WorldWideScience

Sample records for airfoil section equipped

  1. Aeroservoelastic stability of a 2D airfoil section equipped with a trailing edge flap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, Leonardo

    2008-11-15

    Recent studies conclude that important reduction of the fatigue loads encountered by a wind turbine blade can be achieved using a deformable trailing edge control system. The focus of the current work is to determine the effect of this flap-like system on the aeroelastic stability of a 2D airfoil section. A simulation tool is implemented to predict the flow speed at which a flap equipped section may become unstable, either due to flutter or divergence. First, the stability limits of the airfoil without flap are determined, and, in the second part of the work, a deformable trailing edge flap is applied. Stability is investigated for the uncontrolled flap, and for three different control algorithms. The three controls are tuned for fatigue load alleviation and they are based on, respectively, measurement of the heave displacement and velocity, measurement of the local angle of attack, measurement of the pressure difference between the two sides of the airfoil. The stability of the aeroservoelastic system in a defined equilibrium state, and for a given flow speed, is then determined by solving an eigenvalue problem. Results show that the trailing edge control system modifies significantly the stability limits of the section. In the investigated case, increased flutter limits are reported when the elastic flap is left without control, whereas, by applying any of the control algorithms, the flutter velocity is reduced. Nevertheless, only in the heave control case the flutter limit becomes critically close to normal operation flow speeds. Furthermore, a marked dependence of the stability limits on the control gain is also observed and, by tuning the gain parameters, flutter and divergence can be suppressed for flow speed even above the flutter velocity encountered with uncontrolled flap. (author)

  2. Aeroelastic Stability of a 2D Airfoil Section equipped with a Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo

    limits of the section. In the investigated case, increased flutter limits are reported when the elastic flap is left without control, whereas, by applying any of the control algorithms, the flutter velocity is reduced. Nevertheless, only in the heave control case the flutter limit becomes critically...... is applied. Stability is investigated for the uncontrolled flap, and for three different control algorithms. The three controls are tuned for fatigue load alleviation and they are based on, respectively, measurement of the heave displacement and velocity, measurement of the local angle of attack, measurement...... close to normal operation flow speeds. Furthermore, a marked dependence of the stability limits on the control gain is also observed and, by tuning the gain parameters, flutter and divergence can be suppressed for flow speed even above the flutter velocity encountered with uncontrolled flap....

  3. New airfoil sections for straight bladed turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical investigation of aerodynamic performance for vertical axis Darrieus wind turbine with new airfoils sections is carried out. The blade section aerodynamics characteristics are determined from turbomachines cascade model. The model is also adapted to the vertical Darrieus turbine for the performance prediction of the machine. In order to choose appropriate value of zero-lift-drag coefficient in calculation, an analytical expression is introduced as function of chord-radius ratio and Reynolds numbers. New airfoils sections are proposed and analyzed for straight-bladed turbine

  4. Analysis of viscous transonic flow over airfoil sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Wu, Jiunn-Chi; Sankar, L. N.

    1987-01-01

    A full Navier-Stokes solver has been used to model transonic flow over three airfoil sections. The method uses a two-dimensional, implicit, conservative finite difference scheme for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented as prescribed for the Viscous Transonic Airfoil Workshop to be held at the AIAA 25th Aerospace Sciences Meeting. The NACA 0012, RAE 2822 and Jones airfoils have been investigated for both attached and separated transonic flows. Predictions for pressure distributions, loads, skin friction coefficients, boundary layer displacement thickness and velocity profiles are included and compared with experimental data when possible. Overall, the results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...

  6. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias;

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30%...

  7. Profile catalogue for airfoil sections based on 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2006-12-15

    This report is a continuation of the Wind Turbine Airfoil Catalogue which objective was, firstly to provide a database of aerodynamic characteristics for a wide range of airfoil profiles aimed at wind turbine applications, and secondly to test the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D by comparing its results with experimental data. In the present work, the original two-dimensional results are compared with three-dimensional calculations as it was surmised that the two-dimensional assumption might be in some cases responsible for discrepancies between the numerical flow solution and the actual fluid flow, and thereby the incorrect prediction of airfoil characteristics. In addition, other features of the flow solver, such as transition and turbulence modelling, and their influence onto the numerical results are investigated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the evaluation of airfoil aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the use of the Navier-Stokes solver for fluid flow calculations in general. (au)

  8. Airfoil profile optimization of an air suction equipment with an air duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of boundary layer with the airfoil profile, this research attempts to investigate the effect of the angle of spread of the winged air suction equipment on the efficiency of operation. The application of Fluent with the split-middle method under the identical operation mode is expected to optimize the spread angle. The investigated airfoil profile is NACA6413, of which the restrictions on the critical angle of spread suggested in literature will be overcome through the interactions between the internal and external flow fields. As a result, the air speed might increase. The wind tunnel test employed in this research offers the solid evidences to support this hypothesis. The test demonstrates that when the angle of spread is larger than 12°, the effect of accelerating the air flow is still observable. Following the optimization, the air suction effect of the equipment would be optimal when its angle of spread reached 30°.

  9. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Mankbadi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tip vortex flow from a NACA0012 airfoil, pitched periodically at various frequencies, is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Initially, data for stationary airfoil held fixed at various angles-of-attack are gathered. Flow visualization pictures as well as detailed cross-sectional properties areobtained at various streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as various turbulent stresses. Preliminary data are also acquired for periodically pitched airfoil. These results are briefly presented in this extended abstract.

  10. Nonlinear angle control of a sectioned airfoil by using shape memory alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work illustrates an application of shape memory alloys and nonlinear controller applied to the active angular control of a sectioned airfoil. The main objective of the proposed control system is to modify the shape of the profile based on a reference angle. The change of the sectioned airfoil angle is resultant by the effect of shape memory of the alloy due to heating of the wire caused by an electric current that changes its temperature by Joule effect. Considering the presence of plant’s nonlinear effects, especially in the mathematical model of the alloy, this work proposes the application of an on-off control system.

  11. Boundary-layer and stalling characteristics of two symmetrical NACA low-drag airfoil sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccullough, George B; Gault, Donald E

    1947-01-01

    Two symmetrical airfoils, an NACA 633-018 and an NACA 631-012, were investigated for the purpose of determining their stalling and boundary-layer characteristics with a view toward the eventual application of this information to the problem of boundary-layer control. Force measurements, pressure distributions, tuft studies, and boundary-layer-profile measurements were made at a value of 5,800,000 Reynolds number. It was found that the 18-percent-thick airfoil stalled progressively from the trailing edge because of separation of the turbulent boundary layer. In contrast, the12-percent-thick airfoil stalled abruptly from a separation of flow near the leading edge before the turbulent boundary layer became subject to separation. From this it was concluded that if high values of lift are to be obtained with thin, high-critical-speed sections by means of boundary-layer control, the work must be directed toward delaying the separation of flow near the leading edge. It was found that the presence of a nose flap on the 12-percent-thick section caused the airfoil to stall in a manner similar to that of the 18-percent-thick section.

  12. Assessment of the performance of various airfoil sections on power generation from a wind turbine using the blade element momentum theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Agarwal, Ramesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is a function of the number of blades, the tip speed ratio (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity) and the lift to drag ratio (CL /CD) of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD) for a given blade and ratio and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. In this study, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given blade and ratio and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter.

  13. Assessment of the performance of various airfoil sections on power generation from a wind turbine using the blade element momentum theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Chen, Ramesh Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT is a function of the number of blades B, the tip speed ratio λ (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity and the lift to drag ratio (CL /CD of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD for a given B and λ, and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM theory. In this study, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750 and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and λ and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter.

  14. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  15. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  16. Features of vertical axis wind turbine and development of airfoils sections; Chokusen yokugata suichoku jiku fusha no tokucho to yokugata ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Yasui, T. [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan); Nakayama, H. [Oriental Kiden Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Features of a straight wing type vertical axis wind turbine (VAW) and its airfoil sections were studied. The wind turbine in which various aerodynamic work components are mounted on the rotation axis normal to the ground surface is named VAW. Like the airfoil section of aircraft, in lift type VAW, wind turbines were driven by lift 70-90 times as large as drag in some cases. Features of the VAW airfoil section which is a straight wing in plan and a fixed pitch wing (with a fixed angle to a blade support arm) in cross section, and those of wind turbines were studied. Some factors affecting the features, work principle and performance of VAW were clarified. On airfoil sections, products of each weight function and each corresponding aerodynamic factor (lift, drag and pitching moment factors) were plotted on an attack angle ({alpha}) axis. From the conditions for increasing the total sum of areas drawn by the products on the {alpha} axis, various characteristics required for airfoil sections were clarified. Such characteristics nearly agreed between an airfoil section for favorable starting characteristics and that for high efficiency. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, KBMQ; Fagan, A. F.; Mankbadi, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a tip vortex from a NACA0012 airfoil is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4x10(exp 4). Initially, data for a stationary airfoil held at various angles-of-attack (alpha) are gathered. Detailed surveys are done for two cases: alpha=10 deg with attached flow and alpha=25 deg with massive flow separation on the upper surface. Distributions of various properties are obtained using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity and turbulent stresses at various streamwise locations. For all cases, the vortex core is seen to involve a mean velocity deficit. The deficit apparently traces to the airfoil wake, part of which gets wrapped by the tip vortex. At small alpha, the vortex is laminar within the measurement domain. The strength of the vortex increases with increasing alpha but undergoes a sudden drop around alpha (is) greater than 16 deg. The drop in peak vorticity level is accompanied by transition and a sharp rise in turbulence within the core. Data are also acquired with the airfoil pitched sinusoidally. All oscillation cases pertain to a mean alpha=15 deg while the amplitude and frequency are varied. An example of phase-averaged data for an amplitude of +/-10 deg and a reduced frequency of k=0.2 is discussed. All results are compared with available data from the literature shedding further light on the complex dynamics of the tip vortex.

  18. Experiments with an Airfoil Model on which the Boundary Layers are Controlled Without the Use of Supplementary Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, I H

    1931-01-01

    This report describes test made in the Variable Density Wind Tunnel of the NACA to determine the possibility of controlling the boundary layer on the upper surface of an airfoil by use of the low pressure existing near the leading edge. The low pressure was used to induce flow through slots in the upper surface of the wing. The tests showed that the angle of attack for maximum lift was increased at the expense of a reduction in the maximum lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient.

  19. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  20. Aerodynamic response of an airfoil section undergoing pitch motion and trailing edge flap deflection: a comparison of simulation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    –inviscid interaction method and an engineering dynamic stall model suitable for implementation in aeroelastic codes based on blade element momentum theory. The aerodynamic integral forces and pitching moment coefficients are first determined in steady conditions, at angles of attack spanning from attached flow...... generated by the airfoil undergoing harmonic pitching motions and harmonic flap deflections. The unsteady aerodynamic coefficients exhibit significant variations over the corresponding steady-state values. The dynamic characteristics of the unsteady response are predicted with an excellent agreement among...

  1. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  2. Airfoils and method for designing airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to airfoils and design and design optimization of airfoils, in particular airfoils of rotor blades for wind turbines. One aspect of the invention relates to an airfoil with an external shape provided by an airfoil profile defined by a limited number of parameters, such...... as a set of parameters. Another aspect of the invention relates to a method for designing an airfoil by means of an analytical airfoil profile, said method comprising the step of applying a conformal mapping to a near circle in a near circle plane, wherein the near circle is at least partly expressed...... by means of an analytical function, said conformal mapping transforming the near circle in the near circle plane to the airfoil profile in an airfoil plane. L...

  3. Design and optimization of tidal turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    To increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and, thereby, to reduce cost of energy, the use of specially tailored airfoils is needed. This work is focused on the design of an airfoil for marine application. Firstly, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed with reference to the requirements for wind turbine airfoils. Then, the design approach is presented. This is a numerical optimization scheme in which a gradient-based algorithm is used, coupled with the RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints .A section of the present work is dedicated to address this point; particular importance is given to the cavitation phenomenon. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high-efficiency hydrofoil is illustrated, and the results are compared with existing turbine airfoils, considering also the effect on turbine performance due to different airfoils.

  4. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to an airfoil shaped body with a leading edge and a trailing edge extending along the longitudinal extension of the body and defining a profile chord, the airfoil shaped body comprising an airfoil shaped facing that forms the outer surface of the airfoil shaped body...

  5. 翼型加装格尼襟翼的低雷诺数气动特性实验研究%Experimental study on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil equipped with Gurney flaps at low Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔钊; 李建波; 赵洪

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil equipped with Gurney flap at low Reynolds numbers,Eppler387 airfoil is equipped with 0.5% ~5.0% chord height Gurney flap for wind tunnel test.The Reynolds numbers in the test are from 1.49× 105 to 2.31 × 105.The results suggest that lift coefficient and moment coefficient of Eppler387 airfoil equipped with Gurney flap are improved significantly at low Reynolds numbers.Drag coefficient is also improved when the flap is higher than 2% chord.Lift-to-drag ratio is improved when lift coefficient is high,so that Gurney flaps is suitable for MAV or small aircraft with heavy payload.0.5% chord height Gurney flap is also suitable for cruise,since it has better aerodynamic efficiency at low lift coefficient at the same time.Compared with clean airfoil,the angle corresponding to the highest lift-to-drag ratio becomes smaller with the effect of Gurney flaps.When Gurney flaps are higher,the curves of lift-to-drag ratio become smoother.%为了研究低雷诺数下格尼襟翼对翼型气动特性的影响,通过风洞试验研究了Eppler387翼型加装0.5%~5.0%弦长高度格尼襟翼后的气动特性变化,试验雷诺数1.49×105~2.31×105.试验结果表明:低雷诺数下Eppler387翼型加装格尼襟翼后,升力系数和力矩系数明显增大,襟翼高度大于2%弦长时阻力系数显著增大.格尼襟翼在高升力系数下能够起到增大升阻比的作用,适用于微小型飞行器工作在大载荷状态,而0.5%弦长高度的襟翼还能够兼顾中小升力系数下的气动效率,同样适合于微小型飞行器在巡航状态使用.与原翼型相比,加装襟翼后最大升阻比对应的迎角提前,随襟翼高度的增加,翼型升阻比曲线峰值变得不再突出.

  6. Computation of airfoil buffet boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, L. L., Jr.; Bailey, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The ILLIAC IV computer has been programmed with an implicit, finite-difference code for solving the thin layer compressible Navier-Stokes equation. Results presented for the case of the buffet boundaries of a conventional and a supercritical airfoil section at high Reynolds numbers are found to be in agreement with experimentally determined buffet boundaries, especially at the higher freestream Mach numbers and lower lift coefficients where the onset of unsteady flows is associated with shock wave-induced boundary layer separation.

  7. Report of material and equipment section`s activities at New York Shipbuilding Corporation during fabrication of AXC 167 1/2 starting May 18, 1951. Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.R.

    1954-05-26

    This report provides Part III through VI of the Material and Equipment Section`s activities at New York Shipbuilding Corporation. Fabrication, inspection, and testing of reactor components are detailed.

  8. The effect of a cavity on airfoil tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Karn L.; Doolan, Con J.; Kelso, Richard M.

    2014-03-01

    The presence of a cavity in the pressure surface of an airfoil has been found via experiment to play a role in the production of airfoil tones, which was attributed to the presence of an acoustic feedback loop. The cavity length was sufficiently small that cavity oscillation modes did not occur for most of the investigated chord-based Reynolds number range of 70,000-320,000. The airfoil tonal noise frequencies varied as the position of the cavity was moved along a parallel section at the airfoil's maximum thickness: specifically, for a given velocity, the frequency spacing of the tones was inversely proportional to the geometric distance between the cavity and the trailing edge. The boundary layer instability waves considered responsible for the airfoil tones were only detected downstream of the cavity. This may be the first experimental verification of these aspects of the feedback loop model for airfoil tonal noise.

  9. Report of material and equipment section`s activities at New York Shipbuilding Corporation during fabrication of AXC 167 1/2 starting May 18, 1951. Part 7, Section 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.R.

    1954-04-28

    This document provides Part VII, Section III and Section IV of the report of the Material and Equipment Section`s activities at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation. The fabrication, inspection, and testing of reactor components is detailed.

  10. Parental modelling, media equipment and screen-viewing among young children: cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J.; Lucas, Patricia J.; Turner, Katrina M; Bentley, Georgina F; Goodred, Joanna K; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Fox, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether parental screen-viewing, parental attitudes or access to media equipment were associated with the screen-viewing of 6-year-old to 8-year-old children. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Online survey. Main outcome Parental report of the number of hours per weekday that they and, separately, their 6-year-old to 8-year-old child spent watching TV, using a games console, a smart-phone and multiscreen viewing. Parental screen-viewing, parental attitudes and pieces...

  11. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  12. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  13. The design of equipment for optical power measurement in FSO link beam cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latal, Jan; David, Tomas; Wilfert, Otakar; Kolka, Zdenek; Koudelka, Petr; Hanacek, Frantisek; Vitasek, Jan; Siska, Petr; Skapa, Jan; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    The free space optical links have found their major application in today's technological society. The demand for quality broadband is a must for all types of end users in these times. Because of the large jamming from wireless radio networks in non-licensed ISM bands, the free space optical links provide bridging of some densely populated urban areas. Their advantage is the high transmission rate for relatively long distances. However, the disadvantage is the dependence of free space optical links on atmospheric influences. Aired collimated optical beam passes through the atmospheric transmission environment and by its influence cause the deformation of the optical beam. Author's team decided to construct a special measuring device for measurement of optical power in FSO link beam cross-section. The equipment is mobile and can be rearranged and adjust according to the given location and placement of the FSO link at any time. The article describes the individual structural elements of the measuring equipment, its controlling and application for evaluation and adjustment of measuring steps. The graphs from optical power measurements in the beam cross-section of professional FSO links are presented at the end.

  14. Transonic flow theory of airfoils and wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, P R

    1976-01-01

    Supercritical wing technology is expected to have a significant influence on the next generation of commercial aircraft. Computational fluid dynamics is playing a central role in the development of new supercritical wing sections. One of the principal tools is a fast and reliable code that simulates two-dimensional wind tunnel data for transonic flow at high Reynolds numbers. This is used widely by industry to assess drag creep and drag rise. Codes for the design of shockless airfoils by the hodograph method have not been so well received because they usually require a lot of trial and error. However, a more advanced mathematical approach makes it possible to assign the pressure as a function of the arc length and then obtain a shockless airfoil that nearly achieves the given distribution of pressure. This tool should enable engineers to design families of transonic airfoils more easily both for airplane wings and for compressor blades in cascade.

  15. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, N.; Johansen, J.; Fuglsang, P.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which air-foils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so. The airfoils are classified according to the agreement between the numerical results and experimental data. A study correlating the available data and this classification is performed. It is found that transition modelling is to a large extent responsible for the poor quality of the computational results for most of the considered airfoils. The transition model mechanism that leads to these discrepancies is identified. Some advices are given for elaborating future airfoil design processes that would involve the numerical code EllipSys2D in particular, and transition modelling in general. (au)

  16. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  17. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  18. Oscillatory blowing airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    10' NACA 0015 with 30% chord trailing edge flap deflected 20 degrees. Used in 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, this airfoil has a 0.44 mm slot at 70% chord. Oscillatory blowing out of slot used for separation control. Howard Price appears in side view shot, in building 1145, Studio.

  19. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe;

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel...

  20. Residual lifetime calculations for the equipment and pipes of WWER type nuclear power plants (1st draft). Section IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standards documentation of the Association of Mechanical Engineers, Section IV, 'Residual lifetime calculations for the equipment and pipes of WWER type nuclear power plants', provides guidelines and requirements for (i) residual lifetime assessment for apparatus, pipes and supports at WWER type nuclear power plants with respect to their resistance to sudden failure and fatigue damage and with respect to the occurrence of defects detected during in-service inspections; (ii) residual lifetime assessment for apparatus, pipes and supports at WWER type nuclear power plants after component repair, replacement or innovation; and (iii) preparation of documents relating to the continuous gradual exhaustion of the lifetime of apparatus, pipes, and supports at WWER 440 MW and WWER 1000 MW type nuclear power plants and assessment of their residual lifetime. The standards documentation is based on the philosophy of ASME Code Section XI and contains some additional guidelines. The report is divided into the following chapters: General principles, terminology, definitions; General requirements for residual lifetime calculations; Equipment residual lifetime calculation procedure; Equipment residual lifetime assessment with regard to resistance against sudden failure; Assessment of equipment 'fatigue' lifetime; Assessment of equipment 'corrosion mechanical lifetime'; Assessment of the tolerability of defects detected during in-service inspections and residual lifetime assessment for equipment containing such defects; and final assessment of the residual lifetime of equipment. Details are given in 12 Annexes. (P.A.)

  1. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  2. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  3. Selection and Research on Transition Tape in Wind-Turbine Airfoil Section Wind Tunnel Experiment%风力机翼型风洞实验中粗糙带形式的选择研究*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏闯; 高永卫; 肖春生

    2013-01-01

    Due to the limitation of model demension and experimental speed, the experimental Reynolds number in the low speed wind tunnel is usually less than the practical value of airfoil section of wind turbine. This will make the transition location difference between experimental and actual situation. For the purpose of simulating real condition, fixed transition performed with transition tape is often adopted in wind tunnel experiments. Practice shows that the types and parameters of transition tape have an important impact on the experimental results. It needs to be chosen very carefully. In addition, because the wind turbine blade operated in the field for long time, contaminations accumulate on it and increase its surface roughness. This contamination has a great role on the rotor performance; the impact of it has not been well studied. This paper gives a summary of wind tunnel test results and discusses the actions of four types of transition tape of ZZ,ZZT,T and H, and additional effects on the wind turbine airfoil section. The results show that ZZT-type has well transition effect with the least additional drag and H-type has a better simulation for the impact of the insect compacts in the wind turbine blade airfoil experiment.%  由于模型尺寸与实验风速的限制,低速翼型风洞实验雷诺数通常小于实际值,造成翼面转捩点偏后,翼型表面流动与实际不相符。为了尽量真实模拟实际流动,风洞实验一般采用粗糙带在翼型表面前缘进行固定转捩。实践表明,粗糙带的种类及其参数对实验结果有重要的影响,需要非常仔细地选择。另外,由于风力机叶片长期在野外工作,污染造成表面粗糙度增加,这部分的影响一直没有得到很好的研究。本文采用风洞实验的方法,对ZZR、ZZT、T和H型等四种粗糙带在风力机翼型风洞实验中的作用及附加影响进行了研究。研究结果表明,在

  4. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect...... of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence...... that is formed in attached boundary layers, but the freestream turbulence can penetrate the boundary layer. The idea is that the resolved turbulence from the freestream should mix high momentum flow into the boundary layer and thereby increase the resistance against separation and increase the maximum lift...

  5. Study of the TRAC Airfoil Table Computational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong

    1999-01-01

    The report documents the study of the application of the TRAC airfoil table computational package (TRACFOIL) to the prediction of 2D airfoil force and moment data over a wide range of angle of attack and Mach number. The TRACFOIL generates the standard C-81 airfoil table for input into rotorcraft comprehensive codes such as CAM- RAD. The existing TRACFOIL computer package is successfully modified to run on Digital alpha workstations and on Cray-C90 supercomputers. A step-by-step instruction for using the package on both computer platforms is provided. Application of the newer version of TRACFOIL is made for two airfoil sections. The C-81 data obtained using the TRACFOIL method are compared with those of wind-tunnel data and results are presented.

  6. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  7. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  8. Unsteady flow about a circulation control airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晶昌; 孙茂; 吴礼义

    1996-01-01

    The unsteady flow around a circulation control (CC) airfoil was investigated with Navier-Stokes method,which includes the flow around CC airfoil with pulsating jet,the flow around oscillating CC airfoil,and the flow around oscillating CC airfoil with pulsating jet.Dynamic properties of the flow and the aerodynamic forces were rewaled.

  9. Experimental investigation of a transonic potential flow around a symmetric airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, W. J.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental flow investigations on smooth airfoils were done using numerical solutions for transonic airfoil streaming with shockless supersonic range. The experimental flow reproduced essential sections of the theoretically computed frictionless solution. Agreement is better in the expansion part of the of the flow than in the compression part. The flow was nearly stationary in the entire velocity range investigated.

  10. WIND TUNNEL RESEARCH ON THE INFLUENCE OF ACTIVE AIRFLOW ON THE LIFT FORCE GENERATED BY THE AIRFOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Magryta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of wind tunnel tests of airfoils with additional active airflow applied to their upper surfaces. These studies were carried out for a range of velocities up to 28 m/s in an open wind tunnel. Several types of airfoils selected for the examination feature different geometries and are widely applied in today’s aviation industry. The changes in the lift and drag force generated by these airfoils were recorded during the study. The test bench for the tests was equipped with a compressor and a vacuum pump to enable airflow through some holes on the airfoil upper surface. A rapid prototyping method and a 3D printer based on a powder printing technique were applied to print the airfoils. All of their surfaces were subject to surface grinding to smooth their external surfaces. The wind tunnel tests with and without active airflow applied to airfoils are summarised in the paper.

  11. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  12. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    1999-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are basedon four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum...... theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotorwith LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall...... to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFDcomputations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived...

  13. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  14. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  15. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  16. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang

    The effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape on the aerodynamic performance of turbine airfoils are investigated in compressible, high speed flows. The University of Utah Transonic Wind Tunnel is employed for the experimental part of the study. Two different test sections are designed to produce Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, passage mass flow rates, and physical dimensions, which match values along turbine blades in operating engines: (i) a nonturning test section with a symmetric airfoil, and (ii) a cascade test section with a cambered turbine vane. The nonuniform, irregular, three-dimensional surface roughness is characterized using the equivalent sand grain roughness size. Changing the airfoil surface roughness condition has a substantial effect on wake profiles of total pressure loss coefficients, normalized Mach number, normalized kinetic energy, and on the normalized and dimensional magnitudes of Integrated Aerodynamic Losses produced by the airfoils. Comparisons with results for a symmetric airfoil and a cambered vane show that roughness has more substantial effects on losses produced by the symmetric airfoil than the cambered vane. Data are also provided that illustrate the larger loss magnitudes are generally present with flow turning and cambered airfoils, than with symmetric airfoils. Wake turbulence structure of symmetric airfoils and cambered vanes are also studied experimentally. The effects of surface roughness and freestream turbulence levels on wake distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and power spectral density profiles and vortex shedding frequencies are quantified one axial chord length downstream of the test airfoils. As the level of surface roughness increases, all wake profile quantities broaden significantly and nondimensional vortex shedding frequencies decrease. Wake profiles produced by the symmetric airfoil are more sensitive to variations of surface

  17. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Soerensen, N.N.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wen Zhong Shen; Noerkaer Soerensen, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are based on four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotor with LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall at the tip is low and that it is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. The use of these characteristics in aeroelastic calculations shows a good agreement in power and flap moments with measurements. Furthermore, a fatigue analysis shows a reduction in the loads of up to 15 % compared to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFD computations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived that can be used to calculate mean values of power and loads. The lift in stall at the tip is low and at the root it is high compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. In particular the power curves were well calculated by use of the optimised airfoil characteristics. In the quasi-3D CFD computations, the airfoil characteristics are derived directly. This Navier-Stokes model takes into account rotational and 3D effects. The model enables the study of the rotational effect of a rotor blade at computing costs similar to what is typical for 2D airfoil calculations. The depicted results show that the model is capable of determining the correct qualitative behaviour for airfoils subject to rotation. The method shows that lift is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil

  18. Computational Analysis of Propulsion Performance of Modified Pitching Motion Airfoils in Laminar Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The thrust generation performance of airfoils with modified pitching motion was investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling two-dimensional laminar flow at Reynolds number of 104. The effect of shift distance of the pitch axis outside the chord line (R, reduced frequency (k, pitching amplitude (θ, pitching profile, and airfoil shape (airfoil thickness and camber on the thrust generated and efficiency were studied. The results reveal that the increase in R and k leads to an enhancement in thrust generation and a decrease in propulsive efficiency. Besides, there exists an optimal range of θ for the maximum thrust and the increasing θ induces a rapid decrease in propulsive efficiency. Six adjustable parameters (K were employed to realize various nonsinusoidal pitching profiles. An increase in K results in more thrust generated at the cost of decreased propulsive efficiency. The investigation of the airfoil shape effect reveals that there exists an optimal range of airfoil thickness for the best propulsion performance and that the vortex structure is strongly influenced by the airfoil thickness, while varying the camber or camber location of airfoil sections offers no benefit in thrust generation over symmetric airfoil sections.

  19. Derivation of airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade based on 3D CFD rotor calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Soerensen, N.N.; Madsen, H.A. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade are derived from 3D CFD computations on a full-scale 41-m rotor. Based on 3D CFD the force distributions on the blades are determined, from which airfoil characteristics are derived using the momentum theory. The final airfoil characteristics are constructed using both wind tunnel measurements and 3D CFD. Compared to 2D wind tunnel measurements they show a low lift in stall for the airfoil sections at the tip. At the airfoil sections at the inner part of the blade, they show a high lift in stall. At about 60% radius the lift agrees well to 2D wind tunnel measurements. Aero-elastic calculations using the final airfoil characteristics show good agreement to measured power and flap moments. Furthermore, a fatigue load analysis shows a reduction of up to 15% of the load compared to commonly used data. (au)

  20. Robust design of NLF airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing; Gao Zhenghong; Huang Jiangtao; Zhao Ke

    2013-01-01

    A robust optimization design approach of natural laminar airfoils is developed in this paper.First,the non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) free form deformation method based on NURBS basis function is introduced to the airfoil parameterization.Second,aerodynamic characteristics are evaluated by solving Navier Stokes equations,and the γ-Reθt transition model coupling with shear-stress transport (SST) turbulent model is introduced to simulate boundary layer transition.A numerical simulation of transition flow around NLF0416 airfoil is conducted to test the code.The comparison between numerical simulation results and wind tunnel test data approves the validity and applicability of the present transition model.Third,the optimization system is set up,which uses the separated particle swarm optimization (SPSO) as search algorithm and combines the Kriging models as surrogate model during optimization.The system is applied to carry out robust design about the uncertainty of lift coefficient and Mach number for NASA NLF-0115 airfoil.The data of optimized airfoil aerodynamic characteristics indicates that the optimized airfoil can maintain laminar flow stably in an uncertain range and has a wider range of low drag.

  1. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  2. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    The present work contains an extension of the Beddoes-Leishman-type dynamic stall model. In this work, a deformable trailing-edge flap has been added to the dynamic stall model. The model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on an airfoil section undergoing arbitrary motion in heave...

  3. Airfoil deposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, E.N.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, A.E.

    1939-01-01

    In order to extend the useful range of Reynolds numbers of airfoils designed to take advantage of the extensive laminar boundary layers possible in an air stream of low turbulence, tests were made of the NACA 2412-34 and 1412-34 sections in the NACA low-turbulence tunnel. Although the possible extent of the laminar boundary layer on these airfoils is not so great as for specially designed laminar-flow airfoils, it is greater than that for conventional airfoils, and is sufficiently extensive so that at Reynolds numbers above 11,000,000 the laminar region is expected to be limited by the permissible 'Reynolds number run' and not by laminar separation as is the case with conventional airfoils. Drag measurements by the wake-survey method and pressure-distribution measurements were made at several lift coefficients through a range of Reynolds numbers up to 11,400,000. The drag scale-effect curve for the NACA 1412-34 is extrapolated to a Reynolds number of 30,000,000 on the basis of theoretical calculations of the skin friction. Comparable skin-friction calculations were made for the NACA 23012. The results indicate that, for certain applications at moderate values of the Reynolds number, the NACA 1412-34 and 2412-34 airfoils offer some advantages over such conventional airfoils as the NACA 23012. The possibility of maintaining a more extensive laminar boundary layer on these airfoils should result in a small drag reduction, and the absence of pressure peaks allows higher speeds to be reached before the compressibility burble is encountered. At lower Reynold numbers, below about 10,000,000, these airfoils have higher drags than airfoils designed to operate with very extensive laminar boundary layers.

  5. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  6. Airfoil model in Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1939-01-01

    Airfoil model with pressure taps inside the test section of the Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel was originally called the Refrigeration or 'Ice' tunnel because it was intended to support research on aircraft icing. The tunnel was built of wood, lined with sheet steel, and heavily insulated on the outside. Refrigeration equipment was installed to generate icing conditions inside the test section. The NACA sent out a questionnaire to airline operators, asking them to detail the specific kinds of icing problems they encountered in flight. The replies became the basis for a comprehensive research program begun in 1938 when the tunnel commenced operation. Research quickly focused on the concept of using exhaust heat to prevent ice from forming on the wing's leading edge. This project was led by Lewis Rodert, who later would win the Collier Trophy for his work on deicing. By 1940, aircraft icing research had shifted to the new Ames Research Laboratory, and the Ice tunnel was refitted with screens and honeycomb. Researchers were trying to eliminate all turbulence in the test section. From TN 1283: 'The Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel is a single-return closed-throat tunnel.... The tunnel is constructed of heavy steel plate so that the pressure of the air may be varied from approximately full vacuum to 10 atmospheres absolute, thereby giving a wide range of air densities. Reciprocating compressors with a capacity of 1200 cubic feet of free air per minute provide compressed air. Since the tunnel shell has a volume of about 83,000 cubic feet, a compression rate of approximately one atmosphere per hour is obtained. ... The test section is rectangular in shape, 3 feet wide, 7 1/2 feet high, and 7 1/2 feet long. ... The over-all size of the wind-tunnel shell is about 146 feet long and 58 feet wide with a maximum diameter of 26 feet. The test section and entrance and exit cones are surrounded by a 22-foot

  7. Hybrid airfoil design methods for full-scale ice accretion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Farooq

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a design method together with a design philosophy that allows the design of "subscale" or "hybrid" airfoils that simulate fullscale ice accretions. These subscale or hybrid airfoils have full-scale leading edges and redesigned aft-sections. A preliminary study to help develop a design philosophy for the design of hybrid airfoils showed that hybrid airfoils could be designed to simulate full-scale airfoil droplet-impingement characteristics and, therefore, ice accretion. The study showed that the primary objective in such a design should be to determine the aft section profile that provides the circulation necessary for simulating full-scale airfoil droplet-impingement characteristics. The outcome of the study, therefore, reveals circulation control as the main design variable. To best utilize this fact, this thesis describes two innovative airfoil design methods for the design of hybrid airfoils. Of the two design methods, one uses a conventional flap system while the other only suggests the use of boundary-layer control through slot-suction on the airfoil upper surface as a possible alternative for circulation control. The formulation of each of the two design methods is described in detail, and the results from each method are validated using wind-tunnel test data. The thesis demonstrates the capabilities of each method with the help of specific design examples highlighting their application potential. In particular, the flap-system based hybrid airfoil design method is used to demonstrate the design of a half-scale hybrid model of a full-scale airfoil that simulates full-scale ice accretion at both the design and off-design conditions. The full-scale airfoil used is representative of a scaled modern business-jet main wing section. The study suggests some useful advantages of using hybrid airfoils as opposed to full-scale airfoils for a better understanding of the ice accretion process and the related issues. Results

  8. A two element laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  9. Wind tunnel test on airfoil Riso-B1-18 with an Active Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Andersen, Peter Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the wind turbine airfoil Risø-B1-18 equipped with an Active Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF) was carried out. The ATEF was 9% of the total chord, made of piezo electric actuators attached to the trailing edge of a non-deformable airfoil and actuated using an (electric) amplifier....... The airfoil was tested at Re = 1.66 × 106. Steady state and dynamic tests were carried out with prescribed deflections of the ATEF. The steady state tests showed that deflecting the ATEF towards the pressure side (positive ) translated the lift curve to higher lift values and deflecting the ATEF towards...

  10. Musculoskeletal pain among critical-care nurses by availability and use of patient lifting equipment: An analysis of cross-sectional survey data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, SJ; Faucett, J; Gillen, M; Krause, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient handling is a major risk factor for musculoskeletal injuries among nurses. Lifting equipment is a main component of safe patient handling programs that aim to prevent musculoskeletal injury. However, the actual levels of lift availability and usage are far from optimal. Objective: To examine the effect of patient lifting equipment on musculoskeletal pain by level of lift availability and lift use among critical-care nurses. Design and participants: A cross-sectional postal...

  11. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  12. Semi-Empirical Prediction of Airfoil Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance W. Traub

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical method is presented to estimate the angular excursion and the lift loss associated with static hysteresis on an airfoil. Wind tunnel data of various airfoils is used to define and validate the methodology. The resulting equation provides a relationship between the size of the hysteresis loop and characteristics of the airfoil. Comparisons of the equation with experiment show encouraging agreement both in terms of the magnitude of the lift loss and the extent of the loop.

  13. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  14. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    different airfoils at a Reynolds number of 3 million, the FFA- W3-301 and FFA-W3-360, respectively. The computations are compared with wind tunnel measurements from the Stuttgart Laminar Wind Tunnel with respect to lift and drag variation as function of angle of attack. Even though the method does......Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two...... not exactly capture the measured performance, it can be used to compare different VG setups qualitatively with respect to chord- wise position, inter and intra-spacing and inclination of the VGs already in the design phase....

  15. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  16. Preliminary Investigation on Boundary Layer Control by Means of Suction and Pressure with the U.S.A. 27 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, E G; Bamber, M J

    1928-01-01

    The tests described in this report constitute a preliminary investigation of airfoil boundary layer control, as carried out in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, from February to August, 1927. Tests were made on a U.S.A. 27 airfoil section with various slot shapes and combinations, and at various amounts of pressure or suction on the slots. The lift of airfoils can be increased by removing or by accelerating the boundary layer. Removing the boundary layer by suction is more economical than to accelerate it by jet action. Gauze-covered suction slots apparently give the best results. When not in operation, all suction slots tested had a detrimental effect upon the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil which was not apparent with the backward-opening pressure slots. Thick, blunt-nose airfoils would seem to give best results with boundary layer control.

  17. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoils/Blades and Wind Farm Layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomin

    Shape optimization is widely used in the design of wind turbine blades. In this dissertation, a numerical optimization method called Genetic Algorithm (GA) is applied to address the shape optimization of wind turbine airfoils and blades. In recent years, the airfoil sections with blunt trailing edge (called flatback airfoils) have been proposed for the inboard regions of large wind-turbine blades because they provide several structural and aerodynamic performance advantages. The FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils are thick airfoils widely used for wind turbine blade application. They have several advantages in meeting the intrinsic requirements for wind turbines in terms of design point, off-design capabilities and structural properties. This research employ both single- and multi-objective genetic algorithms (SOGA and MOGA) for shape optimization of Flatback, FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils to achieve maximum lift and/or maximum lift to drag ratio. The commercially available software FLUENT is employed for calculation of the flow field using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in conjunction with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model and a three equation k-kl-o turbulence model. The optimization methodology is validated by an optimization study of subsonic and transonic airfoils (NACA0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils). In this dissertation, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and lambda and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated

  18. Technology and Equipment of Waste Heat Recovery in Dryer Section of Paper Machine%纸机干燥部余热回收技术与设备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀文

    2012-01-01

    Some waste heat recovery technology and equipment used in dryer section of paper machine at home and abroad were introduced in this paper.%介绍一些国际、国内余热回收技术和设备,供同行分析、研究和借鉴.

  19. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  20. Study of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    -Stokes equations. It provides us possibilities to study details about noise generation mechanism. The formulation of the semi-empirical model is based on acoustic analogy and then curve-fitted with experimental data. Due to its high efficiency, such empirical relation is used for purpose of low noise airfoil......This paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise with special focus on airfoils with blunt trailing edges. Two methods are employed to calculate airfoil noise: The flow/acoustic splitting method and the semi-empirical method. The flow/acoustic splitting method is derived from compressible Navier...... design or optimization. Calculations from both methods are compared with exist experiments. The airfoil blunt noise is found as a function of trailing edge bluntness, Reynolds number, angle of attack, etc....

  1. Hybrid Optimization for Wind Turbine Thick Airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    One important element in aerodynamic design of wind turbines is the use of specially tailored airfoils to increase the ratio of energy capture and reduce cost of energy. This work is focused on the design of thick airfoils for wind turbines by using numerical optimization. A hybrid scheme is proposed in which genetic and gradient based algorithms are combined together to improve the accuracy and the reliability of the design. Firstly, the requirements and the constraints for this class of airfoils are described; then, the hybrid approach is presented. The final part of this work is dedicated to illustrate a numerical example regarding the design of a new thick airfoil. The results are discussed and compared to existing airfoils.

  2. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Daniel L. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  3. Airfoil profile drag increase due to acoustic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, John G.; Jones, Michael G.

    1989-04-01

    A two-dimensional airfoil (NACA-0009) is subjected to high intensity pure-tone sound over a 1-5 kHz frequency range while immersed in a flow with 240 ft/sec velocity in a quiet flow facility with a Reynolds number of 3 million. Wake dynamic pressures are determined, and the momentum deficit is used to calculate a two-dimensional drag coefficient. Significant increases in drag are observed when the airfoil is subjected to high-intensity sound at critical frequencies. The increased drag is accompanied by movement of the natural transition location. When the transition is fixed by roughness at 10 percent chord, no further transition movement is observed in response to an acoustic Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance. However, a 4 percent increase in the sectional drag coefficient is noted. It is believed to be due to the sound exciting the flow near the airfoil surface (shear layer), thus causing the existing turbulence to become more intense, possess a higher mixing rate (momentum), and increase the skin friction.

  4. Design of a new urban wind turbine airfoil using a pressure-load inverse method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, J.C.C.; Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques da Silva, F. [LNEC - Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Av. Brasil, 101, 1700-066 Lisboa (Portugal); Estanqueiro, A.I. [INETI - Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents the design methodology of a new wind turbine airfoil that achieves high performance in urban environment by increasing the maximum lift. For this purpose, an inverse method was applied to obtain a new wind turbine blade section with constant pressure-load along the chord, at the design inlet angle. In comparison with conventional blade section designs, the new airfoil has increased maximum lift, reduced leading edge suction peak and controlled soft-stall behaviour, due to a reduction of the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side. Wind tunnel experimental results confirmed the computational results. (author)

  5. Investigation of Laminar Boundary Layer on Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    林, 秀千人; 佐々木, 壮一; 児玉, 好雄; 清水, 光昭

    1999-01-01

    The development of the laminar boundary layer on the NACA symmetrical airfoils and the separation of it are simulated by using the boundary layer theory and discrete vortex method. The arrangement of the discrete vortices on the airfoil affects on the separation position very much because the separation is sensitive to the velocity gradient of the main flow. It needs the very small increment 1/500 in boundary layer simulation to get the exact position of the separation. The simulation of both...

  6. Personal and trip characteristics associated with safety equipment use by injured adult bicyclists: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teschke Kay

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to estimate use of helmets, lights, and visible clothing among cyclists and to examine trip and personal characteristics associated with their use. Methods Using data from a study of transportation infrastructure and injuries to 690 adult cyclists in Toronto and Vancouver, Canada, we examined the proportion who used bike lights, conspicuous clothing on the torso, and helmets on their injury trip. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine associations between personal and trip characteristics and each type of safety equipment. Results Bike lights were the least frequently used (20% of all trips although they were used on 77% of trips at night. Conspicuous clothing (white, yellow, orange, red was worn on 33% of trips. Helmets were used on 69% of trips, 76% in Vancouver where adult helmet use is required by law and 59% in Toronto where it is not. Factors positively associated with bike light use included night, dawn and dusk trips, poor weather conditions, weekday trips, male sex, and helmet use. Factors positively associated with conspicuous clothing use included good weather conditions, older age, and more frequent cycling. Factors positively associated with helmet use included bike light use, longer trip distances, hybrid bike type, not using alcohol in the 6 hours prior to the trip, female sex, older age, higher income, and higher education. Conclusions In two of Canada’s largest cities, helmets were the most widely used safety equipment. Measures to increase use of visibility aids on both daytime and night-time cycling trips may help prevent crashes.

  7. Comparative Drag Measurements at Transonic Speeds of Rectangular Sweptback NACA 65-009 Airfoils Mounted on a Freely Falling Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Charles W; Thompson, Jim Rogers

    1950-01-01

    Directly comparable drag measurements have been made of an airfoil with a conventional rectangular plan form and an airfoil with a sweptback plan form mounted on freely falling bodies. Both airfoils had NACA 65-009 sections and were identical in span, frontal area, and chord perpendicular to the leading edge. The sweptback plan form incorporated a sweepback angle of 45 degrees. The data obtained have been used to establish the relation between the airfoil drag coefficients and the free-stream Mach number over a range of Mach numbers from 0.90 to 1.27. The results of the measurements indicate that the drag of the sweptback plan form is less than 0.3 that of the rectangular plan form at a Mach number of 1.00 and is less than 0.4 that at a Mach number of 1.20.

  8. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šidlof, Petr; Štěpán, Martin; Vlček, Václav; Řidký, Václav; Šimurda, David; Horáček, Jaromír

    2014-03-01

    The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis) and plunging (vertical motion). The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  9. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis and plunging (vertical motion. The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  10. Probabilistic Design of Hollow Airfoil Composite Structure by Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sachin M. Shinde

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study represents simulation of Airfoil composite beam by using Monte Carlo method. A three dimensional static analysis of large displacement type has been carried out. Finite element analysis of NACA0012 airfoil composite structure has been carried out and uncertainty in bending stress is analyzed. Bending stress was objective function. Chord length , beam length ,elastic modulus in XY,YZ,XZ and shear modulus of epoxy graphite in XY,YZ,XZ, ply angle and ply thickness of airfoil section, force are varied within effective range and their effect on bending stress has been analyzed. In order to validate the results, one loop of simulation is benchmarked from results in literature. Ultimately, best set of probabilistic design variable is proposed to reduce bending stress under static loading condition.

  11. Turbine Airfoil With CMC Leading-Edge Concept Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for gas turbine engine hot-sections. When the Navy s Harrier fighter experienced engine (Pegasus F402) failure because of leading-edge durability problems on the second-stage high-pressure turbine vane, the Office of Naval Research came to the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for test support in evaluating a concept for eliminating the vane-edge degradation. The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) was selected for testing since it could provide temperature, pressure, velocity, and combustion gas compositions that closely simulate the engine environment. The study focused on equipping the stationary metal airfoil (Pegasus F402) with a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) leading-edge insert and evaluating the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. The test exposed the component, with and without the CMC insert, to the harsh engine environment in an unloaded condition, with cooling to provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The insert was made using an AlliedSignal Composites, Inc., enhanced HiNicalon (Nippon Carbon Co. LTD., Yokohama, Japan) fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite (SiC/SiC CMC) material fabricated via chemical vapor infiltration. This insert was 45-mils thick and occupied a recessed area in the leading edge and shroud of the vane. It was designed to be free floating with an end cap design. The HPBR tests provided a comparative evaluation of the temperature response and leading-edge durability and included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were aircooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the exact set of internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). In addition to documenting the temperature response of the metal vane for comparison with the CMC, a demonstration of improved leading-edge durability was a primary goal. First, the

  12. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran;

    2013-01-01

    some models before they can be used in a BEM code. In this article, the airfoil data for the MEXICO (Model EXperiments in Controlled cOnditions) rotor are extracted from CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) results. The azimuthally averaged velocity is used as the sectional velocity to define the angle...

  13. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.; Antoniou, I.

    2000-12-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risoe-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel was used having a background turbulence intensity of 1%, an inlet flow velocity of 40 m/s which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1.6Oe10{sup 6}. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.600 m and 0.606 m for NACA 63-415 and NACA 63-415-Risoe-D, respectively. The span was 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects. The measurements comprised both static and dynamic inflow where dynamic inflow was obtained by pitching the airfoil in a harmonic motion. We tested the influence of leading edge roughness, stall strips and vortex generators. For smooth surface conditions the modified airfoil showed an increase in lift-drag ratio before stall at {alpha}=8 from 67 to 72. Furthermore, the maximum lift increased from 1.33 to 1.37 while the minimum drag was maintained. Double stall was observed on the NACA 63-415 airfoil, but not on the modified airfoil. This was reflected in the standard deviation of both lift and drag in stall which was significantly lower for the modified airfoil indicating smooth and stable stall conditions. No significant differences were observed for dynamic stall. Test on both airfoil sections with zigzag tape at the leading edge towards the pressure side showed that the insensitivity to roughness was improved significantly for the modified airfoil. However, if zigzag tape was mounted at the leading edge towards the suction side less improvement was observed. Mounting of stall strips at and near the leading edge showed that only if they were mounted at the very vicinity of the leading edge the airfoil characteristics were affected significantly. If the stall strips were mounted on the pressure side downstream of approximately 1 % chord length only little influence was

  14. AirfoilPrep.py Documentation: Release 0.1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, S. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    AirfoilPrep.py provides functionality to preprocess aerodynamic airfoil data. Essentially, the module is an object oriented version of the AirfoilPrep spreadsheet with additional functionality and is written in the Python language. It allows the user to read in two-dimensional aerodynamic airfoil data, apply three-dimensional rotation corrections for wind turbine applications, and extend the datato very large angles of attack. This document discusses installation, usage, and documentation of the module.

  15. Analysis of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.B.Tay; K.B.Lim

    2009-01-01

    Simulations have been done to assess the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of different types of nonsymmetrical airfoils under different flapping configurations. The variables involved are reduced frequency, Strouhal number, pitch amplitude and phase angle. In order to analyze the variables more efficiently, the design of experiments using the response surface methodology is applied. Results show that both the variables and shape of the airfoil have a profound effect on the lift, thrust, and efficiency. By using nonsymmetrical airfoils, average lift coefficient as high as 2.23 can be obtained. The average thrust coefficient and efficiency also reach high values of 2.53 and 0.6 I, respectively. The lift production is highly dependent on the airfoil's shape while thrust production is influenced more heavily by the variables. Efficiency falls somewhere in between. Two-factor interactions are found to exist among the variables. This shows that it is not sufficient to analyze each variable individually. Vorticity diagrams are analyzed to explain the results obtained. Overall, the S1020 airfoil is able to provide relatively good efficiency and at the same time generate high thrust and lift force. These results aid in the design of a better omithopter's wing.

  16. 区间信号设备维修轨道车使用方式探讨%Usage of Railcar in Section Signal Equipment Maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文颖

    2011-01-01

    阐述温福客专铁路现行区间信号设备维修作业组织方式及所遇到的困难,通过比较说明使用轨道车进行区间信号设备检修作业的优越性;提出电务共用工务轨道车的3种方案并进行优劣性比较探讨。%This article discusses the maintenance mode of the section signal equipment in the Wenzhou-Fuzhou railway as well as the difficulties encountered recently.By comparing the two maintenance modes,it was shown that the maintenance mode of section signal equipment by using rail car has many advantages.The author proposed three solutions about sharing rail cars between the department of Permanent Wayside and the department of Communication Signal and compared the advantages and disadvantages of the three solutions.

  17. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Transport-type Airfoil in a Simulated Heavy Rain Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated heavy rain on the aerodynamic characteristics of an NACA 64-210 airfoil section equipped with leading-and trailing-edge high-lift devices were investigated in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The model had a chord of 2.5 ft, a span of 8 ft, and was mounted on the tunnel centerline between two large endplates. Aerodynamic measurements in and out of the simulated rain environment were obtained for dynamic pressures of 30 and 50 psf and an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 20 degrees for the cruise configuration. The rain intensity was varied to produce liquid water contents ranging from 16 to 46 gm/cu m. The results obtained for various rain intensity levels and tunnel speeds showed significant losses in maximum lift capability and increases in drag for a given lift as the liquid water content was increased. The results obtained on the landing configuration also indicate a progressive decrease in the angle of attack at which maximum lift occurred and an increase in the slope of the pitching-moment curve as the liquid water content was increased. The sensitivity of test results to the effects of the water surface tension was also investigated. A chemical was introduced into the rain environment that reduced the surface tension of water by a factor of 2. The reduction in the surface tension of water did not significantly alter the level of performance losses for the landing configuration.

  18. Turbine airfoil fabricated from tapered extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2013-07-16

    An airfoil (30) and fabrication process for turbine blades with cooling channels (26). Tapered tubes (32A-32D) are bonded together in a parallel sequence, forming a leading edge (21), a trailing edge (22), and pressure and suction side walls (23, 24) connected by internal ribs (25). The tapered tubes may be extruded without camber to simplify the extrusion process, then bonded along matching surfaces (34), forming a non-cambered airfoil (28), which may be cambered in a hot forming process and cut (48) to length. The tubes may have tapered walls that are thinner at the blade tip (T1) than at the base (T2), reducing mass. A cap (50) may be attached to the blade tip. A mounting lug (58) may be forged (60) on the airfoil base and then machined, completing the blade for mounting in a turbine rotor disk.

  19. Effects of internal Acoustic Excitation on the Improvementof Airfoil Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlase M.Fayed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of internal acoustic excitation on the leading-edge, separated boundary layers and the aerodynamic performance of NACA23015 cross section airfoil are examined as a function of excitation location with ranging frequency range (50-400 Hz of the introduced acoustic. Tests are separately conducted in two sections, open type wind tunnels at the Reynolds number of 3.3x105 for measurement at angle of attack (0, 3, 6, 9 &12 deg. and 3x104 for the visualization at angle of attack (12 deg. based on the airfoil chord. Results indicated that the excitation frequency and the excitation location are the key parameters to alter the flow properties and thus to improve the aerodynamic performance. The most effective excitation frequency is found to be equal to the shear layer instability frequency and on excitation location close to the separation point. Moreover, the lift is increased and drag reduced dramatically. The corresponding boundary layers are visualized to be reattached to the surface.

  20. Blowing Circulation Control on a Seaplane Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B. D.; Liu, P. Q.; Qu, Q. L.

    2011-09-01

    RANS simulations are presented for blowing circulation control on a seaplane airfoil. Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model and pressure-based coupled algorithm with second-order discretization were adopted to simulate the compressible flow. Both clear and simple flap configuration were simulated with blowing momentum coefficient Cμ = 0, 0.15 and 0.30. The results show that blowing near the airfoil trailing edge could enhance the Coanda effect, delay the flow separation, and increase the lift coefficient dramatically. The blowing circulation control is promising to apply to taking off and landing of an amphibious aircraft or seaplane.

  1. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marion, Lucas; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the sep......An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge...

  2. An experimental study of airfoil instability tonal noise with trailing edge serrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip F.

    2013-11-01

    sequentially, which is the condition for a ladder jump to occur. Lower amplification factor A for the T-S waves, which can result in a radiation of lower noise levels for the broadband hump peak at fs. This phenomenon will proportionally reduce the noise level difference for fn and fn+1, thus making an identification of a ladder jump event more difficult. Finally, we believe that the tone noise generated in this experimental study is of genuine tones of an isolated airfoil. This can be supported by the fact that, when considering either a straight trailing edge or a serrated trailing edge, the overall airfoil geometry at the same angle of attack is still retained and the wind tunnel setup and locations of the laboratory equipment, which could potentially become an anchor point for the acoustic feedback loop, are exactly the same. However, the straight S0 and serrated S2" trailing edges have been shown to produce systematically different spectral characteristics, especially in the forms of tonal rungs, which can be predicted accurately by the original and slightly modified acoustic feedback Model A respectively. In summary, the trailing edge serration is a useful device for the suppression of airfoil instability self-noise. For greater control effectiveness, however, the laminar separation bubble must be situated within the serration region of the trailing edge. This connection imposes restrictions on the angle of attack and velocity over which trailing edge serrations are effective. The feedback loop structure about the wake noise source and the suction surface of the airfoil in Model B is ignored in the present case. This assumption should be reasonably valid given that, in our previous study [3], we cannot identify any significant role of the boundary layer flow at the suction surface in contributing the instability tonal noise radiation across a wide range of Reynolds numbers.

  3. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    and a free-stream Mach number of 0.25 near the tip. Results show that the new airfoils achieve a high power coefficient in a wide range of angles of attack (AOA) and are extremely insensitive to surface roughness. Finally, a full blade analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and blade element......This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and a tip speed ratio, optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve a high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with the objectives of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on a previous in-house designed airfoil family which was optimized at a Reynolds number...

  4. Computational study of the Risø-B1-18 airfoil with a hinged flap providing variable trailing edge geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive computational study, in both steady and unsteady flow conditions, has been carried out to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the Risø-B1.18 airfoil equipped with variable trailing edge geometry as produced by a hinged flap. The function of such flaps should be to decre......A comprehensive computational study, in both steady and unsteady flow conditions, has been carried out to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the Risø-B1.18 airfoil equipped with variable trailing edge geometry as produced by a hinged flap. The function of such flaps should...

  5. EUDP project 'Low noise airfoil' - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F. (ed.)

    2012-06-15

    This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project 'Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (Denmark), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel at the Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA, USA), also a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel but equipped with an anechoic chamber that allow to perform acoustic measurements. On the theoretical side, the above experiments yield a series of model validations and improvements. In particular, the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model could be significantly improved by introducing turbulence anisotropy in its formulation, as well as the influence of the boundary layer mean pressure gradient. This two characteristics are inherent to airfoil flows but were neglected in the original approach. In addition, the experimental results are confronted to detailed Large Eddy Simulations of the airfoil flow giving more insight into the flow turbulence characteristics. The methodology which consists in measuring surface pressure spectra directly on the airfoil surface using flush-mounted microphones in order to evaluate far-field noise emission using additional theoretical results has been validated. This technique presents the advantage that it can easily be used in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel and does not require the use of an anechoic facility. It was developed as a substitute to the original plan that consisted in measuring acoustic waves using hot-wire velocimetry. This last technique proved ineffective in the LM Wind

  6. Causal mechanisms in airfoil-circulation formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Liu, T. S.; Liu, L. Q.; Zou, S. F.; Wu, J. Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we trace the dynamic origin, rather than any kinematic interpretations, of lift in two-dimensional flow to the physical root of airfoil circulation. We show that the key causal process is the vorticity creation by tangent pressure gradient at the airfoil surface via no-slip condition, of which the theoretical basis has been given by Lighthill ["Introduction: Boundary layer theory," in Laminar Boundary Layers, edited by L. Rosenhead (Clarendon Press, 1963), pp. 46-113], which we further elaborate. This mechanism can be clearly revealed in terms of vorticity formulation but is hidden in conventional momentum formulation, and hence has long been missing in the history of one's efforts to understand lift. By a careful numerical simulation of the flow around a NACA-0012 airfoil, and using both Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions, we illustrate the detailed transient process by which the airfoil gains its circulation and demonstrate the dominating role of relevant dynamical causal mechanisms at the boundary. In so doing, we find that the various statements for the establishment of Kutta condition in steady inviscid flow actually correspond to a sequence of events in unsteady viscous flow.

  7. APPROXIMATION OF FREE-FORM CURVE – AIRFOIL SHAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHONG PERK LIN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximation of free-form shape is essential in numerous engineering applications, particularly in automotive and aircraft industries. Commercial CAD software for the approximation of free-form shape is based almost exclusively on parametric polynomial and rational parametric polynomial. The parametric curve is defined by vector function of one independent variable R(u = (x(u, y(u, z(u, where 0≤u≤1. Bézier representation is one of the parametric functions, which is widely used in the approximating of free-form shape. Given a string of points with the assumption of sufficiently dense to characterise airfoil shape, it is desirable to approximate the shape with Bézier representation. The expectation is that the representation function is close to the shape within an acceptable working tolerance. In this paper, the aim is to explore the use of manual and automated methods for approximating section curve of airfoil with Bézier representation.

  8. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  9. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A.; Gomez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-06-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling.

  10. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling

  11. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2015-08-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method which uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB which are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  12. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  13. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  14. Characterization of the Effect of Wing Surface Instrumentation on UAV Airfoil Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed flight research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) has prompted study into the aerodynamic effects of modifications made to the surfaces of laminar airfoils. The research is focused on the high-aspect ratio, laminar-flow type wings commonly found on UAVs and other aircraft with a high endurance requirement. A broad range of instrumentation possibilities, such as structural, pressure, and temperature sensing devices may require the alteration of the airfoil outer mold line as part of the installation process. This study attempts to characterize the effect of installing this additiona1 instrumentation on key airfoil performance factors, such as transition location, lift and drag curves, and stall point. In particular, the general case of an airfoil that is channeled in the spanwise direction is considered, and the impact on key performance characteristics is assessed. Particular attention is focused on exploring the limits of channel depth and low-Reynolds number on performance and stall characteristics. To quantify the effect of increased skin friction due to premature transition caused by protruding or recessed instrumentation, two simplified, conservative scenarios are used to consider two potential sources of diaturbance: A) that leading edge alterations would cause linearly expanding areas (triangles) of turbulent flow on both surfaces of the wing upstream of the natural transition point, and B) that a channel or bump on the upper surface would trip turbulent flow across the whole upper surface upstream of the natural transition point. A potentially more important consideration than the skin friction drag increment is the change in overall airfoil performance due to the installation of instrumentation along most of the wingspan. To quantify this effect, 2D CFD simulations of the flow over a representative mid-span airfoil section were conducted in order to assess the change in lift and drag curves for the airfoil in the presence of

  15. Design Of An Aerodynamic Measurement System For Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and validation of a measurement system for aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles. An aerodynamic balance was designed in order to measure the lift, drag forces and pitching moment for different airfoils. During the design process, several aspects were analyzed in order to produce an efficient design, for instance the range of changes of the angle of attack with and a small increment and the versatility of being adapted to different type of airfoils, since it is a wire balance it was aligned and calibrated as well. Wind tunnel tests of a two dimensional NACA four digits family airfoil and four different modifications of this airfoil were performed to validate the aerodynamic measurement system. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, four different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack experimentally for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off, called the no blowing condition, by means of wind tunnel tests. The experiments were performed in a closed circuit wind tunnel with an open test section. Finally, results of the wind tunnel tests were compared with numerical results obtained by means of computational fluid dynamics as well as with other experimental references and found to be in good agreement.

  16. BIFURCATIONS OF AIRFOIL IN INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuFei; YangYiren

    2005-01-01

    Bifurcations of an airfoil with nonlinear pitching stiffness in incompressible flow are investigated. The pitching spring is regarded as a spring with cubic stiffness. The motion equations of the airfoil are written as the four dimensional one order differential equations. Taking air speed and the linear part of pitching stiffness as the parameters, the analytic solutions of the critical boundaries of pitchfork bifurcations and Hopf bifurcations are obtained in 2 dimensional parameter plane. The stabilities of the equilibrium points and the limit cycles in different regions of 2 dimensional parameter plane are analyzed. By means of harmonic balance method, the approximate critical boundaries of 2-multiple semi-stable limit cycle bifurcations are obtained, and the bifurcation points of supercritical or subcritical Hopf bifurcation are found. Some numerical simulation results are given.

  17. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  18. EUDP Project: Low Noise Airfoil - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project `Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side....... In particular, the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model could be significantly improved by introducing turbulence anisotropy in its formulation, as well as the influence of the boundary layer mean pressure gradient. This two characteristics are inherent to airfoil flows but were neglected in the original......-mounted microphones in order to evaluate far-field noise emission using additional theoretical results has been validated. This technique presents the advantage that it can easily be used in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel and does not require the use of an anechoic facility. It was developed as a substitute...

  19. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.;

    2000-01-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risø-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUXopen jet wind tunnel was used having a backgr......This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risø-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUXopen jet wind tunnel was used having...... a background turbulence intensity of 1%, an inlet flow velocity of 40 m/s which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1.6×106. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.600 m and 0.606 m for NACA 63-415 and NACA 63-415-Risø-D,respectively. The span was 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects...

  20. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D...... Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils....

  1. CFD study of thick flatback airfoils using OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Milián Sanz, José María

    2010-01-01

    New airfoil designs are created in order to improve both the structural and aerodynamic properties of a wind turbine blade, one example of these are flatback airfoils. Furthermore, a new CFD programme exists in order to study the behavior of the flow around an airfoil, OpenFOAM. The flow around these new airfoils using OpenFOAM is studied in the present thesis. It is used the turbulence model k-! SST for fully turbulent boundary layer and free transition at the boundary layer, modeled with th...

  2. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distribution...... of curvature distribution. And the performances of new airfoil are compared with the original one to validate, and results show an improvement, validated the advantage of the improved design method....

  3. Identification of dynamic properties of radial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, V.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost ‘‘top foil’’ layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Air-foil bearings are curre

  4. Investigations of the transonic flow around oscillating airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdeman, H.

    1977-01-01

    Exploratory wind-tunnel experiments in high-subsonic and transonic flow on a conventional airfoil with oscillating flap and a supercritical airfoil oscillating in pitch are described. In the analysis of the experimental results, emphasis is placed upon the typical aspects of transonic flow, namely t

  5. Extraction of airfoil data using PIV and pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2011-01-01

    airfoil data are compared to 2D data from wind tunnel experiments and XFOIL computations. The comparison suggests that the rotor is subject to severe 3D effects originating from the geometry of the rotor, and explains why the Blade Element Momentum technique with 2D airfoil data over‐predicts the loading...

  6. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  7. 纸机干燥部余热回收技术与设备(续)%Technology and Equipment of Waste Heat Recovery in Dryer Section of Paper Machine (Continuous)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀文

    2012-01-01

    Some waste heat recovery technology and equipment used in dryer section of paper machine at home and abroad were introduced in this paper.%介绍一些国际、国内余热回收技术和设备,供同行分析、研究和借鉴.

  8. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  9. Tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Danielle J.; Doolan, Con J.

    2016-02-01

    This study is concerned with the flow-induced noise of a smooth wall-mounted finite airfoil with flat ended tip and natural boundary layer transition. Far-field noise measurements have been taken at a single observer location and with a microphone array in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel for a wall-mounted finite airfoil with aspect ratios of L / C = 1 - 3, at a range of Reynolds numbers (ReC = 7.9 ×105 - 1.6 ×106, based on chord) and geometric angles of attack (α = 0 - 6 °). At these Reynolds numbers, the wall-mounted finite airfoil produces a broadband noise contribution with a number of discrete equispaced tones at non-zero angles of attack. Spectral data are also presented for the noise produced due to three-dimensional vortex flow near the airfoil tip and wall junction to show the contributions of these flow features to airfoil noise generation. Tonal noise production is linked to the presence of a transitional flow state to the trailing edge and an accompanying region of mildly separated flow on the pressure surface. The separated flow region and tonal noise source location shift along the airfoil trailing edge towards the free-end region with increasing geometric angle of attack due to the influence of the tip flow field over the airfoil span. Tonal envelopes defining the operating conditions for tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil are derived and show that the domain of tonal noise production differs significantly from that of a two-dimensional airfoil. Tonal noise production shifts to lower Reynolds numbers and higher geometric angles of attack as airfoil aspect ratio is reduced.

  10. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, M.; Uzol, O.; Akmandor, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack.

  11. 23 CFR 140.910 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 140.910 Section 140.910 Highways FEDERAL... Railroad Work § 140.910 Equipment. (a) Company owned equipment. Cost of company-owned equipment may be... equipment. Where company owned equipment is not available, reimbursement will be limited to the amount...

  12. On the Spanwise Uniformity of Wind Tunnel Test Data of Transonic Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Tadashi; Suzuki, Koichi; KAMIYA, Nobuhiko; 伊藤, 忠; 鈴木, 弘一; 神谷, 信彦

    1981-01-01

    The spanwise uniformity of the flow around two-dimensional models of airfoils has been examined for the 100×400 transonic wind tunnel and the 2M×2M transonic wind tunnel. For flows of free-stream Mach numbers below the drag-divergence Mach number, the spanwise uniformity of the section drag coefficient is good in the region around the center section. Although the spanwise uniformity is bad for flows of freestream Mach numbers above that, the drag-divergence Mach number can be obtained accurat...

  13. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2013-01-01

    million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry on the existing airfoils and thus simplify the design procedure. The viscos/inviscid code Xfoil is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization where the Reynolds number is set at 16 million with a free......-stream Mach number of 0.25 at the blade tip. Results show that these new airfoils achieve high power coefficient in a wide range of angles of attack (AOA) and they are extremely insensitive to surface roughness....

  14. Geometrical effects on the airfoil flow separation and transition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-25

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible flow over two airfoils, NACA-4412 and NACA-0012-64, to investigate the effects of the airfoil geometry on the flow separation and transition patterns at Re=104 and 10 degrees incidence. The two chosen airfoils are geometrically similar except for maximum camber (respectively 4%C and 0 with C the chord length), which results in a larger projection area with respect to the incoming flow for the NACA-4412 airfoil, and a larger leeward surface curvature at the leading edge for the NACA-0012-64 airfoil. The governing equations are discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order spatial discretization scheme. An assessment on the two-point correlation indicates that a spanwise domain size of 0.8C is sufficiently large for the present simulations. We discuss flow separation at the airfoil leading edge, transition of the separated shear layer to three-dimensional flow and subsequently to turbulence. Numerical results reveal a stronger adverse pressure gradient field in the leading edge region of the NACA-0012-64 airfoil due to the rapidly varying surface curvature. As a result, the flow experiences detachment at x/C=0.08, and the separated shear layer transition via Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism occurs at x/C=0.29 with fully developed turbulent flow around x/C=0.80. These flow development phases are delayed to occur at much downstream positions, respectively, observed around x/C=0.25, 0.71 and 1.15 for the NACA-4412 airfoil. The turbulent intensity, measured by the turbulent fluctuations and turbulent Reynolds stresses, are much larger for NACA-0012-64 from the transition onset until the airfoil trailing edge, while turbulence develops significantly downstream of the trailing edge for the NACA-4412 airfoil. For both airfoils, our DNS results indicate that the mean Reynolds stress u\\'u\\'/U02 reaches its maximum value at a distance from the surface approximately equal to the displacement

  15. Trailing Edge Noise Model Validation and Application to Airfoil Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, an existing trailing edge noise model is validated by comparing with airfoil surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound pressure levels measured in three different experiments. The agreement is satisfactory in one case but poor in two other cases....... Nevertheless, the model reproduces the main tendencies observed in the measurements with respect to varying flow conditions. Second, the model is implemented into an airfoil design code that is originally used for aerodynamic optimization. An existing wind turbine airfoil is optimized in order to reduce its...... noise emission, trying at the same time to preserve some of its aerodynamic and geometric characteristics. The new designs are characterized by less cambered airfoils and flatter suction sides. The resulting noise reductions seem to be mainly achieved by a reduction in the turbulent kinetic energy...

  16. Unsteady transonic flow control around an airfoil in a channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Md. Abdul; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, Mohammad; Mitsutake, Yuichi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Yu, Shen

    2016-04-01

    Transonic internal flow around an airfoil is associated with self-excited unsteady shock wave oscillation. This unsteady phenomenon generates buffet, high speed impulsive noise, non-synchronous vibration, high cycle fatigue failure and so on. Present study investigates the effectiveness of perforated cavity to control this unsteady flow field. The cavity has been incorporated on the airfoil surface. The degree of perforation of the cavity is kept constant as 30%. However, the number of openings (perforation) at the cavity upper wall has been varied. Results showed that this passive control reduces the strength of shock wave compared to that of baseline airfoil. As a result, the intensity of shock wave/boundary layer interaction and the root mean square (RMS) of pressure oscillation around the airfoil have been reduced with the control method.

  17. Numerical simulation of airfoil trailing edge serration noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    In the present work, numerical simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with and without serrated Trailing Edge. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy is implemented into the in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity...... field are obtained using Large Eddy Simulation. To obtain the time history data of sound pressure, the flow quantities are integrated around the airfoil surface through the FW-H approach. The extended length of the serration is about 16.7% of the airfoil chord and the geometric angle of the serration...... is 28 degrees. The chord based Reynolds number is around 1.5x106. Simulations are compared with existing wind tunnel experiments at various angles of attack. Even though the airfoil under investigation is already optimized for low noise emission, numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments show...

  18. Development of Variable Camber Morphing Airfoil Using Corrugated Structure

    OpenAIRE

    横関, 智弘; 杉浦, 綾; 平野, 義鎭; Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Aya; Hirano, Yoshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development and the wind tunnel test of a variable geometry morphing airfoil using corrugated structures. Proof-of-concept study of a morphing wing with corrugated flexible seamless flap-like structure is verified by finite element analysis, and a prototype is manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastics. For the actuation system, two servomotors are installed inside the prototype wing to control the airfoil shape by the chordwise tension of the connected wires...

  19. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  20. Response of a Thin Airfoil Encountering a Strong Density Discontinuity

    OpenAIRE

    Marble, F. E.

    1993-01-01

    Airfoil theory for unsteady motion has been developed extensively assuming the undisturbed medium to be of uniform density, a restriction accurate for motion in the atmosphere, G/auert (1929), Burgers (1935), Theodorsen (1935), Kussner (1936), Karman and Sears (1938), Kinney and Sears (1975). In some instances, notably for airfoils comprising fan, compressor and turbine blade rows, the undisturbed medium may carry density variations or "spots," resulting from non-uniformaties ...

  1. Static aeroelastic response of chiral-core airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Spadoni, Alessandro; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research is being devoted to the analysis and application of cellular solids for the design of innovative structural components. The chiral geometry in particular features a unique mechanical behavior which is here exploited for the design of 2D airfoils with morphing capabilities. A coupled-physics model, comprising computational fluid dynamics and structural analyses, investigates the influence of the chiral core on the aerodynamic behavior of the airfoil. Specifically, the model ...

  2. A STUDY ON THE MECHANISM OF HIGH-LIFT GENERATION BY AN AIRFOIL IN UNSTEADY MOTION AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂; Hossein Hamdani

    2001-01-01

    The aerodynamic force and flow structure of NACA 0012 airfoil performing an unsteady motion at low Reynolds number (Re = 100) are calculated by solving Navier-Stokes equations. The motion consists of three parts: the first translation, rotation and the second translation in the direction opposite to the first.The rotation and the second translation in this motion are expected to represent the rotation and translation of the wing-section of a hovering insect. The flow structure is used in combination with the theory of vorticity dynamics to explain the generation of unsteady aerodynamic force in the motion. During the rotation, due to the creation of strong vortices in short time, large aerodynamic force is produced and the force is almost normal to the airfoil chord. During the second translation, large lift coefficient can be maintained for certain time period and CL1, the lift coefficient averaged over four chord lengths of travel, is larger than 2 (the corresponding steady-state lift coefficient is only 0.9). The large lift coefficient is due to two effects. The first is the delayed shedding of the stall vortex. The second is that the vortices created during the airfoil rotation and in the near wake left by previous translation form a short "vortex street" in front of the airfoil and the "vortex street" induces a "wind";against this "wind" the airfoil translates, increasing its relative speed. The above results provide insights to the understanding of the mechanism of high-lift generation by a hovering insect.

  3. Optimization Method for Turbine Airfoil Designing Using Genetic Algorithms, CFD and Parallel Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An optimization method to design turbine airfoils using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) design shell coupled directly with a viscous CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis code is proposed in this paper. The blade geometry is parameterized and the optimization method is used to search for a blade geometry that will minimize the loss in the turbine cascade passage. The viscous flow prediction code is verified by the experimental data of cascade, which is typical for a gas turbine rotor blade section. A comparative study of the blades designed by the optimization technique and the original one is presented

  4. Nomogram for correcting drag and angle of attack of an airfoil model in an air stream of finite diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1924-01-01

    In experimenting with airfoil models in a wind tunnel, the magnitude of the forces acting on the model is affected by the fact that the air stream in which the model is suspended, has a restricted cross-section. In order to utilize the results for an airplane in an unlimited quantity of air, a correction must be made. The magnitude of this correction was determined by Prandtl by the application of his wing theory.

  5. Design and Validation of a Force Measurement System for the Analysis of Airfoil Lift and Drag Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, Niall

    2010-01-01

    One of the aims of this research was to reduce the flow separation and therefore the pressure drag generated by a wing section, through the adding of surface modifications. The modifications consisted of roughening the surface of polystyrene airfoils using a sand blasting technique, which resulted in a dimpled surface. This idea originated from the design of a golf ball, as the dimples are known to delay flow separation which allows the ball to travel further. In relation to wing design, ther...

  6. 7 CFR 550.38 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 550.38 Section 550.38 Agriculture... Equipment/property Standards § 550.38 Equipment. (a) The Cooperator shall not use equipment acquired with... the Federal Government retains an interest in the equipment. (b) The Cooperator shall use...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 23.1415 Section 23.1415... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Safety Equipment § 23.1415 Ditching equipment. (a) Emergency flotation and signaling equipment required by any operating rule in...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 25.1415 Section 25.1415... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Safety Equipment § 25.1415 Ditching equipment. (a) Ditching equipment used in airplanes to be certificated for ditching under § 25.801, and required by...

  9. 21 CFR 606.60 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 606.60 Section 606.60 Food and Drugs... GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Equipment § 606.60 Equipment. (a) Equipment... maintenance. The equipment shall be observed, standardized and calibrated on a regularly scheduled basis...

  10. 21 CFR 225.30 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 225.30 Section 225.30 Food and Drugs... Equipment § 225.30 Equipment. (a) Equipment which is designed to perform its intended function and is properly installed and used is essential to the manufacture of medicated feeds. Such equipment...

  11. 21 CFR 226.30 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 226.30 Section 226.30 Food and Drugs... Facilities and Equipment § 226.30 Equipment. Equipment used for the manufacture, processing, packaging, bulk... facilitate maintenance and operation for its intended purpose. The equipment shall: (a) Be so...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 27.1415 Section 27.1415... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1415 Ditching equipment. (a) Emergency flotation and signaling equipment required by any operating rule in this chapter must meet the...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 29.1415 Section 29.1415... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1415 Ditching equipment. (a) Emergency flotation and signaling equipment required by any operating rule of this chapter must meet...

  14. Assessment of the aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds and moderate Ma numbers using CFD modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospathopoulos, John M.; Papadakis, Giorgos; Sieros, Giorgos; Voutsinas, Spyros G.; Chaviaropoulos, Takis K.; Diakakis, Kostas

    2014-06-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds number is assessed using two different CFD RANS solvers: the compressible MaPFlow and the incompressible CRES-flowNS-2D both equipped with the k-ω SST turbulence model. Validation is carried out by comparing simulations against existing high Reynolds experimental data for the NACA 63-018 airfoil in the range of -10° to 20°. The use of two different solvers aims on one hand at increasing the credibility in the results and on the other at quantifying the compressibility effects. Convergence of steady simulations is achieved within a mean range of -10° to 14° which refers to attached or light stall conditions. Over this range the simulations from the two codes are in good agreement. As stall gets deeper, steady convergence ceases and the simulations must switch to unsteady. Lift and drag oscillations are produced which increase in amplitude as the angle of attack increases. Finally in post stall, the average CL is found to decrease up to ~24° or 32° for the FFA or the NACA 63-018 airfoils respectively, and then recover to higher values indicating a change in the unsteady features of the flow.

  15. 43 CFR 12.934 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 12.934 Section 12.934 Public....934 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired...

  16. 29 CFR 95.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment. 95.34 Section 95.34 Labor Office of the Secretary... Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with...

  17. 34 CFR 74.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 74.34 Section 74.34 Education Office of the... Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient may not use equipment acquired with Federal...

  18. 7 CFR 3019.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 3019.34 Section 3019.34 Agriculture....34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired...

  19. 45 CFR 74.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 74.34 Section 74.34 Public Welfare... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 74.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment... section. (b)(1) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with HHS funds to provide services to...

  20. Numerical study of the static and pitching RISOe-B1-18 airfoil[STALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this report is the better understanding of the physics of the aeroelastic motion of wind turbine blades in order to improve the numerical models used for their design. In this study, the case of the RISOe-B1-18 airfoil which was equipped and measured in an open jet wind tunnel is studied. Two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculations using the k-w SST and Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence models are conducted. An engineering semi-empirical dynamic stall model is also used for performing calculations. Computational results are compared to the experimental results that are available both for the static airfoil and in the case of pitching motions. It is shown that the Navier-Stokes simulations can reproduced the main characteristic features of the flow. The DES model seems also to be able to reproduce some details of the unsteady aerodynamics. The Navier-Stokes computations can then be used to improve the performance of the engineering model. (au)

  1. Influence of Thickness Variation on the Flapping Performance of Symmetric NACA Airfoils in Plunging Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangyu Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the impact of airfoil thickness on flapping performance, the unsteady flow fields of a family of airfoils from an NACA0002 airfoil to an NACA0020 airfoil in a pure plunging motion and a series of altered NACA0012 airfoils in a pure plunging motion were simulated using computational fluid dynamics techniques. The “class function/shape function transformation“ parametric method was employed to decide the coordinates of these altered NACA0012 airfoils. Under specified plunging kinematics, it is observed that the increase of an airfoil thickness can reduce the leading edge vortex (LEV in strength and delay the LEV shedding. The increase of the maximum thickness can enhance the time-averaged thrust coefficient and the propulsive efficiency without lift reduction. As the maximum thickness location moves towards the leading edge, the airfoil obtains a larger time-averaged thrust coefficient and a higher propulsive efficiency without changing the lift coefficient.

  2. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    OpenAIRE

    Hua YANG; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran; Hong, Zedong; Liu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamics performance, but the reliability of airfoil data is an important factor to improve the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power using a BEM code. The airfoil characteristics used in BEM codes are mostly based on 2D wind tunnel measurements of airfoils with constant span. However, a BEM code using airfoil data obtained directly from 2D wind tunnel measurements will not yield the...

  3. Aero-elastic stability of airfoil flow using 2-D CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A three degrees-of-freedom structural dynamics model has been coupled to a two-dimensional incompressible CFD code. The numerical investigation considers aero-elastic stability for two different airfoils; the NACA0012 and the LM 2 18 % airfoils. Stable and unstable configurations and limit cycle oscillations are predicted in accordance with literature for the first airfoil. An attempt to predict stall induced edge-wise vibrations on a wind turbine airfoil fails using this two-dimensional approach. (au)

  4. Large Eddy simulation of Trailing Edge Acoustic Emissions of an Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jinlong; Devenport, William; Paterson, Eric; Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation of trailing edge acoustic emission of an airfoil concerns the effects of the broadband noise generated by the interaction of turbulent boundary layer and airfoil trailing edge, and the tonal noise generated by the vortex shedding of trailing edge bluntness. Large eddy simulation (LES) is performed on an NACA0012 airfoil with blunt trailing edge at a Reynolds number Rec = 400; 000 based on the airfoil chord length for three different configurations with different angl...

  5. Integration of Airfoil Design during the design of new blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, L.; Bottasso, L.; Croce, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Power, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Despite the fact that the design of a new blade is a multidisciplinary task, often the different disciplines are combined together at later stage. Looking at the aerodynamic design, it is common practice design/select the airfoils first and then design the blade in terms of chord and twist based on the initial selection of the airfoils. Although this approach is quite diffused, it limits the potentialities of obtaining optimal performance. The present work is focused on investigating the benefits of designing the external shape of the blade including the airfoil shapes together with chord and twist. To accomplish this, a design approach has been developed, where an advanced gradient based optimization algorithm is able to control the shape of the blade. The airfoils described in the work are the NACA 4 digits, while the chord distribution and the twist distribution are described through Bezier curves. In this way, the complexity of the problem is limited while a versatile geometrical description is kept. After the details of the optimization scheme are illustrated, several numerical examples are shown, demonstrating the advantages in terms of performance and development time of integrating the design of the airfoils during the optimization of the blade.

  6. Energy Harvesting of a Flapping Airfoil in a Vortical Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. Charlie; Wei, Zhenglun

    2014-11-01

    We study the response of a two-dimensional flapping airfoil in the wake downstream of an oscillating D-shape cylinder. The airfoil has either heaving or pitching motions. The leading edge vortex (LEV) and trailing edge vortex (TEV) of the airfoil play important roles in energy harvesting. Two major interaction modes between the airfoil and incoming vortices, the suppressing mode and the reinforcing mode, are identified. However, distinctions exist between the heaving and pitching motion in terms of their contributions to the interaction modes and the efficiency of the energy extraction. A potential theory and the related fluid dynamics analysis are developed to analytically demonstrate that the topology of the incoming vortices corresponding to the airfoil is the primary factor that determines the interaction modes. Finally, the trade-off between the input and the output is discussed. It is found that appropriate operational parameters for the heaving motion are preferable in order to preserve acceptable input power for energy harvesters, while appropriate parameters for the pitching motion are essential to achieve decent output power.

  7. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  8. Design analysis of vertical wind turbine with airfoil variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Qaedy, T. Masykur Al; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    With an ever increasing electrical energy crisis occurring in the Banda Aceh City, it will be important to investigate alternative methods of generating power in ways different than fossil fuels. In fact, one of the biggest sources of energy in Aceh is wind energy. It can be harnessed not only by big corporations but also by individuals using Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). This paper presents a three-dimensional CFD analysis of the influence of airfoil design on performance of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The main objective of this paper is to develop an airfoil design for NACA 63-series vertical axis wind turbine, for average wind velocity 2,5 m/s. To utilize both lift and drag force, some of designs of airfoil are analyzed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such us Fluent. Simulation is performed for this airfoil at different angles of attach rearranging from -12°, -8°, -4°, 0°, 4°, 8°, and 12°. The analysis showed that the significant enhancement in value of lift coefficient for airfoil NACA 63-series is occurred for NACA 63-412.

  9. Interaction of two-dimensional impulsively started airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fu-bing; ZENG Nian-dong; ZHANG Liang; WU De-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous vorticity panels were used to model general unsteady inviscid, incompressible, two-dimensional flows. The geometry of thc airfoil was approximated by series of short straight segments having endpoints that lie on the actual surface. A piecewise linear, continuous distribution of vorticity over the airfoil surface was used to generate disturbance flow. The no-penetration condition was imposed at the midpoint of each segment and at discrete times. The wake was simulated by a system of point vortices, which moved at local fluid velocity. At each time step, a new wake panel with uniform vorticity distribution was attached to the trailing edge, and the condition of constant circulation around the airfoil and wake was imposed. A new expression for Kutta condition was developed to study the interference effect between two impulsively started NACA0012 airfoils. The tandem arrangement was found to be the most effective to enhance the lift of the rear airfoil. The interference effect between tidal turbine blades was shown clearly.

  10. Design and verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Gaunaa, M.;

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design and experimental verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for MW-size wind turbines with variable speed and pitch control. Seven airfoils were designed with thickness-to-chord ratios between 15% and 53% to cover the entire span of a wind turbine blade. The airfoil...

  11. 28 CFR 66.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 66.32 Section 66.32 Judicial... Equipment. (a) The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended, Public Law 90-351, section 808, requires that the title to all equipment and supplies purchased with section 403 or...

  12. Multi-objective optimization design of airfoil and wing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Ziqiang; FU; Hongyan; YU; Rixin; LIU; Jie

    2004-01-01

    To extend available monoobjective optimization methods to multiobjective and multidisciplinary optimization, the construction of a suitable resultant objective function(in deterministic method-DM) or a fitness function(in genetic algorithm-GA) is important. An objective function combination method (OFCM) of constructing such a function for constrained optimization problems is suggested. How to use both deterministic and genetic algorithms to biobjective and bidisciplinary optimal design of high performance airfoils and wings is discussed. Numerical results in both 2D (airfoil) and 3D (wing) cases show that the present method can be used to optimaize different kinds of initial airfoils and wings. The performance of optimized shape is improved significantly. The method is successful and effective.

  13. Response of a thin airfoil encountering strong density discontinuity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marble, F.E. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Karman Lab. of Fluid Mechanics

    1993-12-01

    Airfoil theory for unsteady motion has been developed extensively assuming the undisturbed medium to be of uniform density, a restriction accurate for motion in the atmosphere. In some instances, notably for airfoil comprising fan, compressor and turbine blade rows, the undisturbed medium may carry density variations or ``spots``, resulting from non-uniformities in temperature or composition, of a size comparable to the blade chord. This condition exists for turbine blades, immediately downstream of the main burner of a gas turbine engine where the density fluctuations of the order of 50 percent may occur. Disturbances of a somewhat smaller magnitude arise from the ingestion of hot boundary layers into fans, and exhaust into hovercraft. Because these regions of non-uniform density convect with the moving medium, the airfoil experiences a time varying load and moment which the authors calculate.

  14. Aerodynamic performance of an annular classical airfoil cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsten, D. E.; Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments that were performed in a large-scale subsonic annular cascade facility that was specifically designed to provide three-dimensional aerodynamic data for the verification of numerical-calculation codes. In particular, the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical flat-plate airfoil cascade is determined for angles of incidence of 0, 5, and 10 deg. The resulting data are analyzed and are correlated with predictions obtained from NASA's MERIDL and TSONIC numerical programs. It is found that: (1) at 0 and 5 deg, the airfoil surface data show a good correlation with the predictions; (2) at 10 deg, the data are in fair agreement with the numerical predictions; and (3) the two-dimensional Gaussian similarity relationship is appropriate for the wake velocity profiles in the mid-span region of the airfoil.

  15. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model...... is tested and validated by comparing with other results from the literature. Finally, this model is used in the optimization process of two reference airfoils in order to reduce their noise signature: the RISØ-B1-18 and the S809 airfoils....

  16. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model is tested and validated by comparing with other results from the literature. Finally, this model is used in the optimization process of two reference airfoils in order to reduce their noise signature: the RISOE-B1-18 and the S809 airfoils. (au)

  17. Aspects of Numerical Simulation of Circulation Control Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The mass-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoils. Numerical solutions are computed with a multigrid method that uses an implicit approximate factorization smoother. The effects of flow conditions (e.g., free-stream Mach number, angle of attack, momentum coefficient) and mesh on the prediction of circulation control airfoil flows are considered. In addition, the impact of turbulence modeling, including curvature effects and modifications to reduce eddy viscosity levels in the wall jet (i.e., Coanda flow), is discussed. Computed pressure distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  18. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2010-01-01

    noise prediction model, the previously developed integrated design technique is further developed. The new code takes into account different airfoil requirements according to their local positions on a blade, such as sensitivity to leading edge roughness, design lift at off-design condition, stall......Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...

  19. Design and validation of the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    avoid the problem of curvature discontinuity. An airfoil profile with discontinuous curvature can produce a discontinuous pressure gradient (i.e., local flow acceleration or deceleration), which enhances flow separation and thus decreases the airfoil performance. By combining the design method....... To validate the airfoil design, CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil has been tested experimentally in the acoustic wind tunnel located at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), USA. To show the superiority of the CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils, comparisons on aerodynamic performance and noise...

  20. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved....... been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...

  1. Aerodynamic shape optimization for alleviating dynamic stall characteristics of helicopter rotor airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qing

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to alleviate the dynamic stall effects in helicopter rotor, the sequential quadratic programming (SQP method is employed to optimize the characteristics of airfoil under dynamic stall conditions based on the SC1095 airfoil. The geometry of airfoil is parameterized by the class-shape-transformation (CST method, and the C-topology body-fitted mesh is then automatically generated around the airfoil by solving the Poisson equations. Based on the grid generation technology, the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations are chosen as the governing equations for predicting airfoil flow field and the highly-efficient implicit scheme of lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS is adopted for temporal discretization. To capture the dynamic stall phenomenon of the rotor more accurately, the Spalart–Allmaras turbulence model is employed to close the RANS equations. The optimized airfoil with a larger leading edge radius and camber is obtained. The leading edge vortex and trailing edge separation of the optimized airfoil under unsteady conditions are obviously weakened, and the dynamic stall characteristics of optimized airfoil at different Mach numbers, reduced frequencies and angles of attack are also obviously improved compared with the baseline SC1095 airfoil. It is demonstrated that the optimized method is effective and the optimized airfoil is suitable as the helicopter rotor airfoil.

  2. Design of the new Risoe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Dahl, K.S. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A new airfoil family for wind turbines was developed by use of a design method using numerical optimization and the flow solver, XFOIL. The results were evaluated with the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D. The airfoil family constitutes 6 airfoils ranging in thickness from 15% to 30%. The airfoils were designed to have a maximum lift coefficient around 1.5 in natural conditions and high lift-drag ratios below maximum lift. Insensitivity to leading edge roughness was obtained by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurred close to the leading edge just before stall. The airfoil family was designed for a 600 kW wind turbine and provides a basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  3. Prediction of the wind turbine performance by using BEM with airfoil data extracted from CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran;

    2014-01-01

    codes are mostly based on 2D wind tunnel measurements of airfoils with constant span. Due to 3D effects, a BEM code using airfoil data obtained directly from 2D wind tunnel measurements will not yield the correct loading and power. As a consequence, 2D airfoil characteristics have to be corrected before......Blade element momentum (BEM) theory with airfoil data is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamic performance, but the reliability of the airfoil data is an important factor for the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power. The airfoil characteristics used in BEM...... and the coefficient of lift and drag is determined by the forces on the blade. The extracted airfoil data are put into a BEM code without further corrections, and the calculated axial and tangential forces are compared to both computations using BEM with Shen's tip loss correction model and experimental data...

  4. Simulation of aerodynamic performance affected by vortex generators on blunt trailing-edge airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An investigation was carried out by numerical simulation on a wind turbine airfoil and a blunt trailing-edge airfoil with and without vortex generators (VGs), and the performance of the airfoils was analyzed. By the simulation of airfoil DU 91-W2-250 it was verified that the numerical method and model were credible. Based on this airfoil, a new one with a blunt trailing edge of 6% chord was blended by symmetrically adding thickness, and its characteristics curves were obtained through computing at key angles of attack. Additionally, the pressure distribution on blended airfoil was analyzed by comparing to the airfoil without blend. The interaction of streamwise vortices induced by VGs with trailing vortex or separation vortex was considered, followed by the uncovery of how VGs can suppress the boundary layer separation.

  5. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.;

    2016-01-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3 × ...

  6. Airfoil Trailing Edge Noise Generation and Its Surface Pressure Fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    where the time history pressure data are recorded by the surface pressure microphones. After the flow-field is stabilized, the generated noise from the airfoil Trailing Edge (TE) is predicted using the acoustic analogy solver, where the results from LES are the input. It is found that there is a strong...

  7. Large Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  8. The Ultimate Flow Controlled Wind Turbine Blade Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Avraham; Dolgopyat, Danny; Friedland, Ori; Shig, Lior

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control is being studied as an enabling technology to enhance and maintain high efficiency of wind turbine blades also with contaminated surface and unsteady winds as well as at off-design operating conditions. The study is focused on a 25% thick airfoil (DU91-W2-250) suitable for the mid blade radius location. Initially a clean airfoil was fabricated and tested, as well as compared to XFoil predictions. From these experiments, the evolution of the separation location was identified. Five locations for installing active flow control actuators are available on this airfoil. It uses both Piezo fluidic (``Synthetic jets'') and the Suction and Oscillatory Blowing (SaOB) actuators. Then we evaluate both actuation concepts overall energy efficiency and efficacy in controlling boundary layer separation. Since efficient actuation is to be found at low amplitudes when placed close to separation location, distributed actuation is used. Following the completion of the baseline studies the study has focused on the airfoil instrumentation and extensive wind tunnel testing over a Reynolds number range of 0.2 to 1.5 Million. Sample results will be presented and outline for continued study will be discussed.

  9. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free ...

  10. Unsteady Double Wake Model for the Simulation of Stalled Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Cayron, Antoine; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    separation and its dynamics. In this paper, the calculated integral forces have been successfully validated against wind tunnel measurements for the FFA-W3-211 airfoil. Furthermore, the computed highly unsteady flow field is analyzed in detail for a set of angles of attack ranging from light to deep stall...

  11. Modeling of Airfoil Trailing Edge Flap with Immersed Boundary Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    to simulate the moving part of the trailing edge. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique whereas the moving trailing edge flap is simulated with the immersed boundary method on a curvilinear mesh. The obtained...

  12. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  13. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  14. Preliminary wind-tunnel investigation of an NACA 23012 airfoil with various arrangements of venetian-blind flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Harris, Thomas A

    1940-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord NACA 23012 airfoil with several arrangements of venetian-blind flaps to determine the aerodynamic section characteristics as affected by the over-all flap chord, the chords of the slats used to form the flap, the slat spacing, the number of slats and the position of the flap with respect to the wing. Complete section data are given in the form of graphs for all the combinations tested.

  15. 40 CFR 46.225 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 46.225 Section 46.225... After the Fellowship § 46.225 Equipment. (a) If EPA authorizes you to purchase equipment (see § 46.140(b)) and the equipment retains a fair market value of more than $5,000, you must request...

  16. 49 CFR 19.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 19.34 Section 19.34 Transportation... Requirements Property Standards § 19.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal... use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such... other life saving equipment must be marked accordingly. (c) Stowage provisions for required...

  18. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such as... saving equipment, must be so marked....

  19. 30 CFR 56.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment defects. 56.7002 Section 56.7002... Piercing Drilling § 56.7002 Equipment defects. Equipment defects affecting safety shall be corrected before the equipment is used....

  20. 10 CFR 600.134 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 600.134 Section 600.134 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Nonprofit Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 600.134 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a... recipient shall not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal...

  1. 27 CFR 19.272 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 19.272 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Construction, Equipment and Security § 19.272 Equipment. The proprietor shall provide equipment suitable for the operations conducted on the distilled...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1307 - Miscellaneous equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Miscellaneous equipment. 27.1307 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1307 Miscellaneous equipment. The following is the required miscellaneous equipment: (a) An approved seat for each occupant. (b) An...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  4. 22 CFR 518.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Equipment. 518.34 Section 518.34 Foreign... Property Standards § 518.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds... equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations for a...

  5. 20 CFR 435.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 435.34 Section 435.34 Employees...-Award Requirements Property Standards § 435.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient... may not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1307 - Miscellaneous equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Miscellaneous equipment. 29.1307 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1307 Miscellaneous equipment. The following is required miscellaneous equipment: (a) An approved seat for each occupant. (b) A master...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1431 - Electronic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic equipment. 23.1431 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1431 Electronic equipment. (a) In showing compliance with § 23.1309(b)(1) and (2)...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1307 - Miscellaneous equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Miscellaneous equipment. 25.1307 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1307 Miscellaneous equipment. The following is required miscellaneous equipment: (a) (b) Two or more independent sources of electrical...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1431 - Electronic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic equipment. 25.1431 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1431 Electronic equipment. (a) In showing compliance with § 25.1309 (a) and (b) with respect to radio and...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1307 - Miscellaneous equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Miscellaneous equipment. 23.1307 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 23.1307 Miscellaneous equipment. The equipment necessary for an airplane to operate at the maximum operating...

  11. 45 CFR 2543.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 2543.34 Section 2543.34 Public Welfare... Requirements Property Standards § 2543.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with... not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.600 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1926.600 Section 1926.600 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine Operations § 1926.600 Equipment. (a) General requirements. (1) All equipment left unattended at...

  13. 30 CFR 57.7002 - Equipment defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment defects. 57.7002 Section 57.7002... Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface Only § 57.7002 Equipment defects. Equipment defects affecting safety shall be corrected before the equipment is used....

  14. 21 CFR 225.130 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 225.130 Section 225.130 Food and Drugs... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Facilities and Equipment § 225.130 Equipment. Equipment shall be capable of producing a medicated feed of intended potency and purity, and shall...

  15. 28 CFR 70.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 70.34 Section 70.34 Judicial... Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 70.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a... recipient must not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal...

  16. 7 CFR 58.626 - Packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging equipment. 58.626 Section 58.626 Agriculture....626 Packaging equipment. Packaging equipment designed to mechanically fill and close single service... Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen Desserts and Cottage Cheese. Quality Specifications for...

  17. 21 CFR 58.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment design. 58.61 Section 58.61 Food and... PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Equipment § 58.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall...

  18. 40 CFR 160.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment design. 160.61 Section 160... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 160.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the generation... appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall be suitably...

  19. 40 CFR 792.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment design. 792.61 Section 792.61...) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 792.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall...

  20. Solar Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  1. 20 CFR 437.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 437.32 Section 437.32 Employees... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  2. 32 CFR 33.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 33.32 Section 33.32 National Defense... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 33.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest...

  3. 10 CFR 600.232 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 600.232 Section 600.232 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  4. 40 CFR 31.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 31.32 Section 31.32... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 31.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest...

  5. 29 CFR 1470.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1470.32 Section 1470.32 Labor Regulations... Changes, Property, and Subawards § 1470.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest...

  6. 36 CFR 1207.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1207.32 Section... Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 1207.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or...

  7. 45 CFR 2541.320 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 2541.320 Section 2541.320 Public... Changes, Property and Subawards § 2541.320 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest...

  8. 14 CFR 1273.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 1273.32 Section 1273.32..., Property, and Subawards § 1273.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition...

  9. 21 CFR 1403.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 1403.32 Section 1403.32 Food and Drugs... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  10. 22 CFR 135.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 135.32 Section 135.32 Foreign... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  11. 24 CFR 85.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 85.32 Section 85.32... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 85.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under...

  12. 15 CFR 24.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 24.32 Section 24.32..., Property, and Subawards § 24.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition...

  13. 29 CFR 97.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment. 97.32 Section 97.32 Labor Office of the Secretary... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 97.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant...

  14. 45 CFR 92.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 92.32 Section 92.32 Public Welfare..., Property, and Subawards § 92.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1090 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1926.1090 Section 1926.1090 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Equipment Procedures and Requirements § 1926.1090 Equipment. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  16. 45 CFR 602.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 602.32 Section 602.32 Public Welfare....32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee...

  17. 45 CFR 1157.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 1157.32 Section 1157.32 Public Welfare... AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 1157.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment...

  18. 45 CFR 1183.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 1183.32 Section 1183.32 Public Welfare... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  19. 44 CFR 13.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 13.32 Section 13... LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 13.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under...

  20. 7 CFR 3016.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 3016.32 Section 3016.32 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 3016.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under...

  1. 43 CFR 12.72 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 12.72 Section 12.72 Public... to State and Local Governments Changes, Property, and Subawards § 12.72 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under...

  2. 49 CFR 18.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 18.32 Section 18.32 Transportation... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  3. 13 CFR 143.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 143.32 Section 143.32..., and Subawards § 143.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in...

  4. Robust Airfoil Optimization with Multi-objective Estimation of Distribution Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xiaoping; Ding Jifeng; Li Weiji; Zhang Yong

    2008-01-01

    A transonic airfoil designed by means of classical point-optimization may result in its dramatically inferior performance under off-design conditious. To overcome this shortcoming, robust design is proposed to fred out the optimal profile of an airfoil to maintain its performance in an uncertain environment. The robust airfoil optimization is aimed to minimize mean values and variances of drag coefficients while satisfying the lift and thickness constraints over a range of Maeb numbers. A multi-objective estimation of distribution algorithm is applied to the robust airfoil optimization on the base of the RAE2822 benchmark airfoil. The shape of the airfoil is obtained through superposing ten Hick-Heune shape functions upon the benchmark airfoil. A set of design points is selected according to a uniform design table for aerodynamic evaluation. A Kriging model of drag coefficient is coustrueted with those points to reduce eumputing costs. Over the Maeh range fi'om 0.7 to 0.8, the airfoil generated by the robust optimization has a configuration characterized by supercritical airfoil with low drag coefficients. The small fluctuation in its drag coefficients means that the performance of the robust airfoil is insensitive to variation of Mach number.

  5. Airfoil Selection for a Lift Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine%升力型垂直轴风力机翼型的选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓晶; 陆启迪; 黄典贵; 吴国庆

    2012-01-01

    At present,there are many different types of airfoils that have been used in lift-type vertical axis wind turbines.In order to study the influence of different airfoils on the lift-type vertical axis wind turbine performance,two-dimensional numerical simulation of flow around a Darrieus-type straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine was conducted in this paper with the aid of computational fluid dynamics software and sliding mesh method.Numerical results suggest that NACA0018 airfoil is the most suitable airfoil section used by a lift-type vertical axis wind turbine rotors as it can allow the wind turbine to achieve the highest wind energy utilization efficiency.%目前升力型垂直轴风力机采用的翼型多种多样,为了研究不同翼型对升力型垂直轴风力机风能利用率的影响,本文采用计算流体力学软件和滑移网格技术对升力型直叶片垂直轴风力机进行二维流场的数值模拟。结果表明,对于升力型垂直轴风力机,当选择NACA0018翼型可以达到最高的风能利用率。

  6. A comparison of two-and three-dimensional S809 airfoil properties for rough and smooth HAWT (Horizontal-Axis Wind Tunnel) rotor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, W. D.; Butterfield, C. P.; Jenks, M. D.

    1990-02-01

    At the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), we carried out tests to measure the effects of leading-edge roughness on an S809 airfoil using a 10-m, three-bladed, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). The rotor employed a constant-chord (.457 m) blade geometry with zero twist. Blade structural loads were measured with strain gages mounted at 9 spanwise locations. Airfoil pressure measurements were taken at the 80 percent spanwise station using 32 pressure taps distributed around the airfoil surface. Detailed inflow measurements were taken using nine R.M. Young Model 8002 propvane anemometers on a vertical plane array (VPA) located 10 m upwind of the test turbine in the prevailing wind direction. The major objective of this test was to determine the sensitivity of the S809 airfoil to roughness on a rotating wind turbine blade. We examined this effect by comparing several parameters. We compared power curves to show the sensitivity of whole rotor performance to roughness. We used pressure measurements to generate pressure distributions at the 80 percent span which operates at a Reynolds number (Re) of 800,000. We then integrated these distributions to determine the effect of roughness on the section's lift and pressure-drag coefficients.

  7. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  8. Test results of NREL 10M, special-purpose family of thin airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, K.L.; Nelson, V.C.; Wei, Jun [West Texas A& M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Two 25 kW Carter Wind Systems were tested to determine performance differences between production blades and rotors with NREL Special Purpose Thin Airfoils. Blade design, mold preparation, blade production, and testing were conducted. Design tools were created for computer modeling of the blade. The blades had the same twist, taper, and length as production blades. Flap natural frequency was adjusted to be as similar as possible between rotors, as was blade mass, blade center of gravity and rotor moment of inertia. Data collected were; wind speed at hub height, blade root flap & edgewise loads, main shaft torque, azimuth position, teeter angle, yaw angle and electrical power. These data were collected at 128 Hertz for data sets of eight seconds. This data set was then written to hard disk and the cycle repeated resulting in a file containing five and one half minutes of data. A data run consisted of; preflight checkout/warm-up of equipment, preflight calibration/verification of all sensors on both turbines, collection of five files of data (about thirty minutes of data), post flight calibration/verification of sensors. During this high speed data collection period there were a total of twenty-four data runs collected. Data were collected for wind speeds in the range about 7, 10 and 13 m/s. A data matrix was filled for clean, medium and heavy surface roughness. Baseline power curves, parametric pitch variation runs to establish testing pitch settings, high speed data collection runs with and without applied surface roughness were completed and analyzed. Data were compared using simple arithmetic mean, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis, rainflow counting algorithms and wavelet analysis. The NREL airfoils showed much less sensitivity to surface roughness. There were minimal root bending load differences. Annual energy production during long term operation is being determined. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Experimental verification of the new RISOe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, K.S.; Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper concerns the experimental verification of a new airfoil family for wind turbines. The family consist of airfoils in the relative thickness range from 15% to 30%. Three airfoils, Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21, and Risoe-A1-24 were tested in a wind tunnel. The verification consisted of both static and dynamic measurements. Here, the static results are presented for a Reynolds number of 1.6x10{sup 6} for the following airfoil configurations: smooth surface (all three airfoils) and Risoe-A1-24 mounted with leading edge roughness, vortex generators, and Gurney-flaps, respectively. All three airfoils have constant lift curve slope and almost constant drag coefficient until the maximum lift coefficient of about 1.4 is reached. The experimental results are compared with corresponding computational from the general purpose flow solver, EllipSys2D, showing good agreement. (au)

  10. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces on a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by itscamberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory......, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake isdescribed by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated...... of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stabilityanalysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can...

  11. Modeling Creep-Induced Stress Relaxation at the Leading Edge of SiC/SiC Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC composites into internally cooled airfoil components within the turbine section of future aero-propulsion engines, the primary objective of this study was to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of composite creep and stress relaxation at the airfoil leading edges, which will generally experience large thermal gradients at high temperatures. A second objective was to examine how some advanced NASA-developed SiC/SiC systems coated with typical EBC materials would behave as leading edge materials in terms of long-term steady-state operating temperatures. Because of the complexities introduced by mechanical stresses inherent in internally cooled airfoils, a simple cylindrical thin-walled tube model subjected to thermal stresses only is employed for the leading edge, thereby obtaining a best-case scenario for the material behavior. In addition, the SiC/SiC composite materials are assumed to behave as isotropic materials with temperature-dependent viscoelastic creep behavior as measured in-plane on thin-walled panels. Key findings include: (1) without mechanical stresses and for typical airfoil geometries, as heat flux is increased through the leading edge, life-limiting tensile crack formation will occur first in the hoop direction on the inside wall of the leading edge; (2) thermal gradients through all current SiC/SiC systems should be kept below approx.300 F at high temperatures to avoid this cracking; (3) at temperatures near the maximum operating temperatures of advanced SiC/SiC systems, thermal stresses induced by the thermal gradients will beneficially relax with time due to creep; (4) although stress relaxation occurs, the maximum gradient should still not exceed 300oF because of residual tensile stress buildup on the airfoil outer wall during cool-down; and (5) without film cooling and mechanical stresses, the NASA-developed N26 SiC/SiC system with thru

  12. A critical evaluation of the predictions of the NASA-Lockheed multielement airfoil computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, G. W.; Manke, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of several versions of the multielement airfoil computer program are evaluated. The computed results are compared with experimental high lift data of general aviation airfoils with a single trailing edge flap, and of airfoils with a leading edge flap and double slotted trailing edge flaps. Theoretical and experimental data include lift, pitching moment, profile drag and surface pressure distributions, boundary layer integral parameters, skin friction coefficients, and velocity profiles.

  13. S833, S834, and S835 Airfoils: November 2001--November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S833, S834, and S835, for 1 - 3-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  14. S830, S831, and S832 Airfoils: November 2001-November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S830, S831, and S832, for 40 - 50-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  15. Characteristics of Flow Field around NACA 0012 Airfoil with DBD plasma Actuator at Low Reynolds Number

    OpenAIRE

    簗瀬, 祐太; Yanase, Yuta; 大竹, 智久; Otake, Tomohisa; 村松, 旦典; Muramatsu, Akinori; 本橋, 龍郎; Motohashi, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Aerodymamic performance of NACA0012 airfoil is enhanced with suppression of boundary layer separation due to operation of DBD plasma actuator at low Reynolds numbers. We carried out flow field measurements using hot-wire anemometer around the airfoil which applied to the actuator to investigate relationship between aerodynamics and flow field around the airfoil at Reymolds number of 10,000. Results of velocity profiles of the boundary layer show suppression of laminar separation on the airfoi...

  16. Investigation on Improved Correlation of CFD and EFD for Supercritical Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Xu; Da-wei Liu; De-hua Chen; Zhi Wei; Yuan-jing Wang

    2014-01-01

    It is necessary to improve the correlation between CFD and EFD through the correction of EFD results and validation of CFD method, thus investigating the aerodynamic characteristics of supercritical airfoil perfectly. In this study, NASA SC (2) -0714 airfoil is numerically simulated and compared with NASA corrected experimental results to validate the CFD method. The Barnwell-Sewell method is applied to correct sidewall effects for experimental results of typical supercritical airfoil CH obta...

  17. Turbulent flow simulation of the NREL S809 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerri, Ouahiba; Bouhadef, Khadidja; Harhad, Ameziane

    2006-05-15

    Numerical computations are carried out for the NREL S809 airfoil. The flow is modelled using an unsteady incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Two turbulence models (SST {kappa}/{omega}of Menter and RNG {kappa}/{epsilon}) are applied to close the RANS equations. All computations are performed assuming fully turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed at various angles of attack from 0 to 20 degrees. Lift and drag forces are obtained from the computations by integrating the pressure and shear stress over the blade surface. The performance of the two turbulence models is compared and the influence of the free stream turbulence intensity is checked. The results confirm the satisfactory performance of the SST {kappa}/{omega} model of Menter for modelling turbulent flow around airfoils. (author)

  18. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  19. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  20. Design, Simulation, and Wind Tunnel Verication of a Morphing Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafson, Eric Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The application of smart materials to control the flight dynamics of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) has numerous benefits over traditional servomechanisms. Under study is wing morphing achieved through the use of piezoelectric Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs). These devices exhibit low power draw but excellent bandwidth characteristics. This thesis provides a background in the 2D analytical and computer modeling tools and methods needed to design and characterize an MFC-actuated airfoil. A com...

  1. Characterization of the Flow Separation of a Variable Camber Airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen-Chao; WANG Hui; YANG Jian-Ting; YANG Ji-Ming

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the How separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil. The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber: the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall. Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall, while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve. Under flow separation circumstances, the Bow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions, but also the previous flow characteristics, so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.%An experimental investigation is carried out to study the flow separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil.The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber:the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall.Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall,while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve.Under flow separation circumstances,the flow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions,but also the previous flow characteristics,so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.

  2. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    OpenAIRE

    Kercher, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in th...

  3. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control by Suction and Injection on a Subsonic Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    M. H. Shojaefard; A. R. Noorpoor; A. Avanesians; M. Ghaffarpour

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a numerical study concerning flow control by suction and injection. The case studied is the flow field over a subsonic airfoil with four suction and injection slots on the suction side of the airfoil. Five different angles of attack, 0, 5, 10, 13.3 and 20 with the Mach number of 0.15 are studied. Three cases are studied in each angle of attack. The three cases are airfoil with surface suction, surface injection and the base airfoil. A commercial CFD code, the FLUENT, is us...

  5. Design and Wind Tunnel Testing of a Thick, Multi-Element High-Lift Airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2012-01-01

    In this work a 2D CFD solver has been used to optimize the shape of a leading edge slat with a chord length of 30% of the main airfoil which was 40% thick. The airfoil configuration was subsequently tested in a wind tunnel and compared to numerical predictions. The multi-element airfoil...... was predicted to achieve a Cl−max of 3.1 based on the main airfoil chord length, which was confirmed in the wind tunnel campaign. Using wake rake traversal and wool tuft flow visualization wall interference effects were investigated, which were found to be a source of considerable uncertainty when measuring...

  6. Some practical issues in the computational design of airfoils for the helicopter main rotor blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Very important requirement for the helicopter rotor airfoils is zero, or nearly zero moment coefficient about the aerodynamic center. Unlike the old technologies used for metal blades, modern production involving application of plastic composites has imposed the necessity of adding a flat tab extension to the blade trailing edge, thus changing the original airfoil shape. Using computer program TRANPRO, the author has developed and verified an algorithm for numerical analysis in this design stage, applied it on asymmetrical reflex camber airfoils, determined the influence of angular tab positioning on the moment coefficient value and redesigned some existing airfoils to include properly positioned tabs that satisfy very low moment coefficient requirement. .

  7. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    The CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils were designed with an objective of high lift and low noise emission. In the design process, the aerodynamic performance is obtained using XFOIL while noise emission is obtained with the BPM model. In this paper we present some validations of the designed CQU......, the designed Cl and Cl/Cd agrees well with the experiment and are in general higher than those of the NACA airfoil. For the acoustic features, the noise emission of the LN118 airfoil is compared with the acoustic measurements and that of the NACA airfoil. Comparisons show that the BPM model can predict...

  8. Design of the wind turbine airfoil family RISOe-A-XX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, K.S.; Fuglsang, P.

    1998-12-01

    A method for design of wind turbine airfoils is presented. The design method is based on direct numerical optimization of a B-spline representation of the airfoil shape. For flexibility, the optimization algorithm relies on separate, stand alone tools for the analysis of aerodynamic and structural properties. The panel method based XFOIL is used during the optimization whereas the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D is used in the evaluation of the results. The method is demonstrated by the design of an airfoil family composed of 7 airfoils ranging in thickness from 12% to 30%. The design is based on Reynolds and Mach numbers representative of a 600 kW wind turbine. The airfoils are designed to have maximum lift-drag ratio until just below stall, a design lift coefficient of about 1.55 at an angle of attack of 10 deg. and a maximum lift coefficient of 1.65. The airfoils are made insensitive to leading edge roughness by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurs close to the leading edge for post stall angles of attack. The design method and the airfoil family provides a sound basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95. 3 tabs., 24 ills., 31 refs.

  9. Simulasi Numerik Dynamic Stall Pada Airfoil Yang Berosilasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih S.T.A. Bangga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan analisa pada sudu helikopter, kompresor, kincir angin dan struktur streamline lainya yang beroperasi pada angle of attack yang tinggi dan melibatkan instationary effects yang disebut dynamic stall menjadi semakin penting. Fenomena ini ditandai dengan naiknya dynamic lift melewati static lift maksimum pada critical static stall angle, vortex yang terbentuk pada leading edge mengakibatkan naiknya suction contribution yang kemudian terkonveksi sepanjang permukaan hingga mencapai trailling edge diikuti terbentuknya trailling edge vortex yang menunjukkan terjadinya lift stall. Fenomena ini sangat berbahaya terhadap struktur airfoil itu sendiri. Secara umum, beban fatique yang ditimbulkan oleh adanya efek histerisis karena fluktuasi gaya lift akibat induksi vibrasi lebih besar dibandingkan kondisi statis. Simulasi numerik dilakukan secara 2D dengan menggunakan profil Boeing-Vertol V23010-1.58 pada α0 = 14.92°. Standard-kω dan SST-kω digunakan sebagai URANS turbulence modelling. Model osilasi dari airfoil disusun dalam suatu user defined function (UDF. Gerakan meshing beserta airfoil diakomodasi dengan menggunakan dynamic mesh approach. Simulasi numerik menunjukkan bahwa, model SST-kω menunjukkan performa yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan Standard-kω. Fenomena travelling vortex yang terjadi mampu ditangkap dengan baik, meski pada angle of attack yang tinggi URANS turbulence model gagal memprediksikan fenomena yang terjadi karena dominasi efek 3D.

  10. Flow control at low Reynolds numbers using periodic airfoil morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Santer, Matthew; Papadakis, George; Bouremel, Yann; Debiasi, Marco; Imperial-NUS Joint PhD Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The performance of airfoils operating at low Reynolds numbers is known to suffer from flow separation even at low angles of attack as a result of their boundary layers remaining laminar. The lack of mixing---a characteristic of turbulent boundary layers---leaves laminar boundary layers with insufficient energy to overcome the adverse pressure gradient that occurs in the pressure recovery region. This study looks at periodic surface morphing as an active flow control technique for airfoils in such a flight regime. It was discovered that at sufficiently high frequencies an oscillating surface is capable of not only reducing the size of the separated region---and consequently significantly reducing drag whilst simultaneously increasing lift---but it is also capable of delaying stall and as a result increasing CLmax. Furthermore, by bonding Macro Fiber Composite actuators (MFCs) to the underside of an airfoil skin and driving them with a sinusoidal frequency, it is shown that this control technique can be practically implemented in a lightweight, energy efficient way. Imperial-NUS Joint Ph.D. Programme.

  11. Russian Laminar Flow Airfoils 3rd Part: Measurements on the Profile No. 2315 BIS with Ava-Nose Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegels, F.

    1947-01-01

    The tests on the Russian airfoil 2315 Bis were continued. This airfoil shows, according to Moscow tests, good laminar flow characteristics. Several tests were prepared in the large wind tunnel at Gottingen; partial results were obtained.

  12. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu≁oz, A.; Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations.

  13. Experiment Investigation of Side Wall Boundary-layer BlowingControl of a Multi-element Airfoil Model in Wind Tunnel%多段翼型风洞侧壁边界层吹除控制实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张理想; 解亚军; 邓小龙

    2011-01-01

    Based on a lot of materials about SWBL' s researches, and one of development projects in NWPU-the equipment of NF-3 wind tunnel side wall boundary blowing control system , the aerodynamics of GAW-1 airfoil with relative thickness for 17% has been experimented under the condition of wind tunnel side wall boundary-layer blowing control. Characteristics of the system are introduced here. And the effects of the airfoil' s 2D performance influenced by wind tunnel side wall boundary-layer are investigated. The experiments indicate that; (1) for the different types of blowing slots combination in this experiment, the best type is thought for second blowing way; the former slot close, the middle and after slots open. (2 ) different blowing coefficients have different effects for the pressure distribution of the middle section profile and the end section profile close to tunnel wall; (3 ) analysis of the experiment results verifies the effectiveness of the blowing system to decrease or eliminate interference from wind tunnel side wall boundary layer, and improvement of the experiment accuracy in aerodynamic characteristic of airfoil tests.%通过调研国内外相关文献资料,结合实验室建设项目:侧壁边界层控制系统研制,选取相对厚度为17%的GAW-1翼型进行了风洞侧壁边界层吹除控制下气动性能的实验研究.介绍了该系统的特点和实验方法,研究了侧壁边界层吹除控制对单段和多段翼型的二元性的影响规律.结果表明:(1)对多种吹气位置不同组合来说,以前缝关闭,中缝和后缝打开吹气为最佳吹气方式;(2)不同吹气系数对模型展向中间剖面和端部剖面的压力分布影响不同,存在对应的最佳吹气系数;(3)实验研究验证了NF-3风洞侧壁边界层吹除控制系统可以有效控制侧壁边界层的干扰,改善和提高翼型气动特性实验的准确性.

  14. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved.

  15. 30 CFR 56.4600 - Extinguishing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extinguishing equipment. 56.4600 Section 56... Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 56.4600 Extinguishing equipment. (a) When welding, cutting... equivalent fire extinguishing equipment for the class of fire hazard present shall be at the worksite....

  16. 21 CFR 1271.200 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 1271.200 Section 1271.200 Food and... CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.200 Equipment. (a) General. To prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases, equipment used in...

  17. 41 CFR 105-71.132 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 105-71.132...-Award Requirements/Changes, Property, and Subawards § 105-71.132 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or...

  18. 2 CFR 215.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 215.34 Section 215.34 Grants and... ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-110) Post Award Requirements Property Standards § 215.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions...

  19. 14 CFR 1260.134 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 1260.134 Section 1260.134..., Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Property Standards § 1260.134 Equipment. (a) For grants and... research to not vest title in the recipient as exempt, equipment shall vest in the recipient subject...

  20. 7 CFR 51.58 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 51.58 Section 51.58 Agriculture Regulations... Requirements for Plants Operating Under Continuous Inspection on A Contract Basis § 51.58 Equipment. All equipment used for receiving, washing, grading, packaging or storing shall be of such design, material...

  1. 50 CFR 260.102 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations, 21 CFR part 128. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 260.102 Section 260.102... Basis 1 § 260.102 Equipment. All equipment used for receiving, washing, segregating, picking,...

  2. 36 CFR 1210.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1210.34 Section..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 1210.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with NHPRC funds shall vest in the recipient,...

  3. 24 CFR 84.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 84.34 Section 84.34... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 84.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions...

  4. 17 CFR 256.307 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 256.307 Section 256... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Service Company Property Accounts § 256.307 Equipment. This account shall include the cost of equipment owned by the service company and used in rendering services such as...

  5. 30 CFR 57.4600 - Extinguishing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extinguishing equipment. 57.4600 Section 57... and Control Welding/cutting/compressed Gases § 57.4600 Extinguishing equipment. (a) When welding... equivalent fire extinguishing equipment for the class of fire hazard present shall be at the worksite....

  6. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  7. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must be... times the system's maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped with at...

  8. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  9. 30 CFR 77.1914 - Electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical equipment. 77.1914 Section 77.1914... Shaft Sinking § 77.1914 Electrical equipment. (a) Electric equipment employed below the collar of a.... (b) The insulation of all electric conductors employed below the collar of any slope or shaft...

  10. Used equipment-standard contract elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary F. Alexander

    2004-01-01

    @@ One thing that both the purchase of new and used equipment has in common is the need for a comprehensive purchase agreement. The big difference is that while repetitive purchases of new equipment often only require the modification of one or more sections of a contract, every used equipment transaction and contract is normally different.

  11. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  12. Research on design methods and aerodynamics performance of CQUDTU-B21 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Wen, Zhong Shen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design methods of CQU-DTU-B21 airfoil for wind turbine. Compared with the traditional method of inverse design, the new method is described directly by a compound objective function to balance several conflicting requirements for design wind turbine airfoils, which based o...

  13. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragni, D.; Ashok, A.; van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to

  14. Flow influence on a mode of flow choking in the airfoil cascade of the thin plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л.Г. Волянська

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  Flow of viscous compressible gas is considered in the airfoil cascade of the thin plates with great negative angle of attack. Influence of wall boundary layer upon a mode of  flow choking in the airfoil cascade is estimated in the article.

  15. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  16. Rime ice accretion and its effect on airfoil performance. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the growth of rime ice, and the resulting aerodynamic penalty on unprotected, subcritical, airfoil surfaces. The system of equations governing the trajectory of a water droplet in the airfoil flowfield is developed and a numerical solution is obtained to predict the mass flux of super cooled water droplets freezing on impact. A rime ice shape is predicted. The effect of time on the ice growth is modeled by a time-stepping procedure where the flowfield and droplet mass flux are updated periodically through the ice accretion process. Two similarity parameters, the trajectory similarity parameter and accumulation parameter, are found to govern the accretion of rime ice. In addition, an analytical solution is presented for Langmuir's classical modified inertia parameter. The aerodynamic evaluation of the effect of the ice accretion on airfoil performance is determined using an existing airfoil analysis code with empirical corrections. The change in maximum lift coefficient is found from an analysis of the new iced airfoil shape. The drag correction needed due to the severe surface roughness is formulated from existing iced airfoil and rough airfoil data. A small scale wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the change in airfoil performance due to a simulated rime ice shape.

  17. Modelling of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics for the prediction of blade standstill vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, CFD simulations of the DU96-W-180 airfoil at 26 and 24 deg. angles of attack were performed. 2D RANS and 3D DES computations with non-moving and prescribed motion airfoil suspensions were carried out. The openings of the lift coefficient loops predicted by CFD were different...

  18. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  19. 30 CFR 56.4230 - Self-propelled equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-propelled equipment. 56.4230 Section 56... Control Firefighting Equipment § 56.4230 Self-propelled equipment. (a)(1) Whenever a fire or its effects could impede escape from self-propelled equipment, a fire extinguisher shall be on the equipment....

  20. 46 CFR 180.175 - Survival craft equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft equipment. 180.175 Section 180.175... TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 180.175 Survival craft equipment. (a) General. Each item of survival craft equipment must be of good quality,...

  1. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  2. Experimental studies of flow separation and stalling on two-dimensional airfoils at low speeds. Phase 2: Studies with Fowler flap extended

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, H. C.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results were given on experimental studies of flow separation and stalling on a two-dimensional GA(W)-1 17 percent thick airfoil with an extended Fowler flap. Experimental velocity profiles obtained from a five tube probe survey with optimum flap gap and overlap setting (flap at 40 deg) are shown at various stations above, below, and behind the airfoil/flap combination for various angles of attack. The typical zones of steady flow, intermittent turbulence, and large scale turbulence were obtained from a hot wire anemometer survey and are depicted graphically for an angle of attack of 12.5 deg. Local skin friction distributions were obtained and are given for various angles of attack. Computer plots of the boundary layer profiles are shown for the case of the flap at 40 deg. Static pressure contours are also given. A GA(W)-2 section model was fabricated with 30 percent Fowler flaps and with pressure tabs.

  3. PIV MEASUREMENTS OF THE NEAR-WAKE FLOW OF AN AIRFOIL ABOVE A FREE SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The near-wake flow of a NACA0012 airfoils mounted above a water surface were experimentally studied in a wind/wave tunnel. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the free surface on the structure of the airfoil trailing wake. The flow structure was measured with different ride heights between the airfoil and free surface using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The Reynolds number based on the chord length of the airfoil was about 3.5×103. For each experimental condition, large amount of instantaneous velocity fields were captured and ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of mean velocity and mean vorticity, as well as turbulence statistics. The results show that the flow structures of the airfoil wake varies remarkably with the change in the ride height.

  4. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  5. Corrections for attached sidewall boundary-layer effects in 2-dimensional airfoil testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    The problems of sidewall boundary-layer effects in airfoil testing is treated by considering the changes in the flow area due to boundary-layer thinning under the influence of the airfoil flowfield. Using von Karman's momentum integral equation, it is shown that the sidewall boundary-layer thickness in the region of the airfoil can reduce to about half the undisturbed value under the conditions prevailing in testing of supercritical airfoils. A Mach number correction due to this increased width of the flow passage is proposed. Using the small disturbance approximation, the effect of the sidewall boundary-layers is shown to be equivalent to a change in the test Mach number and also in the airfoil thickness. Comparison of the results of this approach with other similarity rules and correlation of the experimental data demonstrate the applicability of the analysis presented from low speeds to transonic speeds.

  6. Influences of surface temperature on a low camber airfoil aerodynamic performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current note refers to the comparison between a NACA 2510 airfoil with adiabatic walls and the same airfoil with heated patches. Both suction and pressure sides were divided into two regions covering the leading edge (L.E. and trailing edge (T.E.. A RANS method sensitivity test has been performed in the preliminary stage while for the extended 3D cases a DES-SST approach was used. Results indicate that surface temperature distribution influences the aerodynamics of the airfoil, in particular the viscous drag component but also the lift of the airfoil. Moreover, the influence depends not only on the surface temperature but also on the positioning of the heated surfaces, particularly in the case of pressure lift and drag. Further work will be needed to optimize the temperature distribution for airfoil with higher camber.

  7. Airfoil design: Finding the balance between design lift and structural stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christian; Gaudern, Nicholas; Zahle, Frederik;

    2014-01-01

    , the design lift coefficient increases if the box length reduces and at the same time the relative thickness increases. Even though the conclusions are specific to the airfoil design approach used, the study indicated that an increased design lift required slightly higher relative thickness compared...... to airfoils with lower design lift to maintain the flapwise stiffness. Also, the study indicated that the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was relatively independent of the airfoil design with a tendency that the lift-drag ratio decreased for large box lengths. The above conclusions were...... supported by an analysis of the three airfoil families Riso-C2, DU and FFA, where the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was decreasing, but relatively independent of the airfoil design, and the design lift coefficient was varying depending on the design philosophy. To make the analysis...

  8. Wind turbine blade vibration at standstill conditions — the effect of imposing lag on the aerodynamic response of an elastically mounted airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated physical phenomena related to stall-induced vibrations potentially existing on wind turbine blades at standstill conditions. The study considered two-dimensional airfoil sections while it omitted three-dimensional effects. In the study, a new engineering-type comput...... problems in real life. The other type of vibrations potentially present at standstill conditions is vortex-induced, being outside the scope of the present study. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......The present study investigated physical phenomena related to stall-induced vibrations potentially existing on wind turbine blades at standstill conditions. The study considered two-dimensional airfoil sections while it omitted three-dimensional effects. In the study, a new engineering......-type computational model for the aeroelastic response of an elastically mounted airfoil was used to investigate the influence of temporal lag in the aerodynamic response on the aeroelastic stability in deep stall. The study indicated that even a relatively low lag significantly increases the damping of the model...

  9. 典型直升机旋翼翼型气动特性试验研究%Experimental investigation on aerodynamic performance of one typical helicopter rotor airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁红刚; 杨永东; 杨炯; 黄明其

    2013-01-01

    采用高升阻比特性的翼型是提高直升机旋翼气动性能的关键.对在典型的OA309旋翼翼型基础上开发的CH309翼型,进行了低、高速气动特性风洞试验研究.试验分别在FL-14风洞和NF-6风洞中进行,采用表面测压和尾耙型阻测量技术.试验结果表明:CH309翼型的总体性能优于OA309翼型.试验结果为直升机旋翼设计时翼型的选取提供了参考.%Selecting airfoils with high lift-drag ratio is the key for improving aerodynamic performance of helicopter rotor. The CH309 rotor airfoil was developed based on typical OA309 rotor airfoil, and the experimental investigation on low and high speed aerodynamic performance was made. The tests were performed in a two-dimensional testing section of FL-14 wind tunnel at China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center and NF-6 wind tunnel at Northwestern Polytechnical University respectively. Surface pressure measurement and drag measurement with trail total pressure row tube were carried out. Experimental results show that the overall performance of CH309 airfoil is better than that of the OA309 airfoil. These experimental results are valuable for the airfoils selection of designing helicopter rotor.

  10. On the attenuating effect of permeability on the low frequency sound of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenfeld, M.; Manela, A.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of structure permeability on the far-field radiation of a thin airfoil is studied. Assuming low-Mach and high-Reynolds number flow, the near- and far-field descriptions are investigated at flapping-flight and unsteady flow conditions. Analysis is carried out using thin-airfoil theory and compact-body-based calculations for the hydrodynamic and acoustic fields, respectively. Airfoil porosity is modeled via Darcy's law, governed by prescribed distribution of surface intrinsic permeability. Discrete vortex model is applied to describe airfoil wake evolution. To assess the impact of penetrability, results are compared to counterpart predictions for the sound of an impermeable airfoil. Considering the finite-chord airfoil as "acoustically transparent", the leading-order contribution of surface porosity is obtained in terms of an acoustic dipole. It is shown that, at all flow conditions considered, porosity causes attenuation in outcome sound level. This is accompanied by a time-delay in the pressure signal, reflecting the mediating effect of permeability on the interaction of fluid flow with airfoil edge points. To the extent that thin-airfoil theory holds (requiring small normal-to-airfoil flow velocities), the results indicate on a decrease of ~ 10 percent and more in the total energy radiated by a permeable versus an impermeable airfoil. This amounts to a reduction in system sound pressure level of 3 dB and above at pitching flight conditions, where the sound-reducing effect of the seepage dipole pressure becomes dominant. The applicability of Darcy's law to model the effect of material porosity is discussed in light of existing literature.

  11. Airfoil shape optimization using non-traditional optimization technique and its validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mukesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is one of the computer-based solution methods which is more widely employed in aerospace engineering. The computational power and time required to carry out the analysis increase as the fidelity of the analysis increases. Aerodynamic shape optimization has become a vital part of aircraft design in the recent years. Generally if we want to optimize an airfoil we have to describe the airfoil and for that, we need to have at least hundred points of x and y co-ordinates. It is really difficult to optimize airfoils with this large number of co-ordinates. Nowadays many different schemes of parameter sets are used to describe general airfoil such as B-spline, and PARSEC. The main goal of these parameterization schemes is to reduce the number of needed parameters as few as possible while controlling the important aerodynamic features effectively. Here the work has been done on the PARSEC geometry representation method. The objective of this work is to introduce the knowledge of describing general airfoil using twelve parameters by representing its shape as a polynomial function. And also we have introduced the concept of Genetic Algorithm to optimize the aerodynamic characteristics of a general airfoil for specific conditions. A MATLAB program has been developed to implement PARSEC, Panel Technique, and Genetic Algorithm. This program has been tested for a standard NACA 2411 airfoil and optimized to improve its coefficient of lift. Pressure distribution and co-efficient of lift for airfoil geometries have been calculated using the Panel method. The optimized airfoil has improved co-efficient of lift compared to the original one. The optimized airfoil is validated using wind tunnel data.

  12. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  13. Unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Jeppe

    1999-09-01

    The present report describes numerical investigation of two-dimensional unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability. The report is divided in two parts. Part A describes the purely aerodynamic part, while Part B includes the aeroelastic part. In Part A a transition prediction algorithm based on a simplified version of the e{sup n} method is proposed. Laminar Boundary Layer instability data are stored in a database from which stability characteristics can be extracted by interpolation. Input to the database are laminar integral boundary layer parameters. These are computed from an integral boundary layer formulation coupled to a Navier-Stokes flow solver. Five different airfoils are considered at fixed angle of attack, and the flow is computed assuming both fully turbulent and transitional flow and compared with experimental data. Results indicate that using a transition model the drag prediction is improved considerably. Also the lift is slightly improved. At high angles of attack transition will affect leading edge separation which again will affect the overall vortex shedding. If the transition point is not properly predicted this will affect the whole hysteresis curve. The transition model developed in the present work showed more stable predictions compared to the empirical transition model. In Part B a simple three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) structural dynamics model is developed and coupled to the aerodynamics models from Part A. A 2nd order accurate time integration scheme is used to solve the equations of motion. Two airfoils are investigated. The aeroelastic models predict stable conditions well at low angle of attack. But at high angles of attack, and where unstable behaviour is expected, only the Navier-Stokes solver predict correct aeroelastic response. The semi-empirical dynamic stall model does not predict vortex shedding and moment correctly leading to an erroneous aerodynamic damping. (au) 5 tabs.; 55 ills., 52 refs.

  14. Airfoil longitudinal gust response in separated vs. attached flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, K.; Monnier, B.; Ol, M.; Williams, D.

    2014-02-01

    Airfoil aerodynamic loads are expected to have quasi-steady, linear dependence on the history of input disturbances, provided that small-amplitude bounds are observed. We explore this assertion for the problem of periodic sinusoidal streamwise gusts, by comparing experiments on nominally 2D airfoils in temporally sinusoidal modulation of freestream speed in a wind tunnel vs. sinusoidal displacement of the airfoil in constant freestream in a water tunnel. In the wind tunnel, there is a streamwise unsteady pressure gradient causing a buoyancy force, while in the water tunnel one must subtract the inertial load of the test article. Both experiments have an added-mass contribution to aerodynamic force. Within measurement resolution, lift and drag, fluctuating and mean, were in good agreement between the two facilities. For incidence angle below static stall, small-disturbance theory was found to be in good agreement with measured lift history, regardless of oscillation frequency. The circulatory component of fluctuating drag was found to be independent of oscillation frequency. For larger incidence angles, there is marked departure between the measured lift history and that predicted from Greenberg's formula. Flow visualization shows coupling between bluff-body shedding and motion-induced shedding, identifiable with lift cancellation or augmentation, depending on the reduced frequency. Isolating the buoyancy effect in the wind tunnel and dynamic tares in the water tunnel, and theoretical calculation of apparent-mass in both cases, we arrive at good agreement in measured circulatory contribution between the two experiments whether the flow is attached or separated substantiating the linear superposition of the various constituents to total lift and drag, and supporting the idea that aerodynamic gust response can legitimately be studied in a steady freestream by oscillating the test article.

  15. Containment and Surveillance Equipment Compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Containment and Surveillance Equipment Compendium contains information sections describing the application and status of seals, optical surveillance systems, and monitors for international safeguards systems. The Compendium is a collection of information on equipment in use (generally by the IAEA) or under development in the US in diverse programs being conducted at numerous facilities under different sponsors. The Compendium establishes a baseline for the status and applications of C/S equipment and is a tool to assist in the planning of future C/S hardware development activities. The Appendix contains design concepts which can be developed to meet future goals

  16. 45 CFR 1174.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 1174.32 Section 1174.32 Public Welfare... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 1174.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to...

  17. Light Imaging Section

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Light Imaging Section is to give NIAMS scientists access to state-of-the-art light imaging equipment and to offer training and assistance at all...

  18. Evaluation of Icing Scaling on Swept NACA 0012 Airfoil Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Lee, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Icing scaling tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were performed on swept wing models using existing recommended scaling methods that were originally developed for straight wing. Some needed modifications on the stagnation-point local collection efficiency (i.e., beta(sub 0) calculation and the corresponding convective heat transfer coefficient for swept NACA 0012 airfoil models have been studied and reported in 2009, and the correlations will be used in the current study. The reference tests used a 91.4-cm chord, 152.4-cm span, adjustable sweep airfoil model of NACA 0012 profile at velocities of 100 and 150 knot and MVD of 44 and 93 mm. Scale-to-reference model size ratio was 1:2.4. All tests were conducted at 0deg angle of attack (AoA) and 45deg sweep angle. Ice shape comparison results were presented for stagnation-point freezing fractions in the range of 0.4 to 1.0. Preliminary results showed that good scaling was achieved for the conditions test by using the modified scaling methods developed for swept wing icing.

  19. Application of Nontraditional Optimization Techniques for Airfoil Shape Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of optimization algorithms is one of the most important parameters which will strongly influence the fidelity of the solution during an aerodynamic shape optimization problem. Nowadays, various optimization methods, such as genetic algorithm (GA, simulated annealing (SA, and particle swarm optimization (PSO, are more widely employed to solve the aerodynamic shape optimization problems. In addition to the optimization method, the geometry parameterization becomes an important factor to be considered during the aerodynamic shape optimization process. The objective of this work is to introduce the knowledge of describing general airfoil geometry using twelve parameters by representing its shape as a polynomial function and coupling this approach with flow solution and optimization algorithms. An aerodynamic shape optimization problem is formulated for NACA 0012 airfoil and solved using the methods of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm for 5.0 deg angle of attack. The results show that the simulated annealing optimization scheme is more effective in finding the optimum solution among the various possible solutions. It is also found that the SA shows more exploitation characteristics as compared to the GA which is considered to be more effective explorer.

  20. Symbolic regression modeling of noise generation at porous airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarradj, Ennes; Geyer, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Based on data sets from previous experimental studies, the tool of symbolic regression is applied to find empirical models that describe the noise generation at porous airfoils. Both the self noise from the interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with the trailing edge of an porous airfoil and the noise generated at the leading edge due to turbulent inflow are considered. Following a dimensional analysis, models are built for trailing edge noise and leading edge noise in terms of four and six dimensionless quantities, respectively. Models of different accuracy and complexity are proposed and discussed. For the trailing edge noise case, a general dependency of the sound power on the fifth power of the flow velocity was found and the frequency spectrum is controlled by the flow resistivity of the porous material. Leading edge noise power is proportional to the square of the turbulence intensity and shows a dependency on the fifth to sixth power of the flow velocity, while the spectrum is governed by the flow resistivity and the integral length scale of the incoming turbulence.

  1. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  2. Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing using Polynomial Chaos Expansions

    CERN Document Server

    DeGennaro, Anthony M; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of a wing can be detrimental to airplane performance. Complicating this reality is the fact that even a small amount of uncertainty in the shape of the accreted ice may result in a large amount of uncertainty in aerodynamic performance metrics (e.g., stall angle of attack). The main focus of this work concerns using the techniques of Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE) to quantify icing uncertainty much more quickly than traditional methods (e.g., Monte Carlo). First, we present a brief survey of the literature concerning the physics of wing icing, with the intention of giving a certain amount of intuition for the physical process. Next, we give a brief overview of the background theory of PCE. Finally, we compare the results of Monte Carlo simulations to PCE-based uncertainty quantification for several different airfoil icing scenarios. The results are in good agreement and confirm that PCE methods are much more efficient for the canonical airfoil icing un...

  3. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jun Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989. It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model.

  4. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings. (paper)

  5. Equipment for gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-01-28

    Equipment is proposed for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv), possibly in a mixture with air, in order to produce an inorganic gas, which chiefly consists of H2 and COx. It consists of a reaction pipe made of an inorganic refractory ceramic and equipped along the wall circumference with heaters. The reaction pipe is filled with a combined, multilayer catalyst (Kt) carrier, made of gamma-A1203 which in the transverse cross section has a multipore reticular or fibrous structure. Replacement of the traditional steel (St) materials for the walls of the reaction pipe with ceramic materials reduces the output of the hydrocarbon which contaminates the surface (Pv) of the catalyst; the use of a multilayer carrier for the catalyst made of gamma-A1203 with a porous reticular or fibrous structure reduces the pressure losses in the reactor and facilitates the replacement of the spent catalyst. The equipment is designed for vapor conversion of natural gas, C3H8, and vapors of kerosene, naphtha and so on.

  6. Parametric analyses for synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guoqing; Zhao Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoils. The preconditioned and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with akxshear stream transport turbulence model are employed to accomplish the flowfield simulation of rotor airfoils under jet control. Additionally, a velocity boundary condition modeled by a sinusoidal function is developed to fulfill the perturba-tion effect of periodic jets. The validity of the present CFD procedure is evaluated by the simulated results of an isolated synthetic jet and the jet control case for airfoil NACA0015. Then, parametric analyses are conducted specifically for an OA213 rotor airfoil to investigate the effects of jet param-eters (forcing frequency, jet location and momentum coefficient, jet direction, and distribution of jet arrays) on the control effect of the aerodynamic characteristics of a rotor airfoil. Preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of jet control can be improved with specific frequencies (the best lift-drag ratio at F+=2.0) and jet angles (40? or 75?) when the jets are located near the separation point of the rotor airfoil. Furthermore, as a result of a suitable combination of jet arrays, the lift coefficient of the airfoil can be improved by nearly 100%, and the corresponding drag coefficient decreased by 26.5%in comparison with the single point control case.

  7. Experimental Study of Thin and Thick Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Garcia, Elifalet; Johari, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    A recent surge in applications of unmanned air vehicles in various fields has led to increased interest in understanding the characteristics of airfoils at Reynolds number regime ~104. At these low Re numbers, aerodynamics of an airfoil is influenced by laminar separation and its possible reattachment, which is in contrast to airfoil behavior at high Re numbers. This study focused on comparing the load characteristics of symmetric, thin (NACA-0009) and thick (NACA-0021) airfoils at low Re numbers ~2 - 4 × 104, and angles of attack between 2° to 12°, along with simultaneous flow visualization. The experiments were performed in a low speed flow visualization water tunnel facility, and two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to quantify the inflow conditions and turbulence intensity. A high precision force/torque transducer was used for the load measurements, while hydrogen bubble technique was used for flow visualization on the suction side of the airfoils. The presentation will discuss the correlation between observed flow structures and instantaneous load on the airfoils, as well as the aerodynamic load characteristics of thin and thick airfoils at low Re numbers.

  8. The acoustics and unsteady wall pressure of a circulation control airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Jonathan C.

    A Circulation Control (CC) airfoil uses a wall jet exiting onto a rounded trailing edge to generate lift via the Coanda effect. The aerodynamics of the CC airfoil have been studied extensively. The acoustics of the airfoil are, however, much less understood. The primary goal of the present work was to study the radiated sound and unsteady surface pressures of a CC airfoil. The focus of this work can be divided up into three main categories: characterizing the unsteady surface pressures, characterizing the radiated sound, and understanding the acoustics from surface pressures. The present work is the first to present the unsteady surface pressures from the trailing edge cylinder of a circulation control airfoil. The auto-spectral density of the unsteady surface pressures at various locations around the trailing edge are presented over a wide range of the jets momentum coefficient. Coherence of pressure and length scales were computed and presented. Single microphone measurements were made at a range of angles for a fixed observer distance in the far field. Spectra are presented for select angles to show the directivity of the airfoil's radiated sound. Predictions of the acoustics were made from unsteady surface pressures via Howe's curvature noise model and a modified Curle's analogy. A summary of the current understanding of the acoustics from a CC airfoil is given along with suggestions for future work.

  9. Reynolds Number Effects Investigation of Supercritical Airfoil Based on EFD and CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the transonic Reynolds number effects of supercritical airfoil by EFD and CFD method. An experiment was conducted in NF-6 wind tunnel, to obtain the pressure distribution and aerodynamic coefficients of a typical supercritical airfoil through pressure measuring, with Reynolds numbers varied from 3.5×106 to 1.0×107 per airfoil chord, Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.8, angles of attack from 0° to 8°. Also, flows over the supercritical airfoil were numerically studied; the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved with structure grids by utilizing the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A turbulence model, with Reynolds numbers varied from 2.0×106 to 50×10 6 per airfoil chord and Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.8. Computational results compared well with experimental results. It is shown that the upper surface pressure distribution of supercritical airfoil including the location and intensity of shock wave and trailing-edge pressure coefficient, changed apparently with variable Reynolds numbers, when shock-induced trailing-edge separation existed. It is also noticed that the lift coefficient increased, drag and pitching moment coefficient decreased as Reynolds number increasing. Results implied that Reynolds number effects should be considered during the early designing stage and optimization of large aircrafts applied supercritical airfoil.

  10. Parametric analyses for synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Guoqing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoils. The preconditioned and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a k − ω shear stream transport turbulence model are employed to accomplish the flowfield simulation of rotor airfoils under jet control. Additionally, a velocity boundary condition modeled by a sinusoidal function is developed to fulfill the perturbation effect of periodic jets. The validity of the present CFD procedure is evaluated by the simulated results of an isolated synthetic jet and the jet control case for airfoil NACA0015. Then, parametric analyses are conducted specifically for an OA213 rotor airfoil to investigate the effects of jet parameters (forcing frequency, jet location and momentum coefficient, jet direction, and distribution of jet arrays on the control effect of the aerodynamic characteristics of a rotor airfoil. Preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of jet control can be improved with specific frequencies (the best lift-drag ratio at F+ = 2.0 and jet angles (40° or 75° when the jets are located near the separation point of the rotor airfoil. Furthermore, as a result of a suitable combination of jet arrays, the lift coefficient of the airfoil can be improved by nearly 100%, and the corresponding drag coefficient decreased by 26.5% in comparison with the single point control case.

  11. Airfoil-Shaped Fluid Flow Tool for Use in Making Differential Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid flow tool includes an airfoil structure and a support arm. The airfoil structure's high-pressure side and low-pressure side are positioned in a conduit by the support arm coupled to the conduit. The high-pressure and low-pressure sides substantially face opposing walls of the conduit. At least one measurement port is formed in the airfoil structure at each of its high-pressure side and low-pressure side. A first manifold, formed in the airfoil structure and in fluid communication with each measurement port so-formed at the high-pressure side, extends through the airfoil structure and support arm to terminate and be accessible at the exterior wall of the conduit. A second manifold, formed in the airfoil structure and in fluid communication with each measurement port so-formed at the low-pressure side, extends through the airfoil structure and support arm to terminate and be accessible at the exterior wall of the conduit.

  12. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces and a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-07-15

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can be used for various applications which up to now have been possible only using much more computational costly methods. The propulsive performance of a soft heaving propulsor, and the influence of airfoil camberline elasticity on the flutter limit are two computational examples given in the report that highlight this feature. (au)

  13. Wind-tunnel investigation of an NACA 23012 airfoil with 30 percent-chord venetian-blind flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogallo, F M; Spano, Bartholomew S

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a NACA 23012 airfoil with 30-percent-chord venetian-blind flaps having one, two, three, and four slats of Clark y section. The three-slat arrangements was aerodynamically the best of those tested but showed practically no improvement over the comparable arrangement used in the preliminary tests published in NACA Technical Report No. 689. The multiple-slat flaps gave slightly higher lift coefficients than the one-slat (Fowler) flap but gave considerably greater pitching-moment coefficients. An analysis of test data indicates that substitution of a thicker and more cambered section for the Clark y slats should improve the aerodynamic and the structural characteristics of the venetian-blind flap.

  14. Experimental Investigation on the Aerodynamic Performance of NLF-0414 Iced-Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    abbas ebrahimi; majid hajipour; Hossein Hasheminasa

    2016-01-01

    Icing phenomenon on a natural laminar flow airfoil (NLF-0414) has been experimentally investigated. Double horn glaze ice geometry which was acquired during a 15 minutes spray time at-2.23℃ with liquid water content and a median volumetric diameter of 1.0 g/m3 and 20 μm, has been extracted from database of NASA Lewis Research Center. Pressure distribution over airfoil surfacewas evaluated at angles of attack between -2 to 6 degrees for both iced and clean airfoils. Aerodynamics performance de...

  15. The effect of acoustic forcing on an airfoil tonal noise mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Karn L; Doolan, Con J; Kelso, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    The response of the boundary layer over an airfoil with cavity to external acoustic forcing, across a sweep of frequencies, was measured. The boundary layer downstream of the cavity trailing edge was found to respond strongly and selectively at the natural airfoil tonal frequencies. This is considered to be due to enhanced feedback. However, the shear layer upstream of the cavity trailing edge did not respond at these frequencies. These findings confirm that an aeroacoustic feedback loop exists between the airfoil trailing edge and a location near the cavity trailing edge.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenlong Wu; Yihua Cao; Ismail, M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance...

  17. Dynamic stall modeling and correlation with experimental data on airfoils and rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. G.; Blackwell, R. H.; Commerford, G. L.; Mirick, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Two methods for modeling dynamic stall have been developed. The alpha, A, B method generates lift and pitching moments as functions of angle of attack and its first two time derivatives. The coefficients are derived from experimental data for oscillating airfoils. The Time Delay Method generates the coefficients from steady state airfoil characteristics and an associated time delay in stall beyond the steady state stall angle. Correlation with three types of test data shows that the alpha, A, B method is somewhat better for use in predicting helicopter rotor response in forward flight. Correlation with lift and moment hysteresis loops generated for oscillating airfoils was good for both models.

  18. Potential flow around two-dimensional airfoils using a singular integral method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yves; Wilson, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    The problem of potential flow around two-dimensional airfoils is solved by using a new singular integral method. The potential flow equations for incompressible potential flow are written in a singular integral equation. The equation is solved at N collocation points on the airfoil surface. A unique feature of this method is that the airfoil geometry is specified as an independent variable in the exact integral equation. Compared to other numerical methods, the present calculation procedure is much simpler and gives remarkable accuracy for many body shapes. An advantage of the present method is that it allows the inverse design calculation and the results are extremely accurate.

  19. 47 CFR 15.607 - Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment. 15.607 Section 15.607 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.607 Equipment authorization of Access...

  20. Multi-objective robust airfoil optimization based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve airfoil performance under different flight conditions and to make the performance insensitive to off-design condition at the same time,a multi-objective optimization approach considering robust design has been developed and applied to airfoil design. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation is adopted in airfoil design process,control points and related weights around airfoil are used as design variables. Two airfoil representation cases show that the NURBS method can get airfoil geometry with max geometry error less than 0.0019. By using six-sigma robust approach in multi-objective airfoil design,each sub-objective function of the problem has robustness property. By adopting multi-objective genetic algorithm that is based on non-dominated sorting,a set of non-dominated airfoil solutions with robustness can be obtained in the design. The optimum robust airfoil can be traded off and selected in these non-dominated solutions by design tendency. By using the above methods,a multi-objective robust optimization was conducted for NASA SC0712 airfoil. After performing robust airfoil optimization,the mean value of drag coefficient at Ma0.7-0.8 and the mean value of lift coefficient at post stall regime (Ma0.3) have been improved by 12.2% and 25.4%. By comparing the aerodynamic force coefficients of optimization result,it shows that: different from single robust airfoil design which just improves the property of drag divergence at Ma0.7-0.8,multi-objective robust design can improve both the drag divergence property at Ma0.7-0.8 and stall property at low speed. The design cases show that the multi-objective robust design method makes the airfoil performance robust under different off-design conditions.

  1. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2016-01-01

    , Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed...... that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated...... with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model....

  2. An Improved Parallel Optimization Framework for Transonic Airfoil Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kashif Zahir

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Variable Fidelity Optimization (VFO is used to obtain a minimum drag transonic airfoil, at constant lift, subject to thickness and pitching moment constraints using several low fidelity solvers. VFO has emerged as an attractive method of performing, both, high-speed and high-fidelity optimization. VFO uses computationally inexpensive low-fidelity models, complemented by a surrogate to account for the difference between the high- and low-fidelity models, to obtain the optimum of the function efficiently and accurately. The authors’ original Variable Fidelity (VF framework is modified for increased efficiency and accuracy by incorporating parallel evaluation and more constraints to the optimization problem. The method is found to be efficient and capable of finding the optimum that closely agrees with the results of high-fidelity optimization alone.

  3. Dynamic stall on a pitching and surging airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Reeve; McKeon, Beverley J.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine blades undergo dynamic stall due to the large angle of attack variation they experience during a turbine rotation. The flow over a single blade was modeled using a sinusoidally pitching and surging airfoil in a non-rotating frame with a constant freestream flow at a mean chord Reynolds number of . Two-dimensional, time-resolved velocity fields were acquired using particle image velocimetry. Vorticity contours were used to visualize shear layer and vortex activity. A low-order model of dynamic stall was developed using dynamic mode decomposition, from which primary and secondary dynamic separation modes were identified. The interaction between these two modes was able to capture the physics of dynamic stall and as such can be extended to other turbine configurations and problems in unsteady aerodynamics. Results from the linear pitch/surge frame are extrapolated to the rotating VAWT frame to investigate the behavior of identified flow structures.

  4. High frequency microphone measurements for transition detection on airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads

    Time series of pressure fluctuations has been obtained using high frequency microphones distributed over the surface of airfoils undergoing wind tunnel tests in the LM Windtunnel, owned by ’LM Glasfiber’, Denmark. The present report describes the dataanalysis, with special attention given...... to transition detection. It is argued that the transition point can be detected by observing the increase in the mean of the Fourier spectre and that thismethod is very stable froma numerical point of view. Other important issues are also discussed, e.g. the variation of pressure standard deviations (sound...... pressure) and Tollmien-Schlichting frequencies. The tests were made at Reynolds and Mach numbers corresponding to the operating conditions of a typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Risø B1-18, Risø C2-18 and NACA0015 profiles were tested and the measured transition points are reported....

  5. Compliance effects on dynamically pitching wind turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew S.

    The effects of elastic compliance in dynamically pitching wind turbine blades have been investigated. A numerical model guided wind tunnel testing, which used unsteady surface pressure measurements and phase-locked Particle Imaging Velocimetry to gather aerodynamic information. Using a torsionally compliant member, aeroelastic effects on the unsteady aerodynamics were compared against the results from a corresponding rigidly pitching airfoil to isolate the effects of compliance. The novel experimental apparatus and data acquisition techniques developed at the University of Wyoming showed that the presence of compliance can alter flow-field structures and increase dynamic loading. The high sensitivity of this nonlinear system suggests the formation of fluid-structure instabilities in large-scale turbines and demonstrates the potential for aerodynamic control as a means to mitigate adverse loading effects and improve wind turbine efficiency.

  6. SPIV study of passive flow control on a WT airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Meyer, Knud Erik;

    2010-01-01

    to free stream velocity U=15 m/s. The objective was to investigate the flow structures induced by and separation controlling behavior of vortex generators on the airfoil. The experimental results show strong separation of the uncontrolled flow whereas an intermittent behavior appears for the controlled...... flow, where the appearance of vortex structures alternate with a slightly separated turbulent boundary layer. However, the controlled case is yielding less backflow than the uncontrolled one: On average, the controlled flow leaves a nicely attached flow as opposed to the incident one....... For the controlled flow, the observed vortex structures generated by the devices are similar to those found in studies at lower Reynolds numbers. Further, mixing close to the wall, transferring high momentum fluid into the near wall region, is seen. The hypothesis of intermittent fluctuations in the boundary layer...

  7. Effects of a ground vortex on the aerodynamics of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamics of an airfoil with a rectangular jet exiting from its lower surface at fifty percent of the chord. The airfoil was tested with and without the influence of a ground plane. Surface static pressures were measured on the airfoil at jet to free stream velocity ratios ranging from 0 to 9. From these pressures, the variation of C sub L with velocity ratio was easily determined. The measurements indicated significant positive and negative pressure regions on the lower surface of the airfoil ahead of and after the nozzle exit respectively. The presence of a ground plane enhanced these pressure regions at low velocity ratios, but at a particular ratio for each plane location, a recirculation zone or vortex formed ahead of the jet resulting in decreased pressures and a drop in C sub L.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control by Suction and Injection on a Subsonic Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Shojaefard

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a numerical study concerning flow control by suction and injection. The case studied is the flow field over a subsonic airfoil with four suction and injection slots on the suction side of the airfoil. Five different angles of attack, 0, 5, 10, 13.3 and 20 with the Mach number of 0.15 are studied. Three cases are studied in each angle of attack. The three cases are airfoil with surface suction, surface injection and the base airfoil. A commercial CFD code, the FLUENT, is used in this study. The effect of suction and injection on aerodynamic coefficients is investigated. The results show that the surface suction can significantly increase the lift coefficient. The injection decreases the skin friction.

  9. Impact of uncertainty in airfoil characteristics on wind turbine extreme loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Imad; Natarajan, Anand; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Wind tunnel test measurements to characterize the static lift and drag coefficients of airfoils used in wind turbine blades are shown to possess large uncertainties, which leads to uncertainties in the aerodynamic loads on the rotor. In this paper a rational stochastic model is proposed to quantify...... the uncertainty in airfoil static lift and drag coefficients based on field and wind tunnel data, aero-servoelastic calculations and engineering judgment. The stochastic model is subsequently used to assess the effect of the uncertainty in airfoil static lift and drag coefficients on the prediction of extreme...... loads and structural reliability of large wind turbines. It is shown that the uncertainty in the static airfoil data has a significant impact on the prediction of extreme loads effects and structural reliability depending on the component, operating conditions (stand-still versus power production...

  10. Research on Aerodynamic Performance of an Wind Turbine Airfoil With Leading Edge Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Jie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of wind turbine was influenced by the environment. Among them, airfoil with leading edge ice has a great effect on the changes of aerodynamic performance. This study calculated the performance of an wind tubine airfoil at two iced shape model by CFD simulation using LES. LES in various models has been developed to simulate turbulent flows, especially to separated flows. In this investigation, 2D LES has been used to simulate flow past a wind turbine airfoil with leading edge ice which is a classical separated flow. The results show that flow structure is more complex with abundant whirlpools signifying violent turbulence when airfoil with ice and leads to poorer performance of wind turbine.

  11. Parallel numerical simulation of oscillating airfoil NACA0015 in the channel due to flutter instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řidký Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to 3D and 2D parallel numerical computation of pressure and velocity fields around an elastically supported airfoil self-oscillating due to interaction with the airflow. Numerical solution is computed in the OpenFOAM package, an open-source software package based on finite volume method. Movement of airfoil is described by translation and rotation, identified from experimental data. A new boundary condition for the 2DOF motion of the airfoil was implemented. The results of numerical simulations (velocity are compared with data measured in a wind tunnel, where a physical model of NACA0015 airfoil was mounted and tuned to exhibit the flutter instability. The experimental results were obtained previously in the Institute of Thermomechanics by interferographic measurements in a subsonic wind tunnel in Nový Knín.

  12. Modeling the Aerodynamic Lift Produced by Oscillating Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Saif Ullah

    2015-01-01

    For present study, setting Strouhal Number (St) as control parameter, numerical simulations for flow past oscillating NACA-0012 airfoil at 1,000 Reynolds Numbers (Re) are performed. Temporal profiles of unsteady forces; lift and thrust, and their spectral analysis clearly indicate the solution to be a period-1 attractor for low Strouhal numbers. This study reveals that aerodynamic forces produced by plunging airfoil are independent of initial kinematic conditions of airfoil that proves the existence of limit cycle. Frequencies present in the oscillating lift force are composed of fundamental (fs), even and odd harmonics (3fs) at higher Strouhal numbers. Using numerical simulations, shedding frequencies (f_s) were observed to be nearly equal to the excitation frequencies in all the cases. Unsteady lift force generated due to the plunging airfoil is modeled by modified van der Pol oscillator. Using method of multiple scales and spectral analysis of steady-state CFD solutions, frequencies and damping terms in th...

  13. Unsteady two-dimensional potential-flow model for thin variable geometry airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, analytical expressions for distributed and integral unsteady two-dimensional forces on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camber line...... on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated...... in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the integral forces can be reduced to Munk's steady and Theodorsen's unsteady results for thin airfoils, and numerical evaluation shows...

  14. Airfoil Selection of MAV (Miniature Air Vehicle for Low Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur S. Marathe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses issues and practical requirements of Airfoil for MAV. Here considering the MAV which travel with the speed range between 9-20 m/s. The Airfoil which is been selected on various criteria, i.e. - stable flight, cover maximum distance with minimum force. So here the NACA 2204 is been selected for MAV. The Fluent analysis is done on the airfoil for lift to drag ratio. These MAV are having some purpose i.e.:- they can be use as a spy in enemy area, inspection of hazardous area, where human resource can’t reach. Aerodynamic performance and stability should be considered in the context of the airfoil structural integrity. Particular attention should be paid to the unsteady nature of the flow.

  15. FLOWS AROUND TWO AIRFOILS PERFORMING FLING AND SUBSEQUENT TRANSLATION AND TRANSLATION AND SUBSEQUENT CLAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂; 于鑫

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces and flow structures of two airfoils performing "fling and subsequent translation" and "translation and subsequent clap" are studied by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids. These motions are relevant to the flight of very small insects. The Reynolds number, based on the airfoil chord length c and the translation velocity U, is 17. It is shown that: (1) For two airfoils performing fling and subsequent translation, a large lift is generated both in the fling phase and in the early part of the translation phase. During the fling phase,a pair of leading edge vortices of large strength is generated; the generation of the vortex pair in a short period results in a large time rate of change of fluid impulse, which explains the large lift in this period. During the early part of the translation, the two leading edge vortices move with the airfoils;the relative movement of the vortices also results in a large time rate of change of fluid impulse, which explains the large lift in this part of motion. (In the later part of the translation, the vorticity in the vortices is diffused and convected into the wake.) The time averaged lift coeffcient is approximately 2.4 times as large as that of a single airfoil performing a similar motion. (2) For two airfoils performing translation and subsequent clap, a large lift is generated in the clap phase. During the clap, a pair of trailing edge vortices of large strength are generated; again, the generation of the vortex pair in a short period (which results in a large timerate of change of fluid impulse) is responsible for the large lift in this period. The time averaged lift coefficient is approximately 1.6 times as large as that of a single airfoil performing a similar motion. (3) When the initial distance between the airfoils (in the case of clap, the final distance between the airfoils) varies from 0.1 to 0.2c, the lift on an airfoil decreases only slightly but the torque

  16. 21 CFR 211.182 - Equipment cleaning and use log.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment cleaning and use log. 211.182 Section... Reports § 211.182 Equipment cleaning and use log. A written record of major equipment cleaning... individual equipment logs that show the date, time, product, and lot number of each batch processed....

  17. 14 CFR 135.157 - Oxygen equipment requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oxygen equipment requirements. 135.157... Equipment § 135.157 Oxygen equipment requirements. (a) Unpressurized aircraft. No person may operate an unpressurized aircraft at altitudes prescribed in this section unless it is equipped with enough...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1441 - Oxygen equipment and supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oxygen equipment and supply. 25.1441... Oxygen equipment and supply. (a) If certification with supplemental oxygen equipment is requested, the equipment must meet the requirements of this section and §§ 25.1443 through 25.1453. (b) The oxygen...

  19. 38 CFR 17.156 - Eligibility for automobile adaptive equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... automobile adaptive equipment. 17.156 Section 17.156 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.156 Eligibility for automobile adaptive equipment. Automobile adaptive equipment may be authorized if the Under Secretary for Health...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  3. 46 CFR 117.175 - Survival craft equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft equipment. 117.175 Section 117.175... AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 117.175 Survival craft equipment. (a) General. Each item of survival craft equipment must be of good quality, and efficient for the purpose...

  4. 46 CFR 169.513 - Types of primary equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of primary equipment. 169.513 Section 169.513 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.513 Types of primary equipment....

  5. 7 CFR 3015.169 - Equipment management requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment management requirements. 3015.169 Section... Equipment management requirements. Recipient procedures for managing equipment shall, as a minimum, meet the following requirements (including replacement equipment) until such actions as transfer, replacement...

  6. Numerical Solution of Inviscid Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Euler equations in 2D compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. The results are compared with the solution using the software Ansys Fluent 15.0.7.

  7. Airfoil design using a coupled euler and integral boundary layer method with adjoint based sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S.; Reuther, J.; Chattot, J. J.

    The objective of this paper is to present a control theory approach for the design of airfoils in the presence of viscous compressible flows. A coupled system of the integral boundary layer and the Euler equations is solved to provide rapid flow simulations. An adjoint approach consistent with the complete coupled state equations is employed to obtain the sensitivities needed to drive a numerical optimization algorithm. Design to a target pressure distribution is demonstrated on an RAE 2822 airfoil at transonic speeds.

  8. Predicting extreme loads effects on wind turbines considering uncertainty in airfoil data

    OpenAIRE

    Abdallah, Imad; Natarajan, Anand; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    The sources contributing to uncertainty in a wind turbine blade static airfoil data include wind tunnel testing, CFD calculations, 3D rotational corrections based on CFD or empirical models, surface roughness corrections, Reynolds number corrections, expansion to the full 360-degree angle of attack range, validation by full scale measurements, and geometric distortions of the blade during manufacturing and under loading. In this paper a stochastic model of the static airfoil data is proposed ...

  9. TOPFARM, HawtOpt, AirfoilOpt: Three FUSED-Wind based toolsets

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Elouan Réthoré; Frederik Zahle

    2015-01-01

    A presentation about 3 FUSED-Wind based tools developed at DTU Wind Energy. TOPFARM is a tool to optimize wind farm layout from the wind farm owner perspective. HawtOpt is a tool to perform a coupled aero-elastic-structural optimization of wind turbine rotors. AirfoilOpt is a tool to perform coupled aero-structrual optimization of wind turbine blade airfoils.

  10. A study of long separation bubble on thick airfoils and its consequent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effects of long separation bubbles on airfoil performance have been discussed. • The bubble is found to induce a camber-effect on the airfoil. • Effects of Re, TI and angle of attack on the bubble have been presented. • Appropriate modelling methodology of the separation-induced transition is presented. • Comparison of γ–Reθ and κ–κL–ω model for separation bubble in 2D is presented. - Abstract: A parametric study has been performed to analyse the flow around the thick-symmetric NACA 0021 airfoil in order to better understand the characteristics and effects of long separation bubbles (LoSBs) that exist on such airfoils at low Reynolds numbers and turbulence intensities. In the article, the prediction capabilities of two recently-developed transition models, the correlation-based γ–Reθ model and the laminar-kinetic-energy-based κ–κL–ω model are assessed. Two-dimensional steady-state simulations indicated that the κ–κL–ω model predicted the separation and reattachment process accurately when compared with published experimental work. The model was then used to study the attributes and the effects of LoSBs as a function of the angle of attack, freestream turbulence intensity and Reynolds number. It was observed that LoSBs considerably degrade the aerodynamic performance of airfoils and lead to abrupt stall behaviour. It is, furthermore, illustrated that the presence of the LoSB leads to an induced camber effect on the airfoil that increases as the airfoil angle of attack increases due to the upstream migration of the bubble. An increase in the Reynolds number or turbulence levels leads to a reduction in the bubble extent, considerably improving the airfoil performance and leading to a progressive trailing-edge stall

  11. "Ladder" structure in tonal noise generated by laminar flow around an airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, TP; Joseph, PF

    2012-01-01

    The presence of a “ladder” structure in the airfoil tonal noise was discovered in the 1970s, but its mechanism hitherto remains a subject of continual investigation in the research community. Based on the measured noise results and some numerical analysis presented in this letter, the variations of four types of airfoil tonal noise frequencies with the flow velocity were analyzed individually. The ladder structure is proposed to be caused by the acoustic/hydrodynamic frequency lag between the...

  12. Investigation of the Effects of Airfoil-probes on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Axial Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiang; MA Hongwei; REN Minglin; XIANG Honghui

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of the airfoil-probes on the aerodynamic performance of an axial compressor,a numerical simulation of 3D flow field is performed in a 1.5-stage axial compressor with airfoil-probes installed at the stator leading-edge (LE).The airfoil-probes have a negative influence on the compressor aerodynamic performance at all operating points.A streamwise vortex is induced by the airfoil-probe along both sides of the blade.At the mid-operating point,the vortex is notable along the pressure side and is relatively small along the suction side (SS).At the near-stall point,the vortex is slightly suppressed in the pressure surface (PS),but becomes remarkable in the suction side.A small local-separation is induced by the interactions between the vortex and the end-wall boundary layer in the corner region near the hub.That the positive pitch angle of the airfoil-probe at 6.5% span is about 15° plays an important role in the vortex evolution near the hub,which causes the fact that the airfoil-probe near the hub has the largest effects among the four airfoil-probes.In order to get a further understanding of the vortex evolution in the stator in the numerical simulation,a flow visualization experiment in a water tunnel is performed.The flow visualization results give a deep insight into the evolution of the vortex induced by the airfoil-probe.

  13. Parametric analyses for synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Guoqing; Zhao Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoils. The preconditioned and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a k − ω shear stream transport turbulence model are employed to accomplish the flowfield simulation of rotor airfoils under jet control. Additionally, a velocity boundary condition modeled by a sinusoidal function is developed to fulfill the perturbation effect of periodic jet...

  14. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Šidlof Petr; Štěpán Martin; Vlček Václav; Řidký Václav; Šimurda David; Horáček Jaromír

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis) and plunging (vertical motion). The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the t...

  15. The design of post-buckled spinal structures for airfoil shape control using optimization methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ursache, N.M.; Bressloff, N.W.; Keane, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we examine the use of optimization methods and a variety of shape definition schemes to design spinal structures for the control of deformable shape airfoils. The aim is to find structures that, when suitably loaded, can be used to alter the aerodynamic performance of a cladding that forms the airfoil. Further, by using structures that are acting in the post buckling regime it is possible to obtain significant changes in shape with only modest changes in applied load.

  16. A Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Performance and Noise of a Bionic Airfoil Based on Owl Wing

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomin Liu; Xiang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Noise reduction and efficiency enhancement are the two important directions in the development of the multiblade centrifugal fan. In this study, we attempt to develop a bionic airfoil based on the owl wing and investigate its aerodynamic performance and noise-reduction mechanism at the relatively low Reynolds number. Firstly, according to the geometric characteristics of the owl wing, a bionic airfoil is constructed as the object of study at Reynolds number of 12,300. Secondly, the large eddy...

  17. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Ragni, D.; Ashok, A; van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to evaluate pressure fields, whereas lift and drag coefficients are inferred from the evaluation of momentum contour and wake integrals. The PIV-based results are compared to those derived from conve...

  18. Simultaneous Investigation of Flexibility and Plasma Actuation Effects on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Oscillating Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mahboubi Doust

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a numerical study of two dimensional laminar incompressible flow around the flexible oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is performed using the open source code OpenFOAM. Oscillatory motion types including pitching and flapping is considered. Reynolds number for these motions is assumed fixed at 12000. One of the important issues that must be considered in designing air structures, in particular the aircraft wing, is the interaction between the air and the elastic aircraft wings that is known as the Aeroelastic phenomenon. For this purpose, the effect of airfoil flexibility and flow induced vibration in these motion types is investigated and compared with the case of rigid airfoil. It is observed that the flexibility in both types of motions causes improvement of the thrust which is boosted with increasing the frequency. Contrary to thrust, the significant improvement of lift is only achievable in high frequencies. It was also found that the effect of flexibility on the flapping motion is higher than the pitching motion. For flow control on the airfoil, Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasma actuator is used in the trailing edge of a flexible airfoil, and its effect on the flexible airfoil is also investigated.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal/ Fluid Sciences & Engineering Dept.; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.; Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  20. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position

  1. Numerical solutions for a two-dimensional airfoil undergoing unsteady motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fu-bing; ZENG Nian-dong; ZHANG Liang; WU De-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous vorticity panels are used to model general unsteady inviscid, incompressible, and two-dimensional flows. The geometry of the airfoil is approximated by series of short straight segments having endpoints that lie on the actual surface. A piecewise linear, continuous distribution of vorticity over the airfoil surface is used to generate disturbance flow. The no-penetration condition is imposed at the midpoint of each segment and at discrete times. The wake is simulated by a system of point vortices, which move at local fluid velocity. At each time step, a new wake panel with uniform vorticity distribution is attached to the trailing edge, and the condition of eonstant circulation around the airfoil and wake is imposed. A new expression for Kutta condition is developed to study (i) the effect of thickness on the lift build-up of an impulsively started airfoil, (ii) the effects of reduced frequency and heave amplitude on the thrust production of flapping airfoils, and (iii) the vortex-airfoil interaction. This work presents some hydrodynamic results for tidalstreaim turbine.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  3. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position.

  4. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  5. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  6. Airfoil Aeroelastic Flutter Analysis Based on Modified Leishman-Beddoes Model at Low Mach Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Song; ZHU Qinghua; ZHANG Chenglin; NI Xianping

    2011-01-01

    Based on modified Leishman-Beddoes(L-B)state space model at low Mach number(lower than 0.3),the airfoil aeroelastic system is presented in this paper.The main modifications for L-B model include a new dynamic stall criterion and revisions of normal force and pitching moment coefficient.The bifurcation diagrams,the limit cycle oscillation (LCO)phase plane plots and the time domain response figures are applied to investigating the stall flutter bifurcation behavior of airfoil aeroelastic systems with symmetry or asymmetry.It is shown that the symmetric periodical oscillation happens after subcritical bifurcation caused by dynamic stall,and the asymmetric periodical oscillation,which is caused by the interaction of dynamic stall and static divergence,only happens in the airfoil aeroelastic system with asymmetry.Validations of the modified L-B model and the airfoil aeroelastic system are presented with the experimental airload data of NACA0012 and OA207 and experimental stall flutter data of NACA0012 respectively.Results demonstrate that the airfoil aeroelastic system presented in this paper is effective and accurate,which can be applied to the investigation of airfoil stall flutter at low Mach number.

  7. Effect of cavity on shock oscillation in transonic flow over RAE2822 supercritical airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Rizwanur; Labib, Md. Itmam; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Transonic flow past a supercritical airfoil is strongly influenced by the interaction of shock wave with boundary layer. This interaction induces unsteady self-sustaining shock wave oscillation, flow instability, drag rise and buffet onset which limit the flight envelop. In the present study, a computational analysis has been carried out to investigate the flow past a supercritical RAE2822 airfoil in transonic speeds. To control the shock wave oscillation, a cavity is introduced on the airfoil surface where shock wave oscillates. Different geometric configurations have been investigated for finding optimum cavity geometry and dimension. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are computed at Mach 0.729 with an angle of attack of 5°. Computed results are well validated with the available experimental data in case of baseline airfoil. However, in case of airfoil with control cavity; it has been observed that the introduction of cavity completely suppresses the unsteady shock wave oscillation. Further, significant drag reduction and successive improvement of aerodynamic performance have been observed in airfoil with shock control cavity.

  8. Aerodynamic data banks for Clark-Y, NACA 4-digit and NACA 16-series airfoil families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkan, K. D.; Camba, J., III; Morris, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    With the renewed interest in propellers as means of obtaining thrust and fuel efficiency in addition to the increased utilization of the computer, a significant amount of progress was made in the development of theoretical models to predict the performance of propeller systems. Inherent in the majority of the theoretical performance models to date is the need for airfoil data banks which provide lift, drag, and moment coefficient values as a function of Mach number, angle-of-attack, maximum thickness to chord ratio, and Reynolds number. Realizing the need for such data, a study was initiated to provide airfoil data banks for three commonly used airfoil families in propeller design and analysis. The families chosen consisted of the Clark-Y, NACA 16 series, and NACA 4 digit series airfoils. The various component of each computer code, the source of the data used to create the airfoil data bank, the limitations of each data bank, program listing, and a sample case with its associated input-output are described. Each airfoil data bank computer code was written to be used on the Amdahl Computer system, which is IBM compatible and uses Fortran.

  9. Full-scale semispan tests of a business-jet wing with a natural laminar flow airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale semispan model was investigated to evaluate and document the low-speed, high-lift characteristics of a business-jet class wing that utilized the HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil section and a single-slotted flap system. Also, boundary-layer transition effects were examined, a segmented leading-edge droop for improved stall/spin resistance was studied, and two roll-controlled devices were evaluated. The wind-tunnel investigation showed that deployment of single-slotted, trailing-edge flap was effective in providing substantial increments in lift required for takeoff and landing performance. Fixed-transition studies to investigate premature tripping of the boundary layer indicated no adverse effects in lift and pitching-moment characteristics for either the cruise or landing configuration. The full-scale results also suggested the need to further optimize the leading-edge droop design that was developed in the subscale tests.

  10. Hydrodynamic Performance Analysis on Different Airfoils of Straight Blade H Type of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Energy Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Kan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airfoil is a key factor that influences the hydrodynamic performance of vertical axis tidal current energy turbine. In order to explore the influences from the runner’s blade airfoil towards its hydrodynamic performance, three-dimensional unsteady flow numerical simulation on four airfoils of straight blade H type of tidal current energy turbines was carried out, under the precondition of same turbine compactness. Through investigating the influences from the four different airfoils of H blade towards the runner in terms of its dynamic torque feature and hydropower utilization coefficient, this research has analyzed the hydrodynamic performance of the tidal current energy turbine. As the research result indicates, the maximum dynamic torque value of the single-blade turbine with NACA0015 airfoil is significantly higher than that of the other three airfoils; while the maximum value of the overall runner torque is determined by the operating conditions such as different stream speed etc. As a whole, hydropower utilization coefficient of the turbine with asymmetric airfoil NACA4415 is better than that of the other three airfoils. This research has provided references for the design and airfoil selection for the new type of tidal current energy turbine.

  11. 50 CFR 27.72 - Audio equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Audio equipment. 27.72 Section 27.72 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... Audio equipment. The operation or use of audio devices including radios, recording and playback...

  12. 49 CFR 374.313 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 374.313 Section 374.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION... of Intercity Motor Common Carrier Passenger Service § 374.313 Equipment. (a) Temperature control....

  13. 32 CFR 37.1280 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 37.1280 Section 37.1280 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1280 Equipment....

  14. 23 CFR 1200.21 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 402 program, in the absence of which the State shall follow the applicable procedures in 49 CFR part... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 1200.21 Section 1200.21 Highways NATIONAL... Implementation and Management of the Highway Safety Program § 1200.21 Equipment. (a) Title. Except as provided...

  15. 14 CFR 398.4 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 398.4 Section 398.4 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.4 Equipment....

  16. 10 CFR 603.1255 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 603.1255 Section 603.1255 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in this Part § 603.1255 Equipment. Tangible property, other than real property, that has a useful life...

  17. 46 CFR 168.15-20 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 168.15-20 Section 168.15-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-20 Equipment. (a) Each person shall have a separate berth and not more than 1 berth...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.430 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with the applicable provisions of 29 CFR 1910.101 and 1910.169 through 1910.171. (2) Be stored in... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1910.430 Section 1910.430 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment Procedures and...

  19. 46 CFR 153.466 - Electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical equipment. 153.466 Section 153.466 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.466 Electrical equipment. A tankship carrying...

  20. 38 CFR 43.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 43.32 Section 43.32 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) UNIFORM... the equipment in accordance with Federal agency rules and procedures, and submit an annual...

  1. 49 CFR 195.262 - Pumping equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumping equipment. 195.262 Section 195.262... PIPELINE Construction § 195.262 Pumping equipment. (a) Adequate ventilation must be provided in pump... warn of the presence of hazardous vapors in the pumping station building. (b) The following must...

  2. 47 CFR 32.2232 - Circuit equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit equipment. 32.2232 Section 32.2232... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2232 Circuit equipment... which is used for the amplification, modulation, regeneration, circuit patching, balancing or control...

  3. 21 CFR 211.65 - Equipment construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment construction. 211.65 Section 211.65 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... construction. (a) Equipment shall be constructed so that surfaces that contact components, in-process...

  4. 40 CFR 65.103 - Equipment identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment identification. 65.103 Section 65.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS..., engineering calculations, or process knowledge....

  5. Localisation of flow separation and transition over a pitching NACA0012 airfoil at transitional Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Daniel

    Previous research at RMC has cataloged the occurrence of limit cycle oscillations at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers for an elastically mounted aeroelastic airfoil. These oscillations were attributed to boundary layer separation and the formation of a laminar separation bubble. For this thesis, an instrumented and motor-driven oscillating airfoil rig was designed and fabricated for the purpose of investigating the boundary layer of a NACA-0012 airfoil. The oscillating airfoil was driven by a servo motor to mimic the observed aeroelastic pitching with a sinusoid of matched amplitude and frequency. Hot-wire anemometry was used to investigate the near wake of the new motor-driven airfoil and compare it with the aeroelastic experiment. A chord-wise array of hot-film sensors captured the boundary layer state during the airfoil pitching oscillation. A novel analysis technique is introduced; A sliding window (in time) cross-correlation of adjacent sensors was used to detect dynamic laminar separation. Wind tunnel tests were performed at static angles-of-attack, for quasi-static very low frequency sweeps to verify the technique, and for selected cases of oscillations obtained with the aeroelastic rig. The new detection method was verified against the existing static techniques of phase reversal signature detection and signal cross-correlation by comparing quasi-static and static results. A map of the laminar separation bubble was produced for fixed angles of attack as well as for the pitching airfoil. The presence of a laminar separation was linked to the occurrence and characteristics of the limit cycle oscillations. Keywords: laminar separation, NACA0012, hot-film, hot-wire, anemometry, transitional flow, aeroelasticity.

  6. Modular turbine airfoil and platform assembly with independent root teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Davies, Daniel O; Eng, Darryl

    2013-07-30

    A turbine airfoil (22E-H) extends from a shank (23E-H). A platform (30E-H) brackets or surrounds a first portion of the shank (23E-H). Opposed teeth (33, 35) extend laterally from the platform (30E-H) to engage respective slots (50) in a disk. Opposed teeth (25, 27) extend laterally from a second portion of the shank (29) that extends below the platform (30E-H) to engage other slots (52) in the disk. Thus the platform (30E-H) and the shank (23E-H) independently support their own centrifugal loads via their respective teeth. The platform may be formed in two portions (32E-H, 34E-H), that are bonded to each other at matching end-walls (37) and/or via pins (36G) passing through the shank (23E-H). Coolant channels (41, 43) may pass through the shank beside the pins (36G).

  7. Parametric Evaluation of Thin, Transonic Circulation-Control Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Robin; Anders, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel on a 6 percent-thick, elliptical circulation-control airfoil with upper-surface and lower-surface blowing capability. Results for elliptical Coanda trailing-edge geometries, biconvex Coanda trailing-edge geometries, and leading-edge geometries are reported. Results are presented at subsonic and transonic Mach numbers of 0.3 and 0.8, respectively. When considering one fixed trailing-edge geometry, for both the subsonic and transonic conditions it was found that the [3.0:1] ratio elliptical Coanda surface with the most rounded leading-edge [03] performed favorably and was determined to be the best compromise between comparable configurations that took advantage of the Coanda effect. This configuration generated a maximum. (Delta)C(sub 1) = 0.625 at a C(sub mu) = 0.06 at M = 0.3, alpha = 6deg. This same configuration generated a maximum (Delta)C(sub 1) = 0.275 at a C(sub mu) = 0.0085 at M = 0.8, alpha = 3deg.

  8. Nature-Inspired Airfoils for Environmental Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suyeong; Kyung, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Recently, study on the insects' flapping flight became one of the challenging research subjects in the field of environmental engineering and aeronautics because of its potential applicability to intelligent micro-robots capable of autonomous flight and the next generation aerial-vehicles. In order to uncover its curious unsteady characteristics, many researchers have conducted experimental and computational studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of insects' flapping flight. In the present work, the unsteady flow physics around insect wings are conducted by utilizing numerical and computational simulation. The e-AIRS [6] (e-Science Aerospace Integrated Research System) gives a balanced service between computational and experimental aerodynamics, along with integrated research process of these two research activities. This paper presents the wing motions and their aerodynamics with a two dimensional approach to reduce environmental noise during the airflight. Also this paper shows an optimal phase angle, where the thrust is maximized at the position of minimized drag, which occurs when noise is minimized. Aside from the two-dimensional approach, stroke angles and phase angles of the airfoils are set as parameters, to determine which motion yields the best aerodynamic characteristics.

  9. Numerical analysis and optimization of boundary layer suction on airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yayun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerical approach of hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC is investigated for the suction hole with a width between 0.5 mm and 7 mm. The accuracy of Menter and Langtry’s transition model applied for simulating the flow with boundary layer suction is validated. The experiment data are compared with the computational results. The solutions show that this transition model can predict the transition position with suction control accurately. A well designed laminar airfoil is selected in the present research. For suction control with a single hole, the physical mechanism of suction control, including the impact of suction coefficient and the width and position of the suction hole on control results, is analyzed. The single hole simulation results indicate that it is favorable for transition delay and drag reduction to increase the suction coefficient and set the hole position closer to the trailing edge properly. The modified radial basis function (RBF neural network and the modified differential evolution algorithm are used to optimize the design for suction control with three holes. The design variables are suction coefficient, hole width, hole position and hole spacing. The optimization target is to obtain the minimum drag coefficient. After optimization, the transition delay can be up to 17% and the aerodynamic drag coefficient can decrease by 12.1%.

  10. Receptivity to thermal noise in real airfoil configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Thermal noise, the macroscopic manifestation of microscopic particle agitation, is present in fluid flow just as in electron flow in conductors or in other physical transport phenomena. When the flow acts as an amplifier, typically during transition to turbulence, the transition position can be influenced by the amplitude of external disturbances through the so called receptivity of the flow instabilities; internally generated thermal noise represents a thermodynamically enforced lower bound to how much disturbances can be reduced. In a previous paper (Seventh IUTAM Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition, IUTAM Bookseries Volume 18, Springer, 2010, pp. 11-18), the present author showed that the maximum transition distance in a Blasius boundary layer corresponds to a Reynolds number little above 6 .106 and to an N-factor of the order of 13. Results to be exhibited at this conference show that in a real airfoil configuration the maximum transition Reynolds number imposed by thermal noise is even lower than on a flat wall, and not far from the actually observed transition position. It follows that thermal noise might actually have a role in natural transition; and that even a perfectly silenced laboratory environment cannot push the transition position much farther. Work supported by the European Community through the RECEPT grant.

  11. Nonlinear aeroelastic analysis of airfoils: bifurcation and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. H. K.; Price, S. J.; Wong, Y. S.

    1999-04-01

    Different types of structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities commonly encountered in aeronautical engineering are discussed. The equations of motion of a two-dimensional airfoil oscillating in pitch and plunge are derived for a structural nonlinearity using subsonic aerodynamics theory. Three classical nonlinearities, namely, cubic, freeplay and hysteresis are investigated in some detail. The governing equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical simulations and analytical investigation of the system stability. The onset of Hopf-bifurcation, and amplitudes and frequencies of limit cycle oscillations are investigated, with examples given for a cubic hardening spring. For various geometries of the freeplay, bifurcations and chaos are discussed via the phase plane, Poincaré maps, and Lyapunov spectrum. The route to chaos is investigated from bifurcation diagrams, and for the freeplay nonlinearity it is shown that frequency doubling is the most commonly observed route. Examples of aerodynamic nonlinearities arising from transonic flow and dynamic stall are discussed, and special attention is paid to numerical simulation results for dynamic stall using a time-synthesized method for the unsteady aerodynamics. The assumption of uniform flow is usually not met in practice since perturbations in velocities are encountered in flight. Longitudinal atmospheric turbulence is introduced to show its effect on both the flutter boundary and the onset of Hopf-bifurcation for a cubic restoring force.

  12. Structural response of a fiber composite compressor fan blade airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was performed to determine the structural response of a fiber composite airfoil typical of those encountered in high-tip speed compressor fan blades when subjected to load conditions anticipated in such applications. The analysis method consisted of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, and centrifugal. Root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions were investigated. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. The core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design and is sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for the analysis, and to provide quantitative data associated with the various responses which can be helpful in designing composite blades.

  13. A parametric study of thrust and efficiency of an oscillating airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2012-11-01

    An oscillating airfoil serves as a classic test case for a variety of unsteady phenomena in fluid mechanics. In nature, fish, birds, and insects oscillate their fins and wings to produce thrust and maneuvering forces, often studied by approximating the appendages as airfoils. On the other hand, the unsteady fluid mechanics of an oscillating airfoil involve vortex shedding and vortex advection, which are essential to understanding unsteady thrust, and worth studying in their own right. This information is useful in areas such as flow control, fluid-structure interaction, and undersea robotics. In this work, we examine the thrust and efficiency of a heaving (or pitching) foil as a function of variables such as the reduced frequency and amplitude (noting previous related studies such as Koochesfahani 1989; Anderson et al. 1998). Further, our novel experimental ``cyber-physical'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] allows the airfoil to propel itself under its own thrust. Our experimental apparatus constantly monitors the fluid forces acting on the foil, and commands velocity to a carriage system in accordance with these forces. With this capability, we are able to measure the terminal velocity of a self-propelled airfoil, as well as its stationary thrust and efficiency.

  14. Usage of advanced thick airfoils for the outer part of very large offshore turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, F.; Ceyhan, O.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays one of the big challenges in wind energy is connected to the development of very large wind turbines with 100 m blades and 8-10MW power production. The European project INNWIND.EU plays an important role in this challenge because it is focused on exploring and exploiting technical innovations to make these machines not only feasible but also cost effective. In this context, the present work investigates the benefits of adopting thick airfoils also at the outer part of the blade. In fact, if these airfoils are comparable to the existing thinner ones in terms of aerodynamics, the extra thickness would lead to a save in weight. Lightweight blades would visibly contribute to reduce the cost of energy of the turbines and make them cost effective. The reference turbine defined in INNWIND.EU project has been adjusted to use the new airfoils. The results show that the rotor performance is not sacrificed when the 24% airfoils are replaced by the ECN 30% thick airfoils, while 24% extra thickness can be obtained.

  15. Experimental measurement of the aerodynamic charateristics of two-dimensional airfoils for an unmanned aerial vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nožička Jiří

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of the development of an airfoil for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV with internal propulsion system; the investigation involves the analysis of the aerodynamic performance for the gliding condition of two-dimensional airfoil models which have been tested. This development is based on the modification of a selected airfoil from the NACA four digits family. The modification of this base airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface since the UAV will have an internal propulsion system. This analysis involved obtaining the lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients experimentally for the situation where there is not flow through the blowing outlet, called the no blowing condition by means of wind tunnel tests. The methodology to obtain the forces experimentally was through an aerodynamic wire balance. Obtained results were compared with numerical results by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD from references and found in very good agreement. Finally, a selection of the airfoil with the best aerodynamic performance is done and proposed for further analysis including the blowing condition.

  16. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intesaaf Ashraf; Amit Agrawal; Majid Hassan Khan; Sooraj P; Atul Srivastava; Atul Sharma

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) based investigation of wake structure of a pitching airfoil. PIV measurements have been carried out for NACA0015 airfoil at Re = 2900 with reduced frequency range of 1.82–10.92 and pitching angle of 5°. Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán shedding and deflected vortex shedding) are observed over this parameter range. The vorticity decreases substantially over a distance of two chord-lengths. The velocity profile indicates a jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil. It is shown that the jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil is however not a sufficient condition for the generation of thrust. The vortex strength is found to be invariant of the pitching frequency. Certain differences from the reported results are noted, which may be because of difference in the airfoil shape. These results can help improve understanding of the flow behavior as the low Reynolds number range is not well studied.

  17. Wind-Tunnel Tests on Airfoil Boundary Layer Control Using a Backward-Opening Slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Millard J

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of boundary layer control on the lift and drag of an airfoil. Boundary layer control was accomplished by means of a backward-opening slot in the upper surface of the hollow airfoil. Air was caused to flow through this slot by a pressure which was maintained inside the airfoil by a blower. Various slot locations, slot openings, and wing pressures were used. The tests were conducted in the 5-foot atmospheric wind tunnel of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Under the test conditions, the maximum lift coefficient was increased about 96 per cent for one slot arrangement, and the minimum drag coefficient was decreased about 27 per cent for another, both being compared with the results obtained with the unslotted airfoil. It is believed from this investigation that the above effects may be increased by the use of larger slot openings, better slot locations, multiple slots, improved airfoil profiles, and trailing edge flaps.

  18. Studi Karakteristik Aliran Tiga Dimensi Dan Perpindahan Panas Pada Cascade Airfoil Dengan Pengaruh Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Wibisono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dalam dunia teknik khususunya mekanika fluida, aliran tiga dimensi merupakan hal yang sangat penting guna untuk mengetahui fenomena aliran dan perpindahan panas yang terjadi pada bluffbody cascade airfoil. Error atau loses yang terjadi pada cascade airfoil disebabkan oleh adanya aliran sekunder. Error atau loses tersebut menurut penilitian yang terlah dilakukan dapat dikurang dengan aspek clearance. Tujuan dari penilitian ini adalah untuk menganalisa karaktersistik aliran tiga dimensi serta perpindahan panas akibat adanya perubahan jarak antara leading edge antara cascade dan sudut serang serta bentuk geometri. hasil dari simulasi divisualisasikan dalam bentuk velocity dan pressure coefficient. Pada cascade airfoil dengan sudut serang 20° terjadi fenomena pada dinding clearance yaitu tip clearance flow di mana ketika aliran udara melewati dinding akan mengalami up stream yang mengakibatkan arah aliran menuju ke atas, sedangkan pada dinding airfoil ditemukan aliran sekunder berupa curl flow yang akhirnya membentuk spiral point pada trailing edge. Perubahan sudut serang menjadi -20° membuat perbedaan tekanan antara lower side dan upper side semakin lemah, begitu juga tip clearance flow yang terjadi pada wall clearance mengalami perubahan arah menjadi down stream yang mengakibatkan arah aliran menjuu kebawah. Perubahan sudut juga berpengaruh terhadap pressure coeficient pada boundary layer airfoil dan mengakibatkan blockage effect serta terjadinya vortex yang berbeda.

  19. Airfoil data sensitivity analysis for actuator disc simulations used in wind turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Karl; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Sørensen, Jens N.; Ivanell, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To analyse the sensitivity of blade geometry and airfoil characteristics on the prediction of performance characteristics of wind farms, large-eddy simulations using an actuator disc (ACD) method are performed for three different blade/airfoil configurations. The aim of the study is to determine how the mean characteristics of wake flow, mean power production and thrust depend on the choice of airfoil data and blade geometry. In order to simulate realistic conditions, pre-generated turbulence and wind shear are imposed in the computational domain. Using three different turbulence intensities and varying the spacing between the turbines, the flow around 4-8 aligned turbines is simulated. The analysis is based on normalized mean streamwise velocity, turbulence intensity, relative mean power production and thrust. From the computations it can be concluded that the actual airfoil characteristics and blade geometry only are of importance at very low inflow turbulence. At realistic turbulence conditions for an atmospheric boundary layer the specific blade characteristics play an minor role on power performance and the resulting wake characteristics. The results therefore give a hint that the choice of airfoil data in ACD simulations is not crucial if the intention of the simulations is to compute mean wake characteristics using a turbulent inflow.

  20. Computations of unsteady transonic flow over airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-tao; SHAN Peng

    2013-01-01

    Transonic flow over a thin airfoil at low Reynolds number was studied numerically by directly solving two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations through 5th order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme without using any turbulence model.A series of distinguished unsteady phenomena for a thin 2-D transonic airfoil flow were presented.Due to continuous adverse pressure gradient in the subsonic flow downstream of the sonic line,the unsteady separated boundary layer with main vortex and secondary vortex was developed at the rear of the airfoil.At the trailing edge,the vortex-shedding was characterized by periodical connection of the main vortex and secondary vortex on the other side of the airfoil.The unsteady separation and vortex-shedding occurred with the same period.On the airfoil surface,the average pulse pressure related to the unsteady supersonic region was obviously smaller than that related to the vortex-shedding at the trailing edge.With the attack angle increasing from 0° to 2°,the frequency of vortex-shedding decreases about 4.2 %.At last,the turbulence intensity and many second-order statistics in the wake region were investigated.

  1. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  2. Tests and numerical simulation of aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils for general aviation applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lizhen; Wang Xiaoming; Miguel A.González Hernández; Wang Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper was to validate the effects of airfoil thickness ratio on the characteristics of a family of airfoils.Re-search was carried out in different ways.First,tests were conducted in the wind tunnel.And numerical simulation was performed on the basis of tests.Results from calculation were consistent with tests,indicating that numerical method could help evaluate characteristics of airfoils.Then the results were confirmed by compared with empirical data.The study also showed that the determining factor of lift is not only the thickness ratio,but the angle of attack,the relative camber and the camber line.The thickness ratio appears to have little effect on lift coefficient at zero angle of attack,since the angle of zero llft is largely determined by the airfoil camber.According to the research,numerical simulation can be used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in different environment such as in the dusty or hu-mid air.

  3. On the unsteady motion and stability of a heaving airfoil in ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Molina; Xin Zhang; David Angland

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the fluid mechanics and force generation capabilities of an inverted heaving airfoil placed close to a moving ground using a URANS solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. By varying the mean ground clearance and motion frequency of the airfoil, it was possible to construct a frequency-height diagram of the various forces acting on the airfoil. The ground was found to enhance the downforce and reduce the drag with respect to freestream. The unsteady motion induces hysteresis in the forces' behaviour. At moderate ground clearance, the hysteresis increases with frequency and the airfoil loses energy to the flow, resulting in a stabilizing motion. By analogy with a pitching motion, the airfoil stalls in close proximity to the ground. At low frequencies, the motion is unstable and could lead to stall flutter. A stall flutter analysis was undertaken. At higher frequencies, inviscid effects overcome the large separation and the motion becomes stable. Forced trailing edge vortex shedding appears at high frequencies. The shedding mechanism seems to be independent of ground proximity.However, the wake is altered at low heights as a result of an interaction between the vortices and the ground.

  4. Experimental measurement of the aerodynamic charateristics of two-dimensional airfoils for an unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Luis; Nožička, Jiří; Vavřín, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This paper is part of the development of an airfoil for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with internal propulsion system; the investigation involves the analysis of the aerodynamic performance for the gliding condition of two-dimensional airfoil models which have been tested. This development is based on the modification of a selected airfoil from the NACA four digits family. The modification of this base airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface since the UAV will have an internal propulsion system. This analysis involved obtaining the lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients experimentally for the situation where there is not flow through the blowing outlet, called the no blowing condition by means of wind tunnel tests. The methodology to obtain the forces experimentally was through an aerodynamic wire balance. Obtained results were compared with numerical results by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from references and found in very good agreement. Finally, a selection of the airfoil with the best aerodynamic performance is done and proposed for further analysis including the blowing condition.

  5. Usage of advanced thick airfoils for the outer part of very large offshore turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays one of the big challenges in wind energy is connected to the development of very large wind turbines with 100 m blades and 8-10MW power production. The European project INNWIND.EU plays an important role in this challenge because it is focused on exploring and exploiting technical innovations to make these machines not only feasible but also cost effective. In this context, the present work investigates the benefits of adopting thick airfoils also at the outer part of the blade. In fact, if these airfoils are comparable to the existing thinner ones in terms of aerodynamics, the extra thickness would lead to a save in weight. Lightweight blades would visibly contribute to reduce the cost of energy of the turbines and make them cost effective. The reference turbine defined in INNWIND.EU project has been adjusted to use the new airfoils. The results show that the rotor performance is not sacrificed when the 24% airfoils are replaced by the ECN 30% thick airfoils, while 24% extra thickness can be obtained

  6. Numerical simulation of the interaction of a vortex with stationary airfoil in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Mccroskey, W. J.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    A perturbation form of an implicit conservative, noniterative numerical algorithm for the two-dimensional thin layer Navier-Stokes and Euler equations is used to compute the interaction flow-field of a vortex with stationary airfoil. A Lamb-like analytical vortex having a finite core is chosen to interact with a thick (NACA 0012) and a thin (NACA 64A006) airfoil independently in transonic flow. Two different configurations of vortex interaction are studied, viz., (1) when the vortex is fixed at one location in the flowfield, and (2) when the vortex is convecting past the airfoil at freestream velocity. Parallel computations of this interacting flowfield are also done using a version of the Transonic Small Disturbance Code (ATRAN2). A special treatment of the leading edge region for thin airfoils is included in this code. With this, the three methods gave qualitatively similar results for the weaker interactions considered in this study. However, the strongest interactions considered proved to be beyond the capabilities of the small disturbance code. The results also show a far greater influence of the vortex on the airfoil flowfield when the vortex is stationary than when it is convecting with the flow.

  7. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein Pouryoussefi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Experiments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 × 106 over angles of attack from −8° to 20°, and then results are compared. Generally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10° and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50% which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4° and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2° and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  8. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Mirzaei; Mohammad-Mahdi Nazemi; Mojtaba Fouladi; Alireza Doostmahmoudi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Exper-iments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 ? 106 over angles of attack from ? 8? to 20?, and then results are compared. Gener-ally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10? and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50%which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4? and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2? and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  9. An Experimental Study on Aerodynamic Sound Generated from Wake Interaction of Circular Cylinder and Airfoil with Attack Angle in Tandem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In our previous study, the effects of the interval between the cylinder and the airfoil on the aerodynamic sound were investigated and compared with the cases of single circular and single airfoil. In this study, the effects of the attack angle of the airfoil located downstream on the characteristics of aerodynamic sound and the wake structure are investigated at a given interval between the cylinder and the airfoil. It is found that the sound pressure level of DFN and the peak frequency decrease with increasing attack angle of airfoil because of the diffusive wake structure due to the increased back pressure of circular cylinder, which is caused by the blocking effect of airfoil. It is shown that the sound sources are corresponded to the attack points of shedding vortex form the upstream circular cylinder to the downstream airfoil. We conclude that the pressure fluctuation at the airfoil surface effects on the sound pressure level, from the flow visualizations and the exploration test of sound source.

  10. Lagrangian and Eulerian pressure field evaluation of rod-airfoil flow from time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Moore, P.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the rod-airfoil air flow by time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-TOMO PIV) in thin-light volume configuration. Experiments are performed at the region close to the leading edge of a NACA0012 airfoil embedded in the von Karman wake of a cylindrical rod. The

  11. Electrical equipment qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical equipment qualification research programs being carried out by CEA, JAERI, and Sandia Laboratories are discussed. Objectives of the program are: (1) assessment of accident simulation methods for electrical equipment qualification testing; lower coarse (2) evaluation of equipment aging and accelerated aging methods; (3) determine radiation dose spectrum to electrical equipment and assess simulation methods for qualification; (4) identify inadequacies in electrical equipment qualification procedures and standards and potential failure modes; and (5) provide data for verifying and improving standards, rules and regulatory guides

  12. Experimental and computational investigation into ice accretion on airfoil of a transport aircraft%运输机翼型结冰的计算和实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易贤; 桂业伟; 朱国林; 杜雁霞

    2011-01-01

    采用数值计算和结冰风洞实验相结合的手段,对某运输机机翼剖面缩比翼型的结冰特性进行了研究.结冰实验在气动中心0.3m×0.2m结冰风洞中进行,实验模型为弦长0.18m的层流翼型.翼型的绕流流场通过求解低速黏流的时均Navier-Stokes(N-S)方程得到,采用拉格朗日法计算水滴撞击特性,在此基础上,求解结冰热力学模型,获得结冰外形.对计算和实验结果进行了对比分析,发现虽然局部冰形轮廓还存在差异,但计算和实验得到的冰形在结冰极限、冰形体积和主要特征等方面基本一致.研究显示:在结冰的初始阶段,翼型前缘的冰形较规则,随着结冰时间的增加,冰形逐渐变得不规则;翼型下表面冰体前部为明冰,冰体后部、尤其是结冰极限附近则呈现典型的霜冰特征;翼型上表面的结冰范围远小于下表面,在结冰极限附近也不再有明显的霜冰.%Ice accretion characteristics on the airfoil of a transport aircraft were studied with both experimental and computational methods. Icing test was carried out in the icing wind tunnel of 0.3 m × 0.2 m test section, in China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center. The test model is a 0.18-m-chord laminar airfoil, which is the sub-scale model of the transport aircraft's wing section. Numerical simulation of icing was based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. The flow field of airfoil was calculated by solving time averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Droplet trajectories and impingement characteristics were computed with a Lagrangian method. Ice shape was then obtained after solving the thermodynamic model of icing. Computational results were compared with experimental results.Despite of some geometric differences, the volume, limit and main characteristics of computational ice shape agree well with the experimental results. The study shows that the ice shape on the leading edge of airfoil is streamline at the initial

  13. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Some Airfoils Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of some results of four individual studies presenting calculated numerical values for airfoil aerodynamic stability derivatives in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow due separately to angle-of-attack, pitch rate, flap deflection, and airfoil camber using a discrete vortex method. Both steady conditions and oscillatory motion were considered. Variables include the number of vortices representing the airfoil, the pitch axis / moment center chordwise location, flap chord to airfoil chord ratio, and circular or parabolic arc camber. Comparisons with some experimental and other theoretical information are included. The calculated aerodynamic numerical results obtained using a limited number of vortices provided in each study compared favorably with thin airfoil theory predictions. Of particular interest are those aerodynamic results calculated herein (such as induced drag) that are not readily available elsewhere.

  14. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  15. The leading-edge stall of airfoils with various nose shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraljic, Matthew; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2015-11-01

    We study the inception of leading-edge stall on stationary, smooth thin airfoils with various nose shapes of the form xa (where 0 nose, that asymptotically match each other. The flow in the outer region is dominated by the classical thin airfoil theory. Scaled (magnified) coordinates and a modified (smaller) Reynolds number ReM are used to correctly account for the nonlinear behavior and extreme velocity changes in the inner region, where both the near-stagnation and high suction areas occur. The inner region problem is solved numerically to determine the inception of leading-edge stall on the nose. It is found that stall is delayed to higher angles of attack with the decrease of nose parameter a. Specifically, new airfoil shapes are proposed with increased stall angle at subsonic speeds and higher critical Mach numbers at transonic speeds.

  16. Limit cycle oscillation suppression of 2-DOF airfoil using nonlinear energy sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭虎伦; 陈予怒; 扬天智

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel mechanical attachment, i.e., nonlinear energy sink (NES), for suppressing the limit cycle oscillation (LCO) of an airfoil. The dynamic responses of a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) airfoil coupled with an NES are studied with the harmonic balance method. Different structure parameters of the NES, i.e., mass ratio between the NES and airfoil, NES offset, NES damping, and nonlinear stiffness in the NES, are chosen for studying the effect of the LCO suppression on an aeroelastic system with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation or subcritical Hopf bifurcation, respectively. The results show that the structural parameters of the NES have different influence on the supercritical Hopf bifurcation system and the subcritical Hopf bifurcation system.

  17. Experimental characterization of airfoil boundary layers for improvement of aeroacoustic and aerodynamic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    blades makes a transition from laminar to turbulent. In the turbulent boundary layer eddies are created which are a potential noise sources. They are ineffective as noise source on the airfoil surface or in free flow, but when convecting past the trailing edge of the airfoil their efficiency is much......The present work aims at the characterization of aerodynamic noise from wind turbines. There is a consensus among scientists that the dominant aerodynamic noise mechanism is turbulent boundary trailing edge noise. In almost all operational conditions the boundary layer flow over the wind turbine...... increased and audible sound is radiated. We performed measurements of the boundary layer velocity fluctuations and the fluctuating surface pressure field in two different wind tunnels and on three different airfoils. The first wind tunnel is the one of LM Wind Power A/S following the classic concept...

  18. Effects of the impeller inlet tip clearance on the flow and performance of airfoil fans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Y.J. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    Performance tests of an airfoil fan and measurement of flow fields at the impeller exit are carried out to investigate the effects of the tip clearance between the rotor and inlet casing on the impeller performance. The impeller is twelve bladed of NACA 65-810 airfoils and tested with 3 different size of gap; 1, 2, 4{sup mm}. The relative decrease of pressure rising performance of the fan is 15 percent for the design flow rate when the gap size is 1 percent of the impeller diameter. The reduction of performance becomes large as the flow rate increases. The leakage flow through the clearance affects the through flow of the impeller, which results in decrease of the slip factor as well as the impeller efficiency. The data base obtained in the present study can be used for the design and flow analysis of the airfoil fans. (author). 4 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A SIMPLIFIED THEORY FOR UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCES ACTING ON AN AIRFOIL FLYING ABOVE SEA-WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Qi-hu; WU De-ming; ZHANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    A simplified theoretical method based on the quasi-steady wing theory was proposed to study the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil flying in non-uniform flow. Comparison between the theoretical results and the numerical results based on nonlinear theory was made. It shows that the simplified theory is a good approximation for the investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil flying above sea-waves. From on the simplified theory it is also found that an airfoil can get thrust from a wave-disturbed airflow and thus the total drag is reduced. And the relationship among the thrust, the flying altitude, the flying speed and the wave parameters was worked out and discussed.

  20. Aerodynamic Design of Airfoils Based on Variable-Domain Variational Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈池; 刘高联

    2005-01-01

    Designing airfoils according to given pressure (or velocity) distribution is one kind of free boundary problems. Free boundary condition can be coupled with the flow governing equations by variable-domain variational calculus, which makes it possible to calculate simultaneously the flow field and the free boundary. An accurate deduction of the variable-domain variational principles is taken herein to design airfoils in compressible and incompressible flows. Furthermore, two grid types (H and O) are used in the calculation with better results for the O-type grid. It is shown that convergence is accelerated and good results can be obtained even if the initial guessed airfoil shape is a triangle, demonstrating the strong adaptability of this method.

  1. Comparison of two design methods of aerodynamic biobjectives for airfoil and wing shapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Ziqiang; FU; Hongyan; LIU; Hang; WANG; Xiaolu

    2004-01-01

    A simplified adaptive wing, which deflects its leading edge and trailing edge flaps to vary its shape, is calculated to investigate the potential aerodynamic gains and compared with a biobjective optimization (BO) wing in the present paper. In subsonic-transonic flights the deflection angle of a flap is determined through optimization using a deterministic method. In supersonic flight the flaps are not deflected due to the requirement of having a minimum drag. For comparison the aerodynamic characteristics of a BO airfoil and wing is calculated. A parallel genetic algorithm is used in BO. Euler equations served as governing equations in flow field calculation. Numerical results in both 2D (airfoil) and 3D (wing) cases show that aerodynamic performances of the two design airfoils and wings are much better than those of the original ones, with the adaptive design one the best.

  2. Shape Optimization of NREL S809 Airfoil for Wind Turbine Blades Using a Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to employ a multiobjective genetic algorithm (MOGA to optimize the shape of a well-known wind turbine airfoil S809 to improve its lift and drag characteristics, in particular to achieve two objectives, that is, to increase its lift and its lift to drag ratio. The commercially available software FLUENT is employed to calculate the flow field on an adaptive structured mesh using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations in conjunction with a two-equation k-ω SST turbulence model. The results show significant improvement in both lift coefficient and lift to drag ratio of the optimized airfoil compared to the original S809 airfoil. In addition, MOGA results are in close agreement with those obtained by the adjoint-based optimization technique.

  3. Wind Tunnel Tests of Wind Turbine Airfoils at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, E.; Gorostidi, A.; Jacobs, M.; Timmer, W. A.; Munduate, X.; Pires, O.

    2014-06-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been performed to measure the two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of two different airfoil families at high Reynolds numbers (from 3 to 12 millions) in the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. Also, tests at a Reynolds number of 3 millions have been performed in the Low-Speed Low- Turbulence Wind Tunnel of Delft University, The Netherlands. The airfoils tested belong to two wind turbine dedicated families: the TU-Delft DU family and the ACCIONA Windpower AWA family that was designed in collaboration with CENER. Reynolds number effects on airfoil performance have been obtained in the range of 3 to 12 millions. The availability of data from two different wind tunnels has brought the opportunity to cross compare the results from the two facilities.

  4. Airfoil data sensitivity analysis for actuator disc simulations used in wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karl; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2014-01-01

    and blade geometry only are of importance at very low inflow turbulence. At realistic turbulence conditions for an atmospheric boundary layer the specific blade characteristics play an minor role on power performance and the resulting wake characteristics. The results therefore give a hint that the choice......To analyse the sensitivity of blade geometry and airfoil characteristics on the prediction of performance characteristics of wind farms, large-eddy simulations using an actuator disc (ACD) method are performed for three different blade/airfoil configurations. The aim of the study is to determine...... how the mean characteristics of wake flow, mean power production and thrust depend on the choice of airfoil data and blade geometry. In order to simulate realistic conditions, pre-generated turbulence and wind shear are imposed in the computational domain. Using three different turbulence intensities...

  5. Experimental studies of the boundary layer on an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, B. J., Jr.; Mueller, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel investigation was carried out to study the effect of laminar separation bubbles on a NACA 66(3)-018 airfoil for Reynolds numbers less than 4.0 x 10 to the 5th. Leading edge laminar separation bubbles formed for angles of attack of approximately 7 to 12 deg. To study the leading edge separation bubble more closely, hotwire anemometer measurements were made in the airfoil a Reynolds number of 8.0 x 10 to the 4th. Velocity and turbulence intensity profiles were obtained and boundary layer parameters were calculated. Frequency spectra were also calculated at key points in the airfoil boundary layer for this case. Correlation of the anemometry data with static pressure distributions, and flow visualization data provided insight into laminar separation bubble behavior at low Reynolds numbers.

  6. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šidlof, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  7. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  8. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  9. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic camber airfoil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Chandrasekhara

    2007-02-01

    This study reports control of compressible dynamic stall through management of its unsteady vorticity using a variable droop leading edge (VDLE) airfoil. Through dynamic adaptation of the airfoil edge incidence, the formation of a dynamic stall vortex was virtually eliminated for Mach numbers of up to 0·4. Consequently, the leading edge vorticity flux was redistributed enabling retention of the dynamic lift. Of even greater importance was the fact that the drag and pitching moment coefficients were reduced by nearly 50%. The camber variations introduced when the leading edge was drooped are explained to be the source of this benefit. Analysis of the peak vorticity flux levels allowed the determination of minimum necessary airfoil adaptation schedule.

  10. Investigation on Improved Correlation of CFD and EFD for Supercritical Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to improve the correlation between CFD and EFD through the correction of EFD results and validation of CFD method, thus investigating the aerodynamic characteristics of supercritical airfoil perfectly. In this study, NASA SC (2 -0714 airfoil is numerically simulated and compared with NASA corrected experimental results to validate the CFD method. The Barnwell-Sewell method is applied to correct sidewall effects for experimental results of typical supercritical airfoil CH obtained in NF-6 wind tunnel. It is shown that there was large disparity between CFD and uncorrected EFD results, while CFD and EFD compared well after correction. The CFD method is validated and the Barnwell-Sewell method is feasible for sidewall effects correction. The correlation of EFD and CFD improved after the correction of EFD results and validation of CFD method.

  11. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  12. An experimental investigation on the surface water transport process over an airfoil by using a digital image projection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wei, Tian; Hu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the transient behavior of the surface water film and rivulet flows driven by boundary layer airflows over a NACA0012 airfoil in order to elucidate underlying physics of the important micro-physical processes pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. A digital image projection (DIP) technique was developed to quantitatively measure the film thickness distribution of the surface water film/rivulet flows over the airfoil at different test conditions. The time-resolved DIP measurements reveal that micro-sized water droplets carried by the oncoming airflow impinged onto the airfoil surface, mainly in the region near the airfoil leading edge. After impingement, the water droplets formed thin water film that runs back over the airfoil surface, driven by the boundary layer airflow. As the water film advanced downstream, the contact line was found to bugle locally and developed into isolated water rivulets further downstream. The front lobes of the rivulets quickly advanced along the airfoil and then shed from the airfoil trailing edge, resulting in isolated water transport channels over the airfoil surface. The water channels were responsible for transporting the water mass impinging at the airfoil leading edge. Additionally, the transition location of the surface water transport process from film flows to rivulet flows was found to occur further upstream with increasing velocity of the oncoming airflow. The thickness of the water film/rivulet flows was found to increase monotonically with the increasing distance away from the airfoil leading edge. The runback velocity of the water rivulets was found to increase rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, while the rivulet width and the gap between the neighboring rivulets decreased as the airflow velocity increased.

  13. Spatially Developing Secondary Instabilities in Compressible Swept Airfoil Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional eigenvalue analysis is used on a massive scale to study spatial instabilities of compressible shear flows with two inhomogeneous directions. The main focus of the study is crossflow dominated swept-wing boundary layers although the methodology can also be applied to study other type of flows, such as the attachment-line flow. Certain unique aspects of formulating a spatial, two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for the secondary instability of finite amplitude crossflow vortices are discussed, namely, fixing the spatial growth direction unambiguously through a non-orthogonal formulation of the linearized disturbance equations. A primary test case used for parameter study corresponds to the low-speed, NLF-0415(b) airfoil configuration as tested in the ASU Unsteady Wind Tunnel, wherein a spanwise periodic array of roughness elements was placed near the leading edge in order to excite stationary crossflow modes with a specified fundamental wavelength. The two classes of flow conditions selected for this analysis include those for which the roughness array spacing corresponds to either the naturally dominant crossflow wavelength, or a subcritical wavelength that serves to reduce the growth of the naturally excited dominant crossflow modes. Numerical predictions are compared with the measured database, both as indirect validation for the spatial instability analysis and to provide a basis for comparison with a higher Reynolds number, supersonic swept-wing configuration. Application of the eigenvalue analysis to the supersonic configuration reveals that a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow modes can sustain sufficiently strong secondary instabilities as to potentially cause transition over this configuration. Implications of this finding for transition control in swept wing boundary layers are examined.

  14. Effects of laminar separation bubbles and turbulent separation on airfoil stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, P. [Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States); Coiro, D.P. [Universita di Napoli (Italy)

    1997-12-31

    An existing two-dimensional, interactive, stall prediction program is extended by improving its laminar separation bubble model. The program now accounts correctly for the effects of the bubble on airfoil performance characteristics when it forms at the mid-chord and on the leading edge. Furthermore, the model can now predict bubble bursting on very sharp leading edges at high angles of attack. The details of the model are discussed in depth. Comparisons of the predicted stall and post-stall pressure distributions show excellent agreement with experimental measurements for several different airfoils at different Reynolds numbers.

  15. Computational Modeling for the Flow Over a Multi-Element Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun

    1999-01-01

    The flow over a multi-element airfoil is computed using two two-equation turbulence models. The computations are performed using the INS2D) Navier-Stokes code for two angles of attack. Overset grids are used for the three-element airfoil. The computed results are compared with experimental data for the surface pressure, skin friction coefficient, and velocity magnitude. The computed surface quantities generally agree well with the measurement. The computed results reveal the possible existence of a mixing-layer-like region of flow next to the suction surface of the slat for both angles of attack.

  16. Computational Analysis of the 2415-3S Airfoil Aerodynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Velázquez-Araque

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the numerical simulation of the two-dimensional, incompressible, steady air flow past an airfoil for a solar powered unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV with internal propulsion system. This airfoil results from a NACA 2415 four digits family base airfoil modification [7] and has a propulsive outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. The analysis involved the airfoil's aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficient curves as a function of the angle of attack (AOA for the condition where the engine of the UAV is turned off called the gliding condition and also for the blowing propulsive condition by means computational fluid dynamics. The computational domain has been discretised using a structured mesh of 188 x 200 tetrahedral elements. The RNG k-Ε model is utilized to describe the turbulent flow process as it was followed in [5]. The simulations were held at a Reynolds number of 300000. Results allowed obtaining lift and drag forces and pitching moment coefficient and also the location of the separation and reattachment points in some cases by means of the wall shear stress on the suction surface as well as velocity contours and streamlines for both conditions at different angles of attack, from 0 to 16 degrees with the smallest increment of 4 degrees. Finally, results from both cases were compared and the influence of the propulsive flow on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil has been analysed turning out that it improves significantly the performance of the airfoil reaching values up to 1,8 times in terms of lift at high angles of attack. [5] Rhie C.M., Chow W.L., Numerical Study of the Turbulent Flow Past an Airfoil with Trailing Edge Separation, AIAA Journal, Vol. 21, No. 11, 1983. [7] Velazquez L., Nožička J, Kulhanek R., Oil and Smoke Flow Visualization past Two-Dimensional Airfoils for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, in The 11th Asian Symposium of

  17. Scalability of the parallel CFD simulations of flow past a fluttering airfoil in OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Šidlof Petr; Řidký Václav

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil during onset of the flutter instability. Based on the geometry, boundary conditions and airfoil motion data identified from wind-tunnel measurements, a 3D CFD model has been set up in OpenFOAM. The model is based on incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modelled by the Menter’s k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model. The computational mesh was generated in Grid...

  18. Transonic Airfoil Design of Full Potential Flow II. Development of the FORTRAN Code

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIGURO, Tomiko; Kamiya, Nobuhiko; KAWAI, Nobuhiro; OGUCHI, Keiko; 石黒, 登美子; 神谷, 信彦; 河合, 伸坦; 小口, 慶子

    1981-01-01

    The Purpose of Part II of the paper is to present a user’s manual for the FORTRAN program which is coded following the numerical procedure developed for design of transonic airfoils. This procedure, described in Part I, has the following characteristics: 1)It can solve the inverse problem irrespective of the presence of shock waves. 2)The airfoil geometry is designed so that the width of the trailing edge is the required one. 3)The boundary layer calculation is included in this procedure: An ...

  19. "Ladder" structure in tonal noise generated by laminar flow around an airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip

    2012-06-01

    The presence of a "ladder" structure in the airfoil tonal noise was discovered in the 1970s, but its mechanism hitherto remains a subject of continual investigation in the research community. Based on the measured noise results and some numerical analysis presented in this letter, the variations of four types of airfoil tonal noise frequencies with the flow velocity were analyzed individually. The ladder structure is proposed to be caused by the acoustic/hydrodynamic frequency lag between the scattering of the boundary layer instability noise and the discrete noise produced by an aeroacoustic feedback loop.

  20. Usability of the Selig S1223 Profile Airfoil as a High Lift Hydrofoil for Hydrokinetic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Oller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical analysis of the ability of the high lift airfoil profile Selig S1223 for working as hydrofoil under water conditions. The geometry of the hydrofoil blade is designed through a suitable airfoil profile and then studied carefully by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in order to check its hydrodynamic behavior, i.e., including lift and drag analysis, and determinations of streamlines velocities and pressures fields. Finally conclusions on the use of this profile in a possible application for hydrokinetic turbine blades are detailed.

  1. Predicting extreme loads effects on wind turbines considering uncertainty in airfoil data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Imad; Natarajan, Anand; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    The sources contributing to uncertainty in a wind turbine blade static airfoil data include wind tunnel testing, CFD calculations, 3D rotational corrections based on CFD or empirical models, surface roughness corrections, Reynolds number corrections, expansion to the full 360-degree angle of attack...... range, validation by full scale measurements, and geometric distortions of the blade during manufacturing and under loading. In this paper a stochastic model of the static airfoil data is proposed to supplement the prediction of extreme loads effects for large wind turbines. It is shown...

  2. Aerodynamic behaviour of NREL S826 airfoil at Re=100,000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sarmast, Sasan;

    2014-01-01

    at Fluid Mechanics laboratory of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Lift coefficient is obtained from the forge gauge measurements while the drag is measured according to the integration of the wake profiles downstream of the airfoil. The pressure distribution is measured by a set of pressure taps......, there is a better agreement between the drag measurements and computations. It is concluded that LES computations are able to capture the lift and drag polars as well as the pressure distribution around the airfoil with an acceptable accuracy....

  3. URANS simulations of separated flow with stall cells over an NREL S826 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarlak Chivaee, Hamid; Nishino, T.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel measurements and oil flow visualization was recently carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in order to investigate flow characteristics over a 14% thick NREL S826 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. This paper aims at presenting numerical simulations of the same...... airfoil using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach. Results of the simulations are demonstrated in terms of mean flow velocity, lift and drag, as well as pressure distribution, and validated against available experimental data. The simulations are carried out with a wide computational...

  4. Evaluation of a research circulation control airfoil using Navier-Stokes methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds time averaged Navier-Stokes equations were used to obtain solutions for flows about a two dimensional circulation control airfoil. The governing equations were written in conservation form for a body-fitted coordinate system and solved using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure. A modified algebraic eddy viscosity model was used to define the turbulent characteristics of the flow, including the wall jet flow over the Coanda surface at the trailing edge. Numerical results are compared to experimental data obtained for a research circulation control airfoil geometry. Excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  5. An Iterative Method for Estimating Airfoil Deformation due to Solid Particle Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicopter blades are currently constructed with composite materials enveloping honeycomb cores with only the leading and trailing edges made of metal alloys. In some cases, the erosive wear of the bound between the composite skin and metallic leading edge leads to full blade failure. It is therefore the goal of this paper to provide a method for simulating the way an airfoil is deformed through the erosion process. The method involves computational fluid dynamics simulations, scripts for automatic meshing and spreadsheet calculators for estimating the erosion and, ultimately, the airfoil deformation. Further work could include more complex meshing scripts allowing the use of similar methods for turbo-machineries.

  6. Computer investigations of the turbulent flow around a NACA2415 airfoil wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driss, Zied; Chelbi, Tarek; Abid, Mohamed Salah

    2015-12-01

    In this work, computer investigations are carried out to study the flow field developing around a NACA2415 airfoil wind turbine. The Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with the standard k-ɛ turbulence model are considered. These equations are solved numerically to determine the local characteristics of the flow. The models tested are implemented in the software "SolidWorks Flow Simulation" which uses a finite volume scheme. The numerical results are compared with experiments conducted on an open wind tunnel to validate the numerical results. This will help improving the aerodynamic efficiency in the design of packaged installations of the NACA2415 airfoil type wind turbine.

  7. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  8. Time-resolved stereo PIV measurements of shock-boundary layer interaction on a supercritical airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Axel; Klaas, Michael; Schroeder, Wolfgang [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Aerodynamics, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Time-resolved stereo particle-image velocimetry (TR-SPIV) and unsteady pressure measurements are used to analyze the unsteady flow over a supercritical DRA-2303 airfoil in transonic flow. The dynamic shock wave-boundary layer interaction is one of the most essential features of this unsteady flow causing a distinct oscillation of the flow field. Results from wind-tunnel experiments with a variation of the freestream Mach number at Reynolds numbers ranging from 2.55 to 2.79 x 10{sup 6} are analyzed regarding the origin and nature of the unsteady shock-boundary layer interaction. Therefore, the TR-SPIV results are analyzed for three buffet flows. One flow exhibits a sinusoidal streamwise oscillation of the shock wave only due to an acoustic feedback loop formed by the shock wave and the trailing-edge noise. The other two buffet flows have been intentionally influenced by an artificial acoustic source installed downstream of the test section to investigate the behavior of the interaction to upstream-propagating disturbances generated by a defined source of noise. The results show that such upstream-propagating disturbances could be identified to be responsible for the upstream displacement of the shock wave and that the feedback loop is formed by a pulsating separation of the boundary layer dependent on the shock position and the sound pressure level at the shock position. Thereby, the pulsation of the separation could be determined to be a reaction to the shock motion and not vice versa. (orig.)

  9. 18 CFR 367.3980 - Account 398, Miscellaneous equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) This account must include the following items: (1) Hospital and infirmary equipment. (2) Kitchen..., Miscellaneous equipment. 367.3980 Section 367.3980 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts § 367.3980 Account 398, Miscellaneous equipment....

  10. 7 CFR 800.217 - Equipment that shall be tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment that shall be tested. 800.217 Section 800... Supervision, Monitoring, and Equipment Testing § 800.217 Equipment that shall be tested. (a) General. Testing... for which official performance requirements have been established shall be tested for accuracy....

  11. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.454 Section 197.454 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Equipment § 197.454 First aid and treatment equipment. The diving supervisor shall ensure that medical...

  12. 33 CFR 104.260 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... maintenance. 104.260 Section 104.260 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... systems and equipment maintenance. (a) Security systems and equipment must be in good working order and... procedures for identifying and responding to security system and equipment failures or malfunctions....

  13. 33 CFR 105.250 - Security systems and equipment maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... maintenance. 105.250 Section 105.250 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... systems and equipment maintenance. (a) Security systems and equipment must be in good working order and... include procedures for identifying and responding to security system and equipment failures...

  14. 46 CFR 28.130 - Survival craft equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with the requirements for installation, arrangement, equipment, and maintenance contained in 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft equipment. 28.130 Section 28.130 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.130 Survival craft equipment. (a) General. Each item...

  15. 30 CFR 250.1624 - Blowout prevention equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blowout prevention equipment. 250.1624 Section 250.1624 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND... prevention equipment. (a) The BOP system and system components and related well-control equipment shall...

  16. 47 CFR 15.118 - Cable ready consumer electronics equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. 15... Unintentional Radiators § 15.118 Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. (a) All consumer electronics TV... provisions of this section. Consumer electronics TV receiving equipment that includes features intended...

  17. 25 CFR 249.4 - Identification of fishing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identification of fishing equipment. 249.4 Section 249.4... FISHING General Provisions § 249.4 Identification of fishing equipment. All fishing gear or other equipment used in the exercise of any off-reservation treaty fishing right shall be marked in such manner...

  18. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.137 - Electrical protective equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical protective equipment. 1910.137 Section 1910.137... Electrical protective equipment. (a) Design requirements. Insulating blankets, matting, covers, line hose... portion of the glove. (2) Electrical requirements. (i) Equipment shall be capable of withstanding the...

  20. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  1. 9 CFR 354.230 - Equipment and utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 354.230 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... equipped with facilities for locking and sealing. (m) Freezing rooms should be adequately equipped to... constant as possible. Freezing room should be equipped with floor racks or pallets and fans to insure...

  2. 2007 special equipment safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of P.R.China (AQSIQ) issued a notice on May 28, 2007,requiring various locations to rectify their procedures for checking special equipment and hoisting machines for hidden problems. To further clarify and implement responsibility in the safety management of special equipment in enterprises, inspection responsibilities and test organizations related to technical assurance are to be established. Further, quality inspection departments will be supervised by law in order to improve special equipment safety.

  3. Optimization design study of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils for the high-efficiency propeller of low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil makes a great impact on designing a high-efficiency propeller for low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere. At high altitude,low-Reynolds-number airfoils are supposed to have high lift-drag ratio or high endurance factor at cruising attack angle along with good stall characteristics. To design such a high-performance low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil,the paper established a hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform by combing direct search optimization algorithm EXTREM and airfoil flow field solver XFOIL to automatically and quickly calculate aerodynamic performance function of airfoil by computer. It provides an effective solution to multi-point design problem of low-speed low-Reynolds-number airfoil. It can be seen from the results of three typical optimization examples,the new airfoil E387_OPT2,FX63-137_OPT2 and S1223_OPT2 based on hot low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils (Eppler 387 airfoil,Wortmann FX63-137 airfoil and S1223 airfoil) can meet the optimization design requirements and have very good aerodynamic characteristics in both design state and non-design state. Thus,the applicability and effectiveness of hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform are verified.

  4. Equipment qualification research program: program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed this program plan for research in equipment qualification (EQA). In this report the research program which will be executed in accordance with this plan will be referred to as the Equipment Qualification Research Program (EQRP). Covered are electrical and mechanical equipment under the conditions described in the OBJECTIVE section of this report. The EQRP has two phases; Phase I is primarily to produce early results and to develop information for Phase II. Phase I will last 18 months and consists of six projects. The first project is program management. The second project is responsible for in-depth evaluation and review of EQ issues and EQ processes. The third project is responsible for detailed planning to initiate Phase II. The remaining three projects address specific equipment; i.e., valves, electrical equipment, and a pump

  5. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  6. 大断面长距离局部通风设备选择问题探讨%Discussion on the big section of long distance drivage face local ventilation equipment selection problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨绪金; 张东强

    2015-01-01

    How to correctly choose the digging working face local fan and an air duct ventilation, ensure the safety of tunneling face is driving working face safety production is the most important foundation work, through reasonable selection of local fan and air duct, the realization of a large section of long distance drivage face ventilation safety.%如何正确选择掘进工作面的局部通风机和风筒,确保掘进工作面的通风安全,是掘进工作面安全生产最重要的基础工作;通过对局部通风机及风筒的合理选择,实现了大断面长距离掘进工作面通风安全。

  7. 大型低速翼型风洞侧壁边界层控制系统研制%The development of sidewall boundary layer control system for large airfoil low-speed wind tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠增宏; 张传侠; 柳雯

    2012-01-01

    介绍了NF-3大型低速翼型风洞多喷嘴级联吹气侧壁边界层控制系统的结构和原理.为验证本系统的功能和性能,采用侧壁吹气方案并使用增量式PID控制算法进行气源压力的控制,对具有增升装置的GAW-1翼型进行了侧壁边界层吹除试验研究.试验结果表明:(1)使用侧壁吹气系统后翼型模型中间截面最大升力系数由2.79增加到2.84,增加幅度1.8%,且模型端面截面的升力系数与中间截面的升力系数基本上相等;(2)利用增量式PID控制算法对气源压力的精确控制较好地完成了风洞侧壁吹气功能,改善了翼型表面流动,减小了侧壁边界层对翼型试验结果的影响.%This paper describes the structure and the application of multi-injector blowing sidewall boundary layer control system for NF-3 large airfoil low-speed wind tunnel. The sidewall boundary layer blowing experimental investigation of GAW-1 airfoil with high lift device by using the method of sidewall blowing and applying incremental PID control algorithm to control the pneumatic pressure is carried out for testing the function and performance of the system. The results show that the highest lift coefficient increases by 1. 8% from 2. 79 to 2. 84 on the middle section of the airfoil, and the lift coefficient of the edge section is basically equal to the middle section. It shows that the system applying incremental PID control algorithm to control the pneumatic pressure accurately has achieved the function of wind tunnel sidewall boundary layer blowing. Sidewall blowing improves the flow on the surface of airfoil and decreases the effect of sidewall boundary layer on the airfoil experiment results.

  8. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  9. Ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional oscillating airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports results of an experimental investigation into ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional elliptic airfoil undergoing simple harmonic translation and rotational motion. Ground clearance ( D) ranging from 1 c to 5 c (where c is the airfoil chord length) was investigated for three rotational amplitudes ( α m) of 30°, 45° and 60° (which respectively translate to mid-stroke angle of attack of 60°, 45° and 30°). For the lowest rotational amplitude of 30°, results show that an airfoil approaching a ground plane experiences a gradual decrease in cycle-averaged lift and drag coefficients until it reaches D ≈ 2.0 c, below which they increase rapidly. Corresponding DPIV measurement indicates that the initial force reduction is associated with the formation of a weaker leading edge vortex and the subsequent force increase below D ≈ 2.0 c may be attributed to stronger wake capture effect. Furthermore, an airfoil oscillating at higher amplitude lessens the initial force reduction when approaching the ground and this subsequently leads to lift distribution that bears striking resemblance to the ground effect on a conventional fixed wing in steady translation.

  10. Development of a fast shape memory alloy based actuator for morphing airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara-Quintanilla, A.

    2016-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic airfoils are optimized for certain conditions. For instance, the shape of the wings of fixed-wing aircrafts are designed and optimized for a certain flight condition (in terms of altitude, speed, aircraft weight, etc.). However, these flight conditions vary significantly du

  11. Assessment of Control Volume Estimation of Thrust for a Sinusoidally Pitching Airfoil at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patrick; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2015-11-01

    The proper estimation of thrust is very important for understanding the aerodynamics of oscillating airfoils at low chord Reynolds number Re. Although direct force measurement is possible, force values at low Re are often small, and separation of the test-model's inertia forces from the data may not be straightforward. A common alternative is a control-volume (CV) approach, where terms in the integral momentum equation are computed from measured wake velocity profiles. Although it is acceptable to use only the mean streamwise-velocity profile in estimating the streamwise force on stationary airfoils, recent work has highlighted the importance of terms relating the velocity fluctuation and pressure distribution in the wake for unsteady airfoils. The goal of the present work is to capitalize on 2D computational data for a harmonically pitching airfoil at Re in the range 2,000-22,000, where all terms in the momentum-integral equation are accessible, to evaluate the importance of the various terms in the equation and assess the accuracy of the assumptions that are typically made in experiments due to the difficulty in measuring certain terms (such as the wake pressure distribution) by comparing the CV results with the actual computed thrust. This work was supported by AFOSR grant number FA9550-10-1-0342.

  12. Propagation of Shock on NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine Airfoil under Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on numeric analysis of compressible flow around National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL phase VI wind turbine blade airfoil S809. Although wind turbine airfoils are low Reynolds number airfoils, a reasonable investigation of compressible flow under extreme condition might be helpful. A subsonic flow (mach no. M=0.8 has been considered for this analysis and the impacts of this flow under seven different angles of attack have been determined. The results show that shock takes place just after the mid span at the top surface and just before the mid span at the bottom surface at zero angle of attack. Slowly the shock waves translate their positions as angle of attack increases. A relative translation of the shock waves in upper and lower face of the airfoil are presented. Variation of Turbulent viscosity ratio and surface Y+ have also been determined. A k-ω SST turbulent model is considered and the commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT is used to find the pressure coefficient (Cp as well as the lift (CL and drag coefficients (CD. A graphical comparison of shock propagation has been shown with different angle of attack. Flow separation and stream function are also determined.

  13. Aerodynamic design optimization of helicopter rotor blades including airfoil shape for hover performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ngoc Anh Vu; Jae Woo Lee; Jung Il Shu

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a process to obtain an optimal helicopter rotor blade shape for aerodynamic performance in hover flight.A new geometry representation algorithm which uses the class function/shape function transformation (CST) is employed to generate airfoil coordinates.With this approach,airfoil shape is considered in terms of design variables.The optimization process is constructed by integrating several programs developed by author.The design variables include twist,taper ratio,point of taper initiation,blade root chord,and coefficients of the airfoil distribution function.Aerodynamic constraints consist of limits on power available in hover and forward flight.The trim condition must be attainable.This paper considers rotor blade configuration for the hover flight condition only,so that the required power in hover is chosen as the objective function of the optimization problem.Sensitivity analysis of each design variable shows that airfoil shape has an important role in rotor performance.The optimum rotor blade reduces the required hover power by 7.4% and increases the figure of merit by 6.5%,which is a good improvement for rotor blade design.

  14. Effects of mean flow convection, quadrupole sources and vortex shedding on airfoil overall sound pressure level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, William R.; Azevedo, João L. F.; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a further analysis of results of airfoil self-noise prediction obtained in the previous work using large eddy simulation and acoustic analogy. The physical mechanisms responsible for airfoil noise generation in the aerodynamic flows analyzed are a combination of turbulent and laminar boundary layers, as well as vortex shedding (VS) originated due to trailing edge bluntness. The primary interest here consists of evaluating the effects of mean flow convection, quadrupole sources and vortex shedding tonal noise on the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of a NACA0012 airfoil at low and moderate freestream Mach numbers. The overall sound pressure level is the measured quantity which eventually would be the main concern in terms of noise generation for aircraft and wind energy companies, and regulating agencies. The Reynolds number based on the airfoil chord is fixed at Rec=408,000 for all flow configurations studied. The results demonstrate that, for moderate Mach numbers, mean flow effects and quadrupole sources considerably increase OASPL and, therefore, should be taken into account in the acoustic prediction. For a low Mach number flow with vortex shedding, it is observed that OASPL is higher when laminar boundary layer separation is the VS driving mechanism compared to trailing edge bluntness.

  15. A dynamic wall model for Large-Eddy simulations of wind turbine dedicated airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Calafell; O, Lehmkuhl; A, Carmona; D, Pérez-Segarra C.; A, Oliva

    2014-06-01

    This work aims at modelling the flow behavior past a wind turbine dedicated airfoil at high Reynolds number and large angle of attack (AoA). The DU-93-W-210 airfoil has been selected. To do this, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) have been performed. Momentum equations have been solved with a parallel unstructured symmetry preserving formulation while the wall-adapting local-eddy viscosity model within a variational multi-scale framework (VMS- WALE) is used as the subgrid-scales model. Since LES calculations are still very expensive at high Reynolds Number, specially at the near-wall region, a dynamic wall model has been implemented in order to overcome this limitation. The model has been validated with a very unresolved Channel Flow case at Reτ = 2000. Afterwards, the model is also tested with the Ahmed Car case, that from the flow physics point of view is more similar to an stalled airfoil than the Channel Flow is, including flow features as boundary layer detachment and recirculations. This case has been selected because experimental results of mean velocity profiles are available. Finally, a flow around a DU-93-W-210 airfoil is computed at Re = 3 x 106 and with an AoA of 15°. Numerical results are presented in comparison with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or experimental data for all cases.

  16. Identification of stiffness and damping characteristics of axial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, Vikas; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2011-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost “top foil” layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. AFBs are currently used in ma

  17. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  18. Cross-Validation of Numerical and Experimental Studies of Transitional Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frere, Ariane; Hillewaert, Koen; Sarlak, Hamid;

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance characteristic of airfoils are the main input for estimating wind turbine blade loading as well as annual energy production of wind farms. For transitional flow regimes these data are difficult to obtain, both experimentally as well as numerically, due to the very high...

  19. Optimum Duty Cycle of Unsteady Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation for NACA0015 Airfoil Stall Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Yang, Bo; Peng, Tianxiang; Lei, Mingkai

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma aerodynamic actuation technology is employed to suppress airfoil stall separation and the technical parameters are explored with wind tunnel experiments on an NACA0015 airfoil by measuring the surface pressure distribution of the airfoil. The performance of the DBD aerodynamic actuation for airfoil stall separation suppression is evaluated under DBD voltages from 2000 V to 4000 V and the duty cycles varied in the range of 0.1 to 1.0. It is found that higher lift coefficients and lower threshold voltages are achieved under the unsteady DBD aerodynamic actuation with the duty cycles less than 0.5 as compared to that of the steady plasma actuation at the same free-stream speeds and attack angles, indicating a better flow control performance. By comparing the lift coefficients and the threshold voltages, an optimum duty cycle is determined as 0.25 by which the maximum lift coefficient and the minimum threshold voltage are obtained at the same free-stream speed and attack angle. The non-uniform DBD discharge with stronger discharge in the positive half cycle due to electrons deposition on the dielectric slabs and the suppression of opposite momentum transfer due to the intermittent discharge with cutoff of the negative half cycle are responsible for the observed optimum duty cycle. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21276036), Liaoning Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015020123) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 3132015154)

  20. Wind turbine airfoil design method with low noise and experimental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Quan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao;

    2015-01-01

    angle of attack. Then, the comparison of sound pressure level between CQU-DTU-B18 and NACA-64-618 airfoil was analyzed under the same condition of wind tunnel experiment and wind speed. It is indicated that the changed trend of the predicted noise results are in agreement with that of the tested data...