurements of the CMB intensity spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Sironi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) offer the possibility of probing processes which occurred during the evolution of our Universe going back up to Z$\\simeq 10^7$. Unfortunately all the attempts so far carried out for detecting distortions failed. All of them were based on comparisons among absolute measurements of the CMB temperature at different frequencies. We suggest a different approach: measurements of the frequency derivative of the CMB temperature over large frequency intervals instead of observations of the absolute temperature at few, well separated, frequencies as frequently done in the past. The best observing conditions can be found in space. We discuss therefore the perspectives of new observations in the next years from the ground, at very special sites, and in space as independent missions or as part of other CMB projects

  20. Experimental and theoretical comparison of photon-counting and current measurements of light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R; Oliver, C J; Pike, E R

    1971-07-01

    The effect of gain variation on the integrated output-charge distribution of a photomultiplier tube is investigated experimentally and shown to be a predictable function of the multiplier single-electron response. Standardized or nonstandardized pulses recorded using either capacitive or digital storage are considered. Theoretical values for the moment-generating functions and variances (noise powers) of the charge distributions obtained in these four cases are given, and the role of these various distributions in determining the length of time required to achieve a given accuracy in a light-flux measurement is discussed. The experimental measurements adequately confirm the theoretical predictions. The work includes a critical discussion of the field of theoretical and experimental noise investigations in photomultiplier tubes with regard to their relevance in the present state of technology. PMID:20111185

  1. In-site measurement of intensity of proton beam using film scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In proton single-event-effects experiments, and proton accelerators for advanced researches, precise measurement of proton beam current is important for reliability and accuracy of the experiments. Traditional detection methods, such as Faraday cup, Si (Au) surface barrier detector, and diamond detector, are of beam-block type measurements, where changes in proton beam current can hardly be monitored in-site. In this paper, film scintillators are used to detect the proton beam. Protons travel through the film scintillator, deposit part of the energy and make the scintillator emit lights, which are collected by a photomultiplier tube. Response of the film scintillator to protons are calculated and verified by experiments with proton beams at 3-10 MeV from the 2 x 6 MeV tandem accelerator at Peking University. (authors)

  2. Analysis of patient specific dosimetry quality assurance measurements in intensity modulated radiotherapy: A multi centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: IMRT centers are having random and biased (skewed towards over or under dose distribution of the percentage variation in difference between measured and planned doses. The analysis of results of the IMRT pre-treatment dose verification reveals that there are systematic errors in the chain of IMRT treatment process at a few centers. The dosimetry quality audit prior to commissioning of IMRT may play an important role in avoiding such discrepancies.

  3. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    OpenAIRE

    Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Beverini, N.(INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Italy); Biagi, S.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; M. Calamai; Calì, C.; A. Capone; Caruso, F.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also include...

  4. Development of new shipborne aureolemeter to measure the intensities of both direct and circumsolar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, H.; Shiobara, M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play important role in the Earth's radiation budget through the scattering and absorption of solar radiation (direct effect) and modification of cloud properties (indirect effect). A global understanding of the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and aerosol optical properties is necessary for assessment of it. Oceans cover about 70% of the Earth's surface and produce a large quantity of natural aerosols. The new shipborne aureolemeter was developed to improve the sun-tracking performance for accurate measurements of not only direct but circumsolar radiation, even on a vessel weltering. Sun position is determined by a real-time image processing system with a CCD camera. A round shape is extracted from the captured image. The position of the center of gravity of the round shape is used as the sun position. The accuracy of the sun paosition determination is finer than 0.01˚. The radiometer is tracked the sun under a feedback control with the derived sun position. For a sky radiance distribution measurement, the control target position on the CCD camera image is shifted a pixel corresponding to a measuring scattering angle. In the case of a scattering angle larger than 7˚, the radiometer's tracking is conducted under feedforward control on the basis of the angle of roll and pitch monitored with a gyroscope. To decide the solid angle of the radiometer, the radiance around the sun was measured in the angle range between the sun and sensor directions from -1.5˚ to +1.5˚ with 0.1˚ resolution. The instrument constants were determined from a Langley plot method. Now, we are conducting a comparison observation between the developed shipborne aureolemeter and an existing sky radiometer.

  5. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) intensity gradients in the heliotail during year 2003, using Cassini/INCA measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we use all-sky energy-resolved (5-55 keV) energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps obtained by the Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) on board Cassini during the time period DOY 265/2003 to 268/2003, to investigate the properties of the peak-to-basin ENA emissions in the direction of the heliotail. Our conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) a relatively smooth boundary (called transition region) between the very low (basin) and high (tail) ENA emissions from the heliosheath, with a spatial width of ∼30° deg in ecl. longitude, that no theory had predicted to date, is identified in the energy range of 5-55 keV; (2) the ENA intensity gradient in this transition region is almost invariant as a function of both ecl. Latitude and energy, with an average value of ∼2.4% per degree; (3) the deduced partial plasma pressure distributions in the 5-55 keV energy range are consistent with the ENA intensity distributions in the same energy range, while the ENA intensity gradient translates to a corresponding partial pressure gradient that occurs in the transition region; and (4) this partial pressure gradient is possibly not consistent with a tail magnetic field configuration that is similar to the measured magnetic fields by the Voyagers in the nose hemisphere

  6. Measurement of gamma-ray intensities of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th using semiconductor detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chatani, H

    1999-01-01

    Nuclide sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th was yielded by the sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th(n, 2n) reaction with neutron irradiation in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Moreover, the thorium was purified chemically. Gamma-ray spectra of thorium have been measured using low-energy photon spectrometers and a high-purity germanium detector. Relative gamma-ray intensities ranging from 25 to 352 keV in the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th have been determined with satisfactory accuracy. The results are in very good agreement with those of earlier studies. We observe two new gamma-rays at 77.69 and 177.66 keV, whose intensities are found to be (0.063+-0.010)% and (0.00095+-0.00020)%, respectively, relative to that of 84.21 keV taken as 100%. Absolute intensity of 84.21 keV gamma-ray which is the most prominent one from the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th and that of 185.739 keV following the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U are also determined from the secular equilibrium for sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U- sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th. The results obtained in t...

  7. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) intensity gradients in the heliotail during year 2003, using Cassini/INCA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, K.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we use all-sky energy-resolved (5-55 keV) energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps obtained by the Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) on board Cassini during the time period DOY 265/2003 to 268/2003, to investigate the properties of the peak-to-basin ENA emissions in the direction of the heliotail. Our conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) a relatively smooth boundary (called "transition region") between the very low (basin) and high (tail) ENA emissions from the heliosheath, with a spatial width of ~30° deg in ecl. longitude, that no theory had predicted to date, is identified in the energy range of 5-55 keV; (2) the ENA intensity gradient in this transition region is almost invariant as a function of both ecl. Latitude and energy, with an average value of ~2.4% per degree; (3) the deduced partial plasma pressure distributions in the 5-55 keV energy range are consistent with the ENA intensity distributions in the same energy range, while the ENA intensity gradient translates to a corresponding partial pressure gradient that occurs in the transition region; and (4) this partial pressure gradient is possibly not consistent with a tail magnetic field configuration that is similar to the measured magnetic fields by the Voyagers in the nose hemisphere.

  8. Intensive sound speed monitoring in ocean and its impact on the GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) technique, based on GPS positioning and acoustic ranging, is now getting a popular tool to measure seafloor crustal movement. Several groups in the world have been intensively conducted campaign surveys in the region of scientifically interest. As the technology of measurement has been matured and plenty of data are accumulated, researchers are now aware of the limit of its precision mainly due to unexpected undulation of sound speed in ocean, which significantly degrades acoustic ranging. If sound speed structure keeps its figure during survey period, e.g., more than a couple of hours, it can be estimated by a moving survey to get sufficient paths from various directions to illustrate the structure. However the sound speed structure often varies quickly with in a hour due to internal gravitational wave excited by interaction of tidal current and seafloor topography. In this case one cannot separate temporal and spatial variations. We revisited our numerous sound speed profile data derived from numbers of XBT measurements, which were concurrently carried out with GPS/A survey along the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench. Among the measurements, we found notably short-period variation in sound speed profile through intensive XBT survey repeatedly cast every 6 minutes for one hour, which also appeared in residuals in traveltime of acoustic ranging. The same feature is also found in more moderate rate for semidiurnal undulation, in which vertical oscillation of the middle of the profile can be clearly seen rather than variation of absolute sound speed. This also reflects traveltime residuals in the GPS/A measurement. These typical frequencies represent dominant wavelengths of spatial sound speed variation. In the latter, local horizontal variation can be negligible in the vicinity of a point survey area and the traditional analysis can be applicable that assumes time-varying stratified sound speed structure. In the former case, on the contrary, local

  9. Oxygen airglow emission on Venus and Mars as seen by VIRTIS/VEX and OMEGA/MEX imaging spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, A.; Altieri, F.; Zasova, L.; Piccioni, G.; Bellucci, G.; Cardesín Moinelo, A.; Drossart, P.; D'Aversa, E.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2011-08-01

    Imaging spectrometers are highly effective instruments for investigation of planetary atmospheres. They present the advantage of coupling the compositional information to the spatial distribution, allowing simultaneous study of chemistry and dynamics in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars. In this work, we summarize recent results about the O 2(a 1Δg) night and day glows, respectively obtained by VIRTIS/Venus Express and OMEGA/Mars Express, the imaging spectrometers currently in orbit around Venus and Mars. The case of the O 2(a 1Δg - X 3Σg-) IR emission at 1.27 μm on the night side of Venus and the day side of Mars is analyzed, pointing out dynamical aspects of these planets, like the detection of gravity waves in their atmospheres. The monitoring of seasonal and daily airglow variations provides hints about the photochemistry on these planets.

  10. Measurements of Accelerations of Large Neutrally-buoyant Particles in Intense Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Rachel D; Voth, Greg A

    2009-01-01

    We measure acceleration statistics of neutrally buoyant spherical particles with diameter 0.4 , clearly resolve the transition from the tracer like behavior of small particles to the much smaller accelerations of large particles. For d>5 eta, decreases with diameter as d^{-2/3} in agreement with inertial range scaling arguments. A model relating to the pressure structure functions matches the transition from small to large particle behavior if the particles respond to pressure differences over (1.7 +- 0.3) d. A model relating to the fluid acceleration averaged over the particle diameter predicts the transition with no free parameters, but does not show clean inertial range scaling in the size range studied. Consistent with earlier work, we find that the scaled acceleration probability density function shows very little dependence on particle size.

  11. New optical scheme for differential measurements of diffraction reflection intensity on X-radiation sliding incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray optical scheme for differential measurements of X-ray diffraction under sliding incidence conditions is proposed and an attachment design realizng this scheme, using standard equipment, is described. The main feature of the scheme is the following: collimation according to the Bragg angle is carried out for the reflected beam rather than the incident one. Goniometers can be used from DRON, TRS, GS-5 and other spectrometers. The goniometer head carrying the sample is standard, it is a part of the DRON, TRS and DTS. The crystal analyzer is fixed on the attachment. The angular position of the crystal monochromator is controlled by an inductive sensor. The experimental differential curves of X-ray diffraction under conditions of sliding incidence, taken for a silicon crystal having the 111 orientation, are given as well

  12. Recognition of the noise sources and measurement in educational hospital s General Intensive Care Unit (GICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Abolhasannejad

    2014-11-01

    Results: Mean sound pressure level for GICU was 60.9±1/6 dBA that is more than the standard level. The mean of maximum noise level was obtained 82.5±2 dBA and the highest noise level was measured at nursing station. There was significant difference in Noise Pollution level based on different months, level of patient's conciseness and number of ventilator using (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Being more noise pollution in the ICU and stations on all shifts may cause to diminish health and well-being of the staff in long-term and produce some problems for the patient. According to the highest level of noise produced in nursing stations and the different activities doing by the staff as a main noise pollution factor, it's necessary to perform required training in relationship with doing the works in right manner so that we can produce quiet and silence environment for patience.

  13. Measurements of the Intensity and Polarization of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus molecular complex with QUIJOTE

    CERN Document Server

    Génova-Santos, R; Rebolo, R; Peláez-Santos, A; López-Caraballo, C H; Harper, S; Watson, R A; Ashdown, M; Barreiro, R B; Casaponsa, B; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Fernández-Cobos, R; Grainge, K J B; Herranz, D; Hoyland, R; Lasenby, A; López-Caniego, M; Martínez-González, E; McCulloch, M; Melhuish, S; Piccirillo, L; Perrott, Y C; Poidevin, F; Razavi-Ghods, N; Scott, P F; Titterington, D; Tramonte, D; Vielva, P; Vignaga, R

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed in numerous sky regions, in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. One of the most scrutinized regions is G159.6-18.5, located within the Perseus molecular complex. In this paper we present further observations of this region (194 hours in total over ~250 deg^2), both in intensity and in polarization. They span four frequency channels between 10 and 20 GHz, and were gathered with QUIJOTE, a new CMB experiment with the goal of measuring the polarization of the CMB and Galactic foregrounds. When combined with other publicly-available intensity data, we achieve the most precise spectrum of the AME measured to date, with 13 independent data points being dominated by this emission. The four QUIJOTE data points provide the first independent confirmation of the downturn of the AME spectrum at low frequencies, initially unveiled by the COSMOSOMAS experiment in this region. We accomplish an accurate fit of these data using models based on electric dipole emission from spin...

  14. The gated integration technique for the accurate measurement of the autocorrelation function of speckle intensities scattered from random phase screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ningyu; Cheng, Chuanfu; Teng, Shuyun; Chen, Xiaoyi; Xu, Zhizhan

    2007-09-01

    A new approach based on the gated integration technique is proposed for the accurate measurement of the autocorrelation function of speckle intensities scattered from a random phase screen. The Boxcar used for this technique in the acquisition of the speckle intensity data integrates the photoelectric signal during its sampling gate open, and it repeats the sampling by a preset number, m. The average analog of the m samplings output by the Boxcar enhances the signal-to-noise ratio by √{m}, because the repeated sampling and the average make the useful speckle signals stable, while the randomly varied photoelectric noise is suppressed by 1/√{m}. In the experiment, we use an analog-to-digital converter module to synchronize all the actions such as the stepped movement of the phase screen, the repeated sampling, the readout of the averaged output of the Boxcar, etc. The experimental results show that speckle signals are better recovered from contaminated signals, and the autocorrelation function with the secondary maximum is obtained, indicating that the accuracy of the measurement of the autocorrelation function is greatly improved by the gated integration technique.

  15. Measurements of [O I] λ6300/Hα Line Intensity Ratios for Four O Star H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausen, N. R.; Reynolds, R. J.; Haffner, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    We have used the Wisconsin Hα Mapper facility to measure the [O I] λ6300/Hα line intensity ratios for four O star H II regions: S27 (observation coordinates l=6.3d,b=+23.6d), S252 (l=190.1d,b=+0.6d), S261 (l=194.1d,b=-1.9d), and S264 (l=195.1d,b=-12.0d). We find that the ratios range from 0.0015 to 0.0053. These results are roughly a factor of 10 lower than measured [O I]/Hα ratios in directions that sample the warm ionized component of the interstellar medium. This difference implies a significantly lower hydrogen ionization ratio n(H+)/n(H0) or higher electron temperature in the diffuse ionized gas compared with that in the bright discrete O star H II regions.

  16. On-line depth measurement for laser-drilled holes based on the intensity of plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct time-resolved depth measurement of blind holes is extremely difficult due to the short time interval and the limited space inside the hole. This work presents a method that involves on-line plasma emission acquisition and analysis to obtain correlations between the machining processes and the optical signal output. Given that the depths of laser-machined holes can be estimated on-line using a coaxial photodiode, this was employed in our inspection system. Our experiments were conducted in air under normal atmospheric conditions without gas assist. The intensity of radiation emitted from the vaporized material was found to correlate with the depth of the hole. The results indicate that the estimated depths of the laser-drilled holes were inversely proportional to the maximum plasma light emission measured for a given laser pulse number. (paper)

  17. Objectively measured light-intensity lifestyle activity and sedentary time are independently associated with metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study of Japanese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Junghoon; Tanabe, Kai; Yokoyama, Noriko; Zempo, Hirofumi; Kuno, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Background Reducing sedentary time and increasing lifestyle activities, including light-intensity activity, may be an option to help prevent metabolic syndrome (MetS). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether objectively measured light-intensity lifestyle activity and sedentary time is associated with MetS, independent of moderate–vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Methods The participants in this cross-sectional study were 483 middle-aged Japanese adults, aged 30–64 ...

  18. Energy efficiency in intensive livestock Estonia. Energy-saving measures on poultry farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annuk, A.; Nurste, H.; Damskier, S.S.

    2004-07-01

    The overall purpose of this report on energy-saving measures is to provide the Estonian Ministry of Economics and Communication with an overview of the energy consumption on poultry farms at a national level. This report compromises detailed information on energy consumption per ton of broiler meat, egg and young laying hen produced in Estonia and Denmark, respectively, based on field investigations and Danish statistics. To collect information on electricity consumption within Estonian poultry farming on a national level, three pilot farms were analysed with regard to the use of energy consumption on each farm. Results from the three farms are presented in Appendix 1. In addition, a calculation of national energy consumption within chicken meet production, egg production and breeding of young laying hens is presented in this report. The calculation shows the difference between the Danish and Estonian energy consumption on poultry farms. This report presents a proposal for a ten-year development plan for the reduction of the energy consumption on Estonian poultry farms. (au)

  19. Summary report of consultants' meeting on high-precision beta-intensity measurements and evaluations for specific PET radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of a Consultants' Meeting on 'High-precision beta-intensity measurements and evaluations for specific PET radioisotopes'. Participants assessed and reviewed the decay data for close to 50 positron-emitting radionuclides. Technical discussions are described in this report, along with the detailed recommendations and a priority list for future work. Direct positron and X-ray measurements are required to resolve a significant number of outstanding issues associated with the radionuclides reviewed. The following new measurements are recommended: gamma-ray emission probability for Cu-64, positron and Xray emission probabilities for Ni-57, Cu-62, Ga-66, As-72, Se-73, Rb-81,82m, Sr-83, Y-86 and Tc-94m. The following immediate evaluations were also recommended: Br-76 and I-120g.. Participants assessed and reviewed the decay data for close to 50 positron-emitting radionuclides. Technical discussions are described in this report, along with the detailed recommendations and a priority list for future work. Direct positron and X-ray measurements are required to resolve a significant number of outstanding issues associated with the radionuclides reviewed. The following new measurements are recommended: gamma-ray emission probability for Cu-64, positron and Xray emission probabilities for Ni-57, Cu-62, Ga-66, As-72, Se-73, Rb-81,82m, Sr-83, Y-86 and Tc-94m. The following immediate evaluations were also recommended: Br-76 and I-120g. (author)

  20. High-J CO Intensity Measurements for Galaxies Observed by the Herschel FTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip; Conley, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Molecular gas is the raw material for star formation and is commonly traced by the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule. The atmosphere blocks all but the lowest-J transitions of CO for observatories on the ground, but the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory revealed the CO emission of nearby galaxies from J=4-3 to J=13-12. Herschel showed that mid- and high-J CO lines in nearby galaxies are emitted from warm gas, accounting for approximately 10% of the molecular mass, but the majority of the CO luminosity. The energy budget of this warm, highly-excited gas is a significant window into the feedback interactions among molecular gas, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Likely, mechanical heating is required to explain the excitation. Such gas has also been observed in star forming regions within our galaxy.We have examined all ~ 300 spectra of galaxies from the Herschel Fourier Transform Spectrometer and measured line fluxes or upper limits for the CO J=4-3 to J=13-12, [CI], and [NII] 205 micron lines in ~ 200 galaxies, taking systematic effects of the FTS into account. We will present our line fitting method, illustrate trends available so far in this large sample, and preview the full 2-component radiative transfer likelihood modeling of the CO emission using an illustrative sample of 20 galaxies, including comparisons to well-resolved galactic regions. This work is a comprehensive study of mid- and high-J CO emission among a variety of galaxy types, and can be used as a resource for future (sub)millimeter studies of galaxies with ground-based instruments.

  1. Measurement of K X-ray intensity ratios in Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn employing carbon and nitrogen projectiles - VTT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is suggested to effect the self absorption correction in a different way to estimate the K X-ray intensity ratios particularly when heavy ions are used as projectiles. Employing this method, the Kβ/Kα intensity ratios are measured in some 3d shell elements by using Carbon and Nitrogen ions as exciting agents. The Kβ/Kα intensity ratios thus obtained in the present work are compared with the intensity ratios due to some previous authors and also with Scofield theoretical values. (orig.)

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in neonatal intensive care unit: Impact of infection control measures plus palivizumab use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Camila de A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU is related to unfavorable outcomes, as this infection can lead to respiratory distress and death in premature in infants. Report the successful control of an outbreak that occurred in April 2010 in a NICU. Methods After the index case, of 18 premature infants placed in the same room 10 infants were infected. Of those 10, 6 developed mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, 4 persisted asymptomatic and no death occurred. Contact and respiratory precautions were rapidly initiated, the infants were cohorted in 3 different rooms and palivizumab was administered to all contacts. Results The outbreak was controlled and no new cases were subsequently indentified. Conclusion Standard infection control measures plus palivizumab prophylaxis were efficient in rapid control of the outbreak.

  3. Intensity-only measurement of partially uncontrollable transmission matrix: demonstration with wave-field shaping in a microwave cavity

    CERN Document Server

    del Hougne, Philipp; Daudet, Laurent; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    Transmission matrices (TMs) have become a powerful and widely used tool to describe and control wave propagation in complex media. In certain scenarios the TM is partially uncontrollable, complicating its identification and use. In standard optical wavefront shaping experiments, uncontrollable reflections or additional sources may be the cause; in reverberating cavities, uncontrollable reflections off the walls have that effect. Here we employ phase retrieval techniques to identify such a partially uncontrollable system's TM solely based on random intensity-only reference measurements. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by focusing both on a single target as well as on multiple targets in a microwave cavity, using a phase-binary Spatial-Microwave-Modulator.

  4. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 using the MAX-DOAS method combined with relative intensity measurements for aerosol correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Levelt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS is a technique to measure trace gas amounts in the lower troposphere from ground-based scattered sunlight observations. MAX-DOAS observations are especially suitable for validation of tropospheric trace gas observations from satellite, since they have a representative range of several kilometers, both in the horizontal and in the vertical dimension. A two-step retrieval scheme is presented here, to derive aerosol corrected tropospheric NO2 columns from MAX-DOAS observations. In a first step, boundary layer aerosols, characterized in terms of aerosol optical thickness (AOT, are estimated from relative intensity observations, which are defined as the ratio of the sky radiance at elevation α and the sky radiance in the zenith. Relative intensity measurements have the advantage of a strong dependence on boundary layer AOT and almost no dependence on boundary layer height. In a second step, tropospheric NO2 columns are derived from differential slant columns, based on AOT-dependent air mass factors. This two-step retrieval scheme was applied to cloud free periods in a twelve month data set of observations in De Bilt, The Netherlands. In a comparison with AERONET (Cabauw site a mean difference in AOT (AERONET minus MAX-DOAS of −0.01±0.08 was found, and a correlation of 0.85. Tropospheric-NO2 columns were compared with OMI-satellite tropospheric NO2. For ground-based observations restricted to uncertainties below 10%, no significant difference was found, and a correlation of 0.88.

  5. Direct optical measurement of the on-shot incoherent focal spot and intensity contrast on the OMEGA EP laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrer, C.; Consentino, A.; Irwin, D.

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the prepulse temporal contrast of optical pulses is required to understand their interaction with matter. Light with relatively low intensity can interact with the target before the main high-intensity pulse. Estimating the intensity contrast, instead of the spatially averaged power contrast, is important to understand intensity-dependent laser-matter interactions. A direct optical approach to determining the on-shot intensity of the incoherent pedestal on an aberrated high-intensity laser system is presented. The spatially resolved focal spot of the incoherent pedestal preceding the main coherent pulse and the intensity contrast are calculated using experimental data. This technique is experimentally validated on one of the chirped pulse amplification beamlines of the OMEGA EP Laser System. The intensity contrast of a 1-kJ, 10-ps laser pulse is shown to be ~10× higher than the power contrast because of the larger spatial extent of the incoherent focal spot relative to the coherent focal spot.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  7. Relationship between propagation direction of gravity waves in OH and OI airglow images and VHF radar echo occurrence during the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Onoma

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We report simultaneous observations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW in OI (557.7nm and OH airglow images and VHF radar backscatter from field-aligned irregularities (FAI in the E-region during the SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 campaign period from 29 July to 9 August 2002. An all-sky imager was operated at Nishino-Omote (30.5 N, 130.1 E, Japan. On 14 nights, 17 AGW events were detected in OI and OH airglow images. AGW propagated mostly toward the northeast or southeast. From comparison with the E-region FAI occurrence, which is detected by a nearby VHF radar (31.57MHz, we found that AGW tended to propagate southeastward during FAI events. This result suggests that the interaction between AGW and E-region plasma plays an important role in generating FAI. Furthermore, polarization electric fields generated directly by AGW may contribute to the FAI generation.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora, Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities, Mid-latitude ionosphere

  8. Measurement Properties and Implementation of a Checklist to Assess Leadership Skills during Interdisciplinary Rounds in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsbeth C. M. Ten Have

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs. Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85 and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74. Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65. The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of “no” and “yes” scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

  9. Validity and reliability of measuring activities, movement intensity and energy expenditure with the DynaPort MoveMonitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Sonja; Nieuwenhuizen, Mieke G

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of assessing activities, movement intensity (MI) and energy expenditure (EE) measured by accelerometry. 28 Able-bodied participants performed standardized tasks while an accelerometer was worn and oxygen uptake was measured. After uploading the accelerometer data to the manufacturer's website, a report was received that gave minute-by-minute MI and EE of the performed activities. Validity was assessed by comparing reported activities and EE with the actual performed activities and calculated EE from the oxygen uptake, and by testing whether MI differed between walking velocities and cycling resistances. Reliability was assessed by performing the protocol twice. Except for standing (classified predominantly (82%) as sitting), most activities were categorized mainly correctly (93-100%). A difference in MI was detected between walking speeds but not between cycling resistances. EE was overestimated for walking (ICC=0.54) and underestimated for cycling (ICC=0.03). Reliability of MI was high (ICC=0.91) but reliability for the relative time spent in activities or the step count was weak to moderate. In conclusion, most activities were categorized correctly, MI seemed to be valid and reliable but reliability is low for relative time spent in activities and EE cannot be estimated well. PMID:23684579

  10. Application of the measurement-based Monte Carlo method in nasopharyngeal cancer patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to utilize a measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method to evaluate the accuracy of dose distributions calculated using the Eclipse radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) based on the anisotropic analytical algorithm. Dose distributions were calculated for the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten NPC IMRT plans were evaluated by comparing their dose distributions with those obtained from the in-house MBMC programs for the same CT images and beam geometry. To reconstruct the fluence distribution of the IMRT field, an efficiency map was obtained by dividing the energy fluence of the intensity modulated field by that of the open field, both acquired from an aS1000 electronic portal imaging device. The integrated image of the non-gated mode was used to acquire the full dose distribution delivered during the IMRT treatment. This efficiency map redistributed the particle weightings of the open field phase-space file for IMRT applications. Dose differences were observed in the tumor and air cavity boundary. The mean difference between MBMC and TPS in terms of the planning target volume coverage was 0.6% (range: 0.0–2.3%). The mean difference for the conformity index was 0.01 (range: 0.0–0.01). In conclusion, the MBMC method serves as an independent IMRT dose verification tool in a clinical setting. - Highlights: ► The patient-based Monte Carlo method serves as a reference standard to verify IMRT doses. ► 3D Dose distributions for NPC patients have been verified by the Monte Carlo method. ► Doses predicted by the Monte Carlo method matched closely with those by the TPS. ► The Monte Carlo method predicted a higher mean dose to the middle ears than the TPS. ► Critical organ doses should be confirmed to avoid overdose to normal organs

  11. Diagnostics of thin-film silicon solar cells and solar panels/modules with variable intensity measurements (VIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A.V.; Sculati-Meillaud, F.; Ghahfarokhi, O.M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and thin film electronics Laboratory, Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Berenyi, Z.J. [Energosolar, Szep u. 2, 1053 Budapest (Hungary); Kumar, R. [HHV Solar Technologies Private Limited, Site No. 17, Phase 1, Peenya Industrial Area, Bangalore-560 058 (India)

    2011-01-15

    A simple and low-cost method for analyzing amorphous silicon solar cells and modules, which have low values of the fill factor (FF), is proposed. Low fill factors can occur mainly because of 3 reasons: (a) excessive recombination due to ''bad'' intrinsic layers; (b) shunts and (c) very high series resistance. The method described here allows one to discriminate between (a), (b) and (c). It consists of measuring the J-V curves at different light intensities, varying typically from 0.05 to 1 sun. It has been called the ''variable intensity method (VIM)''. Here, one plots R{sub sc}={partial_derivative}V/{partial_derivative}J (at V=0) and R{sub oc}={partial_derivative}V/{partial_derivative}J (at J=0) as a function of J{sub sc}. From the slope of the R{sub sc}-J{sub sc} curve, one derives the ''collection voltage V{sub coll}''; from the asymptotic value of R{sub sc} for low values of J{sub sc} (<0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}) one obtains the ''true'' shunt resistance R{sub shunt}; from the asymptotic value of R{sub oc} for high values of J{sub sc} (around 10 mA/cm{sup 2}) one obtains the ''true'' series resistance R{sub series}. This paper shows quantitatively how too low values of V{sub coll} and of R{sub shunt} as well as how too high a value of R{sub series} lead to a low value of FF for both cells and panels/modules. (author)

  12. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  13. Modeling of intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser absorption spectrometer systems for atmospheric CO(2) column measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Wallace Harrison, F; Browell, Edward V; Nehrir, Amin R; Dobler, Jeremy; Moore, Berrien; Refaat, Tamer; Kooi, Susan A

    2013-10-10

    The focus of this study is to model and validate the performance of intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) CO(2) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) systems and their CO(2) column measurements from airborne and satellite platforms. The model accounts for all fundamental physics of the instruments and their related CO(2) measurement environments, and the modeling results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles that include noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems are based on existing technologies and their implementation in existing systems. The modeled instruments are specifically assumed to be IM-CW LAS systems such as the Exelis' airborne multifunctional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 μm CO(2) absorption band. Atmospheric effects due to variations in CO(2), solar radiation, and thin clouds, are also included in the model. Model results are shown to agree well with LAS atmospheric CO(2) measurement performance. For example, the relative bias errors of both MFLL simulated and measured CO(2) differential optical depths were found to agree to within a few tenths of a percent when compared to the in situ observations from the flight of 3 August 2011 over Railroad Valley (RRV), Nevada, during the summer 2011 flight campaign. In addition, the horizontal variations in the model CO(2) differential optical depths were also found to be consistent with those from MFLL measurements. In general, the modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the CO(2) column differential optical depths (τd) agreed to within about 30%. Model simulations of a spaceborne IM-CW LAS system in a 390 km dawn/dusk orbit for CO(2) column measurements showed that with a total of 42 W of transmitted power for one offline and two different sideline channels (placed at different locations on the side of the CO(2) absorption line), the accuracy of the

  14. High solubility of SO2: evidence in an intensive fog event measured in the NCP region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted in a heavy SO2 pollution area located in north China plain (NCP. During the experiment, SO2 and other air pollutants, liquid water content (LWC of fog droplets, and basic meteorological parameters were measured. During the experiment, an intensive fog event occurred between 5 and 8 November 2009. During the fog period, the concentrations of SO2 showed a strong variability, and the variability was closely correlated to the appearances of fogs and LWC. For example, the averaged concentration of SO2 during the non-fog period was about 25 ppbv. By contrast, during the fog period, the concentration of SO2 reduced to about 4–7 ppbv. The large reduction of SO2 suggests that a majority of SO2 (about 70–80% had been converted from gas-phase to aqueous-phase, showing a high solubility of SO2. However, according to the value of Henry Law constant, the solubility of SO2 is modest, which cannot explain the measured large reduction of SO2. This study highlights that the aqueous reactions of SO2 in the droplets of fogs play important roles to enhance the solubility of SO2. To account for the effect of aqueous reactions on the solubility of SO2, an "effective" Henry Law constant of SO2 is proposed in this study. The study shows that without considering aqueous reactions of SO2 in fog droplets, the estimate of the partitioning of SO2 in droplets is significantly lower than the measured values. By contrast, when the "effective" Henry Law constant is applied in the calculation, the calculated SO2 concentrations are significantly improved, showing that the aqueous reactions of SO2 play important roles in controlling the solubility of SO2, and should be considered in model calculations.

  15. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  16. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  17. Origin of particulate matter and gaseous precursors in the Paris Megacity: Results from intensive campaigns, long term measurements and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekmann, Matthias; Petetin, Hervé; Zhang, Qijie; Prevot, André S. H.; Sciare, Jean; Gros, Valérie; Ghersi, Véronique; Rosso, Amandine; Crippa, Monica; Zotter, Peter; Freutel, Fredericke; Poulain, Laurent; Freney, Evelyne; Sellegri, Karine; Drewnick, Frank; Borbon, Agnès; Wiedensohler, Aflred; Pandis, Spyros N.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainties on the origin of primary and secondary particulate matter and its gaseous precursors in megacities is still large and needs to be reduced. A detailed characterization of air quality in Paris (France), a megacity of more than 10 million inhabitants, during two one month intensive campaigns (MEGAPOLI) and from additional one year observations (PARTICULATE and FRANCIPOL), revealed that about 70% of the fine particulate matter (PM) at urban background is transported on average into the megacity from upwind regions. While advection of sulfate is well documented for other megacities, there was a surprisingly high contribution from long-range transport for both nitrate and organic aerosol. The data set of urban local and advected PM concentrations in the Paris area were used for a thorough evaluation of the CHIMERE model and revealed error compensation for the local and advected components of organic matter and nitrate. During spring time, CHIMERE simulations overestimate the sensitivity of ammonium nitrate peaks to NH3, because (i) they underestimate the urban background NH3 levels, probably due to neglecting enhanced NH3 emissions for larger temperatures, and because they overestimate HNO3. However, from an ensemble of mobile Max-DOAS NO2 column and airborne NOy measurements around Paris, no clear sign on a NOx emission bias in the TNO-Airparif data set was made evident. The origin of organic PM was investigated by a comprehensive analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), radiocarbon and tracer measurements during two intensive campaigns. Primary fossil fuel combustion emissions contributed less than 20% in winter and 40% in summer to carbonaceous fine PM, unexpectedly little for a megacity. Cooking activities and, during winter, residential wood burning are the major primary organic PM sources. This analysis suggests that the major part of secondary organic aerosol is of modern origin, i.e. from biogenic precursors and from wood burning. Implementation

  18. The ratio of the single and double scattering intensities in ion scattering spectroscopy as a quantitative measure of surface structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio R of the intensities of the single and double scattering peaks observed in Ion Scattering Spectroscopy has been determined as a function of several experimental parameters. If all particles scattered through a certain scattering angle are detected with a time of flight spectrometer or when alkali ions are used as primary particles then the absolute value of R as well as the dependence on the experimental parameters correspond with the results of several theoretical models. A simple two atom model, using the Thomas-Fermi-Moliere potential, yields very satisfying results. For low index directions on the surface R is a straightforward measure for the interatomic distance of neighbour surface atoms. For high index directions surface zig-zag collisions complicate the interpretation, but the shape of the energy spectra can be understood reasonably well. When noble gas ions are used as primary particles and only the scattered ions are detected, R+ is influenced by charge exchange and neutralization processes, which complicate the interpretation, and the dependence of R+ on the experimental parameters does not agree with theoretical expectations for R. (author)

  19. Parametric excitation of electron Bernstein waves by radio waves in the ionosphere and its possible consequence for airglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high power radio wave, launched into the polar ionosphere at angle θ with the earth's magnetic field from a ground-based transmitter in the vicinity of twice the electron cyclotron frequency (2.75 MHz), is reported to create an airglow at an effective radiated power (ERP) = 10 MW. We interpret this result as a consequence of parametric decay of the radio wave into an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) and an ion acoustic wave (IAW). The oscillatory velocity of electrons due to the pump couples with the density perturbation due to the IAW to produce a current, driving the Bernstein mode. The latter, in connection with the pump, exerts a ponderomotive force on electrons, driving the IAW. The growth rate of the parametric instability is maximum for θ = 0. At the same time, for any given value of θ, the growth rate increases with b(=k12vth2/2ωc2) and attains a maximum around b ∼ 2, then falls gradually. The EBW produces energetic electrons via cyclotron damping. These electrons collide with the neutral atoms of the plasma to excite them to higher energy states. As the excited atoms return to lower energy states, they radiate in the visible

  20. Climatology of the O+ temperatures over Arecibo for the historical deep solar minimum using Incoherent Scatter Radar and airglow data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P. T.; Brum, C. G. M.; Kerr, R.; Noto, J.

    2014-12-01

    At Arecibo Observatory (AO) a comprehensive description of the ionosphere and thermosphere environment is achieved by the synergy between the Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) and the optical instruments nested on site. An example of this synergy is present in his work where optical and radar techniques were reconciled in order to obtain the O+ temperature variability for 2008 and 2009. During this period, a historical deep solar minimum condition was registered with a remarkable absence of sunspots for a long period (translated into a decreasing in the EUV-UV irradiance). This particular feature implies in an important tool to investigate the variability of O+ temperature, once that any variation can be related to season (modulated by the neutral atmosphere) and/or another modulator different than solar energy input. The OII 7320 Å twilight airglow data used in this work were obtained during new moon periods using a high-spectral resolution Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) with CCD array detection. The FPI was configured with 0.9 cm plate spacing, which produced a free spectral range of 0.298Å and a spectral resolution of 0.03Å, sufficient to sample line width temperatures as low as 500K. A very narrow 3Å Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) three-cavity interference filter was also used.

  1. Development and tests of a simple multifoil spectrometer for highly time-resolved line intensity measurements in the RFX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and cost-effective spectrometer dedicated to line-intensity monitoring in the soft X-ray range has been realized, installed and tested in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment for the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The technique of photon energy selection by means of multilayer material filters has been applied to the instrument described in this paper, which, together with the associated electronics, has been designed in an original compact version for RFX. This present version allows on-line monitoring with good time resolution (10 kHz bandwidth) of line emission from carbon and oxygen in their H- and He-line states (which fall within the soft X-ray energy range), but, with modifications of the set of material filters, different wavelength ranges can be chosen and then other lines can be monitored. A detailed description of the instrument is given in the paper and the data analysis technique is presented. Particular attention is dedicated to a critical analysis of the technique and to the discussion of the experimental errors which may be associated with this measurement; new results on the estimate of systematic errors and experimental improvements to eliminate the problem of continuum radiation are presented. As a demonstration of the proper operation of the instrument, data taken under a wide range of conditions in 0.5-0.6 MA RFX plasmas are shown and discussed. Good agreement of the measurements with other spectroscopic diagnostics already operation on the machine is found; by exploiting the high time resolution of the instrument, interesting results concerning the RFP configuration's dynamics are obtained. Based on this prototype, a multichord diagnostic has been designed for imaging the impurity emission radial profiles. (Author)

  2. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  3. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee,C.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in

  4. Climatology of the O(1S) and O(1D) emission rates from WINDII/UARS global measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Shepherd, S.

    The Wind Imaging Interferometer WINDII on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite UARS has provided a large number of O 1S green line 557 7 nm and O 1D red line 630 0 nm emission rate profiles during 1991-1997 of unprecedented high quality The daytime airglow emission is produced mainly by solar energy deposition and vary according to changes of the solar zenith angle and solar irradiance The nighttime airglow emission rates show strong latitudinal and local time dependences Using both daytime and nighttime measurements the directly solar excited daytime emission rates can be removed and the indirectly excited component is revealed This study presents the seasonal and latitudinal variations of the indirect component of the two airglow emission rates which may be due to tides geomagnetic effects and other physical and photochemical processes

  5. Measurement of L X-Ray Intensity Ratios for 92U and 90Th Elements Using Photoionization in an External Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Demir; Y.(S)ahin

    2007-01-01

    L x-ray intensity ratios L(e)/Lγ, Lα/Lγ and Lβ/Lγ for 92U and 90Th are measured by using 59.5keV incident photon energy at 110° and 125° scattering angles. The samples are located in the external magnetic field of intensities ±0.15T, ±0.30T, ±0.45T, ±0.60T and ±0.75T. The experimental results obtained for B = 0 are compared with the theoretical values calculated using Scofield's tables based on the Hartree-Slater theory. The contribution to the alignment of the external magnetic field is discussed. It is observed that the L x-ray intensity ratios decrease with the increasing magnetic field intensity.

  6. European emissions trading and the international competitiveness of energy-intensive industries: a legal and political evaluation of possible supporting measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EU Emissions Trading Directive is expected by European energy-intensive industries to harm their competitiveness vis-a-vis non-European competitors. Many additional measures have thus been proposed to 'level the playing field' and to protect the competitiveness of European energy-intensive industries within the larger effort of reducing Europe's greenhouse gas emissions and of meeting its obligations under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. This article evaluates a range of proposed measures based on a set of political and legal criteria, including environmental effectiveness; the need to consider differentiated commitments, responsibilities and capabilities; conformity with world trade law and European Union law; and Europe's overall political interests. We discuss measures that could be adopted by the European Union and its member states, such as direct support for energy-intensive industries, restrictions of energy-intensive imports into the European Union through border cost adjustments, quotas or technical regulations, and cost reimbursement for affected developing countries. We also analyse measures available to multilateral institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol and the World Trade Organisation. We conclude with a classification of the discussed measures with red (unfeasible), yellow (potentially feasible) or green (feasible) labels

  7. European emissions trading and the international competitiveness of energy-intensive industries: a legal and political evaluation of possible supporting measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EU Emissions Trading Directive is expected by European energy-intensive industries to harm their competitiveness vis-a-vis non-European competitors. Many additional measures have thus been proposed to 'level the playing field' and to protect the competitiveness of European energy-intensive industries within the larger effort of reducing Europe's greenhouse gas emissions and of meeting its obligations under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. This article evaluates a range of proposed measures based on a set of political and legal criteria, including environmental effectiveness; the need to consider differentiated commitments, responsibilities and capabilities; conformity with world trade law and European Union law; and Europe's overall political interests. We discuss measures that could be adopted by the European Union and its member states, such as direct support for energy-intensive industries, restrictions of energy-intensive imports into the European Union through border cost adjustments, quotas or technical regulations, and cost reimbursement for affected developing countries. We also analyse measures available to multilateral institutions such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol and the World Trade Organisation. We conclude with a classification of the discussed measures with red (unfeasible), yellow (potentially feasible) or green (feasible) labels. (author)

  8. Error calculation and analysis for an improved wind retrieval method based on the ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houmao; Wang, Yongmei

    2015-11-01

    A ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fabricated by American National Center for Atmospheric Research (A-NCAR) was deployed in Kelan (111.6° E, 38.7° N), in middle of China, to observe OH 892.0 nm, OI 630.0 nm, and OI 557.7 nm airglow emissions for wind retrieval of mesospheric and thermospheric atmosphere using a method based on the convolution of the source profile and instrumental function. Based on the instrument, wind velocities were retrieved using another retrieval method but improved in both noise reduction and choice of interference fringes, which can reduce the disturbance of bad fringes and advance the retrieval precision. The retrieval results were subsequently compared with the FPI wind products, and good agreement was found between them. The averaged deviations of wind velocities between the two retrieval methods depend on airglow intensity with 5.7 m/s for 892.0 nm emission, 6.18 m/s for 630.0 nm emission, and 3.66 m/s for 557.7 nm emission, respectively. Then, a new method was proposed for error calculation by considering the influence of airglow intensity, CCD dark noise, background emissions, and data processing, which can steadily evaluate the precision and reliability of wind retrieval. The relationships between errors derived from the two retrieval methods and airglow intensity were compared and analyzed. It is found that the variation of errors is inversely correlated with the variation of airglow intensity.

  9. X-ray polarization measurement for fast electrons in intense-laser-produced plasma under oblique incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Y; Inubushi, Y; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Kai, T; Nakamura, T; Johzaki, T; Nagatomo, H; Mima, K [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kawamura, T [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Batani, D; Morace, A; Redaelli, R [University of Milan - Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fourment, C; Santos, J [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux 1/CNRS/CEA, Talence (France); Malka, G [CENBG, Universite de Bordeaux 1/CNRS - IN2P3, Gradignan (France); Boscheron, A [CEA/CESTA Le BARP (France); Casner, A [CEA-DAM He de France, Bruyres-le-Chtel (France); Koenig, M [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau Cedex (France)], E-mail: okano-yas@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-05-15

    Study on x-ray polarization spectroscopy was performed for intense-laser-produced plasma under laser-oblique incidence. The laser pulse was focused onto a polyvinylchloride target at angles of 67 degrees and 7 degrees to the target normal at average intensities of 10{sup 17-18} W/cm{sup 2}. There were differences in the spectra for shifted K{alpha} lines of C1 atoms between the oblique and nearly normal incidence, indicating the low laser-energy absorption in the oblique incidence. A difference in polarization degrees of C1 He{alpha} lines was also observed, and this means the polarization of incident laser pulse affect velocity distribution functions of fast electrons in intense-laser-produced plasma.

  10. Comparison of the reliability of subjective evaluation and quantitative measurements of MR signal intensity in inflammations of the intratemporal facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare in a single-blind study the reliability of quantitative measurements and subjective evaluations of contrast enhancement of the facial nerve in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis. Materials and Methods: Magnetic resonance images with a 0.7 mm slice thickness (surface coil) were obtained in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis before and after administration of Gd-DTPA, 0.1 mmol/kg. The five intratemporal segments of the facial nerve were quantitatively measured and subjectively assessed by five radiologists as to the degree of enhancement. The results were compared as to the reliability of both methods. Results: Using the quantitative measuring method, 175 measurements were calculated from a total of 350 regions of interest. At all 35 measured sites, the five quantitative measurements produced identical results. In contrast, the subjective assessment of the five radiologists arrived at a majority consensus in only 16 sites. A complete agreement was not reached for any measured site. Conclusion: The measured quantitative increase in signal intensity after administration of contrast medium is more reliable than subjective assessment. The quantitative method enables reproducible signal intensity measurements even for different window settings and can be easily and swiftly performed at the workstation. (orig.)

  11. Quantum assignments and intensity measures for methane between 1100 and 1800 per cm - A comparison between theory and experiment. [in outer planets atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, B. L.; Pierre, C.; Pierre, G.; Champion, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The paper analyzes line positions and absolute line strengths of Blatherwick et al. (1979), based on moderately high resolution spectra of methane between 1100 and 1800 per cm, obtained using the Fourier transform spectrometer and the multiple-pass cold cell at the NASA Ames Research Center. Hamiltonian models are used to calculate theoretical relative line strengths, which, in combination with measured line strengths, yield integrated band strengths for the fundamentals v2 and v4. Ratios of calculated intensities to experimental intensities are analyzed, and the systematic deviations in the P- and R-branches of the v2 band are found to be represented by a Herman-Wallis type factor for Coriolis interactions. An analysis of ratios of calculated to experimental intensities of the v4 band yields a small correction to the Herman-Wallis factor.

  12. Measurement of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-emittance of an intense uranium beam at 11.4 MeV/u

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Gerhard, P.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Vormann, H.

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the transverse four-dimensional beam rms-parameters is essential for applications that involve lattice elements that couple the two transverse degrees of freedom (planes). Usually pepper-pots are used for measuring these beam parameters. However, for ions their application is limited to energies below 150 keV/u. This contribution is on measurements of the full transverse four-dimensional second-moments beam matrix of high intensity uranium ions at an energy of 11.4 MeV/u. The combination of skew quadrupoles with a slit/grid emittance measurement device has been successfully applied.

  13. Arsenic-induced intensity oscillations in reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements. [during MBE of GaAs and InAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. F.; Fernandez, R.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Madhukar, A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique of arsenic-induced RHEED intensity oscillations has been used to accurately measure arsenic incorporation rates as a function of substrate temperature during the homoepitaxial growths of both GaAs and InAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Measurements were made at growth temperatures from 350 to 650 C and at arsenic fluxes of 0.1 to 10.0 monolayer/s. The method measures only the arsenic actually incorporated into the growing film and does not include the arsenic lost in splitting the arsenic tetramers or lost by evaporation from the sample.

  14. Composite Indicators measuring structural change, to monitor the progress towards a more knowledge-intensive economy in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Daniel; VERTESY DANIEL; Tarantola, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    This report is the deliverable of the second work package (WP2) of the feasibility study entitled ERA MONITORING and financed by DG RTD. The objective of this work package is to explore the possibility to develop a composite indicator of structural change towards a more knowledge-intensive economy in Europe, coherently with the orientations of the EU 2020 strategy and the Innovation Union initiative

  15. Proposal for direct measurement of intense-field induced polarization in the continuum on the attosecond time scale using transient absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, C. William; Haxton, Daniel; Li, Xuan

    2015-05-01

    A procedure is proposed for using transient absorption spectroscopy above the ionization threshold to measure the polarization of the continuum induced by an intense optical pulse. In this way transient absorption measurement can be used to probe sub-femtosecond intense field dynamics in atoms and molecules and extract the high frequency polarization that plays a central role in high harmonic generation. The method is based on a robust approximation to the dependence of these spectra on time-delay between an attosecond XUV probe pulse and an intense pump pulse that is verified over a wide range of intensities and time delays by all-electrons-active calculations using the Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree Fock method. To demonstrate the extraction of the field-induced polarization, we study the transient absorption spectrum of atomic Neon. Work at LBNL supported by USDOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, and work at UC Davis supported by USDOE grant No. DESC0007182.

  16. Even aberration measurement of lithographic projection optics based on intensity difference of adjacent peaks in alternating phase-shifting mask image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose an in situ technique for measuring an even aberration of lithographic projection optics. By using the Hopkins theory of partially coherent imaging and the thick-mask model, the linear relationship between the intensity difference of adjacent peaks in an alternating phase-shifting mask image and an even aberration is established by equations and verified by numerical results. The sensitivity of measuring the even aberration of lithographic projection optics based on this linear relationship is analyzed, and the measurement mark is designed accordingly. Measurement performance of the present technique is evaluated using the lithographic simulator PROLITH, which shows that the present technique is capable of measuring the even aberration of lithographic projection optics with ultrahigh measurement accuracy.

  17. On the opportunity of spectroscopic determination of absolute atomic densities in non-equilibrium plasmas from measured relative intensities within resonance multiplets distorted by self-absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, B P

    2007-01-01

    The opportunities of the application of the recently proposed approach in optical emission spectroscopy of non-equilibrium plasmas have been studied. The approach consists of several methods of the determination of {\\em absolute} particle densities of atoms from measured {\\em relative} intensities within resonance multiplets distorted by self-absorption. All available spectroscopic data concerning resonance spectral lines of atoms having multiplet ground states from boron up to gallium were analyzed. It is found that in the case of C, O, F, S and Cl atoms an application of the methods needs VUV technique, while densities of B, Al, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Co, Ni, Ga atoms may be obtained by means of the intensity measurements in UV and visible parts of emission spectra suitable for ordinary spectrometers used for optical diagnostics and monitoring of non-equilibrium plasmas including industrial plasma technologies.

  18. Measurement of relative X-ray intensity ratios for elements in the 22≤Z≤29 Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray spectra obtained by pure element targets photoionization using an X-ray tube were recorded with the Si(Li) detector calibrated for efficiency and peak shape. The spectra were analyzed taking into account the radiative Auger effect and satellite lines. Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu were compared with those obtained from radionuclides decaying by electron capture. The K-shell fluorescence yields were reviewed for the same Z range, pointing out the lack of experimental data

  19. The intensities of exposure doses to gamma radiation: - At the whole territory of SAP Kosovo, measured after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident there have been done measurements of the intensities of the exposure doses to gamma radiation through the territorial communities of SAP Kosovo and that was at the soil surface and at 1,5m. from the soil surface. The results were shown chartly and graphically for the period of May - December 1986 for every community and finally for all territory of SAP Kosovo. (author) 1 tab.; 1 fig

  20. {sup 124}Sb - Activity measurement and determination of photon emission intensities; {sup 124}Sb - Mesure de l'activite et determination des intensites photoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chauvenet, B.

    2009-07-15

    The international traceability of antimony 124, in term of activity, is very limited. The results of {sup 124}Sb activity measurements sent to the SIR (BIPM - International System of Reference, BIPM.RI(II)-K1.Sb-124.) are scarce. Up to now, only three laboratories have contributed. Two of them carried out measurements using the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence counting technique and the third one using the 4pigamma method with a well-type crystal detector. The first two results are in agreement but the last one differs significantly from them, by 2 %. The decay scheme consistency cannot be excluded when trying to explain those discrepancies. In other respects, this nuclide emits high-energy gamma rays, and then could be selected as a valuable standard radionuclide for the calibration of gamma-ray detectors in that energy range, given well known photon intensities. Those considerations led to the proposal of an international exercise and to the realisation of this Euromet project, registered as project no. 907, coordinated by CEA-List-LNE/LNHB. The first part of this exercise was dedicated to activity measurements and to their comparison. For this purpose, participants were asked to make use of all the direct measurement techniques available in their laboratory in order to confirm or not the existence of possible biases specific to some measuring methods. In addition, this exercise offered the opportunity of improving the uncertainties of the gamma-ray intensities. Then, participants were asked, in the second part of the exercise, to carry out X-ray and gamma-ray intensity measurements. These results have been compared to previous published values and new decay scheme data are proposed. Eight international laboratories participated in this exercise. (authors)

  1. Comparison of non contact infrared forehead thermometer to standard temperature measurement in neonatal intensive care unit patients Original Article

    OpenAIRE

    Can, Emrah; Bülbül, Ali; Uslu, Sinan; Nuhoğlu, Asiye

    2010-01-01

    Summary Aim: In this study we aimed to compare non contact infrared forehead thermometer measurement with the mercury thermometer and digital thermometer measurements in the neonatal period Material and Method: A total of 179 newborns who were admitted to our hospital were enrolled and simultaneous temperature measurements were performed via three devices Mesaurements were made from forehead with non contact infrared thermometer and from axillar region with digital thermometers and convention...

  2. Comparison of non-contact infrared forehead thermometer to standard temperature measurement in neonatal intensive care unit patients - Original Article

    OpenAIRE

    Emrah Can; Ali Bülbül; Sinan Uslu; Asiye Nuhoğlu

    2010-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to compare non-contact infrared forehead thermometer measurement with the mercury thermometer and digital thermometer measurements in the neonatal period.Material and Method: A total of 179 newborns who were admitted to our hospital were enrolled, and simultaneous temperature measurements were performed via three devices. Mesaurements were made from forehead with non-contact infrared thermometer and from axillar region with digital thermometers and conventional th...

  3. Aerosol measurements at 60 m during April 1994 remote cloud study intensive operating period (RCS/IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifer, R.; Albert, B.; Lee, N.; Knuth, R.H. [Department of Energy, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Aerosol measurements were made at the Southern Great Plains Site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Many types of air masses pass over this area, and on the data acquisition day, extremly low aerosol scattering coefficients were seen. A major effort was placed on providing some characterization of the aerosol size distribution. Data is currently available from the experimental center.

  4. Measurement of the 3d→2p resonance to intercombination line-intensity ratio in neonlike Fe XVII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the 3d→2p resonance and intercombination lines were made on the PLT tokamak for the neonlike ions Fe XVII, Ge XXIII, and Se XXV at several electron temperatures. The observed ratios agree with measurements of the ratios of the electron-impact excitation cross sections measured at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap indicating that the effects of indirect excitation processes active in a plasma environment are minor for this line pair. However, the measured ratios are significantly smaller than theoretical predictions of their relative oscillator strengths or electron-impact excitation rates, illustrating the need to use laboratory measurements to calibrate this line pair at the level necessary for spectral diagnostics

  5. Measurement of the 3d{yields}2p resonance to intercombination line-intensity ratio in neonlike Fe XVII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Thorn, D. B.

    2001-09-01

    Measurements of the 3d{yields}2p resonance and intercombination lines were made on the PLT tokamak for the neonlike ions Fe XVII, Ge XXIII, and Se XXV at several electron temperatures. The observed ratios agree with measurements of the ratios of the electron-impact excitation cross sections measured at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap indicating that the effects of indirect excitation processes active in a plasma environment are minor for this line pair. However, the measured ratios are significantly smaller than theoretical predictions of their relative oscillator strengths or electron-impact excitation rates, illustrating the need to use laboratory measurements to calibrate this line pair at the level necessary for spectral diagnostics.

  6. Development of a strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source for a confined alpha particle measurement at ITER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaki, M; Shinto, K; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Tsumori, K; Nishiura, M; Kaneko, O; Matsuda, Y; Wada, M; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Hirano, Y

    2008-02-01

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source has been designed and constructed as a beam source for a high-energy He(0) beam probe system for diagnosis of fusion produced alpha particles in the thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The He(+) beam was extracted from the ion source at an acceleration voltage of 18-35 kV. Temperature distributions of the beam target were observed with an IR camera. The 1/e-holding beam profile half-width was about 15 mm at optimum perveance (Perv) of 0.03 (I(beam)=2.4 A). A beam current about 3 A was achieved at an acceleration voltage of 26.7 kV with an arc power of 10 kW (Perv=0.023). PMID:18315239

  7. Trap State Effects in PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot Exciton Kinetics Using Photocarrier Radiometry Intensity and Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Sun, Qiming

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted significant interest for applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. However, a poor understanding of charge transport in these nanocrystalline films hinders their practical applications. The photocarrier radiometry (PCR) technique, a frequency-domain photoluminescence method spectrally gated for monitoring radiative recombination photon emissions while excluding thermal infrared photons due to non-radiative recombination, has been applied to PbS CQD thin films for the analysis of charge transport properties. Linear excitation intensity responses of PCR signals were found in the reported experimental conditions. The type and influence of trap states in the coupled PbS CQD thin film were analyzed with PCR temperature- and time-dependent results.

  8. Modelling and measurements of power losses and turbulence intensity in wind turbine wakes at Middelgrunden offshore wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Nielsen, Niels Morten;

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of power losses and turbulence increase due to wind turbine wake interactions in large offshore wind forms is crucial to optimizing wind farm design. Power losses and turbulence increase due to wakes are quantified based on observations from Middel-grunden and state-of-the-art models....... Observed power losses due solely to wakes are approximately 10% on average. These are relatively high for a single line of wind turbines due in part to the close spacing of the wind farm. The wind form model Wind Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) is shown to capture wake losses despite operating...... beyond its specifications for turbine spacing. The paper describes two methods of estimating turbulence intensity. one based on the mean and standard deviation (SD) of wind speed from the nacelle anemometer, the other from mean power output and its SD. Observations from the nacelle anemometer indicate...

  9. Models and measurements of light intensity changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy: implications for optical monitoring of the coagulation boundary location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a multi-region spherical Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate the dynamic changes in light intensity measured during laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT). Model predictions were validated experimentally in tissue-simulating albumen phantoms with well-characterized optical properties that vary dynamically with LITT in a way similar to tissue. For long treatments (2.5 W, ∼1800 s), the transient light intensity changes demonstrated better qualitative agreement with a three-region MC model (with an inner layer of fully coagulated optical properties, a middle layer of partially coagulated properties and an outer region of native properties); for short treatments (4 W, ∼240 s), better qualitative agreement was seen with a two-region MC model (with an inner layer of fully coagulated properties and outer region of native properties). These differences were attributed to differences in coagulation formation during low- and high-powered heating regimes, respectively. At the end of heating, a three-region coagulation zone was observed for both heating schemes. Quantitatively, final light intensity changes at the end of heating were compared with changes predicted by both two- and three-region MC for the same experimentally measured coagulation size and found to agree within ∼30% for both models. The developed MC model helps lend insight into the nature of thermal coagulation events occurring for low and high power LITT irradiation schemes

  10. Comment on Airglow observations of the OI 7774 A multiplet at Arecibo during a magnetic storm by Roger G. Burnside, John W. Meriwether and James C. G. Walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Y.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Teixeira, N. R.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements and theoretical calculations of the 7774A and 6300A emissions for Arecibo, Puerto Rico, for May 2-3, 1976 during severe magnetic storm conditions are presented. The 6300 A observations were made with a tilting filter photometer looking at zenith, whereas the 7774A observations were made with a 1.0 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer looking towards the west at an elevation angle of 20 deg. The theoretical calculations of the vertical column intensities of these emissions for this specific night, were performed using vertical electron density profile measurements made with the Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Their results show a reasonably good fit between experimental and theoretical 6300 A emissions. However, for the 7774A emission, there is a discrepancy between the theoretical vertical column intensities and the intensities observed looking west at 70 deg. from the zenith. Possible excitation mechanisms to explain the excess 7774A observed intensities are discussed.

  11. Using the geometric mean fluorescence intensity index method to measure ZAP-70 expression in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YJ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jie Wu, Hui Wang, Jian-Hua Liang, Yi Miao, Lu Liu, Hai-Rong Qiu, Chun Qiao, Rong Wang, Jian-Yong Li Department of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Expression of ζ-chain-associated protein kinase 70 kDa (ZAP-70 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is associated with more aggressive disease and can help differentiate CLL from cases expressing mutated or unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IgHV genes. However, standardizing ZAP-70 expression by flow cytometric analysis has proved unsatisfactory. The key point is that ZAP-70 is weakly expressed with a continuous expression pattern rather than a clear discrimination between positive and negative CLL cells, which means that the resulting judgment is subjective. Thus, in this study, we aimed at assessing the reliability and repeatability of ZAP-70 expression using the geometric mean fluorescence intensity (geo MFI index method based on flow cytometry with 256-channel resolution in a series of 402 CLL patients and to compare ZAP-70 with other biological and clinical prognosticators. According to IgHV mutational status, we were able to confirm that the optimal cut-off point for the geo MFI index was 3.5 in the test set. In multivariate analyses that included the major clinical and biological prognostic markers for CLL, the prognostic impact of ZAP-70 expression appeared to have stronger discriminatory power when the geo MFI index method was applied. In addition, we found that ZAP-70-positive patients according to the geo MFI index method had shorter time to first treatment or overall survival (P=0.0002, P=0.0491. This is the first report showing that ZAP-70 expression can be evaluated by a new approach, the geo MFI index, which could be a useful prognostic method as it is more reliable, less subjective, and therefore better associated with improvement of CLL prognostication

  12. On the measurements of the plasma electron density by relative intensities of resonance and intercombination lines of helium-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron density has been measured in a thin layer of a magnesium laser plasma located along the flame axis in its central region. In this way an influence of an optical thickness on radiation of the resonance line of the Mg 11 helium-like ion is eliminated and a contribution of the flame outer regions into the radiation of this ion is strongly diminished. For the first time under these experimental conditions a correspondence has been achieved between the electron density profile measured from relative intensities of resonance and intercombination lines of the He-like ion and the profile measured from the Stark broadening of H-like ion lines. The method for measuring the electron density by relative intensities of resonance and intercombination radiation lines of helium-like ions may be used in principle for investigations of a plasma with the density up to Nsub(e) approximately 1021 cm-3 containing multicharged ions with the charge of a nucleus of Z approximately 12

  13. Development of new shipborne aureolemeter to measure the intensities of direct and scattered solar radiation on rolling and pitching vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shiobara, Masataka

    2015-10-01

    New shipborne aureolemeter was developed to improve the sun-tracking performance for accurate measurements of not only direct but also circumsolar radiation, even on a vessel weltering. Sun position is determined by a real-time image processing system with a CCD camera. The accuracy of the sun position determination is finer than 0.01°. The radiometer is tracked the sun under a feedback control with the derived sun position. For a sky radiance distribution measurement, the control target position on the CCD camera image is shifted a pixel corresponding to a measuring scattering angle. In the case of a scattering angle larger than 7°, the radiometer's tracking is conducted under feed forward control on the basis of the angle of roll and pitch monitored with a gyroscope. The instrument constants were determined from a Langley plot method. Test observation was conducted onboard the Antarctic research vessel (R/V) Shirase during the 56th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-56; 2014-2015). Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was measured. The measurement of the sky radiance distribution is being analyzed to derive the aerosol optical properties.

  14. Molecular line intensities as measures of cloud masses - I. Sensitivity of CO emissions to physical parameter variations

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, T A; Viti, S; Williams, D A

    2006-01-01

    A reliable estimate of the molecular gas content in galaxies plays a crucial role in determining their dynamical and star-forming properties. However, H2, the dominant molecular species, is difficult to observe directly, particularly in the regions where most molecular gas is thought to reside. Its mass is therefore commonly inferred by assuming a direct proportionality with the integrated intensity of the CO(J=1-0) emission line, using a CO-to-H2 conversion factor, X. Although a canonical value for X is used extensively in such estimates, there is increasing evidence, both theoretical and observational, that the conversion factor may vary by over an order of magnitude under conditions different to those of the local neighbourhood. In an effort to understand the influence of changing environmental conditions on the conversion factor, we derive theoretical estimates of X for a wide range of physical parameters using a photon-dominated region (PDR) time-dependent chemical model, benchmarking key results against...

  15. Experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon-, hydrogen-, and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 50 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angels of 50 and 100 to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. Data for two separate shots were analyzed. For a pure neon gas shot at a power level of 420 TW, the reflectivity of the multilayer at 15 cm decayed rapidly with respect to the still-rising signal of the multilayer at 150 cm. The onset time of the decay corresponded to an integrated dose of 5.27 J/cm2. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer

  16. Mg2SiO4:Tb thermoluminescent phosphor for radiation intensity measurement in TL dating of ancient pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of thermoluminescence (TL) dating in archaecology using pottery samples is reviewed. In fine-grain dating, TL measurements are made on quartz grains in the size range 1 to 8 mm, while in inclusion dating, they are made on quartz grains of size about 0.1 mm diameter. The quartz particles/grains are extracted from the pottery samples. Supralinearity correction is discussed. Methods of measuring beta dose rate and gamma dose rate of the pottery samples are briefly described. Out of the various phosphors surveyed for environmental gamma dose rate measurements, Mg2SiO4: Tb phosphor has been found to be promising on account of its high sensitivity and energy dependence same as that of quartz. (M.G.B.)

  17. Measurements of functional residual capacity during intensive care treatment: the technical aspects and its possible clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, H; Eichler, W

    2009-10-01

    Direct measurement of lung volume, i.e. functional residual capacity (FRC) has been recommended for monitoring during mechanical ventilation. Mostly due to technical reasons, FRC measurements have not become a routine monitoring tool, but promising techniques have been presented. We performed a literature search of studies with the key words 'functional residual capacity' or 'end expiratory lung volume' and summarize the physiology and patho-physiology of FRC measurements in ventilated patients, describe the existing techniques for bedside measurement, and provide an overview of the clinical questions that can be addressed using an FRC assessment. The wash-in or wash-out of a tracer gas in a multiple breath maneuver seems to be best applicable at bedside, and promising techniques for nitrogen or oxygen wash-in/wash-out with reasonable accuracy and repeatability have been presented. Studies in ventilated patients demonstrate that FRC can easily be measured at bedside during various clinical settings, including positive end-expiratory pressure optimization, endotracheal suctioning, prone position, and the weaning from mechanical ventilation. Alveolar derecruitment can easily be monitored and improvements of FRC without changes of the ventilatory setting could indicate alveolar recruitment. FRC seems to be insensitive to over-inflation of already inflated alveoli. Growing evidence suggests that FRC measurements, in combination with other parameters such as arterial oxygenation and respiratory compliance, could provide important information on the pulmonary situation in critically ill patients. Further studies are needed to define the exact role of FRC in monitoring and perhaps guiding mechanical ventilation. PMID:19681779

  18. Measurement of intensity-dependent rates of above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measured rates of multiphoton ionization (MPI) from the ground state of atomic hydrogen by a linearly polarized, subpicosecond KrF laser pulse at 248 nm wavelength are compared to predictions of lowest-order perturbation theory, Floquet theory, and Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss (KFR) theory with and without Coulomb correction for peak irradiance of 3 x 1012W/cm2 to 2 x 1014W/cm2. The Coulomb-corrected Keldysh model falls closest to the measured rates, the others being much higher or much lower. At 5 x 1013W/cm2, the number of ATI electrons decreased by a factor of approximately 40 with each additional photon absorbed. ATI of the molecular hydrogen background and of atoms from photodissociation of the molecules were also observed. The experiment employed a crossed-beam technique at ultrahigh vacuum with an rf-discharge atomic hydrogen source and a magnetic-bottle type electron time-of-flight spectrometer to count the electrons in the different ATI channels separately. The apparatus was calibrated to allow comparison of absolute as well as relative ionization rates to the theoretical predictions. This calibration involved measuring the distribution of irradiance in a focal volume that moved randomly and changed its size from time to time. A data collection system under computer control divided the time-of-flight spectra into bins according to the energy of each laser pulse. This is the first measurement of absolute rates of ATI in atomic hydrogen, and the first measurement of absolute test of MPI in atomic hydrogen without a large factor to account for multiple modes in the laser field. As such, the results of this work are important to the development of ATI theories, which presently differ by orders of magnitude in their prediction of the ionization rates. They are also important to recent calculations of temperatures in laser-heated plasmas, many of which incorporate KFR theory

  19. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 50 and 100 to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm2 and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm2. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs

  20. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockaday, M.Y.P.

    1987-06-01

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 5/sup 0/ and 10/sup 0/ to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm/sup 2/ and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm/sup 2/. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p < 0.041). The fact that there is a substantial difference between agar and fat implies that non-invasive all-ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning. PMID:26489364

  2. Use of a lowest intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for the measurement of directional Compton profiles of ZnSe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report on electron momentum densities in ZnSe using Compton scattering technique. For the directional measurements we have employed a newly developed 100 mCi 241Am Compton spectrometer which is based on a small disc source with shortest geometry. For the theoretical calculations we have employed a self-consistent Hartree-Fock linear combination of atomic orbitals (HF-LCAO) approach. It is seen that the anisotropy in the measured Compton profiles is well reproduced by our HF-LCAO calculation and the other available pseudopotential data. The anisotropy in the Compton profiles is explained in terms of energy bands and bond length. - PACS numbers: 13.60.Fz, 78.70. Ck, 78.70.-g (orig.)

  3. Measurements of absolute γ-ray intensities in the decays of very neutron rich isotopes of Cd and In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The half lives and the γ-ray branching ratios of neutron rich Cd and In isotopes have been investigated by simultaneous measurements of β- and γ-ray spectra. The results presented contain information on 21 different β-decaying isotopes or isomers of Cd and In in the mass region A=123-129. Four previously unknown or little known isotopes of Cd are reliably characterized for the first time. (orig.)

  4. Standardizing Operational Vector Sampling Techniques for Measuring Malaria Transmission Intensity: Evaluation of six Mosquito Collection Methods in Western Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Jacklyn; Bayoh, Nabie; Olang, George; Killeen, Gerry F.; Hamel, Mary J; Vulule, John M.; Gimnig, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Operational vector sampling methods lack standardization, making quantitative comparisons of malaria transmission across different settings difficult. Human landing catch (HLC) is considered the research gold standard for measuring human-mosquito contact, but is unsuitable for large-scale sampling. This study assessed mosquito catch rates of CDC light trap (CDC-LT), Ifakara tent trap (ITT), window exit trap (WET), pot resting trap (PRT), and box resting trap (BRT) relative to HLC i...

  5. Energy deposition measurements of a large-diameter, intense relativistic electron beam for high-power gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of electron-beam (e-beam) energy deposition in gaseous medium by a segmented totally stopping calorimeter and a pressure jump method are described, both of which gave the same values. Typical e-beam parameters are 2 MV, 80 kA, and 65 ns (FWHM). The e-beam cross-sectional area is 10 cm in diameter. First, the radial distribution of the e-beam current generated from the field-emission diode as a function of the axial magnetic field was measured. Next, for applications to longitudinal excitation of the high-power gas lasers, the e-beam energy deposition characteristics are measured in N2 for the propagation distance up to 2.3 m in terms of the axial magnetic field, the N2 gas pressure, and the radial e-beam distribution. As a result, the axial field equivalent to the self-magnetic field of the electron beam can acceptably control the e-beam generation and propagation uniformities

  6. New line intensity measurements for 12C2H2 around 7.7 µm and HITRAN format line list for applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Laura; Jacquemart, David; Lacome, Nelly; Mandin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    International audience Absolute intensities of 467 lines are measured in 9 bands of the 7.7 µm spectral region of the 12C2H2 molecule, with an average accuracy of 5%. For each band, the vibrational transition dipole moment squared and Herman-Wallis coefficients are obtained in order to model the rotational dependence of the transition dipole moment squared. These results are used to calculate a line list for atmospheric or astrophysical applications. Merged in the line list set up in a pre...

  7. Measurement of intensity-dependent rates of above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, T.D.

    1991-04-01

    Measured rates of multiphoton ionization (MPI) from the ground state of atomic hydrogen by a linearly polarized, subpicosecond KrF laser pulse at 248 nm wavelength are compared to predictions of lowest-order perturbation theory, Floquet theory, and Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss (KFR) theory with and without Coulomb correction for peak irradiance of 3 {times} 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. The Coulomb-corrected Keldysh model falls closest to the measured rates, the others being much higher or much lower. At 5 {times} 10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2}, the number of ATI electrons decreased by a factor of approximately 40 with each additional photon absorbed. ATI of the molecular hydrogen background and of atoms from photodissociation of the molecules were also observed. The experiment employed a crossed-beam technique at ultrahigh vacuum with an rf-discharge atomic hydrogen source and a magnetic-bottle type electron time-of-flight spectrometer to count the electrons in the different ATI channels separately. The apparatus was calibrated to allow comparison of absolute as well as relative ionization rates to the theoretical predictions. This calibration involved measuring the distribution of irradiance in a focal volume that moved randomly and changed its size from time to time. A data collection system under computer control divided the time-of-flight spectra into bins according to the energy of each laser pulse. This is the first measurement of absolute rates of ATI in atomic hydrogen, and the first measurement of absolute test of MPI in atomic hydrogen without a large factor to account for multiple modes in the laser field. As such, the results of this work are important to the development of ATI theories, which presently differ by orders of magnitude in their prediction of the ionization rates. They are also important to recent calculations of temperatures in laser-heated plasmas, many of which incorporate KFR theory.

  8. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  9. Estimation of gadolinium-induced T1-shortening with measurement of simple signal intensity ratio between the cochlea and brain parenchyma on 3D-FLAIR. Correlation with T1 measurement by TI scout sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to T1-shortening of labyrinthine fluid on 3-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) has been reported in many inner ear disorders. Although semi-quantitative assessment by simple signal intensity ratio between cochlear fluid and brain tissue has been tried, its feasibility using a multi-channel phased-array head coil with an inherently inhomogenous sensitivity distribution has not been fully evaluated. We evaluated the feasibility of measuring simple signal intensity ratio by correlating rapid T1 measurements using an inversion time (TI) scout sequence. We evaluated 10 patients with Meniere's disease and 4 patients with sudden deafness. Nine of the patients with Meniere's disease received a unilateral intratympanic injection of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA); the tenth patient received bilateral injections. The 4 patients with sudden deafness received a double-dose intravenous injection. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained 24 hours after intratympanic injections and 4 hours after intravenous injections at 3 tesla using a 32-channel head coil. We measured the ratio (CM ratio) between the signal intensity of the perilymph in the cochlea (C) and that of the medulla oblongata (M) and correlated it with the null-point inversion time (TInull) obtained with the TI scout sequence. The TI scout consisted of 85 images obtained with TI values between 132.5 and 3087.5 ms at increments of 37.5 ms. The correlation coefficient between TInull and the natural logarithm of the CM ratio was -0.88 (P<0.01). There was significant negative linear correlation. Measurement of the simple signal intensity ratio between the cochlea and the medulla can be used for semi-quantitative analysis of 3D-FLAIR. The results of this study may facilitate clinical research of inner-ear disease using 3D-FLAIR. (author)

  10. SMS fiber structure with a multimode fiber graded index type for a temperature measurement using an intensity-based interrogation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufarrikha, Ainun; Hatta, Agus M.; Koentjoro, Sekartedjo

    2015-01-01

    Temperature sensing based on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure with a graded index multimode fiber (GI-MMF) type using an intensity-based interrogation has been investigated numerically and experimentally. The effect of temperature on the SMS fiber structure with the MMF-GI type was modeled using a modal propagation analysis (MPA). The SMS fiber structures for temperature sensor was fabricated and tested with the MMF length of 57 mm. It is demonstrated experimentally, and supported with numerical results, that the sensor showed a sensitivity of 0.063 dB/°C with a temperature measurement range of 175-325°C. This sensor offers simple configuration and low cost of fabrication for the temperature measurement applications.

  11. Circular intensity differential scattering (CIDS) measurements in the soft x-ray region of the spectrum (@16 eV to 500 eV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maestre, M.F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Bustamante, C. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Snyder, P. (Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Rowe, E.; Hansen, R. (Wisconsin Univ., Stoughton, WI (United States). Synchrotron Radiation Center)

    1991-03-01

    We propose the use of recently developed techniques of circular intensity differential scattering (CIDS), as extended to the soft x-ray region of the spectrum (16 eV to 500 eV), to study the higher order organization of the eukaryotic chromosome. CIDS is the difference in scattering power of an object when illuminated by right circularly polarized vs. left circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation of arbitrary wavelength. CIDS has been shown to be a very sensitive measure of the helical organization of the scattering object eg. the eukaryotic chromosome. Preliminary results of measurements of samples of bacteriophages and octopus sperm done at SRC, Wisconsin, show the technique to be very sensitive to the dimensional parameters of the particles interrogated by circularly polarized light. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Measurements of electric field intensities and of the spectrum of electric fluctuations in relativistic electron beam driven turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to obtain data for determining magnitudes and fluctuation spectra of local electric fields within a turbulent plasma. A 600 keV, 15 ka, 1 μs, 50 ns risetime electron beam is injected into a 20 cm diameter, 60 cm long polycarbonate drift tube containing 10/sup 13/ cm /sup -3/ hydrogen or helium plasmas, constrained by a 2 kgauss axial magnetic field. The transfer of beam kinetic energy to resonant plasma modes is accompanied by large, local electric fields, the average magnitude and fluctuation spectra of which cannot be measured by physical probes. A small plasma gun containing alkaline earth carbonates is used to create plasma doped with appropriate ions, or a small 10 kV electron source is used to ionize 1 mtorr of helium gas in the drift tube. The doping ions or the helium atoms and ions are then excited by laser photons to levels sensitive to the Stark effect or to levels that yield electric field stimulated optical transitions in the vicinity of forbidden lines. A 20 MW, 20 ns XeCl excimer laser is used to pump various dyes to achieve the necessary wavelengths and photon fluxes for these experiments

  13. Quantitative measurements on the paleo-weathering intensity of the loess-soil sequences and implication on paleomonsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO; Qingzhen

    2001-01-01

    [1]Liu, T. S., Loess and the Environment, Beijing: China Ocean Press, 1985, 1-251.[2]Chen, L. X., Zhu, Q. G., Luo, H. B. et al., East Asian Monsoon, Beijing: China Meteorology Press, 1991, 28-61.[3]An, Z. S., Liu, T. S., Lu, Y. C. et al., The long-term palaeomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-palaeosol sequence in central China, Quaternary International, 1990, (7/8): 91-95.[4]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Shift of the monsoon intensity on the Loess Plateau at ca. 0.85 MaBP, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1993, 38(2): 586-591.[5]Chen, J., An, Z. S., Wang, Y. J. et al., Distributions of Rb and Sr in the Luochuan loess-paleosol sequence of China during the last 800 ka: Implications for paleomonsoon variations, Science in China, Ser. D, 1999, 42(3): 225-232.[6]Chen, J., Wang, Y. J., Ji, J. F. et al., Rb/Sr variations and its climatic stratigraphical significance of a loess-paleosol profile from Luochuan, Shaanxi Province, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 19(4): 350-356.[7]Guo, Z. T.,Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Climate extremes in loess of China coupled with the strength of deep-water for-mation in the North Atlantic, Global and Planetary Change, 1998, 18: 113-128.[8]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., An, Z. S., Paleosols of the last 0.15 Ma in the Weinan loess section and their paleoclimate signifi-cance, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1994, 14(3): 256-269.[9]Guo, Z, T,, Fedoroff, N., Liu, T. S., Micromorphology of the loess-paleosol sequence of the last 130 ka in China and pa-leoclimatic event, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1996, 26(3): 392-398.[10]Guo, Z., Liu, T., Guiot, J., et al., High frequency pulses of East Asian monsoon climate in the last two glaciations: Link with the North Atlantic, Climate Dynamics, 1996, 12: 701-709.[11]Guo, Z. T., Peng, S. Z., Wei, L. Y. et al., Weathering signals of Millennial-Scale oscillations of the East Asian Summer monsoon over the last 220 ka, Chinese Science

  14. Measuring topology of low-intensity DNA methylation sites for high-throughput assessment of epigenetic drug-induced effects in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic anti-cancer drugs with demethylating effects have shown to alter genome organization in mammalian cell nuclei. The interest in the development of novel epigenetic drugs has increased the demand for cell-based assays to evaluate drug performance in pre-clinical studies. An imaging-based cytometrical approach that can measure demethylation effects as changes in the spatial nuclear distributions of methylated cytosine and global DNA in cancer cells is introduced in this paper. The cells were studied by immunofluorescence with a specific antibody against 5-methylcytosine (MeC), and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) for delineation of methylated sites and global DNA in nuclei. In the preprocessing step the segmentation of nuclei in three-dimensional images (3-D) is followed by an automated assessment of nuclear DAPI/MeC patterns to exclude dissimilar entities. Next, low-intensity MeC (LIM) and low-intensity DNA (LID) sites of similar nuclei are localized and processed to obtain specific nuclear density profiles. These profiles sampled at half of the total nuclear volume yielded two parameters: LIM0.5 and LID0.5. The analysis shows that zebularine and 5-azacytidine-the two tested epigenetic drugs introduce changes in the spatial distribution of low-intensity DNA and MeC signals. LIM0.5 and LID0.5 were significantly different (p < 0.001) in 5-azacytidine treated (n = 660) and zebularine treated (n = 496) vs. untreated (n = 649) DU145 human prostate cancer cells. In the latter case the LIM sites were predominantly found at the nuclear border, whereas treated populations showed different degrees of increase in LIMs towards the interior nuclear space, in which a large portion of heterochromatin is located. The cell-by-cell evaluation of changes in the spatial reorganization of MeC/DAPI signals revealed that zebularine is a more gentle demethylating agent than 5-azacytidine. Measuring changes in the topology of low-intensity sites can potentially be a valuable

  15. Measurement of event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations using strongly intensive measures $\\Delta[P_T, N]$ and $\\Sigma[P_T, N]$ in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T; Bartke, J; Beck, H; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Book, J; Botje, M; Buncic, P; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J; Eckardt, V; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gazdzicki, M; Grebieszkow, K; Hohne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kolesnikov, V; Kowalski, M; Kresan, D; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; van Leeuwen, M; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A; Melkumov, G; Mitrovski, M; Mrowczynski, S; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Puhlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Rustamov, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Seyboth, P; Sikler, F; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Strobele, H; Susa, T; Szuba, M; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A

    2015-01-01

    Results from the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS are presented on event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations of charged particles, produced at forward rapidities in central Pb+Pb interactions at beam momenta 20$A$, 30$A$, 40$A$, 80$A$, and 158$A$ GeV/c, as well as in systems of different size ($p+p$, C+C, Si+Si, and Pb+Pb) at 158$A$ GeV/c. This publication extends the previous NA49 measurements of the strongly intensive measure $\\Phi_{p_T}$ by a study of the recently proposed strongly intensive measures of fluctuations $\\Delta[P_T, N]$ and $\\Sigma[P_T, N]$. In the explored kinematic region transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations show no significant energy dependence in the SPS energy range. However, a remarkable system size dependence is observed for both $\\Delta[P_T, N]$ and $\\Sigma[P_T, N]$, with the largest values measured in peripheral Pb+Pb interactions. The results are compared with NA61/SHINE measurements in $p+p$ collisions, as well as with predictions of the UrQMD and ...

  16. First real-time measurements of N2O isotopic signatures above intensively managed grassland: analytical performance, validation and illustrative examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Benjamin; Tuzson, Béla; Merbold, Lutz; Decock, Charlotte; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Measurement of the four main N2O isotopic species (14N15N16O / 15N14N16O / 14N14N18O / 14N14N16O) has been suggested as a powerful tool to trace the biogeochemical cycle of N2O and to allocate its emission sources. Studies carried out with microbial pure cultures and mixed population systems (Wunderlin et al. 2012) allowed the determination of characteristic isotopic signatures for the most important production processes. These characteristic signatures have been applied to identify relevant sources at different scales (Park et al. 2012). However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution due to the combination of discrete flask sampling in conjunction with laboratory-based mass spectrometric analysis. We recently demonstrated that a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based absorption spectrometer is capable of simultaneously measuring the three main N2O isotopomers at trace levels (Waechter et al. 2008). Furthermore, its potential for in-situ measurements in conjunction with a liquid nitrogen-free preconcentration unit has been proven (Mohn et al. 2012). Here we present results from the first long-term field measurement campaign conducted on intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland during three months. A modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer (Aerodyne Research, Inc.) employing a mid-infrared cw-QCL (4.54 μm) and a novel astigmatic multipass cell with 204 m optical path-length was connected to a N2O preconcentration unit. High analytical performance in combination with the applied calibration strategy resulted in excellent long-term precision of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11o for δ15Nα, δ15Nβ and δ18O which was determined from repeated preconcentration and measurement of target gas from a compressed air tank. This instrumental setup allowed investigating responses of isotopic composition in soil-emitted N2O to management events and weather influences. The accompanying measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, ammonia

  17. FT-IR measurements of mid-IR propene (C3H6) cross sections and far-IR ammonia (NH3) line intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Keeyoon; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John C.; Kwabia Tchana, Fridolin; Manceron, Laurent; Pirali, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    We present spectroscopy measurements of propene (C3H6) in the mid-infrared and ammonia (NH3) in the far-infrared from two different laboratory studies. [1] For propene (CH2-CH-CH3, alias. propylene), which was detected in the stratosphere of Titan [Nixon et al. 2013], temperature dependent cross sections in the 650 - 1530 cm-1 (6.5 - 15.3 μm) have been measured from a series of high-resolution (0.0022 cm-1) spectra of pure and N2-mixture samples of C3H6 recorded at 150 - 296 K at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The observed spectral features cover the strongest v19 band with its outstanding Q-branch peak at 912 cm-1 and three other strong bands of v18, v16 and v7 at 990, 1442, and 1459 cm-1, respectively. In addition, we have generated a HITRAN-format empirical ‘pseudoline list' containing line positions, intensities, and effective lower state energies by fitting all the observed spectra simultaneously. The results are compared with early work from relatively warm temperatures (278 - 323 K). [2] For ammonia (NH3), we obtained multiple sets of high-resolution spectra in the THz and far-infrared region (50 - 650 cm-1) at room temperature using AILES beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL, France (NH3). In this work, we have measured line intensities for more than 4500 transitions, and made quantum assignments for ~2900 lines including ~960 very weak ΔK = 3 forbidden lines. Final results will be compared with the current databases (e.g., HITRAN, GEISA) and ab initio calculations. [Research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Sung and Yu acknowledge the Synchrotron Soleil for the AILES beam line time.

  18. Real-time monitoring of longitudinal electron bunch parameters by intensity-integrated and spectroscopic measurements of single coherent THz pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) generate intense and monochromatic photon pulses with few tens of femtosecond duration. For this purpose, electron beams are accelerated to relativistic energies and shrunk longitudinally down to micrometer size.The diagnosis of theses compressed electron bunches is a challenge especially for MHz bunch repetition rates as provided by the FEL FLASH in Hamburg. In this thesis, coherently emitted THz radiation of single electron bunches were investigated, on which the longitudinal structure is imprinted. Two instruments were used: First, the FLASH bunch compression monitors, relying on the integrated intensity measurement of diffraction radiation, were modified to determine the overall length of every bunch behind the two bunch compressors (BC). A model was developed showing that their response is independent of the exact bunch shape for lengths below 200 μm (rms). This could experimentally be verified in the range between 50 and 190 μm within 7% accuracy for themonitor behind the last BC by comparison with measurements with the transverse deflecting structure (TDS). Second, a single-shot spectrometer with five staged reflective blazed gratings has been designed, build and commissioned. With its two grating sets, the wavelength ranges from 5.5 to 44 μm and 45 to 440 μm can be simultaneously detected by 118 fast pyroelectric elements. Measurements based on transition radiation spectra were compared with profiles recorded by the TDS.The shape of the spectra as well as the reconstructed temporal profiles (using the Kramers-Kronig relation for phase retrieval) are in excellent agreement. For bunches with a charge of 50 pC, bunch lengths down to 5 μm (fhwm) could be detected.

  19. Investigation of gravity wave activity based on NDMC, NDACC and CTBTO measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wüst, S.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Schmidt, C.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Kramer, R.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Bittner, M.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Hauchecorne, A.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; Keckhut, P.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; LePichon, A.; Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA), France; Marchetti, E.; Università degli studi di firenze (UNIFI); Mze, N.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; Pecora, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia

    2014-01-01

    GRIPS (Ground based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer) airglow measurements allow the derivation of kinetic temperature in the mesopause region during night with a temporal resolution of 10s to 15s. Amongst others, these time series can be used for the investigation of atmospheric dynamics like gravity wave activity. GRIPS measurements are performed in the framework of NDMC – the international Network for the Detection of Mesospheric Change. The project ARISE combines NDMC, NDACC (Network for th...

  20. A portable smart phone-based plasmonic nanosensor readout platform that measures transmitted light intensities of nanosubstrates using an ambient light sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Wu, Ze; Xu, Fangxiang; Li, Xiuqing; Yao, Cuize; Xu, Meng; Sheng, Liangrong; Yu, Shiting; Tang, Yong

    2016-05-21

    Plasmonic nanosensors may be used as tools for diagnostic testing in the field of medicine. However, quantification of plasmonic nanosensors often requires complex and bulky readout instruments. Here, we report the development of a portable smart phone-based plasmonic nanosensor readout platform (PNRP) for accurate quantification of plasmonic nanosensors. This device operates by transmitting excitation light from a LED through a nanosubstrate and measuring the intensity of the transmitted light using the ambient light sensor of a smart phone. The device is a cylinder with a diameter of 14 mm, a length of 38 mm, and a gross weight of 3.5 g. We demonstrated the utility of this smart phone-based PNRP by measuring two well-established plasmonic nanosensors with this system. In the first experiment, the device measured the morphology changes of triangular silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs) in an immunoassay for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In the second experiment, the device measured the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in an aptamer-based assay for the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The results from the smart phone-based PNRP were consistent with those from commercial spectrophotometers, demonstrating that the smart phone-based PNRP enables accurate quantification of plasmonic nanosensors. PMID:27137512

  1. The Difference Between Exercise-Induced Autonomic and Fitness Changes Measured After 12 and 20 Weeks of Medium-to-High Intensity Military Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Catharina C; Mongwe, Lot; Janse van Rensburg, Dina C; Fletcher, Lizelle; Wood, Paola S; Terblanche, Etrisia; du Toit, Peet J

    2016-09-01

    Grant, CC, Mongwe, L, Janse van Rensburg, DC, Fletcher, L, Wood, PS, Terblanche, E, and du Toit, PJ. The difference between exercise-induced autonomic and fitness changes measured after 12 and 20 weeks of medium-to-high intensity military training. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2453-2459, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare the physical fitness, based on VO2max and exercise-induced cardiac autonomic changes, measured by heart rate variability (HRV) of 12 weeks with 20 weeks of training in the South African National Defence Force. Recruits (n = 154) participated in a medium-to-high intensity exercise intervention (daily energy expenditure: 8,485 kJ·d). The significant effect on VO2max between weeks 1 and 12 (48.57, SD = 9.25 vs. 53.36, SD = 7.21] did not continue during weeks 12-20 (53.36, SD = 7.21 vs. 53.87, SD = 7.87). No changes in the supine low frequency (LF)/high frequency (HF) (0.48, SD = 0.51 vs. 0.41, SD = 0.64) or the standing LF/HF (4.02, SD = 5.14 vs. 3.91, SD = 5.28), an indicator of autonomic balance and a possible indicator of overtraining syndrome, suggests that overtraining did not take place during weeks 12-20. This was confirmed with further decreases in supine and standing heart rate. However, the power of the vagal-induced variability continued to increase after 12 weeks. Increased vagal influence without concurrent change in autonomic balance may be interpreted as decreased sympathetic cardiac control. It is important to note that although no fitness changes were detected, positive cardiac autonomic conditioning did continue between weeks 12 and 20, as measured by increased vagal-induced HRV and decreased sympathetic influence on cardiac control. Results may be extrapolated to training in the normal population/athletes after a medium-to-high intensity exercise program, as this intervention was a closely monitored and standardized exercise program. PMID:23838980

  2. UV spectral measurements at moderately high resolution and of OH resonance scattering resolved by polarization during the MANTRA 2002-2004 stratospheric balloon flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A moderately high-resolution (<0.1 nm) grating spectrometer designed to measure the solar radiation in the spectral range 295-315 nm was flown on the MANTRA stratospheric balloon payloads of 2002 and 2004. The instrument measures both the direct sunlight and the radiation scattered by the atmosphere. The latter can be observed in two orthogonal polarization directions, at 90 deg. from the solar azimuth and at several elevations above the horizon. As the OH molecule is the principal resonant scatterer in this spectral region, this permits the inference of both ozone and OH column amounts as well as limited profile information. This paper describes the instrument and its in-flight characterization, the basic data processing and the influence of several aspects of the flight profile. The direct sun measurements are analyzed both to characterize the spectrometer responsivity to scattered radiation and to estimate the ozone abundance at the flight altitude and above. An example of a high-resolution solar spectrum at 37 km altitude is presented and compared with others in the literature. The measured OH and Rayleigh-scattered spectra are used to derive OH radiation intensity measurements (the OH airglow), which are compared with others in the literature

  3. UV spectral measurements at moderately high resolution and of OH resonance scattering resolved by polarization during the MANTRA 2002-2004 stratospheric balloon flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasick, D.W. [Air Quality Research Division, Environment Canada, Downsview, ON, M3H 5T4 (Canada)], E-mail: david.tarasick@ec.gc.ca; Wardle, D.I.; McElroy, C.T.; McLinden, C. [Air Quality Research Division, Environment Canada, Downsview, ON, M3H 5T4 (Canada); Brown, S.; Solheim, B. [Solar Terrestrial Physics Laboratory, Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    A moderately high-resolution (<0.1 nm) grating spectrometer designed to measure the solar radiation in the spectral range 295-315 nm was flown on the MANTRA stratospheric balloon payloads of 2002 and 2004. The instrument measures both the direct sunlight and the radiation scattered by the atmosphere. The latter can be observed in two orthogonal polarization directions, at 90 deg. from the solar azimuth and at several elevations above the horizon. As the OH molecule is the principal resonant scatterer in this spectral region, this permits the inference of both ozone and OH column amounts as well as limited profile information. This paper describes the instrument and its in-flight characterization, the basic data processing and the influence of several aspects of the flight profile. The direct sun measurements are analyzed both to characterize the spectrometer responsivity to scattered radiation and to estimate the ozone abundance at the flight altitude and above. An example of a high-resolution solar spectrum at 37 km altitude is presented and compared with others in the literature. The measured OH and Rayleigh-scattered spectra are used to derive OH radiation intensity measurements (the OH airglow), which are compared with others in the literature.

  4. Increased signal intensity of velocity measurements in duplex sonography by using the contrast agent Levovist trademark: a prospective, randomized study in a fetal sheep model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential diagnostic advantages of the contrast agent Levovist trademark for signal enhancement of small adjoining fetal vessels and to study the effect of Levovist trademark before and during acute fetal hypoxia on the fetal circulation and the fetal blood flow velocities. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized study was performed in 12 fetal sheep before and during acute fetal hypoxia produced by complete occlusion of the maternal common iliac artery. Two groups of animals were studied, comprising animals with (study group, n = 6) and without (control group, n = 6) Levovist trademark. In the study group, Levovist trademark was administered intravenously by a pump (modified IVAC P 4000, Schering, Berlin). Duration and intensity of signal enhancement were measured in the fetal aorta, the common carotid artery and the ophthalmic artery of both groups before and during hypoxia. Concurrently, fetal heart rates as well as systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities in all three vessels were recorded in both groups. Results: The increased signal intensity of up to 15 dB in the study group resulted in improved differentiation and imaging quality of adjoining small fetal vessels when compared with the control group. Neither before nor during acute hypoxia, significant differences of the fetal heart rate and the systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities were observed between the two groups (p > 0.05). In the study group, no emboli were caused by Levovist trademark in any fetal issue or in the placenta. (orig.)

  5. Atmospheric CO2 Column Measurements with an Airborne Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave 1.57-micron Fiber Laser Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Jeremy T.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Browell, Edward V.; Lin, Bing; McGregor, Doug; Kooi, Susan; Choi, Yonghoon; Ismail, Syed

    2013-01-01

    The 2007 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space recommended Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term, Tier II, NASA space mission. ITT Exelis, formerly ITT Corp., and NASA Langley Research Center have been working together since 2004 to develop and demonstrate a prototype Laser Absorption Spectrometer for making high-precision, column CO2 mixing ratio measurements needed for the ASCENDS mission. This instrument, called the Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), operates in an intensity-modulated, continuous-wave mode in the 1.57- micron CO2 absorption band. Flight experiments have been conducted with the MFLL on a Lear-25, UC-12, and DC-8 aircraft over a variety of different surfaces and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Very high-precision CO2 column measurements resulting from high signal-to-noise (great than 1300) column optical depth measurements for a 10-s (approximately 1 km) averaging interval have been achieved. In situ measurements of atmospheric CO2 profiles were used to derive the expected CO2 column values, and when compared to the MFLL measurements over desert and vegetated surfaces, the MFLL measurements were found to agree with the in situ-derived CO2 columns to within an average of 0.17% or approximately 0.65 ppmv with a standard deviation of 0.44% or approximately 1.7 ppmv. Initial results demonstrating ranging capability using a swept modulation technique are also presented.

  6. PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China, in June 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Inomata

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we continuously measured non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006, using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z 17 to m/z 300 during 12–30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The ΔNMVOCs/ΔCO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001 and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007 and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007.

  7. Measurement of flux intensity and epithermal fluence in the neighbourhood of 1 keV (two P-Cu detector method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of epithermal intensity, in the 0.5 to a few tens of eV using conventional resonating detectors: Pu, Lu, In, Au, etc..., is carried out in an energy range which is of little interest from the point of view of radiation damage studies. It is for this reason that we have attempted to measure the flux per unit of lethargy in the region of one keV independently of any consideration concerning the shape of the spectrum, as long it is declining. This method can be summarized as a subtraction: from the total activity of a detector resonating at one keV (copper) is subtracted the activity which does not correspond to its resonances using a second detector whose cross-section is in 1/v (phosphorus). By using B4C as screen it is possible to have a cut-off at about 100 eV and thus to improve the accuracy. It is also shown that a calibration using cobalt allows a direct measurement of the epithermal flux in the keV region. (author)

  8. Ammonia fluxes in relation to cutting and fertilization of an intensively managed grassland derived from an inter-comparison of gradient measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milford, C.; Theobald, M. R.; Nemitz, E.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Horvath, L.; Raso, J.; Dämmgen, U.; Neftel, A.; Jones, S. K.; Hensen, A.; Loubet, B.; Cellier, P.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    Quantification of ammonia (NH3) land-atmosphere exchange is required for atmospheric modelling and assessment of nitrogen deposition, yet flux measurement methods remain highly uncertain. To address this issue, a major inter-comparison of ammonia fluxes over intensively managed grassland was conducted during the GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment held in Braunschweig, Germany. In order to provide a robust dataset of ammonia exchange with the vegetation, four independent continuous flux gradient systems were operated. Three independently operated continuous wet denuders systems (AMANDA) were compared with a Wet Effluent Diffusion Denuder (mini-WEDD) system. Measurements were made at two distances from an adjacent livestock farm, allowing effects of advection to be quantified in a real landscape setting. Data treatment included filtering for instrument failure, disturbed wind sectors and unsuitable micrometeorological conditions, with corrections made for storage and advection errors. The inter-comparison demonstrated good agreement in measured ammonia concentrations and fluxes (relative standard error <20%) for some periods, although the performance of the ammonia analyzers were variable, with much poorer agreement on particular days. However, by using four systems, the inter-comparison was able to provide a robust mean estimate of continuous ammonia fluxes through the experiment. The observed fluxes were: a) small bi-directional fluxes prior to cutting (-64 to 42 ng NH3 m-2 s-1), b) larger diurnally-varying emissions following cutting (-49 to 703 ng NH3 m-2 s-1) and c) much larger emissions following fertilizer application (0 to 3820 ng NH3 m-2 s-1). The results are a salutary reminder of the uncertainty in unreplicated ammonia flux measurements, while the replication of the present study provides a uniquely robust dataset for the evaluation of ammonia exchange processes. It is clear that consistently reliable determination of ammonia concentrations remains the major

  9. HIRISE observations of daytime aurora over boston from ground in response to the magnetic disturbance of october 30, 2003 as corroborated by the TIMED measurements from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallamraju, D.; Chakrabarti, S.

    HIRISE (High Resolution Imaging Spectrograph using Echelle grating) is a high-resolution spectrograph built at Boston University, which is capable of making unambiguous ground-based daytime airglow/aurora measurements. HIRISE has been making daytime red line (OI 630.0nm) emission measurements from Boston (42.2° N, 71° W) on all clear sky days since April 2003. On October 30, 2003, in response to a severe geomagnetic disturbance, HIRISE measured intense daytime red line emissions of 15 KR (scattered background continuum around 2 MRÅ-1)^at 1500 LT (2000 UT; SZA around 75°), which are a factor of 6 -- 8 greater when compared to the typical quiet time dayglow emission rates at that time. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz stayed negative throughout that day but showed a monotonic increase from --20 nT at 0 UT to --15 nT by 24 UT. IMF By was mostly positive (around 5 nT) throughout the day, which is known to move the precipitation/interaction region towards postnoon time, raising interest on whether the magnetospheric cusps moved as far down to mid-latitudes on this day. GUVI (Global UltraViolet Imager) onboard TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite showed nearly an order of magnitude enhancements in irradiances of 1356 and LBH emissions during this time as compared to the quiet time values. Comparison against TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) brightness data will also be made. These different simultaneous measurements will be presented.

  10. Intensive mobilities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this...

  11. Comparative study of temperature measurements in ex vivo swine muscle and a tissue-mimicking material during high intensity focused ultrasound exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) can provide a convenient, stable, and reproducible means for testing high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices. When TMMs containing thermal sensors are used to measure ultrasound-induced temperature rise, it is important that measurement results reasonably represent those that occur in biological tissue. Therefore the aim of this paper is to compare the thermal behavior of the TMM under HIFU exposure to that of ex vivo tissue. This was accomplished using both a previously developed TMM and fresh ex vivo swine muscle that were instrumented with bare 50 µm thin wire thermocouples. HIFU at 825 kHz was focused at the thermocouple junction. 30 s exposures of increasing peak negative pressure (1 to 5 MPa) were applied and the temperature profile during and after sonication was recorded. B-mode imaging was used to monitor bubble activity during sonication. If bubble formation was noted during the sonication, the sonication was repeated at the same pressure levels two more times at 20 min intervals. Temperature traces obtained at various pressure levels demonstrated similar types of heating profiles in both the tissue and TMM, the exact nature of which depended on whether bubbles formed during the HIFU exposure. The onset of bubble activity occurred at lower ultrasonic pressures in the TMM, but the basic temperature rise features due to HIFU exposure were essentially the same for both materials. (paper)

  12. Combination of signal intensity measurements of lesions in the peripheral zone of prostate with MRI and serum PSA level for differentiating benign disease from prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to predict the benign or malignant nature of a prostatic lesion by defining a threshold value of signal intensity ratio and a limiting value of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with elevated PSA level. Twenty-six patients with elevated PSA level and no hypoechogenic lesions at endosonography underwent MR imaging using an endorectal body phased-array coil at 1.5 T (Siemens Magnetom Symphony). A T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) pulse sequence was applied in a transverse orientation. Two radiologists evaluated the images. In the presence of a pathological finding they defined regions of interest (ROI) in the suspicious pathological area of the peripheral zone and in muscle for reference. The quotient of the two ROIs was calculated and then correlated with the actual PSA level. Diagnosis was confirmed by prostate biopsy. Ten of 12 patients with quotients smaller than 4 showed cancer at histology. Nine of 12 men with cancer proven by biopsy had PSA levels higher than 10 ng/ml. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found between the quotients of cancer and quotients of chronic prostatitis, fibrosis, or glandular atrophy. The accuracy of tumor differentiation of the method was 77 %. Measurement of signal intensity quotients in the peripheral zone of the prostate in combination with knowledge of defined limits of PSA levels the technique could be helpful in detecting additional cancer areas for prostate biopsy. False-negative tumor results of standard sextant biopsy can be reduced. In men with high PSA values the method has a role in differentiating between patients who require prostate biopsy and those of clinical observation. (orig.)

  13. PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China, in June 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Inomata

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we performed on-line measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006, using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS. Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z17 to m/z 300 during 12–30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. In combination with non-methane hydrocarbon data obtained by a gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, it was found that oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. Diurnal variations depending mainly on local photochemistry were observed during 24–28 June. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The ΔNMVOCs/ΔCO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode (with biomass burning (BB plume and during 16–23 June (without BB plume are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001 and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007 and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007.

  14. Use of a blood gas analyzer and a laboratory autoanalyzer in routine practice to measure electrolytes in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budak Yasemin U

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrolyte values are measured in most critically ill intensive care unit (ICU patients using both an arterial blood gas analyzer (ABG and a central laboratory auto-analyzer (AA. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether electrolyte levels assessed using an ABG and an AA were equivalent; data on sodium and potassium ion concentrations were examined. Methods We retrospectively studied patients hospitalized in the ICU between July and August 2011. Of 1,105 test samples, we identified 84 instances of simultaneous sampling of arterial and venous blood, where both Na+ and K+ levels were measured using a pHOx Stat Profile Plus L blood gas analyzer (Nova Biomedical, Waltham MA, USA and a Roche Modular P autoanalyzer (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany. Statistical measures employed to compare the data included Spearman's correlation coefficients, paired Student’s t-tests, Deming regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean sodium concentration was 138.1 mmol/L (SD 10.2 mmol/L using the ABG and 143.0 mmol/L (SD 10.5 using the AA (p + and Na+, with biases of 0.150-0.352 and −0.97-10.05 respectively; the associated correlation coefficients were 0.88 and 0.90. Conclusions We conclude that the ABG and AA do not yield equivalent Na+ and K+ data. Concordance between ABG and AA should be established prior to introduction of new ABG systems.

  15. Decomposition analysis of the variations in residential electricity consumption in Brazil for the 1980-2007 period. Measuring the activity, intensity and structure effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achao, Carla; Schaeffer, Roberto [Energy Planning Program, Post-Graduate School of Engineering (COPPE), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco C, Sala 211, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    Introduced at the end of the 1970s to study the impacts of structural changes on electricity consumption by industry, index decomposition analysis techniques have been extended to various other areas to help in the formulation of energy policies, notably in developed countries. However, few authors have applied these techniques to study the evolution of energy consumption in developing countries. In Brazil, the few available studies have focused only on the industrial sector. In this article, we apply the decomposition technique called the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) to electricity consumption of the Brazilian residential sector, to explain its evolution in terms of the activity, structure and intensity affects, over the period from 1980 to 2007. The technique is sufficiently robust and flexible to perform this analysis, by disaggregating residential consumers by consumption classes and regions of the country. Among the main results is measurement of the impact of government programs for income transfer and universal service on variations in residential consumption, typical of developing countries. (author)

  16. Decomposition analysis of the variations in residential electricity consumption in Brazil for the 1980-2007 period: Measuring the activity, intensity and structure effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achao, Carla [Energy Planning Program, Post-Graduate School of Engineering (COPPE), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco C, Sala 211, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Schaeffer, Roberto, E-mail: roberto@ppe.ufrj.b [Energy Planning Program, Post-Graduate School of Engineering (COPPE), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco C, Sala 211, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    Introduced at the end of the 1970s to study the impacts of structural changes on electricity consumption by industry, index decomposition analysis techniques have been extended to various other areas to help in the formulation of energy policies, notably in developed countries. However, few authors have applied these techniques to study the evolution of energy consumption in developing countries. In Brazil, the few available studies have focused only on the industrial sector. In this article, we apply the decomposition technique called the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) to electricity consumption of the Brazilian residential sector, to explain its evolution in terms of the activity, structure and intensity affects, over the period from 1980 to 2007. The technique is sufficiently robust and flexible to perform this analysis, by disaggregating residential consumers by consumption classes and regions of the country. Among the main results is measurement of the impact of government programs for income transfer and universal service on variations in residential consumption, typical of developing countries.

  17. Decomposition analysis of the variations in residential electricity consumption in Brazil for the 1980-2007 period: Measuring the activity, intensity and structure effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduced at the end of the 1970s to study the impacts of structural changes on electricity consumption by industry, index decomposition analysis techniques have been extended to various other areas to help in the formulation of energy policies, notably in developed countries. However, few authors have applied these techniques to study the evolution of energy consumption in developing countries. In Brazil, the few available studies have focused only on the industrial sector. In this article, we apply the decomposition technique called the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) to electricity consumption of the Brazilian residential sector, to explain its evolution in terms of the activity, structure and intensity affects, over the period from 1980 to 2007. The technique is sufficiently robust and flexible to perform this analysis, by disaggregating residential consumers by consumption classes and regions of the country. Among the main results is measurement of the impact of government programs for income transfer and universal service on variations in residential consumption, typical of developing countries.

  18. UV–Visible intensity ratio (aggregates/single particles) as a measure to obtain stability of gold nanoparticles conjugated with protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the titration process of gold nanoparticles with several amounts of protein A (0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, 6, and 9 μg/ml) in the presence of NaCl, which induces aggregation if the surface of particles is not fully covered with protein A. The colloidal solutions with different particle size (16, 18, 20, 33 nm) were synthesized by citrate reduction to be conjugated with protein A. UV–Visible spectroscopy was used to measure the absorption of the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles as a function of the concentration of protein A. Such dependence shows an aggregation region (0 < x<6 μg/ml), where the amount of protein A was insufficient to cover the surface of particles, obtaining aggregation caused by NaCl. The next part is the stability region (x ≥ 6 μg/ml), where the amount of protein used covers the surface of particles and protects it from the aggregation. In addition to that the ratio between the intensities of both: the aggregates and of the gold nanoparticle bands was plotted as a function of the concentration of protein A. It was determined that 6 μg/ml is a sufficient value of protein A to stabilize the gold nanoparticle–protein A system. This method provides a simple way to stabilize gold nanoparticles obtained by citrate reduction, with protein A.

  19. UV-Visible intensity ratio (aggregates/single particles) as a measure to obtain stability of gold nanoparticles conjugated with protein A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Corripio, M. A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, CIBA-Tlaxcala (Mexico); Garcia-Perez, B. E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Inmunologia, ENCB (Mexico); Jaramillo-Flores, M. E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, ENCB (Mexico); Gayou, V. L.; Rojas-Lopez, M., E-mail: marlonrl@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, CIBA-Tlaxcala (Mexico)

    2013-05-15

    We have analyzed the titration process of gold nanoparticles with several amounts of protein A (0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, 6, and 9 {mu}g/ml) in the presence of NaCl, which induces aggregation if the surface of particles is not fully covered with protein A. The colloidal solutions with different particle size (16, 18, 20, 33 nm) were synthesized by citrate reduction to be conjugated with protein A. UV-Visible spectroscopy was used to measure the absorption of the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles as a function of the concentration of protein A. Such dependence shows an aggregation region (0 < x<6 {mu}g/ml), where the amount of protein A was insufficient to cover the surface of particles, obtaining aggregation caused by NaCl. The next part is the stability region (x {>=} 6 {mu}g/ml), where the amount of protein used covers the surface of particles and protects it from the aggregation. In addition to that the ratio between the intensities of both: the aggregates and of the gold nanoparticle bands was plotted as a function of the concentration of protein A. It was determined that 6 {mu}g/ml is a sufficient value of protein A to stabilize the gold nanoparticle-protein A system. This method provides a simple way to stabilize gold nanoparticles obtained by citrate reduction, with protein A.

  20. Response measurement of single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond radiation detector for intense X-rays aiming at neutron bang-time and neutron burn-history measurement on an inertial confinement fusion with fast ignition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimaoka, T; Kaneko, J H; Arikawa, Y; Isobe, M; Sato, Y; Tsubota, M; Nagai, T; Kojima, S; Abe, Y; Sakata, S; Fujioka, S; Nakai, M; Shiraga, H; Azechi, H; Chayahara, A; Umezawa, H; Shikata, S

    2015-05-01

    A neutron bang time and burn history monitor in inertial confinement fusion with fast ignition are necessary for plasma diagnostics. In the FIREX project, however, no detector attained those capabilities because high-intensity X-rays accompanied fast electrons used for plasma heating. To solve this problem, single-crystal CVD diamond was grown and fabricated into a radiation detector. The detector, which had excellent charge transportation property, was tested to obtain a response function for intense X-rays. The applicability for neutron bang time and burn history monitor was verified experimentally. Charge collection efficiency of 99.5% ± 0.8% and 97.1% ± 1.4% for holes and electrons were obtained using 5.486 MeV alpha particles. The drift velocity at electric field which saturates charge collection efficiency was 1.1 ± 0.4 × 10(7) cm/s and 1.0 ± 0.3 × 10(7) cm/s for holes and electrons. Fast response of several ns pulse width for intense X-ray was obtained at the GEKKO XII experiment, which is sufficiently fast for ToF measurements to obtain a neutron signal separately from X-rays. Based on these results, we confirmed that the single-crystal CVD diamond detector obtained neutron signal with good S/N under ion temperature 0.5-1 keV and neutron yield of more than 10(9) neutrons/shot. PMID:26026521

  1. Peripheral dose measurements with diode and thermoluminescence dosimeters for intensity modulated radiotherapy delivered with conventional and un-conventional linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kinhikar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to measure the peripheral dose (PD with diode and thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with linear accelerator (conventional LINAC, and tomotherapy (novel LINAC. Ten patients each were selected from Trilogy dual-energy and from Hi-Art II tomotherapy. Two diodes were kept at 20 and 25 cm from treatment field edge. TLDs (LiF:MgTi were also kept at same distance. TLDs were also kept at 5, 10, and 15 cm from field edge. The TLDs were read with REXON reader. The readings at the respective distance were recorded for both diode and TLD. The PD was estimated by taking the ratio of measured dose at the particular distance to the prescription dose. PD was then compared with diode and TLD for LINAC and tomotherapy. Mean PD for LINAC with TLD and diode was 2.52 cGy (SD 0.69, 2.07 cGy (SD 0.88 at 20 cm, respectively, while at 25 cm, it was 1.94 cGy (SD 0.58 and 1.5 cGy (SD 0.75, respectively. Mean PD for tomotherapy with TLD and diode was 1.681 cGy SD 0.53 and 1.58 (SD 0.44 at 20 cm, respectively. The PD was 1.24 cGy (SD 0.42 and 1.088 cGy (SD 0.35 at 25 cm, respectively, for tomotherapy. Overall, PD from tomotherapy was found lower than LINAC by the factor of 1.2-1.5. PD measurement is essential to find out the potential of secondary cancer. PD for both (conventional LINAC and novel LINACs (tomotherapy were measured and compared with each other. The comparison of the values for PD presented in this work and those published in the literature is difficult because of the different experimental conditions. The diode and TLD readings were reproducible and both the detector readings were comparable.

  2. Quantitative Measurements of Photocatalytic CO-Oxidation as a Function of Light Intensity and Wavelength over TiO2 Nanotube Thin Films in mu-Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; In, Su-il; Olsen, Jacob L.; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Abrams, Billie; Hou, Yidong; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Hansen, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase photooxidation of CO over TiO2 catalysts (P25 and TiO2 nanotubes) in mu-reactors with quantitative product detection was used to study turnover as a function of illumination intensity over 4 orders of magnitude. Turnover was found to be of order 0.84 in illumination intensity. A CO phot...

  3. 公民的基本科学素质及其测评%A Study on Civic Scientific Literacy:Intension,Basic Standard and Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼伟

    2014-01-01

    公民科学素质测评,是衡量公民自身科学素质的主要手段,也是国家实施全民科学素质行动计划的重要参考。开展公民科学素质测评,既要借鉴国外相关经验和成果,有利于国际比较,也要结合我国国情,客观反映我国公民具备基本科学素质的水平以及是否达到了提高科学素质的目标要求。本研究试图通过对国内外关于公民科学素质概念的构成分析,探讨适合我国国情的公民基本科学素质的内涵、基本标准及其测评方式,并尝试从“内容”和“程度”两个维度建立我国公民科学素质测评的六要素模型以及三级指标体系。%The measurement of civic scientific literacy, estimating the level of civic scientific literacy, provides an important reference for the implementation of the National Scheme for Scientific Literacy. The measure used in our country should be created based on a combination of abroad experience and achievements with specific conditions of the country, which can not only facilitate the international comparison,but also reflect the level of public scientific literacy in our country and judge whether the desired goal of increasing scientific literacy have been achieved. This paper aims to: 1) analyze the structure of conceptions civic scientific literacy from both domestic and abroad,2) explore the intension, basic standard and measurement of civic scientific literacy that are suitable for conditions in China,and 3) establish a six-element model and a three-level-index system from two dimensions of“content”and“degree”for evaluating public scientific literacy in China.

  4. Simultaneous measurements of dark band structures in the OI 630 nm emission all-sky images associated with Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Perkins instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Using ground-based measurements we investigate the simultaneous occurrence of dark band structures in the OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Perkins instability. This is the first reported observation related to the quasi north-south aligned intensity depletion bands (plasma bubble) simultaneously with the presence of medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) in the tropical region using OI 630 nm nightglow emission all-sky images. On February 27-28, 2006, the OI 630 nm emission all-sky images obtained at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7 deg S, 45.0 deg W), Brazil, were used to map the spatial and temporal locations of plasma bubble and MSTIDs in the bottomside of the F-region. The ionospheric plasma bubble zonal drift measured by the all-sky imaging showed that it moved to eastward with average speed of 50 m/s, whereas MSTIDs moved from southeast to northwest with average speed of about 40 m/s. Also, digisonde observations registered abrupt increases in both the F-layer peak height (hmF2) and base height (h'F) when the MSTIDs passed over Cachoeira Paulista. It should be pointed out that these thermospheric/ionospheric events are not related to geomagnetic disturbed conditions. In this work, we present and discuss the dynamics of these kind airglow structures and their effects in the thermosphere/ionosphere dynamics.

  5. Global modeling of 13C16O2 absolute line intensities from CW-CRDS and FTS measurements in the 1.6 and 2.0 μm regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line intensities of 13C16O2 have been measured between 5851 and 6580 cm-1 using CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) and in the 4700-5050 and 6050-6850 cm-1 regions using Fourier transform spectroscopy. As a result of the high sensitivity (noise equivalent absorption αmin∼3x10-10 cm-1) and high dynamics allowed by CW-CRDS, accurate line intensities of 2039 transitions ranging between 1.1x10-28 and 1.3x10-23 cm-1/(molecule cm-2) were measured with an average accuracy of 4%. These transitions belong to a total of 48 bands corresponding to the ΔP=9 series of transitions. Additionally, unapodized absorption spectra of 13C-enriched samples have been recorded using a high-resolution Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform spectrometer. Spectral resolutions of 0.004 cm-1 (maximum optical path difference (MOPD)=225 cm) and 0.007 cm-1 (MOPD=128.6 cm), and pressurexpath length products in the ranges 5.2-12 and 69-450 hPaxm have been used for the lower and higher energy spectral regions, respectively. Absolute line intensities have been measured in the 2001i-00001, 3001i-00001 (i=1, 2, 3) and 00031-00001 bands. An excellent agreement was achieved for the line intensities of the 3001i-00001 (i=1, 2, 3) bands measured by both FTS and CW-CRDS. The CW-CRDS and FTS experimental intensity data together with selected intensity information from the literature have been fitted simultaneously using the effective operators approach. Two sets of effective dipole moment parameters have thus been obtained, which reproduce the observed line intensities in the 2.0 and 1.6 μm regions within experimental uncertainties

  6. Climatology of planetary wave type oscillations with periods of 2–20 days derived from O2 atmospheric and OH(6-2 airglow observations at mid-latitude with SATI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Aushev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of planetary wave type oscillations at mid-latitudes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region has been investigated using airglow observations. The observations were taken with a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI installed at Sierra Nevada Observatory (37.06° N, 3.38° W at 2900 m height. Airglow data of the column emission rate of the O2 Atmospheric (0-1 band and of the OH Meinel (6-2 band and deduced rotational temperatures from 1998 to 2007 have been used in this study. From these observations a climatology of planetary wave type oscillations at this location is inferred. It has been found that the planetary wave type oscillations of 5-day period is predominant in our data throughout the year, with activity greater than 50% during March/April and October/November months. The planetary wave type oscillations of 2-day period is predominant during both solstices, being predominant during winter solstice in O2 while a 10-day oscillation appears throughout the year with activity around 20% and with maximum activity during spring and autumn equinoxes. The 16-day oscillation has maximum occurrence during autumn-winter while its activity is almost disappeared during spring-summer. No clear seasonal dependence of the amplitude of the planetary wave type oscillations was observed in the cases considered in this study. The waves simultaneously detected in the rotational temperatures deduced from both OH and O2 emissions usually show an upward energy propagation and are affected by dissipation processes.

  7. Climatology of planetary wave type oscillations with periods of 2-20 days derived from O{sub 2} atmospheric and OH(6-2) airglow observations at mid-latitude with SATI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.J.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Costa, V. [CSIC, Granada (Spain). Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia; Shepherd, M.G.; Shepherd, G.G.; Sargoytchev, S. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Centre for Research in Earth and Space Science; Aushev, V.M. [National Centre of Space Research and Technology, National Space Agency, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Dept. Inst. of Ionosphere

    2009-07-01

    The presence of planetary wave type oscillations at mid-latitudes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region has been investigated using airglow observations. The observations were taken with a Spectral Airglow Temperature Imager (SATI) installed at Sierra Nevada Observatory (37.06 N, 3.38 W) at 2900 m height. Airglow data of the column emission rate of the O{sub 2} Atmospheric (0-1) band and of the OH Meinel (6-2) band and deduced rotational temperatures from 1998 to 2007 have been used in this study. From these observations a climatology of planetary wave type oscillations at this location is inferred. It has been found that the planetary wave type oscillations of 5-day period is predominant in our data throughout the year, with activity greater than 50% during March/April and October/November months. The planetary wave type oscillations of 2-day period is predominant during both solstices, being predominant during winter solstice in O{sub 2} while a 10-day oscillation appears throughout the year with activity around 20% and with maximum activity during spring and autumn equinoxes. The 16-day oscillation has maximum occurrence during autumn-winter while its activity is almost disappeared during spring-summer. No clear seasonal dependence of the amplitude of the planetary wave type oscillations was observed in the cases considered in this study. The waves simultaneously detected in the rotational temperatures deduced from both OH and O{sub 2} emissions usually show an upward energy propagation and are affected by dissipation processes. (orig.)

  8. Fluid accumulation threshold measured by acute body weight change after admission in general surgical intensive care units: how much should be concerning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittawatanarat K

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaweesak Chittawatanarat,1 Todsaporn Pichaiya,2 Kamtone Chandacham,1 Tidarat Jirapongchareonlap,1 Narain Chotirosniramit11Division of Surgical Critical Care and Trauma, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandBackground: The objective of this study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351506 was to identify the threshold level of fluid accumulation measured by acute body weight (BW change during the first week in a general surgical intensive care unit (ICU, which is associated with ICU mortality and other adverse outcomes.Methods: Four hundred sixty-five patients were prospectively followed for a 28-day period. The maximum BW change threshold during the first week was evaluated by the maximum percentage change in BW from the ICU admission weight (Max%ΔBW. Daily screening of adverse events in the ICU were recorded. The cutoff point of Max%ΔBW on ICU mortality was defined by considering the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, intersection of the sensitivity and specificity, and the Youden Index. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to demonstrate the associations. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05.Results: The appropriate cutoff value of Max%ΔBW threshold was 5%. Regarding the multivariable regression model, in overall patients, the occurrence of the following adverse events (expressed as adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] were significantly associated with a Max%ΔBW of >5%: ICU mortality (2.38 [1.25–4.54] (P=0.008, ICU mortality in patients without renal replacement therapy (RRT (2.47 [1.21–5.06] (P=0.013, reintubation within 72 hours (2.51 [1.04–6.00] (P=0.039, RRT requirement (2.67 [1.13–6.33] (P=0.026, and delirium (1.97 [1.08–3.57] (P=0.025. Regarding the postoperative subgroup, a Max%ΔBW value of more than 5% was significantly associated with: ICU

  9. Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for dosimetric evaluations of intrafraction motion for gated and ungated intensity modulated arc therapy deliveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mike; Gladwish, Adam; Staruch, Robert; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2008-11-01

    Respiratory gated radiation therapy allows for a smaller margin expansion for the planning target volume (PTV) to account for respiratory induced motion and is emerging as a common method to treat lung and liver tumors. We investigated the dosimetric effect of free motion and gated delivery for intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) with experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The impact of PTV margin and duty cycle for gated delivery is studied with Monte Carlo simulations. A motion phantom is used for this study. Two sets of contours were drawn on the mid-inspiration CT scan of this motion phantom. For each set of contours, an IMAT plan to be delivered with constant dose rate was created. The plans were generated on a CT scan of the phantom in the static condition with 3 mm PTV margin and applied to the motion phantom under four conditions: static, full superior-inferior (SI) motion (A = 1 cm, T = 4 s) and gating conditions (25% and 50% duty cycles) with full SI motion. A 6 by 15 cm piece of radiographic film was placed in the sagittal plane of the phantom and then irradiated under all measurement conditions. Film calibration was performed with a step-wedge method to convert optical density to dose. Gated IMAT delivery was first validated in 2D by comparing static film with that from gating and full motion. A previously verified simulation tool for IMRT that takes the log files from the multileaf collimator (MLC) controller and the gating system were adapted to simulate the delivered IMAT treatment for full 3D dosimetric analysis. The IMAT simulations were validated against the 2D film measurements. The resultant IMAT simulations were evaluated with dose criteria, dose-volume histograms and 3D gamma analysis. We validated gated IMAT deliveries when we compared the static film with the one from gating using 25% duty cycle using 2D gamma analysis. Within experimental and setup uncertainties, film measurements agreed with their corresponding simulated

  10. Activity measurements and gamma emission intensities determination in the decay of Zn{sup 65}; Mesure de l'activite et des intensites des emissions gamma lors de la decroissance du Zn{sup 65}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Amiot, M.N.; Bobin, C.; Lepy, M.C.; Plagnard, J.; Lee, J.M.; Lee, K.B.; Park, T.S.; Luca, A.; Sahagia, M.; Razdolescu, A.M.; Grigorescu, L.; Sato, Y.; Hino, Y.; Kossert, K.; Klein, R.; Schneider, M.H.K.; Schrader, H.; Dryak, P.; Sochorova, J.; Kovar, P.; Auerbach, P.; Havelka, M.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Iwahara, A.; Da Silva, M.A.L.; Delgado, J.U.; Da Silva, C.J.; Johansson, L.; Collins, S.; Stroak, A

    2005-07-01

    Over the last twenty years, a number of laboratories have participated to the Systeme International de Reference (SIR BIPM) and it appeared that the mass activity of {sup 65}Zn determined by the gamma-ray spectrometry was less by about 2% than the one determined by using 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting. An international exercise EUROMET, action 721, was organized with the objective of improving the knowledge of decay data in the {sup 65}Zn disintegration. Nine laboratories participated, sending results for the activity measurement and the 1115 keV gamma emission intensity. For the activity measurement, the participants used the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence method mainly, resulting values and uncertainty budgets are described. From the new gamma emission intensities measured in this exercise and, taking into account previous published values, the intensity of the 1115 keV gamma emission has been determined being equal to: 50.22 (11) %. This new value must lead to derive activity values higher than those previously obtained, reducing the difference, with other techniques of measurement, to 1 %. Moreover, the uncertainty on the emission intensity value has been divided by a factor of two. (authors)

  11. A review on recent upper atmosphere atomic oxygen measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Martin; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin; Zhu, Yajun

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen is a key player in the upper mesosphere lower and thermosphere chemistry, energy balance, and dynamics. In recent years, a few new global datasets of this species have been presented. They are based on airglow measurements from low earth satellites. Surprisingly, the atomic oxygen abundance differs by 30-50% for similar atmospheric conditions. This paper gives an overview on the various atomic oxygen datasets available so far and presents most recent results obtained from measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument on Envisat. Differences between the datasets are discussed.

  12. Measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation of high definition dose evaluation for nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated by using intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) simulation using a high definition (HD) phantom was used to evaluate the dose distribution in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Around nasopharyngeal cavity, there exists many small volume organs-at-risk (OARs) such as the optic nerves, auditory nerves, cochlea, and semicircular canal which necessitate the use of a high definition phantom for accurate and correct dose evaluation. The aim of this research was to study the advantages of using an HD phantom for MBMC simulation in NPC patients treated with IMRT. The MBMC simulation in this study was based on the IMRT treatment plan of three NPC patients generated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) of the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) using a calculation grid of 2 mm2. The NPC tumor was treated to a cumulative dose of 7000 cGy in 35 fractions using the shrinking-field sequential IMRT (SIMRT) method. The BEAMnrc MC Code was used to simulate a Varian EX21 linear accelerator treatment head. The HD phantom contained 0.5 × 0.5 × 1 mm3 voxels for the nasopharyngeal area and 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm3 for the rest of the head area. An efficiency map was obtained for the amorphous silicon aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to adjust the weighting of each particle in the phase-space file for each IMRT beam. Our analysis revealed that small volume organs such as the eighth cranial nerve, semicircular canal, cochlea and external auditory canal showed an absolute dose difference of ≥200 cGy, while the dose difference for larger organs such as the parotid glands and tumor was negligible for the MBMC simulation using the HD phantom. The HD phantom was found to be suitable for Monte Carlo dose volume analysis of small volume organs. - Highlights: • HD dose evaluation for IMRT of NPC patients have been verified by the MC method. • MC results shows higher

  13. CCN in the marine environment: Results from two intensive measurement campaigns - The Eastern North Atlantic (Mace Head) and The Southern Ocean (PEGASO cruise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Fossum, Kirsten; Ceburnis, Darius; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Simo, Rafel; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Marine aerosol occurring in cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) sizes suggest that it may contribute notably to the CCN population [1, 2], but further cloud droplet number concentration would strongly depend on the ambient (cloud) conditions, such as available water content, supersaturation and competition between the CCN of different composition [3]. Since the global importance of marine aerosol particles to the cloud formation was postulated several decades ago [4], it has progressed from the evaluation of the nss-sulphate and sea salt effects to an acknowledgement of the significant role of organic aerosol [5]. It was demonstrated that primary marine organics, despite its hydrophobic nature, can possess the high CCN activation efficiency, resulting in the efficient cloud formation [6]. Results from two intensive measurement campaigns in The Eastern North Atlantic (Mace Head) and The Southern Ocean (PEGASO cruise) is presented here with the main focus on ssCCN dependence on aerosol chemical composition and, especially, origin and sources of marine organic. We investigate the activation of sea spray composed of the sea salt and externally mixed with nss-sulphate as well as the sea spray highly enriched in organics, stressing the importance of the latter to the formation of the cloud droplets. We also explore the suitability of existing theories to explain the marine aerosol activation to CCN. Acknowledgments The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) project BACCHUS under grant agreement n° 603445; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) as part of the PEGASO (Ref.: CTM2012-37615) and BIO-NUC (Ref.: CGL2013-49020-R); HEA-PRTLI4;EC ACTRIS. [1] Meskhidze & Nenes (2006) Science 314, 1419-1423. [2] Sorooshian et al. (2009) Global Biogeochemical Cycles 23, GB4007. [3] O'Dowd et al. (1999) Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 125, 1295-1313. [4] Charlson

  14. High intensity interval training in a real world setting: a randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lunt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. METHODS: Participants were allocated into one of three groups. The two interventions, aerobic interval training and maximal volitional interval training, were compared with an active control group undertaking walking based exercise. Supervised group sessions (36 per intervention were held outdoors. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using VO2max (maximal oxygen uptake, results expressed in ml/min/kg, before and after the 12 week interventions. RESULTS: On ITT (intention to treat analyses, baseline (N = 49 and exit (N = 39 [Formula: see text]O2 was 25.3±4.5 and 25.3±3.9, respectively. Participant allocation and baseline/exit VO2max by group was as follows: Aerobic interval training N =  16, 24.2±4.8/25.6±4.8; maximal volitional interval training N = 16, 25.0±2.8/25.2±3.4; walking N = 17, 26.5±5.3/25.2±3.6. The post intervention change in VO2max was +1.01 in the aerobic interval training, -0.06 in the maximal volitional interval training and -1.03 in the walking subgroups. The aerobic interval training subgroup increased VO2max compared to walking (p = 0.03. The actual (observed, rather than prescribed time spent exercising (minutes per week, ITT analysis was 74 for aerobic interval training, 45 for maximal volitional interval training and 116 for walking (p =  0.001. On descriptive analysis, the walking subgroup had the fewest adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to earlier studies, the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness in a

  15. Water intensity of transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carey W; Webber, Michael E

    2008-11-01

    As the need for alternative transportation fuels increases, it is important to understand the many effects of introducing fuels based upon feedstocks other than petroleum. Water intensity in "gallons of water per mile traveled" is one method to measure these effects on the consumer level. In this paper we investigate the water intensity for light duty vehicle (LDV) travel using selected fuels based upon petroleum, natural gas, unconventional fossil fuels, hydrogen, electricity, and two biofuels (ethanol from corn and biodiesel from soy). Fuels more directly derived from fossil fuels are less water intensive than those derived either indirectly from fossil fuels (e.g., through electricity generation) or directly from biomass. The lowest water consumptive (electric power generation) withdraw 5-20 times and consume nearly 2-5 times more water than by using petroleum gasoline. The water intensities (gal H20/mile) of LDVs operating on biofuels derived from crops irrigated in the United States at average rates is 28 and 36 for corn ethanol (E85) for consumption and withdrawal, respectively. For soy-derived biodiesel the average consumption and withdrawal rates are 8 and 10 gal H2O/mile. PMID:19031873

  16. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  17. Measurement of profile and intensity of proton beam by an integrating current transformer and a segmented parallel-plate ion chamber for the AGS-spallation target experiment (ASTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profile and intensity of proton beams incident to a mercury target were measured for the experiments under AGS-spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. Protons of 1.94, 12 and 24 GeV energy were measured for a temperature, pressure wave and neutronics in the mercury target. For the beam profile measurement, segmented parallel-plate ion chamber (CHIDORI) was used as the online detector. Imaging plates (IP) were also used for the profile measurement with aluminum activation foils as the image converter. An integrating current transformer (ICT) and activation method by Cu foil were used for the measurement of beam intensity. The beam profile obtained by CHIDORI gives a good agreement with the results with the IP. The beam intensity obtained by ICT agrees with the data obtained by the activation technique within ±3% for 12 and 24 GeV cases. Furthermore, these results show in good agreement with those obtained by the monitor of segmented wire ionization chamber (SWIC) and secondary emission chamber (SEC) installed by the AGS team. Therefore, a reliable beam monitor technique was established, so that the analysis of the experiment such as temperature and pressure wave can be normalized by the number of incident protons. (author)

  18. High Intensity Interval Training in a Real World Setting: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Study in Overweight Inactive Adults, Measuring Change in Maximal Oxygen Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Lunt; Nick Draper; Marshall, Helen C.; Logan, Florence J.; Hamlin, Michael J.; Shearman, Jeremy P.; Cotter, James D.; Kimber, Nicholas E.; Gavin Blackwell; Frampton, Christopher M. A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training) improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot) study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. METHODS: Participant...

  19. Measurement of 2l-nl' x-ray transitions from ≅1 μm Kr clusters irradiated by high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray line emission from 2l-nl' transitions in Ne-like Kr and nearby ions has been observed from ≅1 μm Kr clusters irradiated by fs-scale laser pulses at the JAERI facility in Kyoto, Japan. The incident laser intensity reached 1019 W/cm2, with pulse energies from 50 to 300 mJ and pulse durations from 30 to 500 fs. The dependence of the x-ray spectral features and intensity on the incident laser intensity is rather weak, indicating that the 1-2 ps cluster lifetimes limit the number of ions beyond Ne-like Kr that can be produced by collisional ionization. Lines from F- to Al-like Kr emitted from the cluster plasmas have been identified using data from the relativistic multiconfiguration flexible atomic code. A collisional-radiative model based on these data has been constructed and used to determine that the cluster plasma has electron densities near 1022 cm-3, temperatures of a few hundred eV, and hot electron fractions of a few percent

  20. Application of solid-state nuclear track detectors of the CR-39/PM-355 type for measurements of energetic protons emitted from plasma produced by an ultra-intense laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, A. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Badziak, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Fuchs, J. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay 91128 (France); Kubkowska, M., E-mail: mkubkowska@ifpilm.waw.p [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Suchanska, R.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Antici, P.; Mancic, A. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay 91128 (France)

    2009-10-15

    The paper reports on applications of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) of the CR-39/PM-355, manufactured by Pershore Moulding Ltd., for measurements of fast protons emitted from laser-produced plasma. The experiment was performed at LULI, Ecole Politechnique, on the 100 Tera-Watt laser facility. A 1.05 mum laser pulse of 350 fs duration and intensity up to 2 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} irradiated a thin (1-3 mum) polystyrene (PS) or Au/PS target (PS foil covered with a 0.1-0.2 mum Au layer) along the target normal. The measurements revealed that very intense MeV proton beams can be produced under specially chosen laser-target irradiation conditions. The proton beam characteristics were measured using the TOF method (ion collectors), SSNTDs, and radiochromic films (RCFs). The SSNTDs appeared to be especially useful for the experimental analysis of more energetic protons (E{sub p} > 3 MeV). Using in the same laser shots many detector samples covered with Al foils of different thicknesses (from 15 mum up to 400 mum) it was possible to estimate energy spectra of protons emitted under various irradiation conditions. The most energetic protons (of energy up to 10 MeV) and the most intense proton beams were generated from a double-layer Au/PS target.

  1. Data-model comparison search analysis of coincident PBO Balmer α, EURD Lyman β geocoronal measurements from March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Gómez, J. F.; Morales, C.

    2004-05-01

    Recent Lyman series and Balmer series airglow measurements provide a fresh opportunity to investigate the density distribution and variability of atomic hydrogen in the upper atmosphere. Dedicated nightside Balmer α Fabry-Perot spectrometer measurements at the Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO), University of Wisconsin-Madison, have been acquired since late 1999 taking advantage of several technological advances. Extreme ultraviolet spectral radiance measurements by the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish MINISAT-1 satellite from October 1997 to December 2001 provide extensive sets of geocoronal Lyman β, Lyman γ and He 584 Å emission intensities. In this paper, coincident EURD Lyman β and PBO Balmer α radiance measurements from the early March 2000 new moon period are presented. In addition to serving as examples of the data sets now available, the data volume poses an analysis challenge not faced in prior geocoronal studies. A data-model comparison search procedure employing resonance radiation transport results for extensive sets of parametric density distribution models is being developed for use in analyses of multiple large data sets; this is described, and example results for the PBO and EURD March 2000 data sets are presented. The tightness of the constraints obtained for the solar line-center Lyman β irradiance and the atomic hydrogen column abundance is somewhat surprising, given the crudeness of the parameter binning in the search procedure and the fact that a small number of recognized corrections remain to be made to each data set.

  2. Kinetic Sunyaev Zeldovich effect in an anisotropic CMB model: measuring low multipoles of the CMB at higher redshifts using intensity and polarization spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Yasini, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel mathematical formalism that allows to easily compute the expected kinetic Sunyaev Zeldovich (kSZ) signal in intensity and polarization due to an anisotropic primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We show that, in the direction of moving clusters, low CMB multipoles impose intensity and polarization spectral distortions with different frequency dependences. The polarization signal primarily probes the quadrupole moment of the CMB, with a significant contribution from the primordial dipole and octupole moments. For a typical cluster velocity of 1000 km/s, corrections to the standard, non-moving cluster quadrupole-induced polarization are of the order of 2-10% between 200-600 GHz, and depend on cluster's position on the sky, velocity magnitude and direction of motion. At 300 GHz, the sky area where the correction is greater than 10% is about 20%, although close to the galactic plane. The sky locations where maximum and minimum polarization signals are expected for moving clusters vary w...

  3. 强辐射条件下应变测量的抗干扰技术研究%Research on anti-interference technique in strain measurement under intense radiation conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张从和

    2001-01-01

    在强辐射强电磁脉冲干扰环境条件下,为保证应变测量的实现,经模拟试验研究,应变测量采用一系列抗干扰技术措施,包括所用元器件材料的选择,传感应变计安装方式,组桥接线方式,密封屏蔽等技术。还介绍了这些技术措施在某试验现场应变测试试验中的应用概况。%This paper emphatically describes a series of anti-interference technical measures adopted in the strain measurement under the environment conditions of intense radiation and intense electromagnetic pulse interference,including techniques in the selection of the components and materials,the installation pattern of the sensing strain gauges,bridge combination and wire connection pattern,sealing and shielding etc.In order to realize the strain measurement under such an environment,a number of simulated tests and researches have been made.The paper also gives a brief description of the application of aforesaid technical measures in the strain measurement test on a test site.

  4. Crack closure and stress intensity factor measurements in nodular graphite cast iron using three-dimensional correlation of laboratory X-ray microtomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic images of a nodular graphite cast iron obtained using a laboratory X-ray source were used to analyze the opening of a fatigue crack during in situ mechanical loading. Direct image analysis and digital image correlation are utilized to obtain the 3-D morphology and front location of the crack, as well as the displacement fields in the bulk of the specimen. From digital image correlation results it is possible to extract the crack opening displacement (COD) map in the whole sample cross-section and to compute stress intensity factors (SIFs) all along the crack front, even for COD values that are less than the image resolution. The comparison of COD maps with local values of the SIF enabled for an estimation of the opening SIF (Kop) equal to 6 MPa m1/2.

  5. Confirmation of spectral jitter: a measured shift in the spectral distribution of intense pulsed light systems using a time-resolved spectrometer during exposure and increased fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, C; Town, G; Clement, M

    2010-02-01

    High quality intense pulsed light (IPL) systems can offer simple, safe and effective treatments for long-term hair reduction, skin rejuvenation and removal of benign vascular and pigmented lesions. Considerable differences in clinical efficacy and adverse effects have been recorded amongst different IPL systems despite comparable display settings. This study examines the variation in pulse structures exhibited by several popular professional IPL systems that can cause a spectral change within the broadband output depending on the pulse structure chosen by the system designers. A fast spectrometer was used to capture IPL spectral outputs. A spectral distribution shift that occurs both within a pulse and between pulses is clearly demonstrated and is more prominent with uncontrolled free discharge systems than with square pulsed technology, which provides a constant spectral distribution throughout the pulse duration. PMID:20017711

  6. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  7. Correlation of Stroke Volume Measurement between Sonosite Portable Echocardiogram and Edwards Flotrac Sensor-Vigileo Monitor in an Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad Behnia; Sherry Powell; Linda Fallen; Houman Tamaddon; Masud Behnia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stroke volume (SV) is a parameter that is being recognized as an endpoint in fluid resuscitation algorithms. Its role is now being realized as an important variable in hemodynamic assessment in various clinical scenarios such as septic and cardiogenic shocks. Direct measurement of stroke volume (SV) and its novel corollary, stroke volume variation (SVV) derived by proprietary software, are preferred over mean cardiac output (CO) measurements because they render a more accurate reflect...

  8. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially-resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally-incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is of the order of the pulsewidth, whereas a spatial resolution of a few microns is achieved by this optical technique. In addition, this technique does not suffer from refraction effects due to the steep plasma density gradients owing to the near-normal incidence of the probe pulse and consequently, higher harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target fro...

  9. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on 18F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Araujo Valadares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on 18FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and Methods: A total of 254 18F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH, right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF, and first lumbar vertebra (LV1 in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1. Results: Mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: The three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation.

  10. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on 18F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on 18FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and methods: a total of 254 18F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Results: mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: the three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation. (author)

  11. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Woellner, Eduardo Bechtloff; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: agnesvaladares@me.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Coura-Filho, George Barberio [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo Octavio Frias de Oliveira (ICESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on {sup 18}FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and methods: a total of 254 {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Results: mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion: the three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation. (author)

  12. Meso-Beta-Scale Data Assimilation of the Winter Icing and Storms Program/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 91 intensive observing period case on 6 March 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To support the ARM program, we have proposed to develop an Integrated Data Assimilation and Sounding System (IDASS). The IDASS is composed of a measurement component and a modeling component. The measurement component (Integrated Sounding System or ISS) is developed around a suite of in situ and active and passive remote sensors. Individually, these sensors satisfy certain needs, together they function in a synergistic and complementary mode. The modeling component is an enhanced nonhydrostatic version of the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model with data assimilation capability. The goal of IDASS is to provide continuous high-resolution tropospheric profiles of basic meteorological variables by continuous assimilation of measurements taken by ISS. The objectives of this study are (1) to assess the impact of mesoscale data assimilation on the model results, and (2) to evaluate the basic concept of IDASS

  13. Intense low energy positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  14. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 using the MAX-DOAS method combined with relative intensity measurements for aerosol correction

    OpenAIRE

    Levelt, P. F.; Wang, P.; P. Stammes; A. J. M. Piters; T. Vlemmix

    2010-01-01

    Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a technique to measure trace gas amounts in the lower troposphere from ground-based scattered sunlight observations. MAX-DOAS observations are especially suitable for validation of tropospheric trace gas observations from satellite, since they have a representative range of several kilometers, both in the horizontal and in the vertical dimension. A two-step retrieval scheme is presented here, to derive aerosol corrected tr...

  15. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 using the MAX-DOAS method combined with relative intensity measurements for aerosol correction

    OpenAIRE

    T. Vlemmix; Piters, A. J. M.; Stammes, P.; Wang, P.; P. F. Levelt

    2010-01-01

    Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a technique to measure trace gas amounts in the lower troposphere from ground-based scattered sunlight observations. MAX-DOAS observations are especially suitable for validation of tropospheric trace gas observations from satellite, since they have a representative range of several kilometers, both in the horizontal and in the vertical dimension. A two-step retrieval scheme is presented here, to derive aerosol corrected tr...

  16. Results from an intensive measurement programme for suspended particulate matter in a region of the Irish Sea between Anglesey and the Isle of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher N.; Stewart, T. Henry; McDonald, Paul

    2003-06-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) plays an important role in the transport of metals and other contaminants in the marine environment. To varying degrees dissolved metals are scavenged by suspended particles and this can have a significant impact on the transport and dispersion of the metal. In contaminated areas, such as the Irish Sea, the SPM becomes increasingly important in understanding the transport and fate of contaminants. Despite its importance, measurements of SPM in the Irish Sea are sparse. This paper presents measured SPM concentrations from a long-term sampling campaign from 25 sites in an area of the Irish Sea between Anglesey and the Isle of Man which were sampled over 14 months (July 1998-August 1999) at 5 and 30 m depth. In total 585 measurements were made. A transmissometer was also deployed on some occasions to look at the depth dependence of SPM. Results showed an average SPM concentration of 2.14 mg l -1 with a maximum value of 6.28 mg l -1 and a minimum of 0.30 mg l -1. The strongest relationship found was between the SPM and the spring-neap tidal cycle, which outweighed any seasonal variation. Spatially, the SPM was highest in the south and east of the region sampled and is probably due to higher tidal velocities and greater availability of fine sediment in these areas. There was no evidence of SPM varying with depth in the water column.

  17. Measurement and Monte Carlo simulation for energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy delivered by a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lihui; Eldib, Ahmed; Li, Jinsheng; Emam, Ismail; Fan, Jiajin; Wang, Lu; Ma, C-M

    2014-01-01

    The dosimetric advantage of modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has been explored by many investigators and is considered to be an advanced radiation therapy technique in the utilization of electrons. A computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator (MLC) prototype, newly designed to be added onto a Varian linac to deliver MERT, was investigated both experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulations. Four different electron energies, 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV, were employed for this investigation. To ensure that this device was capable of delivering the electron beams properly, measurements were performed to examine the electron MLC (eMLC) leaf leakage and to determine the appropriate jaw positioning for an eMLC-shaped field in order to eliminate a secondary radiation peak that could otherwise appear outside of an intended radiation field in the case of inappropriate jaw positioning due to insufficient radiation blockage from the jaws. Phase space data were obtained by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and recorded at the plane just above the jaws for each of the energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV). As an input source, phase space data were used in MC dose calculations for various sizes of the eMLC shaped field (10 × 10 cm2, 3.4 × 3.4 cm2, and 2 × 2 cm2) with respect to a water phantom at source-to-surface distance (SSD) = 94 cm, while the jaws, eMLC leaves, and some accessories associated with the eMLC assembly as well were modeled as modifiers in the calculations. The calculated results were then compared with measurements from a water scanning system. The results showed that jaw settings with 5 mm margins beyond the field shaped by the eMLC were appropriate to eliminate the secondary radiation peak while not widening the beam penumbra; the eMLC leaf leakage measurements ranged from 0.3% to 1.8% for different energies based on in-phantom measurements, which should be quite acceptable for MERT. Comparisons between MC dose calculations and measurements showed agreement

  18. Investigating the dependence of the temperature of high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp electrodes on the operating frequency by pyrometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinelt, J.; Westermeier, M.; Ruhrmann, C.; Bergner, A.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2011-03-01

    Phase-resolved temperature distributions are determined along a rod-shaped tungsten electrode, by which an ac arc is operated within a model lamp filled with argon. Switched dc and sinusoidal currents are applied with amplitudes of several amperes and operating frequencies being varied between 10 Hz and 10 kHz. The temperature is deduced from the grey body radiation of the electrode being recorded with a spectroscopic measuring system. Phase-resolved values of the electrode tip temperature Ttip and of the power input Pin are determined comparing the measured temperature distributions with the integral of the one-dimensional heat balance with these parameters as integration constants. They are supplemented by phase-resolved measurements of the sum of cathode and anode fall called the electrode sheath voltage. If a switched dc current is applied it is found that both quantities are within the cathodic phase only marginally higher than for a cathode being operated with a dc current. Ttip and Pin start to decrease for low currents and to increase for high currents at the beginning of the anodic phase. But with increasing operating frequency the deviations from the cathodic phase are reduced until they cannot be resolved for frequencies of several kHz. A more pronounced modulation, but the same tendencies, is observed with a sinusoidal current waveform. For 10 kHz a diffuse arc attachment with an almost phase-independent electrode tip temperature, which deviates only marginally from that of a dc cathode, and an electrode sheath voltage proportional to the arc current is established with both current waveforms.

  19. Ground-satellite conjugate observations of low-latitude travelling ionospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shin; Liu, Huixin; Yatini, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are studied by using three CHAMP satellite overpasses on ground-based 630-nm airglow images. The airglow images are obtained from Kototabang (KTB), Indonesia (geographic coordinates: 0.2S, 100.3E, geomagnetic latitude: 10.6S). From 7-year data from October 2002 to October 2009, April 30, 2006 (event 1), September 28, 2006 (event 2) and April 12, 2004 (event 3) are the only TID events found in both ground and satellite measurements. They show southward-moving structures in 630-nm airglow images. The events 1 and 2 are single pulse with horizontal scales of ~500-1000 km and event 3 show three wave fronts with horizontal scale sizes of 500-700 km. For events 1 and 3, the neutral density in CHAMP shows out-of-phase variations with the airglow intensity, while event 2 is in-phase. For event 1, the relation between electron density and airglow intensity is out of phase, while relationships of event 2 and 3 are unclear. These unclear relationships suggest that ionospheric plasma variation is not the cause of the TIDs. In the case if gravity waves in the thermosphere is the source of the observed TIDs, in-phase and out-of-phase relationships of neutral density and airglow intensity can be explained by different vertical wavelengths of the gravity wave. We estimate possible vertical wavelengths for those events using observed wave parameters and modeled neutral winds.

  20. Iowa Intensive Archaeological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file contains intensive level archaeological survey areas for the state of Iowa. All intensive Phase I surveys that are submitted to the State Historic...