WorldWideScience

Sample records for airfoil section equipped

  1. Aeroelastic Stability of a 2D Airfoil Section equipped with a Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo

    section. A simulation tool is implemented to predict the flow speed at which a flap equipped section may become unstable, either due to flutter or divergence. First, the stability limits of the airfoil without flap are determined, and, in the second part of the work, a deformable trailing edge flap...

  2. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias;

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30%...

  3. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a method to determine flutter and divergence instability limits for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil section fitted with an actively controlled trailing edge flap. This flap consists of a deformable trailing edge, which deformation is governed by control algorithms based...... for fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...... function approximation. Stability of the full aeroservoelastic system is determined through eigenvalue analysis by state-space formulation of the indicial approximation. Validation is carried out against an implementation of the recursive method by Theodorsen and Garrick for flexure-torsion-aileron flutter...

  4. A study of test section configuration for shock tube testing of transonic airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for alleviating wall interference effects in a shock tube test section intended for testing two-dimensional transonic airfoils. The first method involves contouring the test section walls to match approximate streamlines in the flow. Contours are matched to each airfoil tested to produce results close to those obtained in a conventional wind tunnel. Data from a previous study and the present study for two different airfoils demonstrate that useful results are obtained in a shock tube using a test section with contoured walls. The second method involves use of a fixed-geometry slotted-wall test section to provide automatic flow compensation for various airfoils. The slotted-wall test section developed exhibited the desired performance characteristics in the approximate Mach number range 0.82 to 0.89, as evidenced by good agreement obtained between shock tube and wind tunnel results for several airfoil flows.

  5. Airfoil profile optimization of an air suction equipment with an air duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of boundary layer with the airfoil profile, this research attempts to investigate the effect of the angle of spread of the winged air suction equipment on the efficiency of operation. The application of Fluent with the split-middle method under the identical operation mode is expected to optimize the spread angle. The investigated airfoil profile is NACA6413, of which the restrictions on the critical angle of spread suggested in literature will be overcome through the interactions between the internal and external flow fields. As a result, the air speed might increase. The wind tunnel test employed in this research offers the solid evidences to support this hypothesis. The test demonstrates that when the angle of spread is larger than 12°, the effect of accelerating the air flow is still observable. Following the optimization, the air suction effect of the equipment would be optimal when its angle of spread reached 30°.

  6. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Mankbadi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tip vortex flow from a NACA0012 airfoil, pitched periodically at various frequencies, is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Initially, data for stationary airfoil held fixed at various angles-of-attack are gathered. Flow visualization pictures as well as detailed cross-sectional properties areobtained at various streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as various turbulent stresses. Preliminary data are also acquired for periodically pitched airfoil. These results are briefly presented in this extended abstract.

  7. Nonlinear angle control of a sectioned airfoil by using shape memory alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work illustrates an application of shape memory alloys and nonlinear controller applied to the active angular control of a sectioned airfoil. The main objective of the proposed control system is to modify the shape of the profile based on a reference angle. The change of the sectioned airfoil angle is resultant by the effect of shape memory of the alloy due to heating of the wire caused by an electric current that changes its temperature by Joule effect. Considering the presence of plant’s nonlinear effects, especially in the mathematical model of the alloy, this work proposes the application of an on-off control system.

  8. Nonlinear angle control of a sectioned airfoil by using shape memory alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu G.; Maestá M.; Faria C.; Lopes V.

    2014-01-01

    The present work illustrates an application of shape memory alloys and nonlinear controller applied to the active angular control of a sectioned airfoil. The main objective of the proposed control system is to modify the shape of the profile based on a reference angle. The change of the sectioned airfoil angle is resultant by the effect of shape memory of the alloy due to heating of the wire caused by an electric current that changes its temperature by Joule effect. Considering the presence o...

  9. Aerodynamic forces acting on a passive flow control equipped airfoil in turbulent inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampers, Gerrit; Peinke, Joachim; Hölling, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Wind turbines work within turbulent atmospheric flows, with their well known challenging features of intermittent two point statistics. These intermittent statistics have a big impact on wind turbines, concerning fluctuating mechanical loads. Flow control is a promising approach for the reduction of these fluctuations. In this project, an airfoil profile is equipped with mechanically coupled flexible leading and trailing edge flaps, enabling to passively adapt its camber. We expose the profile to different reproducible turbulent inflow conditions, generated with an active grid in a wind tunnel and study the profile's ability to alleviate lift fluctuations. The first experiment is concerned with repeated mexican hat shaped inflow gusts. The corresponding lift reactions of the profile show, that the adaptive camber mechanism is able to alleviate lift fluctuations caused by the inflow gust. In the second experiment, we use different grid excitations to vary the flatness of the inflow angle increments and study the influence of the statistics at different angles of attack. We propose a stochastic Langevin approach to decompose the lift dynamics into a deterministic response and a stochastic part, allowing for a quantitative analysis of the response dynamics. Funded by the German Research Foundation, Ref. No. PE 478/15-1.

  10. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  11. Features of vertical axis wind turbine and development of airfoils sections; Chokusen yokugata suichoku jiku fusha no tokucho to yokugata ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Yasui, T. [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan); Nakayama, H. [Oriental Kiden Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Features of a straight wing type vertical axis wind turbine (VAW) and its airfoil sections were studied. The wind turbine in which various aerodynamic work components are mounted on the rotation axis normal to the ground surface is named VAW. Like the airfoil section of aircraft, in lift type VAW, wind turbines were driven by lift 70-90 times as large as drag in some cases. Features of the VAW airfoil section which is a straight wing in plan and a fixed pitch wing (with a fixed angle to a blade support arm) in cross section, and those of wind turbines were studied. Some factors affecting the features, work principle and performance of VAW were clarified. On airfoil sections, products of each weight function and each corresponding aerodynamic factor (lift, drag and pitching moment factors) were plotted on an attack angle ({alpha}) axis. From the conditions for increasing the total sum of areas drawn by the products on the {alpha} axis, various characteristics required for airfoil sections were clarified. Such characteristics nearly agreed between an airfoil section for favorable starting characteristics and that for high efficiency. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, KBMQ; Fagan, A. F.; Mankbadi, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a tip vortex from a NACA0012 airfoil is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4x10(exp 4). Initially, data for a stationary airfoil held at various angles-of-attack (alpha) are gathered. Detailed surveys are done for two cases: alpha=10 deg with attached flow and alpha=25 deg with massive flow separation on the upper surface. Distributions of various properties are obtained using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity and turbulent stresses at various streamwise locations. For all cases, the vortex core is seen to involve a mean velocity deficit. The deficit apparently traces to the airfoil wake, part of which gets wrapped by the tip vortex. At small alpha, the vortex is laminar within the measurement domain. The strength of the vortex increases with increasing alpha but undergoes a sudden drop around alpha (is) greater than 16 deg. The drop in peak vorticity level is accompanied by transition and a sharp rise in turbulence within the core. Data are also acquired with the airfoil pitched sinusoidally. All oscillation cases pertain to a mean alpha=15 deg while the amplitude and frequency are varied. An example of phase-averaged data for an amplitude of +/-10 deg and a reduced frequency of k=0.2 is discussed. All results are compared with available data from the literature shedding further light on the complex dynamics of the tip vortex.

  13. NASA low- and medium-speed airfoil development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.; Whitcomb, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The status of NASA low and medium speed airfoil research is discussed. Effects of airfoil thickness-chord ratios varying from 9 percent to 21 percent on the section characteristics for a design lift coefficient of 0.40 are presented for the initial low speed family of airfoils. Also, modifications to the 17-percent low-speed airfoil to reduce the pitching-moment coefficient and to the 21-percent low speed airfoil results are shown for two new medium speed airfoils with thickness ratios of 13 percent and 17 percent and design-lift coefficients of 0.30. Applications of NASA-developed airfoils to general aviation aircraft are summarized.

  14. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  15. Aerodynamic response of an airfoil section undergoing pitch motion and trailing edge flap deflection: a comparison of simulation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    –inviscid interaction method and an engineering dynamic stall model suitable for implementation in aeroelastic codes based on blade element momentum theory. The aerodynamic integral forces and pitching moment coefficients are first determined in steady conditions, at angles of attack spanning from attached flow...... generated by the airfoil undergoing harmonic pitching motions and harmonic flap deflections. The unsteady aerodynamic coefficients exhibit significant variations over the corresponding steady-state values. The dynamic characteristics of the unsteady response are predicted with an excellent agreement among...

  16. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  17. Design and optimization of tidal turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    To increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and, thereby, to reduce cost of energy, the use of specially tailored airfoils is needed. This work is focused on the design of an airfoil for marine application. Firstly, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed with reference to the requirements for wind turbine airfoils. Then, the design approach is presented. This is a numerical optimization scheme in which a gradient-based algorithm is used, coupled with the RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints .A section of the present work is dedicated to address this point; particular importance is given to the cavitation phenomenon. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high-efficiency hydrofoil is illustrated, and the results are compared with existing turbine airfoils, considering also the effect on turbine performance due to different airfoils.

  18. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    , lead-lag, pitch, trailing-edge flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model, which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered a crossover between the work of Gaunaa...... for the attached flow region and Hansen et al. The model is compared qualitatively to wind tunnel measurements of a Riso/ B1-18 blade section equipped with deformable trailing-edge flap devices in the form of piezoelectric devices. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  19. Report of material and equipment section`s activities at New York Shipbuilding Corporation during fabrication of AXC 167 1/2 starting May 18, 1951. Part 7, Section 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.R.

    1954-04-28

    This document provides Part VII, Section III and Section IV of the report of the Material and Equipment Section`s activities at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation. The fabrication, inspection, and testing of reactor components is detailed.

  20. Report of material and equipment section`s activities at New York Shipbuilding Corporation during fabrication of AXC 167 1/2 starting May 18, 1951. Part 7, Section 1: Paragraphs 1--14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.R.

    1954-02-28

    This document provides Part VII, Section I, Paragraphs 1 through 16 and Part VII, Section II of the Material and Equipment Section`s activities during the fabrication of reactor components and vessels at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation.

  1. The design of equipment for optical power measurement in FSO link beam cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latal, Jan; David, Tomas; Wilfert, Otakar; Kolka, Zdenek; Koudelka, Petr; Hanacek, Frantisek; Vitasek, Jan; Siska, Petr; Skapa, Jan; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    The free space optical links have found their major application in today's technological society. The demand for quality broadband is a must for all types of end users in these times. Because of the large jamming from wireless radio networks in non-licensed ISM bands, the free space optical links provide bridging of some densely populated urban areas. Their advantage is the high transmission rate for relatively long distances. However, the disadvantage is the dependence of free space optical links on atmospheric influences. Aired collimated optical beam passes through the atmospheric transmission environment and by its influence cause the deformation of the optical beam. Author's team decided to construct a special measuring device for measurement of optical power in FSO link beam cross-section. The equipment is mobile and can be rearranged and adjust according to the given location and placement of the FSO link at any time. The article describes the individual structural elements of the measuring equipment, its controlling and application for evaluation and adjustment of measuring steps. The graphs from optical power measurements in the beam cross-section of professional FSO links are presented at the end.

  2. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  3. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to an airfoil shaped body with a leading edge and a trailing edge extending along the longitudinal extension of the body and defining a profile chord, the airfoil shaped body comprising an airfoil shaped facing that forms the outer surface of the airfoil shaped body...... and surrounds an internal volume of the body, a distance member that is connected to the facing inside the body and extends from the facing and into the internal volume of the body, and at least one reinforcing member that operates in tension for reinforcing the facing against inward deflections...... and that is connected to the facing inside the internal volume of the body at the same side of the profile chord as the connection of the distance member to the facing and to the distance member at a distance from the facing....

  4. Electromechanical dynamics analysis and simulation on rollforming equipment with both sides variable cross-section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫军

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical dynamics analysis and simulation on a rollforming equipment with both sides variable cross-section are discussed in this study.The system includes mechanical parts and electro-magnetism parts, and it is a strongly coupled electromechanical system.Based on a virtual work principle and given power,generalized forces of this system are obtained.By using Lagrange-Maxwell equations, a model of electromechanical dynamics is established.Differential equations of two-phase winding on d-q axis are obtained by Park transformation, which comes from three-phase winding equations on the A-B-C axis.This system is solved with the 4th order Runge-Kutta’ s method, and discrete solutions of all variables are obtained.Finally, by using Matlab language, the system is simulated.The results show that the proposed method works very well.

  5. Transonic flow theory of airfoils and wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, P R

    1976-01-01

    Supercritical wing technology is expected to have a significant influence on the next generation of commercial aircraft. Computational fluid dynamics is playing a central role in the development of new supercritical wing sections. One of the principal tools is a fast and reliable code that simulates two-dimensional wind tunnel data for transonic flow at high Reynolds numbers. This is used widely by industry to assess drag creep and drag rise. Codes for the design of shockless airfoils by the hodograph method have not been so well received because they usually require a lot of trial and error. However, a more advanced mathematical approach makes it possible to assign the pressure as a function of the arc length and then obtain a shockless airfoil that nearly achieves the given distribution of pressure. This tool should enable engineers to design families of transonic airfoils more easily both for airplane wings and for compressor blades in cascade.

  6. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which airfoils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so. Theairfoils are classified according to the agreement between the numerical results and experimental...... to these discrepancies is identified. Some advices are given for elaborating future airfoil design processes that would involvethe numerical code EllipSys2D in particular, and transition modelling in general.......The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel...

  7. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  8. Airfoil Design and Rotorcraft Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousman, William G.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between global performance of a typical helicopter and the airfoil environment, as represented by the airfoil angles of attack and Mach number, has been examined using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. A general correspondence is observed between global performance parameters, such as rotor L/D, and airfoil performance parameters, such as airfoil L/D, the drag bucket boundaries, and the divergence Mach number. Effects of design parameters such as blade twist and rotor speed variation have been examined and, in most cases, improvements observed in global performance are also observed in terms of airfoil performance. The relations observed between global Performance and the airfoil environment suggests that the emphasis in airfoil design should be for good L/D, while the maximum lift coefficient performance is less important.

  9. Effect of pivot location and passive heave on propulsion from a pitching airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the propulsive characteristics of a pitching NACA 0012 airfoil section, with emphasis on thrust and propulsive efficiency, at a Reynolds number of 1.7 ×104 . For the sake of mechanical simplicity, we consider an airfoil restricted to a single actuator in the pitching direction. We examine the effect of changing the airfoil's axis of rotation, finding that contrary to Garrick's linear theory, there exists a pitching axis near the airfoil that maximizes propulsive efficiency. Next, we examine the effect of placing passive springs on the airfoil in the heave (transverse) direction using our Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics technique. This elastic heaving motion allows the airfoil to combine pitching and heaving modes while being actuated only in the pitching direction. Two sets of dynamics are considered: one case where the airfoil is weighted unevenly and pitched about its center of mass (so that the resulting heaving motion is independent of inertial forces), and another case where the airfoil's center of mass is fixed at its centroid. For pitching at an amplitude of 8∘ and a reduced frequency k of two, we find that elastic heave produces a maximum propulsive efficiency of 35%, compared to 25% without any heave motion. Further, while operating at the same efficiency as the static-pivot case, we find that passive heaving greatly increases the magnitude of the airfoil's thrust. The airfoil configurations with highest propulsive efficiency generally involve pitching near or ahead of the airfoil's leading edge.

  10. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  11. A finite-difference method for transonic airfoil design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, J. L.; Klineberg, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes an inverse method for designing transonic airfoil sections or for modifying existing profiles. Mixed finite-difference procedures are applied to the equations of transonic small disturbance theory to determine the airfoil shape corresponding to a given surface pressure distribution. The equations are solved for the velocity components in the physical domain and flows with embedded shock waves can be calculated. To facilitate airfoil design, the method allows alternating between inverse and direct calculations to obtain a profile shape that satisfies given geometric constraints. Examples are shown of the application of the technique to improve the performance of several lifting airfoil sections. The extension of the method to three dimensions for designing supercritical wings is also indicated.

  12. EUDP Project: Low Noise Airfoil - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    at the Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA,(USA), also a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel but equipped with an anechoic chamber that allow to perform acoustic measurements. On the theoretical side, the above experiments yield a series of model validations and improvements......This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project `Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side...... to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (DK), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel...

  13. Key Issues in Building Design: How to Get Started in Planning a Project. Library Buildings and Equipment Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Anders C.; Eigenbrodt, Olaf; Latimer, Karen; Romero, Santi

    2009-01-01

    Based on the IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) Library Buildings and Equipment Section's Library Building Guidelines published in 2007, this short publication summarises the key points to take into consideration when designing a new or refurbished library building. The aim of the brochure is not to replace…

  14. Interagency Evaluation of the Section 1206 Global Train and Equip Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    sealift, rail, pipeline , and land collection, and submission of the movement requirements for air mobility, sealift, and ). sportation services...B5-B- ADC $6,427,884 $0 Secure comm. equipment; NVGs Dec-08 Secure communications equipment delivered. No ESD for the NVGs. B5-B-ADD...UHF) communications system and provides interconnectivity among land-based and wireless communications media. The suites include data terminals

  15. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  16. Verification of U-21 Cloud Parameter Measurement Equipment and Comparison of Natural and Artifical Ice Accretion Characteristics on Rotor Blade Airfoil Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Systems, Inc. laser spectrometers (Models FSSP-1O and nAP ?OOy) a Cloud Technology Inc. hot wire liquid water content (MwC) sensor; a Rosemount total air...point hygrometer and display, Cloud Technology Inc. model LWH-I (Johnson Williams type) liiuid water content (LWC) indicator system (installed after

  17. Study of the TRAC Airfoil Table Computational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong

    1999-01-01

    The report documents the study of the application of the TRAC airfoil table computational package (TRACFOIL) to the prediction of 2D airfoil force and moment data over a wide range of angle of attack and Mach number. The TRACFOIL generates the standard C-81 airfoil table for input into rotorcraft comprehensive codes such as CAM- RAD. The existing TRACFOIL computer package is successfully modified to run on Digital alpha workstations and on Cray-C90 supercomputers. A step-by-step instruction for using the package on both computer platforms is provided. Application of the newer version of TRACFOIL is made for two airfoil sections. The C-81 data obtained using the TRACFOIL method are compared with those of wind-tunnel data and results are presented.

  18. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  19. Wind tunnel test on airfoil Riso-B1-18 with an Active Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Andersen, Peter Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the wind turbine airfoil Risø-B1-18 equipped with an Active Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF) was carried out. The ATEF was 9% of the total chord, made of piezo electric actuators attached to the trailing edge of a non-deformable airfoil and actuated using an (electric) amplifier...

  20. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  1. Unsteady flow about a circulation control airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晶昌; 孙茂; 吴礼义

    1996-01-01

    The unsteady flow around a circulation control (CC) airfoil was investigated with Navier-Stokes method,which includes the flow around CC airfoil with pulsating jet,the flow around oscillating CC airfoil,and the flow around oscillating CC airfoil with pulsating jet.Dynamic properties of the flow and the aerodynamic forces were rewaled.

  2. WIND TUNNEL RESEARCH ON THE INFLUENCE OF ACTIVE AIRFLOW ON THE LIFT FORCE GENERATED BY THE AIRFOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Magryta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of wind tunnel tests of airfoils with additional active airflow applied to their upper surfaces. These studies were carried out for a range of velocities up to 28 m/s in an open wind tunnel. Several types of airfoils selected for the examination feature different geometries and are widely applied in today’s aviation industry. The changes in the lift and drag force generated by these airfoils were recorded during the study. The test bench for the tests was equipped with a compressor and a vacuum pump to enable airflow through some holes on the airfoil upper surface. A rapid prototyping method and a 3D printer based on a powder printing technique were applied to print the airfoils. All of their surfaces were subject to surface grinding to smooth their external surfaces. The wind tunnel tests with and without active airflow applied to airfoils are summarised in the paper.

  3. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two diff...

  4. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    1999-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are basedon four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum...... to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFDcomputations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived...

  5. The shock tube as a device for testing transonic airfoils at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A performance analysis of gas-driven shock tubes shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 100 million can be generated behind the primary shock in a large shock tube. A study of flow over simple airfoils has been carried out at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photos and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those observed for the airfoils in wind tunnels can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with either properly-contoured test section walls or a properly-designed slotted-wall test section. The study indicates that the shock tube is a useful facility for studying two-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic airfoil flows.

  6. Natural laminar flow airfoil design considerations for winglets on low-speed airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Winglet airfoil section characteristics which significantly influence cruise performance and handling qualities of an airplane are discussed. A good winglet design requires an airfoil section with a low cruise drag coefficient, a high maximum lift coefficient, and a gradual and steady movement of the boundary layer transition location with angle of attack. The first design requirement provides a low crossover lift coefficient of airplane drag polars with winglets off and on. The other requirements prevent nonlinear changes in airplane lateral/directional stability and control characteristics. These requirements are considered in the design of a natural laminar flow airfoil section for winglet applications and chord Reynolds number of 1 to 4 million.

  7. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  8. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Soerensen, N.N.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wen Zhong Shen; Noerkaer Soerensen, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are based on four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotor with LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall at the tip is low and that it is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. The use of these characteristics in aeroelastic calculations shows a good agreement in power and flap moments with measurements. Furthermore, a fatigue analysis shows a reduction in the loads of up to 15 % compared to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFD computations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived that can be used to calculate mean values of power and loads. The lift in stall at the tip is low and at the root it is high compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. In particular the power curves were well calculated by use of the optimised airfoil characteristics. In the quasi-3D CFD computations, the airfoil characteristics are derived directly. This Navier-Stokes model takes into account rotational and 3D effects. The model enables the study of the rotational effect of a rotor blade at computing costs similar to what is typical for 2D airfoil calculations. The depicted results show that the model is capable of determining the correct qualitative behaviour for airfoils subject to rotation. The method shows that lift is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil

  9. Derivation of airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade based on 3D CFD rotor calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Soerensen, N.N.; Madsen, H.A. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade are derived from 3D CFD computations on a full-scale 41-m rotor. Based on 3D CFD the force distributions on the blades are determined, from which airfoil characteristics are derived using the momentum theory. The final airfoil characteristics are constructed using both wind tunnel measurements and 3D CFD. Compared to 2D wind tunnel measurements they show a low lift in stall for the airfoil sections at the tip. At the airfoil sections at the inner part of the blade, they show a high lift in stall. At about 60% radius the lift agrees well to 2D wind tunnel measurements. Aero-elastic calculations using the final airfoil characteristics show good agreement to measured power and flap moments. Furthermore, a fatigue load analysis shows a reduction of up to 15% of the load compared to commonly used data. (au)

  10. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics.

  11. Robust design of NLF airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing; Gao Zhenghong; Huang Jiangtao; Zhao Ke

    2013-01-01

    A robust optimization design approach of natural laminar airfoils is developed in this paper.First,the non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) free form deformation method based on NURBS basis function is introduced to the airfoil parameterization.Second,aerodynamic characteristics are evaluated by solving Navier Stokes equations,and the γ-Reθt transition model coupling with shear-stress transport (SST) turbulent model is introduced to simulate boundary layer transition.A numerical simulation of transition flow around NLF0416 airfoil is conducted to test the code.The comparison between numerical simulation results and wind tunnel test data approves the validity and applicability of the present transition model.Third,the optimization system is set up,which uses the separated particle swarm optimization (SPSO) as search algorithm and combines the Kriging models as surrogate model during optimization.The system is applied to carry out robust design about the uncertainty of lift coefficient and Mach number for NASA NLF-0115 airfoil.The data of optimized airfoil aerodynamic characteristics indicates that the optimized airfoil can maintain laminar flow stably in an uncertain range and has a wider range of low drag.

  12. Extraction of airfoil data using PIV and pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    Velocimetry (PIV) flow fields at different rotor azimuth positions are examined for determining sectional airfoil data. The AOA is derived locally by determining the local circulation on the blade from pressure data and subtracting the induction of the bound circulation from the local velocity. The derived...

  13. A Two Element Laminar Flow Airfoil Optimized for Cruise. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  14. An Integrated Method for Designing Airfoils Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for designing wind turbine airfoils is presented in this paper. As a main component in the design method, airfoil profiles are expressed in a trigonometric series form using conformal transformations and series of polynomial equations. The characteristics of the coefficient parameters in the trigonometric expression for airfoils profiles are first studied. As a direct consequence, three generic airfoil profiles are obtained from the expression. To validate and show the generality of the trigonometric expression, the profiles of the NACA 64418 and S809 airfoils are expressed by the present expression. Using the trigonometric expression for airfoil profiles, a so-called integrated design method is developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. As airfoil shapes are expressed with analytical functions, the airfoil surface can be kept smooth in a high degree. In the optimization step, drag and lift force coefficients are calculated using the XFOIL code. Three new airfoils CQ-A15, CQ-A18, and CQ-A21 with a thickness of 15%, 18%, and 21%, respectively, are designed with the new integrated design method.

  15. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  16. Technology and Equipment of Waste Heat Recovery in Dryer Section of Paper Machine%纸机干燥部余热回收技术与设备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀文

    2012-01-01

    Some waste heat recovery technology and equipment used in dryer section of paper machine at home and abroad were introduced in this paper.%介绍一些国际、国内余热回收技术和设备,供同行分析、研究和借鉴.

  17. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  18. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  19. Study of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise with special focus on airfoils with blunt trailing edges. Two methods are employed to calculate airfoil noise: The flow/acoustic splitting method and the semi-empirical method. The flow/acoustic splitting method is derived from compressible Navier...... design or optimization. Calculations from both methods are compared with exist experiments. The airfoil blunt noise is found as a function of trailing edge bluntness, Reynolds number, angle of attack, etc.......-Stokes equations. It provides us possibilities to study details about noise generation mechanism. The formulation of the semi-empirical model is based on acoustic analogy and then curve-fitted with experimental data. Due to its high efficiency, such empirical relation is used for purpose of low noise airfoil...

  20. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  1. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  2. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Daniel L. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  3. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marion, Lucas; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the sep......An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge...... and at the separation point. A calibration of the code through comparison with experiments has been performed using one set of airfoils. A second set of airfoils has been used for the validation of the calibrated model. Predicted aerodynamic forces for a wide range of angles of attack (0 to 90 deg) are in overall good...

  4. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  5. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis and plunging (vertical motion. The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  6. 区间信号设备维修轨道车使用方式探讨%Usage of Railcar in Section Signal Equipment Maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文颖

    2011-01-01

    阐述温福客专铁路现行区间信号设备维修作业组织方式及所遇到的困难,通过比较说明使用轨道车进行区间信号设备检修作业的优越性;提出电务共用工务轨道车的3种方案并进行优劣性比较探讨。%This article discusses the maintenance mode of the section signal equipment in the Wenzhou-Fuzhou railway as well as the difficulties encountered recently.By comparing the two maintenance modes,it was shown that the maintenance mode of section signal equipment by using rail car has many advantages.The author proposed three solutions about sharing rail cars between the department of Permanent Wayside and the department of Communication Signal and compared the advantages and disadvantages of the three solutions.

  7. Application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced supercritical airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    An application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced airfoils for transonic aircraft showed that low-drag sections can be developed for a given design Mach number without an accompanying drag increase at lower Mach numbers. This is achieved by imposing a constraint on the drag coefficient at an off-design Mach number while minimizing the drag coefficient at the design Mach number. This multiple design-point numerical optimization has been implemented with the use of airfoil shape functions which permit a wide range of attainable profiles during the optimization process. Analytical data for the starting airfoil shape, a single design-point optimized shape, and a double design-point optimized shape are presented. Experimental data obtained in the NASA Ames two-by two-foot wind tunnel are also presented and discussed.

  8. Probabilistic Design of Hollow Airfoil Composite Structure by Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sachin M. Shinde

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study represents simulation of Airfoil composite beam by using Monte Carlo method. A three dimensional static analysis of large displacement type has been carried out. Finite element analysis of NACA0012 airfoil composite structure has been carried out and uncertainty in bending stress is analyzed. Bending stress was objective function. Chord length , beam length ,elastic modulus in XY,YZ,XZ and shear modulus of epoxy graphite in XY,YZ,XZ, ply angle and ply thickness of airfoil section, force are varied within effective range and their effect on bending stress has been analyzed. In order to validate the results, one loop of simulation is benchmarked from results in literature. Ultimately, best set of probabilistic design variable is proposed to reduce bending stress under static loading condition.

  9. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    some models before they can be used in a BEM code. In this article, the airfoil data for the MEXICO (Model EXperiments in Controlled cOnditions) rotor are extracted from CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) results. The azimuthally averaged velocity is used as the sectional velocity to define the angle...

  10. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.; Antoniou, I.

    2000-12-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risoe-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel was used having a background turbulence intensity of 1%, an inlet flow velocity of 40 m/s which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1.6Oe10{sup 6}. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.600 m and 0.606 m for NACA 63-415 and NACA 63-415-Risoe-D, respectively. The span was 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects. The measurements comprised both static and dynamic inflow where dynamic inflow was obtained by pitching the airfoil in a harmonic motion. We tested the influence of leading edge roughness, stall strips and vortex generators. For smooth surface conditions the modified airfoil showed an increase in lift-drag ratio before stall at {alpha}=8 from 67 to 72. Furthermore, the maximum lift increased from 1.33 to 1.37 while the minimum drag was maintained. Double stall was observed on the NACA 63-415 airfoil, but not on the modified airfoil. This was reflected in the standard deviation of both lift and drag in stall which was significantly lower for the modified airfoil indicating smooth and stable stall conditions. No significant differences were observed for dynamic stall. Test on both airfoil sections with zigzag tape at the leading edge towards the pressure side showed that the insensitivity to roughness was improved significantly for the modified airfoil. However, if zigzag tape was mounted at the leading edge towards the suction side less improvement was observed. Mounting of stall strips at and near the leading edge showed that only if they were mounted at the very vicinity of the leading edge the airfoil characteristics were affected significantly. If the stall strips were mounted on the pressure side downstream of approximately 1 % chord length only little influence was

  11. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and tip speed ratio, the optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with an objective of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on the previous in-house airfoil family which were optimized at a Reynolds number of 3...... million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry on the existing airfoils and thus simplify the design procedure. The viscos/inviscid code Xfoil is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization where the Reynolds number is set at 16 million with a free...

  12. AirfoilPrep.py Documentation: Release 0.1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, S. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    AirfoilPrep.py provides functionality to preprocess aerodynamic airfoil data. Essentially, the module is an object oriented version of the AirfoilPrep spreadsheet with additional functionality and is written in the Python language. It allows the user to read in two-dimensional aerodynamic airfoil data, apply three-dimensional rotation corrections for wind turbine applications, and extend the datato very large angles of attack. This document discusses installation, usage, and documentation of the module.

  13. Analysis of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.B.Tay; K.B.Lim

    2009-01-01

    Simulations have been done to assess the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of different types of nonsymmetrical airfoils under different flapping configurations. The variables involved are reduced frequency, Strouhal number, pitch amplitude and phase angle. In order to analyze the variables more efficiently, the design of experiments using the response surface methodology is applied. Results show that both the variables and shape of the airfoil have a profound effect on the lift, thrust, and efficiency. By using nonsymmetrical airfoils, average lift coefficient as high as 2.23 can be obtained. The average thrust coefficient and efficiency also reach high values of 2.53 and 0.6 I, respectively. The lift production is highly dependent on the airfoil's shape while thrust production is influenced more heavily by the variables. Efficiency falls somewhere in between. Two-factor interactions are found to exist among the variables. This shows that it is not sufficient to analyze each variable individually. Vorticity diagrams are analyzed to explain the results obtained. Overall, the S1020 airfoil is able to provide relatively good efficiency and at the same time generate high thrust and lift force. These results aid in the design of a better omithopter's wing.

  14. Computational study of the Risø-B1-18 airfoil with a hinged flap providing variable trailing edge geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive computational study, in both steady and unsteady flow conditions, has been carried out to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of the Risø-B1.18 airfoil equipped with variable trailing edge geometry as produced by a hinged flap. The function of such flaps should be to decre...... frequencies, was investigated so that an optimum design can be suggested for application with wind turbine blades. It is concluded that a moderately curved flap with flap chord to airfoil curve ratio between 0.05 and 0.10 would be an optimum choice....... on the baseline airfoil showed excellent agreement with measurements on the same airfoil with the same specified conditions. Furthermore, a more widespread comparison with an advanced potential theory code is presented. The influence of various key parameters, such as flap shape, flap size and oscillating...

  15. Improvement of aerodynamic characteristics of a thick airfoil with a vortex cell in sub- and transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, Sergey; Baranov, Paul; Popov, Igor; Sudakov, Alexander; Usachov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The modified SST model (2005) is verified using Rodi- Leschziner-Isaev's approach and the multiblock computational technologies are validated in the VP2/3 code on different-structure overlapping grids by comparing the numerical predictions with the experimental data on transonic flow around an NACA0012 airfoil at an angle of attack of 4o for M=0.7 and Re=4×106. It is proved that the aerodynamic characteristics of a thick (20% of the chord) MQ airfoil mounted at an angle of attack of 2o for Re=107 and over the Mach number range 0.3-0.55 are significantly improved because an almost circular small-size (0.12) vortex cell with a defined volumetric flow rate coefficient of 0.007 during slot suction has been located on the upper airfoil section and an intense trapped vortex has been formed in it. A detailed analysis of buffeting within the self-oscillatory regime of flow around the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell has demonstrated the periodic changes in local and integral characteristics; the lift and the aerodynamic efficiency remain quite high, but inferior to the similar characteristics at M=0.55. It is found that the vortex cell at M=0.7 is inactive, and the aerodynamic characteristics of the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell are close to those of a smooth airfoil without a cell.

  16. LDV measurements of the velocity field on the inlet section of a pumped storage equipped with a symmetrical suction elbow for variable discharge values

    Science.gov (United States)

    ǎghici, I., Dr; Muntean, S.; Bosioc, A. I.; Anton, L. E.

    2014-03-01

    The storage pumps are equipped with various types of inlet casings. The flow nonuniformity is generated by the suction elbows being ingested by the impeller leading to unsteady phenomena and worse cavitational behaviour. A symmetrical suction elbow model corresponding to the double flux storage pump was manufactured and installed on the test rig in order to assess the flow field at the pump inlet. The experimental investigations are performed for 9 discharge values from 0.5 to 1.3 of nominal discharge. LDV measurements are performed on the annular section of the pump inlet in order to quantify the flow non-uniformity generated by the symmetrical suction elbow. Both axial and circumferential velocity components are simultaneously measured on the half plane (180°) of the annular inlet section along to 19 survey axis with 62 points on each. The flow field on the next half plane is determined tacking into account the symmetry. As a result, the flow map on the pump inlet annular section is reconstructed revealing a significant variation of the circumferential velocity component. The absolute flow angle is computed showing a significant variation of ±38°.

  17. Vortex noise from nonrotating cylinders and airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.; Fink, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of vortex-shedding noise was conducted in an acoustic research tunnel over a Reynolds-number range applicable to full-scale helicopter tail-rotor blades. Two-dimensional tapered-chord nonrotating models were tested to simulate the effect of spanwise frequency variation on the vortex-shedding mechanism. Both a tapered circular cylinder and tapered airfoils were investigated. The results were compared with data for constant-diameter cylinder and constant-chord airfoil models also tested during this study. Far-field noise, surface pressure fluctuations, and spanwise correlation lengths were measured for each configuration. Vortex-shedding noise for tapered cylinders and airfoils was found to contain many narrowband-random peaks which occurred within a range of frequencies corresponding to a predictable Strouhal number referenced to the maximum and minimum chord. The noise was observed to depend on surface roughness and Reynolds number.

  18. An overview of NACA 6-digit airfoil series characteristics with reference to airfoils for large wind turbine blades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the NACA 63 and 64 6-digit series of airfoils tested in the NACA LTPT in view to verify the RFOIL calculated airfoil characteristics for high Reynolds numbers. Some anomalies in the zero-lift angles of 15% and 18% thick airfoils from these series are identified, both in the a

  19. Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2011-06-28

    An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

  20. EUDP project 'Low noise airfoil' - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F. (ed.)

    2012-06-15

    This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project 'Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (Denmark), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel at the Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA, USA), also a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel but equipped with an anechoic chamber that allow to perform acoustic measurements. On the theoretical side, the above experiments yield a series of model validations and improvements. In particular, the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model could be significantly improved by introducing turbulence anisotropy in its formulation, as well as the influence of the boundary layer mean pressure gradient. This two characteristics are inherent to airfoil flows but were neglected in the original approach. In addition, the experimental results are confronted to detailed Large Eddy Simulations of the airfoil flow giving more insight into the flow turbulence characteristics. The methodology which consists in measuring surface pressure spectra directly on the airfoil surface using flush-mounted microphones in order to evaluate far-field noise emission using additional theoretical results has been validated. This technique presents the advantage that it can easily be used in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel and does not require the use of an anechoic facility. It was developed as a substitute to the original plan that consisted in measuring acoustic waves using hot-wire velocimetry. This last technique proved ineffective in the LM Wind

  1. ANALYSIS OF TRANSONIC FLOW PAST CUSPED AIRFOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Stodůlka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transonic flow past two cusped airfoils is numerically solved and achieved results are analyzed by means of flow behavior and oblique shocks formation.Regions around sharp trailing edges are studied in detail and parameters of shock waves are solved and compared using classical shock polar approach and verified by reduction parameters for symmetric configurations.

  2. Analysis of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, W. B.; Lim, K. B.

    2009-08-01

    Simulations have been done to assess the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of different types of non-symmetrical airfoils under different flapping configurations. The variables involved are reduced frequency, Strouhal number, pitch amplitude and phase angle. In order to analyze the variables more efficiently, the design of experiments using the response surface methodology is applied. Results show that both the variables and shape of the airfoil have a profound effect on the lift, thrust, and efficiency. By using non-symmetrical airfoils, average lift coefficient as high as 2.23 can be obtained. The average thrust coefficient and efficiency also reach high values of 2.53 and 0.61, respectively. The lift production is highly dependent on the airfoil’s shape while thrust production is influenced more heavily by the variables. Efficiency falls somewhere in between. Two-factor interactions are found to exist among the variables. This shows that it is not sufficient to analyze each variable individually. Vorticity diagrams are analyzed to explain the results obtained. Overall, the S1020 airfoil is able to provide relatively good efficiency and at the same time generate high thrust and lift force. These results aid in the design of a better ornithopter’s wing.

  3. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform...

  4. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  5. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A.; Gomez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-06-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling.

  6. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  7. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and a tip speed ratio, optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve a high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... momentum (BEM) technique proves the reliability of the integrated design method. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd....... with the objectives of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on a previous in-house designed airfoil family which was optimized at a Reynolds number...

  8. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  9. Characterization of the Effect of Wing Surface Instrumentation on UAV Airfoil Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed flight research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) has prompted study into the aerodynamic effects of modifications made to the surfaces of laminar airfoils. The research is focused on the high-aspect ratio, laminar-flow type wings commonly found on UAVs and other aircraft with a high endurance requirement. A broad range of instrumentation possibilities, such as structural, pressure, and temperature sensing devices may require the alteration of the airfoil outer mold line as part of the installation process. This study attempts to characterize the effect of installing this additiona1 instrumentation on key airfoil performance factors, such as transition location, lift and drag curves, and stall point. In particular, the general case of an airfoil that is channeled in the spanwise direction is considered, and the impact on key performance characteristics is assessed. Particular attention is focused on exploring the limits of channel depth and low-Reynolds number on performance and stall characteristics. To quantify the effect of increased skin friction due to premature transition caused by protruding or recessed instrumentation, two simplified, conservative scenarios are used to consider two potential sources of diaturbance: A) that leading edge alterations would cause linearly expanding areas (triangles) of turbulent flow on both surfaces of the wing upstream of the natural transition point, and B) that a channel or bump on the upper surface would trip turbulent flow across the whole upper surface upstream of the natural transition point. A potentially more important consideration than the skin friction drag increment is the change in overall airfoil performance due to the installation of instrumentation along most of the wingspan. To quantify this effect, 2D CFD simulations of the flow over a representative mid-span airfoil section were conducted in order to assess the change in lift and drag curves for the airfoil in the presence of

  10. Design Of An Aerodynamic Measurement System For Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and validation of a measurement system for aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles. An aerodynamic balance was designed in order to measure the lift, drag forces and pitching moment for different airfoils. During the design process, several aspects were analyzed in order to produce an efficient design, for instance the range of changes of the angle of attack with and a small increment and the versatility of being adapted to different type of airfoils, since it is a wire balance it was aligned and calibrated as well. Wind tunnel tests of a two dimensional NACA four digits family airfoil and four different modifications of this airfoil were performed to validate the aerodynamic measurement system. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, four different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack experimentally for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off, called the no blowing condition, by means of wind tunnel tests. The experiments were performed in a closed circuit wind tunnel with an open test section. Finally, results of the wind tunnel tests were compared with numerical results obtained by means of computational fluid dynamics as well as with other experimental references and found to be in good agreement.

  11. BIFURCATIONS OF AIRFOIL IN INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuFei; YangYiren

    2005-01-01

    Bifurcations of an airfoil with nonlinear pitching stiffness in incompressible flow are investigated. The pitching spring is regarded as a spring with cubic stiffness. The motion equations of the airfoil are written as the four dimensional one order differential equations. Taking air speed and the linear part of pitching stiffness as the parameters, the analytic solutions of the critical boundaries of pitchfork bifurcations and Hopf bifurcations are obtained in 2 dimensional parameter plane. The stabilities of the equilibrium points and the limit cycles in different regions of 2 dimensional parameter plane are analyzed. By means of harmonic balance method, the approximate critical boundaries of 2-multiple semi-stable limit cycle bifurcations are obtained, and the bifurcation points of supercritical or subcritical Hopf bifurcation are found. Some numerical simulation results are given.

  12. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  13. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  14. The S415 and S418 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 4.) This characteristic is related to the...edge with increasing (decreasing) lift coefficient. This feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift...should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 1Director, Institute for Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart, Germany, 1974–1985.5 No suction

  15. An overview of NACA 6-digit airfoil series characteristics with reference to airfoils for large wind turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Timmer, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the NACA 63 and 64 6-digit series of airfoils tested in the NACA LTPT in view to verify the RFOIL calculated airfoil characteristics for high Reynolds numbers. Some anomalies in the zero-lift angles of 15% and 18% thick airfoils from these series are identified, both in the airfoil clean case and in case of wrap-around roughness. It is found that RFOIL predicts the maximum lift coefficient at a Reynolds number of 3 million well, but consistently under predicts the Cl,m...

  16. 纸机干燥部余热回收技术与设备(续)%Technology and Equipment of Waste Heat Recovery in Dryer Section of Paper Machine (Continuous)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀文

    2012-01-01

    Some waste heat recovery technology and equipment used in dryer section of paper machine at home and abroad were introduced in this paper.%介绍一些国际、国内余热回收技术和设备,供同行分析、研究和借鉴.

  17. 基于海鸥翼型的小型风力机叶片仿生设计与试验%Bionic design and test of small-sized wind turbine blade based on seagull airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骥月; 丛茜; 梁宁; 毛士佳; 关欢欢; 刘林鹏; 陈创发

    2015-01-01

    针对现有小型风力发电机效率远低于理论值问题,对100 W水平轴风力机叶片进行仿生改进。采用Spalart-Allmaras模型分析不同攻角下海鸥翼型与标准翼型的气动特性;以标准100 W水平轴风力机叶片为原型,结合海鸥翼型、标准弦长和计算得出的安装角,设计得到仿海鸥翼型叶片;利用SST k-ω模型进行仿海鸥翼型叶片与标准叶片气动特性数值模拟;搭建室内风力机效率测试平台,进行仿海鸥翼型风力机与标准风力机效率对比试验。结果表明:海鸥翼型气动性能优良,最大升力系数是标准翼型的2.19倍,最大升阻比是标准翼型的1.34倍;仿海鸥翼型叶片与标准叶片相比,输出功率提高25.77%。该研究可为小型风力发电机的改进设计提供参考。%Power of the existing small-sized wind turbine blades is much less than the theoretical value. This study improved 100 W wind turbine blades to increase the power of wind turbine. First of all, Spalart-Allmaras model which was suitable for airfoil stalling characteristics research was used to analyze the aerodynamic characteristics of seagull airfoil and standard airfoil with different angles of attack (AOA). Seagull airfoil and standard airfoil were got from seagull wing and standard blade by portable three-dimension scanner, Imageware software and Geomagic Studio software through standard blade scan, seagull wing scan, point cloud processing, reverse engineering modeling and cross section capture. Lift coefficients and lift-drag ratios of seagull airfoil and standard airfoil were calculated by Fluent software. Secondly, bionic blade was designed based on standard 100 W blades and Glauert theory. Thirdly, numerical simulations of bionic blade and standard blade were performed by using SST(shear stress transport) k-ω model which was suitable for blade performance research to analyze the aerodynamic characteristics of bionic blade and standard

  18. Measurement of local convective heat transfer coefficients from a smooth and roughened NACA-0012 airfoil - Flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fossen, G. James; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Newton, James E.; Poinsatte, Phillip E.

    1988-01-01

    Wind tunnels typically have higher free stream turbulence levels than are found in flight. Turbulence intensity was measured to be 0.5 percent in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the cloud making sprays off and around 2 percent with cloud making equipment on. Turbulence intensity for flight conditions was found to be too low to make meaningful measurements for smooth air. This difference between free stream and wind tunnel conditions has raised questions as to the validity of results obtained in the IRT. One objective of these tests was to determine the effect of free stream turbulence on convective heat transfer for the NASA Lewis LEWICE ice growth prediction code. These tests provide in-flight heat transfer data for a NASA-0012 airfoil with a 533 cm chord. Future tests will measure heat transfer data from the same airfoil in the Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Roughness was obtained by the attachment of small, 2 mm diameter hemispheres of uniform size to the airfoil in three different patterns. Heat transfer measurements were recorded in flight on the NASA Lewis Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft. Measurements were taken for the smooth and roughened surfaces at various aircraft speeds and angles of attack up to four degrees. Results are presented as Frossling number versus position on the airfoil for various roughnesses and angles of attack.

  19. Measurement of local convective heat transfer coefficients from a smooth and roughened NACA-0012 airfoil: Flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, James E.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Phillip E.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Wind tunnels typically have higher free stream turbulence levels than are found in flight. Turbulence intensity was measured to be 0.5 percent in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the cloud making sprays off and around 2 percent with cloud making equipment on. Turbulence intensity for flight conditions was found to be too low to make meaningful measurements for smooth air. This difference between free stream and wing tunnel conditions has raised questions as to the validity of results obtained in the IRT. One objective of these tests was to determine the effect of free stream turbulence on convective heat transfer for the NASA Lewis LEWICE ice growth prediction code. These tests provide in-flight heat transfer data for a NASA-0012 airfoil with a 533 cm chord. Future tests will measure heat transfer data from the same airfoil in the Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Roughness was obtained by the attachment of small, 2 mm diameter hemispheres of uniform size to the airfoil in three different patterns. Heat transfer measurements were recorded in flight on the NASA Lewis Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft. Measurements were taken for the smooth and roughened surfaces at various aircraft speeds and angles of attack up to four degrees. Results are presented as Frossling number versus position on the airfoil for various roughnesses and angles of attack.

  20. Airfoil Analysis with Uncertain Geometry using the Probabilistic Collocation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeven, G.J.A.; Bijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    Due to manufacturing tolerances, the airfoil of a wing after production is never exactly the same as the designed airfoil. Also during operation the geometry may change due to aerodynamic loading, icing or wear of the construction. The geometry can, therefore, be treated as uncertain. Uncertainties

  1. Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, L.D.; Schram, C.; Desmet, W.

    2015-01-01

    The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization

  2. Identification of dynamic properties of radial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, V.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost “top foil” layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Air-foil bearings are current

  3. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Nav...

  4. Identification of dynamic properties of radial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, V.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost ‘‘top foil’’ layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Air-foil bearings are curre

  5. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  6. Discontinuous Galerkin methodology for Large-Eddy Simulations of wind turbine airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frére, A.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Hillewaert, K.

    2016-01-01

    sector yet. The present study aims at evaluating this methodology on an application which is relevant for that sector and focuses on blade section aerodynamics characterization. To be pertinent for large wind turbines, the simulations would need to be at low Mach numbers (M ≤ 0.3) where compressible......This paper aims at evaluating the potential of the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methodology for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind turbine airfoils. The DG method has shown high accuracy, excellent scalability and capacity to handle unstructured meshes. It is however not used in the wind energy...... approaches are often limited and at large Reynolds numbers (Re ≥ 106) where wall-resolved LES is still unaffordable. At these high Re, a wall-modeled LES (WMLES) approach is thus required. In order to first validate the LES methodology, before the WMLES approach, this study presents airfoil flow simulations...

  7. Application of numerical optimization to the design of supercritical airfoils without drag-creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R. M.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent applications of numerical optimization to the design of advanced airfoils for transonic aircraft have shown that low-drag sections can be developed for a given design Mach number without an accompanying drag increase at lower Mach numbers. This is achieved by imposing a constraint on the drag coefficient at an off-design Mach number while the drag at the design Mach number is the objective function. Such a procedure doubles the computation time over that for single design-point problems, but the final result is worth the increased cost of computation. The ability to treat such multiple design-point problems by numerical optimization has been enhanced by the development of improved airfoil shape functions. Such functions permit a considerable increase in the range of profiles attainable during the optimization process.

  8. Tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Danielle J.; Doolan, Con J.

    2016-02-01

    This study is concerned with the flow-induced noise of a smooth wall-mounted finite airfoil with flat ended tip and natural boundary layer transition. Far-field noise measurements have been taken at a single observer location and with a microphone array in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel for a wall-mounted finite airfoil with aspect ratios of L / C = 1 - 3, at a range of Reynolds numbers (ReC = 7.9 ×105 - 1.6 ×106, based on chord) and geometric angles of attack (α = 0 - 6 °). At these Reynolds numbers, the wall-mounted finite airfoil produces a broadband noise contribution with a number of discrete equispaced tones at non-zero angles of attack. Spectral data are also presented for the noise produced due to three-dimensional vortex flow near the airfoil tip and wall junction to show the contributions of these flow features to airfoil noise generation. Tonal noise production is linked to the presence of a transitional flow state to the trailing edge and an accompanying region of mildly separated flow on the pressure surface. The separated flow region and tonal noise source location shift along the airfoil trailing edge towards the free-end region with increasing geometric angle of attack due to the influence of the tip flow field over the airfoil span. Tonal envelopes defining the operating conditions for tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil are derived and show that the domain of tonal noise production differs significantly from that of a two-dimensional airfoil. Tonal noise production shifts to lower Reynolds numbers and higher geometric angles of attack as airfoil aspect ratio is reduced.

  9. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  10. Wind turbine airfoil design method with low noise and experimental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Quan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao;

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the noise characteristic of wind turbine airfoils, the airfoil optimal design mathematic model was built based on airfoil functional integrated theory and noise calculated model. The new optimized objective function of maximizing lift/drag to noise was developed on the design......, though there is a certain difference between the theory results and experiment data. Compared with NACA-64-618 airfoil, the CQU-DTU-B18 airfoil exhibits lower noise, which validates the feasibility of this design method. It is a guide to design wind turbine airfoil with lower noise and to reduce airfoil...

  11. Linearized propulsion theory of flapping airfoils revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2016-11-01

    A vortical impulse theory is used to compute the thrust of a plunging and pitching airfoil in forward flight within the framework of linear potential flow theory. The result is significantly different from the classical one of Garrick that considered the leading-edge suction and the projection in the flight direction of the pressure force. By taking into account the complete vorticity distribution on the airfoil and the wake the mean thrust coefficient contains a new term that generalizes the leading-edge suction term and depends on Theodorsen function C (k) and on a new complex function C1 (k) of the reduced frequency k. The main qualitative difference with Garrick's theory is that the propulsive efficiency tends to zero as the reduced frequency increases to infinity (as 1 / k), in contrast to Garrick's efficiency that tends to a constant (1 / 2). Consequently, for pure pitching and combined pitching and plunging motions, the maximum of the propulsive efficiency is not reached as k -> ∞ like in Garrick's theory, but at a finite value of the reduced frequency that depends on the remaining non-dimensional parameters. The present analytical results are in good agreement with experimental data and numerical results for small amplitude oscillations. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grant No. DPI2013-40479-P.

  12. FLEET Velocimetry Measurements on a Transonic Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) velocimetry was used to study the flowfield around a symmetric, transonic airfoil in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT facility. A nominal Mach number of 0.85 was investigated with a total pressure of 125 kPa and total temperature of 280 K. Two-components of velocity were measured along vertical profiles at different locations above, below, and aft of the airfoil at angles of attack of 0 deg, 3.5 deg, and 7deg. Measurements were assessed for their accuracy, precision, dynamic range, spatial resolution, and overall measurement uncertainty in the context of the applied flowfield. Measurement precisions as low as 1 m/s were observed, while overall uncertainties ranged from 4 to 5 percent. Velocity profiles within the wake showed sufficient accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to resolve both the mean and fluctuating velocities and general flow physics such as shear layer growth. Evidence of flow separation is found at high angles of attack.

  13. Application of mobile display equipment in analyzing sectional loss mechanism%流动演示仪在分析局部损失机理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁晖; 杨革; 王少纯

    2000-01-01

    运用流动演示仪的水力现象分析局部损失机理,详细阐述了各种边界流场局部水头损失产生的根本原因。%This paper narrated essential reasons for lost production of water head in all kinds of boundary field in utilizing hydraulic appearance analysis of sectional loss mechanism of mobile display equipment.

  14. Flow Visualization around a Double Wedge Airfoil Model with Focusing Schlieren System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masashi KASHITANI; Yutaka YAMAGUCHI

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, aerodynamic characteristics of the double wedge airfoil model were investigated in a transonic flow by using the shock tube as an intermittent wind tunnel. The driver and driven gases of the shock tube are dry air. The airfoil model of double wedge has the span of 58 mm, chord length c = 75 mm and its maximum thickness is 7.5 mm. The apex of the double wedge airfoil model is located on the 35% chord length from the leading edge. The range of hot gas Mach numbers are from 0.80 to 0.88, and the Reynolds numbers based on chord length are 3.11×105~3.49×105, respectively. The flow visualizations were performed by the sharp focusing schlieren method which can visualize the three dimensional flow fields. The results show that the present system can visualize the transonic flowfield clearer than the previous system, and the shock wave profiles of the center of span in the test section are visualized

  15. Accurate load prediction by BEM with airfoil data from 3D RANS simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc S.; Nitzsche, Jens; Hennings, Holger

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two methods for the extraction of airfoil coefficients from 3D CFD simulations of a wind turbine rotor are investigated, and these coefficients are used to improve the load prediction of a BEM code. The coefficients are extracted from a number of steady RANS simulations, using either averaging of velocities in annular sections, or an inverse BEM approach for determination of the induction factors in the rotor plane. It is shown that these 3D rotor polars are able to capture the rotational augmentation at the inner part of the blade as well as the load reduction by 3D effects close to the blade tip. They are used as input to a simple BEM code and the results of this BEM with 3D rotor polars are compared to the predictions of BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients plus common empirical corrections for stall delay and tip loss. While BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients produces a very different radial distribution of loads than the RANS simulation, the BEM with 3D rotor polars manages to reproduce the loads from RANS very accurately for a variety of load cases, as long as the blade pitch angle is not too different from the cases from which the polars were extracted.

  16. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D M [Airfoils, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  17. Optimum Transonic Airfoils Based on the Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iollo, Angelo; Salas, Manuel, D.

    1996-01-01

    We solve the problem of determining airfoils that approximate, in a least square sense, given surface pressure distributions in transonic flight regimes. The flow is modeled by means of the Euler equations and the solution procedure is an adjoint- based minimization algorithm that makes use of the inverse Theodorsen transform in order to parameterize the airfoil. Fast convergence to the optimal solution is obtained by means of the pseudo-time method. Results are obtained using three different pressure distributions for several free stream conditions. The airfoils obtained have given a trailing edge angle.

  18. Geometrical effects on the airfoil flow separation and transition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-25

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible flow over two airfoils, NACA-4412 and NACA-0012-64, to investigate the effects of the airfoil geometry on the flow separation and transition patterns at Re=104 and 10 degrees incidence. The two chosen airfoils are geometrically similar except for maximum camber (respectively 4%C and 0 with C the chord length), which results in a larger projection area with respect to the incoming flow for the NACA-4412 airfoil, and a larger leeward surface curvature at the leading edge for the NACA-0012-64 airfoil. The governing equations are discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order spatial discretization scheme. An assessment on the two-point correlation indicates that a spanwise domain size of 0.8C is sufficiently large for the present simulations. We discuss flow separation at the airfoil leading edge, transition of the separated shear layer to three-dimensional flow and subsequently to turbulence. Numerical results reveal a stronger adverse pressure gradient field in the leading edge region of the NACA-0012-64 airfoil due to the rapidly varying surface curvature. As a result, the flow experiences detachment at x/C=0.08, and the separated shear layer transition via Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism occurs at x/C=0.29 with fully developed turbulent flow around x/C=0.80. These flow development phases are delayed to occur at much downstream positions, respectively, observed around x/C=0.25, 0.71 and 1.15 for the NACA-4412 airfoil. The turbulent intensity, measured by the turbulent fluctuations and turbulent Reynolds stresses, are much larger for NACA-0012-64 from the transition onset until the airfoil trailing edge, while turbulence develops significantly downstream of the trailing edge for the NACA-4412 airfoil. For both airfoils, our DNS results indicate that the mean Reynolds stress u\\'u\\'/U02 reaches its maximum value at a distance from the surface approximately equal to the displacement

  19. Effects of finite aspect ratio on wind turbine airfoil measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus;

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines partly operate in stalled conditions within their operational cycle. To simulate these conditions, it is also necessary to obtain 2-D airfoil data in terms of lift and drag coefficients at high angles of attack. Such data has been obtained previously, but often at low aspect ratios...... and only barely past the stall point, where strong wall boundary layer influence is expected. In this study, the influence of the wall boundary layer on 2D airfoil data, especially in the post stall domain, is investigated. Here, a wind turbine airfoil is tested at different angles of attack and with two...

  20. Design Points of New Civil Air Defense Equipment in Subway Sections%地铁区间新型人防设备设计要点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭士博; 徐胜

    2016-01-01

    经济合理地实现城市轨道交通设计中的人防功能是地铁设计的一个重要问题。为解决地铁区间刚性接触网不断开条件下的人防设防问题,设计出新型区间单扇防护密闭隔断门。新型设备同时有效地解决了线路曲线段、大坡段及大盾构区间施工段的人防设防问题。详细介绍了新型设备的机构设计原理、工作性能及既有难题的解决方案,对其与既有设备的改进处进行对比,得出了新型设备的优越性与应用范围。%How to realize the functions of air defense eco-nomically and rationaly is an important issue in subway de-sign.Airtight blast partition door is designed for rigid cate-nary subway system which can be used when the catenaries and rail track are not disconnected.This new equipment al-so effectively solves the problem of air defense fortification line curve segments,steep slopes and large segments in shield zone construction.In this paper,the new equipment design principles, performance and solutions to existing problems are introduced in detail.The improvement and application range of the new equipment are also described.

  1. Numerical investigation of airfoils for small wind turbine applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed numerical investigation of the aerodynamic performance on the five airfoils namely Mid321a, Mid321b, Mid321c, Mid321d, and Mid321e were carried out at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5×105 to 2.5×105. The airfoils used for small wind turbines are designed for Reynolds number ranges between 3×105 and 5×105 and the blades are tend to work on off-design conditions. The blade element moment method was applied to predict the aerodynamic loads, power coefficient, and blade parameters for the airfoils. Based on the evaluate data, it was found that Mid321c airfoil has better lift to drag ratio over the range of Reynolds numbers and attained maximum power coefficient of 0.4487 at Re = 2×105.

  2. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  3. 14 CFR 25.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 25.1415 Section 25.1415... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Safety Equipment § 25.1415 Ditching equipment. (a) Ditching equipment used in airplanes to be certificated for ditching under § 25.801, and required by...

  4. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  5. A STUDY ON THE MECHANISM OF HIGH-LIFT GENERATION BY AN AIRFOIL IN UNSTEADY MOTION AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂; Hossein Hamdani

    2001-01-01

    The aerodynamic force and flow structure of NACA 0012 airfoil performing an unsteady motion at low Reynolds number (Re = 100) are calculated by solving Navier-Stokes equations. The motion consists of three parts: the first translation, rotation and the second translation in the direction opposite to the first.The rotation and the second translation in this motion are expected to represent the rotation and translation of the wing-section of a hovering insect. The flow structure is used in combination with the theory of vorticity dynamics to explain the generation of unsteady aerodynamic force in the motion. During the rotation, due to the creation of strong vortices in short time, large aerodynamic force is produced and the force is almost normal to the airfoil chord. During the second translation, large lift coefficient can be maintained for certain time period and CL1, the lift coefficient averaged over four chord lengths of travel, is larger than 2 (the corresponding steady-state lift coefficient is only 0.9). The large lift coefficient is due to two effects. The first is the delayed shedding of the stall vortex. The second is that the vortices created during the airfoil rotation and in the near wake left by previous translation form a short "vortex street" in front of the airfoil and the "vortex street" induces a "wind";against this "wind" the airfoil translates, increasing its relative speed. The above results provide insights to the understanding of the mechanism of high-lift generation by a hovering insect.

  6. Quarry Equipment Yearbook 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This issue of the journal is devoted to an annual review of developments in the equipment used for minerals extraction and recycling. For each of 12 types of equipment, an editorial review is presented of developments and a tabular presentation of suppliers' ranges and contact information, including e-mail addresses and websites. The sections are: asphalt plants, conveyors, crushers and screens, drill rigs, dump trucks, excavators, hammers, pumps, tyres, weighbridges, wheel loaders and wheel washers.

  7. Optimization Method for Turbine Airfoil Designing Using Genetic Algorithms, CFD and Parallel Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An optimization method to design turbine airfoils using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) design shell coupled directly with a viscous CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis code is proposed in this paper. The blade geometry is parameterized and the optimization method is used to search for a blade geometry that will minimize the loss in the turbine cascade passage. The viscous flow prediction code is verified by the experimental data of cascade, which is typical for a gas turbine rotor blade section. A comparative study of the blades designed by the optimization technique and the original one is presented

  8. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.

    2000-01-01

    a background turbulence intensity of 1%, an inlet flow velocity of 40 m/s which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1.6×106. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.600 m and 0.606 m for NACA 63-415 and NACA 63-415-Risø-D,respectively. The span was 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects...

  9. Aero-elastic stability of airfoil flow using 2-D CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A three degrees-of-freedom structural dynamics model has been coupled to a two-dimensional incompressible CFD code. The numerical investigation considers aero-elastic stability for two different airfoils; the NACA0012 and the LM 2 18 % airfoils. Stable and unstable configurations and limit cycle oscillations are predicted in accordance with literature for the first airfoil. An attempt to predict stall induced edge-wise vibrations on a wind turbine airfoil fails using this two-dimensional approach. (au)

  10. Interaction of two-dimensional impulsively started airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fu-bing; ZENG Nian-dong; ZHANG Liang; WU De-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous vorticity panels were used to model general unsteady inviscid, incompressible, two-dimensional flows. The geometry of thc airfoil was approximated by series of short straight segments having endpoints that lie on the actual surface. A piecewise linear, continuous distribution of vorticity over the airfoil surface was used to generate disturbance flow. The no-penetration condition was imposed at the midpoint of each segment and at discrete times. The wake was simulated by a system of point vortices, which moved at local fluid velocity. At each time step, a new wake panel with uniform vorticity distribution was attached to the trailing edge, and the condition of constant circulation around the airfoil and wake was imposed. A new expression for Kutta condition was developed to study the interference effect between two impulsively started NACA0012 airfoils. The tandem arrangement was found to be the most effective to enhance the lift of the rear airfoil. The interference effect between tidal turbine blades was shown clearly.

  11. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  12. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -DTU-LN118 airfoil by using wind tunnel measurements in the acoustic wind tunnel located at Virginia Tech and numerical computations with the inhouse Q3uic and EllipSys 2D/3D codes. To show the superiority of the new airfoils, comparisons with a NACA64618 airfoil are made. For the aerodynamic features...

  13. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Haoran; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun;

    2014-01-01

    model and RFOIL all show that with the increase of thickness of trailing edge, the linear region of lift is extended and the maximum lift also increases, the increase rate and amount of lift become limited gradually at low angles of attack, while the drag increases dramatically. For thicker airfoils...... with larger maximum thickness to chord length, the increment of lift is larger than that of relatively thinner airfoils when the thickness of blunt trailing edge is increased from 5% to 10% chord length. But too large lift can cause abrupt stall which is profitless for power output. The transient...... characteristics of blunt trailing edge airfoils are caused by blunt body vortices at low angles of attack, and by the combined effect of separation and blunt body vortices at large angles of attack. With the increase of thickness of blunt trailing edge, the vibration amplitudes of lift and drag curves increase...

  14. A robust inverse inviscid method for airfoil design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.; Dedoussis, V.; Papailiou, K. D.

    An irrotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional airfoil profiles is described. The method is based on the potential streamfunction formulation, where the physical space on which the boundaries of the airfoil are sought, is mapped onto the (phi, psi) space via a body-fitted coordinate transformation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equations for the inverse problem, by requiring the curvature of the flat 2-D Euclidean space to be zero. An auxiliary coordinate transformation permits the definition of C-type computational grids on the (phi, psi) plane resulting to a more accurate description of the leading edge region. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations along the grid lines. To validate the method inverse calculation results are compared to direct, `reproduction', calculation results. The design procedure of a new airfoil shape is also presented.

  15. Wind tunnel test of the FFA-W3-241, FFA-W3-301 and NACA 63-430 airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I.; Dahl, K.S.; Madsen, H.A.

    1998-12-01

    This report deals with 2D measurements of the FFA-W3-241, FFA-W3-301 and NACA 63-430 airfoils. The aerodynamic properties were measured at Re = 1.6x10{sup 6}. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel with a background turbulence intensity of 1% was used. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.60 m and a span of 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimize 3D flow effects. The measurements comprised both static and dynamic inflow where dynamic inflow was obtained by pitching the airfoil in a harmonic motion. We tested the influence from vortex generators and leading edge roughness both individually and in combination. The aerodynamic characteristics were measured and the agreement between calculations and measurements was fair for FFA-W3-241 but not good for FFA-W3-301 and NACA 63-430. In general calculations overestimated maximum C{sub L} and sometimes underestimated minimum C{sub D}. Maximum C{sub L} for smooth flow was in good agreement with calculated maximum C{sub L} for leading edge transition flow and this could serve as a worst case calculation. We determined the influence from vortex generators and they should always be applied on thick airfoils to increase maximum C{sub L}. We determined the influence from leading edge roughness, which reduced maximum C{sub L} and increased minimum C{sub D}. Compared with the NACA 63-4xx airfoils, the FFA-W3 airfoils were found better suited for the inboard part of a wind turbine blade both with and without vortex generators. (au) EFP-94; EFP-95; EFP-97. 8 tabs., 195 ills., 13 refs.

  16. 46 CFR 197.460 - Diving equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving equipment. 197.460 Section 197.460 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.460 Diving equipment. The diving supervisor shall insure that the diving equipment designated for...

  17. 14 CFR 27.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 27.1415 Section 27.1415... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1415 Ditching equipment. (a) Emergency... accommodate one life preserver for each occupant for which certification for ditching is requested. (c)...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 29.1415 Section 29.1415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1415 Ditching equipment....

  19. 7 CFR 58.626 - Packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging equipment. 58.626 Section 58.626 Agriculture....626 Packaging equipment. Packaging equipment designed to mechanically fill and close single service... Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen Desserts and Cottage Cheese. Quality Specifications for...

  20. 21 CFR 58.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment design. 58.61 Section 58.61 Food and... PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Equipment § 58.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall...

  1. 40 CFR 792.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment design. 792.61 Section 792.61...) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 792.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall...

  2. 21 CFR 606.60 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 606.60 Section 606.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Equipment § 606.60 Equipment. (a) Equipment used in the collection, processing,...

  3. Evolving aerodynamic airfoils for wind turbines through a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. J.; Gómez, E.; Grageda, J. I.; Couder, C.; Solís, A.; Hanotel, C. L.; Ledesma, JI

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, genetic algorithms stand out for airfoil optimisation, due to the virtues of mutation and crossing-over techniques. In this work we propose a genetic algorithm with arithmetic crossover rules. The optimisation criteria are taken to be the maximisation of both aerodynamic efficiency and lift coefficient, while minimising drag coefficient. Such algorithm shows greatly improvements in computational costs, as well as a high performance by obtaining optimised airfoils for Mexico City's specific wind conditions from generic wind turbines designed for higher Reynolds numbers, in few iterations.

  4. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2010-01-01

    noise prediction model, the previously developed integrated design technique is further developed. The new code takes into account different airfoil requirements according to their local positions on a blade, such as sensitivity to leading edge roughness, design lift at off-design condition, stall......Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...

  5. Research on design methods and aerodynamics performance of CQUDTU-B21 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Wen, Zhong Shen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design methods of CQU-DTU-B21 airfoil for wind turbine. Compared with the traditional method of inverse design, the new method is described directly by a compound objective function to balance several conflicting requirements for design wind turbine airfoils, which based...... on design theory of airfoil profiles, blade element momentum (BEM) theory and airfoil Self-Noise prediction model. And then an optimization model with the target of maximum power performance on a 2D airfoil and low noise emission of design ranges for angle of attack has been developed for designing CQU...

  6. Communications techniques and equipment: A compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    This Compilation is devoted to equipment and techniques in the field of communications. It contains three sections. One section is on telemetry, including articles on radar and antennas. The second section describes techniques and equipment for coding and handling data. The third and final section includes descriptions of amplifiers, receivers, and other communications subsystems.

  7. Design of the new Risoe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Dahl, K.S. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A new airfoil family for wind turbines was developed by use of a design method using numerical optimization and the flow solver, XFOIL. The results were evaluated with the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D. The airfoil family constitutes 6 airfoils ranging in thickness from 15% to 30%. The airfoils were designed to have a maximum lift coefficient around 1.5 in natural conditions and high lift-drag ratios below maximum lift. Insensitivity to leading edge roughness was obtained by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurred close to the leading edge just before stall. The airfoil family was designed for a 600 kW wind turbine and provides a basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  8. Design and validation of the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    . To validate the airfoil design, CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil has been tested experimentally in the acoustic wind tunnel located at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), USA. To show the superiority of the CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils, comparisons on aerodynamic performance and noise......This paper presents the design and validation of the high performance and low noise Chong Qing University and Technical University of Denmark LN1 (CQU-DTU-LN1) series of airfoils for wind turbine applications. The new design method uses target characteristics of wind turbine airfoils in the design...... emission between the CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 64618 airfoil, which is used in modern wind turbine blades, are carried out. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  9. SK变频器在平弯钢化玻璃设备上的应用%Application of SK Frequency Invertor in the Bending Section of Tempering Glass Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁波

    2012-01-01

    The SK diver from control techniques are playing an important role at the tempering glass equipment from Luoyang North Glass Co. Ltd. The paper introduces that how the SK drive control the motor in the bending section area, and SK dirver offers the switch function between the speed control and the torque control in the production engineering.%本文讲述了艾默生CT的SK变频器在洛阳北方玻璃技术股份有限公司生产的平弯玻璃钢化设备中的具体应用.详细讲解了SK变频器在该设备的弯风栅段对变弧电机的控制功能,并重点介绍了SK变频器在该工艺中特有的速度控制和转矩控制的切换功能.

  10. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  11. Unsteady Double Wake Model for the Simulation of Stalled Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Cayron, Antoine; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    separation and its dynamics. In this paper, the calculated integral forces have been successfully validated against wind tunnel measurements for the FFA-W3-211 airfoil. Furthermore, the computed highly unsteady flow field is analyzed in detail for a set of angles of attack ranging from light to deep stall...

  12. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  13. Stability of Inviscid Flow over Airfoils Admitting Multiple Numerical Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Xiong, Juntao; Liu, Feng; Luo, Shijun

    2012-11-01

    Multiple numerical solutions at the same flight condition are found of inviscid transonic flow over certain airfoils (Jameson et al., AIAA 2011-3509) within some Mach number range. Both symmetric and asymmetric solutions exist for a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack. Global linear stability analysis of the multiple solutions is conducted. Linear perturbation equations of the Euler equations around a steady-state solution are formed and discretized numerically. An eigenvalue problem is then constructed using the modal analysis approach. Only a small portion of the eigen spectrum is needed and thus can be found efficiently by using Arnoldi's algorithm. The least stable or unstable mode corresponds to the eigenvalue with the largest real part. Analysis of the NACA 0012 airfoil indicates stability of symmetric solutions of the Euler equations at conditions where buffet is found from unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Euler solutions of the same airfoil but modified to include the displacement thickness of the boundary layer computed from the Navier-Stokes equations, however, exhibit instability based on the present linear stability analysis. Graduate Student.

  14. Modeling of Airfoil Trailing Edge Flap with Immersed Boundary Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    to simulate the moving part of the trailing edge. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique whereas the moving trailing edge flap is simulated with the immersed boundary method on a curvilinear mesh. The obtained...

  15. Numerical simulation of airfoil trailing edge serration noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    In the present work, numerical simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with and without serrated Trailing Edge. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy is implemented into the in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity...

  16. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free ...

  17. Decomposing the aerodynamic forces of low-Reynolds flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriche, Manuel; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Flores, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of flow around flapping NACA0012 airfoils at relatively small Reynolds numbers, Re = 1000 . The simulations are carried out with TUCAN, an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible flow with an immersed boundary method to model the presence of the airfoil. The motion of the airfoil is composed of a vertical translation, heaving, and a rotation about the quarter of the chord, pitching. Both motions are prescribed by sinusoidal laws, with a reduced frequency of k = 1 . 41 , a pitching amplitude of 30deg and a heaving amplitude of one chord. Both, the mean pitch angle and the phase shift between pitching and heaving motions are varied, to build a database with 18 configurations. Four of these cases are analysed in detail using the force decomposition algorithm of Chang (1992) and Martín Alcántara et al. (2015). This method decomposes the total aerodynamic force into added-mass (translation and rotation of the airfoil), a volumetric contribution from the vorticity (circulatory effects) and a surface contribution proportional to viscosity. In particular we will focus on the second, analysing the contribution of the leading and trailing edge vortices that typically appear in these flows. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P. The authors thankfully acknowledge the computer resources provided by the Red Española de Supercomputacion.

  18. Airfoil Trailing Edge Noise Generation and Its Surface Pressure Fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flows over a NACA 0015 airfoil is performed. The purpose of such numerical study is to relate the aerodynamic surface pressure with the noise generation. The results from LES are validated against detailed surface pressure measurements...

  19. Large Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  20. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.;

    2016-01-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3 × ...

  1. Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoil Self-Noise at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocheemoolayil, Joseph; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-11-01

    The trailing edge noise section (Category 1) of the Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC) workshop features five canonical problems. No first-principles based approach free of empiricism and tunable coefficients has successfully predicted trailing edge noise for the five configurations to date. Our simulations predict trailing edge noise accurately for all five configurations. The simulation database is described in detail, highlighting efforts undertaken to validate the results through systematic comparison with dedicated experiments and establish insensitivity to grid resolution, domain size, alleatory uncertainties such as the tripping mechanism used to force transition to turbulence and epistemic uncertainties such as models for unresolved near-wall turbulence. Ongoing efforts to extend the predictive capability to non-canonical configurations featuring flow separation are summarized. A novel, large-span calculation that predicts the flow past a wind turbine airfoil in deep stall with unprecedented accuracy is presented. The simulations predict airfoil noise in the near-stall regime accurately. While the post-stall noise predictions leave room for improvement, significant uncertainties in the experiment might preclude a fair comparison in this regime. We thank Cascade Technologies Inc. for providing access to the CharLES toolkit - a massively-parallel, unstructured large eddy simulation framework.

  2. Robust Airfoil Optimization with Multi-objective Estimation of Distribution Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xiaoping; Ding Jifeng; Li Weiji; Zhang Yong

    2008-01-01

    A transonic airfoil designed by means of classical point-optimization may result in its dramatically inferior performance under off-design conditious. To overcome this shortcoming, robust design is proposed to fred out the optimal profile of an airfoil to maintain its performance in an uncertain environment. The robust airfoil optimization is aimed to minimize mean values and variances of drag coefficients while satisfying the lift and thickness constraints over a range of Maeb numbers. A multi-objective estimation of distribution algorithm is applied to the robust airfoil optimization on the base of the RAE2822 benchmark airfoil. The shape of the airfoil is obtained through superposing ten Hick-Heune shape functions upon the benchmark airfoil. A set of design points is selected according to a uniform design table for aerodynamic evaluation. A Kriging model of drag coefficient is coustrueted with those points to reduce eumputing costs. Over the Maeh range fi'om 0.7 to 0.8, the airfoil generated by the robust optimization has a configuration characterized by supercritical airfoil with low drag coefficients. The small fluctuation in its drag coefficients means that the performance of the robust airfoil is insensitive to variation of Mach number.

  3. The Effect of Aerodynamic Evaluators on the Multi-Objective Optimization of Flatback Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.; Slew, K. Lee; Matida, E.

    2016-09-01

    With the long lengths of today's wind turbine rotor blades, there is a need to reduce the mass, thereby requiring stiffer airfoils, while maintaining the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoils, particularly in the inboard region of the blade where structural demands are highest. Using a genetic algorithm, the multi-objective aero-structural optimization of 30% thick flatback airfoils was systematically performed for a variety of aerodynamic evaluators such as lift-to-drag ratio (Cl/Cd), torque (Ct), and torque-to-thrust ratio (Ct/Cn) to determine their influence on airfoil shape and performance. The airfoil optimized for Ct possessed a 4.8% thick trailing-edge, and a rather blunt leading-edge region which creates high levels of lift and correspondingly, drag. It's ability to maintain similar levels of lift and drag under forced transition conditions proved it's insensitivity to roughness. The airfoil optimized for Cl/Cd displayed relatively poor insensitivity to roughness due to the rather aft-located free transition points. The Ct/Cn optimized airfoil was found to have a very similar shape to that of the Cl/Cd airfoil, with a slightly more blunt leading-edge which aided in providing higher levels of lift and moderate insensitivity to roughness. The influence of the chosen aerodynamic evaluator under the specified conditions and constraints in the optimization of wind turbine airfoils is shown to have a direct impact on the airfoil shape and performance.

  4. Test results of NREL 10M, special-purpose family of thin airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, K.L.; Nelson, V.C.; Wei, Jun [West Texas A& M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Two 25 kW Carter Wind Systems were tested to determine performance differences between production blades and rotors with NREL Special Purpose Thin Airfoils. Blade design, mold preparation, blade production, and testing were conducted. Design tools were created for computer modeling of the blade. The blades had the same twist, taper, and length as production blades. Flap natural frequency was adjusted to be as similar as possible between rotors, as was blade mass, blade center of gravity and rotor moment of inertia. Data collected were; wind speed at hub height, blade root flap & edgewise loads, main shaft torque, azimuth position, teeter angle, yaw angle and electrical power. These data were collected at 128 Hertz for data sets of eight seconds. This data set was then written to hard disk and the cycle repeated resulting in a file containing five and one half minutes of data. A data run consisted of; preflight checkout/warm-up of equipment, preflight calibration/verification of all sensors on both turbines, collection of five files of data (about thirty minutes of data), post flight calibration/verification of sensors. During this high speed data collection period there were a total of twenty-four data runs collected. Data were collected for wind speeds in the range about 7, 10 and 13 m/s. A data matrix was filled for clean, medium and heavy surface roughness. Baseline power curves, parametric pitch variation runs to establish testing pitch settings, high speed data collection runs with and without applied surface roughness were completed and analyzed. Data were compared using simple arithmetic mean, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis, rainflow counting algorithms and wavelet analysis. The NREL airfoils showed much less sensitivity to surface roughness. There were minimal root bending load differences. Annual energy production during long term operation is being determined. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  6. Mechanisms of sound amplification and sound reduction in the flapping flight of side-by-side airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, A.; Halachmi, M.

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic signature of side-by-side airfoils, subject to small-amplitude harmonic pitching and incoming flow unsteadiness, is investigated. The two-dimensional near-field problem is formulated using thin-airfoil theory, where flow unsteadiness is modeled as a passing line vortex, and wake evolution is calculated via the Brown and Michael formula. Assuming that the setup is acoustically compact, acoustic radiation is obtained by means of the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. The associated compact Green's function is calculated numerically using potential-flow analysis of the fluid-structure flow domain. Results, comparing the acoustic radiation of the double-airfoil system to a reference case of a single airfoil, point to several mechanisms of sound attenuation and sound amplification, caused by airfoil-airfoil and airfoils-wake interactions. It is found that counter-phase pitching of the airfoils results in effective cloaking of the system, which otherwise becomes significantly noisy (as a 5/2-power of the pitching frequency) at large frequencies. In addition, depending on the distance between airfoils, in-phase pitching may result in an acoustic signature equivalent to a single airfoil (when the airfoils are adjacent) or to two separate airfoils (when the airfoils are far apart). In general, flow unsteadiness produces more sound when interacting with a double (compared with a single) airfoil setup. However, airfoils' nonlinear wake-wake interactions give rise to a sound reduction mechanism, which becomes most efficient at times when incoming vorticity passes above airfoils' leading and trailing edges. The present scheme can be readily extended to consider the acoustic properties of various double-airfoil configurations, as well as multiple (> 2) airfoil setups.

  7. Ice-induced unsteady flowfield effects on airfoil performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbacki, Holly Marie

    Numerical prediction of iced-airfoil performance prior to and at maximum lift is often inaccurate due to large-scale flow unsteadiness. New computational models are being developed to improve predictions of complex separated flowfields; however, experimental data are required to improve and validate these algorithms. The objective of this investigation was to examine the unsteady flow behavior and the time-dependent performance of an iced airfoil to determine the flowfield characteristics with the most influence on airfoil performance, especially near stall. A NACA 0012 airfoil with two-dimensional and three-dimensional leading-edge simulated glaze ice shapes was tested in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers 1.8 x 106 and 1.0 x 106. Time-dependent surface pressure measurements were used to calculate root-mean-square lift and quarter-chord pitching-moment coefficients. Surface and flowfield visualization and wake hot-wire data were acquired. Spectral, correlation and phase-angle analyses were performed. The most significant unsteady flowfield effect on the iced-airfoil performance was a low-frequency flow phenomenon on the order of 10 Hz that resulted in Strouhal numbers of 0.0048--0.0101. The low-frequency oscillation produced large-scale pressure fluctuations nears eparation at high angles of attack and elevated lift and moment fluctuations as low as alpha = 4°. The low-frequency motion of surface pressure coefficients convected downstream at velocities 4%--34% of the freestream value and in one case, upstream at 0.18Uinfinity. The iced-airfoil flowfield exhibited a separation bubble of varying thickness and fluctuating reattachment, characteristics similar to those associated with the low-frequency shear-layer flapping and bubble growth and decay of other separated and reattached flows. Vortex structures observed in the shear layer were presumed to be the cause of large-scale pressure fluctuations upstream of reattachment at small angles of attack. Pressure

  8. Vortex Interaction and Roll-Up in Unsteady Flow past Tandem Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete vortex model coupled with a vortex dissipation and vortex core criteria is used to study the unsteady flow past two airfoils in configuration. The unsteady wakes of the airfoils are modeled by discrete vortices and time-stepping is used to predict the individual wake shapes. The coupled flow is solved using a combined zero-normal flow boundary condition and Kelvin condition which result in (2N + 2X(2N + 2 equations. Results are presented showing the effect of airfoil-airfoil and airfoil-wake interaction on the aerodynamic characteristics of the configuration. The effect of relative velocity, rate of pitching and phase-lag are studied on airfoil performance and wake shape is predicted.

  9. Experimental verification of the new RISOe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, K.S.; Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper concerns the experimental verification of a new airfoil family for wind turbines. The family consist of airfoils in the relative thickness range from 15% to 30%. Three airfoils, Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21, and Risoe-A1-24 were tested in a wind tunnel. The verification consisted of both static and dynamic measurements. Here, the static results are presented for a Reynolds number of 1.6x10{sup 6} for the following airfoil configurations: smooth surface (all three airfoils) and Risoe-A1-24 mounted with leading edge roughness, vortex generators, and Gurney-flaps, respectively. All three airfoils have constant lift curve slope and almost constant drag coefficient until the maximum lift coefficient of about 1.4 is reached. The experimental results are compared with corresponding computational from the general purpose flow solver, EllipSys2D, showing good agreement. (au)

  10. An Experimental Investigation of the Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Characteristics of a Circulation-Controlled Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    sound production from a hydrofoil and identified three mechanisms: (1) low frequency curvature noise associated with interaction of a turbulent...2002). 2 Technical Approach A two-dimensional, dual-slotted, elliptic circulation control airfoil based on the hydrofoil studied by Rogers...airfoil, shown in Figure 1A, is designed based on the geometry of the hydrofoil previously studied by Rogers & Donnelly (2004). The airfoil’s profile

  11. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  12. A Theory of Unstaggered Airfoil Cascades in Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Robert A.; Allen, H. Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, rela.tio^as are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord gap ratios, For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low speed flows. Choking of cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  13. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  14. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces on a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by itscamberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory...... of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stabilityanalysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can...

  15. Oscillatory Behavior of an Arc Airfoil in Low-Speed Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molki, Majid; Sattari, Negin

    2011-11-01

    A computational investigation is conducted to study the oscillatory behavior of an arc airfoil situated in low-speed airflow. The present work is relevant to situations where the conventional rigid airfoils do not apply, such as the flight of bats. The outcome of this study is also beneficial in the design of micro air vehicles with flexible wings. The computations are performed using a deforming mesh to accommodate the airfoil oscillations. An unsteady, spatially second-order algorithm is employed to capture the time-variations of the lift and drag coefficients. A key feature of the present work is the flow response to airfoil oscillations. Fast Fourier Transform was applied to various parameters of the flow. For certain values of angle of attack for the non-oscillating airfoil, the flow has a dominant frequency and a well-defined vortex shedding. For other values of angle of attack, the flow around the non-oscillating airfoil contains many frequencies and has complex vortical structures. However, the oscillating airfoil in all cases makes the flow field periodic with well-defined patterns of vortex shedding. In this work, the flux of vorticity from the airfoil surface into the airflow is computed and compared with the pressure gradient along the surface of the airfoil. Effects of oscillations on magnitude and behavior of aerodynamic forces are also studied.

  16. Characterization of the Flow Separation of a Variable Camber Airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen-Chao; WANG Hui; YANG Jian-Ting; YANG Ji-Ming

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the How separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil. The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber: the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall. Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall, while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve. Under flow separation circumstances, the Bow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions, but also the previous flow characteristics, so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.%An experimental investigation is carried out to study the flow separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil.The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber:the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall.Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall,while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve.Under flow separation circumstances,the flow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions,but also the previous flow characteristics,so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.

  17. Leading-Edge "Pop-Up" Spoiler For Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John C.; Lance, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    New concept places spoiler in leading edge of airfoil, hinged along its trailing edge, so airflow helps to deploy it and force it against mechanical stop. Deployed "pop-up" spoiler quickly eliminates almost all aerodynamic lift of stabilator. Designed to be added to leading edge of existing stabilator, without major rework. Though initial application to be on helicopter stabilators, equally applicable to wings or winglike components.

  18. The S411, S412, and S413 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant...in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that tran- sition on the upper surface will occur very near...the pressure distribution should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the

  19. Design and Experimental Results for the S415 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 8.) This... suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface will occur very near the leading edge. Thus, the...pressure distribution should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a moderately adverse pressure

  20. Design and Experimental Results for the S411 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 8...produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that tran- sition on the upper surface will occur very near the leading edge. Thus...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  1. Design and Experimental Results for the S406 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly...in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface will occur very near...3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar flow

  2. Trailing Edge Noise Model Validation and Application to Airfoil Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, an existing trailing edge noise model is validated by comparing with airfoil surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound pressure levels measured in three different experiments. The agreement is satisfactory in one case but poor in two other cases...... across the boundary layer near the trailing edge and to a lesser extent by a smaller boundary layer displacement thickness. ©2010 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  3. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  4. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  5. 30 CFR 56.4230 - Self-propelled equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-propelled equipment. 56.4230 Section 56... Control Firefighting Equipment § 56.4230 Self-propelled equipment. (a)(1) Whenever a fire or its effects could impede escape from self-propelled equipment, a fire extinguisher shall be on the equipment....

  6. Test section configuration for aerodynamic testing in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the test section configuration required to minimize or alleviate interference effects on model flow produced by the presence of test section walls in the aerodynamic testing of two dimensional transonic airfoils in a shock tube. Tests at a nominal Mach number of 0.85 and a chord Reynolds number of 2,000,000 were carried out by means of schlieren photography and pressure measurements for several symmetric airfoil profiles using shock tube test sections with unmodified straight walls, contoured walls, and slotted walls with adjacent chambers. Results were compared with corresponding results from conventional wind tunnel tests of the airfoils. Results for the straight wall tests show major airfoil flow distortions. Results from contoured wall tests and those performed using a slotted wall test section developed in this study exhibit essential agreement with wind tunnel results. The collective results show that test sections for aerodynamic testing can be designed for shock tubes that will alleviate wall interference effects.

  7. Simulasi Numerik Dynamic Stall Pada Airfoil Yang Berosilasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih S.T.A. Bangga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan analisa pada sudu helikopter, kompresor, kincir angin dan struktur streamline lainya yang beroperasi pada angle of attack yang tinggi dan melibatkan instationary effects yang disebut dynamic stall menjadi semakin penting. Fenomena ini ditandai dengan naiknya dynamic lift melewati static lift maksimum pada critical static stall angle, vortex yang terbentuk pada leading edge mengakibatkan naiknya suction contribution yang kemudian terkonveksi sepanjang permukaan hingga mencapai trailling edge diikuti terbentuknya trailling edge vortex yang menunjukkan terjadinya lift stall. Fenomena ini sangat berbahaya terhadap struktur airfoil itu sendiri. Secara umum, beban fatique yang ditimbulkan oleh adanya efek histerisis karena fluktuasi gaya lift akibat induksi vibrasi lebih besar dibandingkan kondisi statis. Simulasi numerik dilakukan secara 2D dengan menggunakan profil Boeing-Vertol V23010-1.58 pada α0 = 14.92°. Standard-kω dan SST-kω digunakan sebagai URANS turbulence modelling. Model osilasi dari airfoil disusun dalam suatu user defined function (UDF. Gerakan meshing beserta airfoil diakomodasi dengan menggunakan dynamic mesh approach. Simulasi numerik menunjukkan bahwa, model SST-kω menunjukkan performa yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan Standard-kω. Fenomena travelling vortex yang terjadi mampu ditangkap dengan baik, meski pada angle of attack yang tinggi URANS turbulence model gagal memprediksikan fenomena yang terjadi karena dominasi efek 3D.

  8. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  9. Prediction of Film Cooling on Gas Turbine Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis tool has been developed in order to study the effect of film cooling on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of actual turbine airfoils. An existing code (Arnone et al., 1991) has been modified for the purpose. The code is an explicit, multigrid, cell-centered, finite volume code with an algebraic turbulence model. Eigenvalue scaled artificial dissipation and variable-coefficient implicit residual smoothing are used with a full-multigrid technique. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (Mayle, 1991) is used. The effects of film cooling have been incorporated into the code in the form of appropriate boundary conditions at the hole locations on the airfoil surface. Each hole exit is represented by several control volumes, thus providing an ability to study the effect of hole shape on the film-cooling characteristics. Comparison is fair with near mid-span experimental data for four and nine rows of cooling holes, five on the shower head, and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. The computations, however, show a strong spanwise variation of the heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil surface, specially with shower-head cooling.

  10. RANS Simulations of Aerodynamic Performance of NACA 0015 Flapped Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Obeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of 2D subsonic flow over an NACA 0015 airfoil with a 30% trailing edge flap at a constant Reynolds number of 106 for various incidence angles and a range of flap deflections is presented. The steady-state governing equations of continuity and momentum conservation are solved combined with the realizable k-ε turbulence model using the ANSYS-Fluent code (Version 13.7, ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA. The primary objective of the study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of flow characteristics around the NACA 0015 airfoil as a function of the angle of attack and flap deflection at Re = 106 using the realizable k-ε turbulence model. The results are validated through comparison of the predictions with the free field experimental measurements. Consistent with the experimental observations, the numerical results show that increased flap deflections increase the maximum lift coefficient, move the zero-lift angle of attack (AoA to a more negative value, decrease the stall AoA, while the slope of the lift curve remains unchanged and the curve just shifts upwards. In addition, the numerical simulations provide limits for lift increment Δ C l and Cl, max values to be 1.1 and 2.2, respectively, obtained at a flap deflection of 50°. This investigation demonstrates that the realizable k-ε turbulence model is capable of predicting flow features over an airfoil with and without flap deflections with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Performance Trades Study for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    From time to time, existing aircraft need to be redesigned for new missions with modified operating conditions such as required lift or cruise speed. This research is motivated by the needs of conceptual and preliminary design teams for smooth airfoil shapes that are similar to the baseline design but have improved drag performance over a range of flight conditions. The proposed modified profile optimization method (MPOM) modifies a large number of design variables to search for nonintuitive performance improvements, while avoiding off-design performance degradation. Given a good initial design, the MPOM generates fairly smooth airfoils that are better than the baseline without making drastic shape changes. Moreover, the MPOM allows users to gain valuable information by exploring performance trades over various design conditions. Four simulation cases of airfoil optimization in transonic viscous ow are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the MPOM as a performance trades study tool. Simulation results are obtained by solving fully turbulent Navier-Stokes equations and the corresponding discrete adjoint equations using an unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics code FUN2D.

  12. Used equipment-standard contract elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary F. Alexander

    2004-01-01

    @@ One thing that both the purchase of new and used equipment has in common is the need for a comprehensive purchase agreement. The big difference is that while repetitive purchases of new equipment often only require the modification of one or more sections of a contract, every used equipment transaction and contract is normally different.

  13. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hydraulic equipment and the adjacent work area. Protection shall be afforded to the operator of hydraulic... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ditching equipment. 23.1415 Section 23.1415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Ditching equipment. (a) Emergency flotation and signaling equipment required by any operating rule in...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1914 - Electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical equipment. 77.1914 Section 77.1914... Shaft Sinking § 77.1914 Electrical equipment. (a) Electric equipment employed below the collar of a.... (b) The insulation of all electric conductors employed below the collar of any slope or shaft...

  16. 46 CFR 121.210 - Heating equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating equipment. 121.210 Section 121.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 121.210 Heating equipment. (a) Each heater must be...

  17. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.952 - Mechanical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Power Transmission and Distribution § 1926.952 Mechanical equipment. (a) General. (1) Visual inspections shall be made of the equipment to determine that it... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical equipment. 1926.952 Section 1926.952...

  19. Drilling equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, Yu.M.; Kholosha, Ye.G.; Leshchenko, A.G.; Timchenko, A.I.

    1979-01-10

    The invention refers to units designed for extracting minerals by mechanical action on the face by a cutting tool. There is a known drills which includes a pulse device which contains a combustion chamber, cylinder, piston-percussion tool and cutting tool. The combustion chamber and the sub-piston cavity of the cylinder are connected by a channel in which there is a distributor. Its shortcoming is the fact that the pulse device does not guarantee the necessary motion of the actuating mechanism for its velocity and frequency of the shocks on the cutting tool. This reduces the efficiency of the operation and limits the area of application. The purpose of the proposed invention is to improve productivity of the device. This is achieved because the head of the drill is equipped with a 2-piston pulse device which contains 2-combustion chambers, 2 working cylinders, 2 piston percussion instruments, a rod with gas-conducting and connecting channels for interconnection of the sub-piston cavities and combustion chambers of both cylinders. The spent gases of one cylinder are used for closing the combustion chamber of the second cylinder.

  20. Numerical study of Wavy Blade Section for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobæk, C. M.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2016-01-01

    relevant for modern wind turbines. The findings in the literature from geometries similar to the hump back whale flipper indicate that the aerodynamic performance can be improved at high angles of attack, but sometimes at the expense of a lower lift slope and increased drag before stall. The numerical...... results for a blade section based on the S809 airfoil are, however, not as promising as some of the findings reported in the literature for the whale flipper at high angles of attack. These first CFD computations using a thicker airfoil and a higher Reynolds number than the whale flipper indicate...

  1. Russian Laminar Flow Airfoils 3rd Part: Measurements on the Profile No. 2315 BIS with Ava-Nose Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegels, F.

    1947-01-01

    The tests on the Russian airfoil 2315 Bis were continued. This airfoil shows, according to Moscow tests, good laminar flow characteristics. Several tests were prepared in the large wind tunnel at Gottingen; partial results were obtained.

  2. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade......Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...

  3. 46 CFR 154.1430 - Equipment locker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment locker. 154.1430 Section 154.1430 Shipping... Equipment § 154.1430 Equipment locker. One of each item of equipment under §§ 154.1400 and 154.1420 must be stowed in a marked locker: (a) On the open deck in or adjacent to the cargo area; or (b) In...

  4. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu≁oz, A.; Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations.

  5. Aquatic Equipment Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, Ruth

    Equipment usually used in water exercise programs is designed for variety, intensity, and program necessity. This guide discusses aquatic equipment under the following headings: (1) equipment design; (2) equipment principles; (3) precautions and contraindications; (4) population contraindications; and (5) choosing equipment. Equipment is used…

  6. Design and Experimental Validation of Thick Airfoils for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrgovan, Iva; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, two new airfoils with thickness to chord ratios of 30 and 36 % are presented, which were designed with an objective of good aerodynamic and structural features. Airfoil design is based on a direct method using shape perturbation function. The optimization algorithm is coupled wit...

  7. Hybrid immersed boundary method for airfoils with a trailing-edge flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Behrens, Tim; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid immersed boundary technique has been developed for simulating turbulent flows past airfoils with moving trailing-edge flaps. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil, the equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique, whereas the moving trailing-...

  8. A Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Performance and Noise of a Bionic Airfoil Based on Owl Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noise reduction and efficiency enhancement are the two important directions in the development of the multiblade centrifugal fan. In this study, we attempt to develop a bionic airfoil based on the owl wing and investigate its aerodynamic performance and noise-reduction mechanism at the relatively low Reynolds number. Firstly, according to the geometric characteristics of the owl wing, a bionic airfoil is constructed as the object of study at Reynolds number of 12,300. Secondly, the large eddy simulation (LES with the Smagorinsky model is adopted to numerically simulate the unsteady flow fields around the bionic airfoil and the standard NACA0006 airfoil. And then, the acoustic sources are extracted from the unsteady flow field data, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H equation based on Lighthill's acoustic theory is solved to predict the propagation of these acoustic sources. The numerical results show that the lift-to-drag ratio of bionic airfoil is higher than that of the traditional NACA 0006 airfoil because of its deeply concave lower surface geometry. Finally, the sound field of the bionic airfoil is analyzed in detail. The distribution of the A-weighted sound pressure levels, the scaled directivity of the sound, and the distribution of dP/dt on the airfoil surface are provided so that the characteristics of the acoustic sources could be revealed.

  9. Study of laminar boundary layer instability noise study on a controlled diffusion airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Prateek; Sanjose, Marlene; Moreau, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Detailed experimental study has been carried out on a Controlled Diffusion (CD) airfoil at 5° angle of attack and at chord based Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 . All the measurements were done in an open-jet anechoic wind tunnel. The airfoil mock-up is held between two side plates, to keep the flow two-dimensional. PIV measurements have been performed in the wake and on the boundary layer of the airfoil. Pressure sensor probes on the airfoil were used to detect mean airfoil loading and remote microphone probes were used to measure unsteady pressure fluctuations on the surface of the airfoil. Furthermore the far field acoustic pressure was measured using an 1/2 inch ICP microphone. The results confirm very later transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent boundary layer on the suction side of the airfoil. The process of transition of laminar to turbulent boundary layer comprises of turbulent reattachment of a separated shear layer. The pressure side of the boundary layer is found to be laminar and stable. Therefore tonal noise generated is attributed to events on suction side of the airfoil. The flow transition and emission of tones are further investigated in detail thanks to the complementary DNS study.

  10. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  11. Cost Reduction of Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Rethore, Pierre-Elouan

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses simulations of airfoil flows by use of computational fluid dynamics. In recent work large eddy simulations (LES) of airfoil flows have proved superior to detached eddy simulations (DES); by resolving the inflow turbulence the agreement with experiments is improved. The scope...

  12. Modelling of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics for the prediction of blade standstill vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, CFD simulations of the DU96-W-180 airfoil at 26 and 24 deg. angles of attack were performed. 2D RANS and 3D DES computations with non-moving and prescribed motion airfoil suspensions were carried out. The openings of the lift coefficient loops predicted by CFD were different...

  13. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are ana...

  14. Light Imaging Section

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Light Imaging Section is to give NIAMS scientists access to state-of-the-art light imaging equipment and to offer training and assistance at all...

  15. Wind turbine blade vibration at standstill conditions — the effect of imposing lag on the aerodynamic response of an elastically mounted airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated physical phenomena related to stall-induced vibrations potentially existing on wind turbine blades at standstill conditions. The study considered two-dimensional airfoil sections while it omitted three-dimensional effects. In the study, a new engineering-type comput......The present study investigated physical phenomena related to stall-induced vibrations potentially existing on wind turbine blades at standstill conditions. The study considered two-dimensional airfoil sections while it omitted three-dimensional effects. In the study, a new engineering......-type computational model for the aeroelastic response of an elastically mounted airfoil was used to investigate the influence of temporal lag in the aerodynamic response on the aeroelastic stability in deep stall. The study indicated that even a relatively low lag significantly increases the damping of the model...... of the influence of the added mass terms showed that only the pitch-rate and flapwise-acceleration terms have any influence on the stability. An investigation of three different profiles showed that the stability is heavily dependent on the aerodynamic characteristics of the profiles—mainly on the lift...

  16. PIV MEASUREMENTS OF THE NEAR-WAKE FLOW OF AN AIRFOIL ABOVE A FREE SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The near-wake flow of a NACA0012 airfoils mounted above a water surface were experimentally studied in a wind/wave tunnel. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the free surface on the structure of the airfoil trailing wake. The flow structure was measured with different ride heights between the airfoil and free surface using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The Reynolds number based on the chord length of the airfoil was about 3.5×103. For each experimental condition, large amount of instantaneous velocity fields were captured and ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of mean velocity and mean vorticity, as well as turbulence statistics. The results show that the flow structures of the airfoil wake varies remarkably with the change in the ride height.

  17. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  18. Equipment for gas conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    1983-01-28

    Equipment is proposed for vapor conversion of hydrocarbons (Uv), possibly in a mixture with air, in order to produce an inorganic gas, which chiefly consists of H2 and COx. It consists of a reaction pipe made of an inorganic refractory ceramic and equipped along the wall circumference with heaters. The reaction pipe is filled with a combined, multilayer catalyst (Kt) carrier, made of gamma-A1203 which in the transverse cross section has a multipore reticular or fibrous structure. Replacement of the traditional steel (St) materials for the walls of the reaction pipe with ceramic materials reduces the output of the hydrocarbon which contaminates the surface (Pv) of the catalyst; the use of a multilayer carrier for the catalyst made of gamma-A1203 with a porous reticular or fibrous structure reduces the pressure losses in the reactor and facilitates the replacement of the spent catalyst. The equipment is designed for vapor conversion of natural gas, C3H8, and vapors of kerosene, naphtha and so on.

  19. Airfoil shape optimization using non-traditional optimization technique and its validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mukesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is one of the computer-based solution methods which is more widely employed in aerospace engineering. The computational power and time required to carry out the analysis increase as the fidelity of the analysis increases. Aerodynamic shape optimization has become a vital part of aircraft design in the recent years. Generally if we want to optimize an airfoil we have to describe the airfoil and for that, we need to have at least hundred points of x and y co-ordinates. It is really difficult to optimize airfoils with this large number of co-ordinates. Nowadays many different schemes of parameter sets are used to describe general airfoil such as B-spline, and PARSEC. The main goal of these parameterization schemes is to reduce the number of needed parameters as few as possible while controlling the important aerodynamic features effectively. Here the work has been done on the PARSEC geometry representation method. The objective of this work is to introduce the knowledge of describing general airfoil using twelve parameters by representing its shape as a polynomial function. And also we have introduced the concept of Genetic Algorithm to optimize the aerodynamic characteristics of a general airfoil for specific conditions. A MATLAB program has been developed to implement PARSEC, Panel Technique, and Genetic Algorithm. This program has been tested for a standard NACA 2411 airfoil and optimized to improve its coefficient of lift. Pressure distribution and co-efficient of lift for airfoil geometries have been calculated using the Panel method. The optimized airfoil has improved co-efficient of lift compared to the original one. The optimized airfoil is validated using wind tunnel data.

  20. Unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Jeppe

    1999-09-01

    The present report describes numerical investigation of two-dimensional unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability. The report is divided in two parts. Part A describes the purely aerodynamic part, while Part B includes the aeroelastic part. In Part A a transition prediction algorithm based on a simplified version of the e{sup n} method is proposed. Laminar Boundary Layer instability data are stored in a database from which stability characteristics can be extracted by interpolation. Input to the database are laminar integral boundary layer parameters. These are computed from an integral boundary layer formulation coupled to a Navier-Stokes flow solver. Five different airfoils are considered at fixed angle of attack, and the flow is computed assuming both fully turbulent and transitional flow and compared with experimental data. Results indicate that using a transition model the drag prediction is improved considerably. Also the lift is slightly improved. At high angles of attack transition will affect leading edge separation which again will affect the overall vortex shedding. If the transition point is not properly predicted this will affect the whole hysteresis curve. The transition model developed in the present work showed more stable predictions compared to the empirical transition model. In Part B a simple three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) structural dynamics model is developed and coupled to the aerodynamics models from Part A. A 2nd order accurate time integration scheme is used to solve the equations of motion. Two airfoils are investigated. The aeroelastic models predict stable conditions well at low angle of attack. But at high angles of attack, and where unstable behaviour is expected, only the Navier-Stokes solver predict correct aeroelastic response. The semi-empirical dynamic stall model does not predict vortex shedding and moment correctly leading to an erroneous aerodynamic damping. (au) 5 tabs.; 55 ills., 52 refs.

  1. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  2. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3...... × 106 and 15 × 106. The necessary grid resolution, domain size, and iterative convergence criteria to have consistent results are discussed, and suggestions are given for best practice. For the fully turbulent results four out of seven codes provide consistent results. For the laminar...

  3. The S407, S409, and S410 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    coefficient at point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is...feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  4. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  5. 9 CFR 590.502 - Equipment and utensils; PCB-containing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment and utensils; PCB-containing equipment. 590.502 Section 590.502 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.502 Equipment and utensils;...

  6. 47 CFR 15.607 - Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment. 15.607 Section 15.607 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.607 Equipment authorization of Access...

  7. Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing using Polynomial Chaos Expansions

    CERN Document Server

    DeGennaro, Anthony M; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of a wing can be detrimental to airplane performance. Complicating this reality is the fact that even a small amount of uncertainty in the shape of the accreted ice may result in a large amount of uncertainty in aerodynamic performance metrics (e.g., stall angle of attack). The main focus of this work concerns using the techniques of Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE) to quantify icing uncertainty much more quickly than traditional methods (e.g., Monte Carlo). First, we present a brief survey of the literature concerning the physics of wing icing, with the intention of giving a certain amount of intuition for the physical process. Next, we give a brief overview of the background theory of PCE. Finally, we compare the results of Monte Carlo simulations to PCE-based uncertainty quantification for several different airfoil icing scenarios. The results are in good agreement and confirm that PCE methods are much more efficient for the canonical airfoil icing un...

  8. Evaluation of Icing Scaling on Swept NACA 0012 Airfoil Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Lee, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Icing scaling tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were performed on swept wing models using existing recommended scaling methods that were originally developed for straight wing. Some needed modifications on the stagnation-point local collection efficiency (i.e., beta(sub 0) calculation and the corresponding convective heat transfer coefficient for swept NACA 0012 airfoil models have been studied and reported in 2009, and the correlations will be used in the current study. The reference tests used a 91.4-cm chord, 152.4-cm span, adjustable sweep airfoil model of NACA 0012 profile at velocities of 100 and 150 knot and MVD of 44 and 93 mm. Scale-to-reference model size ratio was 1:2.4. All tests were conducted at 0deg angle of attack (AoA) and 45deg sweep angle. Ice shape comparison results were presented for stagnation-point freezing fractions in the range of 0.4 to 1.0. Preliminary results showed that good scaling was achieved for the conditions test by using the modified scaling methods developed for swept wing icing.

  9. Implementation of CPFD to Control Active and Passive Airfoil Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay; Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of biologically-inspired flapping propulsion provides a fertile testing ground for the field of unsteady aerodynamics, serving as important groundwork for the design and development of fast, mobile underwater vehicles and flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs). There has been a recent surge of interest in these technologies as they provide low cost, compact, and maneuverable means for terrain mapping, search and rescue operations, and reconnaissance. Propulsion by unsteady motions has been fundamentally modeled with an airfoil that heaves and pitches, and previous work has been done to show that actively controlling these motions can generate high thrust and efficiency (Read, Hover & Triantafyllou 2003). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil with an actuated heave motion coupled with a passively controlled pitch motion created by simulating the presence of a torsional spring using our cyber-physical fluid dynamics (CPFD) approach (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016). By using passively controlled pitch, we have effectively eliminated an actuator, decreasing cost and mass, an important step for developing efficient vehicles. In many cases, we have achieved comparable or superior thrust and efficiency values to those obtained using two actively controlled degrees of freedom. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  10. A strong viscous–inviscid interaction model for rotating airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    a boundary-layer trip or computed using an en envelope transition method. Validation of the incompressible 2D version of the code is carried out against measurements and other numerical codes for different airfoil geometries at various Reynolds numbers, ranging from 0.9 ⋅ 106 to 8.2 ⋅ 106. In the quasi-3D......Two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three dimensional (3D), steady and unsteady, viscous–inviscid interactive codes capable of predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbine airfoils are presented. The model is based on a viscous–inviscid interaction technique using strong coupling between...... the viscous and inviscid parts. The inviscid part is modeled by a 2D panel method, and the viscous part is modeled by solving the integral form of the laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations with extension for 3D rotational effects. Laminar-to-turbulent transition is either forced by employing...

  11. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jun Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989. It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model.

  12. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  13. A unified viscous theory of lift and drag of 2-D thin airfoils and 3-D thin wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A unified viscous theory of 2-D thin airfoils and 3-D thin wings is developed with numerical examples. The viscous theory of the load distribution is unique and tends to the classical inviscid result with Kutta condition in the high Reynolds number limit. A new theory of 2-D section induced drag is introduced with specific applications to three cases of interest: (1) constant angle of attack; (2) parabolic camber; and (3) a flapped airfoil. The first case is also extended to a profiled leading edge foil. The well-known drag due to absence of leading edge suction is derived from the viscous theory. It is independent of Reynolds number for zero thickness and varies inversely with the square root of the Reynolds number based on the leading edge radius for profiled sections. The role of turbulence in the section induced drag problem is discussed. A theory of minimum section induced drag is derived and applied. For low Reynolds number the minimum drag load tends to the constant angle of attack solution and for high Reynolds number to an approximation of the parabolic camber solution. The parabolic camber section induced drag is about 4 percent greater than the ideal minimum at high Reynolds number. Two new concepts, the viscous induced drag angle and the viscous induced separation potential are introduced. The separation potential is calculated for three 2-D cases and for a 3-D rectangular wing. The potential is calculated with input from a standard doublet lattice wing code without recourse to any boundary layer calculations. Separation is indicated in regions where it is observed experimentally. The classical induced drag is recovered in the 3-D high Reynolds number limit with an additional contribution that is Reynold number dependent. The 3-D viscous theory of minimum induced drag yields an equation for the optimal spanwise and chordwise load distribution. The design of optimal wing tip planforms and camber distributions is possible with the viscous 3-D wing theory.

  14. Parametric analyses for synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guoqing; Zhao Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoils. The preconditioned and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with akxshear stream transport turbulence model are employed to accomplish the flowfield simulation of rotor airfoils under jet control. Additionally, a velocity boundary condition modeled by a sinusoidal function is developed to fulfill the perturba-tion effect of periodic jets. The validity of the present CFD procedure is evaluated by the simulated results of an isolated synthetic jet and the jet control case for airfoil NACA0015. Then, parametric analyses are conducted specifically for an OA213 rotor airfoil to investigate the effects of jet param-eters (forcing frequency, jet location and momentum coefficient, jet direction, and distribution of jet arrays) on the control effect of the aerodynamic characteristics of a rotor airfoil. Preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of jet control can be improved with specific frequencies (the best lift-drag ratio at F+=2.0) and jet angles (40? or 75?) when the jets are located near the separation point of the rotor airfoil. Furthermore, as a result of a suitable combination of jet arrays, the lift coefficient of the airfoil can be improved by nearly 100%, and the corresponding drag coefficient decreased by 26.5%in comparison with the single point control case.

  15. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces and a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-07-15

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can be used for various applications which up to now have been possible only using much more computational costly methods. The propulsive performance of a soft heaving propulsor, and the influence of airfoil camberline elasticity on the flutter limit are two computational examples given in the report that highlight this feature. (au)

  16. Numerical Analysis of Wind Turbine Airfoil Aerodynamic Performance with Leading Edge Bump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic performance improvement of wind turbine blade is the key process to improve wind turbine performance in electricity generated and energy conversion in renewable energy sources concept. The flow behavior on wind turbine blades profile and the relevant phenomena like stall can be improved by some modifications. In the present paper, Humpback Whales flippers leading edge protuberances model as a novel passive stall control method was investigated on S809 as a thick airfoil. The airfoil was numerically analyzed by CFD method in Reynolds number of 106 and aerodynamic coefficients in static angle of attacks were validated with the experimental data reported by Somers in NREL. Therefore, computational results for modified airfoil with sinusoidal wavy leading edge were presented. The results revealed that, at low angles of attacks before the stall region, lift coefficient decreases slightly rather than baseline model. However, the modified airfoil has a smooth stall trend while baseline airfoil lift coefficient decreases sharply due to the separation which occurred on suction side. According to the flow physics over the airfoils, leading edge bumps act as vortex generator so vortices containing high level of momentum make the flow remain attached to the surface of the airfoil at high angle of attack and prevent it from having a deep stall.

  17. On the influence of airfoil deviations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstroth, J.; Seume, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The manufacture of large wind turbine rotor blades is a difficult task that still involves a certain degree of manual labor. Due to the complexity, airfoil deviations between the design airfoils and the manufactured blade are certain to arise. Presently, the understanding of the impact of manufacturing uncertainties on the aerodynamic performance is still incomplete. The present work analyzes the influence of a series of airfoil deviations likely to occur during manufacturing by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the aeroelastic code FAST. The average power production of the NREL 5MW wind turbine is used to evaluate the different airfoil deviations. Analyzed deviations include: Mold tilt towards the leading and trailing edge, thick bond lines, thick bond lines with cantilever correction, backward facing steps and airfoil waviness. The most severe influences are observed for mold tilt towards the leading and thick bond lines. By applying the cantilever correction, the influence of thick bond lines is almost compensated. Airfoil waviness is very dependent on amplitude height and the location along the surface of the airfoil. Increased influence is observed for backward facing steps, once they are high enough to trigger boundary layer transition close to the leading edge.

  18. Effects of relative thickness on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at a low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Dongli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characteristics of low Reynolds number flow around airfoil of high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (HAUAVs cruising at low speed. Numerical simulation on the flows around several representative airfoils is carried out to investigate the low Reynolds number flow. The water tunnel model tests further validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the numerical method. Then the effects of the relative thickness of airfoil on aerodynamic performance are explored, using the above numerical method, by simulating flows around airfoils of different relative thicknesses (12%, 14%, 16%, 18%, as well as different locations of the maximum relative thickness (x/c = 22%, 26%, 30%, 34%, at a low Reynolds number of 5 × 105. Results show that performance of airfoils at low Reynolds number is mainly affected by the laminar separation bubble. On the premise of good stall characteristics, the value of maximum relative thickness should be as small as possible, and the location of the maximum relative thickness ought to be closer to the trailing edge to obtain fine airfoil performance. The numerical method is feasible for the simulation of low Reynolds number flow. The study can help to provide a basis for the design of low Reynolds number airfoil.

  19. Experimental Study of Thin and Thick Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Garcia, Elifalet; Johari, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    A recent surge in applications of unmanned air vehicles in various fields has led to increased interest in understanding the characteristics of airfoils at Reynolds number regime ~104. At these low Re numbers, aerodynamics of an airfoil is influenced by laminar separation and its possible reattachment, which is in contrast to airfoil behavior at high Re numbers. This study focused on comparing the load characteristics of symmetric, thin (NACA-0009) and thick (NACA-0021) airfoils at low Re numbers ~2 - 4 × 104, and angles of attack between 2° to 12°, along with simultaneous flow visualization. The experiments were performed in a low speed flow visualization water tunnel facility, and two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to quantify the inflow conditions and turbulence intensity. A high precision force/torque transducer was used for the load measurements, while hydrogen bubble technique was used for flow visualization on the suction side of the airfoils. The presentation will discuss the correlation between observed flow structures and instantaneous load on the airfoils, as well as the aerodynamic load characteristics of thin and thick airfoils at low Re numbers.

  20. 7 CFR 58.222 - Dry dairy product cooling equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry dairy product cooling equipment. 58.222 Section 58... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.222 Dry dairy product cooling equipment. Cooling equipment shall...

  1. 46 CFR 153.215 - Safety equipment lockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety equipment lockers. 153.215 Section 153.215... Vessel Requirements § 153.215 Safety equipment lockers. Each self-propelled ship must have the following: (a) Each tankship must have at least two safety equipment lockers. (b) One safety equipment...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  5. 14 CFR 399.39 - Equipment purchase deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment purchase deposits. 399.39 Section... Equipment purchase deposits. Equipment purchase deposits are advance payments made by air carriers to manufacturers for the purchase of equipment to be delivered in the future, or funds segregated by air...

  6. 7 CFR 58.419 - Curd mill and miscellaneous equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Curd mill and miscellaneous equipment. 58.419 Section... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.419 Curd mill and miscellaneous equipment. Knives, hand rakes... of the curd mill should be of stainless steel. All pieces of equipment shall be so constructed...

  7. 21 CFR 211.182 - Equipment cleaning and use log.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment cleaning and use log. 211.182 Section... Reports § 211.182 Equipment cleaning and use log. A written record of major equipment cleaning... individual equipment logs that show the date, time, product, and lot number of each batch processed....

  8. 38 CFR 17.156 - Eligibility for automobile adaptive equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... automobile adaptive equipment. 17.156 Section 17.156 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.156 Eligibility for automobile adaptive equipment. Automobile adaptive equipment may be authorized if the Under Secretary for Health...

  9. 7 CFR 3015.169 - Equipment management requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment management requirements. 3015.169 Section... Equipment management requirements. Recipient procedures for managing equipment shall, as a minimum, meet the following requirements (including replacement equipment) until such actions as transfer, replacement...

  10. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of airfoils for helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Phenomena that control the flow during the stall portion of a dynamic stall cycle are analyzed, and their effect on blade motion is outlined. Four mechanisms by which dynamic stall may be initiated are identified: (1) bursting of the separation bubble, (2) flow reversal in the turbulent boundary layer on the airfoil upper surface, (3) shock wave-boundary layer interaction behind the airfoil crest, and (4) acoustic wave propagation below the airfoil. The fluid mechanics that contribute to the identified flow phenomena are summarized, and the usefulness of a model that incorporates the required fluid mechanics mechanisms is discussed.

  11. Multi-objective robust airfoil optimization based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve airfoil performance under different flight conditions and to make the performance insensitive to off-design condition at the same time,a multi-objective optimization approach considering robust design has been developed and applied to airfoil design. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation is adopted in airfoil design process,control points and related weights around airfoil are used as design variables. Two airfoil representation cases show that the NURBS method can get airfoil geometry with max geometry error less than 0.0019. By using six-sigma robust approach in multi-objective airfoil design,each sub-objective function of the problem has robustness property. By adopting multi-objective genetic algorithm that is based on non-dominated sorting,a set of non-dominated airfoil solutions with robustness can be obtained in the design. The optimum robust airfoil can be traded off and selected in these non-dominated solutions by design tendency. By using the above methods,a multi-objective robust optimization was conducted for NASA SC0712 airfoil. After performing robust airfoil optimization,the mean value of drag coefficient at Ma0.7-0.8 and the mean value of lift coefficient at post stall regime (Ma0.3) have been improved by 12.2% and 25.4%. By comparing the aerodynamic force coefficients of optimization result,it shows that: different from single robust airfoil design which just improves the property of drag divergence at Ma0.7-0.8,multi-objective robust design can improve both the drag divergence property at Ma0.7-0.8 and stall property at low speed. The design cases show that the multi-objective robust design method makes the airfoil performance robust under different off-design conditions.

  12. Experimental characterization of airfoil boundary layers for improvement of aeroacoustic and aerodynamic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    blades makes a transition from laminar to turbulent. In the turbulent boundary layer eddies are created which are a potential noise sources. They are ineffective as noise source on the airfoil surface or in free flow, but when convecting past the trailing edge of the airfoil their efficiency is much...... and to improve it, because the predictions gave in general too low far field noise levels. Our main finding is that the acoustic formulations to relate the fluctuating surface pressure field close to the trailing edge of airfoil to the radiated far field sound give excellent results when compared to far field......, trailing edge noise can be evaluated by means of measured surface pressure field, even in cases where a direct measurement of trailing edge noise is not possible. This opens up great new vistas, i.e. by testing new airfoils in a standard industrial wind tunnel or by testing new wind turbine rotors...

  13. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  14. Modeling the Aerodynamic Lift Produced by Oscillating Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Saif Ullah

    2015-01-01

    For present study, setting Strouhal Number (St) as control parameter, numerical simulations for flow past oscillating NACA-0012 airfoil at 1,000 Reynolds Numbers (Re) are performed. Temporal profiles of unsteady forces; lift and thrust, and their spectral analysis clearly indicate the solution to be a period-1 attractor for low Strouhal numbers. This study reveals that aerodynamic forces produced by plunging airfoil are independent of initial kinematic conditions of airfoil that proves the existence of limit cycle. Frequencies present in the oscillating lift force are composed of fundamental (fs), even and odd harmonics (3fs) at higher Strouhal numbers. Using numerical simulations, shedding frequencies (f_s) were observed to be nearly equal to the excitation frequencies in all the cases. Unsteady lift force generated due to the plunging airfoil is modeled by modified van der Pol oscillator. Using method of multiple scales and spectral analysis of steady-state CFD solutions, frequencies and damping terms in th...

  15. Airfoil Selection of MAV (Miniature Air Vehicle for Low Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur S. Marathe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses issues and practical requirements of Airfoil for MAV. Here considering the MAV which travel with the speed range between 9-20 m/s. The Airfoil which is been selected on various criteria, i.e. - stable flight, cover maximum distance with minimum force. So here the NACA 2204 is been selected for MAV. The Fluent analysis is done on the airfoil for lift to drag ratio. These MAV are having some purpose i.e.:- they can be use as a spy in enemy area, inspection of hazardous area, where human resource can’t reach. Aerodynamic performance and stability should be considered in the context of the airfoil structural integrity. Particular attention should be paid to the unsteady nature of the flow.

  16. Unsteady two-dimensional potential-flow model for thin variable geometry airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the integral forces can be reduced to Munk's steady and Theodorsen's unsteady results for thin airfoils, and numerical evaluation shows...... excellent agreement with other unsteady two-dimensional thin-airfoil results. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the present theory can be used for various applications which up to the formulation of the present theory have been possible only using much more...... as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chord-wise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time lag for all chord-wise positions...

  17. Effects of a ground vortex on the aerodynamics of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamics of an airfoil with a rectangular jet exiting from its lower surface at fifty percent of the chord. The airfoil was tested with and without the influence of a ground plane. Surface static pressures were measured on the airfoil at jet to free stream velocity ratios ranging from 0 to 9. From these pressures, the variation of C sub L with velocity ratio was easily determined. The measurements indicated significant positive and negative pressure regions on the lower surface of the airfoil ahead of and after the nozzle exit respectively. The presence of a ground plane enhanced these pressure regions at low velocity ratios, but at a particular ratio for each plane location, a recirculation zone or vortex formed ahead of the jet resulting in decreased pressures and a drop in C sub L.

  18. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift. PMID:28243053

  19. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weijun; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jiyue; Li, Ming; Ma, Yi; Cong, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  20. Airfoil data sensitivity analysis for actuator disc simulations used in wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karl; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the sensitivity of blade geometry and airfoil characteristics on the prediction of performance characteristics of wind farms, large-eddy simulations using an actuator disc (ACD) method are performed for three different blade/airfoil configurations. The aim of the study is to determine...... how the mean characteristics of wake flow, mean power production and thrust depend on the choice of airfoil data and blade geometry. In order to simulate realistic conditions, pre-generated turbulence and wind shear are imposed in the computational domain. Using three different turbulence intensities...... and varying the spacing between the turbines, the flow around 4-8 aligned turbines is simulated. The analysis is based on normalized mean streamwise velocity, turbulence intensity, relative mean power production and thrust. From the computations it can be concluded that the actual airfoil characteristics...

  1. Coupled-Mode Flutter of Bending-Bending Type in Highly-Flexible Uniform Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourazarm, Pariya; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    We study the behavior of a highly flexible uniform airfoil placed in wind both numerically and experimentally. It is shown that for a non-rotating highly-flexible cantilevered airfoil, placed at very small angles of attack (less than 1 degree), the airfoil loses its stability by buckling. For slightly higher angles of attack (more than 1 degree) a coupled-mode flutter in which the first and the second flapwise modes coalesce toward a flutter mode is observed, and thus the observed flutter has a bending-bending nature. The flutter onset and frequency found experimentally matched the numerical predictions. If the same airfoil is forced to rotate about its fixed end, the static deflection decreases and the observed couple-mode flutter becomes of flapwise-torsional type, same as what has already been observed for flutter of rotating wind turbine blades. The support provided by the National Science Foundation, CBET-1437988, is greatly acknowledged.

  2. Parallel numerical simulation of oscillating airfoil NACA0015 in the channel due to flutter instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řidký Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to 3D and 2D parallel numerical computation of pressure and velocity fields around an elastically supported airfoil self-oscillating due to interaction with the airflow. Numerical solution is computed in the OpenFOAM package, an open-source software package based on finite volume method. Movement of airfoil is described by translation and rotation, identified from experimental data. A new boundary condition for the 2DOF motion of the airfoil was implemented. The results of numerical simulations (velocity are compared with data measured in a wind tunnel, where a physical model of NACA0015 airfoil was mounted and tuned to exhibit the flutter instability. The experimental results were obtained previously in the Institute of Thermomechanics by interferographic measurements in a subsonic wind tunnel in Nový Knín.

  3. 46 CFR 153.466 - Electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical equipment. 153.466 Section 153.466 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.466 Electrical equipment. A tankship carrying...

  4. 46 CFR 184.210 - Heating equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating equipment. 184.210 Section 184.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 184.210 Heating...

  5. 38 CFR 43.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 43.32 Section 43.32 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) UNIFORM... the equipment in accordance with Federal agency rules and procedures, and submit an annual...

  6. 21 CFR 211.65 - Equipment construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment construction. 211.65 Section 211.65 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... construction. (a) Equipment shall be constructed so that surfaces that contact components, in-process...

  7. System and method for manufacture of airfoil components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, Thomas Michael

    2016-11-29

    Embodiments of the present disclosure relate generally to systems and methods for manufacturing an airfoil component. The system can include: a geometrical mold; an elongated flexible sleeve having a closed-off interior and positioned within the geometrical mold, wherein the elongated flexible sleeve is further positioned to have a desired geometry; an infusing channel in fluid communication with the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve and configured to communicate a resinous material thereto; a vacuum channel in fluid communication with the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve and configured to vacuum seal the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve; and a glass fiber layer positioned within the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve.

  8. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2016-01-01

    , Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed...... that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated...... with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model....

  9. Dynamic stall on a pitching and surging airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Reeve; McKeon, Beverley J.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine blades undergo dynamic stall due to the large angle of attack variation they experience during a turbine rotation. The flow over a single blade was modeled using a sinusoidally pitching and surging airfoil in a non-rotating frame with a constant freestream flow at a mean chord Reynolds number of . Two-dimensional, time-resolved velocity fields were acquired using particle image velocimetry. Vorticity contours were used to visualize shear layer and vortex activity. A low-order model of dynamic stall was developed using dynamic mode decomposition, from which primary and secondary dynamic separation modes were identified. The interaction between these two modes was able to capture the physics of dynamic stall and as such can be extended to other turbine configurations and problems in unsteady aerodynamics. Results from the linear pitch/surge frame are extrapolated to the rotating VAWT frame to investigate the behavior of identified flow structures.

  10. FLOWS AROUND TWO AIRFOILS PERFORMING FLING AND SUBSEQUENT TRANSLATION AND TRANSLATION AND SUBSEQUENT CLAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂; 于鑫

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces and flow structures of two airfoils performing "fling and subsequent translation" and "translation and subsequent clap" are studied by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids. These motions are relevant to the flight of very small insects. The Reynolds number, based on the airfoil chord length c and the translation velocity U, is 17. It is shown that: (1) For two airfoils performing fling and subsequent translation, a large lift is generated both in the fling phase and in the early part of the translation phase. During the fling phase,a pair of leading edge vortices of large strength is generated; the generation of the vortex pair in a short period results in a large time rate of change of fluid impulse, which explains the large lift in this period. During the early part of the translation, the two leading edge vortices move with the airfoils;the relative movement of the vortices also results in a large time rate of change of fluid impulse, which explains the large lift in this part of motion. (In the later part of the translation, the vorticity in the vortices is diffused and convected into the wake.) The time averaged lift coeffcient is approximately 2.4 times as large as that of a single airfoil performing a similar motion. (2) For two airfoils performing translation and subsequent clap, a large lift is generated in the clap phase. During the clap, a pair of trailing edge vortices of large strength are generated; again, the generation of the vortex pair in a short period (which results in a large timerate of change of fluid impulse) is responsible for the large lift in this period. The time averaged lift coefficient is approximately 1.6 times as large as that of a single airfoil performing a similar motion. (3) When the initial distance between the airfoils (in the case of clap, the final distance between the airfoils) varies from 0.1 to 0.2c, the lift on an airfoil decreases only slightly but the torque

  11. On the design of airfoils in which the transition of the boundary layer is delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Itiro

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for designing suitable thickness distributions and mean camber lines for airfoils permitting extensive chordwise laminar flow. Wind tunnel and flight tests confirming the existence of laminar flow; possible maintenance of laminar flow by area suction; and the effects of wind tunnel turbulence and surface roughness on the promotion of premature boundary layer transition are discussed. In addition, estimates of profile drag and scale effect on maximum lift of the derived airfoils are made.

  12. Schlieren Studies of Compressibility Effects on Dynamic Stall of Airfoils in Transient Pitching Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Ahmed, S; Carr, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    Compressibility effects on the flowfield of an airfoil executing rapid transient pitching motion from 0 - 60 degrees over a wide range of Mach numbers and pitching rates were studied using a stroboscopic schlieren flow visualization technique. The studies have led to the first direct experiments] documentation of multiple shocks on the airfoil upper surface flow for certain conditions. Also, at low Mach numbers, additional coherent vortical structures were found to be ...

  13. Schlieren Studies of Compressibility Effects on Dynamic Stall on Transiently Pitching Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Ahmed, S; Carr, L.W.

    2016-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.2514/3.48268 Compressibility effects on the flowfield of an airfoil executing rapid transient pitching motion from 0-60 deg over a wide range of Mach numbers and pitching rates were studied using a stroboscopic schlieren flow visualization technique. The studies have led to the first direct experimental documentation of multiple shocks on the airfoil upper surface flow for certain conditions. Also, at low Mach...

  14. Investigation of the Effects of Airfoil-probes on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Axial Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiang; MA Hongwei; REN Minglin; XIANG Honghui

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of the airfoil-probes on the aerodynamic performance of an axial compressor,a numerical simulation of 3D flow field is performed in a 1.5-stage axial compressor with airfoil-probes installed at the stator leading-edge (LE).The airfoil-probes have a negative influence on the compressor aerodynamic performance at all operating points.A streamwise vortex is induced by the airfoil-probe along both sides of the blade.At the mid-operating point,the vortex is notable along the pressure side and is relatively small along the suction side (SS).At the near-stall point,the vortex is slightly suppressed in the pressure surface (PS),but becomes remarkable in the suction side.A small local-separation is induced by the interactions between the vortex and the end-wall boundary layer in the corner region near the hub.That the positive pitch angle of the airfoil-probe at 6.5% span is about 15° plays an important role in the vortex evolution near the hub,which causes the fact that the airfoil-probe near the hub has the largest effects among the four airfoil-probes.In order to get a further understanding of the vortex evolution in the stator in the numerical simulation,a flow visualization experiment in a water tunnel is performed.The flow visualization results give a deep insight into the evolution of the vortex induced by the airfoil-probe.

  15. Numerical study of Wavy Blade Section for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobæk, C. M.; Hansen, M. O. L.

    2016-09-01

    The Wavy Blade concept is inspired by the unique flipper of a humpback whale, characterized by the tubercles located at the leading edge. It has been suggested that this shape may have been a result of a natural selection process, since this flipper under some circumstances can produce higher lift than a flipper having a smooth trailing edge and thus could be potentially beneficial when catching food. A thorough literature study of the Wavy Blade concept is made and followed by CFD computations of two wavy blade geometries and a comparison with their baseline S809 airfoil at conditions more relevant for modern wind turbines. The findings in the literature from geometries similar to the hump back whale flipper indicate that the aerodynamic performance can be improved at high angles of attack, but sometimes at the expense of a lower lift slope and increased drag before stall. The numerical results for a blade section based on the S809 airfoil are, however, not as promising as some of the findings reported in the literature for the whale flipper at high angles of attack. These first CFD computations using a thicker airfoil and a higher Reynolds number than the whale flipper indicate that the results may very well depend on the actual airfoil geometry and perhaps also the Reynolds number, and future studies are necessary in order to illuminate this further.

  16. Simultaneous Investigation of Flexibility and Plasma Actuation Effects on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Oscillating Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mahboubi Doust

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a numerical study of two dimensional laminar incompressible flow around the flexible oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is performed using the open source code OpenFOAM. Oscillatory motion types including pitching and flapping is considered. Reynolds number for these motions is assumed fixed at 12000. One of the important issues that must be considered in designing air structures, in particular the aircraft wing, is the interaction between the air and the elastic aircraft wings that is known as the Aeroelastic phenomenon. For this purpose, the effect of airfoil flexibility and flow induced vibration in these motion types is investigated and compared with the case of rigid airfoil. It is observed that the flexibility in both types of motions causes improvement of the thrust which is boosted with increasing the frequency. Contrary to thrust, the significant improvement of lift is only achievable in high frequencies. It was also found that the effect of flexibility on the flapping motion is higher than the pitching motion. For flow control on the airfoil, Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasma actuator is used in the trailing edge of a flexible airfoil, and its effect on the flexible airfoil is also investigated.

  17. Cylinder wake influence on the tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Nashimoto, A.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of cylinder wake on discrete tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil is studied experimentally in a uniform flow at a moderate Reynolds number. The experiments are carried out by measuring sound pressure levels and spectrum, separation and the reattachment points, pressure distribution, fluid forces, mean-flow and turbulence characteristics around the airfoil with and without the cylinder wake. Present results indicate that the tonal noise from the airfoil is suppressed by the influence of the cylinder wake and the aerodynamic characteristics are improved in comparison with the case without the cylinder wake. These are mainly due to the separation control of boundary layers over the airfoil caused by the wake-induced transition, which is observed by surface flow visualization with liquid- crystal coating. The PIV measurements of the flow field around the airfoil confirm that highly turbulent velocity fluctuation of the cylinder wake induces the transition of the boundary layers and produces an attached boundary layer over the airfoil. Then, the vortex shedding phenomenon near the trailing edge of pressure surface is removed by the influence of the wake and results in the suppression of tonal noise.

  18. Numerical analysis of the s1020 airfoils in tandem under different flapping configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K. B.; Tay, W. B.

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the performance of the efficiency, thrust and lift of flapping wings in tandem arrangement. This research investigates the effect of the arrangement of the airfoils in tandem on the performance of the airfoils by varying the phase difference and distance between the airfoils. Three flapping configurations from an earlier phase of a research which gives high efficiency, thrust and lift are used in the tandem simulation. It is found all the different flapping configurations show improvement in the efficiency, thrust or lift when the distance between the two airfoils and the phase angle between the heaving positions of the two airfoils are optimal. The average thrust coefficient of the tandem arrangement managed to attain more than twice that of the single one (4.84 vs. 2.05). On the other hand, the average lift coefficient of the tandem arrangement also increased to 4.59, as compared to the original single airfoil value of 3.04. All these results obtained will aid in the design of a better ornithopter with tandem wing arrangement.

  19. Airfoil Aeroelastic Flutter Analysis Based on Modified Leishman-Beddoes Model at Low Mach Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Song; ZHU Qinghua; ZHANG Chenglin; NI Xianping

    2011-01-01

    Based on modified Leishman-Beddoes(L-B)state space model at low Mach number(lower than 0.3),the airfoil aeroelastic system is presented in this paper.The main modifications for L-B model include a new dynamic stall criterion and revisions of normal force and pitching moment coefficient.The bifurcation diagrams,the limit cycle oscillation (LCO)phase plane plots and the time domain response figures are applied to investigating the stall flutter bifurcation behavior of airfoil aeroelastic systems with symmetry or asymmetry.It is shown that the symmetric periodical oscillation happens after subcritical bifurcation caused by dynamic stall,and the asymmetric periodical oscillation,which is caused by the interaction of dynamic stall and static divergence,only happens in the airfoil aeroelastic system with asymmetry.Validations of the modified L-B model and the airfoil aeroelastic system are presented with the experimental airload data of NACA0012 and OA207 and experimental stall flutter data of NACA0012 respectively.Results demonstrate that the airfoil aeroelastic system presented in this paper is effective and accurate,which can be applied to the investigation of airfoil stall flutter at low Mach number.

  20. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal/ Fluid Sciences & Engineering Dept.; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.; Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  1. Numerical solutions for a two-dimensional airfoil undergoing unsteady motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fu-bing; ZENG Nian-dong; ZHANG Liang; WU De-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous vorticity panels are used to model general unsteady inviscid, incompressible, and two-dimensional flows. The geometry of the airfoil is approximated by series of short straight segments having endpoints that lie on the actual surface. A piecewise linear, continuous distribution of vorticity over the airfoil surface is used to generate disturbance flow. The no-penetration condition is imposed at the midpoint of each segment and at discrete times. The wake is simulated by a system of point vortices, which move at local fluid velocity. At each time step, a new wake panel with uniform vorticity distribution is attached to the trailing edge, and the condition of eonstant circulation around the airfoil and wake is imposed. A new expression for Kutta condition is developed to study (i) the effect of thickness on the lift build-up of an impulsively started airfoil, (ii) the effects of reduced frequency and heave amplitude on the thrust production of flapping airfoils, and (iii) the vortex-airfoil interaction. This work presents some hydrodynamic results for tidalstreaim turbine.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  3. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position.

  4. Effect of cavity on shock oscillation in transonic flow over RAE2822 supercritical airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Rizwanur; Labib, Md. Itmam; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Transonic flow past a supercritical airfoil is strongly influenced by the interaction of shock wave with boundary layer. This interaction induces unsteady self-sustaining shock wave oscillation, flow instability, drag rise and buffet onset which limit the flight envelop. In the present study, a computational analysis has been carried out to investigate the flow past a supercritical RAE2822 airfoil in transonic speeds. To control the shock wave oscillation, a cavity is introduced on the airfoil surface where shock wave oscillates. Different geometric configurations have been investigated for finding optimum cavity geometry and dimension. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are computed at Mach 0.729 with an angle of attack of 5°. Computed results are well validated with the available experimental data in case of baseline airfoil. However, in case of airfoil with control cavity; it has been observed that the introduction of cavity completely suppresses the unsteady shock wave oscillation. Further, significant drag reduction and successive improvement of aerodynamic performance have been observed in airfoil with shock control cavity.

  5. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  6. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  7. Experimental study of the effect of a slat angle on double-element airfoil and application in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Rosendahl, Lasse; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2015-01-01

    A design of double-element airfoil is proposed for its use in the vertical axis wind turbine. The double-element airfoil system consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. The design parameters of the double-element airfoil system are given by the position and orientation of the trailing edge......-element airfoil system designed in this paper. Further, the performance of new design of a vertical axis wind turbine shows considerable increase in the power coefficient and the total power output as compared to the reference wind turbine...

  8. Hydrodynamic Performance Analysis on Different Airfoils of Straight Blade H Type of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Energy Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Kan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airfoil is a key factor that influences the hydrodynamic performance of vertical axis tidal current energy turbine. In order to explore the influences from the runner’s blade airfoil towards its hydrodynamic performance, three-dimensional unsteady flow numerical simulation on four airfoils of straight blade H type of tidal current energy turbines was carried out, under the precondition of same turbine compactness. Through investigating the influences from the four different airfoils of H blade towards the runner in terms of its dynamic torque feature and hydropower utilization coefficient, this research has analyzed the hydrodynamic performance of the tidal current energy turbine. As the research result indicates, the maximum dynamic torque value of the single-blade turbine with NACA0015 airfoil is significantly higher than that of the other three airfoils; while the maximum value of the overall runner torque is determined by the operating conditions such as different stream speed etc. As a whole, hydropower utilization coefficient of the turbine with asymmetric airfoil NACA4415 is better than that of the other three airfoils. This research has provided references for the design and airfoil selection for the new type of tidal current energy turbine.

  9. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    An effort to understand and control the unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils was funded for three years through the NASA cooperative agreement program. As part of this effort a substantial data base was compiled detailing the effects various parameters have on the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Parameters studied include Mach number, pitch rate, and pitch history, as well as Reynolds number (through two different model chord lengths) and the condition of the boundary layer at the leading edge of the airfoil (through application of surface roughness). It was found for free stream Mach numbers as low as 0.4 that a region of supersonic flow forms on the leading edge of the suction surface of the airfoil at moderate angles of attack. The shocks which form in this supersonic region induce boundary-layer separation and advance the dynamic stall process. Under such conditions a supercritical airfoil profile is called for to produce a flow field having a weaker leading-edge pressure gradient and no leading-edge shocks. An airfoil having an adaptive-geometry, or dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE), is under development as a unique active flow-control device. The DDLE, formed of carbon-fiber composite and fiberglass, can be flexed between a NACA 0012 profile and a supercritical profile in a controllable fashion while the airfoil is executing an angle-of-attack pitch-up maneuver. The dynamic stall data were recorded using point diffraction interferometry (PDI), a noninvasive measurement technique. A new high-speed cinematography system was developed for recording interferometric images. The system is capable of phase-locking with the pitching airfoil motion for real-time documentation of the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Computer-aided image analysis algorithms were developed for fast and accurate reduction of the images, improving interpretation of the results.

  10. Localisation of flow separation and transition over a pitching NACA0012 airfoil at transitional Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Daniel

    Previous research at RMC has cataloged the occurrence of limit cycle oscillations at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers for an elastically mounted aeroelastic airfoil. These oscillations were attributed to boundary layer separation and the formation of a laminar separation bubble. For this thesis, an instrumented and motor-driven oscillating airfoil rig was designed and fabricated for the purpose of investigating the boundary layer of a NACA-0012 airfoil. The oscillating airfoil was driven by a servo motor to mimic the observed aeroelastic pitching with a sinusoid of matched amplitude and frequency. Hot-wire anemometry was used to investigate the near wake of the new motor-driven airfoil and compare it with the aeroelastic experiment. A chord-wise array of hot-film sensors captured the boundary layer state during the airfoil pitching oscillation. A novel analysis technique is introduced; A sliding window (in time) cross-correlation of adjacent sensors was used to detect dynamic laminar separation. Wind tunnel tests were performed at static angles-of-attack, for quasi-static very low frequency sweeps to verify the technique, and for selected cases of oscillations obtained with the aeroelastic rig. The new detection method was verified against the existing static techniques of phase reversal signature detection and signal cross-correlation by comparing quasi-static and static results. A map of the laminar separation bubble was produced for fixed angles of attack as well as for the pitching airfoil. The presence of a laminar separation was linked to the occurrence and characteristics of the limit cycle oscillations. Keywords: laminar separation, NACA0012, hot-film, hot-wire, anemometry, transitional flow, aeroelasticity.

  11. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  12. Exploration of plasma-based control for low-Reynolds number airfoil/gust interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetta, Donald P.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the use of plasma-based actuation for the control of a vortical gust interacting with a wing section at a low Reynolds number. Flow about the SD7003 airfoil section at 4° angle of attack and a chord-based Reynolds number of 60,000 is considered in the simulation, which typifies micro air vehicle (MAV) applications. Solutions are obtained to the Navier-Stokes equations that were augmented by source terms used to represent body forces imparted by the plasma actuator on the fluid. A simple phenomenological model provided these body forces resulting from the electric field generated by the plasma. The numerical method is based upon a high-fidelity time-implicit scheme and an implicit LES approach which are used to obtain solutions on a locally refined overset mesh system. A Taylor-like vortex model is employed to represent a gust impinging upon the wing surface, which causes a substantial disruption to the undisturbed flow. It is shown that the fundamental impact of the gust on unsteady aerodynamic forces is due to an inviscid process, corresponding to variation in the effective angle of attack, which is not easily overcome. Plasma control is utilised to mitigate adverse effects of the interaction and improve aerodynamic performance. Physical characteristics of the interaction are described, and several aspects of the control strategy are explored. Among these are uniform and non-uniform spanwise variations of the control configuration, co-flow and counter-flow orientations of the directed force, pulsed and continuous operations of the actuator and strength of the plasma field. Results of the control situations are compared with regard to their effect upon aerodynamic forces. It was found that disturbances to the moment coefficient produced by the gust can be greatly reduced, which may be significant for stability and handling of MAV operations.

  13. Pressure measurements on a pitching airfoil in a water channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Rand N.; Ramaprian, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of unsteady pressures over a symmetric NACA 0015 airfoil performing pitching maneuvers are reported. The tests were performed in an open-surface water channel specially constructed for this purpose. The design of the apparatus allowed the pressure measurements to be made to a very high degree of spatial and temporal resolution. Reynolds numbers in the range of 5.2 x 10(exp 4) to 2.2 x 10(exp 5) were studied. Although the results qualitatively agreed with earlier studies performed at similar Reynolds numbers, the magnitudes of pressure and aerodynamic forces measured were observed to be much larger than those measured in ealier pitchup studies. They were found, in fact, to be closer to those obtained in some recent high-Reynolds-number experiments. This interesting behavior, which was suspected to be caused by the relatively high freestream turbulence level in the water channel, was explored in some detail. In addition, several issues like the quasisteady and dynamic effects of the pitching process are discussed. The experimental data are all archived and are available for use as a database.

  14. Numerical simulations of the NREL S826 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagmo, KF; Bartl, J.; Sætran, L.

    2016-09-01

    2D and 3D steady state simulations were done using the commercial CFD package Star-CCM+ with three different RANS turbulence models. Lift and drag coefficients were simulated at different angles of attack for the NREL S826 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 100 000, and compared to experimental data obtained at NTNU and at DTU. The Spalart-Allmaras and the Realizable k-epsilon turbulence models reproduced experimental results for lift well in the 2D simulations. The 3D simulations with the Realizable two-layer k-epsilon model predicted essentially the same lift coefficients as the 2D Spalart-Allmaras simulations. A comparison between 2D and 3D simulations with the Realizable k-epsilon model showed a significantly lower prediction in drag by the 2D simulations. From the conducted 3D simulations surface pressure predictions along the wing span were presented, along with volumetric renderings of vorticity. Both showed a high degree of span wise flow variation when going into the stall region, and predicted a flow field resembling that of stall cells for angles of attack above peak lift.

  15. On the acoustics of a circulation control airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, R.; Nickels, A.; Ukeiley, L.; Cattafesta, L. N.

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional elliptical circulation control airfoil model is studied in the Florida State Aeroacoustic Tunnel. Far-field acoustics are obtained via a 55 microphone phased array. Single microphone spectra are also obtained, and it is shown that background noise is significant. In order to circumvent this problem, beamforming is employed. The primary sources of background noise are from the tunnel collector and jet/sidewall interaction. The deconvolution approach to mapping acoustic sources (DAMAS) is employed to remove the effects of the array point spread function. Spectra are acquired by integrating the DAMAS result over the source region. The resulting DAMAS spectral levels are significantly below single microphone levels. Although the DAMAS levels are reduced from those of a single microphone or delay and sum beamforming (DAS), they are still above those of a NACA 0012, estimated using NAFNoise, at the same geometric and free-stream conditions. A scaling analysis is performed on the processed array data. With a constant free-stream velocity and a varying jet velocity the data scale as jet Mach number to the 6th power. If the momentum coefficient is held constant and the free-stream velocity is varied the data scale as free-stream Mach number to the 7th power.

  16. Nonlinear aeroelastic analysis of airfoils: bifurcation and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. H. K.; Price, S. J.; Wong, Y. S.

    1999-04-01

    Different types of structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities commonly encountered in aeronautical engineering are discussed. The equations of motion of a two-dimensional airfoil oscillating in pitch and plunge are derived for a structural nonlinearity using subsonic aerodynamics theory. Three classical nonlinearities, namely, cubic, freeplay and hysteresis are investigated in some detail. The governing equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical simulations and analytical investigation of the system stability. The onset of Hopf-bifurcation, and amplitudes and frequencies of limit cycle oscillations are investigated, with examples given for a cubic hardening spring. For various geometries of the freeplay, bifurcations and chaos are discussed via the phase plane, Poincaré maps, and Lyapunov spectrum. The route to chaos is investigated from bifurcation diagrams, and for the freeplay nonlinearity it is shown that frequency doubling is the most commonly observed route. Examples of aerodynamic nonlinearities arising from transonic flow and dynamic stall are discussed, and special attention is paid to numerical simulation results for dynamic stall using a time-synthesized method for the unsteady aerodynamics. The assumption of uniform flow is usually not met in practice since perturbations in velocities are encountered in flight. Longitudinal atmospheric turbulence is introduced to show its effect on both the flutter boundary and the onset of Hopf-bifurcation for a cubic restoring force.

  17. Numerical simulation of the interaction of a vortex with stationary airfoil in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Mccroskey, W. J.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    A perturbation form of an implicit conservative, noniterative numerical algorithm for the two-dimensional thin layer Navier-Stokes and Euler equations is used to compute the interaction flow-field of a vortex with stationary airfoil. A Lamb-like analytical vortex having a finite core is chosen to interact with a thick (NACA 0012) and a thin (NACA 64A006) airfoil independently in transonic flow. Two different configurations of vortex interaction are studied, viz., (1) when the vortex is fixed at one location in the flowfield, and (2) when the vortex is convecting past the airfoil at freestream velocity. Parallel computations of this interacting flowfield are also done using a version of the Transonic Small Disturbance Code (ATRAN2). A special treatment of the leading edge region for thin airfoils is included in this code. With this, the three methods gave qualitatively similar results for the weaker interactions considered in this study. However, the strongest interactions considered proved to be beyond the capabilities of the small disturbance code. The results also show a far greater influence of the vortex on the airfoil flowfield when the vortex is stationary than when it is convecting with the flow.

  18. Numerical analysis of active chordwise flexibility on the performance of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, W. B.; Lim, K. B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of active chordwise flexing on the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of three types of airfoils. The factors studied are the flexing center location, standard two-sided flexing as well as a type of single-sided flexing. The airfoils are simulated to flap with four configurations, and the effects of flexing under these configurations are investigated. Results show that flexing is not necessarily beneficial for the performance of the airfoils. However, with the correct parameters, efficiency is as high as 0.76 by placing the flexing centre at the trailing edge. The average thrust coefficient is more than twice as high, from 1.63 to 3.57 with flapping and flexing under the right conditions. Moreover, the single-sided flexing also gives an average lift coefficient as high as 4.61 for the S1020 airfoil. The shape of the airfoil does alter the effect of flexing too. Deviating the flexing phase angle away from 90° does not give a significant improvement to the airfoil’s performance. These results greatly enhance the design of a better performing ornithopter wing.

  19. On the unsteady motion and stability of a heaving airfoil in ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Molina; Xin Zhang; David Angland

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the fluid mechanics and force generation capabilities of an inverted heaving airfoil placed close to a moving ground using a URANS solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. By varying the mean ground clearance and motion frequency of the airfoil, it was possible to construct a frequency-height diagram of the various forces acting on the airfoil. The ground was found to enhance the downforce and reduce the drag with respect to freestream. The unsteady motion induces hysteresis in the forces' behaviour. At moderate ground clearance, the hysteresis increases with frequency and the airfoil loses energy to the flow, resulting in a stabilizing motion. By analogy with a pitching motion, the airfoil stalls in close proximity to the ground. At low frequencies, the motion is unstable and could lead to stall flutter. A stall flutter analysis was undertaken. At higher frequencies, inviscid effects overcome the large separation and the motion becomes stable. Forced trailing edge vortex shedding appears at high frequencies. The shedding mechanism seems to be independent of ground proximity.However, the wake is altered at low heights as a result of an interaction between the vortices and the ground.

  20. Lift on a Steady Airfoil in Low Reynolds Number Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patrick; Visbal, Miguel; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    Current understanding of airfoil aerodynamics is primarily based on a uniform freestream velocity approaching the airfoil, without consideration for possible presence of shear in the approach flow. Inviscid theory by Tsien (1943) shows that a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack experiences positive lift, i.e. a shift in the zero-lift angle of attack, in the presence of positive mean shear in the approach flow. In the current work, 2D computations are conducted on a steady NACA 0012 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of Re = 12,000, at zero angle of attack. A uniform shear profile (i.e. a linear velocity variation) is used for the approach flow by modifying the FDL3DI Navier-Stokes solver (Visbal and Gaitonde, 1999). Interestingly, opposite to the inviscid prediction of Tsien (1943), the results for the airfoil at zero angle of attack show that the average lift is negative in the shear flow. The magnitude of this lift grows as the shear rate increases. Additional results are presented regarding the physics underlying the shear effect on lift. A companion experimental study is also given in a separate presentation. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  1. Tests and numerical simulation of aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils for general aviation applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lizhen; Wang Xiaoming; Miguel A.González Hernández; Wang Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper was to validate the effects of airfoil thickness ratio on the characteristics of a family of airfoils.Re-search was carried out in different ways.First,tests were conducted in the wind tunnel.And numerical simulation was performed on the basis of tests.Results from calculation were consistent with tests,indicating that numerical method could help evaluate characteristics of airfoils.Then the results were confirmed by compared with empirical data.The study also showed that the determining factor of lift is not only the thickness ratio,but the angle of attack,the relative camber and the camber line.The thickness ratio appears to have little effect on lift coefficient at zero angle of attack,since the angle of zero llft is largely determined by the airfoil camber.According to the research,numerical simulation can be used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in different environment such as in the dusty or hu-mid air.

  2. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Mirzaei; Mohammad-Mahdi Nazemi; Mojtaba Fouladi; Alireza Doostmahmoudi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Exper-iments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 ? 106 over angles of attack from ? 8? to 20?, and then results are compared. Gener-ally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10? and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50%which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4? and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2? and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  3. Transitory Control of the Aerodynamic Loads on an Airfoil in Dynamic Pitch and Plunge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuehan; Crittenden, Thomas; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Transitory control and regulation of trapped vorticity concentrations are exploited in wind tunnel experiments for control of the aerodynamic loads on an airfoil moving in time-periodic 2-DOF (pitch and plunge) beyond the dynamic stall margin. Actuation is effected using a spanwise array of integrated miniature chemical (combustion based) high-impulse actuators that are triggered intermittently relative to the airfoil's motion. Each actuation pulse has sufficient control authority to alter the global aerodynamic performance throughout the motion cycle on a characteristic time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's convective time scale. The effects of the actuation on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil are assessed using time-dependent measurements of the lift force and pitching moment coupled with time-resolved particle image velocimetry that is acquired phased-locked to the motion of the airfoil. It is shown that the aerodynamic loads can be significantly altered using actuation programs based on multiple actuation pulses during the time-periodic pitch/plunge cycle. Superposition of such actuation programs leads to enhancement of cycle lift and pitch stability, and reduced cycle hysteresis and peak pitching moment. Supported by GT-VLRCOE.

  4. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  5. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intesaaf Ashraf; Amit Agrawal; Majid Hassan Khan; Sooraj P; Atul Srivastava; Atul Sharma

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) based investigation of wake structure of a pitching airfoil. PIV measurements have been carried out for NACA0015 airfoil at Re = 2900 with reduced frequency range of 1.82–10.92 and pitching angle of 5°. Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán shedding and deflected vortex shedding) are observed over this parameter range. The vorticity decreases substantially over a distance of two chord-lengths. The velocity profile indicates a jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil. It is shown that the jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil is however not a sufficient condition for the generation of thrust. The vortex strength is found to be invariant of the pitching frequency. Certain differences from the reported results are noted, which may be because of difference in the airfoil shape. These results can help improve understanding of the flow behavior as the low Reynolds number range is not well studied.

  6. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein Pouryoussefi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Experiments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 × 106 over angles of attack from −8° to 20°, and then results are compared. Generally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10° and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50% which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4° and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2° and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  7. Application of a Beamforming Technique to the Measurement of Airfoil Leading Edge Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the use of microphone array technology and beamforming algorithms for the measurement and analysis of noise generated by the interaction of a turbulent flow with the leading edge of an airfoil. Experiments were performed using a setup in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel, where the turbulent inflow is provided by different grids. In order to exactly localize the aeroacoustic noise sources and, moreover, to separate airfoil leading edge noise from grid-generated noise, the selected deconvolution beamforming algorithm is extended to be used on a fully three-dimensional source region. The result of this extended beamforming are three-dimensional mappings of noise source locations. Besides acoustic measurements, the investigation of airfoil leading edge noise requires the measurement of parameters describing the incident turbulence, such as the intensity and a characteristic length scale or time scale. The method used for the determination of these parameters in the present study is explained in detail. To demonstrate the applicability of the extended beamforming algorithm and the experimental setup as a whole, the noise generated at the leading edge of airfoils made of porous materials was measured and compared to that generated at the leading edge of a common nonporous airfoil.

  8. 30 CFR 72.520 - Diesel equipment inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel equipment inventory. 72.520 Section 72... Mines § 72.520 Diesel equipment inventory. (a) The operator of each mine that utilizes diesel equipment underground, shall prepare and submit in writing to the District Manager, an inventory of diesel...

  9. 30 CFR 250.1624 - Blowout prevention equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blowout prevention equipment. 250.1624 Section 250.1624 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND... prevention equipment. (a) The BOP system and system components and related well-control equipment shall...

  10. 33 CFR 155.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for prepositioned response equipment. 155.1130 Section 155.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... various other tools; (8) Decontamination equipment; (9) Shoreline cleanup equipment; (10)...

  11. 47 CFR 2.945 - Sampling tests of equipment compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sampling tests of equipment compliance. 2.945 Section 2.945 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO... An Equipment Authorization § 2.945 Sampling tests of equipment compliance. The Commission will,...

  12. 47 CFR 76.1621 - Equipment compatibility offer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment compatibility offer. 76.1621 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1621 Equipment compatibility offer. Cable system... individual compatibility problems. (d) Cable operators shall provide such equipment at the request...

  13. 25 CFR 117.10 - Purchase of automotive equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purchase of automotive equipment. 117.10 Section 117.10... COMPETENCY § 117.10 Purchase of automotive equipment. The superintendent may disburse from the surplus funds of an adult Indian not to exceed $2,000 for the purchase of automotive equipment when the...

  14. 46 CFR 105.30-5 - Grounding of electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding of electrical equipment. 105.30-5 Section 105... VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Electrical Requirements § 105.30-5 Grounding of electrical equipment. (a) All electrical equipment shall be grounded to the vessel's...

  15. 9 CFR 354.230 - Equipment and utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 354.230 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... equipped with facilities for locking and sealing. (m) Freezing rooms should be adequately equipped to... constant as possible. Freezing room should be equipped with floor racks or pallets and fans to insure...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.603 - Pile driving equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pile driving equipment. 1926.603 Section 1926.603 Labor... Operations § 1926.603 Pile driving equipment. (a) General requirements. (1) Boilers and piping systems which are a part of, or used with, pile driving equipment shall meet the applicable requirements of...

  17. 46 CFR 183.372 - Equipment and conductor grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment and conductor grounding. 183.372 Section 183... conductor grounding. (a) All metallic enclosures and frames of electrical equipment must be permanently... equipment must be bonded together to a common ground by a normally non-current carrying conductor....

  18. 47 CFR 15.118 - Cable ready consumer electronics equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. 15... Unintentional Radiators § 15.118 Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. (a) All consumer electronics TV... provisions of this section. Consumer electronics TV receiving equipment that includes features intended...

  19. 47 CFR 17.53 - Lighting equipment and paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Lighting equipment and paint. The lighting equipment, color or filters, and shade of paint referred to in... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lighting equipment and paint. 17.53 Section 17... (Color No. 17875, FS-595). Aviation surface orange TT-P-59 1 (Color No. 12197, FS-595). Aviation...

  20. RETRIEVAL EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Steinhoff

    1997-08-25

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) retrieval from the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. There are no quality assurance requirements or QA controls in this document. Retrieval under normal conditions is accomplished with the same fleet of equipment as is used for emplacement. Descriptions of equipment used for retrieval under normal conditions is found in Emplacement Equipment Descriptions, DI: BCAF00000-01717-5705-00002 (a document in progress). Equipment used for retrieval under abnormal conditions is addressed in this document and consists of the following: (1) Inclined Plane Hauler; (2) Bottom Lift Transporter; (3) Load Haul Dump (LHD) Loader; (4) Heavy Duty Forklift for Emplacement Drifts; (5) Covered Shuttle Car; (6) Multipurpose Vehicle; and (7) Scaler.

  1. Summary of the Blind Test Campaign to predict the High Reynolds number performance of DU00-W-210 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Özlem Ceyhan; Pires, Oscar; Munduate, Xabier;

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a blind test campaign organized in the AVATAR project to predict the high Reynolds number performance of a wind turbine airfoil for wind turbine applications. The DU00-W-210 airfoil was tested in the DNW-HDG pressurized wind tunnel in order to investigate the ...

  2. Lagrangian and Eulerian pressure field evaluation of rod-airfoil flow from time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Moore, P.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the rod-airfoil air flow by time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-TOMO PIV) in thin-light volume configuration. Experiments are performed at the region close to the leading edge of a NACA0012 airfoil embedded in the von Karman wake of a cylindrical rod. The

  3. 2007 special equipment safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of P.R.China (AQSIQ) issued a notice on May 28, 2007,requiring various locations to rectify their procedures for checking special equipment and hoisting machines for hidden problems. To further clarify and implement responsibility in the safety management of special equipment in enterprises, inspection responsibilities and test organizations related to technical assurance are to be established. Further, quality inspection departments will be supervised by law in order to improve special equipment safety.

  4. Medical equipment management

    CERN Document Server

    Willson, Keith; Tabakov, Slavik

    2013-01-01

    Know What to Expect When Managing Medical Equipment and Healthcare Technology in Your Organization As medical technology in clinical care becomes more complex, clinical professionals and support staff must know how to keep patients safe and equipment working in the clinical environment. Accessible to all healthcare professionals and managers, Medical Equipment Management presents an integrated approach to managing medical equipment in healthcare organizations. The book explains the underlying principles and requirements and raises awareness of what needs to be done and what questions to ask. I

  5. Aerodynamic Design of Airfoils Based on Variable-Domain Variational Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈池; 刘高联

    2005-01-01

    Designing airfoils according to given pressure (or velocity) distribution is one kind of free boundary problems. Free boundary condition can be coupled with the flow governing equations by variable-domain variational calculus, which makes it possible to calculate simultaneously the flow field and the free boundary. An accurate deduction of the variable-domain variational principles is taken herein to design airfoils in compressible and incompressible flows. Furthermore, two grid types (H and O) are used in the calculation with better results for the O-type grid. It is shown that convergence is accelerated and good results can be obtained even if the initial guessed airfoil shape is a triangle, demonstrating the strong adaptability of this method.

  6. Status of advanced airfoil tests in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladson, C. L.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A joint NASA/U.S. industry program to test advanced technology airfoils in the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Tunnel (TCT) was formulated under the Langley ACEE Project Office. The objectives include providing U.S. industry an opportunity to compare their most advanced airfoils to the latest NASA designs by means of high Reynolds number tests in the same facility. At the same time, industry would again experience in the design and construction of cryogenic test techniques. The status and details of the test program are presented. Typical aerodynamic results obtained, to date, are presented at chord Reynolds number up to 45 x 10(6) and are compared to results from other facilities and theory. Details of a joint agreement between NASA and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsantalt fur Luft- and Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR) for tests of two airfoils are also included. Results of these tests will be made available as soon as practical.

  7. Wind Tunnel Tests of Wind Turbine Airfoils at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, E.; Gorostidi, A.; Jacobs, M.; Timmer, W. A.; Munduate, X.; Pires, O.

    2014-06-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been performed to measure the two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of two different airfoil families at high Reynolds numbers (from 3 to 12 millions) in the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. Also, tests at a Reynolds number of 3 millions have been performed in the Low-Speed Low- Turbulence Wind Tunnel of Delft University, The Netherlands. The airfoils tested belong to two wind turbine dedicated families: the TU-Delft DU family and the ACCIONA Windpower AWA family that was designed in collaboration with CENER. Reynolds number effects on airfoil performance have been obtained in the range of 3 to 12 millions. The availability of data from two different wind tunnels has brought the opportunity to cross compare the results from the two facilities.

  8. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic camber airfoil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Chandrasekhara

    2007-02-01

    This study reports control of compressible dynamic stall through management of its unsteady vorticity using a variable droop leading edge (VDLE) airfoil. Through dynamic adaptation of the airfoil edge incidence, the formation of a dynamic stall vortex was virtually eliminated for Mach numbers of up to 0·4. Consequently, the leading edge vorticity flux was redistributed enabling retention of the dynamic lift. Of even greater importance was the fact that the drag and pitching moment coefficients were reduced by nearly 50%. The camber variations introduced when the leading edge was drooped are explained to be the source of this benefit. Analysis of the peak vorticity flux levels allowed the determination of minimum necessary airfoil adaptation schedule.

  9. Modeling and computation of flow in a passage with 360 deg turning and multiple airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, W.; Vu, T. C.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the three-dimensional flows in a spiral casing of a hydraulic turbine, containing a passage of 360-deg turning and multiple elements of airfoils (the so-called distributor), is made. The physical model is based on a novel two-level approach, comprising of (1) a global model that adequately accounts for the geometry of the spiral casing but smears out the details of the distributor and represents the multiple airfoils by a porous medium treatment; and (2) a local model that performs detailed analysis of flow in the distributor region. The global analysis supplies the inlet flow condition for the individual cascade of distributor airfoils, while the distributor analysis yields the information needed for modeling the characteristics of the porous medium. Comparisons of pressure and velocity profiles between measurement and prediction have been made to assess the validity of the present approach. Flow characteristics in the spiral casing are also discussed.

  10. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  11. A SIMPLIFIED THEORY FOR UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCES ACTING ON AN AIRFOIL FLYING ABOVE SEA-WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Qi-hu; WU De-ming; ZHANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    A simplified theoretical method based on the quasi-steady wing theory was proposed to study the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil flying in non-uniform flow. Comparison between the theoretical results and the numerical results based on nonlinear theory was made. It shows that the simplified theory is a good approximation for the investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil flying above sea-waves. From on the simplified theory it is also found that an airfoil can get thrust from a wave-disturbed airflow and thus the total drag is reduced. And the relationship among the thrust, the flying altitude, the flying speed and the wave parameters was worked out and discussed.

  12. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  13. Scaling for Shock Response of Equipment in Different Submarines

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hara, G.J.; Cunniff, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents scaling rules developed to predict the response of submarine equipment subjected to underwater chemical explosions. The computer was used as a surrogate for shock tests. A simplified model of a hull section was used to contain frame-mounted single degree of freedom equipment. A general scaling rule has been developed to handle the spread in the shock response attributable to the charge weight, equipment weight, and equipment frequency, where the shock response is the abs...

  14. Parameter study of simplified dragonfly airfoil geometry at Reynolds number of 6000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-10-21

    Aerodynamic study of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil in gliding flight at Reynolds numbers below 10,000 is motivated by both pure scientific interest and technological applications. At these Reynolds numbers, the natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development of Micro UAV's and more. Insect wings are typically characterized by corrugated airfoils. The present study follows a fundamental flow physics study (Levy and Seifert, 2009), that revealed the importance of flow separation from the first corrugation, the roll-up of the separated shear layer to discrete vortices and their role in promoting flow reattachment to the aft arc, as the leading mechanism enabling high-lift, low drag performance of the Dragonfly gliding flight. This paper describes the effect of systematic airfoil geometry variations on the aerodynamic properties of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil at Reynolds number of 6000. The parameter study includes a detailed analysis of small variations of the nominal geometry, such as corrugation placement or height, rear arc and trailing edge shape. Numerical simulations using the 2D laminar Navier-Stokes equations revealed that the flow accelerating over the first corrugation slope is followed by an unsteady pressure recovery, combined with vortex shedding. The latter allows the reattachment of the flow over the rear arc. Also, the drag values are directly linked to the vortices' magnitude. This parametric study shows that geometric variations which reduce the vortices' amplitude, as reduction of the rear cavity depth or the reduction of the rear arc and trailing edge curvature, will reduce the drag values. Other changes will extend the flow reattachment over the rear arc for a larger mean lift coefficients range; such as the negative deflection of the forward flat plate. These changes consequently reduce the drag values at higher mean lift coefficients. The detailed geometry study enabled the definition of a corrugated airfoil

  15. Computational Analysis of the 2415-3S Airfoil Aerodynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Velázquez-Araque

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the numerical simulation of the two-dimensional, incompressible, steady air flow past an airfoil for a solar powered unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV with internal propulsion system. This airfoil results from a NACA 2415 four digits family base airfoil modification [7] and has a propulsive outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. The analysis involved the airfoil's aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficient curves as a function of the angle of attack (AOA for the condition where the engine of the UAV is turned off called the gliding condition and also for the blowing propulsive condition by means computational fluid dynamics. The computational domain has been discretised using a structured mesh of 188 x 200 tetrahedral elements. The RNG k-Ε model is utilized to describe the turbulent flow process as it was followed in [5]. The simulations were held at a Reynolds number of 300000. Results allowed obtaining lift and drag forces and pitching moment coefficient and also the location of the separation and reattachment points in some cases by means of the wall shear stress on the suction surface as well as velocity contours and streamlines for both conditions at different angles of attack, from 0 to 16 degrees with the smallest increment of 4 degrees. Finally, results from both cases were compared and the influence of the propulsive flow on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil has been analysed turning out that it improves significantly the performance of the airfoil reaching values up to 1,8 times in terms of lift at high angles of attack. [5] Rhie C.M., Chow W.L., Numerical Study of the Turbulent Flow Past an Airfoil with Trailing Edge Separation, AIAA Journal, Vol. 21, No. 11, 1983. [7] Velazquez L., Nožička J, Kulhanek R., Oil and Smoke Flow Visualization past Two-Dimensional Airfoils for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, in The 11th Asian Symposium of

  16. Aerodynamic behaviour of NREL S826 airfoil at Re=100,000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sarmast, Sasan;

    2014-01-01

    at Fluid Mechanics laboratory of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Lift coefficient is obtained from the forge gauge measurements while the drag is measured according to the integration of the wake profiles downstream of the airfoil. The pressure distribution is measured by a set of pressure taps......, there is a better agreement between the drag measurements and computations. It is concluded that LES computations are able to capture the lift and drag polars as well as the pressure distribution around the airfoil with an acceptable accuracy....

  17. Finding optimum airfoil shape to get maximum aerodynamic efficiency for a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of S-series wind turbine airfoil of S 825 are investigated to find optimum angle of attack. Aerodynamic performances calculations are carried out by utilization of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method withstand finite capacity approximation by using Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes (RANS) theorem. The lift and pressure coefficients, lift to drag ratio of airfoil S 825 are analyzed with SST turbulence model then obtained results crosscheck with wind tunnel data to verify the precision of computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approximation. The comparison indicates that SST turbulence model used in this study can predict aerodynamics properties of wind blade.

  18. Assessment of PIV-based unsteady load determination of an airfoil with actuated flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenborg, J. J. H. M.; Lindeboom, R. C. J.; Simão Ferreira, C. J.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; Bijl, H.

    2014-02-01

    For complex experimental setups involving movable structures it is not trivial to directly measure unsteady loads. An alternative is to deduce unsteady loads indirectly from measured velocity fields using Noca's method. The ultimate aim is to use this method in future work to determine unsteady loads for fluid-structure interaction problems. The focus in this paper is first on the application and assessment of Noca's method for an airfoil with an oscillating trailing edge flap. To our best knowledge Noca's method has not been applied yet to airfoils with moving control surfaces or fluid-structure interaction problems. In addition, wind tunnel corrections for this type of unsteady flow problem are considered.

  19. An Iterative Method for Estimating Airfoil Deformation due to Solid Particle Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicopter blades are currently constructed with composite materials enveloping honeycomb cores with only the leading and trailing edges made of metal alloys. In some cases, the erosive wear of the bound between the composite skin and metallic leading edge leads to full blade failure. It is therefore the goal of this paper to provide a method for simulating the way an airfoil is deformed through the erosion process. The method involves computational fluid dynamics simulations, scripts for automatic meshing and spreadsheet calculators for estimating the erosion and, ultimately, the airfoil deformation. Further work could include more complex meshing scripts allowing the use of similar methods for turbo-machineries.

  20. Usability of the Selig S1223 Profile Airfoil as a High Lift Hydrofoil for Hydrokinetic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Oller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical analysis of the ability of the high lift airfoil profile Selig S1223 for working as hydrofoil under water conditions. The geometry of the hydrofoil blade is designed through a suitable airfoil profile and then studied carefully by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in order to check its hydrodynamic behavior, i.e., including lift and drag analysis, and determinations of streamlines velocities and pressures fields. Finally conclusions on the use of this profile in a possible application for hydrokinetic turbine blades are detailed.

  1. Self-induced vibrations of a DU96-W-180 airfoil in stall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) non-moving, prescribed motion and elastically mounted airfoil computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations. The elastically mounted airfoil computations were performed by means of a 2D structural model with two d...... are likely to occur at modern wind turbine blades at standstill. In contrast, the predicted cut-in wind speed necessary for the onset of stall-induced vibrations appeared high enough for such vibrations to be unlikely. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  2. Evaluation of a research circulation control airfoil using Navier-Stokes methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds time averaged Navier-Stokes equations were used to obtain solutions for flows about a two dimensional circulation control airfoil. The governing equations were written in conservation form for a body-fitted coordinate system and solved using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure. A modified algebraic eddy viscosity model was used to define the turbulent characteristics of the flow, including the wall jet flow over the Coanda surface at the trailing edge. Numerical results are compared to experimental data obtained for a research circulation control airfoil geometry. Excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  3. Effects of laminar separation bubbles and turbulent separation on airfoil stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, P. [Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States); Coiro, D.P. [Universita di Napoli (Italy)

    1997-12-31

    An existing two-dimensional, interactive, stall prediction program is extended by improving its laminar separation bubble model. The program now accounts correctly for the effects of the bubble on airfoil performance characteristics when it forms at the mid-chord and on the leading edge. Furthermore, the model can now predict bubble bursting on very sharp leading edges at high angles of attack. The details of the model are discussed in depth. Comparisons of the predicted stall and post-stall pressure distributions show excellent agreement with experimental measurements for several different airfoils at different Reynolds numbers.

  4. Cesarean Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) KidsHealth > For Parents > Cesarean Sections (C-Sections) A A A What's in this ... babies in the United States are delivered via cesarean section (C-section). Even if you're envisioning a ...

  5. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  6. Optimization design study of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils for the high-efficiency propeller of low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil makes a great impact on designing a high-efficiency propeller for low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere. At high altitude,low-Reynolds-number airfoils are supposed to have high lift-drag ratio or high endurance factor at cruising attack angle along with good stall characteristics. To design such a high-performance low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil,the paper established a hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform by combing direct search optimization algorithm EXTREM and airfoil flow field solver XFOIL to automatically and quickly calculate aerodynamic performance function of airfoil by computer. It provides an effective solution to multi-point design problem of low-speed low-Reynolds-number airfoil. It can be seen from the results of three typical optimization examples,the new airfoil E387_OPT2,FX63-137_OPT2 and S1223_OPT2 based on hot low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils (Eppler 387 airfoil,Wortmann FX63-137 airfoil and S1223 airfoil) can meet the optimization design requirements and have very good aerodynamic characteristics in both design state and non-design state. Thus,the applicability and effectiveness of hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform are verified.

  7. Test of 4' x 20' Clark-Y airfoil model in FST

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Test of 4' x 20' Clark-Y airfoil model in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST

  8. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  9. Development of a fast shape memory alloy based actuator for morphing airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara-Quintanilla, A.

    2016-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic airfoils are optimized for certain conditions. For instance, the shape of the wings of fixed-wing aircrafts are designed and optimized for a certain flight condition (in terms of altitude, speed, aircraft weight, etc.). However, these flight conditions vary significantly du

  10. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  11. Cross-Validation of Numerical and Experimental Studies of Transitional Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frere, Ariane; Hillewaert, Koen; Sarlak, Hamid;

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance characteristic of airfoils are the main input for estimating wind turbine blade loading as well as annual energy production of wind farms. For transitional flow regimes these data are difficult to obtain, both experimentally as well as numerically, due to the very high...

  12. Experiments on a Steady Low Reynolds Number Airfoil in a Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, David; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    The aerodynamics of steady airfoils in uniform flow have received considerably more attention than that of an airfoil operating in a non-uniform flow. Inviscid theory by Tsien (1943) shows that an airfoil experiences a decrease in the zero lift angle of attack for a shear flow with uniform clockwise vorticity. The current work utilizes a shaped honeycomb technique to create a velocity profile with a large region of uniform shear in a water tunnel. Direct force measurements are implemented and validated using experiments on a circular cylinder and NACA 0012 in a uniform cross-flow. Results for a NACA 0012 airfoil with a chord Reynolds number of 1.2 ×104 in a non-uniform approach flow are compared to concurrent CFD calculations (presented in a companion talk) showing an increase in the zero lift angle of attack; in contradiction with inviscid theory. The effect of shear on the mean lift coefficient over a wide range of angles of attack is also explored. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  13. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  14. Identification of stiffness and damping characteristics of axial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, Vikas; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2011-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost “top foil” layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. AFBs are currently used in ma

  15. High Humidity Aerodynamic Effects Study on Offshore Wind Turbine Airfoil/Blade Performance through CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damp air with high humidity combined with foggy, rainy weather, and icing in winter weather often is found to cause turbine performance degradation, and it is more concerned with offshore wind farm development. To address and understand the high humidity effects on wind turbine performance, our study has been conducted with spread sheet analysis on damp air properties investigation for air density and viscosity; then CFD modeling study using Fluent was carried out on airfoil and blade aerodynamic performance effects due to water vapor partial pressure of mixing flow and water condensation around leading edge and trailing edge of airfoil. It is found that the high humidity effects with water vapor mixing flow and water condensation thin film around airfoil may have insignificant effect directly on airfoil/blade performance; however, the indirect effects such as blade contamination and icing due to the water condensation may have significant effects on turbine performance degradation. Also it is that found the foggy weather with microwater droplet (including rainy weather may cause higher drag that lead to turbine performance degradation. It is found that, at high temperature, the high humidity effect on air density cannot be ignored for annual energy production calculation. The blade contamination and icing phenomenon need to be further investigated in the next study.

  16. Propagation of Shock on NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine Airfoil under Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on numeric analysis of compressible flow around National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL phase VI wind turbine blade airfoil S809. Although wind turbine airfoils are low Reynolds number airfoils, a reasonable investigation of compressible flow under extreme condition might be helpful. A subsonic flow (mach no. M=0.8 has been considered for this analysis and the impacts of this flow under seven different angles of attack have been determined. The results show that shock takes place just after the mid span at the top surface and just before the mid span at the bottom surface at zero angle of attack. Slowly the shock waves translate their positions as angle of attack increases. A relative translation of the shock waves in upper and lower face of the airfoil are presented. Variation of Turbulent viscosity ratio and surface Y+ have also been determined. A k-ω SST turbulent model is considered and the commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT is used to find the pressure coefficient (Cp as well as the lift (CL and drag coefficients (CD. A graphical comparison of shock propagation has been shown with different angle of attack. Flow separation and stream function are also determined.

  17. Ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional oscillating airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports results of an experimental investigation into ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional elliptic airfoil undergoing simple harmonic translation and rotational motion. Ground clearance ( D) ranging from 1 c to 5 c (where c is the airfoil chord length) was investigated for three rotational amplitudes ( α m) of 30°, 45° and 60° (which respectively translate to mid-stroke angle of attack of 60°, 45° and 30°). For the lowest rotational amplitude of 30°, results show that an airfoil approaching a ground plane experiences a gradual decrease in cycle-averaged lift and drag coefficients until it reaches D ≈ 2.0 c, below which they increase rapidly. Corresponding DPIV measurement indicates that the initial force reduction is associated with the formation of a weaker leading edge vortex and the subsequent force increase below D ≈ 2.0 c may be attributed to stronger wake capture effect. Furthermore, an airfoil oscillating at higher amplitude lessens the initial force reduction when approaching the ground and this subsequently leads to lift distribution that bears striking resemblance to the ground effect on a conventional fixed wing in steady translation.

  18. Design and verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Gaunaa, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design and experimental verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for MW-size wind turbines with variable speed and pitch control. Seven airfoils were designed with thickness-to-chord ratios between 15% and 53% to cover the entire span of a wind turbine blade. The airfoils...... were designed to have high maximum lift and high design lift to allow a slender flexible blade while maintaining high aerodynamic efficiency. The design was carried out with a Risø in-house multi disciplinary optimization tool. Wind tunnel testing was done for Risø-B1-18 and Risø-B1-24 in the VELUX...... wind tunnel, Denmark, at a Reynolds number of 1.6x10(6). For both airfoils the predicted target characteristics were met. Results for Risø-B1-18 showed a maximum lift coefficient of 1.64. A standard case of zigzag tape leading edge roughness caused a drop in maximum lift of only 3.7%. Cases of more...

  19. Self-sustained Flow-acoustic Interactions in Airfoil Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    all tested airfoils multiple tones were observed. Tracking the dominant tone at increasing flow speed produces the so-called ladder-type tonal...anecho c w nd tunne of Eco e Centra e de Lyon. Measurements of wa pressure, far- f e d acoust c pressure and ve oc ty f uctuat ons us ng the hot-w re

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation Analysis of Unsteady Separation Over a Pitching Airfoil at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    helicopter rotor blades , wind turbine blades , pitching and flapping airfoils and wings, and rotating turbomachinery blades . For instance, helicopter...the date of this printing . List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories: (b) Papers published in non-peer-reviewed...77 A.3.5 3D Taylor-Green vortex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 A.4 Summary

  1. URANS simulations of separated flow with stall cells over an NREL S826 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarlak Chivaee, Hamid; Nishino, T.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel measurements and oil flow visualization was recently carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in order to investigate flow characteristics over a 14% thick NREL S826 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. This paper aims at presenting numerical simulations of the same ...

  2. Predicting extreme loads effects on wind turbines considering uncertainty in airfoil data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Imad; Natarajan, Anand; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    The sources contributing to uncertainty in a wind turbine blade static airfoil data include wind tunnel testing, CFD calculations, 3D rotational corrections based on CFD or empirical models, surface roughness corrections, Reynolds number corrections, expansion to the full 360-degree angle of atta...

  3. Computational Study on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine Airfoil Fitted with Coandă Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Djojodihardjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various methods of flow control for enhanced aerodynamic performance have been developed and applied to enhance and control the behavior of aerodynamic components. The use of Coandă effect for the enhancement of circulation and lift has gained renewed interest, in particular with the progress of CFD. The present work addresses the influence, effectiveness, and configuration of Coandă-jet fitted aerodynamic surface for improving lift and L/D, specifically for S809 airfoil, with a view on its incorporation in the wind turbine. A simple two-dimensional CFD modeling using k-ɛ turbulence model is utilized to reveal the key elements that could exhibit the desired performance for a series of S809 airfoil configurations. Parametric study performed indicates that the use of Coandă-jet S809 airfoil can only be effective in certain range of trailing edge rounding-off radius, Coandă-jet thickness, and momentum jet size. The location of the Coandă-jet was found to be effective when it is placed close to the trailing edge. The results are compared with experimental data for benchmarking. Three-dimensional configurations are synthesized using certain acceptable assumptions. A trade-off study on the S809 Coandă configured airfoil is needed to judge the optimum configuration of Coandă-jet fitted Wind-Turbine design.

  4. Amiet theory extension to predict leading-edge generated noise in compact airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, L.D.; Schram, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the Amiet theory to frequencies where the airfoil can be considered a compact noise source. The original Amiet theory proposes to apply the Schwarzschild theorem in an iterative procedure, which generally leads to noise over-prediction at low-frequencies. To overcome this problem,

  5. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  6. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  7. A dynamic wall model for Large-Eddy simulations of wind turbine dedicated airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Calafell; O, Lehmkuhl; A, Carmona; D, Pérez-Segarra C.; A, Oliva

    2014-06-01

    This work aims at modelling the flow behavior past a wind turbine dedicated airfoil at high Reynolds number and large angle of attack (AoA). The DU-93-W-210 airfoil has been selected. To do this, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) have been performed. Momentum equations have been solved with a parallel unstructured symmetry preserving formulation while the wall-adapting local-eddy viscosity model within a variational multi-scale framework (VMS- WALE) is used as the subgrid-scales model. Since LES calculations are still very expensive at high Reynolds Number, specially at the near-wall region, a dynamic wall model has been implemented in order to overcome this limitation. The model has been validated with a very unresolved Channel Flow case at Reτ = 2000. Afterwards, the model is also tested with the Ahmed Car case, that from the flow physics point of view is more similar to an stalled airfoil than the Channel Flow is, including flow features as boundary layer detachment and recirculations. This case has been selected because experimental results of mean velocity profiles are available. Finally, a flow around a DU-93-W-210 airfoil is computed at Re = 3 x 106 and with an AoA of 15°. Numerical results are presented in comparison with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or experimental data for all cases.

  8. Reliable Electronic Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nayak

    1960-05-01

    Full Text Available The reliability aspect of electronic equipment's is discussed. To obtain optimum results, close cooperation between the components engineer, the design engineer and the production engineer is suggested.

  9. Electronic equipment packaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Gerald L

    1992-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen major advances in the electronics industry. Perhaps the most significant aspect of these advances has been the significant role that electronic equipment plays in almost all product markets. Even though electronic equipment is used in a broad base of applications, many future applications have yet to be conceived. This versatility of electron­ ics has been brought about primarily by the significant advances that have been made in integrated circuit technology. The electronic product user is rarely aware of the integrated circuits within the equipment. However, the user is often very aware of the size, weight, mod­ ularity, maintainability, aesthetics, and human interface features of the product. In fact, these are aspects of the products that often are instrumental in deter­ mining its success or failure in the marketplace. Optimizing these and other product features is the primary role of Electronic Equipment Packaging Technology. As the electronics industry continues to pr...

  10. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Methodology Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10−7 and 10−6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. Results It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics

  11. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...... is considered as extruded profiles are inadequate for compact designs. An optimal pin fin shape and configuration is sought also taking manufacturing costs into consideration. Standard methods for geometrical modeling and thermal analysis are applied....

  12. Estimation of morphing airfoil shapes and aerodynamic loads using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan Scott

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape, as well as the aerodynamic loads, in real time. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors (AHS) developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this study, AHS measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the AHS measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network (ANN) based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Additionally, an aerodynamic formulation based on the finite-state inflow theory has been developed to calculate the aerodynamic loads on thin airfoils with arbitrary camber deformations. Various aerodynamic properties approximated from the AHS/ANN system will be compared with the results of the finite-state inflow aerodynamic formulation in order to validate the approximation approach.

  13. Design of low noise airfoil with high aerodynamic performance for use on small wind turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taehyung; KIM; Seungmin; LEE; Hogeon; KIM; Soogab; LEE

    2010-01-01

    Wind power is one of the most reliable renewable energy sources and internationally installed capacity is increasing radically every year.Although wind power has been favored by the public in general,the problem with the impact of wind turbine noise on people living in the vicinity of the turbines has been increased.Low noise wind turbine design is becoming more and more important as noise is spreading more adverse effect of wind turbine to public.This paper demonstrates the design of 10 kW class wind turbines,each of three blades,a rotor diameter 6.4 m,a rated rotating speed 200 r/min and a rated wind speed 10 m/s.The optimized airfoil is dedicated for the 75% spanwise position because the dominant source of a wind turbine blade is trailing edge noise from the outer 25% of the blade.Numerical computations are performed for incompressible flow and for Mach number at 0.145 and for Reynolds numbers at 1.02×106 with a lift performance,which is resistant to surface contamination and turbulence intensity.The objectives in the design process are to reduce noise emission,while sustaining high aerodynamic efficiency.Dominant broadband noise sources are predicted by semi-empirical formulas composed of the groundwork by Brooks et al.and Lowson associated with typical wind turbine operation conditions.During the airfoil redesign process,the aerodynamic performance is analyzed to reduce the wind turbine power loss.The results obtained from the design process show that the design method is capable of designing airfoils with reduced noise using a commercial 10 kW class wind turbine blade airfoil as a basis.Therefore,the new optimized airfoil showing 2.9 dB reductions of total sound pressure level(SPL) and higher aerodynamic performance are achieved.

  14. Analysis and research on inconsistency problem between section state reported by interlock and train location reported by on board equipment%对联锁报告区段状态和车载报告列车位置信息不一致问题的分析与研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张友兵; 张波; 刘志刚

    2012-01-01

    CTCS-3级列控系统的列车走行累计误差如果过大,有可能造成联锁设备向RBC报告区段占用状态与车载设备向RBC报告列车位置之间存在信息不一致问题,导致列车运行效率降低,影响行车安全.本文针对该问题进行了数学建模,通过对模型的分析研究,说明了问题发生的原因,并提出了降低问题发生概率的方法.%In the CTCS-3, the accumulated error of the train running distance was inevitable when the train was running. If the accumulated error was too large, it was probable to cause the inconsistency problem between section state reported by interlock equipment and train location reported by on board equipment, reduce the train running efficiency and impact the traffic safety. In this paper, the mathematical model was built. With the theoretical analysis to the model, the occurrence reason of the problem was illustrated, the method of reducing the occurrence probability of this problem was put forward.

  15. Numerical analysis of air-foil shaped fin performance in printed circuit heat exchanger in a supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jin Gyu [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jae Eun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Staggered arrangement affects the pressure drop but does not significantly affect to the heat transfer. • The total pressure drop is reduced, but the amount of acceleration pressure drop increases while that of frictional pressure drop decreases as the horizontal number increases. • For the vertical number, the total pressure drop decreases more largely than the horizontal number. • The objective function shows that the fully staggered arrangement shows best performance. - Abstract: One of the key issues of the PCHE technology in the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is to achieve an efficient and compact designs to be able to enhance heat transfer and reduce pressure drop. The issue is challenging due to the complex configuration of micro-channels in the PCHE. In this study, an innovative micro-channel equipped with an array of airfoil fins is analyzed to evaluate its performance. In so doing, sensitivity analysis with various design parameters is performed to configure the optimal arrangement of airfoil fins by using CFD analysis for Supercritical Carbon dioxide Integral Experimental Loop (SCIEL) in Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Dominant geometric parameters of the fin arrangement that affects to the thermal and hydraulic performances are the horizontal, vertical and staggered pitches. ANSYS ICEM CFD and ANSYS CFX are used for the grid generation and the computational calculation. CO{sub 2} properties are used by using REFPROF software database. The inlet temperature of the hot side is 618 K and that of the cold side is 585 K. The reference mass flow rate is set as 1.2 g/s for the vertical number of 2.0, which is the Reynolds number of about 30,000. The mass flow rate changes from 0.4 to 4.8 g/s in order to investigate the Reynolds number effect. The k-ε model is selected as the turbulence model. In conclusions, the results show that the optimal arrangement of airfoil fins can be examined in terms of an objective

  16. Vortex-induced vibrations of a DU96-W-180 airfoil at 90° angle of attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of vortex-induced vibrations of a DU96-W-180 airfoil in deep stall at a 90 degrees angle of attack, based on 2D and 3D Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes and 3D Detached Eddy Simulation unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics computations with non-moving, prescribed motion...... and elastically mounted airfoil suspensions. Stationary vortex-shedding frequencies computed in 2D and 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics differed. In the prescribed motion computations, the airfoil oscillated in the direction of the chord line. Negative aerodynamic damping, found in both 2D and 3D Computational...... Fluid Dynamics computations with moving airfoil, showed in the vicinity of the stationary vortex-shedding frequency computed by 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics. A shorter time series was sufficient to verify the sign of the aerodynamic damping in the case of the elastic computations than the prescribed...

  17. Analysis of the separated boundary layer flow on the surface and in the wake of blunt trailing edge airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradia, S. H.; Mehta, J. M.; Shrewsbury, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    The viscous flow phenomena associated with sharp and blunt trailing edge airfoils were investigated. Experimental measurements were obtained for a 17 percent thick, high performance GAW-1 airfoil. Experimental measurements consist of velocity and static pressure profiles which were obtained by the use of forward and reverse total pressure probes and disc type static pressure probes over the surface and in the wake of sharp and blunt trailing edge airfoils. Measurements of the upper surface boundary layer were obtained in both the attached and separated flow regions. In addition, static pressure data were acquired, and skin friction on the airfoil upper surface was measured with a specially constructed device. Comparison of the viscous flow data with data previously obtained elsewhere indicates reasonable agreement in the attached flow region. In the separated flow region, considerable differences exist between these two sets of measurements.

  18. 21 CFR 1250.34 - Refrigeration equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refrigeration equipment. 1250.34 Section 1250.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Food Service Sanitation on Land and Air Conveyances, and Vessels § 1250.34 Refrigeration...

  19. 47 CFR 73.712 - Equipment tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... rules and regulations. Such tests shall use voice identification and test tones only. No programming... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment tests. 73.712 Section 73.712 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST...

  20. 43 CFR 12.72 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 12.72 Section 12.72 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative...

  1. Equipment Operational Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  2. Experimental Analysis of the Vorticity and Turbulent Flow Dynamics of a Pitching Airfoil at Realistic Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-31

    increasing Re, while the angle for maximum lift increases with increasing Re. Hot - wire anemometry data indicated the occurrence of a short bubble...then convects downstream near the airfoil surface, which causes an increase in lift and strong pitching- moments due to suction created by the vortex...always forms and 14 convects over the airfoil upper surface at approximately 0.3 times the freestream velocity for all cases studied. The

  3. 49 CFR 393.130 - What are the rules for securing heavy vehicles, equipment and machinery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., equipment and machinery? 393.130 Section 393.130 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... heavy vehicles, equipment and machinery? (a) Applicability. The rules in this section apply to the transportation of heavy vehicles, equipment and machinery which operate on wheels or tracks, such as front...

  4. 锻压设备通用结构件与型钢三维模型库的开发与应用系统%The exploitation and application system of three-dimensional model library for general structural part and section steel for metalforming equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晋生

    2011-01-01

    The exploitation and application system of three -dimensional model library for general structural part and section steel for metalforming equipment have been conducted by use of SolidWorks three-dimensional model design software. On basis of structure characteristics and product structure, the plate and section steel have been categorized, tidied up, and unified with the serial number. Finally, the three-dimensional model library system has been established.%采用SolidWorks三维模型设计软件进行锻压设备通用结构件与型钢三维模型库的开发及应用系统,是依据钢板类零件及型钢的结构特点以及产品结构,对各种形状的钢板类零件和型钢进行归类、整理、统一编号并建立三维模型库系统.

  5. Dairy Equipment Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Lake To Lake Dairy Cooperative, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, operates four plants in Wisconsin for processing milk, butter and cheese products from its 1,300 member farms. The large co-op was able to realize substantial savings by using NASA information for improved efficiency in plant maintenance. Under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a handbook consolidating information about commercially available lubricants. The handbook details chemical and physical properties, applications, specifications, test procedures and test data for liquid and solid lubricants. Lake To Lake's plant engineer used the handbook to effect savings in maintenance labor and materials costs by reducing the number of lubricants used on certain equipment. Strict U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration regulations preclude lubrication changes n production equipment, but the co-op's maintenance chief was able to eliminate seven types of lubricants for ancillary equipment, such as compressors and high pressure pumps. Handbook data enabled him to select comparable but les expensive lubricants in the materials consolidation process, and simplified lubrication schedules and procedures. The handbook is in continuing use as a reference source when a new item of equipment is purchased.

  6. Data-Driven Low-Dimensional Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing

    CERN Document Server

    DeGennaro, Anthony M; Martinelli, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of an airfoil can be detrimental to aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, the geometric shape of leading edge ice profiles can vary significantly depending on a wide range of physical parameters, which can translate into a wide variability in aerodynamic performance. The purpose of this work is to explore the variability in airfoil aerodynamic performance that results from variability in leading edge ice shape profile. First, we demonstrate how to identify a low-dimensional set of parameters that governs ice shape from a database of ice shapes using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). Then, we investigate the effects of uncertainty in the POD coefficients. This is done by building a global response surface surrogate using Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE). To construct this surrogate efficiently, we use adaptive sparse grid sampling of the POD parameter space. We then analyze the data from a statistical standpoint.

  7. Innovative Design of a Darrieus Straight Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine by using Multi Element Airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougle, Prasad Devendra

    , as big as 10 MW wind energy convertors. Today wind turbines are the biggest structures on the earth. The knowledge and experiences from aviation and a construction industry has made quicker developments in the wind turbines. This research work is aimed at design and development of a small wind turbine....... Mainly, there is the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) and vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). HAWTs are more popular than VAWTs due to failure of VAWT commercialization during the late of 1980s on a large scale. However, in recent research work it has been documented that VAWTs are more economical...... for validation. In this PhD research, a development of wind turbine rotor is planned based on the multi-element airfoil technology used in aviation for aeroplanes. A method of experimental and numerical analysis is combined together for successful research. A double-element airfoil design is carried out...

  8. Flow Simulation Around Cambered Airfoil by Using Conformal Mapping and Intermediate Domain in Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poozesh, Amin; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the developed interpolation lattice Boltzmann method is used for simulation of unsteady fluid flow. It combines the desirable features of the lattice Boltzmann and the Joukowski transformation methods. This approach has capability to simulate flow around curved boundary geometries such as airfoils in a body fitted grid system. Simulation of unsteady flow around a cambered airfoil in a non-uniform grid for the first time is considered to show the capability of this method for modeling of fluid flow around complex geometries and complicated long-term periodic flow phenomena. The developed solver is also coupled with a fast adaptive grid generator. In addition, the new approach retains all the advantages of the standard lattice Boltzmann method. The Strouhal number, the pressure, the drag and the lift coefficients obtained from the simulations agree well with classical computational fluid dynamics simulations. Numerical studies for various test cases illustrate the strength of this new approach.

  9. Passive Boundary Layer Separation Control on a NACA2415 Airfoil at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Agastya; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    The design and analysis of a passive flow control system for a NACA2415 airfoil is undertaken. There exists a vast body of knowledge on airfoil boundary layer control with the use of controlled mass flux, but there is little work investigating passive mass flux-based methods. A simple duct system that uses the upper surface pressure gradient to force blowing near the leading edge and suction near the trailing edge is proposed and evaluated. 2D RANS analyses at Rec 1 . 27 ×106 were used to generate potential configurations for experimental tests. Initial computational results suggest drag reductions of approximately 2 - 7 % as well as lift increases of 4 - 5 % at α = 10 .0° and α = 12 .5° . A carbon composite-aluminum structure model that implements the most effective configurations, according to the CFD predictions, has been designed and fabricated. Experiments are being performed to evaluate the CFD results and the feasibility the duct system.

  10. Kinematic optimization of 2D plunging airfoil motion using the response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmoud MEKADEM; Taha CHETTIBI; Samir HANCHI; Laurent KEIRSBULCK; Larbi LABRAGA

    2012-01-01

    The propulsive efficiency of a plunging NACA0012 airfoil is maximized by means of a simple numerical optimization method based on the response surface methodology (RSM).The control parameters are the amplitude and the reduced frequency of the harmonic sinusoidal motion.The 2D unsteady laminar flow around the plunging airfoil is computed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for three Reynolds number values (Re =3.3 × 103,1.1 × 104,and 2.2× 104).The Nelder-Mead algorithm is used to find the best control parameters leading to the optimal propulsive efficiency over the constructed response surfaces.It is found that,for a given efficiency level and regardless of the considered Re value,it is possible either to obtain high thrust by selecting a high oscillation frequency or to reduce the input power by adopting a low plunging amplitude.

  11. Numerical modeling of aerodynamics of airfoils of micro air vehicles in gusty environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Harish

    The superior flight characteristics exhibited by birds and insects can be taken as a prototype of the most perfect form of flying machine ever created. The design of Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) which tries mimic the flight of birds and insects has generated a great deal of interest as the MAVs can be utilized for a number of commercial and military operations which is usually not easily accessible by manned motion. The size and speed of operation of a MAV results in low Reynolds number flight, way below the flying conditions of a conventional aircraft. The insensitivity to wind shear and gust is one of the required factors to be considered in the design of airfoil for MAVs. The stability of flight under wind shear is successfully accomplished in the flight of birds and insects, through the flapping motion of their wings. Numerous studies which attempt to model the flapping motion of the birds and insects have neglected the effect of wind gust on the stability of the motion. Also sudden change in flight conditions makes it important to have the ability to have an instantaneous change of the lift force without disturbing the stability of the MAV. In the current study, two dimensional rigid airfoil, undergoing flapping motion is studied numerically using a compressible Navier-Stokes solver discretized using high-order finite difference schemes. The high-order schemes in space and in time are needed to keep the numerical solution economic in terms of computer resources and to prevent vortices from smearing. The numerical grid required for the computations are generated using an inverse panel method for the streamfunction and potential function. This grid generating algorithm allows the creation of single-block orthogonal H-grids with ease of clustering anywhere in the domain and the easy resolution of boundary layers. The developed numerical algorithm has been validated successfully against benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics (CAA), and unsteady viscous

  12. Integrated axial and tangential serpentine cooling circuit in a turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J; Dalton, John P

    2015-05-05

    A continuous serpentine cooling circuit forming a progression of radial passages (44, 45, 46, 47A, 48A) between pressure and suction side walls (52, 54) in a MID region of a turbine airfoil (24). The circuit progresses first axially, then tangentially, ending in a last radial passage (48A) adjacent to the suction side (54) and not adjacent to the pressure side (52). The passages of the axial progression (44, 45, 46) may be adjacent to both the pressure and suction side walls of the airfoil. The next to last radial passage (47A) may be adjacent to the pressure side wall and not adjacent to the suction side wall. The last two radial passages (47A, 48A) may be longer along the pressure and suction side walls respectively than they are in a width direction, providing increased direct cooling surface area on the interiors of these hot walls.

  13. Investigation of flow past a translatoric oscillating airfoil using detached eddy simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Mads; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2003-01-01

    . The DES method difines a hybrid method combining Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) in the attached boundary layer with Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in the outer separated regions, thus resolving largescaled transient turbulent motion. Comparison to existing unsteady k-w-SST RANS simulations...... at the high angle of attacks often experienced by the individual rotor blade. The present paper covers simulation of a translatoric oscillating NACA 0015 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 555,000, corresponding to avialable experimental data, using the newly adopted Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) approach......Wind turbine rotor blades in operation have been observed to undergo stall-induced lead-lag instabilities resulting in dramatic reduction of blade life, due to structural fatigue. Previous attempts to numerically simulate the flow past a translatoric oscillating airfoil have been few and feeble...

  14. LDA measurement of the passage flow field in an annular airfoil cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1987-01-01

    Models to predict the complex three-dimensional flow through turbomachine blade rows are being developed. To verify these models and direct necessary refinements, it is necessary that predictions be correlated with data obtained in experiments which model the fundamental three-dimensional blade row flow phenomena. This paper describes a series of experiments performed in a large scale, subsonic, annular cascade facility specifically designed to provide such data. In particular, the effect of incidence angle on the three-dimensional passage flow field through an annular cascade of cambered airfoils is investigated and quantified, accomplished by obtaining detailed and expensive LDA data. These data demonstrate and quantify the development of the passage vortices through the airfoil passage and their strong interaction with the endwall boundary layers.

  15. LDA measurement of the passage flow field in a 3-D airfoil cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional internal flow computational models are currently being developed to predict the flow through turbomachinery blade rows. For these codes to be of quantitative value, they must be verified with data obtained in experiments which model the fundamental flow phenomena. In this paper, the complete three-dimensional flow field through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils is experimentally quantified. In particular, detailed three-dimensional data are obtained to quantify the inlet velocity profile, the cascade passage velocity field, and the exit region flow field. The primary instrumentation for acquiring these data is a single-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer operating in the backscatter mode, with chordwise distributions of airfoil surface static pressure taps also utilized. Appropriate data are correlated with predictions from the MERIDL/TSONIC codes.

  16. Simultaneous Investigation of Flexibility and Plasma Actuation Effects on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Oscillating Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Mahboubi Doust; Abas Ramiar; Morteza Dardel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a numerical study of two dimensional laminar incompressible flow around the flexible oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is performed using the open source code OpenFOAM. Oscillatory motion types including pitching and flapping is considered. Reynolds number for these motions is assumed fixed at 12000. One of the important issues that must be considered in designing air structures, in particular the aircraft wing, is the interaction between the air and the elastic aircraft wings that i...

  17. Effects of a trapped vortex cell on a thick wing airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasagna, Davide; Iuso, Gaetano [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aeronautica e Spaziale, Torino (Italy); Donelli, Raffaele; De Gregorio, Fabrizio [Centro Italiano di Ricerca Aerospaziale (C.I.R.A), Capua (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    The effects of a trapped vortex cell (TVC) on the aerodynamic performance of a NACA0024 wing model were investigated experimentally at Re = 10{sup 6} and 6.67 x 10{sup 5}. The static pressure distributions around the model and the wake velocity profiles were measured to obtain lift and drag coefficients, for both the clean airfoil and the controlled configurations. Suction was applied in the cavity region to stabilize the trapped vortex. For comparison, a classical boundary layer suction configuration was also tested. The drag coefficient curve of the TVC-controlled airfoil showed sharp discontinuities and bifurcative behavior, generating two drag modes. A strong influence of the angle of attack, the suction rate and the Reynolds number on the drag coefficient was observed. With respect to the clean airfoil, the control led to a drag reduction only if the suction was high enough. Compared to the classical boundary layer suction configuration, the drag reduction was higher for the same amount of suction only in a specific range of incidence, i.e., {alpha} = -2 to {alpha} = 6 and only for the higher Reynolds number. For all the other conditions, the classical boundary layer suction configuration gave better drag performances. Moderate increments of lift were observed for the TVC-controlled airfoil at low incidence, while a 20% lift enhancement was observed in the stall region with respect to the baseline. However, the same lift increments were also observed for the classical boundary layer suction configuration. Pressure fluctuation measurements in the cavity region suggested a very complex interaction of several flow features. The two drag modes were characterized by typical unsteady phenomena observed in rectangular cavity flows, namely the shear layer mode and the wake mode. (orig.)

  18. High-Speed Wind-Tunnel Tests of the NACA 23012 and 23012-64 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1941-02-01

    ce tha n the :: JaCA 2,3012 and should , therefore , have the l o we r cr itica l speed . The critical speeds esti - ~ated frorr ref er ence 7 a r e...t ical sleeds at w~icb :arge i~cr ea5e s in drag coefficient o ccurr et were sli~h tl y higher for the NACA 23012- 54 airfoil t h an for tne JACA

  19. Impact of the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Oscillating Airfoils on the Flutter Characteristics of Turbomachines

    OpenAIRE

    Vega Coso, Almudena

    2017-01-01

    This thesis studies the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating airfoils in the low reduced frequency regime, with special emphasis on its impact on the scaling of the work per cycle curves, using an asymptotic approach and numerical experiments. The unsteady aerodynamics associated with the vibration of turbine and compressor bladed-discs and stator vanes is nowadays routinely analysed within the design loop of the aeroengine companies, and it has also been the subject of dedicated experiments....

  20. Interferometric Investigations of Compressible Dynamic Stall Over a Transiently Pitching Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Carr, L.W.; Wilder, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.2514/6.1993-211 The dynamic stall flow field over a NACA 0012 airfoil pitching transiently from 0 - 60 degrees at a constant rate under compressible flow conditions has been studied using the real-time technique of point diffraction interferometrv. This investigation using nonintrusive diagnostics-provides a quantitative description of the overall flow field, including the finer details of dynamic...

  1. Falco UAV Low Reynolds Airfoil Design and Testing at Galileo Avionica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    thickness to chord ratio. The airfoil selected among a wide range of geometries optimizing the two design points has been investigated using CFD for...ALSWT Alenia Low Speed Wind Tunnel A/P Autopilot AR Aspect Ratio CD Drag Coefficient CFD Computational Fluid Dynamics CMIC Continuous...features (estimated geometrical characteristics) Air Vehicle T/O weight [kg] Wing surf . [m2] Wing span [m] AR M.A.C. [m] Meteor Mirach 26 230 2.94

  2. Experimental investigation of the transonic flow around the leading edge of an eroded fan airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Klinner, Joachim; Hergt, Alexander; Willert, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The influence of leading edge modification on the time-averaged and instantaneous flow around a fan airfoil is investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV), schlieren imaging and high-speed shock shadowgraphs in a transonic cascade windtunnel. In addition to a global characterization of the time-averaged flow using PIV, the instantaneous passage shock position was extracted from single-shot PIV measurements by matching the tracer velocity across the normal shock with an exponential fit. T...

  3. Computing Aerodynamic Performance of a 2D Iced Airfoil: Blocking Topology and Grid Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, X.; Zhu, B.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Slater, J. W.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Yung K.; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ice accrued on airfoils can have enormously complicated shapes with multiple protruded horns and feathers. In this paper, several blocking topologies are proposed and evaluated on their ability to produce high-quality structured multi-block grid systems. A transition layer grid is introduced to ensure that jaggedness on the ice-surface geometry do not to propagate into the domain. This is important for grid-generation methods based on hyperbolic PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) and algebraic transfinite interpolation. A 'thick' wrap-around grid is introduced to ensure that grid lines clustered next to solid walls do not propagate as streaks of tightly packed grid lines into the interior of the domain along block boundaries. For ice shapes that are not too complicated, a method is presented for generating high-quality single-block grids. To demonstrate the usefulness of the methods developed, grids and CFD solutions were generated for two iced airfoils: the NLF0414 airfoil with and without the 623-ice shape and the B575/767 airfoil with and without the 145m-ice shape. To validate the computations, the computed lift coefficients as a function of angle of attack were compared with available experimental data. The ice shapes and the blocking topologies were prepared by NASA Glenn's SmaggIce software. The grid systems were generated by using a four-boundary method based on Hermite interpolation with controls on clustering, orthogonality next to walls, and C continuity across block boundaries. The flow was modeled by the ensemble-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations, closed by the shear-stress transport turbulence model in which the integration is to the wall. All solutions were generated by using the NPARC WIND code.

  4. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. 75.503 Section 75.503 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.431 - Maintenance of equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Electrical Safety-Related Maintenance and Environmental Considerations § 1926.431 Maintenance of equipment. The employer shall ensure that all wiring... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of equipment. 1926.431 Section 1926.431...

  6. 30 CFR 250.515 - Blowout prevention equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blowout prevention equipment. 250.515 Section 250.515 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS... Blowout prevention equipment. (a) The BOP system and system components and related well-control...

  7. 33 CFR 154.1130 - Requirements for prepositioned response equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for prepositioned response equipment. 154.1130 Section 154.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF.... (7) Buckets, shovels, and various other tools. (8) Decontamination equipment. (9) Shoreline...

  8. Illustrated glossary of process equipment. Chinese/English/French edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paruit, B.

    1984-01-01

    Here is a volume of process equipment and terms in standard Mandarin Chinese, English, and French. As with the English/French/Spanish edition, each page illustrates a particular piece of equipment, with captions identifying the key components. Glossaries at the end of each major section include the Romanized pronunciation of the Chinese.

  9. 42 CFR 457.222 - FFP for equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... participation in the cost of equipment under CHIP are determined in accordance with subpart G of 45 CFR part 95... of 45 CFR part 95. ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP for equipment. 457.222 Section 457.222...

  10. 7 CFR 2902.10 - Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11. ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids. 2902.10 Section... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.10 Mobile equipment hydraulic fluids. (a) Definition. Hydraulic...

  11. 46 CFR 189.25-30 - Electrical engineering equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical engineering equipment. 189.25-30 Section 189.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection for Certification § 189.25-30 Electrical engineering equipment. (a) For inspection procedures of...

  12. 46 CFR 91.25-30 - Electrical engineering equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical engineering equipment. 91.25-30 Section 91.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection for Certification § 91.25-30 Electrical engineering equipment. For inspection procedures of...

  13. 40 CFR 86.206-94 - Equipment required; overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment required; overview. 86.206-94 Section 86.206-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.206-94 Equipment...

  14. 40 CFR 86.206-11 - Equipment required; overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment required; overview. 86.206-11 Section 86.206-11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.206-11 Equipment...

  15. 46 CFR 120.372 - Equipment and conductor grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment and conductor grounding. 120.372 Section 120... INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 120.372 Equipment and conductor grounding. (a) All... together to a common ground by a normally non-current carrying conductor. Metallic cases of instruments...

  16. 47 CFR 76.630 - Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment. 76.630 Section 76.630 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST... Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment. (a) Cable system operators shall not scramble or...

  17. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  18. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  19. 46 CFR 154.1852 - Air breathing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air breathing equipment. 154.1852 Section 154.1852... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1852 Air breathing equipment. (a) The master shall ensure that a licensed officer inspects the compressed air...

  20. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE UNSTEADY EULER EQUATIONS FOR AIRFOILS USING APPROXIMATE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高超; 罗时钧; 刘锋

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient numerical method for solving the unsteady Euler equations on stationary rectilinear grids. Boundary conditions on the surface of an airfoil are implemented by using their first-order expansions on the mean chord line. The method is not restricted to flows with small disturbances since there are no restrictions on the mean angle of attack of the airfoil. The mathematical formulation and the numerical implementation of the wall boundary conditions in a fully implicit time-accurate finite-volume Euler scheme are described. Unsteady transonic flows about an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil are calculated. Computational results compare well with Euler solutions by the full boundary conditions on a body-fitted curvilinear grid and published experimental data. This study establishes the feasibility for computing unsteady fluid-structure interaction problems, where the use of a stationary rectilinear grid offers substantial advantages in saving computer time and program design since it does not require the generation and implementation of time-dependent body-fitted grids.

  1. Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation of transonic airfoil buffet at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuma; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we conduct the wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (LES) of transonic buffet phenomena over the OAT15A supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number. The transonic airfoil buffet involves shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions and shock vibration associated with the flow separation downstream of the shock wave. The wall-modeled LES developed by Kawai and Larsson PoF (2012) is tuned on the K supercomputer for high-fidelity simulation. We first show the capability of the present wall-modeled LES on the transonic airfoil buffet phenomena and then investigate the detailed flow physics of unsteadiness of shock waves and separated boundary layer interaction phenomena. We also focus on the sustaining mechanism of the buffet phenomena, including the source of the pressure waves propagated from the trailing edge and the interactions between the shock wave and the generated sound waves. This work was supported in part by MEXT as a social and scientific priority issue to be tackled by using post-K computer. Computer resources of the K computer was provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Project ID: hp150254).

  2. Wall-Resolved Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow Past a NACA0012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow past a NACA0012 airfoil is performed at angle of attack (AoA) 3o and Rec = 2 . 3 ×104 . The filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are spatially discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order scheme developed by Morinishi et al. (J. of Comput. Phys., 1998), and the subgrid-scale (SGS) tensor is modeled by the stretched-vortex SGS model developed by Pullin and co-workers (Phys. of Fluids, 2000, J. of Fluid Mech., 2009). An extension of the original stretched-vortex SGS model is utilized to resolve the streak-like structures in the near-wall flow regions. The mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles on airfoil surface and in wake are validated against experimental data reported in Dong-Ha Kim et al. (AIAA, 2009). To further verify our LES capacity, some high-order turbulence quantities are also compared with the DNS results produced by our in-house DNS code. The effect of grid-refinement on the wall-resolved LES approach is also discussed. Supported by KAUST OCRF funded CRG project on simulation of turbulent flows over bluff bodies and airfoils.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulations of Plasma Flow Control on a GOE735 Wind Turbine Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czulak, Alexander; Franck, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control using plasma actuation was studied for the GOE735 airfoil and compared to non-actuated baseline cases using numerical simulations. This investigation considers two-dimensional simulations at a Reynolds number of 1,000 using direct numerical simulation (DNS) as well as three-dimensional simulations at a Reynolds number of 50,000 and 100,000 using large-eddy simulation (LES). Plasma actuation is applied in terms of a source term within the boundary layer close to the airfoil surface. Angles of attack of 0°, 5° and 15° were considered, and control is shown to be effective at increasing the lift coefficient, decreasing the drag coefficient and reducing the root mean squared deviation of both lift and drag. An analysis of the flow physics reveals that the actuated cases delay the point of separation, reduce the wake width and diminish the size and strength of the shed vortices. For this particular airfoil, there are significant differences in Reynolds number in terms of the baseline flow, control effectiveness and performance factors such as lift and drag.

  4. Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation of Flow Over an Airfoil with Synthetic Jet Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Omar; Uday, Godse; Moser, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Delayed Detached-Eddy Simulation (DDES) is a hybrid RANS-LES model similar to DES but with modifications to reduce the influences of ambiguous grid densities in the numerical results. This model was implemented in CDP, a parallel unstructured grid incompressible flow solver, developed at the Center for Integrated Turbulence Simulations (CITS) at Stanford University. CDP has the advantage of being nearly energy conserving. Several simulations at static angles of attack at a Re based on the chord of 5.7e5 showed good agreement with experiments and other computational studies. Simulations of pitching and plunging cases have also yield good results. This simulation capability is being used to model closed-loop flow control of the airfoil. The action of tangential-blowing synthetic jet actuators mounted near the trailing edge of the airfoil are modeled as local momentum sources, based on detailed measurements of this configuration conducted at Georgia Tech. Resulting simulations show the effects of the actuators on the vortical structure of the flow, as well as on the aerodynamic properties. By integrating actuator and sensor models with a model of the flow controller, we will be able to simulate experiments currently being conducted by A.Glezer and his group at Georgia Tech. on the control of an airfoil in a wind tunnel.

  5. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoil Using Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm and Pareto Optimal Front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaul Huque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and response surface-based multiobjective design optimization were performed for six different 2D airfoil profiles, and the Pareto optimal front of each airfoil is presented. FLUENT, which is a commercial CFD simulation code, was used to determine the relevant aerodynamic loads. The Lift Coefficient (CL and Drag Coefficient (CD data at a range of 0° to 12° angles of attack (α and at three different Reynolds numbers (Re=68,459, 479, 210, and 958, 422 for all the six airfoils were obtained. Realizable k-ε turbulence model with a second-order upwind solution method was used in the simulations. The standard least square method was used to generate response surface by the statistical code JMP. Elitist Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II was used to determine the Pareto optimal set based on the response surfaces. Each Pareto optimal solution represents a different compromise between design objectives. This gives the designer a choice to select a design compromise that best suits the requirements from a set of optimal solutions. The Pareto solution set is presented in the form of a Pareto optimal front.

  6. Zonal Detached-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Unsteady Flow over Iced Airfoils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-07-23

    This paper presentsamultiscale finite-element formulation for the second modeofzonal detached-eddy simulation. The multiscale formulation corrects the lack of stability of the standard Galerkin formulation by incorporating the effect of unresolved scales to the grid (resolved) scales. The stabilization terms arise naturally and are free of userdefined stability parameters. Validation of the method is accomplished via the turbulent flow over tandem cylinders. The boundary-layer separation, free shear-layer rollup, vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, and interaction with the downstream cylinder are well reproduced. Good agreement with experimental measurements gives credence to the accuracy of zonal detached-eddy simulation in modeling turbulent separated flows. A comprehensive study is then conducted on the performance degradation of ice-contaminated airfoils. NACA 23012 airfoil with a spanwise ice ridge and Gates Learjet Corporation-305 airfoil with a leading-edge horn-shape glaze ice are selected for investigation. Appropriate spanwise domain size and sufficient grid density are determined to enhance the reliability of the simulations. A comparison of lift coefficient and flowfield variables demonstrates the added advantage that the zonal detached-eddy simulation model brings to the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Spectral analysis and instantaneous visualization of turbulent structures are also highlighted via zonal detached-eddy simulation. Copyright © 2015 by the CFD Lab of McGill University. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  7. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and diamond airfoils at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, John S

    1953-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees to 460 degrees R. Also, free-stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semi-apex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  8. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  9. Active Control of Airfoil Boundary Layer Separation and Wake using Ns-DBD Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durasiewicz, Claudia; Castro Maldonado, Jorge; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators are employed to control boundary layer separation and the wake of a NACA 0012 airfoil having aspect ratio of three. Ns-DBD plasma actuators are known to operate via a thermal mechanism in contrast to ac-DBDs which are momentum-based devices. Nominally 2D forcing is applied to the airfoil leading edge with pulse energy of 0.35 mJ/cm. Experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 0 . 74 ×106 primarily at 18° incidence which is well within the stalled regime. Baseline and controlled flow fields are studied using surface pressure measurements, constant temperature anemometry (CTA) and PIV. Forcing at a dimensionless frequency of F+ = fc /U∞ = 1 . 14 results in reattachment of nominally separated flow to the airfoil surface. Lower frequency forcing is less optimal for separation control, but produces strong fluctuations in the wake which are intended for use in the study of vortex body interaction in the future. Actuation below F+ = 0 . 23 shows behavior consistent with an impulse-like response while forcing in the range 0 . 23

  10. Numerical investigation of aerodynamic flow actuation produced by surface plasma actuator on 2D oscillating airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minh Khang Phan; Jichul Shin

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulation of unsteady flow control over an oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is investigated. Flow actuation of a turbulent flow over the airfoil is provided by low current DC sur-face glow discharge plasma actuator which is analytically modeled as an ion pressure force pro-duced in the cathode sheath region. The modeled plasma actuator has an induced pressure force of about 2 kPa under a typical experiment condition and is placed on the airfoil surface at 0%chord length and/or at 10%chord length. The plasma actuator at deep-stall angles (from 5° to 25°) is able to slightly delay a dynamic stall and to weaken a pressure fluctuation in down-stroke motion. As a result, the wake region is reduced. The actuation effect varies with different plasma pulse frequen-cies, actuator locations and reduced frequencies. A lift coefficient can increase up to 70%by a selec-tive operation of the plasma actuator with various plasma frequencies and locations as the angle of attack changes. Active flow control which is a key advantageous feature of the plasma actuator reveals that a dynamic stall phenomenon can be controlled by the surface plasma actuator with less power consumption if a careful control scheme of the plasma actuator is employed with the opti-mized plasma pulse frequency and actuator location corresponding to a dynamic change in reduced frequency.

  11. Modeling and computation of flow in a passage with 360-degree turning and multiple airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyy, W. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering); Vu, T.C. (GE Canada, Lanchine, Quebec, (Canada). Hydro Business)

    1993-03-01

    The spiral casing of a hydraulic turbine is a complex flow device which contains a passage of 360-degree turning and multiple elements of airfoils (the so-called distributor). A three-dimensional flow analysis has been made to predict the flow behavior inside the casing and distributor. The physical model employs a two-level approach, comprising of (1) a global model that adequately accounts for the geometry of the spiral casing but smears out the details of the distributor, and represents the multiple airfoils by a porous medium treatment, and (2) a local model that performs detailed analysis of flow in the distributor region. The global analysis supplies the inlet flow condition for the individual cascade of distributor airfoils, while the distributor analysis yields the information needed for modeling the characteristics of the porous medium. Comparisons of pressure and velocity profiles between measurement and prediction have been made to assess the validity of the present approach. Flow characteristics in the spiral casing are also discussed.

  12. Boundary layer separation and reattachment detection on airfoils by thermal flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Hannes; Dumstorff, Gerrit; Busche, Peter; Westermann, Dieter; Lang, Walter

    2012-10-24

    A sensor concept for detection of boundary layer separation (flow separation, stall) and reattachment on airfoils is introduced in this paper. Boundary layer separation and reattachment are phenomena of fluid mechanics showing characteristics of extinction and even inversion of the flow velocity on an overflowed surface. The flow sensor used in this work is able to measure the flow velocity in terms of direction and quantity at the sensor's position and expected to determine those specific flow conditions. Therefore, an array of thermal flow sensors has been integrated (flush-mounted) on an airfoil and placed in a wind tunnel for measurement. Sensor signals have been recorded at different wind speeds and angles of attack for different positions on the airfoil. The sensors used here are based on the change of temperature distribution on a membrane (calorimetric principle). Thermopiles are used as temperature sensors in this approach offering a baseline free sensor signal, which is favorable for measurements at zero flow. Measurement results show clear separation points (zero flow) and even negative flow values (back flow) for all sensor positions. In addition to standard silicon-based flow sensors, a polymer-based flexible approach has been tested showing similar results.

  13. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlček V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA. Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  14. MODERNIZATION OF CUPOLA EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an automated cupola complex, developed by scientific-production enterprise «Technolit» together with GSTU named after P. O. Sukhoi, launched in the spring of 2015 at the plant «Stroiex» in the city of Chelyabinsk (the Russian Federation. The old cupolas (open type have been replaced by the new cupolas of the closed type, equipped with automatic control and management system and multistage wet gas treatment system. Cupolas are equipped with systems of post-combustion gases and the batch charging, the separate systems of air blast, systems of sludge removal and recirculation of water, the slag granulation installations, mechanized cleaning of cupola furnace and automatic safety system. These activities allowed the company to increase production and improve the quality of cast iron, reduce the coke consumption by 20% and reducing emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere almost 30 times.

  15. Soviet equipment flies in

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    End of February 1977 a Soviet Ilyushin-76 heavy freight aircraft landed at Cointrin airport having on board fifty large wire proprtional chambers and associated apparatus, together weighing 10 tons, supplied by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, USSR. The equipment was for the CERN- Dubna-Munich-Saclay experiment NA4 on deep inelastic muon scattering being set up in the North Area of SPS. See Weekly Bulletin 11/78.

  16. Equipment Obsolescence Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, J.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Operators are challenged with securing reliable supply channels for safety related equipment due to equipment obsolescence. Many Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have terminated production of spare parts and product life-cycle support. The average component life cycles are much shorter than the NPP design life, which means that replacement components and parts for the original NPP systems are not available for the complete design life of the NPPs. The lack or scarcity of replacement parts adversely affects plant reliability and ultimately the profitability of the affected NPPs. This problem is further compounded when NPPs pursue license renewal and approval for plant-life extension. A reliable and predictable supply of replacement co components is necessary for NPPs to remain economically competitive and meet regulatory requirements and guidelines. Electrical and I and C components, in particular, have short product life cycles and obsolescence issues must be managed pro actively and not reactively in order to mitigate the risk to the NPP to ensure reliable and economic NPP operation. (Author)

  17. AERODYNAMIC FORCE AND FLOW STRUCTURES OF TWO AIRFOILS IN FLAPPING MOTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰世隆; 孙茂

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and flow structures of two airfoils in a tandem configuration in flapping motions are studied, by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids. Three typical phase differences between the fore- and aftairfoil flapping cycles are considered. It is shown that: (1) in the case of no interaction (single airfoil), the time average of the vertical force coefficient over the downstroke is 2.74, which is about 3 times as large as the maximum steady-state lift coefficient of a dragonfly wing; the time average of the horizontal force coefficient is 1.97, which is also large. The reasons for the large force coefficients are the acceleration at the beginning of a stroke, the delayed stall and the “pitching-up” motion near the end of the stroke. (2) In the cases of two-airfoils, the time-variations of the force and moment coefficients on each airfoil are broadly similar to that of the single airfoil in that the vertical force is mainly produced in downstroke and the horizontal force in upstroke, but very large differences exist due to the interaction. (3) For in-phase stroking, the major differences caused by the interaction are that the vertical force on FA in downstroke is increased and the horizontal force on FA in upstroke decreased.As a result, the magnitude of the resultant force is almost unchanged but it inclines less forward. (4) For counter stroking, the major differences are that the vertical force on AA in downstroke and the horizontal force on FA in upstroke are decreased. As a result, the magnitude of the resultant force is decreased by about 20 percent but its direction is almost unchanged. (5) For 90°-phase-difference stroking, the major differences are that the vertical force on AA in downstroke and the horizontal force on FA in upstroke are decreased greatly and the horizontal force on AA in upstrokeincreased. As a result, the magnitude of the resultant force is decreased by about 28% and it inclines more forward. (6

  18. Feasibility of Actively Cooled Silicon Nitride Airfoil for Turbine Applications Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys currently limit gas turbine engine performance. Active cooling has extended the temperature range of service of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Therefore, significant advancements in materials technology are needed to raise turbine inlet temperatures above 2400 F to increase engine specific thrust and operating efficiency. Because of their low density and high-temperature strength and thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, the high processing costs and low impact resistance of silicon nitride ceramics have proven to be major obstacles for widespread applications. Advanced rapid prototyping technology in combination with conventional gel casting and sintering can reduce high processing costs and may offer an affordable manufacturing approach. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with a local university and an aerospace company, are developing actively cooled and functionally graded ceramic structures. The objective of this program is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technology and experimental and analytical capabilities for environmentally stable, aerodynamically efficient, foreign-object-damage-resistant, in situ toughened silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes, and to test these vanes under simulated engine conditions. Starting with computer aided design (CAD) files of an airfoil and a flat plate with internal cooling passages, the permanent and removable mold components for gel casting ceramic slips were made by stereolithography and Sanders machines, respectively. The gel-cast part was dried and sintered to final shape. Several in situ toughened silicon nitride generic airfoils with internal cooling passages have been fabricated. The uncoated and thermal barrier coated airfoils and flat plates were burner rig tested for 30 min without

  19. Waste Handling Equipment Devleopment Test and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Tome

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify candidate Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface waste handling equipment for development testing. This study will also identify strategies for performing the development tests. Development testing shall be implemented to support detail design and reduce design risks. Development testing shall be conducted to confirm design concepts, evaluate alternative design concepts, show the availability of needed technology, and provide design documentation. The candidate equipment will be selected from MGR surface waste handling equipment that is the responsibility of the Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) Surface Design Department. The equipment identified in this study is based on Viability Assessment (VA) design. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test and Evaluation Plan'' (MGR T&EP), Reference 5.1, was used as a basis for this study. The MGR T&EP reflects the extent of test planning and analysis that can be conducted, given the current status of the MGR requirements and latest VA design information. The MGR T&EP supports the appropriate sections in the license application (LA) in accordance with 10 CFR 60.2 1(c)(14). The MGR T&EP describes the following test activities: site characterization to confirm, by test and analysis, the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for housing a geologic repository; development testing to investigate and document design concepts to reduce risk; qualification testing to verify equipment compliance with design requirements, specifications, and regulatory requirements; system testing to validate compliance with MGR requirements, which include the receipt, handling, retrieval, and disposal of waste; periodic performance testing to verify preclosure requirements and to demonstrate safe and reliable MGR operation; and performance confirmation modeling, testing, and analysis to verify adherence to postclosure regulatory requirements. Development test activities can be

  20. Equipment and Technical Features of Process Section in the Continuous Electro Galvanizing Line of Han Dan Iron and Steel Co.,Ltd%邯钢连续电镀锌机组工艺段设备及技术特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩

    2014-01-01

    介绍了邯郸钢铁集团2号彩涂生产线改造成电镀锌生产线的项目,详细说明了连续电镀锌机组工艺段设备的布置,以及主要设备及技术的特点。该机组工艺段采用不换极性的电解清洗槽和先进的水平式电镀槽,以及闪镀镍技术,保证了机组的产能以及产品的表面质量。%A continuous electro galvanizing line (EGL)reconstructed from No.2 coloured strip steel production line of Han Dan Iron and Steel Co.,Ltd.is described.This report mainly explains the arrangement and details of the equipment and the technical features in process section of EGL.It applies electrolytic cleaning tank without changing the polarity of the plate electrode,advanced horizontal plating cell and Ni-flash plating technique to guarantee the production capacity and product surface quality.

  1. How to Use Equipment Therapeutically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowne, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Shares therapeutic and economic practices surrounding equipment used in New York's Higher Horizons adventure program of therapy for troubled youth. Encourages educators, therapists, and administrators to explore relationship between equipment selection, program goals, and clients. (NEC)

  2. Experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re airfoil using leading-edge protuberance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. M.; Wang, G. F.; Xu, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re c airfoil was presently investigated using a newly developed leading-edge protuberance method, motivated by the improvement in the hydrodynamics of the giant humpback whale through its pectoral flippers. Deploying this method, the control effectiveness of the airfoil aerodynamics was fully evaluated using a three-component force balance, leading to an effectively impaired stall phenomenon and great improvement in the performances within the wide post-stall angle range (22°-80°). To understand the flow physics behind, the vorticity field, velocity field and boundary layer flow field over the airfoil suction side were examined using a particle image velocimetry and an oil-flow surface visualization system. It was found that the leading-edge protuberance method, more like low-profile vortex generator, effectively modified the flow pattern of the airfoil boundary layer through the chordwise and spanwise evolutions of the interacting streamwise vortices generated by protuberances, where the separation of the turbulent boundary layer dominated within the stall region and the rather strong attachment of the laminar boundary layer still existed within the post-stall region. The characteristics to manipulate the flow separation mode of the original airfoil indicated the possibility to further optimize the control performance by reasonably designing the layout of the protuberances.

  3. NIH Standard. Animal Care Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Office of Administrative Management.

    The National Institutes of Health standardized animal care equipment is presented in this catalog. Each piece of equipment is illustrated and described in terms of overall dimensions, construction, and general usage. A price list is included to estimate costs in budgeting, planning, and requisitioning animal care equipment. The standards and…

  4. Abyssal soil investigation equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smits, F.P.; Maggioni, W.; Mainardi, U. [ISMES, Bergamo (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    The present paper deals with the development of a testing device for quick offshore geotechnical investigations. The equipment, at present, consists of a penetrometer, mounted on a sea bed platform, a handling frame and a control cabin; a further development includes a drill rig and a geotechnical laboratory. All this is designed so as to be an autonomous unit that can be handled by various types of non-specialized ships which have the necessary deck space. The sea bed platform can operate in 2,000 m of waterdepth and is provided with a hydraulic penetrometer, with a thrust capacity of 400 kN, able to carry out cone penetration type testing until a depth of more than 100 m, as well as shallow depth continuous sampling. The penetrometer can be equipped with a series of probes (piezocone, pressiocone, total radial pressure transducer, seismic cone) allowing the execution of the wide range of direct geotechnical measurements normally performed during on-land penetration tests.

  5. Japanese National Safety Standards for Electrical Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junkichi Sumiya

    2006-01-01

    @@ I am working in Japan electrical safety & environment technology laboratory, which is called JET for short. In JET, we are carrying out the safety test of electrical equipment according to Japanese domestic standards or IEC standards. And in my section, our stuff is drafting some national safety standards harmonized with IEC in cooperation with the government. The standards are applied for the mandatory regulation and other schemes.

  6. Remanufacturing strategy for chemical equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-cheng; XU Bin-shi; WANG Hai-dou; JIANG Yi; WU Yi-xiong; GONG Jian-ming; TU Shan-dong

    2005-01-01

    Failure, especially induced by cracks, usually occurred in the service process of chemical equipment, which could cause the medium leakage, fire hazard and explosion and induced the personnel casualty and economic losses. To assure the long-term and safety service, it is necessary to apply the remanufacturing technology on the chemical equipment containing cracks. The recent research advances on the remanufacturing, the failure modes and the life extension technology for chemical equipment were reviewed. The engineering strategy of the remanufacturing for the chemical equipment was proposed, which could provide a reasonable and reliable technical route for the remanufacturing operation of chemical equipment. In the strategy, the redesign was also been considered.

  7. Design of a 21 m blade with Risø-A1 airfoils for active stall controlled wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Peter; Sangill, O.; Hansen, P.

    2002-01-01

    the characteristics of the new blade. Airfoil characteristics, power curve and fatigue loads were derived onbasis of the measurements. Most of the design criteria for the new blade were met. The new blade had a reduced weight of 4% reducing blade cost compared with LM 21.0P. The measurements showed that the wind......This is the final report, from the project, "Design of a Rotor/Airfoil Family for Active Stall-regulated Wind Turbines by Use of Multi-point Optimization". It describes the full scale testing of a 21 m wind turbine blade specially designed for active stallregulation. Design objectives were...... increased ratio of produced energy to turbine loads and more stable power control characteristics. Both were taken directly into account during the design of the blade using numerical optimization. The blade used theRisø-A1 airfoil family, which was specially designed for operation on wind turbine blades...

  8. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF FLOW AROUND A BIO-INSPIRED AIRFOIL AT REYNOLDS NUMBER 2.0×103

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Sheng-xian; LIU Ying-zheng; CHEN Jian-min

    2012-01-01

    The fluid flow around a bio-iuspired airfoil with corrugated surfaces and its smooth counterpart at chord Reynolds number Re =2.0× 103 and different Angle-Of-Attack (AOA =0°,4°,8° and 12°) were measured by using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).The global characteristics of the fluid flow around two airfoils were analyzed by ensemble-averaged velocity field,distribution of reverse flow intennittency,and time-series flow visualizations.At AOA =0°,no significant variation of the global flow patterns was recognized for both configurations.The statistical results of reverse flow intermittency results demonstrated that the protruding peaks of the corrugated airfoil delay flow separation occur at AOA =4°.At large AOAs (8° and 12°),however,the flow is massively separated in both configurations,the combination of large separation bubble above the corrugated airfoil and small reeirculation zones in the upstream upper valley results in earlier separation of the flow.At AOA=g°,the wake region behind the corrugated airfoil is considerably shortened in comparison to the smooth one,indicating a remarkable reduction of the time-mean lift and drag forces,however,at AOA =12°,the wake region behind the corrugated one is slightly larger than that behind the smooth one.For the case of AOA - 8° and 12°,the time-series flow visualizations demonstrate the intensified vortex shedding process of the corrugated airfoil,which would give rise to enhanced dynamic loading.Due to the fact that dragonfly wing is practically flexible,it is speculated that the wing structure of a gliding dragonfly might be sophisticatedly deformed in response to the periodic loading to reduce the drag.

  9. Investigation of airfoil leading edge separation control with nanosecond plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J. G.; Cui, Y. D.; Zhao, Z. J.; Li, J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    A combined numerical and experimental investigation of airfoil leading edge flow separation control with a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is presented. Our study concentrates on describing dynamics of detailed flow actuation process and elucidating the nanosecond DBD actuation mechanism. A loose coupling methodology is employed to perform simulation, which consists of a self-similar plasma model for the description of pulsed discharge and two-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for the calculation of external airflow. A series of simulations of poststall flows around a NACA0015 airfoil is conducted with a Reynolds number range covering both low and high Re at Re=(0.05 ,0.15 ,1.2 ) ×106 . Meanwhile, wind-tunnel experiment is performed for two low Re flows to measure aerodynamic force on airfoil model and transient flow field with time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurement provides possibly the clearest view of flow reattachment process under the actuation of a nanosecond plasma actuator ever observed in experiments, which is highly comparable to that predicted by simulation. It is found from the detailed simulation that the discharge-induced residual heat rather than shock wave plays a dominant role in flow control. For any leading edge separations, the preliminary flow reattachment is realized by residual heat-induced spanwise vortices. After that, the nanosecond actuator functions by continuing exciting flow instability at poststall attack angles or acting as an active trip near stall angle. As a result, the controlled flow is characterized by a train of repetitive, downstream moving vortices over suction surface or an attached turbulent boundary layer, which depends on both angle of attack and Reynolds number. The advection of residual temperature with external flow offers a nanosecond plasma actuator a lot of flexibility to extend its influence region. Animations are provided for

  10. High-Lift System for a Supercritical Airfoil: Simplified by Active Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Lin, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control wind tunnel experiments were conducted in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel using a two-dimensional supercritical high-lift airfoil with a 15% chord hinged leading-edge flap and a 25% chord hinged trailing-edge flap. This paper focuses on the application of zero-net-mass-flux periodic excitation near the airfoil trailing edge flap shoulder at a Mach number of 0.1 and chord Reynolds numbers of 1.2 x 10(exp 6) to 9 x 10(exp 6) with leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections of 25 deg. and 30 deg., respectively. The purpose of the investigation was to increase the zero-net-mass-flux options for controlling trailing edge flap separation by using a larger model than used on the low Reynolds number version of this model and to investigate the effect of flow control at higher Reynolds numbers. Static and dynamic surface pressures and wake pressures were acquired to determine the effects of flow control on airfoil performance. Active flow control was applied both upstream of the trailing edge flap and immediately downstream of the trailing edge flap shoulder and the effects of Reynolds number, excitation frequency and amplitude are presented. The excitations around the trailing edge flap are then combined to control trailing edge flap separation. The combination of two closely spaced actuators around the trailing-edge flap knee was shown to increase the lift produced by an individual actuator. The phase sensitivity between two closely spaced actuators seen at low Reynolds number is confirmed at higher Reynolds numbers. The momentum input required to completely control flow separation on the configuration was larger than that available from the actuators used.

  11. A least squares finite element scheme for transonic flow around harmonically oscillating airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C. L.; Fix, G. J.; Gunzburger, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation shows that a finite element scheme with a weighted least squares variational principle is applicable to the problem of transonic flow around a harmonically oscillating airfoil. For the flat plate case, numerical results compare favorably with the exact solution. The obtained numerical results for the transonic problem, for which an exact solution is not known, have the characteristics of known experimental results. It is demonstrated that the performance of the employed numerical method is independent of equation type (elliptic or hyperbolic) and frequency. The weighted least squares principle allows the appropriate modeling of singularities, which such a modeling of singularities is not possible with normal least squares.

  12. A comparative study on the flow over an airfoil using transitional turbulence models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Mou; Sarlak Chivaee, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the simulation of the flow over NREL S826 airfoil under a relatively low Reynolds number (Re = 1 × 105 ) using the CFD solvers OpenFoam and ANSYS Fluent. The flow is simulated using two different transition models, γ − Reθ and k − kL − ω model, and the results are examined...... against the k − ω SST model without transitional formulations. By comparing the simulations with the available experimental data, we find that the using the transitional model can effectively improve the flow prediction, especially the drag coefficient results, before the stall....

  13. Numerical study of the static and pitching RISØ-B1-18 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this report is the better understanding of the physics of the aeroelastic motion of wind turbine blades in order to improve the numerical models used for their design. In this study, the case of the RISØ-B1-18 airfoil which was equippedand measured in an open jet wind tunnel...... is studied. Two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculations using the k-w SST and Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence models are conducted. An engineering semi-empirical dynamic stall model is also used forperforming calculations. Computational results are compared to the experimental results...

  14. Interactive Software System Developed to Study How Icing Affects Airfoil Performance (Phase 1 Results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2000-01-01

    SmaggIce (Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils), which is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is an interactive software system for data probing, boundary smoothing, domain decomposition, and structured grid generation and refinement. All these steps are required for aerodynamic performance prediction using structured, grid-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD), as illustrated in the following figure. SmaggIce provides the underlying computations to perform these functions, as well as a graphical user interface to control and interact with them, and graphics to display the results.

  15. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  16. Large-eddy simulations of a S826 airfoil with the Discontinuous Galerkin Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frère, A.; Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to improve the understanding of low Reynolds flow physics by performing Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of the NREL S826 airfoil. The paper compares the results obtained with a novel high order code based on the Discontinuous Galerkin Method (ArgoDG) and a recent...... experiment performed at the Technical University of Denmark. Chordwise pressure evolutions, integrated lift and drag forces are compared at Reynolds number 4.104 and angles of attack (AoA) 10 and 12 degrees. Important differences are observed between the simulations and the experiment. These differences are...

  17. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yong, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn; Tao, Gang, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 XiaoLingwei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  18. Design and construction of 2 transonic airfoil models for tests in the NASA Langley C.3-M TCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechterle, G.; Ludewig, K. H.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a NASA/DFVLR cooperation program two transonic airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT. Model design and construction was carried out by DFVLR. The models designed and constructed performed extremely well under cryogenic conditions. Essentially no permanent changes in surface quality and geometric dimensions occurred during the tests. The aerodynamic results from the TCT tests which demonstrate the large sensitivity of the airfoil CAST 10-Z/DOAZ to Reynolds number changes compared well with results from other facilities at ambient temperatures.

  19. Scaling for Shock Response of Equipment in Different Submarines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J. O’Hara

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents scaling rules developed to predict the response of submarine equipment subjected to underwater chemical explosions. The computer was used as a surrogate for shock tests. A simplified model of a hull section was used to contain frame-mounted single degree of freedom equipment. A general scaling rule has been developed to handle the spread in the shock response attributable to the charge weight, equipment weight, and equipment frequency, where the shock response is the absolute maximum acceleration of the equipment mass as a function of the shock factor for a given charge weight. The article also examines those cases where a new hull is derived from an original hull by the linear scaling law. The solution of the shock response is well known when the internal equipment has also been linearly scaled. A new general scaling rule is developed for those cases when the equipment is not linearly scaled, that is, the equipment and charge weight used with the original hull remains unchanged when installed in the linearly scaled hull or a completely different equipment and charge weight are used with the new hull. It is emphasized that the test sections were short and devoid of typical equipment present in a real compartment. The results, nevertheless, provide trends and ratios in shock design values, not necessarily absolute design numbers. The approach taken in developing these scaling rules could be useful for enhancing field data that may exist for a given class of boat to allow greater usage of these data for different equipment subject to a variety of charge weights, attack geometries, and other boats.

  20. 30 CFR 75.512 - Electric equipment; examination, testing and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-General § 75.512 Electric equipment; examination, testing and maintenance. All electric equipment shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment; examination, testing and maintenance. 75.512 Section 75.512 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  1. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. 75.506-1 Section 75.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  2. 30 CFR 75.518 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection. 75.518 Section 75.518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.518 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection....

  3. 30 CFR 56.14200 - Warnings prior to starting or moving equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warnings prior to starting or moving equipment. 56.14200 Section 56.14200 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... starting or moving equipment. Before starting crushers or moving self-propelled mobile equipment,...

  4. 49 CFR 1242.46 - Computers and data processing equipment (account XX-27-46).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computers and data processing equipment (account XX-27-46). 1242.46 Section 1242.46 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.46 Computers and data processing equipment (account...

  5. 48 CFR 552.238-70 - Identification of Electronic Office Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Electronic Office Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped. 552.238-70 Section 552.238-70... Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped. As prescribed in 538.273(a)(1), insert the following clause: Identification of Electronic Office Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1010 - Electrical equipment in gas-dangerous space or zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical equipment in gas-dangerous space or zone. 154.1010 Section 154.1010 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK..., Construction and Equipment Electrical § 154.1010 Electrical equipment in gas-dangerous space or zone....

  7. 40 CFR 265.114 - Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment, structures and soils. 265.114 Section 265.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. During the partial and final closure periods, all contaminated equipment, structures and soil must be properly disposed of, or decontaminated unless specified otherwise...

  8. 40 CFR 264.114 - Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment, structures and soils. 264.114 Section 264.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... of equipment, structures and soils. During the partial and final closure periods, all contaminated equipment, structures and soils must be properly disposed of or decontaminated unless otherwise specified...

  9. 40 CFR 63.769 - Equipment leak standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...), and paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section. (7) Reciprocating compressors in wet gas service are exempt from the compressor control requirements of 40 CFR 61.242-3. (8) Flares used to comply with... defined in § 63.761; and (2) Compressors. (b) This section does not apply to ancillary equipment...

  10. Information technology equipment cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  11. Tax Adjusted for Imported Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Ministry of Finance, Central Administration of Customs, and State Administration of Taxation of P.R. of China jointly issued a "Notice on the Lists Related to the Interim Provisions on the Adjustment of Import Tax Policy on Major Technical Equipment" (the Notice) on April 13rd to adjust the list of equipment catalog and merchandise attached to the "Interim Provisions on the Import Tax Policy on Major Technical Equipment", as well as the preferential scope and extent of the import tax on a number of major technical equipment.

  12. Power Product Equipment Technician: Equipment Systems. Teacher Edition. Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, Robert

    This packet contains teacher and student editions on the topic of equipment systems, intended for the preparation of power product equipment technicians. This publication contains seven units: (1) principles of power transmission; (2) mechanical drive systems; (3) principles of fluid power; (4) hydraulic and pneumatic drive systems; (5) wheel and…

  13. Experimental study of the boundary layer over an airfoil in plunging motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Rasi Marzabadi; M. R. Soltani

    2012-01-01

    This is an experimental study on the boundary layer over an airfoil under steady and unsteady conditions.It specifically deals with the effect of plunging oscillation on the laminar/turbulent characteristics of the boundary layer.The wind tunnel measurements involved surfacemounted hot-film sensors and boundary-layer rake.The experiments were conducted at Reynolds numbers of 0.42 × 106 to 0.84 × 106 and the reduced frequency was varied from 0.01 to 0.1 1.The results of the quasi-wall-shear stress as well as the boundary layer velocity profiles provided important information about the state of the boundary layer over the suction surface of the airfoil in both static and dynamic cases.For the static tests,boundary layer transition occurred through a laminar separation bubble.By increasing the angle of attack,disturbances and the transition location moved toward the leading edge.For the dynamic tests,earlier transition occurred with increasing rather than decreasing effective angle of attack.The mean angle of attack and the oscillating parameters significantly affected the state of the boundary layer.By increasing the reduced frequency,the boundary layer transition was promoted to the upstroke portion of the equivalent angle of attack,but the quasi skin friction coefficient was decreased.

  14. Computational Simulation of the Flow Past an Airfoil for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the numerical simulation of the two-dimensional, incompressible, steady air flow past a NACA 2415 airfoil and four modifications of this one. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, five different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off called the no blowing condition by means computational fluid dynamics. The RNG k-ε model is utilized to describe the turbulent flow process. The simulations were held at a Reynolds number of 105. Results allowed obtaining lift and drag forces and pitching moment coefficient and also the location of the separation and reattachment point in some cases for different angles of attack, from 0 to 16 degrees with the smallest increment of 4 degrees. Finally, numerical results were compared with results obtained from wind tunnel tests by means of an aerodynamic balance and also oil and smoke visualization techniques and found to be in very good agreement.

  15. Transonic flow of moist air around an NACA 0012 airfoil with non-equilibrium condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang; SUN Xiuling; FENG Zhenping; LI Guojun

    2005-01-01

    The classical condensation model of water vapor is coupled with the Euler equations to calculate transonic flows of moist air with non-equilibrium condensation. By means of this model, numerical computations are implemented to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of an NACA 0012 airfoil in transonic flows of moist air at various angles of attack and relative humidities, and the results are compared with those in dry air flows. For different angles of attack considered at 50 % relative humidity, the lift decreases 30 % -40 %.The pressure drag increases when the angle of attack is smaller than 1.4° and decreases when higher than 1.4°. At zero angle of attack,with the relative humidity rising from zero to 90 %, the pressure drag increases exponentially. At 90 % relative humidity, the pressure drag increases 160 %, and self-oscillation takes place periodically and alternately over the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. The oscillation is caused by the interactions of local supersonic flow and heat release in the condensation process.

  16. The passage of a distorted velocity field through a cascade of airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis has been developed to predict the unsteady force and moment generated by the passage of a timewise periodic total pressure distortion through an arbitrary cascade of airfoils. The mathematical formulation of this analysis is based on the assumption that the magnitudes of the timewise fluctuations of the variables which describe the flow field are small compared to their time average values. This assumption permits the development of a linear unsteady perturbation analysis about a steady flow field. In addition to this linearization assumption the fluid medium is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid. The mathematical development begins by decomposing the velocity field surrounding an infinite cascade of airfoils into its irrotational and rotational components. The rotational component is associated with an upstream unsteady total pressure distortion and is defined in terms of the vorticity field associated with the distortion pattern. The irrotational component is further decomposed into a steady and unsteady part. A combined analytical and numerical procedure has been developed to solve the field equations which govern the rotational and irrotational velocity fields. Results of this analysis show a strong influence of mean loading on the unsteady force generated by the passage of a one dimensional gust through a cascade of compressor blades.

  17. Gust Acoustic Response of a Single Airfoil Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James (Technical Monitor); Wang, X. Y.; Chang, S. C.; Himansu, A.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.

    2003-01-01

    A 2D parallel Euler code based on the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is validated by solving the benchmark problem I in Category 3 of the Third CAA Workshop. This problem concerns the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected harmonic vortical gust with a single airfoil. Three gust frequencies, two gust configurations, and three airfoil geometries are considered. Numerical results at both near and far fields are presented and compared with the analytical solutions, a frequency-domain solver GUST3D solutions, and a time-domain high-order Discontinuous Spectral Element Method (DSEM) solutions. It is shown that the CE/SE solutions agree well with the GUST3D solution for the lowest frequency, while there are discrepancies between CE/SE and GUST3D solutions for higher frequencies. However, the CE/SE solution is in good agreement with the DSEM solution for these higher frequencies. It demonstrates that the CE/SE method can produce accurate results of CAA problems involving complex geometries by using unstructured meshes.

  18. Performance of active and passive control of an airfoil using CPFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Daniel; Young, Jay; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2016-11-01

    Birds and fish employ flapping motions of their wings and fins in order to produce thrust and maneuver in flight and underwater. There is considerable interest in designing aerial and submersible systems that mimic these motions for the purposes of surveillance, environmental monitoring, and search and rescue, among other applications. Flapping motions are typically composed of combined pitch and heave and can provide good thrust and efficiency (Read, et al. 2003). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil actuated only in the heave direction. Using a cyber-physical fluid dynamics system (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016), we simulate the presence of a torsion spring to enable the airfoil to undergo a passively controlled pitching motion. The addition of passive pitching combined with active heaving ("Active-Passive" or AP) provides significantly improved thrust and efficiency compared with heaving alone. In many cases, values of thrust and efficiency are comparable to or better than those obtained with two actively controlled degrees of freedom ("Active-Active" or AA). By using carefully-designed passive dynamics in the pitch direction, we can eliminate one of the two actuators, saving cost, complexity, and weight, while maintaining or improving performance. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  19. Dynamic Stall Prediction of a Pitching Airfoil using an Adjusted Two-Equation URANS Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Bangga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity in the analysis of dynamic stall becomes increasingly important due to its impact on many streamlined structures such as helicopter and wind turbine rotor blades. The present paper provides Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD predictions of a pitching NACA 0012 airfoil at reduced frequency of 0.1 and at small Reynolds number value of 1.35e5. The simulations were carried out by adjusting the k − ε URANS turbulence model in order to damp the turbulence production in the near wall region. The damping factor was introduced as a function of wall distance in the buffer zone region. Parametric studies on the involving variables were conducted and the effect on the prediction capability was shown. The results were compared with available experimental data and CFD simulations using some selected two-equation turbulence models. An improvement of the lift coefficient prediction was shown even though the results still roughly mimic the experimental data. The flow development under the dynamic stall onset was investigated with regards to the effect of the leading and trailing edge vortices. Furthermore, the characteristics of the flow at several chords length downstream the airfoil were evaluated.

  20. Artificial intelligence metamodel comparison and application to wind turbine airfoil uncertainty analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Ju

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Monte Carlo simulation method for turbomachinery uncertainty analysis often requires performing a huge number of simulations, the computational cost of which can be greatly alleviated with the help of metamodeling techniques. An intensive comparative study was performed on the approximation performance of three prospective artificial intelligence metamodels, that is, artificial neural network, radial basis function, and support vector regression. The genetic algorithm was used to optimize the predetermined parameters of each metamodel for the sake of a fair comparison. Through testing on 10 nonlinear functions with different problem scales and sample sizes, the genetic algorithm–support vector regression metamodel was found more accurate and robust than the other two counterparts. Accordingly, the genetic algorithm–support vector regression metamodel was selected and combined with the Monte Carlo simulation method for the uncertainty analysis of a wind turbine airfoil under two types of surface roughness uncertainties. The results show that the genetic algorithm–support vector regression metamodel can capture well the uncertainty propagation from the surface roughness to the airfoil aerodynamic performance. This work is useful to the application of metamodeling techniques in the robust design optimization of turbomachinery.

  1. Application of output feedback sliding mode control to active flutter suppression of two-dimensional airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of the sliding mode control(SMC) method for active flutter suppression(AFS) and the issues concerning control system discretization and control input constraints were studied using a typical two-dimensional airfoil.The airfoil has a trailing-edge flap for flutter control.The aeroelastic system involves a two-degrees-of-freedom motion(pitch and plunge),and the equations were constructed by utilizing quasi-steady aerodynamic forces.The control system,designed by the output feedback SMC method,was incorporated to suppress the pitch-plunge flutter.Meanwhile,the system discretization and the flap deflection constraints were implemented.Then,a classical Runge-Kutta(RK) algorithm was utilized for numerical calculations.The results indicated that the close-loop system with the SMC system could be stable at a speed above the flutter boundary.However,when the flap deflection limits are reached,the close-loop system with the simple discretized control system loses control.Furthermore,control compensation developed by theoretical analysis was proposed to make the system stable again.The parameter perturbations and the time delay effects were also discussed in this paper.

  2. Unsteady Aerodynamics and Vortex-sheet Formation of A Two-dimensional Airfoil

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady inviscid flow models of wings and airfoils have been developed to study the aerodynamics of natural and man-made flyers. Vortex methods have been extensively applied to reduce the dimensionality of these aerodynamic models, based on the proper estimation of the strength and distribution of the vortices in the wake. In such modeling approaches, one of the most fundamental questions is how the vortex sheets are generated and released from sharp edges. To determine the formation of the trailing-edge vortex sheet, the classical Kutta condition can be extended to unsteady situations by realizing that a flow cannot turn abruptly around a sharp edge. This condition can be readily applied to a flat plate or an airfoil with cusped trailing edge since the direction of the forming vortex sheet is known to be tangential to the trailing edge. However, for a finite-angle trailing edge, or in the case of flow separation away from a sharp corner, the direction of the forming vortex sheet is ambiguous. To remove any ...

  3. Numerical simulation and reduced-order modeling of a flapping airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Gregory Carl

    Recent advances in many fields have made the design of micro-aerial vehicles that implement flapping wings a possibility. However, there are many outstanding problems that must be solved before flapping flight can be implemented as a practical means of propulsion. This dissertation focuses on two important aspects of flapping flight: the physics of the flow of a fluid around a heaving airfoil and the development of a reduced-order model for the control of a flapping airfoil. To study the physics of the flow, a numerical model for two-dimensional flow around an airfoil undergoing prescribed oscillatory motions in a viscous flow is developed. The model is used to examine the flow characteristics and power coefficients of a symmetric airfoil heaving sinusoidally over a range of frequencies and amplitudes. Both periodic and aperiodic solutions are found. Additionally, some flows are asymmetric in that the up-stroke is not a mirror image of the down-stroke. For a given Strouhal number---defined as the product of dimensionless frequency and heave amplitude---the maximum efficiency occurs at an intermediate heaving frequency. This is in contrast to ideal flow models, in which efficiency increases monotonically as frequency decreases. Below a threshold frequency, the separation of the leading edge vortices early in each stroke reduces the force on the airfoil and leads to diminished thrust and efficiency. Above the optimum frequency, the efficiency decreases similarly to inviscid theory. For most cases, the efficiency can be correlated to interactions between leading and trailing edge vortices, with positive reinforcement leading to relatively high efficiency, and negative reinforcement leading to relatively low efficiency. Additionally, the efficiency is related to the proximity of the heaving frequency to the frequency of the most spatially unstable mode of the average velocity profile of the wake; the greatest efficiency occurs when the two frequencies are nearly

  4. Models of Lift and Drag Coefficients of Stalled and Unstalled Airfoils in Wind Turbines and Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Equations are developed with which to calculate lift and drag coefficients along the spans of torsionally-stiff rotating airfoils of the type used in wind turbine rotors and wind tunnel fans, at angles of attack in both the unstalled and stalled aerodynamic regimes. Explicit adjustments are made for the effects of aspect ratio (length to chord width) and airfoil thickness ratio. Calculated lift and drag parameters are compared to measured parameters for 55 airfoil data sets including 585 test points. Mean deviation was found to be -0.4 percent and standard deviation was 4.8 percent. When the proposed equations were applied to the calculation of power from a stall-controlled wind turbine tested in a NASA wind tunnel, mean deviation from 54 data points was -1.3 percent and standard deviation was 4.0 percent. Pressure-rise calculations for a large wind tunnel fan deviated by 2.7 percent (mean) and 4.4 percent (standard). The assumption that a single set of lift and drag coefficient equations can represent the stalled aerodynamic behavior of a wide variety of airfoils was found to be satisfactory.

  5. Convective heat transfer measurements from a NACA 0012 airfoil in flight and in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Van Fossen, G. James; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured on a smooth and roughened NACA 0012 airfoil. Heat transfer measurements on the 0.533 m chord airfoil were made both in flight on the NASA Lewis Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft and in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Roughness was obtained by the attachment of uniform 2 mm diameter hemispheres to the airfoil surface in 4 distinct patterns. Flight data were taken for the smooth and roughened airfoil at various Reynolds numbers based on chord in the range 1.24 to 2.50 x 10 (exp 6) and at various angles of attack up to 4 deg. During these flight tests, the free stream velocity turbulence intensity was found to be very low (less than 0.1 percent). Wind tunnel data were acquired in the Reynolds number range 1.20 to 4.25 x 10 (exp t) and at angles of attack from -4 to 8 deg. The turbulence intensity in the IRT was 0.5 to 0.7 percent with the cloud generating sprays off. A direct comparison was made between the results obtained in flight and in the IRT. The higher level of turbulence in the IRT vs. flight had little effect on the heat transfer for the lower Reynolds numbers but caused a moderate increase in heat transfer at the high Reynolds numbers. Roughness generally increased the heat transfer.

  6. The flow over a thin airfoil subjected to elevated levels of freestream turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sridhar; Watkins, Simon; Watmuff, Jon; Massey, Kevin; Petersen, Phred; Marino, Matthew; Ravi, Anuradha

    2012-09-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) can be difficult to control in the outdoor environment as they fly at relatively low speeds and are of low mass, yet exposed to high levels of freestream turbulence present within the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. In order to examine transient flow phenomena, two turbulence conditions of nominally the same longitudinal integral length scale (Lxx/c = 1) but with significantly different intensities (Ti = 7.2 % and 12.3 %) were generated within a wind tunnel; time-varying surface pressure measurements, smoke flow visualization, and wake velocity measurements were made on a thin flat plate airfoil. Rapid changes in oncoming flow pitch angle resulted in the shear layer to separate from the leading edge of the airfoil even at lower geometric angles of attack. At higher geometric angles of attack, massive flow separation occurred at the leading edge followed by enhanced roll up of the shear layer. This lead to the formation of large Leading Edge Vortices (LEVs) that advected at a rate much lower than the mean flow speed while imparting high pressure fluctuations over the airfoil. The rate of LEV formation was dependent on the angle of attack until 10° and it was independent of the turbulence properties tested. The fluctuations in surface pressures and consequently aerodynamic loads were considerably limited on the airfoil bottom surface due to the favorable pressure gradient.

  7. Investigation of flow behind vortex generators by stereo particle image velocimetry on a thick airfoil near stall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2013-01-01

    Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements investigating the effect of vortex generators (VGs) on the flow near stall were carried out in a purpose-built wind tunnel for airfoil investigations on a DU 91-W2-250 profile. Measurements were conducted at Re = 0.9⋅106, corresponding to free...

  8. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  9. Numerical analysis of air flow past the 2415-3S airfoil for an unmanned aerial vehicle with internal propulsion system

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez-Araque, L.; Mendoza Perez, Luis Daniel; Casanova Kindelán, Jesús; Nozicka, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of pressure and velocity fields on the 2415-3S airfoil which will be used for and unmanned aerial vehicle with internal propulsion system and in this way analyze the air flow through an internal duct of the airfoil using computational fluid dynamics. The main objective is to evaluate the effect of the internal air flow past the airfoil and how this affects the aerodynamic performance by means of lift and drag forces. For this purpose, three different desig...

  10. Analysis of Air Flow Past and through the 2415-3S Airfoil for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with Internal Propulsion System

    OpenAIRE

    Luis D. Mendoza; Jiří Nožička

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of velocity fields on the 2415-3S airfoil which will be used for an unmanned aerial vehicle with internal propulsion system and in this way analyze the air flow through an internal duct of the airfoil using computational fluid dynamics. The main objective is to evaluate the effect of the internal air flow past the airfoil and how this affects the aerodynamic performance by means of lift and drag forces. For this purpose, three different designs of the inte...

  11. Analysis of air flow past and through the 2415-3S airfoil for an unmanned aerial vehicle with internal propulsion system

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez-Araque, L.; Mendoza Pérez, Luis Daniel; J. Nožička

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of velocity fields on the 2415-3S airfoil which will be used for an unmanned aerial vehicle with internal propulsion system and in this way analyze the air flow through an internal duct of the airfoil using computational fluid dynamics. The main objective is to evaluate the effect of the internal air flow past the airfoil and how this affects the aerodynamic performance by means of lift and drag forces. For this purpose, three different designs of the inte...

  12. Information technology equipment cooling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  13. Aeration equipment for small depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  14. Global surface pressure measurements of static and dynamic stall on a wind turbine airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Gregory, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Recognizing the need for global surface measurement techniques to characterize the time-varying, three-dimensional loading encountered on rotating wind turbine blades, fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been evaluated for resolving unsteady aerodynamic effects in incompressible flow. Results of a study aimed at demonstrating the laser-based, single-shot PSP technique on a low Reynolds number wind turbine airfoil in static and dynamic stall are reported. PSP was applied to the suction side of a Delft DU97-W-300 airfoil (maximum thickness-to-chord ratio of 30 %) at a chord Reynolds number of 225,000 in the University of Wyoming open-return wind tunnel. Static and dynamic stall behaviors are presented using instantaneous and phase-averaged global pressure maps. In particular, a three-dimensional pressure topology driven by a stall cell pattern is detected near the maximum lift condition on the steady airfoil. Trends in the PSP-measured pressure topology on the steady airfoil were confirmed using surface oil visualization. The dynamic stall case was characterized by a sinusoidal pitching motion with mean angle of 15.7°, amplitude of 11.2°, and reduced frequency of 0.106 based on semichord. PSP images were acquired at selected phase positions, capturing the breakdown of nominally two-dimensional flow near lift stall, development of post-stall suction near the trailing edge, and a highly three-dimensional topology as the flow reattaches. Structural patterns in the surface pressure topologies are considered from the analysis of the individual PSP snapshots, enabled by a laser-based excitation system that achieves sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the single-shot images. The PSP results are found to be in general agreement with observations about the steady and unsteady stall characteristics expected for the airfoil.

  15. Upper section for anchor timbering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirokov, A.P.; Isachenko, V.M.; Kuntsevich, V.I.; Pishulin, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to exclude rotation of the fixing device around the anchor with screwing of the tightening nut and simplification of the fixing device design. The support fixing device is made of a section of pipe and is equipped with a rotation delimiter made in the form of a female fixing device of the projection arranged on it at an angle to the longitudinal axis.

  16. Equipe de trabalho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gerber Hornink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available   Equipe de Trabalho 2014 1. Equipe editorial Editor-Chefe Bayardo Bapstista Torres, Instituto de Química - USP, Brasil Eduardo Galembeck, Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Biologia UNICAMP, Brasil   Editores Gabriel Gerber Hornink, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade - Federal de Alfenas - Unifal-MG, Brasil Vera Maria Treis Trindade, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil   Corpo Editorial Adriana Cassina, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguai Angel Herráez, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología molecular, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Espanha André Amaral Gonçalves Bianco, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, Brasil Denise Vaz de Macedo, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Brasil Eneida de Paula, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Brasil Guilherme Andrade Marson, Instituto de Química - USP, Brasil Jose Antonio Martinez Oyanedel, Universidad de Concepción, Chile Josep Maria Fernández Novell, Dept. Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular Universitat de Barcelona, Espanha Leila Maria Beltramini, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo - USP, Brasil Manuel João da Costa, Escola de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Minho, Portugal Maria Lucia Bianconi, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Brasil María Noel Alvarez, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguai Miguel Ángel Medina Torres, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Faculty of Sciences University of Málaga, Espanha Nelma Regina Segnini Bossolan, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo - USP, Brasil Paulo De Avila

  17. Assessment of spanwise domain size effect on the transitional flow past an airfoil

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-19

    In most large-eddy and direct numerical simulations of flow past an isolated airfoil, the flow is assumed periodic in the spanwise direction. The size of the spanwise domain is an important geometrical parameter determining whether the turbulent flow is fully developed, and whether the separation and transition patterns are accurately modeled. In the present study, we investigate the incompressible flow past an isolated NACA0012 airfoil at the angle of attack of 5 degrees and Reynolds number 5 × 104. The spanwise domain size Lz, represented by the aspect ratio AR=Lz/C where C is the airfoil chord length, is varied in the range 0.1−0.80.1−0.8. The effect of varying the normalized spanwise domain size AR is examined via direct numerical simulation (DNS) on several aspects of the turbulent flow quantities including the time-averaged and time-dependent behavior as well as the spanwise variation of the selected statistical quantities. DNS results reveal that different aspect ratios result in close predictions of the time-averaged aerodynamic quantities, and the velocity field except for a slight difference in the separation bubble. Smaller aspect ratios tend to underpredict the turbulent fluctuations near the separation point but overpredict them inside the separation bubble. Large differences are observed for multiple statistical quantities near the reattachment point, especially the turbulent kinetic energy budget terms. The leading edge separation is notably three-dimensional for simulation at AR=0.8, while remaining quasi-2D for smaller aspect ratios. The spanwise two-point correlation coefficient shows significant dependence on the position of the probe and the velocity component analyzed: small aspect ratios do not produce uncorrelated results for all the velocity components. The simulation results demonstrate that examining only a few statistical quantities may result in a misleading conclusion regarding the sufficiency of the spanwise domain size. Reliable

  18. Experimental investigations of a trailing edge noise feedback mechanism on a NACA 0012 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plogmann, B.; Herrig, A.; Würz, W.

    2013-05-01

    Discrete frequency tones in the trailing edge noise spectra of NACA 0012 airfoils are investigated with the Coherent Particle Velocity method. The Reynolds number and angle of attack range, in which these discrete frequency tones are present, are consistent with published results. The discrete tones are composed of a main tone and a set of regularly spaced side peaks resulting in a ladder-type structure for the dependency on the free stream velocity. The occurrence of this discrete frequency noise could be attributed to the presence of a laminar boundary layer on the pressure side opening up into a separation bubble near the trailing edge, which was visualized using oil flow. Wall pressure measurements close to the trailing edge revealed a strong spanwise and streamwise coherence of the flow structures inside this laminar separation bubble. The laminar vortex shedding frequencies inferred from the streamwise velocity fluctuations, which were evaluated from hot-wire measurements at the trailing edge, were seen to coincide with the discrete tone frequencies observed in the trailing edge noise spectra. Previous findings on discrete frequency tones for airfoils with laminar boundary layers up to the trailing edge hint at the existence of a global feedback loop. Hence, sound waves generated at the trailing edge feed back into the laminar boundary layer upstream by receptivity and are, then, convectively amplified downstream. The most dominant amplification of these disturbance modes is observed inside the laminar separation bubble. Therefore, the frequencies of the most pronounced tones in the trailing edge noise spectra are in the frequency range of the convectively most amplified disturbance modes. Modifying the receptivity behavior of the laminar boundary layer on the pressure side by means of very thin, two-dimensional roughness elements considerably changes the discrete tone frequencies. For roughness elements placed closer to the trailing edge, the main tone

  19. TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    1997-09-29

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive.

  20. Supersonic unstalled flutter. [aerodynamic loading of thin airfoils induced by cascade motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Flutter analyses were developed to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. These analyses are utilized in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.