WorldWideScience

Sample records for airfoil sand erosion

  1. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  2. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impac......The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  3. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  4. An Iterative Method for Estimating Airfoil Deformation due to Solid Particle Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicopter blades are currently constructed with composite materials enveloping honeycomb cores with only the leading and trailing edges made of metal alloys. In some cases, the erosive wear of the bound between the composite skin and metallic leading edge leads to full blade failure. It is therefore the goal of this paper to provide a method for simulating the way an airfoil is deformed through the erosion process. The method involves computational fluid dynamics simulations, scripts for automatic meshing and spreadsheet calculators for estimating the erosion and, ultimately, the airfoil deformation. Further work could include more complex meshing scripts allowing the use of similar methods for turbo-machineries.

  5. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  6. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  7. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  8. Electronmicroscopic Study of Sand Erosion Processes in Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    AO—A073 k97 ISRAEL INST OF MEtALS HAIFA - ~ - - — Ffl 11/6 ELECTROI~~ICROSCOPIC STUDY OF SAND EROSION PROCESSES IN METALS, IU) UNCLASSIFIED 79...General Appearance 8 4.2.2 Local Erosion Processes and Hard Phase Par t icles 9 5. Further Discussion 10 S S-_ S _~S _~~SS ~~~ S ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ __SS...research was to ga in addit iona l unders tan di ng of the mechanism of loca l mater ia l removal from eroded compos ite meta l l i c surface

  9. Numerical modelling of the erosion and deposition of sand inside a filter layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; van Gent, Marcel R. A.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    prediction method to assure that the amount of erosion remains within acceptable limits. This work presents a numerical model that is capable of describing the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter of rock on top of sand. The hydraulic loading is that of incident irregular waves...... additional data sets on the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter. A few cases are defined to study the effect of the sinking of the filter into the erosion hole. The numerical model is also applied to several application cases. The response of the core material (sand) to changes......This paper treats the numerical modelling of the behaviour of a sand core covered by rocks and exposed to waves. The associated displacement of the rock is also studied. A design that allows for erosion and deposition of the sand core beneath a rock layer in a coastal structure requires an accurate...

  10. A Multiphase First Order Model for Non-Equilibrium Sand Erosion, Transport and Sedimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Preziosi, Luigi; Bruno, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Three phenomena are involved in sand movement: erosion, wind transport, and sedimentation. This paper presents a comprehensive easy-to-use multiphase model that include all three aspects with a particular attention to situations in which erosion due to wind shear and sedimentation due to gravity are not in equilibrium. The interest is related to the fact that these are the situations leading to a change of profile of the sand bed.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Sand Erosion Phenomena in Rotor/Stator Interaction of Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaya Suzuki; Kazuaki Inaba; Makoto Yamamoto

    2008-01-01

    Sand erosion is a phenomenon where solid particles impinging to a wall cause serious mechanical damages to the wall surface. This phenomenon is a typical gas-particle two-phase turbulent flow and a multi-physics problem where the flow field, particle trajectory and wall deformation interact with each other. On the other hand, aircraft engines operating in a particulate environment are subjected to the performance and lifetime deterioration due to sand erosion. Especially, the compressor of the aircraft engines is severely damaged. The flow fields of the compressor have strongly three dimensional and unsteady natures. In order to estimate the deterioration due to sand erosion, the sand erosion simulation for a compressor is required under the consideration of the rotor-stator interaction. In the present study, we apply our three dimensional sand erosion prediction code to a single stage axial flow compressor. We numerically investigate the change of the flow field, the particle trajectories, and the eroded wall shape in the compressor, to clarify the effects of sand erosion in the compressor.

  12. Sand erosion at the toe of a gabion-protected dune face

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to study the manner in which erosion takes place the the toe of a dune slope protected by gabions, and to examine the response of the gabions to this erosion. A sand slope overlaid by model gabions was subjected to wave attack in a hydraulic flume, and period

  13. AN ALTERNATE METHOD TO PREVENT SAND ABRASIVE EROSION IN PIPELINES FOR TRANSPORTING HIGH-SPEED NATURAL GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternate method to re-move the sand carried by natural gas in the upstream pipelinestherefore preventing sand abrasive erosion in pipelines used intransporting high-speed natural gas. Conventionally, most ex-perts pay much attention to improving the anti-erosion charac-teristics of the pipeline materials to solve the problem of seri-ous abrasive erosion, but without significant success. Basedon the theory of multiphase flow and analysis of the character-istics of sandy jets, a new equipment named "Sand Catcher" isintroduced in this article. Experimental results show that theSand Catcher effectively removes most of the sand in the natu-ral gas and significantly reduces the abrasive erosion of thepipelines. The Sand Catcher can be widely applied in practicein the near future.

  14. Experimental Evaluation of Erosion of Gunmetal under Asymmetrical Shaped Sand Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asaduzzaman Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The erosion characteristics of gunmetal have been evaluated practically at different operating conditions. Asymmetrical silica sand (SiO2 is taken into account as erodent within range of 300–600 μm. The impact velocity within 30–50 m/sec, impact angle 15–900, and stand off distance 15–25 mm are inspected as other relevant operating test conditions. The maximum level of erosion is obtained at impact angle 15° which indicates the ductile manner of the tested gunmetal. The higher the impact velocity, the higher the erosion rate as almost linear fashion is observed. Mass loss of gunmetal reduces with the increase of stand-off distance. A dimensional analysis, erosion efficiency (η, and relationship between friction and erosion indicate the prominent correlation. The test results are designated using Taguchi’s and ANOVA concept. S/N ratio indicates that there are 1.72% deviations that are estimated between predicted and experimental results. To elaborately analyze the results, ANN and GMDH methods are mentioned. After erosion process of tested composite, the damage propagation on surfaces is examined using SEM for the confirmation of possible nature of wear behavior. The elemental composition of eroded test samples at varying percentage of gunmetal is analyzed by EDX analysis.

  15. Sand petrology and focused erosion in collision orogens: the Brahmaputra case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Andò, Sergio; France-Lanord, Christian; Singh, Sunil K.; Foster, Gavin

    2004-03-01

    The high-relief and tectonically active Himalayan range, characterized by markedly varying climate but relatively homogeneous geology along strike, is a unique natural laboratory in which to investigate several of the factors controlling the composition of orogenic sediments. Coupling of surface and tectonic processes is most evident in the eastern Namche Barwa syntaxis, where the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra River, draining a large elevated area in south Tibet, plunges down the deepest gorge on Earth. Here composition of river sands changes drastically from lithic to quartzofeldspathic. After confluence with the Lohit River, draining the Transhimalayan-equivalent Mishmi arc batholiths, sediment composition remains remarkably constant across Assam, indicating subordinate contributions from Himalayan tributaries. Independent calculations based on petrographical, mineralogical, and geochemical data indicate that the syntaxis, representing only ∼4% of total basin area, contributes 35±6% to the total Brahmaputra sediment flux, and ∼20% of total detritus reaching the Bay of Bengal. Such huge anomalies in erosion patterns have major effects on composition of orogenic sediments, which are recorded as far as the Bengal Fan. In the Brahmaputra basin, in spite of very fast erosion and detrital evacuation, chemical weathering is not negligible. Sand-sized carbonate grains are dissolved partially in mountain reaches and completely in monsoon-drenched Assam plains, where clinopyroxenes are selectively altered. Plagioclase, instead, is preferentially weathered only in detritus from the Shillong Plateau, which is markedly enriched in microcline. Most difficult to assess is the effect of hydraulic sorting in Bangladesh, where quartz, garnet and epidote tend to be sequestered in the bedload and trapped on the coastal plain, whereas cleavable feldspars and amphiboles are concentrated in the suspended load and eventually deposited in the deep sea. High-resolution petrographic and

  16. Soil erosion rates caused by wind and saltating sand stresses in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1993-02-01

    Wind erosion tests were performed in a wind tunnel in support of the development of long-term protective barriers to cap stabilized waste sites at the Hanford Site. Controlled wind and saltating sand erosive stresses were applied to physical models of barrier surface layers to simulate worst-case eolian erosive stresses. The goal of these tests was to provide information useful to the design and evaluation of the surface layer composition of an arid-region waste site barrier concept that incorporates a deep fine-soil reservoir. A surface layer composition is needed that will form an armor resistant to eolian erosion during periods of extreme dry climatic conditions, especially when such conditions result in the elimination or reduction of vegetation by water deprivation or wildfire. Because of the life span required of Hanford waste barriers, it is important that additional work follow these wind tunnel studies. A modeling effort is planned to aid the interpretation of test results with respect to the suitability of pea gravel to protect the finite-soil reservoir during long periods of climatic stress. It is additionally recommended that wind tunnel tests be continued and field data be obtained at prototype or actual barrier sites. Results wig contribute to barrier design efforts and provide confidence in the design of long-term waste site caps for and regions.

  17. Parrotfish erosion underpins reef growth, sand talus development and island building in the Maldives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kyle M.; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-07-01

    Parrotfish play a key functional role on coral reefs as external bioerosion agents and produce large quantities of carbonate sediment as a by-product of grazing on reef surfaces. Parrotfish are therefore an important potential source of sediment for island construction and maintenance within atoll reef environments, particularly under future scenarios of sea level rise and island morphological change. Here, we present the first field-based estimates of excavating parrotfish erosion (Chlorurus sordidus and Chlorurus strongylocephalus) within the Indian Ocean and quantify the contribution of parrotfish to the carbonate and sediment budgets of an atoll interior reef platform in the Maldives. We note that parrotfish erosion rates are high (6.3 kg m- 2 y- 1), generating large amounts of new coral-based sediment (2.6 kg m- 2 y- 1) that has a comparable grain size distribution to island deposits. Mean erosion rates by individual C. strongylocephalus (405 kg individual y- 1) were higher than C. sordidus (55 kg individual y- 1), but their contribution to erosion per unit area of reef was less due to a lower relative biomass (C. strongylocephalus: 1.3 kg m- 2 y- 1; C. sordidus: 5.0 kg m- 2 y- 1). Parrotfish also facilitate sediment export from reefs (0.7 kg m- 2 y- 1), which contributes extensively to the development of the sand talus on the fore-reef slope and to the evolution of the wider atoll basin. Our results provide strong evidence that parrotfish erosion (and sediment generation) underpins island morphology on Maldivian reefs and highlight the importance of larger parrotfish as producers of island-grade sediment. Ecological processes must therefore be considered within future coastal management strategies for enhancing island stability.

  18. Measuring splash erosion potential under vegetation using sand-filled splash cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, C.; Scholten, T.; Kühn, P.

    2009-04-01

    In soil erosion research it is widely accepted that vegetation is not only protecting the soil from the erosive power of rainfall. Under specific circumstances (like they occur e.g. in forests) vegetation can enhance the erosive power of rainfall by modifying its properties (esp. drop size distribution, kinetic energy). The adjacent processes are very complex and variable in time and space and depend on numerous variables (e.g. rainfall intensity, drop size distribution, drop fall velocity, height of the canopy, density of the canopy, crown and leaf traits, LAI). In the last decades a large number of studies focused this process-system using different methods and came to often different results (Brandt 1989; Calder 2001; Foot & Morgan 2005; Hall & Calder 1993; Mosley 1982; Nanko et al. 2006; Park & Cameron 2008; Vis 1986). The main objective of our field experiments in subtropical China is to quantify the modification of precipitation by its pass through the canopy layer for six different tree species, three different successional stages and three different biodiversity classes. For this, new splash cups were developed based on the archetype of Ellison (1947). In contrast to previous studies with splash cups (Vis 1986) or other forms of splash cups (Kinnell 1974; Morgan 1981) we measured the unit sand remaining inside the cup after single natural rainfall events. The new splash cups contain of a PE-flask to which a carrier system has been attached. In this carrier system a cup filled with unit sand of 125-200 µm particle size is inserted. At the bottom of the cup a silk cover is attached to avoid the loss of sand and to guarantee free drainage of water from the cup to the carrier and vice versa. Cup and PE-flask are hydraulically connected by a cotton wick to assure constant moisture content throughout the time of measuring. Additionally, vents in the carrier system ensure that the pressure arising from the insertion of the cup doesn't lead to a loss of sand. The

  19. Aerolian erosion, transport, and deposition of volcaniclastic sands among the shifting sand dunes, Christmas Lake Valley, Oregon: TIMS image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ramsey, Michael S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing is a tool that, in the context of aeolian studies, offers a synoptic view of a dune field, sand sea, or entire desert region. Blount et al. (1990) presented one of the first studies demonstrating the power of multispectral images for interpreting the dynamic history of an aeolian sand sea. Blount's work on the Gran Desierto of Mexico used a Landsat TM scene and a linear spectral mixing model to show where different sand populations occur and along what paths these sands may have traveled before becoming incorporated into dunes. Interpretation of sand transport paths and sources in the Gran Desierto led to an improved understanding of the origin and Holocene history of the dunes. With the anticipated advent of the EOS-A platform and ASTER thermal infrared capability in 1998, it will become possible to look at continental sand seas and map sand transport paths using 8-12 mu m bands that are well-suited to tracking silicate sediments. A logical extension of Blount's work is to attempt a similar study using thermal infrared images. One such study has already begun by looking at feldspar, quartz, magnetite, and clay distributions in the Kelso Dunes of southern California. This paper describes the geology and application of TIMS image analysis of a less-well known Holocene dune field in south central Oregon using TIMS data obtained in 1991.

  20. Effect of Annealing Treatment on Erosion-Corrosion of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in Saline-Sand Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiulin; Shan, Yiping; Chen, Yueyue; Wang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Bulk metallic glass (BMG) may be a good candidate to solve the erosion-corrosion (E-C) problems of marine pumps in sand-containing seawater. Since annealing treatment is an effective way to improve plasticity of BMGs, the effect of annealing treatment on E-C wear of Zr-based BMG in saline-sand slurry was investigated. All of the annealed BMG samples were crystallized and the quantity of (Zr, Cu) phase increased but that of Al4Cu9 phase decreased with the increase of annealing temperature from 360 to 480 °C. Accordingly, annealing treatment enhances plasticity of the as-cast BMG at the cost of hardness and corrosion resistance. Moreover, 480 °C annealed BMG sample possesses the highest hardness and the lowest corrosion current density in all of the annealed BMG samples. Using a slurry pot erosion tester, the E-C wear of the as-cast and annealed BMG samples was studied under different impingement angles, impact velocities, and concentrations in saline-sand slurry. With the improvement of plasticity, 480 °C annealed BMG sample exhibits the best E-C wear resistance under high impingement angle, high impact velocity, and high sand concentration.

  1. Erosion-corrosion in carbon dioxide saturated systems in presence of sand, inhibitor, oil, and high concentration of salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Shokrollah

    Oil and gas production is usually accompanied by formation water which typically contains high levels of chloride. Some effects of chloride concentration on corrosion are not widely known in the literature, and this can result in misleading conclusions. One goal of this research was to contribute to a better understanding of the effects of chloride concentration in CO2 corrosion. Experimental and theoretical studies conducted in the present work have shown that increasing the NaCl concentration in solution has three important effects on corrosion results. First, standard pH meter readings in high NaCl concentration solutions require corrections. Second, increasing the NaCl concentration decreases the CO2 concentration in solution and therefore contributes to a decrease in the corrosion rate. Third, increasing the NaCl concentration increases the solubility of FeCO3 and therefore reduces the likelihood of forming an iron carbonate scale. High NaCl concentration also decreases the sand erosion rate of the metal slightly by increasing the density and viscosity of the liquid. There are two main contributions of this research. The first contribution is the experimental characterization of inhibited erosion-corrosion behavior of mild steel under CO2-saturated conditions with a high salt concentration. Chemical inhibition is one the most important techniques for controlling erosion-corrosion in offshore mild steel pipelines, tubing and pipe fittings in oil and gas industry. The second contribution is the introduction of a new approach for predicting inhibited erosion-corrosion in mild steel pipes including the effects of flow and environmental conditions, sand production, and an oil phase. Sand erosion can decrease the efficiency of corrosion protection systems including iron-carbonate scale formation and chemical inhibition. The need to be able to predict inhibitor performance under sand production conditions is particularly acute when the wells are deep or off

  2. Application of sediment transport formulae to sand-dike breach erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Technical Advisory Committee on Water Defences in the Netherlands has decided to develop a mathematical model for breach erosion in dunes and dikes, with which it will be possible to predict the growth of the breach and the discharge rate through the breach in case of a dike-burst. An essential

  3. Wave-induced flow and its influence on ridge erosion and channel deposition in Lanshayang channel of radial sand ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈可峰; 安翔; 陆培东; 张玮; 徐卓

    2014-01-01

    Very limited modeling studies were available of the wave-induced current under the complex hydrodynamic conditions in the South Yellow Sea Radial Sand Ridge area (SYSRSR). Partly it is due to the difficulties in estimating the influence of the wave-induced current in this area. In this study, a coupled 3-D storm-surge-wave model is built. In this model, the time-dependent varying Collins coefficient with the water level method (TCL) are used. The wave-flow environment in the Lanshayang Channel (LSYC) during the “Winnie” typhoon is successfully represented by this model. According to the modelling results, at a high water level (HWL), the wave-induced current similar to the long-shore current will emerge in the shallow area of the ridges, and has two different motion trends correlated with the morphological characteristics of the ridges. The wave-induced current velocity could be as strong as 1 m/s, which is at the same magnitude as the tidal current. This result is verified by the bathymetric changes in the LSYC during the “Matsa” typhoon. Thus, the wave-induced current may be one of the driven force of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR. These conclusions will help to further study the mechanism of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR.

  4. Effects of disturbance on vegetation by sand accretion and erosion across coastal dune habitats on a barrier island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas E

    2015-01-12

    Coastal geomorphology and vegetation are expected to be particularly sensitive to climate change, because of disturbances caused by sea-level rise and increased storm frequency. Dunes have critical reciprocal interactions with vegetation; dunes create habitats for plants, while plants help to build dunes and promote geomorphological stability. These interactions are also greatly affected by disturbances associated with sand movement, either in accretion (dune building) or in erosion. The magnitude and intensity of disturbances are expected to vary with habitat, from the more exposed and less stable foredunes, to low-lying and flood-prone interdunes, to the protected and older backdunes. Permanent plots were established at three different spatial scales on St George Island, FL, USA, where the vegetation and dune elevation were quantified annually from 2011 to 2013. Change in elevation, either through accretion or erosion, was used as a measure of year-to-year disturbance over the 2 years of the study. At the scale of different dune habitats, foredunes were found to have the greatest disturbance, while interdunes had the least. Elevation and habitat (i.e. foredune, interdune, backdune) were significantly correlated with plant community composition. Generalized linear models conducted within each habitat show that the change in elevation (disturbance) is also significantly correlated with the plant community, but only within foredunes and interdunes. The importance of disturbance in exposed foredunes was expected and was found to be related to an increasing abundance of a dominant species (Uniola paniculata) in eroding areas. The significant effect of disturbance in the relatively stable interdunes was surprising, and may be due to the importance of flooding associated with small changes in elevation in these low-lying areas. Overall, this study documents changes in the plant community associated with elevation, and demonstrates that the foredune and interdune

  5. 搭设障蔽控制樟子松风蚀沙埋危害的效果%Control Effect on Wind Erosion and Sand Cover by Building Sand-Barrier for Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica Plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈升银; 叶竹林

    2011-01-01

    The control effect on wind erosion and sand cover by building sand-barrier was studied by taking Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica as planting tree species. The results showed that building sand-barrier could promote the survival rate of the plantation up to 100% , which was significantly higher than that of the control. There were also significant differences in the growth rate of the Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica plantation between building the sand-barrier and the control. The experiment showed that building the sand-barrier could promote the average sapling height, basal diameter and crown growth by 55.4% , 66. 6% and 60.1% respectively compared to the control. Sand-barrier building provided the morphology construction of the Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica saplings with much better environment that significantly reduced the phenomena such as trunk bending, wind throw and drying up of the brnaches and turning yellow of the leaves due to the wind damage.%以樟子松为对象探讨搭设沙障控制风蚀沙埋危害的效果.结果表明:搭设与未搭设沙障的造林保存率存在显著差异,搭设沙障可使造林保存率高达100%;搭设与未搭设沙障的生长量也存在显著差异,搭设沙障可使树高、地径、树冠生长量分别提高55.4%、66.6%和60.7%;搭设沙障为樟子松的形态建成创造了良好的环境条件,树干弯曲、风倒及枯黄现象明显减少.

  6. Vertical distribution of soil moisture and surface sandy soil wind erosion for different types of sand dune on the southeastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChaoFeng Fu; JingBo Zhao; FanMin Mei; TianJie Shao; Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture is a critical state affecting a variety of land surface and subsurface processes. We report investigation results of the factors controlling vertical variation of soil moisture and sand transport rate of three types of dunes on the south-eastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land. Samples were taken from holes drilled to a depth of 4 m at different topographic sites on the dunes, and were analyzed for soil moisture, grain-size distribution and surface sediment discharge. The results show that: (1) The average soil moisture varies in different types of dunes, with the following sequences ordered from highest to lowest: in the shrubs-covered dunes and the trees-covered dunes the sequence is from inter-dunes lowland to windward slope to leeward slope. The average moisture in the bare-migratory sand dunes is sequenced from inter-dunes lowland to leeward slope to windward slope. (2) Vegetation form and surface coverage affect the range of soil moisture of different types of dunes in the same topographic position. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture for shrubs-covered dunes is higher than that of other types of dune. (3) The effect of shrubs on dune soil moisture is explained in terms of the greater ability of shrubs to trap fine-grained atmospheric dust and hold moisture. (4) The estimated sand transport rates over sand dunes with sparse shrubs are less than those over bare-migratory dunes or sand dunes with sparse trees, indi-cating that shrubs are more effective in inhibiting wind erosion in the sandy land area.

  7. Evaluation of the Synergistic Effect of Erosion-Corrosion on AISI 4330 Steel in Saline-Sand Multiphase Flow by Electrochemical and Gravimetric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Yesid Peña Ballesteros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effects of fluid flow, sand particles, and solution pH on erosion-corrosion of AISI 4330 steel alloy in saline-sand medium were studied through a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE system by weight-loss and electrochemical measurements. The worn surface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results show that, under all the test conditions assessed, the passivity of the steel alloy could not be maintained; as a result, an activation mechanism dominates the corrosion process of steel alloy. Furthermore, the potentiodynamic curves show that, with the increasing of the electrode flow rate and particle size, the anodic current density increased, which is due to deterioration of the electrode by the impacting slurry. Although the increase of particle size affects the anodic current density, the effect of particle size does not cause a significant change in the polarization behavior of the steel electrode. The electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic curves suggest that erosion-corrosion phenomenon of the ASISI 4330 steel is under mixed control of mass transport and charge transfer. The inductive loops formed in the impedance plots are representative of an increase in roughness of the electrode caused by the particles impacting at the surface. The change in the passivity of the steel alloy as the pH is altered plays an important role in the corrosion rate.

  8. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  9. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to an airfoil shaped body with a leading edge and a trailing edge extending along the longitudinal extension of the body and defining a profile chord, the airfoil shaped body comprising an airfoil shaped facing that forms the outer surface of the airfoil shaped body...... and surrounds an internal volume of the body, a distance member that is connected to the facing inside the body and extends from the facing and into the internal volume of the body, and at least one reinforcing member that operates in tension for reinforcing the facing against inward deflections...... and that is connected to the facing inside the internal volume of the body at the same side of the profile chord as the connection of the distance member to the facing and to the distance member at a distance from the facing....

  10. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  11. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which airfoils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so. Theairfoils are classified according to the agreement between the numerical results and experimental...... to these discrepancies is identified. Some advices are given for elaborating future airfoil design processes that would involvethe numerical code EllipSys2D in particular, and transition modelling in general.......The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel...

  12. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  13. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki; Cordier, Stephane; Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás; Centeri, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  14. Airfoil Design and Rotorcraft Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousman, William G.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between global performance of a typical helicopter and the airfoil environment, as represented by the airfoil angles of attack and Mach number, has been examined using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. A general correspondence is observed between global performance parameters, such as rotor L/D, and airfoil performance parameters, such as airfoil L/D, the drag bucket boundaries, and the divergence Mach number. Effects of design parameters such as blade twist and rotor speed variation have been examined and, in most cases, improvements observed in global performance are also observed in terms of airfoil performance. The relations observed between global Performance and the airfoil environment suggests that the emphasis in airfoil design should be for good L/D, while the maximum lift coefficient performance is less important.

  15. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  16. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  17. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  18. Unsteady flow about a circulation control airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晶昌; 孙茂; 吴礼义

    1996-01-01

    The unsteady flow around a circulation control (CC) airfoil was investigated with Navier-Stokes method,which includes the flow around CC airfoil with pulsating jet,the flow around oscillating CC airfoil,and the flow around oscillating CC airfoil with pulsating jet.Dynamic properties of the flow and the aerodynamic forces were rewaled.

  19. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbine Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to test and substantiate erosion-resistant (ER) nanocoatings for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbine engines in both industrial gas turbines and commercial aviation.

  20. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    1999-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are basedon four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum...... to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFDcomputations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived...

  1. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  2. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  3. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Soerensen, N.N.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wen Zhong Shen; Noerkaer Soerensen, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are based on four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotor with LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall at the tip is low and that it is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. The use of these characteristics in aeroelastic calculations shows a good agreement in power and flap moments with measurements. Furthermore, a fatigue analysis shows a reduction in the loads of up to 15 % compared to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFD computations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived that can be used to calculate mean values of power and loads. The lift in stall at the tip is low and at the root it is high compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. In particular the power curves were well calculated by use of the optimised airfoil characteristics. In the quasi-3D CFD computations, the airfoil characteristics are derived directly. This Navier-Stokes model takes into account rotational and 3D effects. The model enables the study of the rotational effect of a rotor blade at computing costs similar to what is typical for 2D airfoil calculations. The depicted results show that the model is capable of determining the correct qualitative behaviour for airfoils subject to rotation. The method shows that lift is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil

  4. Robust design of NLF airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing; Gao Zhenghong; Huang Jiangtao; Zhao Ke

    2013-01-01

    A robust optimization design approach of natural laminar airfoils is developed in this paper.First,the non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) free form deformation method based on NURBS basis function is introduced to the airfoil parameterization.Second,aerodynamic characteristics are evaluated by solving Navier Stokes equations,and the γ-Reθt transition model coupling with shear-stress transport (SST) turbulent model is introduced to simulate boundary layer transition.A numerical simulation of transition flow around NLF0416 airfoil is conducted to test the code.The comparison between numerical simulation results and wind tunnel test data approves the validity and applicability of the present transition model.Third,the optimization system is set up,which uses the separated particle swarm optimization (SPSO) as search algorithm and combines the Kriging models as surrogate model during optimization.The system is applied to carry out robust design about the uncertainty of lift coefficient and Mach number for NASA NLF-0115 airfoil.The data of optimized airfoil aerodynamic characteristics indicates that the optimized airfoil can maintain laminar flow stably in an uncertain range and has a wider range of low drag.

  5. Erosion Pressure on the Danish Coasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Sørensen, Per; Kroon, Aart

    , neglects the need for sand replenishment i.e. in the form of repeated sand nourishments. Here we present a conceptual model and method for dividing coastal erosion into acute and chronic erosion pressure, respectively. We focus on the model use for management and climate change adaptation purposes......Coastlines around the world are receding due to coastal erosion.With rising sea levels and a potential climatic deterioration due to climate change, erosion rates are likely to increase at many locations in the future.Together with the current preference of people to settle near or directly...... by the ocean, coastal erosion issues become increasingly more important to the human values at risk. Along many Danish coastlines, hard structures already act as coastal protection in the form of groins, breakwaters, revetments etc. These eroding coasts however still lack sand and where the public, in general...

  6. An Integrated Method for Designing Airfoils Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xudong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for designing wind turbine airfoils is presented in this paper. As a main component in the design method, airfoil profiles are expressed in a trigonometric series form using conformal transformations and series of polynomial equations. The characteristics of the coefficient parameters in the trigonometric expression for airfoils profiles are first studied. As a direct consequence, three generic airfoil profiles are obtained from the expression. To validate and show the generality of the trigonometric expression, the profiles of the NACA 64418 and S809 airfoils are expressed by the present expression. Using the trigonometric expression for airfoil profiles, a so-called integrated design method is developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. As airfoil shapes are expressed with analytical functions, the airfoil surface can be kept smooth in a high degree. In the optimization step, drag and lift force coefficients are calculated using the XFOIL code. Three new airfoils CQ-A15, CQ-A18, and CQ-A21 with a thickness of 15%, 18%, and 21%, respectively, are designed with the new integrated design method.

  7. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  8. Design and optimization of tidal turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    To increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and, thereby, to reduce cost of energy, the use of specially tailored airfoils is needed. This work is focused on the design of an airfoil for marine application. Firstly, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed with reference to the requirements for wind turbine airfoils. Then, the design approach is presented. This is a numerical optimization scheme in which a gradient-based algorithm is used, coupled with the RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints .A section of the present work is dedicated to address this point; particular importance is given to the cavitation phenomenon. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high-efficiency hydrofoil is illustrated, and the results are compared with existing turbine airfoils, considering also the effect on turbine performance due to different airfoils.

  9. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Skidmore, Andrew K; Hao, Fanghua; Wang, Tiejun

    2010-02-15

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate assessment, from 1977 to 2006, of erosion in the upper watershed of the Yellow River. At same time, the impacts of land use and landscape service features on soil erosion load were assessed. A series of supervised land use classifications of Landsat images characterized variations in land use and landscape patterns over three decades. The SWAT database was constructed with soil properties, climate and elevation data. Using water flow and sand density data as parameters, regional soil erosion load was simulated. A numerical statistical model was used to relate soil erosion to land use and landscape. The results indicated that decadal decrease of grassland areas did not pose a significant threat to soil erosion, while the continual increase of bare land, water area and farmland increased soil erosion. Regional landscape variation also had a strong relationship with erosion. Patch level landscape analyses demonstrated that larger water area led to more soil erosion. The patch correlation indicated that contagious grassland patches reduced soil erosion yield. The increased grassland patches led to more patch edges, in turn increasing the sediment transportation from the patch edges. The findings increase understanding of the temporal variation in soil erosion processes, which is the basis for preventing local pollution.

  10. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  11. Study of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise with special focus on airfoils with blunt trailing edges. Two methods are employed to calculate airfoil noise: The flow/acoustic splitting method and the semi-empirical method. The flow/acoustic splitting method is derived from compressible Navier...... design or optimization. Calculations from both methods are compared with exist experiments. The airfoil blunt noise is found as a function of trailing edge bluntness, Reynolds number, angle of attack, etc.......-Stokes equations. It provides us possibilities to study details about noise generation mechanism. The formulation of the semi-empirical model is based on acoustic analogy and then curve-fitted with experimental data. Due to its high efficiency, such empirical relation is used for purpose of low noise airfoil...

  12. NASA low- and medium-speed airfoil development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.; Whitcomb, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The status of NASA low and medium speed airfoil research is discussed. Effects of airfoil thickness-chord ratios varying from 9 percent to 21 percent on the section characteristics for a design lift coefficient of 0.40 are presented for the initial low speed family of airfoils. Also, modifications to the 17-percent low-speed airfoil to reduce the pitching-moment coefficient and to the 21-percent low speed airfoil results are shown for two new medium speed airfoils with thickness ratios of 13 percent and 17 percent and design-lift coefficients of 0.30. Applications of NASA-developed airfoils to general aviation aircraft are summarized.

  13. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  14. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Daniel L. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  15. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  16. Optimization design of performance test of cyclone separator sand sampler based on numerical simulation and wind erosion tunnel experiment%基于数值模拟与风洞试验的旋风分离式集沙仪优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄炎; 赵满全

    2015-01-01

    为了解风蚀风沙运动规律,提高旋风分离式集沙仪集沙效率。该文在Fluent 平台中建立了旋风分离式集沙仪有限元模型,基于RNG k-ε模型和雷诺应力模型对旋风分离式集沙仪进行数值分析,并对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行风洞试验。通过有限元分析,得到了其内部气相运动规律,观察到集沙仪升气管附近气流强度较大,其内部有“短路流”存在。同时,通过对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行数值模拟,得到结构参数为:筒体直径50 mm;锥体段高度125 mm 的旋风分离式集沙仪集沙盒底部具有较小的湍动能和向上轴向速度,其大小分别为0.99 m2/s2和1.48 m/s。另外,分别对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行风洞试验,得到了改变筒体直径与锥体段高度引起集沙盒底部湍流强度的改变,从而对集沙效率有一定影响,相比较筒体直径而言,锥体段高度对集沙效率影响更明显;集沙盒底部湍动能和向上轴向速度较小的集沙仪,集沙效率较高,具有良好的分离性能。结合数值模拟和风洞试验确定了集沙盒底部湍动能、向上轴向速度为目标函数,根据目标函数,优化设计了集沙盒直管的长度,确定了集沙盒直管长16 mm的旋风分离式集沙仪可以降低集沙盒底部湍动能和向上轴向速度,理论上可以提高旋风分离式集沙仪集沙效率。该文研究结果可为进一步提高旋风分离式集沙仪性能提供依据。%For the purpose of knowing the motion law of sand erosion and improving the efficiency of cyclone separation sand sampler, the finite element model of cyclone separation sand sampler is built by using the software of Fluent. There is a two-phase movement inside the cyclone separation sand sampler, including air and soil particles. The cyclone separation sand sampler mainly separates the soil

  17. Recent coastal dune development: Effects of sand nourishments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.A.J.; Heteren, S. van; Vonhgen, L.M.; Spek, A.J.F. van der; Valk, B. van der

    2012-01-01

    Much of the Dutch coast has been subject to structural erosion. From 1990 onward, sand nourishments have been used under a government policy of dynamic preservation. Annual monitoring and field inspections show that the structural erosion has decreased or even turned into coastal progradation after

  18. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marion, Lucas; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the sep......An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge...... and at the separation point. A calibration of the code through comparison with experiments has been performed using one set of airfoils. A second set of airfoils has been used for the validation of the calibrated model. Predicted aerodynamic forces for a wide range of angles of attack (0 to 90 deg) are in overall good...

  19. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and tip speed ratio, the optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with an objective of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on the previous in-house airfoil family which were optimized at a Reynolds number of 3...... million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry on the existing airfoils and thus simplify the design procedure. The viscos/inviscid code Xfoil is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization where the Reynolds number is set at 16 million with a free...

  20. AirfoilPrep.py Documentation: Release 0.1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, S. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    AirfoilPrep.py provides functionality to preprocess aerodynamic airfoil data. Essentially, the module is an object oriented version of the AirfoilPrep spreadsheet with additional functionality and is written in the Python language. It allows the user to read in two-dimensional aerodynamic airfoil data, apply three-dimensional rotation corrections for wind turbine applications, and extend the datato very large angles of attack. This document discusses installation, usage, and documentation of the module.

  1. Analysis of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.B.Tay; K.B.Lim

    2009-01-01

    Simulations have been done to assess the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of different types of nonsymmetrical airfoils under different flapping configurations. The variables involved are reduced frequency, Strouhal number, pitch amplitude and phase angle. In order to analyze the variables more efficiently, the design of experiments using the response surface methodology is applied. Results show that both the variables and shape of the airfoil have a profound effect on the lift, thrust, and efficiency. By using nonsymmetrical airfoils, average lift coefficient as high as 2.23 can be obtained. The average thrust coefficient and efficiency also reach high values of 2.53 and 0.6 I, respectively. The lift production is highly dependent on the airfoil's shape while thrust production is influenced more heavily by the variables. Efficiency falls somewhere in between. Two-factor interactions are found to exist among the variables. This shows that it is not sufficient to analyze each variable individually. Vorticity diagrams are analyzed to explain the results obtained. Overall, the S1020 airfoil is able to provide relatively good efficiency and at the same time generate high thrust and lift force. These results aid in the design of a better omithopter's wing.

  2. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and application of a novel chemical sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jun [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Fang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Fang Li [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tan Tianwei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)]. E-mail: twtan@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    A novel sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites were synthesized to improve sand particles compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties. The relationship between the concentration of sand-fixing agent and the sand-fixing properties was studied by three kinds of aging tests. Some composites were choose to improve the sand-fixing property and the composition of 40% xanthan gum and 60% ethyl cellulose were chosen to compare sand-fixing property with lignosulfonate. The results showed that the sand-fixing and water-retaining properties of xanthan gum and ethyl cellulose composites were better than that of lignosulfonate. The biodegradability experiment showed that the PASP and its composites were environment-friendly products and the field test showed that the PASP composites could improve wind erosion disturbance. - A novel biodegradability polymer significantly improved sand particles' compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties.

  4. Vortex noise from nonrotating cylinders and airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.; Fink, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of vortex-shedding noise was conducted in an acoustic research tunnel over a Reynolds-number range applicable to full-scale helicopter tail-rotor blades. Two-dimensional tapered-chord nonrotating models were tested to simulate the effect of spanwise frequency variation on the vortex-shedding mechanism. Both a tapered circular cylinder and tapered airfoils were investigated. The results were compared with data for constant-diameter cylinder and constant-chord airfoil models also tested during this study. Far-field noise, surface pressure fluctuations, and spanwise correlation lengths were measured for each configuration. Vortex-shedding noise for tapered cylinders and airfoils was found to contain many narrowband-random peaks which occurred within a range of frequencies corresponding to a predictable Strouhal number referenced to the maximum and minimum chord. The noise was observed to depend on surface roughness and Reynolds number.

  5. Transonic flow theory of airfoils and wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, P R

    1976-01-01

    Supercritical wing technology is expected to have a significant influence on the next generation of commercial aircraft. Computational fluid dynamics is playing a central role in the development of new supercritical wing sections. One of the principal tools is a fast and reliable code that simulates two-dimensional wind tunnel data for transonic flow at high Reynolds numbers. This is used widely by industry to assess drag creep and drag rise. Codes for the design of shockless airfoils by the hodograph method have not been so well received because they usually require a lot of trial and error. However, a more advanced mathematical approach makes it possible to assign the pressure as a function of the arc length and then obtain a shockless airfoil that nearly achieves the given distribution of pressure. This tool should enable engineers to design families of transonic airfoils more easily both for airplane wings and for compressor blades in cascade.

  6. An overview of NACA 6-digit airfoil series characteristics with reference to airfoils for large wind turbine blades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the NACA 63 and 64 6-digit series of airfoils tested in the NACA LTPT in view to verify the RFOIL calculated airfoil characteristics for high Reynolds numbers. Some anomalies in the zero-lift angles of 15% and 18% thick airfoils from these series are identified, both in the a

  7. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  8. Effect of erodent particles on the erosion of metal specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, M. Mahbubur; Alam, M. Khorshed; Khan, M. Ishak

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of the measurement of erosion rate of carbon steel specimens in sand water slurry system in a slurry pot tester. Sylhet sand has been sieved to get three sizes of erodent particles; namely, less than 250 micron, 250 to 590 micron and 590 to 1190 micron. Experiments are done with three sand concentrations (10%, 15% and 20%). The rate of erosion of the carbon steel specimens is measured as the loss of weight per unit surface area per unit time under the dynamic action of solid particles. The eroded surfaces of the specimens are examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to visualize the impact of the slurry of various conditions. It is seen that irrespective of the particle size the rate of erosion increases with the increase of slurry concentration. This increment of erosion rate at high concentration is high for large particles. High erosion rate is observed in case of large sand particles. In case of small and fine particles erosion rate is small because of low impact energy as well as the wastage of energy to overcome the hindrance of the finer particles before striking on the specimen surface.

  9. Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2011-06-28

    An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

  10. Sand production prediction using ratio of shear modulus to bulk compressibility (case study)

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Khamehchi; Ebrahim Reisi

    2015-01-01

    Sand production is a serious problem widely existing in oil/gas production. The problems resulting from sand influx include abrasion of downhole tubular/casing, subsurface safety valve and surface equipment; casing/tubing buckling, failure of casing or liners from removal of surrounding formation, compaction and erosion; and loss of production caused by sand bridging in tubing and/or flow lines. There are several methods for predicting sand production. The methods include use of production da...

  11. ANALYSIS OF TRANSONIC FLOW PAST CUSPED AIRFOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Stodůlka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transonic flow past two cusped airfoils is numerically solved and achieved results are analyzed by means of flow behavior and oblique shocks formation.Regions around sharp trailing edges are studied in detail and parameters of shock waves are solved and compared using classical shock polar approach and verified by reduction parameters for symmetric configurations.

  12. Analysis of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, W. B.; Lim, K. B.

    2009-08-01

    Simulations have been done to assess the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of different types of non-symmetrical airfoils under different flapping configurations. The variables involved are reduced frequency, Strouhal number, pitch amplitude and phase angle. In order to analyze the variables more efficiently, the design of experiments using the response surface methodology is applied. Results show that both the variables and shape of the airfoil have a profound effect on the lift, thrust, and efficiency. By using non-symmetrical airfoils, average lift coefficient as high as 2.23 can be obtained. The average thrust coefficient and efficiency also reach high values of 2.53 and 0.61, respectively. The lift production is highly dependent on the airfoil’s shape while thrust production is influenced more heavily by the variables. Efficiency falls somewhere in between. Two-factor interactions are found to exist among the variables. This shows that it is not sufficient to analyze each variable individually. Vorticity diagrams are analyzed to explain the results obtained. Overall, the S1020 airfoil is able to provide relatively good efficiency and at the same time generate high thrust and lift force. These results aid in the design of a better ornithopter’s wing.

  13. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform...

  14. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  15. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  16. Erosion behaviour of epoxy based unidirectionl (GFRP composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fouad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the solid particle erosion behaviour and wear mechanism of commercial epoxy based unidirectional glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP composites were investigated. The erosion experiments have been carried out using irregular silica sand (SiC particles (150 ± 15 μm as an erodent. The erosion losses of these composites were evaluated at various impingement angles (30°, 60° and 90° with the change of both of erosion time and pressure. The erosion behaviour of (GFRP has changed from ductile to brittle at 60° impingement angle and the erosion loss was the highest. The morphology of eroded surfaces was observed under scanning electron microscope and damage mechanisms were discussed.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CRUSHED SAND FOR CONCRETE PRODUCTION WITH MICROPROPORTIONING

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Sand and gravel are mined all over the globe and form the largest volume of solid material extracted world-wide. These materials that have been formed by erosive processes over thousands of years are now being extracted at a rate that is far greater than their possible renewal. This has led to a situation when suitable natural sand and gravel resources that previously were taken for granted and historically used for concrete production, are now depleted around many densely popu...

  18. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  19. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and a tip speed ratio, optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve a high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... momentum (BEM) technique proves the reliability of the integrated design method. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd....... with the objectives of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on a previous in-house designed airfoil family which was optimized at a Reynolds number...

  20. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  1. Sand Dunes Fixation in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out at Sand Dunes Stabilization Researches Station in Baiji district (230 ln north of Baghdad, Iraq) to evaluate the effects of local soil conditioners manufactured from oil derivatives and plant residuals on sand dunes fixation as the first step for sand dunes stabilization. The results indicate that the fuel oil has the first place in improving wind erosion parameters in the study area, such as increasing mean weight diameter, dry aggregates percentage, the needed time for complete disaggregation by dry sieving, and decreasing the disaggregation rates. Bitumen emulsion occupies the second place, while the plant residuals occupies the third place and has slight effects on the studied parameters. Effects of conditioners on natural vegetation cover are negative in oil derivatives treatments,while positive in plants residuals treatments.

  2. TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

    2007-06-12

    Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

  3. Regularities of wind-erosion of different land-use types in Yongding River sandy land,Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Depeng; Liu Yongbing; Zang Runguo; Wang Xian

    2006-01-01

    The threshold wind velocity of a number of variables was studied in four different land-use types:farmland,forestland,wild grassland and a flood plain in the Yongding River sandy land in Beijing.The variables studied were transport of sand, underlying surface roughness,windblown sediment,wind-sand flow structure,soil mechanical composition and amount of wind erosion.The following conclusions were drawn: 1) The order of decreasing threshold of wind speed for sand displacement and surface roughness were forestland,wild grassland,farmland,sparse wild grassland and flood plain.2) There were significant differences in sand flux among different ground covers.At a height of 0-20 cm,the height increased while the sediment discharge percent of sand flux decreased;there were significant differences in the sand flow formation under different land-use types.3) The mechanical composition of sand particles consisted mainly of silver sand in the flood plain and sparse wild grassland,and of silver sand,particle silver sand and floury sand in other land-use types.4) The amounts of wind erosion and sand sediment were different among different land-use types.Increased vegetation cover and change in farming techniques were suggested to prevent and control wind erosion of sand and soil.

  4. BIFURCATIONS OF AIRFOIL IN INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuFei; YangYiren

    2005-01-01

    Bifurcations of an airfoil with nonlinear pitching stiffness in incompressible flow are investigated. The pitching spring is regarded as a spring with cubic stiffness. The motion equations of the airfoil are written as the four dimensional one order differential equations. Taking air speed and the linear part of pitching stiffness as the parameters, the analytic solutions of the critical boundaries of pitchfork bifurcations and Hopf bifurcations are obtained in 2 dimensional parameter plane. The stabilities of the equilibrium points and the limit cycles in different regions of 2 dimensional parameter plane are analyzed. By means of harmonic balance method, the approximate critical boundaries of 2-multiple semi-stable limit cycle bifurcations are obtained, and the bifurcation points of supercritical or subcritical Hopf bifurcation are found. Some numerical simulation results are given.

  5. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  6. EUDP Project: Low Noise Airfoil - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    at the Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA,(USA), also a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel but equipped with an anechoic chamber that allow to perform acoustic measurements. On the theoretical side, the above experiments yield a series of model validations and improvements......This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project `Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side...... to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (DK), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel...

  7. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  8. The S415 and S418 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 4.) This characteristic is related to the...edge with increasing (decreasing) lift coefficient. This feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift...should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 1Director, Institute for Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart, Germany, 1974–1985.5 No suction

  9. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  10. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  11. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  12. An overview of NACA 6-digit airfoil series characteristics with reference to airfoils for large wind turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Timmer, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the NACA 63 and 64 6-digit series of airfoils tested in the NACA LTPT in view to verify the RFOIL calculated airfoil characteristics for high Reynolds numbers. Some anomalies in the zero-lift angles of 15% and 18% thick airfoils from these series are identified, both in the airfoil clean case and in case of wrap-around roughness. It is found that RFOIL predicts the maximum lift coefficient at a Reynolds number of 3 million well, but consistently under predicts the Cl,m...

  13. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  14. Erosion-corrosion interactions and their affect on marine and offshore components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert JK [Surface Engineering and Tribology Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The operation of modern fluid handling systems demands for low costs, reliability, longevity and no loss of fluid containment. All these can be achieved by minimising the material damage caused by the combined attack of solid particle or cavitation impingement and corrosion. This paper will cover the rationale behind the selection of erosion resistance surfaces for fluid handling equipment and highlight the complexities encountered when these surfaces are exposed to environments which contain sand particles or cavitation in a corrosive medium. The erosion and erosion-corrosion performance of a variety of coatings and bulk surfaces will be discussed using volume loss rate versus sand impact energy maps. Recent research into the erosion-corrosion of polymer coatings, PEO and HVOF aluminium and nickel aluminium bronze coatings will be reviewed. Electrochemical techniques designed to monitor the erosion-corrosion mechanisms and coating integrity will be presented and used to quantify the synergistic terms present when both erosion and corrosion act concurrently. (author)

  15. Sedimentation process of saturated sand under impact loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Junfeng; MENG; Xiangyue

    2005-01-01

    The initial small inhomogeneity of saturated sand could be amplified during the sedimentation process after liquefaction, and cracks could be observed in the sand column. Layers of fine sand could also be found at the exact place where cracks developed and disappeared. The phenomena and the whole process were experimentally shown by X-rays images. To account for the phenomena, a linearized stability analysis of the sedimentation of saturated sand was conducted; however, it did not produce a satisfactory result. A three-phase flow model describing the transportation of fine sand is presented in this paper. It is shown that such a kind of erosion/deposition model was qualitatively in good agreement with the experimental observation.

  16. When erosion ruins the chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Steffen; Enters, Dirk; Blume, Katharina; Lücke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Human land-use has considerably shaped the landscape of north-western Germany over the past millennia. Deforestation and agriculture created a predominantly open scenery preserved until today with only a few remnants of former landscape elements such as woodlands, peat bogs, heath lands and lakes. Here we present a multi-proxy approach including sedimentological and geochemical parameters (e. g. element concentrations and stable isotopes) as well as biological proxies (pollen, macro fossils and diatoms) combined with an archaeological site analysis to investigate the effects of prehistoric land-use on lake systems and their catchment areas with a special focus on changes of the water quality, e. g. eutrophication and acidification and its natural regeneration during phases of weaker land-use impact. The study reveals a millenia-long history of erosion processes caused by successive selective woodland clearances starting in Neolithic Times. The geochemical evidence of soil erosion is recorded by distinct peaks of the terrigenic elements K and Ti. However, due to (1) the low sensitivy of the XRF scanner for Si and (2) the prevalence of diatom related biogenic silicon XRF-scanning of highly organic lake sediments fails to reflect the actual sand input caused by erosion. Particularly single quartz grains are not detected in the organic sediment matrix. Therefore we make successful use of mineral grain analysis which previously has only been applied to record aeolian input in bogs. K and Ti concentrations are not correlated with the content of mineral grains which suggest two different erosion processes. Our efforts to construct robust age-depth relationships based on AMS 14C-dates of terrestrial plant macrofossils reveal a specific dating issue of northwest German lakes. Especially in younger sediments we observe 14C-dates which are on the one hand too old and on the other hand among themselves roughly contemporaneous. We explain this feature with the extensive bog

  17. Erosion wear behaviour and mechanism of abradable seal coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉丽萍

    2002-01-01

    The erosion wear behaviour and mechanism of several middle temperature seal coatings were investigated by a CMS-100 self-made vacuum sand erosion machine. The results show that the relationship between the erosion mass loss and the erosion time is linear, the coatings hold a maximum erosion rate at 60° impact angle, and the relationship between the erosion rate and the impact speed is an exponential function. The speed exponent increases with the increase of the impact angle. At 90° impact, indentations and extruded lips were generated on the coating surface subjected to impact. With repetitive impact by the abrasive particles, the extruded lips were work-hardened and peeled off, while flattened metal phase grains were impacted repeatedly, loosed and debonded. At 30° impact, the erosion wear of the coating is characterized by micro-cutting, plowing and tunneling via pores and non-metal phase. The model of the erosion mechanism is advanced on the basis of the above-mentioned erosion wear behaviour.

  18. Airfoil Analysis with Uncertain Geometry using the Probabilistic Collocation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeven, G.J.A.; Bijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    Due to manufacturing tolerances, the airfoil of a wing after production is never exactly the same as the designed airfoil. Also during operation the geometry may change due to aerodynamic loading, icing or wear of the construction. The geometry can, therefore, be treated as uncertain. Uncertainties

  19. Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, L.D.; Schram, C.; Desmet, W.

    2015-01-01

    The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization

  20. Identification of dynamic properties of radial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, V.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost “top foil” layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Air-foil bearings are current

  1. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Nav...

  2. Identification of dynamic properties of radial air-foil bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, V.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Boer, de A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-foil bearings (AFBs) are self acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost ‘‘top foil’’ layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while the layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Air-foil bearings are curre

  3. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  4. Erosion Testing of Coatings for V-22 Aircraft Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Y. Richardson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity (183 m/sec sand erosion tests in a wind tunnel were conducted to evaluate developmental coatings from three separate companies under funding by the Navy's phase I small business innovative research program. The purpose of the coatings was to address a particular problem the V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft (Osprey was having with regard to ingestion of sand particles by a titanium impeller that was associated with the aircraft's environmental control system. The three coatings that were deposited on titanium substrates and erosion-tested included (1 SixCy/DLC multilayers deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD; (2 WC/TaC/TiC processed by electrospark deposition; and (3 polymer ceramic mixtures applied by means of an aqueous synthesis. The erosion test results are presented; they provided the basis for assessing the suitability of some of these coatings for the intended application.

  5. Tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Danielle J.; Doolan, Con J.

    2016-02-01

    This study is concerned with the flow-induced noise of a smooth wall-mounted finite airfoil with flat ended tip and natural boundary layer transition. Far-field noise measurements have been taken at a single observer location and with a microphone array in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel for a wall-mounted finite airfoil with aspect ratios of L / C = 1 - 3, at a range of Reynolds numbers (ReC = 7.9 ×105 - 1.6 ×106, based on chord) and geometric angles of attack (α = 0 - 6 °). At these Reynolds numbers, the wall-mounted finite airfoil produces a broadband noise contribution with a number of discrete equispaced tones at non-zero angles of attack. Spectral data are also presented for the noise produced due to three-dimensional vortex flow near the airfoil tip and wall junction to show the contributions of these flow features to airfoil noise generation. Tonal noise production is linked to the presence of a transitional flow state to the trailing edge and an accompanying region of mildly separated flow on the pressure surface. The separated flow region and tonal noise source location shift along the airfoil trailing edge towards the free-end region with increasing geometric angle of attack due to the influence of the tip flow field over the airfoil span. Tonal envelopes defining the operating conditions for tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil are derived and show that the domain of tonal noise production differs significantly from that of a two-dimensional airfoil. Tonal noise production shifts to lower Reynolds numbers and higher geometric angles of attack as airfoil aspect ratio is reduced.

  6. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  7. Erosion-corrosion; Erosionkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili, B

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment 32 refs, 16 figs, tabs

  8. Wind turbine airfoil design method with low noise and experimental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Quan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao;

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the noise characteristic of wind turbine airfoils, the airfoil optimal design mathematic model was built based on airfoil functional integrated theory and noise calculated model. The new optimized objective function of maximizing lift/drag to noise was developed on the design......, though there is a certain difference between the theory results and experiment data. Compared with NACA-64-618 airfoil, the CQU-DTU-B18 airfoil exhibits lower noise, which validates the feasibility of this design method. It is a guide to design wind turbine airfoil with lower noise and to reduce airfoil...

  9. Evaluation of Sand Dunes Stabilization Techniques in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This research was conducted at the sand dunes stabilization research station in Baiji district, Iraq. Three techniques for sand dunes stabilization are selected: the first method is stabilization by clayey block barriers; the second method is stabilization by dry planting of tamarix (tamarix articulata)cuttings and the third is stabilization by using cane branch barriers. Randomized samples were taken from the surface and subsurface layers of the stabilized and shifting sand dunes to evaluate the effect of the three techniques on wind erosion parameters. The results indicate high significant differences between the wind erosion parameters in the surface and subsurface layers in the stabilized sand dunes, while there are insignificant differences between the subsurface layer of the stabilized dunes and the surface and subsurface layers in the active sand dunes. The results clarify the fact that there is an increase in the percentage of clay, silt, organic matter, mean weight diameter and the percentage of the dry aggregates (>0. 84 mm). A decrease is found in the rate of disaggregation for the dry aggregates in the samples of the surface layer of stabilized dunes when compared with the subsurface layer of stabilized dunes and the surface layer of the shifting sand dunes. There is a positive high significant correlation among the aggregate stability parameters and the percentage of clay and silt, and the content of organic matter in the studied layers.

  10. PERMEABILITY AND CONSOLIDATION OF SEDIMENT MIXTURES AS FUNCTION OF SAND CONTENT AND CLAY MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The current study is the first step in a systematic experimental research on the erosion behaviour of sand-mud mixtures. It concerns the effect of a varying sand content and clay mineralogy on the porosity, structure, strength and permeability of artificially generated sediment mixtures. The permeability of a sediment mixture is an especially significant parameter concerning the type of erosion that occurs. It determines ifthe erosion of the bed is either a drained or an undrained process,respectively indicating surface erosion or mass erosion. Measurements on various mixtures concerning the consolidation coefficient and the permeability have been executed. Results show a distinct transition of behaviour between a sand-silt dominated network structure and a clay-water matrix. The occurrence of these two types of structures appears to depend on the porosity of the volume fraction of sand related to silt, which is, therefore, an important parameter concerning the type of erosion. Finally, the study provides a valuable data set that can be used as a reference for following stages of this research on the erosion behaviour of natural cohesive sediments.

  11. Linearized propulsion theory of flapping airfoils revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2016-11-01

    A vortical impulse theory is used to compute the thrust of a plunging and pitching airfoil in forward flight within the framework of linear potential flow theory. The result is significantly different from the classical one of Garrick that considered the leading-edge suction and the projection in the flight direction of the pressure force. By taking into account the complete vorticity distribution on the airfoil and the wake the mean thrust coefficient contains a new term that generalizes the leading-edge suction term and depends on Theodorsen function C (k) and on a new complex function C1 (k) of the reduced frequency k. The main qualitative difference with Garrick's theory is that the propulsive efficiency tends to zero as the reduced frequency increases to infinity (as 1 / k), in contrast to Garrick's efficiency that tends to a constant (1 / 2). Consequently, for pure pitching and combined pitching and plunging motions, the maximum of the propulsive efficiency is not reached as k -> ∞ like in Garrick's theory, but at a finite value of the reduced frequency that depends on the remaining non-dimensional parameters. The present analytical results are in good agreement with experimental data and numerical results for small amplitude oscillations. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grant No. DPI2013-40479-P.

  12. FLEET Velocimetry Measurements on a Transonic Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) velocimetry was used to study the flowfield around a symmetric, transonic airfoil in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT facility. A nominal Mach number of 0.85 was investigated with a total pressure of 125 kPa and total temperature of 280 K. Two-components of velocity were measured along vertical profiles at different locations above, below, and aft of the airfoil at angles of attack of 0 deg, 3.5 deg, and 7deg. Measurements were assessed for their accuracy, precision, dynamic range, spatial resolution, and overall measurement uncertainty in the context of the applied flowfield. Measurement precisions as low as 1 m/s were observed, while overall uncertainties ranged from 4 to 5 percent. Velocity profiles within the wake showed sufficient accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to resolve both the mean and fluctuating velocities and general flow physics such as shear layer growth. Evidence of flow separation is found at high angles of attack.

  13. Erosion Negril Beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Ham, D.; Henrotte, J.; Kraaijeveld, R.; Milosevic, M.; Smit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing erosion of the Negril Beach has become worse the past decade. In most places along the coast line, the beach will be gone in approximately 10 years. This will result in a major decrease of incomes that are made by the local tourist sector. To prevent the erosion this study has been perfo

  14. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  15. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D M [Airfoils, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  16. Optimum Transonic Airfoils Based on the Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iollo, Angelo; Salas, Manuel, D.

    1996-01-01

    We solve the problem of determining airfoils that approximate, in a least square sense, given surface pressure distributions in transonic flight regimes. The flow is modeled by means of the Euler equations and the solution procedure is an adjoint- based minimization algorithm that makes use of the inverse Theodorsen transform in order to parameterize the airfoil. Fast convergence to the optimal solution is obtained by means of the pseudo-time method. Results are obtained using three different pressure distributions for several free stream conditions. The airfoils obtained have given a trailing edge angle.

  17. Geometrical effects on the airfoil flow separation and transition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-25

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible flow over two airfoils, NACA-4412 and NACA-0012-64, to investigate the effects of the airfoil geometry on the flow separation and transition patterns at Re=104 and 10 degrees incidence. The two chosen airfoils are geometrically similar except for maximum camber (respectively 4%C and 0 with C the chord length), which results in a larger projection area with respect to the incoming flow for the NACA-4412 airfoil, and a larger leeward surface curvature at the leading edge for the NACA-0012-64 airfoil. The governing equations are discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order spatial discretization scheme. An assessment on the two-point correlation indicates that a spanwise domain size of 0.8C is sufficiently large for the present simulations. We discuss flow separation at the airfoil leading edge, transition of the separated shear layer to three-dimensional flow and subsequently to turbulence. Numerical results reveal a stronger adverse pressure gradient field in the leading edge region of the NACA-0012-64 airfoil due to the rapidly varying surface curvature. As a result, the flow experiences detachment at x/C=0.08, and the separated shear layer transition via Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism occurs at x/C=0.29 with fully developed turbulent flow around x/C=0.80. These flow development phases are delayed to occur at much downstream positions, respectively, observed around x/C=0.25, 0.71 and 1.15 for the NACA-4412 airfoil. The turbulent intensity, measured by the turbulent fluctuations and turbulent Reynolds stresses, are much larger for NACA-0012-64 from the transition onset until the airfoil trailing edge, while turbulence develops significantly downstream of the trailing edge for the NACA-4412 airfoil. For both airfoils, our DNS results indicate that the mean Reynolds stress u\\'u\\'/U02 reaches its maximum value at a distance from the surface approximately equal to the displacement

  18. Effects of finite aspect ratio on wind turbine airfoil measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus;

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines partly operate in stalled conditions within their operational cycle. To simulate these conditions, it is also necessary to obtain 2-D airfoil data in terms of lift and drag coefficients at high angles of attack. Such data has been obtained previously, but often at low aspect ratios...... and only barely past the stall point, where strong wall boundary layer influence is expected. In this study, the influence of the wall boundary layer on 2D airfoil data, especially in the post stall domain, is investigated. Here, a wind turbine airfoil is tested at different angles of attack and with two...

  19. Active Anti-erosion Protection Strategy in Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-12-01

    Plants have numerous active protection strategies for adapting to complex and severe environments. These strategies provide endless inspiration for extending the service life of materials and machines. Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla), a tree that thrives in raging sandstorm regions, has adapted to blustery conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust erosion resistant characteristics. However, the relationships among its surface cracks, internal histology and biomechanics, such as cracks, rings, cells, elasticity modulus and growth stress, which account for its erosion resistance, remain unclear. This present study reveals that the directionally eccentric growth rings of tamarisk, which are attributed to reduced stress and accelerated cell division, promote the formation of surface cracks. The windward rings are more extensive than the leeward side rings. The windward surfaces are more prone to cracks, which improves erosion resistance. Our data provide insight into the active protection strategy of the tamarisk against wind-sand erosion.

  20. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  1. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  2. Polyanhydride degradation and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpferich, A; Tessmar, J

    2002-10-16

    It was the intention of this paper to give a survey on the degradation and erosion of polyanhydrides. Due to the multitude of polymers that have been synthesized in this class of material in recent years, it was not possible to discuss all polyanhydrides that have gained in significance based on their application. It was rather the intention to provide a broad picture on polyanhydride degradation and erosion based on the knowledge that we have from those polymers that have been intensively investigated. To reach this goal this review contains several sections. First, the foundation for an understanding of the nomenclature are laid by defining degradation and erosion which was deemed necessary because many different definitions exist in the current literature. Next, the properties of major classes of anhydrides are reviewed and the impact of geometry on degradation and erosion is discussed. A complicated issue is the control of drug release from degradable polymers. Therefore, the aspect of erosion-controlled release and drug stability inside polyanhydrides are discussed. Towards the end of the paper models are briefly reviewed that describe the erosion of polyanhydrides. Empirical models as well as Monte-Carlo-based approaches are described. Finally it is outlined how theoretical models can help to answer the question why polyanhydrides are surface eroding. A look at the microstructure and the results from these models lead to the conclusion that polyanhydrides are surface eroding due to their fast degradation. However they switch to bulk erosion once the device dimensions drop below a critical limit.

  3. Release of Escherichia coli from Foreshore Sand and Pore Water during Intensified Wave Conditions at a Recreational Beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Laura J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Edge, Thomas A; Robinson, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Foreshore beach sands and pore water may act as a reservoir and nonpoint source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to surface waters. This paper presents data collected at a fine sand beach on Lake Huron, Canada over three field events. The data show that foreshore sand erosion as wave height increases results in elevated Escherichia coli concentrations in surface water, as well as depletion of E. coli from the foreshore sand and pore water. E. coli initially attached to foreshore sand rather than initially residing in the pore water was found to be the main contributor to elevated surface water concentrations. Surface water E. coli concentrations were a function of not only wave height (and associated sand erosion) but also the time elapsed since a preceding period of high wave intensity. This finding is important for statistical regression models used to predict beach advisories. While calculations suggest that foreshore sand erosion may be the dominant mechanism for releasing E. coli to surface water during intensified wave conditions at a fine sand beach, comparative characterization of the E. coli distribution at a coarse sand-cobble beach suggests that interstitial pore water flow and discharge may be more important for coarser sand beaches.

  4. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  5. Study of the TRAC Airfoil Table Computational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong

    1999-01-01

    The report documents the study of the application of the TRAC airfoil table computational package (TRACFOIL) to the prediction of 2D airfoil force and moment data over a wide range of angle of attack and Mach number. The TRACFOIL generates the standard C-81 airfoil table for input into rotorcraft comprehensive codes such as CAM- RAD. The existing TRACFOIL computer package is successfully modified to run on Digital alpha workstations and on Cray-C90 supercomputers. A step-by-step instruction for using the package on both computer platforms is provided. Application of the newer version of TRACFOIL is made for two airfoil sections. The C-81 data obtained using the TRACFOIL method are compared with those of wind-tunnel data and results are presented.

  6. Numerical investigation of airfoils for small wind turbine applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed numerical investigation of the aerodynamic performance on the five airfoils namely Mid321a, Mid321b, Mid321c, Mid321d, and Mid321e were carried out at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5×105 to 2.5×105. The airfoils used for small wind turbines are designed for Reynolds number ranges between 3×105 and 5×105 and the blades are tend to work on off-design conditions. The blade element moment method was applied to predict the aerodynamic loads, power coefficient, and blade parameters for the airfoils. Based on the evaluate data, it was found that Mid321c airfoil has better lift to drag ratio over the range of Reynolds numbers and attained maximum power coefficient of 0.4487 at Re = 2×105.

  7. A finite-difference method for transonic airfoil design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, J. L.; Klineberg, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes an inverse method for designing transonic airfoil sections or for modifying existing profiles. Mixed finite-difference procedures are applied to the equations of transonic small disturbance theory to determine the airfoil shape corresponding to a given surface pressure distribution. The equations are solved for the velocity components in the physical domain and flows with embedded shock waves can be calculated. To facilitate airfoil design, the method allows alternating between inverse and direct calculations to obtain a profile shape that satisfies given geometric constraints. Examples are shown of the application of the technique to improve the performance of several lifting airfoil sections. The extension of the method to three dimensions for designing supercritical wings is also indicated.

  8. Determination of the Critical Erosion Threshold of Cohesive Sediments on Intertidal Mudflats Along the Dutch Wadden Sea Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwing, E.-J.

    1999-10-01

    The bed shear strength on an intertidal mudflat bordering salt marshes along the Dutch Wadden Sea coast was determined by means of an in situ erosion flume (ISEF). Characteristic erosion patterns (type I- and type II-erosion) were observed for most measurements. The critical erosion threshold varied between 0·11-0·18 (Pa) for all measurements and erosion rates varied between 5×10 -5and 3×10 -3(kg m -2 s -1). No clear relationship was found between distinct parameters like bed density, moisture content or biological activity and the critical erosion threshold. A more pronounced effect of the erodability of the mudflat was found when the erosion rate was taken into account. Basically two clusters were distinguished. High mean peak erosion rates of the substratum were found at locations which were characterized by a low mud content of the substratum (below 20% mud by weight). In these situations bed load transport is expected to be the most important process which determined erosion of the bed and erosion of predominantly the sand fraction was found. At higher rates of the mud content (over 20% mud by weight) mean peak erosion rates decreased substantially (an order 6 to 10 times lower) and both erosion of the mud and sand fraction was found.

  9. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  10. Sets resilient to erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Pegden, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    The erosion of a set in Euclidean space by a radius r>0 is the subset of X consisting of points at distance >/-r from the complement of X. A set is resilient to erosion if it is similar to its erosion by some positive radius. We give a somewhat surprising characterization of resilient sets, consisting in one part of simple geometric constraints on convex resilient sets, and, in another, a correspondence between nonconvex resilient sets and scale-invariant (e.g., 'exact fractal') sets.

  11. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  12. A Comparative Study on Sand Transport Modeling for Horizontal Multiphase Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Wai Choong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Presence of sand causes adverse effects on hydrocarbon production, pipeline erosion and problems at wellbore. If the problems persist, production may be stopped and delayed. This imposes workover cost. Hence, operating expenses increase and revenue reduces. There is no explicit calculation algorithm for sand transportation modeling readily available in flow simulators. Therefore, this study aims to develop an Excel-based spreadsheet on sand transportation to predict sand critical velocity and onset of sand deposition based on published literature. The authors reviewed nine sand transportation models in pipelines and made comparisons on the selected models based on various criteria. Four of which were then developed into a sand modeling spreadsheet. The four models are the Turian et al. (1987, Oudeman (1993, Stevenson et al. (2002b Model and Danielson (2007. The spreadsheet presently focuses on sand production prediction in horizontal two-phase flow. The Danielson model can predict sand hold up while the other models estimate grain size transportable and critical velocity of sand. Flowing pipeline properties, sand properties and results of simulations like using OLGA (for flow rate, velocity and superficial velocity of different phases are necessary inputs of the spreadsheet. A user selects any model based on different operating conditions or user preference. The spreadsheet was validated by comparing data extracted from the research papers. Sensitivity analyses can also be performed with the spreadsheet by manipulating the parameters such as grain size and flow rate. This review is useful for flow simulators’ development to include sand transport modeling.

  13. Wind born(e) landscapes: the role of wind erosion in agricultural land management and nature development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind has played an important role in the geological development of the north-western Europe. Various aeolian deposits such as inland dunes, river dunes, cover sands, drift sands and coastal dunes, form the base of large areas in our present landscape. The role of wind erosion in today's north-west E

  14. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Fifield L. K.; Tims S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace...

  15. Long-term cosmogenic 10Be catchment-wide erosion rates in the Kruger National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Paape, Alexander; Reinwarth, Bastian; Baade, Jussi; Miller, Jordan; Rowntree, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In this study we estimated long-term catchment-wide erosion rates in the central and southern Kruger National Park with cosmogenic 10Be analyses. Samples were collected in small catchments (2-100 km2) upstream of dams, which were used to determine short-term sediment yield rates. 10Be-derived erosion rates vary from 4-15 mm/kyr. Although there are significant site-specific differences in geomorphic parameters and precipitation we could not identify a single parameter controlling long-term erosion. Geomorphic fieldwork reveals that an unknown fraction of sampled sand-sized channel sediments derived from partly extensive and up to a few-meters deep gully erosion, which may lead to an overestimation of 10Be-derived erosion rates. Cosmogenic nuclide production is rapidly decreasing with depth and consequently the measured 10Be concentration of stream sediments is a mixture of (i) sand with high 10Be concentration from colluvial creep or sheet flow from hillslopes and (ii) sand with low 10Be concentration from gully erosion. To correct erosion rates, we quantify sediments derived from gullies using a combination of mapping gullies using remote sensing data and field work and geochemical characterisation of intact hillslopes and gully side walls.

  16. Contribution to Improving the Performance of Concrete: The Case of the Use of Desert Sand of the Region of Dakar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cisse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the extraction of sea sand is not the only factor responsible for coastal erosion, it is an important phenomenon in the degradation of the coastal environment. For this reason, local authorities have banned the use of sea sand and also operators in the construction sector (Public Works and Water Resources should use the desert sand that is the only current alternative. Indeed, the alluvial sand usually has better features than the desert sand, but it is not available in sufficient reserves to the needs of the construction sector. The purpose of this study is to characterize (granularity, cleanliness some quarries of desert sand used in the Dakar region to verify the extent to which they are used in construction and more specifically in hydraulic concrete composition. Furthermore, a method of mixing improved this desert sand with crushed sand 0/3, from the rock crushing mass, is studied below.

  17. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation re

  18. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  19. Very Tough, Erosion-Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are receiving increased attention for advanced gas turbine engine applications. These coatings are considered to be technologically important because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus achieving higher engine efficiency, lower emissions, and increased performance goals. To take full advantage of the capabilities of these coatings, researchers need to use an aggressive design approach whenever possible--one that allows greater temperature reductions through the coating systems and less cooling air to the components. Advanced TBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability than current coatings have been developed for future ultra-efficient, low-emission engine systems. Multicomponent-doped, defect-clustered TBCs have been shown to offer the low conductivity and high stability required for future high-temperature engine applications.

  20. Use of palm-mat geotextiles for rainsplash erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Fullen, M. A.; Davies, K.; Booth, C. A.

    2010-07-01

    Soil detachment by raindrop action (rainsplash erosion) is a very important subprocess of erosion by water. It is a particular problem in the UK as most soils are sandy or loamy sand in texture and lands have gentle to medium slope. However, few studies report potential rainsplash erosion control options under field conditions. Hence, the utilization of palm-mat geotextiles as a rainsplash erosion control technique was investigated at Hilton, east Shropshire, U.K. (52°33'5.7″ N, 2°19'18.3″ W). Geotextile-mats constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Borassus palm of West Africa) and Mauritia flexuosa (Buriti palm of South America) leaves are termed Borassus mats and Buriti mats, respectively. Two-year field experiments were conducted at Hilton to study the effects of emplacing Borassus and Buriti mats on rainsplash erosion of a loamy sand soil. Two sets (12 plots each) of experiments were established to study the effects of these mats on splash height and splash erosion. Splash height needs to be known to assess the transport mechanism of major soil fraction and its constituents on sloping land by rainsplash. In both sets, six randomly-selected plots were covered with mats, and the rest were bare. Results (during 22/01/2007‒23/01/2009; total precipitation = 1731.5 mm) show that Borassus mat-covered plots had ˜ 89% ( P 0.05) effect in rainsplash erosion control during that period, although plots with Buriti mats significantly ( P 0.05) improve selected soil properties (i.e., soil organic matter, particle size distribution, aggregate stability and total soil carbon) as soil organic matter (SOM) input from mat-decomposition was much less than total SOM content. However, the changes in fine and medium sand contents (after 2 years) in the Borassus covered plots were significantly ( P < 0.05; n = 6) related to the total rainsplash erosion during 2007‒2009. Emplacement of Borassus and Buriti mats on bare soils did not decrease SOM contents after 2 years, indicating

  1. Solid Particle Erosion of Date Palm Leaf Fiber Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti R. Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particle erosion behavior of short date palm leaf (DPL fiber reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA composite has been studied using silica sand particles (200 ± 50 μm as an erodent at different impingement angles (15–90° and impact velocities (48–109 m/s. The influence of fiber content (wt% of DPL fiber on erosion rate of PVA/DPL composite has also been investigated. The neat PVA shows maximum erosion rate at 30° impingement angle whereas PVA/DPL composites exhibit maximum erosion rate at 45° impingement angle irrespective of fiber loading showing semiductile behavior. The erosion efficiency of PVA and its composites varies from 0.735 to 16.289% for different impact velocities studied. The eroded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM to understand the erosion mechanism.

  2. Aero-elastic stability of airfoil flow using 2-D CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A three degrees-of-freedom structural dynamics model has been coupled to a two-dimensional incompressible CFD code. The numerical investigation considers aero-elastic stability for two different airfoils; the NACA0012 and the LM 2 18 % airfoils. Stable and unstable configurations and limit cycle oscillations are predicted in accordance with literature for the first airfoil. An attempt to predict stall induced edge-wise vibrations on a wind turbine airfoil fails using this two-dimensional approach. (au)

  3. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alman, David; Marcio, Duffles

    2014-02-05

    The objective of this Stage Gate IV project was to test and substantiate the viability of an erosion-resistant nanocoating for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbines in both industrial power generation and commercial aviation applications. To effectively complete this project, the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Office of Research & Development teamed with MDS Coating Technologies Inc. (MCT), Delta Air Lines - Technical Operations Division (Delta Tech Ops), and Calpine Corporation. The coating targeted for this application was MCT’s Next Generation Coating, version 4 (NGC-v4 - with the new registered trademark name of BlackGold®). The coating is an erosion and corrosion resistant composite nanostructured coating. This coating is comprised of a proprietary ceramic-metallic nano-composite construction which provides enhanced erosion resistance and also retains the aerodynamic geometry of the airfoils. The objective of the commercial aviation portion of the project was to substantiate the coating properties to allow certification from the FAA to apply an erosion-resistant coating in a commercial aviation engine. The goal of the series of tests was to demonstrate that the durability of the airfoils is not affected negatively with the application of the NGC v4 coating. Tests included erosion, corrosion, vibration and fatigue. The results of the testing demonstrated that the application of the coating did not negatively impact the properties of the blades, especially fatigue performance – which is of importance in acceptance for commercial aviation applications. The objective of the industrial gas turbine element of the project was to evaluate the coating as an enabling technology for inlet fogging during the operation of industrial gas turbines. Fluid erosion laboratory scale tests were conducted to simulate inlet fogging conditions. Results of these tests indicated that the application of the erosion resistant NGC-v4 nanocoating improved the

  4. Experimental study of surface texture and resonance mechanism of booming sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU; JianJun; ZHANG; KeCun; SUN; Bo; JIANG; ShengXiang; DONG; GuangRong; ZU; RuiPing; FANG; HaiYan

    2007-01-01

    The sound-producing mechanism of booming sand has long been a pending problem in the blown sand physics. Based on the earlier researches, the authors collected some silent sand samples from Tengger Desert, Australian Desert, Kuwait Desert, beaches of Hainan Island and Japanese coast as well as the soundless booming sand samples from the Mingsha Mountain in Dunhuang to make washing experiments. In the meantime the chemical corrosion experiment of glass micro-spheres, surface coating experiment and SEM examination were also conducted. The experimental results show that the sound production of booming sand seems to have nothing to do with the presence of SiO2 gel on the surface of sand grains and unrelated to the surface chemical composition of sand grains but is related to the resonance cavities formed by porous (pit-like) physical structure resulting from a number of factors such as wind erosion, water erosion, chemical corrosion and SiO2 gel deposition, etc. Its resonance mechanism is similar to that of Hemholz resonance cavity. Under the action of external forces, numerous spherical and sand grains with smooth surface and porous surface are set in motion and rub with each other to produce extremely weak vibration sound and then become audible sound by human ears through the magnification of surface cavity resonance. However the booming sands may lose their resonance mechanism and become silent sand due to the damping action caused by the invasion of finer particles such as dust and clay into surface holes of sand grains. Therefore, clearing away fine pollutants on the quartz grain surface is an effective way to make silent sand emit audible sound.

  5. Interaction of two-dimensional impulsively started airfoils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fu-bing; ZENG Nian-dong; ZHANG Liang; WU De-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous vorticity panels were used to model general unsteady inviscid, incompressible, two-dimensional flows. The geometry of thc airfoil was approximated by series of short straight segments having endpoints that lie on the actual surface. A piecewise linear, continuous distribution of vorticity over the airfoil surface was used to generate disturbance flow. The no-penetration condition was imposed at the midpoint of each segment and at discrete times. The wake was simulated by a system of point vortices, which moved at local fluid velocity. At each time step, a new wake panel with uniform vorticity distribution was attached to the trailing edge, and the condition of constant circulation around the airfoil and wake was imposed. A new expression for Kutta condition was developed to study the interference effect between two impulsively started NACA0012 airfoils. The tandem arrangement was found to be the most effective to enhance the lift of the rear airfoil. The interference effect between tidal turbine blades was shown clearly.

  6. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  7. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  8. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -DTU-LN118 airfoil by using wind tunnel measurements in the acoustic wind tunnel located at Virginia Tech and numerical computations with the inhouse Q3uic and EllipSys 2D/3D codes. To show the superiority of the new airfoils, comparisons with a NACA64618 airfoil are made. For the aerodynamic features...

  9. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  10. Experimental Investigation of Temperature Effects on Microparticle Sand Rebound Characteristics at Gas Turbine Representative Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Delimont, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    When a gas turbine operates in a particle laden environment, such as a desert, small solid particles are ingested into the engine. The ingested sand particles can cause damage to engine components and reduce the service life of the engine. Particle ingestion causes the erosion of metal blades and vanes, and, if the firing temperature is hot enough, deposition of molten particles in the hot sections of the engine. Both deposition and erosion phenomena can severely reduce overall engine perfo...

  11. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Haoran; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun;

    2014-01-01

    model and RFOIL all show that with the increase of thickness of trailing edge, the linear region of lift is extended and the maximum lift also increases, the increase rate and amount of lift become limited gradually at low angles of attack, while the drag increases dramatically. For thicker airfoils...... with larger maximum thickness to chord length, the increment of lift is larger than that of relatively thinner airfoils when the thickness of blunt trailing edge is increased from 5% to 10% chord length. But too large lift can cause abrupt stall which is profitless for power output. The transient...... characteristics of blunt trailing edge airfoils are caused by blunt body vortices at low angles of attack, and by the combined effect of separation and blunt body vortices at large angles of attack. With the increase of thickness of blunt trailing edge, the vibration amplitudes of lift and drag curves increase...

  12. A robust inverse inviscid method for airfoil design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.; Dedoussis, V.; Papailiou, K. D.

    An irrotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional airfoil profiles is described. The method is based on the potential streamfunction formulation, where the physical space on which the boundaries of the airfoil are sought, is mapped onto the (phi, psi) space via a body-fitted coordinate transformation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equations for the inverse problem, by requiring the curvature of the flat 2-D Euclidean space to be zero. An auxiliary coordinate transformation permits the definition of C-type computational grids on the (phi, psi) plane resulting to a more accurate description of the leading edge region. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations along the grid lines. To validate the method inverse calculation results are compared to direct, `reproduction', calculation results. The design procedure of a new airfoil shape is also presented.

  13. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  14. SEDIMENTATION AND EROSION STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ The river systems observed today is the cumulative result of surface, rill, and gully erosion, and sediment transport, scour, and deposition. The divisions of approach between these two related areas are man-made, and are not based on sound science. Most of the erosion studies are done by geologists and agricultural engineers who are concerned of the surface, rill, and gully erosion and the loss of agricultural land productivity. Hydraulic engineers are more interested in the study of sediment transport, scour, and deposition, and their impacts on river engineering and hydraulic structures in rivers and reservoirs. Erosion studies are often based on empirical relationships or field data to determinate the annual sediment yield from a watershed. On the other hand, hydraulic engineers focus their attention on solving equations based on assumed initial and boundary conditions with a time scale of days, hours, or seconds. Both approaches have their complementary strengths and weaknesses. It is important to provide a forum for specialists in both areas to communicate, exchange ideas, and learn from each other.

  15. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  16. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  17. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  18. Evolving aerodynamic airfoils for wind turbines through a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. J.; Gómez, E.; Grageda, J. I.; Couder, C.; Solís, A.; Hanotel, C. L.; Ledesma, JI

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, genetic algorithms stand out for airfoil optimisation, due to the virtues of mutation and crossing-over techniques. In this work we propose a genetic algorithm with arithmetic crossover rules. The optimisation criteria are taken to be the maximisation of both aerodynamic efficiency and lift coefficient, while minimising drag coefficient. Such algorithm shows greatly improvements in computational costs, as well as a high performance by obtaining optimised airfoils for Mexico City's specific wind conditions from generic wind turbines designed for higher Reynolds numbers, in few iterations.

  19. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2010-01-01

    noise prediction model, the previously developed integrated design technique is further developed. The new code takes into account different airfoil requirements according to their local positions on a blade, such as sensitivity to leading edge roughness, design lift at off-design condition, stall......Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...

  20. The cumulative effects of using fine particles and cyanobacteria for rehabilitation of disturbed active sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Katra, Itzhak; Barkai, Daniel; Knoll, Yaakov; Sarig, Shlomo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems in desertified lands worldwide is active wind-borne sand dunes, which lead to covering of fertile soils and agricultural fields. In regions with more than 100 mm of annual rainfall, sand dunes may be naturally stabilized by biocrusts (biological soil crusts). One of the main restraints of biocrust development is the typical lack of fine particles in sand dunes. Our study investigated the combined application of fine particles [coal fly-ash <100 micrometer] and bio-inoculant of filamentous cyanobacteria, isolated from nearby natural stabilized sand dunes, on the soil surface of active sands for increasing resistance to wind erosion. Boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments were conducted in experimental plots within a greenhouse for examining the effects of adding coal fly-ash and bio-inoculant to active sands. The biocrust development was evaluated via several physical and bio-physiological variables. In all the physical measurements and the bio-physiological variables, the treatment of "sand+inoculum+coal fly-ash" showed significant differences from the "sand-control". The combination led to the best results of surface stabilization in boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments, with the lowest sand fluxes. The filamentous cyanobacteria use the fine particles of the coal fly-ash as bridges for growing toward and adhering to the large sand particles. The cumulative effects of biocrusts and coal fly-ash enhance soil surface stabilization and may allow long-term sustainability.

  1. Erosion by an Alpine glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beyssac, Olivier; Brughelli, Mattia; Lane, Stuart N; Leprince, Sébastien; Adatte, Thierry; Lin, Jiao Y Y; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Cox, Simon C

    2015-10-09

    Assessing the impact of glaciation on Earth's surface requires understanding glacial erosion processes. Developing erosion theories is challenging because of the complex nature of the erosion processes and the difficulty of examining the ice/bedrock interface of contemporary glaciers. We demonstrate that the glacial erosion rate is proportional to the ice-sliding velocity squared, by quantifying spatial variations in ice-sliding velocity and the erosion rate of a fast-flowing Alpine glacier. The nonlinear behavior implies a high erosion sensitivity to small variations in topographic slope and precipitation. A nonlinear rate law suggests that abrasion may dominate over other erosion processes in fast-flowing glaciers. It may also explain the wide range of observed glacial erosion rates and, in part, the impact of glaciation on mountainous landscapes during the past few million years.

  2. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  3. Research on design methods and aerodynamics performance of CQUDTU-B21 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Wen, Zhong Shen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design methods of CQU-DTU-B21 airfoil for wind turbine. Compared with the traditional method of inverse design, the new method is described directly by a compound objective function to balance several conflicting requirements for design wind turbine airfoils, which based...... on design theory of airfoil profiles, blade element momentum (BEM) theory and airfoil Self-Noise prediction model. And then an optimization model with the target of maximum power performance on a 2D airfoil and low noise emission of design ranges for angle of attack has been developed for designing CQU...

  4. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  5. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  6. Effect of pivot location and passive heave on propulsion from a pitching airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the propulsive characteristics of a pitching NACA 0012 airfoil section, with emphasis on thrust and propulsive efficiency, at a Reynolds number of 1.7 ×104 . For the sake of mechanical simplicity, we consider an airfoil restricted to a single actuator in the pitching direction. We examine the effect of changing the airfoil's axis of rotation, finding that contrary to Garrick's linear theory, there exists a pitching axis near the airfoil that maximizes propulsive efficiency. Next, we examine the effect of placing passive springs on the airfoil in the heave (transverse) direction using our Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics technique. This elastic heaving motion allows the airfoil to combine pitching and heaving modes while being actuated only in the pitching direction. Two sets of dynamics are considered: one case where the airfoil is weighted unevenly and pitched about its center of mass (so that the resulting heaving motion is independent of inertial forces), and another case where the airfoil's center of mass is fixed at its centroid. For pitching at an amplitude of 8∘ and a reduced frequency k of two, we find that elastic heave produces a maximum propulsive efficiency of 35%, compared to 25% without any heave motion. Further, while operating at the same efficiency as the static-pivot case, we find that passive heaving greatly increases the magnitude of the airfoil's thrust. The airfoil configurations with highest propulsive efficiency generally involve pitching near or ahead of the airfoil's leading edge.

  7. Design of the new Risoe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Dahl, K.S. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A new airfoil family for wind turbines was developed by use of a design method using numerical optimization and the flow solver, XFOIL. The results were evaluated with the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D. The airfoil family constitutes 6 airfoils ranging in thickness from 15% to 30%. The airfoils were designed to have a maximum lift coefficient around 1.5 in natural conditions and high lift-drag ratios below maximum lift. Insensitivity to leading edge roughness was obtained by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurred close to the leading edge just before stall. The airfoil family was designed for a 600 kW wind turbine and provides a basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  8. Design and validation of the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    . To validate the airfoil design, CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil has been tested experimentally in the acoustic wind tunnel located at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), USA. To show the superiority of the CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils, comparisons on aerodynamic performance and noise......This paper presents the design and validation of the high performance and low noise Chong Qing University and Technical University of Denmark LN1 (CQU-DTU-LN1) series of airfoils for wind turbine applications. The new design method uses target characteristics of wind turbine airfoils in the design...... emission between the CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 64618 airfoil, which is used in modern wind turbine blades, are carried out. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  9. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  10. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  11. Erosive Wear and Wear Mechanism of in situ TiCp/Fe Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaojing LIU; Zhiliang NING; Fengzhen LI; Xiurong YAO; Shanzhi REN

    2005-01-01

    The base structure of in situ TiCP/Fe composites fabricated under industrial condition was changed by different heat treatments. Erosive wear tests were carried out and the results were compared with that of wear-resistant white cast iron. The results suggest that the wear resistance of the in situ TiCp/Fe composite is higher than that of wear-resistant white cast iron under the sand erosive wear condition. The wear mechanism of the wear-resistant white cast iron was a cycle process that base surface was worn and carbides were exposed, then carbides was broken and wear pits appeared. While the wear mechanism of in situ TiCp/Fe composite was a cycle process that base surface was worn and TiC grains were exposed and dropped. The wear resistance of in situ TiCp/Fe composite was lower than that of wear-resistant white cast iron under the slurry erosive wear condition. Under such circumstance,the material was not only undergone erosive wear but also electrochemistry erosion due to the contact with water in the medium. The wear behaviours can be a combination of two kinds of wear and the sand erosive wear is worse than slurry erosive wear.

  12. An Extreme Event as a Game Changer in Coastal Erosion Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Drønen, Nils K.; Knudsen, Per;

    2016-01-01

    of cyclone Xaver in December 2013 with severe coastal erosion led to collaboration between the involved municipalities to work on a coherent solution for the entire coastline that involves sand nourishments, renovation and optimization of hard protection structures, and the restoration of recreational values......The construction of hard protection measures along the northeast coast of Sealand, Denmark, has gradually led to profile steepening, loss of beaches, and increased storm erosion. Although the problem has been addressed for decades no common solutions have been implemented yet. However, the impact....... We present a concept of 'erosion pressure' as a simple method to estimate potential chronic (longshore) and acute (cross-shore) erosion on protected coasts. The erosion pressure estimates are reliable at the investigated coast and the concept has proved useful for dissemination to stakeholders about...

  13. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  14. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  15. Unsteady Double Wake Model for the Simulation of Stalled Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Cayron, Antoine; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    separation and its dynamics. In this paper, the calculated integral forces have been successfully validated against wind tunnel measurements for the FFA-W3-211 airfoil. Furthermore, the computed highly unsteady flow field is analyzed in detail for a set of angles of attack ranging from light to deep stall...

  16. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  17. Extraction of airfoil data using PIV and pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    Velocimetry (PIV) flow fields at different rotor azimuth positions are examined for determining sectional airfoil data. The AOA is derived locally by determining the local circulation on the blade from pressure data and subtracting the induction of the bound circulation from the local velocity. The derived...

  18. Stability of Inviscid Flow over Airfoils Admitting Multiple Numerical Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Xiong, Juntao; Liu, Feng; Luo, Shijun

    2012-11-01

    Multiple numerical solutions at the same flight condition are found of inviscid transonic flow over certain airfoils (Jameson et al., AIAA 2011-3509) within some Mach number range. Both symmetric and asymmetric solutions exist for a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack. Global linear stability analysis of the multiple solutions is conducted. Linear perturbation equations of the Euler equations around a steady-state solution are formed and discretized numerically. An eigenvalue problem is then constructed using the modal analysis approach. Only a small portion of the eigen spectrum is needed and thus can be found efficiently by using Arnoldi's algorithm. The least stable or unstable mode corresponds to the eigenvalue with the largest real part. Analysis of the NACA 0012 airfoil indicates stability of symmetric solutions of the Euler equations at conditions where buffet is found from unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Euler solutions of the same airfoil but modified to include the displacement thickness of the boundary layer computed from the Navier-Stokes equations, however, exhibit instability based on the present linear stability analysis. Graduate Student.

  19. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two diff...

  20. Modeling of Airfoil Trailing Edge Flap with Immersed Boundary Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    to simulate the moving part of the trailing edge. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique whereas the moving trailing edge flap is simulated with the immersed boundary method on a curvilinear mesh. The obtained...

  1. Numerical simulation of airfoil trailing edge serration noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    In the present work, numerical simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with and without serrated Trailing Edge. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy is implemented into the in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity...

  2. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free ...

  3. Decomposing the aerodynamic forces of low-Reynolds flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriche, Manuel; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Flores, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of flow around flapping NACA0012 airfoils at relatively small Reynolds numbers, Re = 1000 . The simulations are carried out with TUCAN, an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible flow with an immersed boundary method to model the presence of the airfoil. The motion of the airfoil is composed of a vertical translation, heaving, and a rotation about the quarter of the chord, pitching. Both motions are prescribed by sinusoidal laws, with a reduced frequency of k = 1 . 41 , a pitching amplitude of 30deg and a heaving amplitude of one chord. Both, the mean pitch angle and the phase shift between pitching and heaving motions are varied, to build a database with 18 configurations. Four of these cases are analysed in detail using the force decomposition algorithm of Chang (1992) and Martín Alcántara et al. (2015). This method decomposes the total aerodynamic force into added-mass (translation and rotation of the airfoil), a volumetric contribution from the vorticity (circulatory effects) and a surface contribution proportional to viscosity. In particular we will focus on the second, analysing the contribution of the leading and trailing edge vortices that typically appear in these flows. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P. The authors thankfully acknowledge the computer resources provided by the Red Española de Supercomputacion.

  4. Airfoil Trailing Edge Noise Generation and Its Surface Pressure Fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flows over a NACA 0015 airfoil is performed. The purpose of such numerical study is to relate the aerodynamic surface pressure with the noise generation. The results from LES are validated against detailed surface pressure measurements...

  5. Large Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  6. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.;

    2016-01-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3 × ...

  7. Replacement of Natural Sand with Efficient Alternatives: Recent Advances in Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzar Hamid Mir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most undisputable material being used in infrastructure development throughout the world. It is a globally accepted construction material in all types of Civil Engineering structures. Natural sand is a prime material used for the preparation of concrete and also plays an important role in Mix Design. Now a day‟s river erosion and other environmental issues have led to the scarcity of river sand. The reduction in the sources of natural sand and the requirement for reduction in the cost of concrete production has resulted in the increased need to find new alternative materials to replace river sand so that excess river erosion is prevented and high strength concrete is obtained at lower cost. Partial or full replacement of natural sand by the other alternative materials like quarry dust, foundry sand and others are being researched from past two decades, in view of conserving the ecological balance. This paper summarizes conclusions of experiments conducted for the properties like strength, durability etc. It was observed the results have shown positive changes and improvement in mechanical properties of the conventional concrete due to the addition or replacement of fine sand with efficient alternatives.

  8. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, S. G.; Fifield, L. K.

    2012-10-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium), and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  9. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield L.K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium, and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  10. Particle erosion of infrared materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Erosion test of some infrared (IR) optical crystals (Ge,ZnS,MgF2,and quartz) was conducted with a number of different erodents (glass bead,and angular SiC,SiO2,Al2O3 by a homemade gas-blasting erosion tester.The influence of impact angle,impact velocity,erodent,and erosion time on the erosion rate and the effect of erosion on their IR transmittance were studied.The damaged surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy,and the erosion mechanism was explored.All of the materials show the maximum in wear versus impact angle at 90°,confirming their brittle failure behavior.It is found that the erosion rate is dependent on the erodent velocity by a power law,and it is highly correlated to the hardness of the erodent.The erosion rate-time curves do not show an incubation state,but an accelerated erosion period followed a maximum erosion (steady state).The decrease of IR transmittance is direct proportion to the erosion rate.Although the material loss occurs primarily by brittle process,ductile behavior is clearly an important feature,especially for MgF2 and ZnS.

  11. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Négyesi, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Kovács, Tamás; László, Elemér; Bihari, Zita

    2016-11-01

    Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover). Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5' resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH) method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0-5 cm) layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc.), to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  12. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  13. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  14. Physical Characterizations of Sands and Their Influence in Fall Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancun beach is one of the most important tourist resorts on the Mexican coast, and is of prime importance to the local and national economies. As a result of the intense use of the beach and the unavailability of sand reserves, the extreme weather events that occur in the region (hurricanes have permanently damaged the beach. Over the last two decades several strong hurricanes severely weakened the system, but hurricane Wilma, October 2005, caused devastating erosion to the beach. After Wilma, an emergency nourishment project was implemented pumping a volume of 2.7 million m3 of sand onto the beach. Clearly, the sand used for the nourishment has a different shape factor, diameter distribution and density property compared to the native sand. The main goal of this paper is to characterize and compare the fall velocities of sand samples taken in and around Cancun. The settling velocities obtained for several samples were compared with the empirical formulations proposed by various authors. The influence of several parameters measured in the laboratory is discussed and a new formulation is presented.

  15. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  16. Characteristic and paleoenvironmental evolution of subaerial tidal sand body in Subei coastal plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李从先; 张家强; 杨守业; 范代读

    1999-01-01

    The subaerial tidal sand area in the northern Jiangsu Province (Subei), stretching from Dongtai towards east with a fan shape, is an early developing stage of radial sand ridges distributed in the South Yellow Sea. Since 5 000—6 000 a BP, after the Holoeene transgression maximum in the northern Jiangsu Province, subaqueous tidal sand bodies were exposed and changed into land gradually. The environmental magnetism analysis shows that subaerial tidal sand strata are formed by the convergent-divergent palco-tidal current field. The sediment source of tidal sand strata came early from the Changjiang River and late from the Yellow River. Sea floor erosion by tidal currents also served as an important sand source. Drilling cores and ground-penetrating profile show that there exists no probability of sand supplying directly by a large river through the apical area of tidal sand ridges either on land or in the sea. Fluvial deposits supplied the tidal sand bodies by alongshore transportation, which corresponds

  17. Effect of compost on erodibility of loamy sand under simulated rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.M.; Vermang, J.;

    2011-01-01

    Three types of composts [vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost (VFYW), garden waste compost (GW), and spent mushroom compost (SM)] were applied at a rate of 30 m3 ha−1 for 10 years to loamy sand, to determine its effect on the aggregate stability and susceptibility to water erosion. Aggregate...

  18. Robust Airfoil Optimization with Multi-objective Estimation of Distribution Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xiaoping; Ding Jifeng; Li Weiji; Zhang Yong

    2008-01-01

    A transonic airfoil designed by means of classical point-optimization may result in its dramatically inferior performance under off-design conditious. To overcome this shortcoming, robust design is proposed to fred out the optimal profile of an airfoil to maintain its performance in an uncertain environment. The robust airfoil optimization is aimed to minimize mean values and variances of drag coefficients while satisfying the lift and thickness constraints over a range of Maeb numbers. A multi-objective estimation of distribution algorithm is applied to the robust airfoil optimization on the base of the RAE2822 benchmark airfoil. The shape of the airfoil is obtained through superposing ten Hick-Heune shape functions upon the benchmark airfoil. A set of design points is selected according to a uniform design table for aerodynamic evaluation. A Kriging model of drag coefficient is coustrueted with those points to reduce eumputing costs. Over the Maeh range fi'om 0.7 to 0.8, the airfoil generated by the robust optimization has a configuration characterized by supercritical airfoil with low drag coefficients. The small fluctuation in its drag coefficients means that the performance of the robust airfoil is insensitive to variation of Mach number.

  19. The Effect of Aerodynamic Evaluators on the Multi-Objective Optimization of Flatback Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.; Slew, K. Lee; Matida, E.

    2016-09-01

    With the long lengths of today's wind turbine rotor blades, there is a need to reduce the mass, thereby requiring stiffer airfoils, while maintaining the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoils, particularly in the inboard region of the blade where structural demands are highest. Using a genetic algorithm, the multi-objective aero-structural optimization of 30% thick flatback airfoils was systematically performed for a variety of aerodynamic evaluators such as lift-to-drag ratio (Cl/Cd), torque (Ct), and torque-to-thrust ratio (Ct/Cn) to determine their influence on airfoil shape and performance. The airfoil optimized for Ct possessed a 4.8% thick trailing-edge, and a rather blunt leading-edge region which creates high levels of lift and correspondingly, drag. It's ability to maintain similar levels of lift and drag under forced transition conditions proved it's insensitivity to roughness. The airfoil optimized for Cl/Cd displayed relatively poor insensitivity to roughness due to the rather aft-located free transition points. The Ct/Cn optimized airfoil was found to have a very similar shape to that of the Cl/Cd airfoil, with a slightly more blunt leading-edge which aided in providing higher levels of lift and moderate insensitivity to roughness. The influence of the chosen aerodynamic evaluator under the specified conditions and constraints in the optimization of wind turbine airfoils is shown to have a direct impact on the airfoil shape and performance.

  20. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  1. Simulation model of erosion and deposition on a barchan dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. D.; Morton, J. B.; Gal-El-hak, M.; Pierce, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion and deposition over a barchan dune near the Salton Sea, California, are modeled by bookkeeping the quantity of sand in saltation following streamlines of transport. Field observations of near surface wind velocity and direction plus supplemental measurements of the velocity distribution over a scale model of the dune are combined as input to Bagnold type sand transport formulas corrected for slope effects. A unidirectional wind is assumed. The resulting patterns of erosion and deposition compare closely with those observed in the field and those predicted by the assumption of equilibrium (downwind translation of the dune without change in size or geometry). Discrepancies between the simulated results and the observed or predicted erosional patterns appear to be largely due to natural fluctuations in the wind direction. The shape of barchan dunes is a function of grain size, velocity, degree of saturation of the oncoming flow, and the variability in the direction of the oncoming wind. The size of the barchans may be controlled by natural atmospheric scales, by the age of the dunes, or by the upwind roughness. The upwind roughness can be controlled by fixed elements or by sand in the saltation. In the latter case, dune scale is determined by grain size and wind velocity.

  2. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  3. A terminological matter: paragenesis, antigravitative erosion or antigravitational erosion ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasini G.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the speleological literature three terms are utilized to designate the “ascending erosion”: paragenesis (= paragénésis, coined in1968, antigravitative erosion (= erosione antigravitativa, coined in 1966 and antigravitational erosion (wrong English translation ofthe Italian term erosione antigravitativa, utilized later on. The term paragenesis should be abandoned because of the priority of theterm erosione antigravitativa - on the ground of the “law of priority” – and because of its ambiguous etimology. On the other hand,the term antigravitational erosion should be forsaken in favour of the term antigravitative erosion, given the meaning that the termsgravitation and gravity have in Physics. Therefore, to designate the phenomenon of the “ascending erosion” there would be nothingleft but the term antigravitative erosion.The antigravitative erosion process and its recognizability are illustrated.Examples of caves with evident antigravitative erosion phenomena, developed in different karstifiable rocks and in several partsof the world, are given.It is recalled that the antigravitative erosion is a phenomenon well-known since 1942 and widely proven and supported, and that it isrelatively easy – in many cases - to recognize the antigravitative origin of karstic passages.It is stressed that the antigravitative erosion is an important phenomenon, exclusive of the karstic caves and unique in nature.

  4. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  5. Erosion by shallow concentrated flow - experimental model deconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Wirtz, S.; Ali, M.

    2012-04-01

    The force of the flowing water is considered to be the main determinant factor for soil particle detachment and transport. The flow of water is described with flow velocity and discharge, and is often summarised in different composite parameters such as shear stress, stream power etc. The entrainment and transport of soil particles is then expressed as a threshold problem, where a soil specific critical value of shear stress, stream power etc. has to be trespassed. Thereafter, the increase of erosion is considered to be lineal. Despite considerable efforts, the process based model concepts have not been able to produce more reliable and accurate reproduction and forecast of soil erosion than "simple" empirical models such as the USLE and its derivates. Therefore, there still remain some unanswered fundamental questions about soil erosion modelling: 1. What are the main parameters of soils and flowing water influencing soil erosion? 2. What relationship do these parameters have with the intensity and different types of soil erosion? 3. Are the present concepts suitable to describe and quantify soil erosion accurately? For approaching these questions, laboratory flume and field experiments were set up. The aim of the laboratory experiments was to elucidate the influence of basic parameters as grain size, slope, flow and flow velocity on sediment transport by shallow flowing water. Therefore, variable flow was applied under different slopes on moveable beds of non-coherent sands of different grain sizes. The field experiments were designed to quantify the hydraulic and erosive functionality of small rills in the field. Here, small existing rills were flushed with defined flows, and flow velocity, flow depth, discharge at the end of the rill as well as transported sediments were quantified. The laboratory flume experiments clearly show a strong influence of flow velocity on sediment transport, depending this at the same time on the size of the transported grains, and

  6. Mechanisms of sound amplification and sound reduction in the flapping flight of side-by-side airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, A.; Halachmi, M.

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic signature of side-by-side airfoils, subject to small-amplitude harmonic pitching and incoming flow unsteadiness, is investigated. The two-dimensional near-field problem is formulated using thin-airfoil theory, where flow unsteadiness is modeled as a passing line vortex, and wake evolution is calculated via the Brown and Michael formula. Assuming that the setup is acoustically compact, acoustic radiation is obtained by means of the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. The associated compact Green's function is calculated numerically using potential-flow analysis of the fluid-structure flow domain. Results, comparing the acoustic radiation of the double-airfoil system to a reference case of a single airfoil, point to several mechanisms of sound attenuation and sound amplification, caused by airfoil-airfoil and airfoils-wake interactions. It is found that counter-phase pitching of the airfoils results in effective cloaking of the system, which otherwise becomes significantly noisy (as a 5/2-power of the pitching frequency) at large frequencies. In addition, depending on the distance between airfoils, in-phase pitching may result in an acoustic signature equivalent to a single airfoil (when the airfoils are adjacent) or to two separate airfoils (when the airfoils are far apart). In general, flow unsteadiness produces more sound when interacting with a double (compared with a single) airfoil setup. However, airfoils' nonlinear wake-wake interactions give rise to a sound reduction mechanism, which becomes most efficient at times when incoming vorticity passes above airfoils' leading and trailing edges. The present scheme can be readily extended to consider the acoustic properties of various double-airfoil configurations, as well as multiple (> 2) airfoil setups.

  7. Ice-induced unsteady flowfield effects on airfoil performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbacki, Holly Marie

    Numerical prediction of iced-airfoil performance prior to and at maximum lift is often inaccurate due to large-scale flow unsteadiness. New computational models are being developed to improve predictions of complex separated flowfields; however, experimental data are required to improve and validate these algorithms. The objective of this investigation was to examine the unsteady flow behavior and the time-dependent performance of an iced airfoil to determine the flowfield characteristics with the most influence on airfoil performance, especially near stall. A NACA 0012 airfoil with two-dimensional and three-dimensional leading-edge simulated glaze ice shapes was tested in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers 1.8 x 106 and 1.0 x 106. Time-dependent surface pressure measurements were used to calculate root-mean-square lift and quarter-chord pitching-moment coefficients. Surface and flowfield visualization and wake hot-wire data were acquired. Spectral, correlation and phase-angle analyses were performed. The most significant unsteady flowfield effect on the iced-airfoil performance was a low-frequency flow phenomenon on the order of 10 Hz that resulted in Strouhal numbers of 0.0048--0.0101. The low-frequency oscillation produced large-scale pressure fluctuations nears eparation at high angles of attack and elevated lift and moment fluctuations as low as alpha = 4°. The low-frequency motion of surface pressure coefficients convected downstream at velocities 4%--34% of the freestream value and in one case, upstream at 0.18Uinfinity. The iced-airfoil flowfield exhibited a separation bubble of varying thickness and fluctuating reattachment, characteristics similar to those associated with the low-frequency shear-layer flapping and bubble growth and decay of other separated and reattached flows. Vortex structures observed in the shear layer were presumed to be the cause of large-scale pressure fluctuations upstream of reattachment at small angles of attack. Pressure

  8. Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R.; Griffith, A.

    2009-04-01

    For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a

  9. Vortex Interaction and Roll-Up in Unsteady Flow past Tandem Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete vortex model coupled with a vortex dissipation and vortex core criteria is used to study the unsteady flow past two airfoils in configuration. The unsteady wakes of the airfoils are modeled by discrete vortices and time-stepping is used to predict the individual wake shapes. The coupled flow is solved using a combined zero-normal flow boundary condition and Kelvin condition which result in (2N + 2X(2N + 2 equations. Results are presented showing the effect of airfoil-airfoil and airfoil-wake interaction on the aerodynamic characteristics of the configuration. The effect of relative velocity, rate of pitching and phase-lag are studied on airfoil performance and wake shape is predicted.

  10. Experimental verification of the new RISOe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, K.S.; Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper concerns the experimental verification of a new airfoil family for wind turbines. The family consist of airfoils in the relative thickness range from 15% to 30%. Three airfoils, Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21, and Risoe-A1-24 were tested in a wind tunnel. The verification consisted of both static and dynamic measurements. Here, the static results are presented for a Reynolds number of 1.6x10{sup 6} for the following airfoil configurations: smooth surface (all three airfoils) and Risoe-A1-24 mounted with leading edge roughness, vortex generators, and Gurney-flaps, respectively. All three airfoils have constant lift curve slope and almost constant drag coefficient until the maximum lift coefficient of about 1.4 is reached. The experimental results are compared with corresponding computational from the general purpose flow solver, EllipSys2D, showing good agreement. (au)

  11. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  12. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  13. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  14. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  15. Friction surfacing for enhanced surface protection of marine engineering components: erosion-corrosion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balakrishnan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Good mechanical properties combined with outstanding corrosion-resistance properties of cast nickel-aluminum bronze (NAB) alloy lead to be a specific material for many marine applications, including ship propellers. However, the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast-NAB alloy is not as good as wrought NAB alloy. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast NAB alloy by depositing wrought (extruded) NAB alloy applying the friction surfacing (FS) technique. Erosion-corrosion tests were carried out in slurries composed of sand particles of 3.5% NaCl solution. Silica sand having a nominal size range of 250-355 μm is used as an erodent. Specimens were tested at 30° and 90° impingement angles. It is observed that the erosion and erosion-corrosion resistance of friction surfaced NAB alloy exhibited an improvement as compared to cast NAB alloy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed that the erosion tracks developed on the cast NAB alloy were wider and deeper than those formed on the friction surfaced extruded NAB alloy.

  16. An Experimental Investigation of the Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Characteristics of a Circulation-Controlled Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    sound production from a hydrofoil and identified three mechanisms: (1) low frequency curvature noise associated with interaction of a turbulent...2002). 2 Technical Approach A two-dimensional, dual-slotted, elliptic circulation control airfoil based on the hydrofoil studied by Rogers...airfoil, shown in Figure 1A, is designed based on the geometry of the hydrofoil previously studied by Rogers & Donnelly (2004). The airfoil’s profile

  17. Solid-particle erosion in the tube end of the tube sheet of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, M. A.; Badr, H. M.; Said, S. A. M.; Ben-Mansour, R.; Al-Anizi, S. S.

    2006-03-01

    Erosion is one of the major problems in many industrial processes, and in particular, in heat exchangers. The effects of flow velocity and sand particle size on the rate of erosion in a typical shell-and-tube heat exchanger were investigated numerically using the Lagrangian particle-tracking method. Erosion and penetration rates were obtained for sand particles of diameters ranging from 10 to 500 μm and for inlet flow velocities ranging from 0.197 to 2.95 m/s. A flow visualization experiment was conducted with the objective of verifying the accuracy of the continuous phase calculation procedure. Comparison with available experimental data of penetration rates was also conducted. These comparisons resulted in a good agreement. The results show that the location and number of eroded tubes depend mainly on the particle size and velocity magnitude at the header inlet. The rate of erosion depends exponentially on the velocity. The particle size shows negligible effect on the erosion rate at high velocity values and the large-size particles show less erosion rates compared to the small-size particles at low values of inlet flow velocities. The results indicated that the erosion and penetration rates are insignificant at the lower end of the velocity range. However, these rates were found to increase continuously with the increase of the inlet flow velocity for all particle sizes. The particle size creating the highest erosion rate was found to depend on the flow velocity range.

  18. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a method to determine flutter and divergence instability limits for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil section fitted with an actively controlled trailing edge flap. This flap consists of a deformable trailing edge, which deformation is governed by control algorithms based...... for fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...... function approximation. Stability of the full aeroservoelastic system is determined through eigenvalue analysis by state-space formulation of the indicial approximation. Validation is carried out against an implementation of the recursive method by Theodorsen and Garrick for flexure-torsion-aileron flutter...

  19. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  20. A Theory of Unstaggered Airfoil Cascades in Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Robert A.; Allen, H. Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, rela.tio^as are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord gap ratios, For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low speed flows. Choking of cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  1. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note that the tes......The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  2. Combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of HVOF spray coated SS 410 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarendra, H. J.; Prathap, M. S.; Karthik, S.; Abhishek, A. M.; Madhu surya, K. C.; Gujjar gowda, S.; Anilkumar, T.

    2016-09-01

    The hydro turbine materials surface is degraded due to the slurry erosion and cavitation. The solid particles carried by water impacting the material results in slurry erosion. The damage occurred due to slurry erosion is the concern, when considered individually. The erosion damage is observed to be severe when slurry erosion and cavitation are combined. The hydro turbine material, martensitic stainless (SS 410) is surface modified with 80Ni-Cr by High Velocity Oxy Fuel spray process. The coated material subjected to post thermal treatment at a temperature of 950 ° C, soaked at 1 h, 2 h and 3 h are subjected to combined slurry and cavitation erosion test. The cavitation is created by using Cavitation Inducers. The tests are conducted by using silica sand as the erodent with three different sizes of 150, 200 and 300 μm. The results are compared with the as-received specimen. The results confirmed the effect of heat treatment on the end results, as the coated thermal treated specimens showed better erosion resistance against the as-received specimen. The eroded specimens are characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope. The thermal treated HVOF coated specimens shown the better erosion resistance.

  3. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces on a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by itscamberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory...... of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stabilityanalysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can...

  4. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  5. Oscillatory Behavior of an Arc Airfoil in Low-Speed Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molki, Majid; Sattari, Negin

    2011-11-01

    A computational investigation is conducted to study the oscillatory behavior of an arc airfoil situated in low-speed airflow. The present work is relevant to situations where the conventional rigid airfoils do not apply, such as the flight of bats. The outcome of this study is also beneficial in the design of micro air vehicles with flexible wings. The computations are performed using a deforming mesh to accommodate the airfoil oscillations. An unsteady, spatially second-order algorithm is employed to capture the time-variations of the lift and drag coefficients. A key feature of the present work is the flow response to airfoil oscillations. Fast Fourier Transform was applied to various parameters of the flow. For certain values of angle of attack for the non-oscillating airfoil, the flow has a dominant frequency and a well-defined vortex shedding. For other values of angle of attack, the flow around the non-oscillating airfoil contains many frequencies and has complex vortical structures. However, the oscillating airfoil in all cases makes the flow field periodic with well-defined patterns of vortex shedding. In this work, the flux of vorticity from the airfoil surface into the airflow is computed and compared with the pressure gradient along the surface of the airfoil. Effects of oscillations on magnitude and behavior of aerodynamic forces are also studied.

  6. Characterization of the Flow Separation of a Variable Camber Airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen-Chao; WANG Hui; YANG Jian-Ting; YANG Ji-Ming

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the How separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil. The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber: the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall. Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall, while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve. Under flow separation circumstances, the Bow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions, but also the previous flow characteristics, so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.%An experimental investigation is carried out to study the flow separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil.The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber:the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall.Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall,while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve.Under flow separation circumstances,the flow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions,but also the previous flow characteristics,so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements.

  7. Leading-Edge "Pop-Up" Spoiler For Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John C.; Lance, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    New concept places spoiler in leading edge of airfoil, hinged along its trailing edge, so airflow helps to deploy it and force it against mechanical stop. Deployed "pop-up" spoiler quickly eliminates almost all aerodynamic lift of stabilator. Designed to be added to leading edge of existing stabilator, without major rework. Though initial application to be on helicopter stabilators, equally applicable to wings or winglike components.

  8. The S411, S412, and S413 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant...in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that tran- sition on the upper surface will occur very near...the pressure distribution should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the

  9. Design and Experimental Results for the S415 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 8.) This... suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface will occur very near the leading edge. Thus, the...pressure distribution should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a moderately adverse pressure

  10. Design and Experimental Results for the S411 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 8...produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that tran- sition on the upper surface will occur very near the leading edge. Thus...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  11. Design and Experimental Results for the S406 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly...in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface will occur very near...3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar flow

  12. Trailing Edge Noise Model Validation and Application to Airfoil Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, an existing trailing edge noise model is validated by comparing with airfoil surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound pressure levels measured in three different experiments. The agreement is satisfactory in one case but poor in two other cases...... across the boundary layer near the trailing edge and to a lesser extent by a smaller boundary layer displacement thickness. ©2010 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  13. Simulasi Numerik Dynamic Stall Pada Airfoil Yang Berosilasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih S.T.A. Bangga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan analisa pada sudu helikopter, kompresor, kincir angin dan struktur streamline lainya yang beroperasi pada angle of attack yang tinggi dan melibatkan instationary effects yang disebut dynamic stall menjadi semakin penting. Fenomena ini ditandai dengan naiknya dynamic lift melewati static lift maksimum pada critical static stall angle, vortex yang terbentuk pada leading edge mengakibatkan naiknya suction contribution yang kemudian terkonveksi sepanjang permukaan hingga mencapai trailling edge diikuti terbentuknya trailling edge vortex yang menunjukkan terjadinya lift stall. Fenomena ini sangat berbahaya terhadap struktur airfoil itu sendiri. Secara umum, beban fatique yang ditimbulkan oleh adanya efek histerisis karena fluktuasi gaya lift akibat induksi vibrasi lebih besar dibandingkan kondisi statis. Simulasi numerik dilakukan secara 2D dengan menggunakan profil Boeing-Vertol V23010-1.58 pada α0 = 14.92°. Standard-kω dan SST-kω digunakan sebagai URANS turbulence modelling. Model osilasi dari airfoil disusun dalam suatu user defined function (UDF. Gerakan meshing beserta airfoil diakomodasi dengan menggunakan dynamic mesh approach. Simulasi numerik menunjukkan bahwa, model SST-kω menunjukkan performa yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan Standard-kω. Fenomena travelling vortex yang terjadi mampu ditangkap dengan baik, meski pada angle of attack yang tinggi URANS turbulence model gagal memprediksikan fenomena yang terjadi karena dominasi efek 3D.

  14. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  15. Prediction of Film Cooling on Gas Turbine Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis tool has been developed in order to study the effect of film cooling on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of actual turbine airfoils. An existing code (Arnone et al., 1991) has been modified for the purpose. The code is an explicit, multigrid, cell-centered, finite volume code with an algebraic turbulence model. Eigenvalue scaled artificial dissipation and variable-coefficient implicit residual smoothing are used with a full-multigrid technique. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (Mayle, 1991) is used. The effects of film cooling have been incorporated into the code in the form of appropriate boundary conditions at the hole locations on the airfoil surface. Each hole exit is represented by several control volumes, thus providing an ability to study the effect of hole shape on the film-cooling characteristics. Comparison is fair with near mid-span experimental data for four and nine rows of cooling holes, five on the shower head, and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. The computations, however, show a strong spanwise variation of the heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil surface, specially with shower-head cooling.

  16. RANS Simulations of Aerodynamic Performance of NACA 0015 Flapped Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Obeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of 2D subsonic flow over an NACA 0015 airfoil with a 30% trailing edge flap at a constant Reynolds number of 106 for various incidence angles and a range of flap deflections is presented. The steady-state governing equations of continuity and momentum conservation are solved combined with the realizable k-ε turbulence model using the ANSYS-Fluent code (Version 13.7, ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA. The primary objective of the study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of flow characteristics around the NACA 0015 airfoil as a function of the angle of attack and flap deflection at Re = 106 using the realizable k-ε turbulence model. The results are validated through comparison of the predictions with the free field experimental measurements. Consistent with the experimental observations, the numerical results show that increased flap deflections increase the maximum lift coefficient, move the zero-lift angle of attack (AoA to a more negative value, decrease the stall AoA, while the slope of the lift curve remains unchanged and the curve just shifts upwards. In addition, the numerical simulations provide limits for lift increment Δ C l and Cl, max values to be 1.1 and 2.2, respectively, obtained at a flap deflection of 50°. This investigation demonstrates that the realizable k-ε turbulence model is capable of predicting flow features over an airfoil with and without flap deflections with reasonable accuracy.

  17. Performance Trades Study for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    From time to time, existing aircraft need to be redesigned for new missions with modified operating conditions such as required lift or cruise speed. This research is motivated by the needs of conceptual and preliminary design teams for smooth airfoil shapes that are similar to the baseline design but have improved drag performance over a range of flight conditions. The proposed modified profile optimization method (MPOM) modifies a large number of design variables to search for nonintuitive performance improvements, while avoiding off-design performance degradation. Given a good initial design, the MPOM generates fairly smooth airfoils that are better than the baseline without making drastic shape changes. Moreover, the MPOM allows users to gain valuable information by exploring performance trades over various design conditions. Four simulation cases of airfoil optimization in transonic viscous ow are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the MPOM as a performance trades study tool. Simulation results are obtained by solving fully turbulent Navier-Stokes equations and the corresponding discrete adjoint equations using an unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics code FUN2D.

  18. Erosion--Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, B.

    1978-01-01

    The deterioration of materials by corrosion or erosion by itself presents a formidable problem and for this reason investigators have studied these two phenomena independently. In fact, there are very few systematic studies on E-C and the majority of references mention it only in passing. In most real systems, however, the two destructive processes take place simultaneously, hence the purpose of this review is to present the various interactions between the chemical and mechanical agents leading to accelerated degradation of the material. The papers cited in the review are those that lead to a better understanding of the process involved in the accelerated rate of material loss under E-C conditions.

  19. Dune erosion during storm surges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Large parts of The Netherlands are protected from flooding by a narrow strip of sandy beaches and dunes. The aim of this thesis is to extend the existing knowledge of dune erosion during storm surges as it occurs along the Dutch coast. The thesis discusses: • A large scale dune erosion experiment to

  20. Dune erosion under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    This PhD-thesis investigated the effect of future climate change on dune erosion in the Netherlands. At present, dune erosion occurs under a combination of large storm surge and high waves, which are both generated by a storm event. Therefore to investigate the affect of future climate change on dun

  1. The erosive potential of lollipops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Gambon, D.L.; Paap, A.; Bulthuis, M.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the erosive potential of several commercially available lollipops and the protective effect of saliva. Methods: The erosive potential of lollipops was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. Subsequently, 10 healthy volunteers tested different types of lo

  2. Coastal geology and recent origins for Sand Point, Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Krantz, David E.; Castaneda, Mario R.; Loope, Walter L.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Higley, Melinda C.; DeWald, Samantha; Hansen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sand Point is a small cuspate foreland located along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Munising, Michigan. Park managers’ concerns for the integrity of historic buildings at the northern periphery of the point during the rising lake levels in the mid-1980s greatly elevated the priority of research into the geomorphic history and age of Sand Point. To pursue this priority, we recovered sediment cores from four ponds on Sand Point, assessed subsurface stratigraphy onshore and offshore using geophysical techniques, and interpreted the chronology of events using radiocarbon and luminescence dating. Sand Point formed at the southwest edge of a subaqueous platform whose base is probably constructed of glacial diamicton and outwash. During the post-glacial Nipissing Transgression, the base was mantled with sand derived from erosion of adjacent sandstone cliffs. An aerial photograph time sequence, 1939–present, shows that the periphery of the platform has evolved considerably during historical time, infl uenced by transport of sediment into adjacent South Bay. Shallow seismic refl ections suggest slump blocks along the leading edge of the platform. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and shallow seismic refl ections to the northwest of the platform reveal large sand waves within a deep (12 m) channel produced by currents fl owing episodically to the northeast into Lake Superior. Ground-penetrating radar profi les show transport and deposition of sand across the upper surface of the platform. Basal radiocarbon dates from ponds between subaerial beach ridges range in age from 540 to 910 cal yr B.P., suggesting that Sand Point became emergent during the last ~1000 years, upon the separation of Lake Superior from Lakes Huron and Michigan. However, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from the beach ridges were two to three times as old as the radiocarbon ages, implying that emergence of Sand Point may have begun

  3. The Relationship Between Shoreline Change and Surf Zone Sand Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miselis, J. L.; McNinch, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    , which may perpetuate erosion in the area. Also, the interaction of waves with both a sand-starved nearshore and exposed reflectors may cause variations in sediment transport, which may be linked to hotspot formation. Research was conducted with the support of the USGS, USACE, and ARO.

  4. Long-term erosion rates of Panamanian drainage basins determined using in situ 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica Sosa; Bierman, Paul R.; Nichols, Kyle K.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-12-01

    from Panama; finer grain sizes from landslide material have lower 10Be concentration than fine-grained fluvial sediment. Large grains from both landslide and stream sediments have similarly low 10Be concentrations. These data suggest that fluvial gravel is delivered to the channel by landslides whereas sand is preferentially delivered by soil creep and bank collapse. Furthermore, the difference in 10Be concentration in sand-sized material delivered by soil creep and that delivered by landsliding suggests that the frequency and intensity of landslides influence basin scale erosion rates.

  5. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  6. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  7. Russian Laminar Flow Airfoils 3rd Part: Measurements on the Profile No. 2315 BIS with Ava-Nose Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegels, F.

    1947-01-01

    The tests on the Russian airfoil 2315 Bis were continued. This airfoil shows, according to Moscow tests, good laminar flow characteristics. Several tests were prepared in the large wind tunnel at Gottingen; partial results were obtained.

  8. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade......Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...

  9. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  10. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu≁oz, A.; Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations.

  11. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  12. Using REE Tracers to Measure Sheet Erosion Changing to Rill Erosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋炜; 刘普灵; 杨明义; 薛亚洲

    2003-01-01

    Rare earth element(REE) tracer method was used to study sheet erosion changing to rill erosion on slope land. By placing different REE on different soil depth across a slope in an indoor plot, two simulated rainfalls were applied to study the change of erosion type and the rill erosion process. The results indicate that the main erosion type is sheet erosion at the beginning of the rainfalls, and serious erosion happens after rill erosion appears. Accumulated sheet and rill erosion amount increases with the rainfalls time. The percentage of sheet erosion amount decreases and rill erosion percentage increases with time. At the end of the rainfalls, the total rill erosion amounts are 4.3 and 5 times more than sheet erosion. In this paper, a new REE tracer method was used to quantitatively distinguish sheet and rill erosion amount. The new REE tracer method should be useful to future studying of erosion processes on slope lands.

  13. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  14. Rapid erosion of the coast of Sagar island, West Bengal - India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Girish; Seralathan, P.

    2005-10-01

    The coastal zone of the Sagar island has been studied. The island has been subjected to erosion by natural processes and to a little extent by anthropogenic activities over a long period. Major landforms identified in the coastal area of the Sagar island are the mud flats/salt marshes, sandy beaches/dunes and mangroves. The foreshore sediments are characterized by silty, slightly sandy mud, slightly silty sand and silty sand. Samples 500 m inland from high waterline are silty slightly sandy mud, and by clayey slightly sandy mud. The extent of coastline changes are made by comparing the topographic maps of 1967 and satellite imageries of 1996, 1998 and 1999. Between 1967 and 1999 about 29.8 km2 of the island has been eroded and the accreted area is only 6.03 km2. Between 1996 and 1998 the area underwent erosion of 13.64 km2 while accretion was 0.48 km2. From 1998 to 1999, 3.26 km2 additional area was eroded with meager accretion. Erosion from 1997 to 1999 was estimated at 0.74 km2 /year; however, from 1996 to 1999, the erosion rate was calculated as 5.47 km2/year. The areas severely affected by erosion are the northeastern, southwestern and southeastern faces of the island. As a consequence of coastal erosion, the mud flats/salt marshes, sandy beaches/dunes and mangroves have been eroded considerably. Deposition is experienced mainly on the western and southern part of the island. The island is built primarily by silt and clay, which can more easily be eroded by the waves, tides and cyclonic activities than a sandy coast. Historic sea level rises accompanied by land subsidence lead to differing rates of erosion at several pockets, thus periodically establishing new erosion planes.

  15. The Influence of Ephemeral Beaches on Alongshore Variability of Hard-rock Cliff Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann Jones, E. C.; Rosser, N. J.; Brain, M.; Varley, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The role of abrasion of rock cliffs is typically considered in the long-term presence of a beach. During monthly monitoring of hard rock cliff erosion along the North Yorkshire coast, UK, we have observed a number of small ephemeral beaches of highly variable duration and extent. The erosive significance of the temporary presence of sediment at the cliffs is unknown and we set out to examine whether observed alongshore variability in erosion can be linked to the presence of ephemeral beaches. We explore the temporal and spatial variability in sediment deposition and transport along a low-sediment rock coast foreshore, the controlling marine conditions and the effects on cliff erosion. We focus on a 500 m wide embayment set into 70 m high hard rock cliffs consisting of horizontally bedded Jurassic mudstone, shale, siltstone and sandstone. The bay has a wide, shallow gradient foreshore up to 300 m wide with highly variable topography. With the exception of an ephemeral beach (of widths up to approximately 150 m alongshore and 10 m cross-shore) the rock foreshore is typically sand-free, with failed material from the cliffs quickly removed from the cliff toe by the sea leaving only boulders. The high tidal range (6 m) and storm wave environment of the North Sea result in variable marine conditions at the site. We use magnetic sand tracers and a grid of foreshore and cliff face magnets to examine the sand transport across the foreshore and to identify the vertical extent of cliff face impacted by sand. We monitor the driving marine conditions on the foreshore using a network of current meters and wave pressure sensors. Erosion of the cliff face across the whole bay is monitored at high-resolution using terrestrial laser scanning to examine the spatial distribution of abrasion and the influence of the ephemeral beach.

  16. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  17. From Sand to Rock: a teaching activity to introduce beach dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravina, Teresita

    2015-04-01

    The Italian coastline is about 7,500 km long; approximately 53% of the coastlines are low or deltaic coastlines, while 3,240 km were mainly composed of sand or gravel beaches. Most of the Italian coastal environment suffers from intense and growing urbanization, tourism and industry pressure, which could partly explain that 42% of Italian beaches experience erosion. Terracina is situated Lazio (Central Italy), a region strongly impacted by coastal erosion, and for this reason we organized a teaching activity, carried out with fourth year high school classes, in order to help students to understand sand beach dynamics, acquisition of geology issues and land conservation and preservation skills. We decided to focus our activity on the mineralogical composition of beach sand in order to relate beach formations with the geological evolution of the territory. Sand beach minerals were used as tracers in order to support students to understand dynamics that influence beach formations. In addition to mineral characteristic recognition, this activity allows us to introduce the beach balance concept and the phenomena that regulate sediment balance, in order to allow students to consider beaches as a resource which needs to be preserved. Sand mineralogical composition data is treated in a worksheet to elaborate simple statistical analysis in order to recognize the mineral composition of Terracina beach sand's rock sources. This exercise allows students to find relationships between regional geology and beach sand's composition. Finally, statistical evidence could be compared with geological maps of the area in order to find the probable provenance of sand's rock source and rocks recognition thanks to related morphologies. Our main purpose was to help students to understand that beaches are dynamic systems subject to anthropogenic pressure and for this reason they needed to be preserved. Proposed teaching activities involve topics related to students' living territory and to

  18. Design and Experimental Validation of Thick Airfoils for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrgovan, Iva; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, two new airfoils with thickness to chord ratios of 30 and 36 % are presented, which were designed with an objective of good aerodynamic and structural features. Airfoil design is based on a direct method using shape perturbation function. The optimization algorithm is coupled wit...

  19. Hybrid immersed boundary method for airfoils with a trailing-edge flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Behrens, Tim; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid immersed boundary technique has been developed for simulating turbulent flows past airfoils with moving trailing-edge flaps. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil, the equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique, whereas the moving trailing-...

  20. A Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Performance and Noise of a Bionic Airfoil Based on Owl Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noise reduction and efficiency enhancement are the two important directions in the development of the multiblade centrifugal fan. In this study, we attempt to develop a bionic airfoil based on the owl wing and investigate its aerodynamic performance and noise-reduction mechanism at the relatively low Reynolds number. Firstly, according to the geometric characteristics of the owl wing, a bionic airfoil is constructed as the object of study at Reynolds number of 12,300. Secondly, the large eddy simulation (LES with the Smagorinsky model is adopted to numerically simulate the unsteady flow fields around the bionic airfoil and the standard NACA0006 airfoil. And then, the acoustic sources are extracted from the unsteady flow field data, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H equation based on Lighthill's acoustic theory is solved to predict the propagation of these acoustic sources. The numerical results show that the lift-to-drag ratio of bionic airfoil is higher than that of the traditional NACA 0006 airfoil because of its deeply concave lower surface geometry. Finally, the sound field of the bionic airfoil is analyzed in detail. The distribution of the A-weighted sound pressure levels, the scaled directivity of the sound, and the distribution of dP/dt on the airfoil surface are provided so that the characteristics of the acoustic sources could be revealed.

  1. Study of laminar boundary layer instability noise study on a controlled diffusion airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Prateek; Sanjose, Marlene; Moreau, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Detailed experimental study has been carried out on a Controlled Diffusion (CD) airfoil at 5° angle of attack and at chord based Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 . All the measurements were done in an open-jet anechoic wind tunnel. The airfoil mock-up is held between two side plates, to keep the flow two-dimensional. PIV measurements have been performed in the wake and on the boundary layer of the airfoil. Pressure sensor probes on the airfoil were used to detect mean airfoil loading and remote microphone probes were used to measure unsteady pressure fluctuations on the surface of the airfoil. Furthermore the far field acoustic pressure was measured using an 1/2 inch ICP microphone. The results confirm very later transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent boundary layer on the suction side of the airfoil. The process of transition of laminar to turbulent boundary layer comprises of turbulent reattachment of a separated shear layer. The pressure side of the boundary layer is found to be laminar and stable. Therefore tonal noise generated is attributed to events on suction side of the airfoil. The flow transition and emission of tones are further investigated in detail thanks to the complementary DNS study.

  2. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  3. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias;

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30%...

  4. Cost Reduction of Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Rethore, Pierre-Elouan

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses simulations of airfoil flows by use of computational fluid dynamics. In recent work large eddy simulations (LES) of airfoil flows have proved superior to detached eddy simulations (DES); by resolving the inflow turbulence the agreement with experiments is improved. The scope...

  5. Modelling of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics for the prediction of blade standstill vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, CFD simulations of the DU96-W-180 airfoil at 26 and 24 deg. angles of attack were performed. 2D RANS and 3D DES computations with non-moving and prescribed motion airfoil suspensions were carried out. The openings of the lift coefficient loops predicted by CFD were different...

  6. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are ana...

  7. Slurry Erosion Behavior of Destabilized and Deep Cryogenically Treated Cr-Mn-Cu White Cast Irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gupta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of destabilization treatment and destabilization followed by cryogenic treatment have been evaluated on the microstructural evolution and sand-water slurry erosion behavior of Cr-Mn-Cu white cast irons. The phase transformations after the destabilization and cryotreatment have been characterized by bulk hardness measurement, optical and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis. The static corrosion rate has been measured in tap water (with pH=7 and the erosion-corrosion behavior has been studied by slurry pot tester using sand-water slurry. The test results indicate that the cryogenic treatment has a significant effect in minimizing the as-cast retained austenite content and transforming into martensitic and bainitic matrix embedded with ultra-fine M7C3 alloy carbides. In contrast, by conventional destabilization treatment retained austenite in the matrix are not fully eliminated. The slurry erosive wear resistance has been compared with reference to destabilized and cryotreated high chromium iron samples which are commonly employed for such applications. The cryotreated Cr-Mn-Cu irons have exhibited a comparable erosive wear performance to those of high chromium irons. Higher hardness combined with improved corrosion resistance result in better slurry erosion resistance.

  8. Effects of wheat starch on erosive wear of E-glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, V.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)]. E-mail: vk_sa@yahoo.co.in

    2006-11-05

    Erosive wear tests were carried out to study the effects of particle, impingement angle and particle velocity on the solid particle erosion behaviour of E-glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin (GFRP) composites. The erosive wear of wheat flour powder filled composites is evaluated at different impingement angles from 30 deg. to 90 deg. and at three different velocities of 24, 35 and 52 m s{sup -1}. The erodent used is silica sand with the size range 150-250 {mu}m of irregular shapes. The result shows erosive wear rates of GFRP composite with 2 g wheat flour, as filler is the lowest. This restricts fiber-matrix debonding. Pure glass epoxy without any filler shows the highest erosion rate due to weak bonding strength. The morphologies of eroded surface were examined by the scanning electron microscope.

  9. PIV MEASUREMENTS OF THE NEAR-WAKE FLOW OF AN AIRFOIL ABOVE A FREE SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The near-wake flow of a NACA0012 airfoils mounted above a water surface were experimentally studied in a wind/wave tunnel. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the free surface on the structure of the airfoil trailing wake. The flow structure was measured with different ride heights between the airfoil and free surface using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The Reynolds number based on the chord length of the airfoil was about 3.5×103. For each experimental condition, large amount of instantaneous velocity fields were captured and ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of mean velocity and mean vorticity, as well as turbulence statistics. The results show that the flow structures of the airfoil wake varies remarkably with the change in the ride height.

  10. The shock tube as a device for testing transonic airfoils at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A performance analysis of gas-driven shock tubes shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 100 million can be generated behind the primary shock in a large shock tube. A study of flow over simple airfoils has been carried out at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photos and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those observed for the airfoils in wind tunnels can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with either properly-contoured test section walls or a properly-designed slotted-wall test section. The study indicates that the shock tube is a useful facility for studying two-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic airfoil flows.

  11. A study of test section configuration for shock tube testing of transonic airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for alleviating wall interference effects in a shock tube test section intended for testing two-dimensional transonic airfoils. The first method involves contouring the test section walls to match approximate streamlines in the flow. Contours are matched to each airfoil tested to produce results close to those obtained in a conventional wind tunnel. Data from a previous study and the present study for two different airfoils demonstrate that useful results are obtained in a shock tube using a test section with contoured walls. The second method involves use of a fixed-geometry slotted-wall test section to provide automatic flow compensation for various airfoils. The slotted-wall test section developed exhibited the desired performance characteristics in the approximate Mach number range 0.82 to 0.89, as evidenced by good agreement obtained between shock tube and wind tunnel results for several airfoil flows.

  12. Erosion-corrosion of 316 stainless steel rods immersed in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Coronella, C.J.; Seader, J.D. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Pitt, C.H. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy and Metallurgical Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    A fluidized bed was operated in the bubbling regime with sand to determine the effects of process variables on in-bed metal wastage due to erosion and/or corrosion of immersed 316 stainless steel (SS) rods. Weight loss as a result of erosion was determined by conducting experiments with air at room temperature and high fluidizing velocities (erosion-dominated). Weight loss due mainly to corrosion was determined by carrying out wear tests at 500[sup o]C and relatively low gas velocity (corrosion-dominated). By comparing the total weight loss obtained from the tests at high temperature and high gas velocity conditions (erosion-corrosion-dominated) with the sum of weight losses from erosion-dominated and corrosion-dominated studies, it was found that there was a synergistic effect between corrosion and erosion, i.e. erosion and corrosion took place simultaneously and interacted in a way leading to accelerated wear of the 316 SS rods. The wear rates increased with increasing temperature and excess gas velocity and were also affected by rod orientation in that wear rates of vertical rods were less than those of horizontal rods under identical test conditions. In all cases, wear rates were less than 3.0 nm/h in the radial direction. (author)

  13. Coastal Erosion Along the West Coast of the Taiwan Strait and It's Influencing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianhui; CAI Feng; QI Hongshuai; LEI Gang; CAO Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Based on the field surveys and repeated cross-profile observations combined with the comparison of many years' topographic maps, this study shows the spatial variability and varying patterns of coastal erosion along the west coast of the Taiwan Strait. Regional differentiation in the Meso-Cenozoic coastal tectonics determined the irregular coastline and geological background for large-scale coastal erosion distribution. The intensity of coastal erosion on the west side of the Taiwan Strait is mild in the northern region, severe in the central region and modest in the southern region. The beaches along the coast are mainly backed by dunes, seawalls or cliffs. The dunes and beaches show periodic erosion and recovery along the coast adjacent to river mouths, while persistent retreat of frontal dunes and beaches tends to occur in other areas. The beach erosion occurs mainly in front of seawalls. Due to the low strength of the unconsolidated sediment the soft cliffs suffer the severest coastline recession. Sea level rise and river sediment discharge reduction are main causes of coastal erosion. Storm surge is common in the studied area and plays an important role in the progress of coastal erosion. Human activities including coastal constructions and sand mining also tend to interfere strongly with the balance of sediment budget in some coastal cells.

  14. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  15. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  16. Sand Bed Morphodynamics under Standing Waves and Vegetated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, B. J.; Garcia, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    effect that vegetation can impose on bed form evolution whereby the rate of development can be significantly reduced, mitigated, or even completely redirected. These findings suggest that bottom roughness could be controlled with the help of vegetation thus providing a means to reduce wave energy and prevent sediment erosion. Three-dimensional bathymetric scan of a sand bar having superimposed ripples with idealized vegetation (i.e., 6.35-mm diameter rigid wooden cylinders) positioned at the bar toughs.

  17. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  18. Airfoil shape optimization using non-traditional optimization technique and its validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mukesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is one of the computer-based solution methods which is more widely employed in aerospace engineering. The computational power and time required to carry out the analysis increase as the fidelity of the analysis increases. Aerodynamic shape optimization has become a vital part of aircraft design in the recent years. Generally if we want to optimize an airfoil we have to describe the airfoil and for that, we need to have at least hundred points of x and y co-ordinates. It is really difficult to optimize airfoils with this large number of co-ordinates. Nowadays many different schemes of parameter sets are used to describe general airfoil such as B-spline, and PARSEC. The main goal of these parameterization schemes is to reduce the number of needed parameters as few as possible while controlling the important aerodynamic features effectively. Here the work has been done on the PARSEC geometry representation method. The objective of this work is to introduce the knowledge of describing general airfoil using twelve parameters by representing its shape as a polynomial function. And also we have introduced the concept of Genetic Algorithm to optimize the aerodynamic characteristics of a general airfoil for specific conditions. A MATLAB program has been developed to implement PARSEC, Panel Technique, and Genetic Algorithm. This program has been tested for a standard NACA 2411 airfoil and optimized to improve its coefficient of lift. Pressure distribution and co-efficient of lift for airfoil geometries have been calculated using the Panel method. The optimized airfoil has improved co-efficient of lift compared to the original one. The optimized airfoil is validated using wind tunnel data.

  19. Study of Sand Dunes and Their Effect on Desertification of Cultivated Lands in Shaanxi Province, China Using Remote Sensing Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    About half of the arid and semi-arid lands in the world are deserts that comprise various types of aeolian sand dunes deposits. In Shaanxi Province, aeolian sand dunes cover considerable areas of the Yulin desert and northern Jinbian. Sand dunes are moving in the main wind direction and converting some agricultural area to wasteland. Remote sensing of sand dunes helps in the understanding of aeolian process and desertification. Remote sensing data combined with field studies are valuable in studying sand dunes, regional aeolian depositional history. In particular, active and inactive sand dunes of the north Shaanxi Province were studied using remote sensing and geographic information system. In this study, we describe the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) images, covering north Shaanxi Province, which were used to study the distribution, shape, size, trends, density and movement of sand dunes and their effect on desertification of cultivated lands. Estimation was made depending on soil erodibility factor (Ⅰ) and local climatic factor (C) during the period (June to September). The result indicates that soil erosion caused sand drift of 8.957 5, 7.03 ton for Yulin and Jinbian, respectively. The mean sand dunes movement rate were 4.37, 3.11 m, whereas, monthly sand dune advance rate were 1.092 5, 0.777 5 m, for the two locations, respectively. The study reveals that cultivated lands extended obliquely to the direction of sand dune movement are extremely affected, while other segments that extend parallel to the direction of the movement are not affected. Accordingly the north Shaanxi Province was divided into areas of different classes of potential risk. Moreover, blown sands and sand movement from neighboring highlands also affect the area of western desert.

  20. Unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Jeppe

    1999-09-01

    The present report describes numerical investigation of two-dimensional unsteady airfoil flows with application to aeroelastic stability. The report is divided in two parts. Part A describes the purely aerodynamic part, while Part B includes the aeroelastic part. In Part A a transition prediction algorithm based on a simplified version of the e{sup n} method is proposed. Laminar Boundary Layer instability data are stored in a database from which stability characteristics can be extracted by interpolation. Input to the database are laminar integral boundary layer parameters. These are computed from an integral boundary layer formulation coupled to a Navier-Stokes flow solver. Five different airfoils are considered at fixed angle of attack, and the flow is computed assuming both fully turbulent and transitional flow and compared with experimental data. Results indicate that using a transition model the drag prediction is improved considerably. Also the lift is slightly improved. At high angles of attack transition will affect leading edge separation which again will affect the overall vortex shedding. If the transition point is not properly predicted this will affect the whole hysteresis curve. The transition model developed in the present work showed more stable predictions compared to the empirical transition model. In Part B a simple three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) structural dynamics model is developed and coupled to the aerodynamics models from Part A. A 2nd order accurate time integration scheme is used to solve the equations of motion. Two airfoils are investigated. The aeroelastic models predict stable conditions well at low angle of attack. But at high angles of attack, and where unstable behaviour is expected, only the Navier-Stokes solver predict correct aeroelastic response. The semi-empirical dynamic stall model does not predict vortex shedding and moment correctly leading to an erroneous aerodynamic damping. (au) 5 tabs.; 55 ills., 52 refs.

  1. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  2. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3...... × 106 and 15 × 106. The necessary grid resolution, domain size, and iterative convergence criteria to have consistent results are discussed, and suggestions are given for best practice. For the fully turbulent results four out of seven codes provide consistent results. For the laminar...

  3. The S407, S409, and S410 Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    coefficient at point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is...feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  4. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  5. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    , lead-lag, pitch, trailing-edge flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model, which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered a crossover between the work of Gaunaa...... for the attached flow region and Hansen et al. The model is compared qualitatively to wind tunnel measurements of a Riso/ B1-18 blade section equipped with deformable trailing-edge flap devices in the form of piezoelectric devices. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  6. Fractal Tectonics and Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    Tectonic processes build landforms that are subsequently destroyed by erosional processes. Landforms exhibit fractal statistics in a variety of ways; examples include (1) lengths of coast lines; (2) number-size statistics of lakes and islands; (3) spectral behavior of topography and bathymetry both globally and locally; and (4) branching statistics of drainage networks. Erosional processes are dominant in the development of many landforms on this planet, but similar fractal statistics are also applicable to the surface of Venus where minimal erosion has occurred. A number of dynamical systems models for landforms have been proposed, including (1) cellular automata; (2) diffusion limited aggregation; (3) self-avoiding percolation; and (4) advective-diffusion equations. The fractal statistics and validity of these models will be discussed. Earthquakes also exhibit fractal statistics. The frequency-magnitude statistics of earthquakes satisfy the fractal Gutenberg-Richter relation both globally and locally. Earthquakes are believed to be a classic example of self-organized criticality. One model for earthquakes utilizes interacting slider-blocks. These slider block models have been shown to behave chaotically and to exhibit self-organized criticality. The applicability of these models will be discussed and alternative approaches will be presented. Fragmentation has been demonstrated to produce fractal statistics in many cases. Comminution is one model for fragmentation that yields fractal statistics. It has been proposed that comminution is also responsible for much of the deformation in the earth's crust. The brittle disruption of the crust and the resulting earthquakes present an integrated problem with many fractal aspects.

  7. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  8. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  9. In Situ Erosion Flume (ISEF): determination of bed-shear stress and erosion of a kaolinite bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwing, Erik-Jan; van Rijn, Leo C.

    1998-06-01

    The strength of a cohesive sediment bed is difficult to determine and must be found experimentally from laboratory tests or through in situ field tests. A new in situ erosion instrument, the In situ Erosion Flume (ISEF), has been developed which is a circulating flow system in the vertical plane. The erosion process of sediment particles of the bed in the test section of the ISEF is related to the prevailing bed-shear stress induced by a unidirectional current. The bed-shear stress can be determined from the measured velocity profile in the test section assuming a logarithmic distribution in a vertical direction. The bed-shear stress equation has been calibrated under various conditions characterised by initiation of motion of sand and gravel particles at a flat bed where the bed-shear stresses mobilising the particles are known from the Shields curve. Three reproducibility tests were carried out under laboratory conditions. The bed consisted of kaolinite and was formed by sedimentation in still fresh water. The results of the three tests showed similar values. The erosion of a kaolinite sediment bed is more precisely determined under laboratory conditions by means of the ISEF. The results are compared with data from the literature. The ISEF is a relatively simple instrument for the determination of the strength of (cohesive) sediment beds. The results based on the ISEF measurements represent the minimum shear stress exerted at initiation of erosion of the bed, which will lead to the maximum shear strength of the top layer of the (cohesive) sediment bed.

  10. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

    1985-12-01

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

  11. Effects of woody vegetation on overbank sand transport during a large flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Perignon, Mariela C.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions of woody vegetation on floodplain surfaces affect flood-flow erosion and deposition processes. A large flood along the lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, in August 2006 caused extensive erosion in a reach that had been sprayed with herbicide in September 2003 for the purpose of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control. Large volumes of sediment, including a substantial fraction of sand, were delivered to the reach downstream, which had not been treated with herbicide. We applied physically based, one-dimensional models of flow and suspended-sediment transport to compute volume concentrations of sand in suspension in floodplain flow at a site within the sprayed reach and at a site downstream from the sprayed reach. We computed the effects of drag on woody stems in reducing the skin friction shear stress, velocity of flow, and suspended-sand transport from open paths into patches of dense stems. Total flow and suspended-sand fluxes were computed for each site using well-constrained flood-flow depths, water-surface slopes, and measured shrub characteristics. Results show that flow in open paths carried high concentrations of sand in suspension with nearly uniform vertical distributions. Drag on woody floodplain stems reduced skin friction shear stresses by two orders of magnitude, yet sufficient velocities were maintained to transport sand more than 50 m into fields of dense, free-surface-penetrating stems. An increase in shrub canopy extent from 31% in the sprayed reach site to 49% in the downstream site was found to account for 69% of the computed decrease in discharge between the two sites. The results demonstrate the need to compute the spatial distribution of skin friction shear stress in order to effectively compute suspended-sand transport and to predict the fate of sediment and contaminants carried in suspension during large floods.

  12. Tolerable soil erosion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, Frank; Jones, Bob; Rickson, Jane; Smith, Celina

    2010-05-01

    Soil loss by erosion has been identified as an important threat to soils in Europe* and is recognised as a contributing process to soil degradation and associated deterioration, or loss, of soil functioning. From a policy perspective, it is imperative to establish well-defined baseline values to evaluate soil erosion monitoring data against. For this purpose, accurate baseline values - i.e. tolerable soil loss - need to be differentiated at appropriate scales for monitoring and, ideally, should take soil functions and even changing environmental conditions into account. The concept of tolerable soil erosion has been interpreted in the scientific literature in two ways: i) maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of soil quantity, and ii) maintaining biomass production, at a location. The first interpretation ignores soil quality by focusing only on soil quantity. The second approach ignores many soil functions by focusing only on the biomass (particularly crop) production function of soil. Considering recognised soil functions, tolerable soil erosion may be defined as 'any mean annual cumulative (all erosion types combined) soil erosion rate at which a deterioration or loss of one or more soil functions does not occur'. Assumptions and problems of this definition will be discussed. Soil functions can generally be judged not to deteriorate as long as soil erosion does not exceed soil formation. At present, this assumption remains largely untested, but applying the precautionary principle appears to be a reasonable starting point. Considering soil formation rates by both weathering and dust deposition, it is estimated that for the majority of soil forming factors in most European situations, soil formation rates probably range from ca. 0.3 - 1.4 t ha-1 yr-1. Although the current agreement on these values seems relatively strong, how the variation within the range is spatially distributed across Europe and how this may be affected by climate, land use and land management

  13. Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing using Polynomial Chaos Expansions

    CERN Document Server

    DeGennaro, Anthony M; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accretion of ice on the leading edge of a wing can be detrimental to airplane performance. Complicating this reality is the fact that even a small amount of uncertainty in the shape of the accreted ice may result in a large amount of uncertainty in aerodynamic performance metrics (e.g., stall angle of attack). The main focus of this work concerns using the techniques of Polynomial Chaos Expansions (PCE) to quantify icing uncertainty much more quickly than traditional methods (e.g., Monte Carlo). First, we present a brief survey of the literature concerning the physics of wing icing, with the intention of giving a certain amount of intuition for the physical process. Next, we give a brief overview of the background theory of PCE. Finally, we compare the results of Monte Carlo simulations to PCE-based uncertainty quantification for several different airfoil icing scenarios. The results are in good agreement and confirm that PCE methods are much more efficient for the canonical airfoil icing un...

  14. Evaluation of Icing Scaling on Swept NACA 0012 Airfoil Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Lee, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Icing scaling tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were performed on swept wing models using existing recommended scaling methods that were originally developed for straight wing. Some needed modifications on the stagnation-point local collection efficiency (i.e., beta(sub 0) calculation and the corresponding convective heat transfer coefficient for swept NACA 0012 airfoil models have been studied and reported in 2009, and the correlations will be used in the current study. The reference tests used a 91.4-cm chord, 152.4-cm span, adjustable sweep airfoil model of NACA 0012 profile at velocities of 100 and 150 knot and MVD of 44 and 93 mm. Scale-to-reference model size ratio was 1:2.4. All tests were conducted at 0deg angle of attack (AoA) and 45deg sweep angle. Ice shape comparison results were presented for stagnation-point freezing fractions in the range of 0.4 to 1.0. Preliminary results showed that good scaling was achieved for the conditions test by using the modified scaling methods developed for swept wing icing.

  15. Implementation of CPFD to Control Active and Passive Airfoil Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay; Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of biologically-inspired flapping propulsion provides a fertile testing ground for the field of unsteady aerodynamics, serving as important groundwork for the design and development of fast, mobile underwater vehicles and flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs). There has been a recent surge of interest in these technologies as they provide low cost, compact, and maneuverable means for terrain mapping, search and rescue operations, and reconnaissance. Propulsion by unsteady motions has been fundamentally modeled with an airfoil that heaves and pitches, and previous work has been done to show that actively controlling these motions can generate high thrust and efficiency (Read, Hover & Triantafyllou 2003). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil with an actuated heave motion coupled with a passively controlled pitch motion created by simulating the presence of a torsional spring using our cyber-physical fluid dynamics (CPFD) approach (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016). By using passively controlled pitch, we have effectively eliminated an actuator, decreasing cost and mass, an important step for developing efficient vehicles. In many cases, we have achieved comparable or superior thrust and efficiency values to those obtained using two actively controlled degrees of freedom. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  16. A strong viscous–inviscid interaction model for rotating airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    a boundary-layer trip or computed using an en envelope transition method. Validation of the incompressible 2D version of the code is carried out against measurements and other numerical codes for different airfoil geometries at various Reynolds numbers, ranging from 0.9 ⋅ 106 to 8.2 ⋅ 106. In the quasi-3D......Two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three dimensional (3D), steady and unsteady, viscous–inviscid interactive codes capable of predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbine airfoils are presented. The model is based on a viscous–inviscid interaction technique using strong coupling between...... the viscous and inviscid parts. The inviscid part is modeled by a 2D panel method, and the viscous part is modeled by solving the integral form of the laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations with extension for 3D rotational effects. Laminar-to-turbulent transition is either forced by employing...

  17. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jun Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989. It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model.

  18. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  19. Erosion-resistant coatings for gas turbine compressor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of ion-plasma coatings made from high-hardness metal compounds on the erosion and corrosion resistance and the mechanical properties of alloy (substrate) + coating compositions is comprehensively studied. The effects of the thickness, composition, deposition conditions, and design of coatings based on metal nitrides and carbides on the relative gas-abrasive wear of alloy + coating compositions in a gas-abrasive flux are analyzed. The flux contains quartz sand with an average fraction of 300-350 μm; the abrasive feed rate is 200 g/min; and the angles of flux incidence are 20° (tangential flow) and 70° (near-head-on attack flow). Alloy + coating compositions based on VN, VC, Cr3C2, ZrN, and TiN coatings 15-30 μ m thick or more are shown to have high erosion resistance. A detailed examination of the coatings with high erosion resistance demonstrates that a zirconium nitride coating is most appropriate for protecting gas turbine compressor blades made of titanium alloys; this coating does not decrease the fatigue strength of these alloys. A chromium carbide coating is the best coating for protecting compressor steel blades.

  20. Parametric analyses for synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guoqing; Zhao Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoils. The preconditioned and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with akxshear stream transport turbulence model are employed to accomplish the flowfield simulation of rotor airfoils under jet control. Additionally, a velocity boundary condition modeled by a sinusoidal function is developed to fulfill the perturba-tion effect of periodic jets. The validity of the present CFD procedure is evaluated by the simulated results of an isolated synthetic jet and the jet control case for airfoil NACA0015. Then, parametric analyses are conducted specifically for an OA213 rotor airfoil to investigate the effects of jet param-eters (forcing frequency, jet location and momentum coefficient, jet direction, and distribution of jet arrays) on the control effect of the aerodynamic characteristics of a rotor airfoil. Preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of jet control can be improved with specific frequencies (the best lift-drag ratio at F+=2.0) and jet angles (40? or 75?) when the jets are located near the separation point of the rotor airfoil. Furthermore, as a result of a suitable combination of jet arrays, the lift coefficient of the airfoil can be improved by nearly 100%, and the corresponding drag coefficient decreased by 26.5%in comparison with the single point control case.

  1. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces and a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-07-15

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can be used for various applications which up to now have been possible only using much more computational costly methods. The propulsive performance of a soft heaving propulsor, and the influence of airfoil camberline elasticity on the flutter limit are two computational examples given in the report that highlight this feature. (au)

  2. Numerical Analysis of Wind Turbine Airfoil Aerodynamic Performance with Leading Edge Bump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic performance improvement of wind turbine blade is the key process to improve wind turbine performance in electricity generated and energy conversion in renewable energy sources concept. The flow behavior on wind turbine blades profile and the relevant phenomena like stall can be improved by some modifications. In the present paper, Humpback Whales flippers leading edge protuberances model as a novel passive stall control method was investigated on S809 as a thick airfoil. The airfoil was numerically analyzed by CFD method in Reynolds number of 106 and aerodynamic coefficients in static angle of attacks were validated with the experimental data reported by Somers in NREL. Therefore, computational results for modified airfoil with sinusoidal wavy leading edge were presented. The results revealed that, at low angles of attacks before the stall region, lift coefficient decreases slightly rather than baseline model. However, the modified airfoil has a smooth stall trend while baseline airfoil lift coefficient decreases sharply due to the separation which occurred on suction side. According to the flow physics over the airfoils, leading edge bumps act as vortex generator so vortices containing high level of momentum make the flow remain attached to the surface of the airfoil at high angle of attack and prevent it from having a deep stall.

  3. A Two Element Laminar Flow Airfoil Optimized for Cruise. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  4. On the influence of airfoil deviations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstroth, J.; Seume, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The manufacture of large wind turbine rotor blades is a difficult task that still involves a certain degree of manual labor. Due to the complexity, airfoil deviations between the design airfoils and the manufactured blade are certain to arise. Presently, the understanding of the impact of manufacturing uncertainties on the aerodynamic performance is still incomplete. The present work analyzes the influence of a series of airfoil deviations likely to occur during manufacturing by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the aeroelastic code FAST. The average power production of the NREL 5MW wind turbine is used to evaluate the different airfoil deviations. Analyzed deviations include: Mold tilt towards the leading and trailing edge, thick bond lines, thick bond lines with cantilever correction, backward facing steps and airfoil waviness. The most severe influences are observed for mold tilt towards the leading and thick bond lines. By applying the cantilever correction, the influence of thick bond lines is almost compensated. Airfoil waviness is very dependent on amplitude height and the location along the surface of the airfoil. Increased influence is observed for backward facing steps, once they are high enough to trigger boundary layer transition close to the leading edge.

  5. Effects of relative thickness on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at a low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Dongli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characteristics of low Reynolds number flow around airfoil of high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (HAUAVs cruising at low speed. Numerical simulation on the flows around several representative airfoils is carried out to investigate the low Reynolds number flow. The water tunnel model tests further validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the numerical method. Then the effects of the relative thickness of airfoil on aerodynamic performance are explored, using the above numerical method, by simulating flows around airfoils of different relative thicknesses (12%, 14%, 16%, 18%, as well as different locations of the maximum relative thickness (x/c = 22%, 26%, 30%, 34%, at a low Reynolds number of 5 × 105. Results show that performance of airfoils at low Reynolds number is mainly affected by the laminar separation bubble. On the premise of good stall characteristics, the value of maximum relative thickness should be as small as possible, and the location of the maximum relative thickness ought to be closer to the trailing edge to obtain fine airfoil performance. The numerical method is feasible for the simulation of low Reynolds number flow. The study can help to provide a basis for the design of low Reynolds number airfoil.

  6. Experimental Study of Thin and Thick Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Garcia, Elifalet; Johari, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    A recent surge in applications of unmanned air vehicles in various fields has led to increased interest in understanding the characteristics of airfoils at Reynolds number regime ~104. At these low Re numbers, aerodynamics of an airfoil is influenced by laminar separation and its possible reattachment, which is in contrast to airfoil behavior at high Re numbers. This study focused on comparing the load characteristics of symmetric, thin (NACA-0009) and thick (NACA-0021) airfoils at low Re numbers ~2 - 4 × 104, and angles of attack between 2° to 12°, along with simultaneous flow visualization. The experiments were performed in a low speed flow visualization water tunnel facility, and two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to quantify the inflow conditions and turbulence intensity. A high precision force/torque transducer was used for the load measurements, while hydrogen bubble technique was used for flow visualization on the suction side of the airfoils. The presentation will discuss the correlation between observed flow structures and instantaneous load on the airfoils, as well as the aerodynamic load characteristics of thin and thick airfoils at low Re numbers.

  7. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  8. Comparative Study on Rain Splash Erosion of Representative Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qinjuan; CAI Qiangguo; MA Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    As the first event of soil erosion,rain splash erosion supplies materials for subsequent transportation and entrainment.The Loess Plateau,the southern hilly region and the Northeast China are subject to serious soil and water loss;however,the characteristics of rain splash erosion in those regions are still unclear.The objectives of the study are to analyze the characteristics of splash erosion on loess soil,red soil,purple soil and black soil,and to discuss the relationship between splash erosion and soil properties.Soil samples spatially distributed in the abovementioned regions were collected and underwent simulated rainfalls at a high intensity of 1.2mm/min,lasting for 5,10,15,and 20min,respectively.Rain splash and soil crust development were analyzed.It shows that black soil sample from Heilongjiang Province corresponds to the minimum splash erosion amount because it has high aggregate content,aggregate stability and organic matter content.Loess soil sample from Inner Mongolia corresponds to the maximum splash erosion amount because it has high content of sand particles.Loess soil sample from Shanxi Province has relatively lower splash erosion amount because it has high silt particle content and low aggregate stability easily to be disrupted under rainfalls with high intensity.Although aggregate contents of red soil and purple soil samples from Hubei and Guangdong provinces are high,the stability is weak and prone to be disrupted,so the splash erosion amount is medium.Splash rate which fluctuates over time is observed because soil crust development follows a cycling processes of formation and disruption.In addition,there are two locations of soil crust development,one appears at the surface,and the other occurs at the subsurface.

  9. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  10. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Mankbadi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tip vortex flow from a NACA0012 airfoil, pitched periodically at various frequencies, is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Initially, data for stationary airfoil held fixed at various angles-of-attack are gathered. Flow visualization pictures as well as detailed cross-sectional properties areobtained at various streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as various turbulent stresses. Preliminary data are also acquired for periodically pitched airfoil. These results are briefly presented in this extended abstract.

  11. Natural laminar flow airfoil design considerations for winglets on low-speed airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Winglet airfoil section characteristics which significantly influence cruise performance and handling qualities of an airplane are discussed. A good winglet design requires an airfoil section with a low cruise drag coefficient, a high maximum lift coefficient, and a gradual and steady movement of the boundary layer transition location with angle of attack. The first design requirement provides a low crossover lift coefficient of airplane drag polars with winglets off and on. The other requirements prevent nonlinear changes in airplane lateral/directional stability and control characteristics. These requirements are considered in the design of a natural laminar flow airfoil section for winglet applications and chord Reynolds number of 1 to 4 million.

  12. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of airfoils for helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Phenomena that control the flow during the stall portion of a dynamic stall cycle are analyzed, and their effect on blade motion is outlined. Four mechanisms by which dynamic stall may be initiated are identified: (1) bursting of the separation bubble, (2) flow reversal in the turbulent boundary layer on the airfoil upper surface, (3) shock wave-boundary layer interaction behind the airfoil crest, and (4) acoustic wave propagation below the airfoil. The fluid mechanics that contribute to the identified flow phenomena are summarized, and the usefulness of a model that incorporates the required fluid mechanics mechanisms is discussed.

  13. Exploring the relationship between gully erosion and rainfall erosivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Miguel; Casalí, Javier; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall erosivity plays and important role in gully erosion. However, there are few studies that explore this relationship. The main purpose of this work is to analyse the link between observed gully erosion rates and rainfall erosivity. However, in order to get a suitable and comparable set of daily rainfall erosivity data, we firstly evaluate the performance of several daily rainfall erosivity models to estimate the daily accumulated RUSLE EI30 index. One 300 ha watershed (El Cantalar) located in Navarre (Spain) was selected to carry out field studies. A meteorological station located 10 km appart from the experimental site provided daily precipitation records since 1930 to 2009 and also 10min records since 1991 to 2009. In this watershed a total of 35 gully headcuts developed in cohesive soil were monitored. Aerial photographic stereo-pairs covering the study area were used for the survey. These were taken in five different years and at different spatial scales each time: 1956 (1: 34,000), 1967 (1:17,500), 1982 (1:13,500), 2003 (1:20,000) and 2006 (1:2000). Manual restitution of photographs was carried out. 1m resolution DEMs were obtained by triangular interpolation (Triangular Irregular Network) and then used to characterize gully headcuts. Moreover, from the aerial photos and the DEMs, ortho-photographs with a final resolution of 0.40 m were created. The geocoding of the scenes had a Root Mean Square error of less than 0.5 m both in planimetry and altimetry. Furthermore, using the DEMs and the ortho-photographs, volumetric headcut retreat rates for each period were calculated as the product of the lineal retreat and a representative section of the headcut. Daily accumulated RUSLE EI30 index was calculated in a conventional way from records of precipitation every 10 minutes for the period 1991-2009; these results were used as reference data. In addition, for the same period, this index was estimated with daily precipitation records through several models

  14. Experiments and Numerical Simulations of Dike Erosion due to a Wave Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Evangelista

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dike erosion is a crucial issue in coastal and fluvial flood risk management. These defense structures appear vulnerable to extreme hydrological events, whose potential occurrence risk seems to be recently increased due to climate change. Their design and reinforcement is, however, a complex task, and although numerical models are very powerful nowadays, real processes cannot be accurately predicted; therefore, physical models constitute a useful tool to investigate different features under controlled conditions. This paper presents some laboratory experimental results of erosion of a sand dike produced by the impact of a dam break wave. Experiments have been conducted in the Water Engineering Laboratory at the University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Italy, in a rectangular channel: here, the sudden opening of a gate forming the reservoir generates the wave impacting the dike, made in turn of two different, almost uniform sands. The physical evidence proves that the erosion process is strongly unsteady and significantly different from a gradual overtopping and highlights the importance of apparent cohesion for the fine sand dike. The experimental results have also been compared against the ones obtained through the numerical integration of a two-phase model, which shows the reasonable predictive capability of the temporal free surface and dike profile evolution.

  15. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  16. Understanding coastal processes to assist with coastal erosion management in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyes, S. G.; Wasson, R. J.; Munksgaard, N. C.; Evans, K. G.; Brinkman, R.; Williams, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Sand transport pathways in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia, are being investigated to assist with coastal management. Coastal erosion, which threatens public and private infrastructure, is one of the major problems along the harbour beaches. A study of sediment transport is essential to identify the challenges encountered by the stakeholders in coastal management. Darwin Harbour, located in the tropical, cyclone prone area of Australia, was, until recently, considered a near pristine estuary. A semi-diurnal macro-tidal embayment, the tidal variation in the harbour reaches up to 8 m with a mean tidal range of 3.7 m. The beach morphology consists of sandy pocket beaches between coastal cliffs, sandbars, rocky shore platforms, tidal flats and mangrove fringes. A two-dimensional depth averaged finite-element hydrodynamic model (RMA-2), coupled with a sediment transport model (RMA-11) from Resource Modelling Associates, has been used to infer the sources and the depositional areas of sand in the harbour. Grain size distributions and geochemical analysis are also used to characterize the sand and its source(s). Initial results show that the beach sand is mostly of offshore origin with small sand input from the rivers. Potential supplementary sand sources are the eroded materials from the shore platforms and the rocky cliffs. Due to the rapid development in Darwin Harbour, this study is fundamental in understanding coastal processes to support decision making in coastal management, particularly in a macro-tidal, tropical estuary.

  17. Using the RBFN model and GIS technique to assess wind erosion hazards of Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huading; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhuang, Dafang; Hu, Yunfeng

    2006-08-01

    Soil wind erosion is the primary process and the main driving force for land desertification and sand-dust storms in arid and semi-arid areas of Northern China. Many researchers have paid more attention to this issue. This paper select Inner Mongolia autonomous region as the research area, quantify the various indicators affecting the soil wind erosion, using the GIS technology to extract the spatial data, and construct the RBFN (Radial Basis Function Network) model for assessment of wind erosion hazard. After training the sample data of the different levels of wind erosion hazard, we get the parameters of the model, and then assess the wind erosion hazard. The result shows that in the Southern parts of Inner Mongolia wind erosion hazard are very severe, counties in the middle regions of Inner Mongolia vary from moderate to severe, and in eastern are slight. The comparison of the result with other researches shows that the result is in conformity with actual conditions, proving the reasonability and applicability of the RBFN model.

  18. Soil erosion in Slovene Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Mikoš

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From the end of nineties of the 20th century, intense hydrologic and geomorphologic research is taking place in the Slovene Istria. As a part of this research also studies on soil erosion were undertaken in the period from 2005 to 2008. The field measurements were under taken onclosed 1m2 large erosion plots under three different land uses (on bare soils in an olive grove, on an overgrown meadow, in a forest, placed south of the Marezige village in the Rokava River basin.We show weekly measurements of surface erosion (interrill erosion for the period of 13 months (the end of March 2005 – the end of April 2006, as well as monthly and seasonal averages together with selected linear statistical correlations between soil erosion and weather parameters.From May 2005 to April 2006 the interrill erosion on bare soils in an olive grove with an inclination of 5.5° amounted to 9013 g/m2 (90 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 8.5 mm/yr; on an overgrown meadow with an inclination of 9.4° it amounted to 168 g/m2 (1,68 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.16 mm//yr; and in a forest with an inclination of 7.8° it amounted to 391 g/m2 (3,91 t/ha and in a forest with an inclination of 21.4° it amounted to 415 g/m2 (4,15 t/ha, respectively, that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.4 mm/yr.

  19. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  20. Dust and nutrient enrichment by wind erosion from Danish soils in dependence of tillage direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian Behbahani, Ali; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion is a selective process, which promotes erosion of fine particles. Therefore, it can be assumed that increasing erosion rates are generally associated with increasing loss of dust sized particles and nutrients. However, this selective process is strongly affected by the orientation and respective trapping efficiency of tillage ridges and furrows. Since tillage ridges are often the only protection measure available on poorly aggregated soils in absence of a protective vegetation cover, it is very important to know which orientation respective to the dominant wind direction provides best protection. This knowledge could be very helpful for planning erosion protection measures on fields with high wind erosion susceptibility. The main objective of this study, therefore, was to determine the effect of tillage direction on dust and nutrient mobilization by wind, using wind tunnel simulations. In order to assess the relationship between the enrichment ratio of specific particle sizes and the amount of eroded nutrients, three soils with loamy sand texture, but varying amounts of sand-sized particles, were selected. In addition, a soil with slightly less sand, but much higher organic matter content was chosen. The soils were tested with three different soil surface scenarios - flat surface, parallel tillage, perpendicular tillage. The parallel tillage operation experienced the greatest erosion rates, independent of soil type. Particles with D50 between 100-155 μm showed the greatest risk of erosion. However, due to a greater loss of dust sized particles from perpendicularly tilled surfaces, this wind-surface arrangement showed a significant increase in nutrient enrichment ratio compared to parallel tillage and flat surfaces. The main reason for this phenomenon is most probably the trapping of larger particles in the perpendicular furrows. This indicates that the highest rate of soil protection does not necessarily coincide with lowest soil nutrient losses and

  1. Preliminary assessment of soil erosion impact during forest restoration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Jen; Chang, Cheng-Sheng; Tsao, Tsung-Ming; Wey, Tsong-Huei; Chiang, Po-Neng; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan has a fragile geology and steep terrain. The 921 earthquake, Typhoon Toraji, Typhoon Morakot, and the exploitation and use of the woodland by local residents have severely damaged the landscape and posed more severe challenges to the montane ecosystem. A land conservation project has been implemented by the Experimental Forest of National Taiwan University which reclaimed approximately 1,500 hectares of leased woodland from 2008 to 2010, primarily used to grow bamboo, tea trees, betel nut, fruit, and vegetable and about 1,298 hectares have been reforested. The process of forest restoration involves clear cutting, soil preparation and a six-year weeding and tending period which may affect the amount of soil erosion dramatically. This study tried to assess the impact of forest restoration from the perspective of soil erosion through leased-land recovery periods and would like to benefit the practical implementation of reforestation in the future. A new plantation reforested in the early 2013 and a nearby 29-year-old mature forest were chosen as experimental and comparison sites. A self-designed weir was set up in a small watershed of each site for the runoff and sediment yield observation. According to the observed results from May to August 2013, a raining season in Taiwan, the runoff and erosion would not as high as we expected, because the in-situ soil texture of both sites is sandy loam to sandy with high percentage of coarse fragment which increased the infiltration. There were around 200 kg to 250 kg of wet sand/soil yielded in mature forest during the hit of Typhoon Soulik while the rest of the time only suspended material be yielded at both sites. To further investigate the influence of the six-year weeding and tending period, long term observations are needed for a more completed assessment of soil erosion impact.

  2. Multi-objective robust airfoil optimization based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve airfoil performance under different flight conditions and to make the performance insensitive to off-design condition at the same time,a multi-objective optimization approach considering robust design has been developed and applied to airfoil design. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) representation is adopted in airfoil design process,control points and related weights around airfoil are used as design variables. Two airfoil representation cases show that the NURBS method can get airfoil geometry with max geometry error less than 0.0019. By using six-sigma robust approach in multi-objective airfoil design,each sub-objective function of the problem has robustness property. By adopting multi-objective genetic algorithm that is based on non-dominated sorting,a set of non-dominated airfoil solutions with robustness can be obtained in the design. The optimum robust airfoil can be traded off and selected in these non-dominated solutions by design tendency. By using the above methods,a multi-objective robust optimization was conducted for NASA SC0712 airfoil. After performing robust airfoil optimization,the mean value of drag coefficient at Ma0.7-0.8 and the mean value of lift coefficient at post stall regime (Ma0.3) have been improved by 12.2% and 25.4%. By comparing the aerodynamic force coefficients of optimization result,it shows that: different from single robust airfoil design which just improves the property of drag divergence at Ma0.7-0.8,multi-objective robust design can improve both the drag divergence property at Ma0.7-0.8 and stall property at low speed. The design cases show that the multi-objective robust design method makes the airfoil performance robust under different off-design conditions.

  3. Rainfall erosivity in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, Andreas; Haas, Kathrin; Dvorackova, Anna; Fuller, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall and its kinetic energy expressed by the rainfall erosivity is the main driver of soil erosion processes by water. The Rainfall-Runoff Erosivity Factor (R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation is one oft he most widely used parameters describing rainfall erosivity. This factor includes the cumulative effects of the many moderate-sized storms as well as the effects oft he occasional severe ones: R quantifies the effect of raindrop impact and reflects the amopunt and rate of runoff associated with the rain. New Zealand is geologically young and not comparable with any other country in the world. Inordinately high rainfall and strong prevailing winds are New Zealand's dominant climatic features. Annual rainfall up to 15000 mm, steep slopes, small catchments and earthquakes are the perfect basis for a high rate of natural and accelerated erosion. Due to the multifacted landscape of New Zealand its location as island between the Pacific and the Tasmanian Sea there is a high gradient in precipitation between North and South Island as well as between West and East Coast. The objective of this study was to determine the R-factor for the different climatic regions in New Zealand, in order to create a rainfall erosivity map. We used rainfall data (breakpoint data in 10-min intervals) from 34 gauging stations for the calcuation of the rainfall erosivity. 15 stations were located on the North Island and 19 stations on the South Island. From these stations, a total of 397 station years with 12710 rainstorms were analyzed. The kinetic energy for each rainfall event was calculated based on the equation by Brown and Foster (1987), using the breakpoint precipitation data for each storm. On average, a mean annual precipitation of 1357 mm was obtained from the 15 observed stations on the North Island. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is relatively even with 22-24% of annual rainfall occurring in spring , fall and winter and 31% in summer. On the South Island

  4. Experimental characterization of airfoil boundary layers for improvement of aeroacoustic and aerodynamic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    blades makes a transition from laminar to turbulent. In the turbulent boundary layer eddies are created which are a potential noise sources. They are ineffective as noise source on the airfoil surface or in free flow, but when convecting past the trailing edge of the airfoil their efficiency is much...... and to improve it, because the predictions gave in general too low far field noise levels. Our main finding is that the acoustic formulations to relate the fluctuating surface pressure field close to the trailing edge of airfoil to the radiated far field sound give excellent results when compared to far field......, trailing edge noise can be evaluated by means of measured surface pressure field, even in cases where a direct measurement of trailing edge noise is not possible. This opens up great new vistas, i.e. by testing new airfoils in a standard industrial wind tunnel or by testing new wind turbine rotors...

  5. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  6. Modeling the Aerodynamic Lift Produced by Oscillating Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Saif Ullah

    2015-01-01

    For present study, setting Strouhal Number (St) as control parameter, numerical simulations for flow past oscillating NACA-0012 airfoil at 1,000 Reynolds Numbers (Re) are performed. Temporal profiles of unsteady forces; lift and thrust, and their spectral analysis clearly indicate the solution to be a period-1 attractor for low Strouhal numbers. This study reveals that aerodynamic forces produced by plunging airfoil are independent of initial kinematic conditions of airfoil that proves the existence of limit cycle. Frequencies present in the oscillating lift force are composed of fundamental (fs), even and odd harmonics (3fs) at higher Strouhal numbers. Using numerical simulations, shedding frequencies (f_s) were observed to be nearly equal to the excitation frequencies in all the cases. Unsteady lift force generated due to the plunging airfoil is modeled by modified van der Pol oscillator. Using method of multiple scales and spectral analysis of steady-state CFD solutions, frequencies and damping terms in th...

  7. Airfoil Selection of MAV (Miniature Air Vehicle for Low Reynolds Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur S. Marathe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses issues and practical requirements of Airfoil for MAV. Here considering the MAV which travel with the speed range between 9-20 m/s. The Airfoil which is been selected on various criteria, i.e. - stable flight, cover maximum distance with minimum force. So here the NACA 2204 is been selected for MAV. The Fluent analysis is done on the airfoil for lift to drag ratio. These MAV are having some purpose i.e.:- they can be use as a spy in enemy area, inspection of hazardous area, where human resource can’t reach. Aerodynamic performance and stability should be considered in the context of the airfoil structural integrity. Particular attention should be paid to the unsteady nature of the flow.

  8. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  9. Unsteady two-dimensional potential-flow model for thin variable geometry airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the integral forces can be reduced to Munk's steady and Theodorsen's unsteady results for thin airfoils, and numerical evaluation shows...... excellent agreement with other unsteady two-dimensional thin-airfoil results. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the present theory can be used for various applications which up to the formulation of the present theory have been possible only using much more...... as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chord-wise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time lag for all chord-wise positions...

  10. Effects of a ground vortex on the aerodynamics of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamics of an airfoil with a rectangular jet exiting from its lower surface at fifty percent of the chord. The airfoil was tested with and without the influence of a ground plane. Surface static pressures were measured on the airfoil at jet to free stream velocity ratios ranging from 0 to 9. From these pressures, the variation of C sub L with velocity ratio was easily determined. The measurements indicated significant positive and negative pressure regions on the lower surface of the airfoil ahead of and after the nozzle exit respectively. The presence of a ground plane enhanced these pressure regions at low velocity ratios, but at a particular ratio for each plane location, a recirculation zone or vortex formed ahead of the jet resulting in decreased pressures and a drop in C sub L.

  11. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift. PMID:28243053

  12. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weijun; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jiyue; Li, Ming; Ma, Yi; Cong, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  13. Airfoil data sensitivity analysis for actuator disc simulations used in wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karl; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the sensitivity of blade geometry and airfoil characteristics on the prediction of performance characteristics of wind farms, large-eddy simulations using an actuator disc (ACD) method are performed for three different blade/airfoil configurations. The aim of the study is to determine...... how the mean characteristics of wake flow, mean power production and thrust depend on the choice of airfoil data and blade geometry. In order to simulate realistic conditions, pre-generated turbulence and wind shear are imposed in the computational domain. Using three different turbulence intensities...... and varying the spacing between the turbines, the flow around 4-8 aligned turbines is simulated. The analysis is based on normalized mean streamwise velocity, turbulence intensity, relative mean power production and thrust. From the computations it can be concluded that the actual airfoil characteristics...

  14. Coupled-Mode Flutter of Bending-Bending Type in Highly-Flexible Uniform Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourazarm, Pariya; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    We study the behavior of a highly flexible uniform airfoil placed in wind both numerically and experimentally. It is shown that for a non-rotating highly-flexible cantilevered airfoil, placed at very small angles of attack (less than 1 degree), the airfoil loses its stability by buckling. For slightly higher angles of attack (more than 1 degree) a coupled-mode flutter in which the first and the second flapwise modes coalesce toward a flutter mode is observed, and thus the observed flutter has a bending-bending nature. The flutter onset and frequency found experimentally matched the numerical predictions. If the same airfoil is forced to rotate about its fixed end, the static deflection decreases and the observed couple-mode flutter becomes of flapwise-torsional type, same as what has already been observed for flutter of rotating wind turbine blades. The support provided by the National Science Foundation, CBET-1437988, is greatly acknowledged.

  15. Parallel numerical simulation of oscillating airfoil NACA0015 in the channel due to flutter instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řidký Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to 3D and 2D parallel numerical computation of pressure and velocity fields around an elastically supported airfoil self-oscillating due to interaction with the airflow. Numerical solution is computed in the OpenFOAM package, an open-source software package based on finite volume method. Movement of airfoil is described by translation and rotation, identified from experimental data. A new boundary condition for the 2DOF motion of the airfoil was implemented. The results of numerical simulations (velocity are compared with data measured in a wind tunnel, where a physical model of NACA0015 airfoil was mounted and tuned to exhibit the flutter instability. The experimental results were obtained previously in the Institute of Thermomechanics by interferographic measurements in a subsonic wind tunnel in Nový Knín.

  16. System and method for manufacture of airfoil components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, Thomas Michael

    2016-11-29

    Embodiments of the present disclosure relate generally to systems and methods for manufacturing an airfoil component. The system can include: a geometrical mold; an elongated flexible sleeve having a closed-off interior and positioned within the geometrical mold, wherein the elongated flexible sleeve is further positioned to have a desired geometry; an infusing channel in fluid communication with the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve and configured to communicate a resinous material thereto; a vacuum channel in fluid communication with the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve and configured to vacuum seal the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve; and a glass fiber layer positioned within the closed-off interior of the elongated flexible sleeve.

  17. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2016-01-01

    , Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed...... that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated...... with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model....

  18. Dynamic stall on a pitching and surging airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Reeve; McKeon, Beverley J.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine blades undergo dynamic stall due to the large angle of attack variation they experience during a turbine rotation. The flow over a single blade was modeled using a sinusoidally pitching and surging airfoil in a non-rotating frame with a constant freestream flow at a mean chord Reynolds number of . Two-dimensional, time-resolved velocity fields were acquired using particle image velocimetry. Vorticity contours were used to visualize shear layer and vortex activity. A low-order model of dynamic stall was developed using dynamic mode decomposition, from which primary and secondary dynamic separation modes were identified. The interaction between these two modes was able to capture the physics of dynamic stall and as such can be extended to other turbine configurations and problems in unsteady aerodynamics. Results from the linear pitch/surge frame are extrapolated to the rotating VAWT frame to investigate the behavior of identified flow structures.

  19. FLOWS AROUND TWO AIRFOILS PERFORMING FLING AND SUBSEQUENT TRANSLATION AND TRANSLATION AND SUBSEQUENT CLAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙茂; 于鑫

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces and flow structures of two airfoils performing "fling and subsequent translation" and "translation and subsequent clap" are studied by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids. These motions are relevant to the flight of very small insects. The Reynolds number, based on the airfoil chord length c and the translation velocity U, is 17. It is shown that: (1) For two airfoils performing fling and subsequent translation, a large lift is generated both in the fling phase and in the early part of the translation phase. During the fling phase,a pair of leading edge vortices of large strength is generated; the generation of the vortex pair in a short period results in a large time rate of change of fluid impulse, which explains the large lift in this period. During the early part of the translation, the two leading edge vortices move with the airfoils;the relative movement of the vortices also results in a large time rate of change of fluid impulse, which explains the large lift in this part of motion. (In the later part of the translation, the vorticity in the vortices is diffused and convected into the wake.) The time averaged lift coeffcient is approximately 2.4 times as large as that of a single airfoil performing a similar motion. (2) For two airfoils performing translation and subsequent clap, a large lift is generated in the clap phase. During the clap, a pair of trailing edge vortices of large strength are generated; again, the generation of the vortex pair in a short period (which results in a large timerate of change of fluid impulse) is responsible for the large lift in this period. The time averaged lift coefficient is approximately 1.6 times as large as that of a single airfoil performing a similar motion. (3) When the initial distance between the airfoils (in the case of clap, the final distance between the airfoils) varies from 0.1 to 0.2c, the lift on an airfoil decreases only slightly but the torque

  20. [Spatio-temporal change of sand-fixing function and its driving forces in desertification control ecological function area of Hunshandake, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Tian, Mei-rong; Gao, Ji-xi; Qian, Jin-ping

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is an important ecological and environmental problem in Hunshandake Desert, and the sand-fixing function determines the degree of ecological security in the entire region. In order to clarify the situation of windbreak and sand fixation in Hunshandake area, and to guide the prevention and treatment of desertification on regional scale, based on the meteorological and remote sensing data, this paper quantitatively analyzed the temporal and spatial pattern of windbreak and sand fixation ability between 2000-2010 by the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ) model, meanwhile, the driving forces for each county ( or banner) in the functional zone were analyzed with the method of principal component analysis. The results showed that there was a fluctuation of the sand fixing capacity in Hunshandake over time, generally rendering a decline trend. The coniferous forest and grassland had strong windbreak and sand fixation capacity in unit area among the various land categories. In terms of spatial distribution, the windbreak and sand fixation function in western and southeastern region was weak and needed to be strengthened with ecological restoration efforts. Through the study of the social driving forces of each administrative region in the function zone, there were 3 main social driving forces of soil erosion in the administrative functions: the intensity of input-output, the level of economic development and the level of agriculture-husbandry development.

  1. The effect of wind erosion on toxic element content of soils based on wind tunnel trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatárvári, Károly; Négyesi, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion causes enormous problems in many parts of the world. It damages the fertile layer of soils, and eventually wind erosion can transport materials, pathogens and these may cause medical problems in the respiratory system. Numerous international and Hungarian surveys have proved, that wind erosion not only affects loose textured soils. During droughts wind erosion may cause great damage in bound soils of clay in case these are over-cultivated and dusty. As an effect of climate change the duration and frequency of drought periods shall grow. In our investigation samples were taken from the upper 10 cms of soils of 5 various types of mechanical compounds (according to physical characteristics sand, clay, clay loam, loam, sandy loam) in Györ-Moson-Sopron County Hungary. According to the map of Hungary of the areas potentially affected by wind erosion the sand physical soil type is strongly endangered by wind erosion, other areas are moderatly endangered. According to most recent international classification areas belonging to the sand physical soil type are categorized as "endangered by wind erosion", and others belong to the category "not endangered by wind erosion", but these data were not based on local trials. When selecting the sampling areas it was taken to account that opencast sand and gravel mines are in operation in the area. Because of these recently significant wind erosion related phenomena were observed. The area is the most windy in the country. The mechanical composition, CaCO3 content, pH value (H2O,Kcl), humus content of the samples were defined. The wind erosion experiments were conducted in the wind tunnel of the University of Debrecen. The threshold velocities of the soils were measured, and the quantity of the soil transported by the wind was analyzed at four wind velocity value ranges. The transported material intercepted at different wind velocities at the height of 0-10 cm and 10-35 cm. The As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn

  2. On the design of airfoils in which the transition of the boundary layer is delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Itiro

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for designing suitable thickness distributions and mean camber lines for airfoils permitting extensive chordwise laminar flow. Wind tunnel and flight tests confirming the existence of laminar flow; possible maintenance of laminar flow by area suction; and the effects of wind tunnel turbulence and surface roughness on the promotion of premature boundary layer transition are discussed. In addition, estimates of profile drag and scale effect on maximum lift of the derived airfoils are made.

  3. Schlieren Studies of Compressibility Effects on Dynamic Stall of Airfoils in Transient Pitching Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Ahmed, S; Carr, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    Compressibility effects on the flowfield of an airfoil executing rapid transient pitching motion from 0 - 60 degrees over a wide range of Mach numbers and pitching rates were studied using a stroboscopic schlieren flow visualization technique. The studies have led to the first direct experiments] documentation of multiple shocks on the airfoil upper surface flow for certain conditions. Also, at low Mach numbers, additional coherent vortical structures were found to be ...

  4. Schlieren Studies of Compressibility Effects on Dynamic Stall on Transiently Pitching Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhara, M.S.; Ahmed, S; Carr, L.W.

    2016-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.2514/3.48268 Compressibility effects on the flowfield of an airfoil executing rapid transient pitching motion from 0-60 deg over a wide range of Mach numbers and pitching rates were studied using a stroboscopic schlieren flow visualization technique. The studies have led to the first direct experimental documentation of multiple shocks on the airfoil upper surface flow for certain conditions. Also, at low Mach...

  5. Investigation of the Effects of Airfoil-probes on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Axial Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiang; MA Hongwei; REN Minglin; XIANG Honghui

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of the airfoil-probes on the aerodynamic performance of an axial compressor,a numerical simulation of 3D flow field is performed in a 1.5-stage axial compressor with airfoil-probes installed at the stator leading-edge (LE).The airfoil-probes have a negative influence on the compressor aerodynamic performance at all operating points.A streamwise vortex is induced by the airfoil-probe along both sides of the blade.At the mid-operating point,the vortex is notable along the pressure side and is relatively small along the suction side (SS).At the near-stall point,the vortex is slightly suppressed in the pressure surface (PS),but becomes remarkable in the suction side.A small local-separation is induced by the interactions between the vortex and the end-wall boundary layer in the corner region near the hub.That the positive pitch angle of the airfoil-probe at 6.5% span is about 15° plays an important role in the vortex evolution near the hub,which causes the fact that the airfoil-probe near the hub has the largest effects among the four airfoil-probes.In order to get a further understanding of the vortex evolution in the stator in the numerical simulation,a flow visualization experiment in a water tunnel is performed.The flow visualization results give a deep insight into the evolution of the vortex induced by the airfoil-probe.

  6. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  7. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  8. Latest Pleistocene Deposition and Erosion on the New Jersey Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B. A.; Alexander, C.; Stackhouse, S.; Turner, R.; Nordfjord, S.; Austin, J.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S.; Fulthorpe, C.

    2007-12-01

    The New Jersey margin is an ideal location for the study of sedimentary response to glacioeustatic forcing because this passive continental edge is both wide and stable. Although the region has been intensively imaged and mapped geophysically, it is still far from being understood stratigraphically because of a lack of samples to constrain timing and paleo-depositional environment. This study examines the timing and nature of latest Pleistocene erosion and deposition on the shelf, using grab samples and core recovered using the AHC-800 (Active Heave Compensation - 800 m) drilling system. The latest Pleistocene shelf is characterized by (1) downcutting and erosion by rivers associated with subaerial exposure during glacial retreat of sea level; (2) deposition at the shelf edge during sea level fall associated with formation of an outer shelf wedge; and (3) deposition in estuarine environments as sea level rose. Foraminiferal and sediment textural analyses of cores samples ground truth previous seismic reflection-based interpretations of incision and paleochannel formation. Grab samples analyzed for foraminiferal content and grain size identify environment of deposition within three main bathymetric features: sand ridges, sand ribbons, and glacial scours. Radiometric dating (14C) further constrains the timing of intervals of erosion and deposition. We relate our results to other studies and suggest a complex, spatially variable shelf response to glacial advance and retreat. K-Ar analyses of hornblende crystals provide constraints on sediment sources. Two assemblages exist: one consistent with ages of Proterozoic age plutons in the New Jersey area, and another, younger, indicating mixing. K-Ar dates show a clear difference between and Holocene (930- 970 +/- 20 Ma) sedimentary assemblages and sediments older than 30 k.y, (850-880 Ma +/- 20-30 Ma). Holocene hornblend crystal ages are consistent with Grenvillian aged plutons common to the source region (e

  9. Tube erosion in bubbling fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.K. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center; Stallings, J.W. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This paper reports on experimental and theoretical studies that were preformed of the interaction between bubbles and tubes and tube erosion in fluidized beds. The results are applicable to the erosion of horizontal tubes in the bottom row of a tube bundle in a bubbling bed. Cold model experimental data show that erosion is caused by the impact of bubble wakes on the tubes, with the rate of erosion increasing with the velocity of wake impact with the particle size. Wake impacts resulting from the vertical coalescence of pairs of bubbles directly beneath the tube result in particularly high rates of erosion damage. Theoretical results from a computer simulation of bubbling and erosion show very strong effects of the bed geometry and bubbling conditions on computed rates of erosion. These results show, for example, that the rate of erosion can be very sensitive to the vertical location of the bottom row of tubes with respect to the distributor.

  10. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  11. Simultaneous Investigation of Flexibility and Plasma Actuation Effects on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Oscillating Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mahboubi Doust

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a numerical study of two dimensional laminar incompressible flow around the flexible oscillating NACA0012 airfoil is performed using the open source code OpenFOAM. Oscillatory motion types including pitching and flapping is considered. Reynolds number for these motions is assumed fixed at 12000. One of the important issues that must be considered in designing air structures, in particular the aircraft wing, is the interaction between the air and the elastic aircraft wings that is known as the Aeroelastic phenomenon. For this purpose, the effect of airfoil flexibility and flow induced vibration in these motion types is investigated and compared with the case of rigid airfoil. It is observed that the flexibility in both types of motions causes improvement of the thrust which is boosted with increasing the frequency. Contrary to thrust, the significant improvement of lift is only achievable in high frequencies. It was also found that the effect of flexibility on the flapping motion is higher than the pitching motion. For flow control on the airfoil, Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasma actuator is used in the trailing edge of a flexible airfoil, and its effect on the flexible airfoil is also investigated.

  12. Cylinder wake influence on the tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Nashimoto, A.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of cylinder wake on discrete tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil is studied experimentally in a uniform flow at a moderate Reynolds number. The experiments are carried out by measuring sound pressure levels and spectrum, separation and the reattachment points, pressure distribution, fluid forces, mean-flow and turbulence characteristics around the airfoil with and without the cylinder wake. Present results indicate that the tonal noise from the airfoil is suppressed by the influence of the cylinder wake and the aerodynamic characteristics are improved in comparison with the case without the cylinder wake. These are mainly due to the separation control of boundary layers over the airfoil caused by the wake-induced transition, which is observed by surface flow visualization with liquid- crystal coating. The PIV measurements of the flow field around the airfoil confirm that highly turbulent velocity fluctuation of the cylinder wake induces the transition of the boundary layers and produces an attached boundary layer over the airfoil. Then, the vortex shedding phenomenon near the trailing edge of pressure surface is removed by the influence of the wake and results in the suppression of tonal noise.

  13. Numerical analysis of the s1020 airfoils in tandem under different flapping configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K. B.; Tay, W. B.

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the performance of the efficiency, thrust and lift of flapping wings in tandem arrangement. This research investigates the effect of the arrangement of the airfoils in tandem on the performance of the airfoils by varying the phase difference and distance between the airfoils. Three flapping configurations from an earlier phase of a research which gives high efficiency, thrust and lift are used in the tandem simulation. It is found all the different flapping configurations show improvement in the efficiency, thrust or lift when the distance between the two airfoils and the phase angle between the heaving positions of the two airfoils are optimal. The average thrust coefficient of the tandem arrangement managed to attain more than twice that of the single one (4.84 vs. 2.05). On the other hand, the average lift coefficient of the tandem arrangement also increased to 4.59, as compared to the original single airfoil value of 3.04. All these results obtained will aid in the design of a better ornithopter with tandem wing arrangement.

  14. Airfoil Aeroelastic Flutter Analysis Based on Modified Leishman-Beddoes Model at Low Mach Number

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Song; ZHU Qinghua; ZHANG Chenglin; NI Xianping

    2011-01-01

    Based on modified Leishman-Beddoes(L-B)state space model at low Mach number(lower than 0.3),the airfoil aeroelastic system is presented in this paper.The main modifications for L-B model include a new dynamic stall criterion and revisions of normal force and pitching moment coefficient.The bifurcation diagrams,the limit cycle oscillation (LCO)phase plane plots and the time domain response figures are applied to investigating the stall flutter bifurcation behavior of airfoil aeroelastic systems with symmetry or asymmetry.It is shown that the symmetric periodical oscillation happens after subcritical bifurcation caused by dynamic stall,and the asymmetric periodical oscillation,which is caused by the interaction of dynamic stall and static divergence,only happens in the airfoil aeroelastic system with asymmetry.Validations of the modified L-B model and the airfoil aeroelastic system are presented with the experimental airload data of NACA0012 and OA207 and experimental stall flutter data of NACA0012 respectively.Results demonstrate that the airfoil aeroelastic system presented in this paper is effective and accurate,which can be applied to the investigation of airfoil stall flutter at low Mach number.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal/ Fluid Sciences & Engineering Dept.; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.; Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  16. Numerical solutions for a two-dimensional airfoil undergoing unsteady motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Fu-bing; ZENG Nian-dong; ZHANG Liang; WU De-ming

    2004-01-01

    Continuous vorticity panels are used to model general unsteady inviscid, incompressible, and two-dimensional flows. The geometry of the airfoil is approximated by series of short straight segments having endpoints that lie on the actual surface. A piecewise linear, continuous distribution of vorticity over the airfoil surface is used to generate disturbance flow. The no-penetration condition is imposed at the midpoint of each segment and at discrete times. The wake is simulated by a system of point vortices, which move at local fluid velocity. At each time step, a new wake panel with uniform vorticity distribution is attached to the trailing edge, and the condition of eonstant circulation around the airfoil and wake is imposed. A new expression for Kutta condition is developed to study (i) the effect of thickness on the lift build-up of an impulsively started airfoil, (ii) the effects of reduced frequency and heave amplitude on the thrust production of flapping airfoils, and (iii) the vortex-airfoil interaction. This work presents some hydrodynamic results for tidalstreaim turbine.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  18. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position.

  19. Effect of cavity on shock oscillation in transonic flow over RAE2822 supercritical airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Rizwanur; Labib, Md. Itmam; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Transonic flow past a supercritical airfoil is strongly influenced by the interaction of shock wave with boundary layer. This interaction induces unsteady self-sustaining shock wave oscillation, flow instability, drag rise and buffet onset which limit the flight envelop. In the present study, a computational analysis has been carried out to investigate the flow past a supercritical RAE2822 airfoil in transonic speeds. To control the shock wave oscillation, a cavity is introduced on the airfoil surface where shock wave oscillates. Different geometric configurations have been investigated for finding optimum cavity geometry and dimension. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are computed at Mach 0.729 with an angle of attack of 5°. Computed results are well validated with the available experimental data in case of baseline airfoil. However, in case of airfoil with control cavity; it has been observed that the introduction of cavity completely suppresses the unsteady shock wave oscillation. Further, significant drag reduction and successive improvement of aerodynamic performance have been observed in airfoil with shock control cavity.

  20. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  1. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  2. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  3. WIND TUNNEL RESEARCH ON THE INFLUENCE OF ACTIVE AIRFLOW ON THE LIFT FORCE GENERATED BY THE AIRFOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Magryta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of wind tunnel tests of airfoils with additional active airflow applied to their upper surfaces. These studies were carried out for a range of velocities up to 28 m/s in an open wind tunnel. Several types of airfoils selected for the examination feature different geometries and are widely applied in today’s aviation industry. The changes in the lift and drag force generated by these airfoils were recorded during the study. The test bench for the tests was equipped with a compressor and a vacuum pump to enable airflow through some holes on the airfoil upper surface. A rapid prototyping method and a 3D printer based on a powder printing technique were applied to print the airfoils. All of their surfaces were subject to surface grinding to smooth their external surfaces. The wind tunnel tests with and without active airflow applied to airfoils are summarised in the paper.

  4. Derivation of airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade based on 3D CFD rotor calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C.; Soerensen, N.N.; Madsen, H.A. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade are derived from 3D CFD computations on a full-scale 41-m rotor. Based on 3D CFD the force distributions on the blades are determined, from which airfoil characteristics are derived using the momentum theory. The final airfoil characteristics are constructed using both wind tunnel measurements and 3D CFD. Compared to 2D wind tunnel measurements they show a low lift in stall for the airfoil sections at the tip. At the airfoil sections at the inner part of the blade, they show a high lift in stall. At about 60% radius the lift agrees well to 2D wind tunnel measurements. Aero-elastic calculations using the final airfoil characteristics show good agreement to measured power and flap moments. Furthermore, a fatigue load analysis shows a reduction of up to 15% of the load compared to commonly used data. (au)

  5. Experimental study of the effect of a slat angle on double-element airfoil and application in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Rosendahl, Lasse; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2015-01-01

    A design of double-element airfoil is proposed for its use in the vertical axis wind turbine. The double-element airfoil system consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. The design parameters of the double-element airfoil system are given by the position and orientation of the trailing edge......-element airfoil system designed in this paper. Further, the performance of new design of a vertical axis wind turbine shows considerable increase in the power coefficient and the total power output as compared to the reference wind turbine...

  6. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  7. Cropping system effects on wind erosion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion of soil is a destructive process impacting crop productivity and human health and safety. The mechanics of wind erosion and soil properties that influence erosion are well understood. Less well-studied are the effects that cropping intensity has upon those soil properties. We collected ...

  8. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  9. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  10. Modeling the fluid/soil interface erosion in the Hole Erosion Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissi B.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon which yields at its final stage to insidious fluid leakages under the hydraulic infrastructures known as piping and which are the main cause of their rupture. The Hole Erosion Test is commonly used to quantify the rate of piping erosion. In this work, The Hole Erosion Test is modelled by using Fluent software package. The aim is to predict the erosion rate of soil during the hole erosion test. The renormalization group theory – based k–ε turbulence model equations are used. This modelling makes it possible describing the effect of the clay concentration in flowing water on erosion. Unlike the usual one dimensional models, the proposed modelling shows that erosion is not uniform erosion along the hole length. In particular, the concentration of clay is found to increase noticeably the erosion rate.

  11. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  12. Hydrodynamic Performance Analysis on Different Airfoils of Straight Blade H Type of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Energy Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Kan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airfoil is a key factor that influences the hydrodynamic performance of vertical axis tidal current energy turbine. In order to explore the influences from the runner’s blade airfoil towards its hydrodynamic performance, three-dimensional unsteady flow numerical simulation on four airfoils of straight blade H type of tidal current energy turbines was carried out, under the precondition of same turbine compactness. Through investigating the influences from the four different airfoils of H blade towards the runner in terms of its dynamic torque feature and hydropower utilization coefficient, this research has analyzed the hydrodynamic performance of the tidal current energy turbine. As the research result indicates, the maximum dynamic torque value of the single-blade turbine with NACA0015 airfoil is significantly higher than that of the other three airfoils; while the maximum value of the overall runner torque is determined by the operating conditions such as different stream speed etc. As a whole, hydropower utilization coefficient of the turbine with asymmetric airfoil NACA4415 is better than that of the other three airfoils. This research has provided references for the design and airfoil selection for the new type of tidal current energy turbine.

  13. National assessment of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards: Southeast Atlantic Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Thompson, David M.; Sopkin, Kristin L.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Beaches serve as a natural barrier between the ocean and inland communities, ecosystems, and natural resources. However, these dynamic environments move and change in response to winds, waves, and currents. During extreme storms, changes to beaches can be large, and the results are sometimes catastrophic. Lives may be lost, communities destroyed, and millions of dollars spent on rebuilding. During storms, large waves may erode beaches, and high storm surge shifts the erosive force of the waves higher on the beach. In some cases, the combined effects of waves and surge may cause overwash or flooding. Building and infrastructure on or near a dune can be undermined during wave attack and subsequent erosion. During Hurricane Ivan in 2004, a five-story condominium in Orange Beach, Alabama, collapsed after the sand dune supporting the foundation eroded. The September 1999 landfall of Hurricane Dennis caused erosion and undermining that destroyed roads, foundations, and septic systems. Waves overtopping a dune can transport sand inland, covering roads and blocking evacuation routes or emergency relief. If storm surge inundates barrier island dunes, currents flowing across the island can create a breach, or new inlet, completely severing evacuation routes. Waves and surge during the 2003 landfall of Hurricane Isabel left a 200-meter (m) wide breach that cut the only road to and from the village of Hatteras, N.C. Extreme coastal changes caused by hurricanes may increase the vulnerability of communities both during a storm and to future storms. For example, when sand dunes on a barrier island are eroded substantially, inland structures are exposed to storm surge and waves. Absent or low dunes also allow water to flow inland across the island, potentially increasing storm surge in the back bay, on the soundside of the barrier, and on the mainland. During Hurricane Isabel the protective sand dunes near the breach were completely eroded, increasing vulnerability to future

  14. Sand Waves. Report 1. Sand Wave Shoaling in Navigation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    heights range from 0.8 m in the Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy (Dalrymple 1984) to 6.0 m in the Bahia Blanca Estuary, Argentina (Aliotta and Perillo 1987...26 PART IV: SITE-SPECIFIC SAND WAVE SHOALING PROBLEMS .. ........ 30 Columbia River Navigation Channel ........ ............... .. 30 Panama ...problem location discussed in this report is at St. Andrew Bay near Panama City, Florida. A relatively short section of the jettied inlet channel requires

  15. Wind characteristics and the associated risk of erosion in Seribu Islands patch reef complexes, Java Sea, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerbandono

    2016-05-01

    This paper explores design event and entrainment of cay beach sands due to wave shear stresses from winds. Univariate frequency analysis is used to predict recurrence intervals of extreme winds from 30-year (1984-2013) global assimilated data set. Two primary clusters of wind directions representing East and West monsoons are examined. This identifies the equivalence of characteristics of regime among the two clusters. Taking into account the threshold of bottom shear stress of cay beach sands, conceptual relationship between height of wind-generated waves (forecasted from predefined fetch length and wind speed) and erosion of cay beach sand is prescribed. The results indicate that East monsoon is the predominant occurrence of wind and facilitates persistent north-westward shift of cay beach sands, while West monsoon provides extreme events in shorter time span. It is suspiciously thought that due to these, net north-westward drift of sand is indicated. These imply that many of cays in the domain being investigated is at risk of erosion due to unequal balance forcing of winds.

  16. Splash erosion. A bibliometric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Ellison (1944) developed the splash board as a system for measuring splash erosion that was both cheap and reliable. Bollinne (1975), Morgan (1978, 1981). Mutchler (1967) described another different type of splash detectors according to whether they were passive or could register data. In the study mentioned above these authors included bottles, funnels, glasses, photography, markers. After that several devices has been made up like the splash sampler (Leguedois et al., 2005), soil tray (Van Dijk et al., 2002), splash funnel (Terry, 1989) and several rain cups (Fernandez-Raga et al., 2010; Molina and Llinares, 1996; Torri et al., 1987). Splash erosion research has materialized in the form of a number of papers published in international journals. The database of bibliographic references employed has been one of the most prestigious ones: theWeb of Science (ISI). The search was carried out on January 27th 2012. Among the 3x10^8 scholarly documents included in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) 1899 to present , the searching engine located 439 containing the word "splash erosion*", where the asterisk acts as a wildcard for any letter or group of letters. Of these, 383 were classified as articles, 87 as proceeding papers, 5 as editorial material, 2 as notes and 1 as correction. These documents have been published in 163 different journals, although four are particularly recurrent: Earth surface processes and Landforms, Catena, Soil Science Society of America Journal and Hydrological processes, with 41, 35, 35 and 26 published documents respectively. A geographic analysis of these articles has been carried out in an attempt to determine in what parts of the world research projects were making use of splash erosion. The results are that anglo-saxon countries, as USA, England and Australia dominate, particularly USA, with 130 articles. China and Japan are large communities of researches too, and some Central European countries as Belgium, France Germany

  17. Soil Erosion Threatens Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burgess

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since humans worldwide obtain more than 99.7% of their food (calories from the land and less than 0.3% from the oceans and aquatic ecosystems, preserving cropland and maintaining soil fertility should be of the highest importance to human welfare. Soil erosion is one of the most serious threats facing world food production. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for world food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization report that two-thirds of the world population is malnourished. Overall, soil is being lost from agricultural areas 10 to 40 times faster than the rate of soil formation imperiling humanity’s food security.

  18. Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. M.; Keiser, K.; Graves, S. J.; Conover, H.; Ebersole, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since the year 2000, Eastern Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, Alabama, and the western Florida panhandle have been affected by 28 tropical storms, seven of which were hurricanes. These tropical cyclones have significantly altered normal coastal processes and characteristics in the Gulf region through sediment disturbance. Although tides, seasonality, and agricultural development influence suspended sediment and sediment deposition over periods of time, tropical storm activity has the capability of moving the largest sediment loads in the shortest periods of time for coastal areas. The importance of sediments upon water quality, coastal erosion, habitats and nutrients has made their study and monitoring vital to decision makers in the region. Currently agencies such as United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), NASA, and Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) are employing a variety of in-situ and airborne based measurements to assess and monitor sediment loading and deposition. These methods provide highly accurate information but are limited in geographic range, are not continuous over a region and, in the case of airborne LIDAR are expensive and do not recur on a regular basis. Multi-temporal and multi-spectral satellite imagery that shows tropical-storm-induced suspended sediment and storm-surge sediment deposits can provide decision makers with immediate and long-term information about the impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes. It can also be valuable for those conducting research and for projects related to coastal issues such as recovery, planning, management, and mitigation. The recently awarded Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support will generate decision support products using NASA satellite observations from MODIS, Landsat and SeaWiFS instruments to support resource management, planning, and decision making activities in the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, SANDS will generate decision support products that address the impacts of tropical storms

  19. Wind tunnel simulation of the effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil erosion in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShengBo Xie; JianJun Qu; Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Intense freezing and thawing actions occur in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau because of its high elevation and cold temperature. The plateau's unique environment makes it easy to generate wind erosion under dry, windy weather conditions, resulting in the emergence of desertification. As a major form of freeze–thaw erosion, freeze–thaw and wind erosion is displayed prominently on the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. Therefore, in this study, soil samples were collected from the surface of the plateau to undergo freeze–thaw and wind erosion simulation experiments. Results show that wind erosion strength increases with an increasing number of freeze–thaw cycles, water content in the freezing–thawing process, and the difference in freeze–thaw temperatures. Therefore, in the conditions of water participation, the main reason for the freeze–thaw and wind erosion in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau is the damage to the soil structure by repeated, fierce freeze–thaw actions, and the sand-bearing wind is the main driving force for this process. The research results have theoretical significance for exploring the formation mechanism of freeze–thaw and wind erosion in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, and provide a scientific basis for freeze–thaw desertification control in the plateau.

  20. Erosive burning of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Merrill K.

    1993-01-01

    Presented here is a review of the experimental and modeling work concerning erosive burning of solid propellants (augmentation of burning rate by flow of product gases across a burning surface). A brief introduction describes the motor design problems caused by this phenomenon, particularly for low port/throat area ratio motors and nozzleless motors. Various experimental techniques for measuring crossflow sensitivity of solid propellant burning rates are described, with the conclusion that accurate simulation of the flow, including upstream flow development, in actual motors is important since the degree of erosive burning depends not only on local mean crossflow velocity and propellant nature, but also upon this upstream development. In the modeling area, a brief review of simplified models and correlating equations is presented, followed by a description of more complex numerical analysis models. Both composite and double-base propellant models are reviewed. A second generation composite model is shown to give good agreement with data obtained in a series of tests in which composite propellant composition and heterogeneity (particle size distribution) were systematically varied. Finally, the use of numerical models for the development of erosive burning correlations is described, and a brief discussion of scaling is presented.

  1. The June 2016 Australian East Coast Low: Importance of Wave Direction for Coastal Erosion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Mortlock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an unusual East Coast Low storm affected some 2000 km of the eastern seaboard of Australia bringing heavy rain, strong winds and powerful wave conditions. While wave heights offshore of Sydney were not exceptional, nearshore wave conditions were such that beaches experienced some of the worst erosion in 40 years. Hydrodynamic modelling of wave and current behaviour as well as contemporaneous sand transport shows the east to north-east storm wave direction to be the major determinant of erosion magnitude. This arises because of reduced energy attenuation across the continental shelf and the focussing of wave energy on coastal sections not equilibrated with such wave exposure under the prevailing south-easterly wave climate. Narrabeen–Collaroy, a well-known erosion hot spot on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, is shown to be particularly vulnerable to storms from this direction because the destructive erosion potential is amplified by the influence of the local embayment geometry. We demonstrate the magnified erosion response that occurs when there is bi-directionality between an extreme wave event and preceding modal conditions and the importance of considering wave direction in extreme value analyses.

  2. Particle Erosion Resistance of Bionic Samples Inspired from Skin Structure of Desert Lizard, Laudakin stoliczkana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Huang; Yan Zhang; Luquan Ren

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the particle erosion resistance of engineering surfaces,this paper proposed a bionic sample which is inspired from the skin structure of desert lizard,Laudakin stoliczkana.The bionic sample consists of a hard shell (aluminum) and a soft core (silicone rubber) which form a two-layer composite structure.The sand blast tests indicated that the bionic sample has better particle erosion resistance.In steady erosion period,the weight loss per unit time of the bionic sample is about 10% smaller than the contrast sample.The anti-erosion mechanism of the bionic sample was studied by single particle impact test.The results show that,after the impact,the kinetic energy of the particle is reduced by 56.5% on the bionic sample which is higher than that on the contrast sample (31.2%).That means the bionic sample can partly convert the kinetic energy of the particle into the deformation energy of the silicone rubber layer,thus the erosion is reduced.

  3. Human impact on erosion patterns and sediment transport in the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xilin; Li, Chang'an; Kuiper, K. F.; Zhang, Zengjie; Gao, Jianhua; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    Sediment load in rivers is an indicator of erosional processes in the upstream river catchments. Understanding the origin and composition of the sediment load can help to assess the influence of natural processes and human activities on erosion. Tectonic uplift, precipitation and run-off, hill slopes and vegetation can influence erosion in natural systems. Agriculture and deforestation are expected to increase the sediment yield, but dams and reservoirs can trap much of this sediment before it reaches the ocean. Here, we use major element composition and 40Ar/39Ar ages of detrital muscovites to constrain the sediment contribution of various tributaries to sedimentation in the Yangtze delta. The sediment contribution calculated from muscovite data was compared with that estimated from current sediment load data from gauging stations. Muscovite data show that the main contributor to the Yangtze delta sands is the Min River, while the current sediment load suggests that the Jinsha and Jialing rivers are the most important current contributors to delta sediments. We suggest that this difference reflects an "old" and "young" erosion pattern, respectively as medium grained muscovite could be transported much slower than suspended sediment load in the complex river-lake systems of the Yangtze River basin. These two different erosion patterns likely reflect enhanced human activity (deforestation, cultivation, and mining) that increasingly overwhelmed long-time natural factors controls on erosion since ~ 1900 cal years B.P.

  4. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  5. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    An effort to understand and control the unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils was funded for three years through the NASA cooperative agreement program. As part of this effort a substantial data base was compiled detailing the effects various parameters have on the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Parameters studied include Mach number, pitch rate, and pitch history, as well as Reynolds number (through two different model chord lengths) and the condition of the boundary layer at the leading edge of the airfoil (through application of surface roughness). It was found for free stream Mach numbers as low as 0.4 that a region of supersonic flow forms on the leading edge of the suction surface of the airfoil at moderate angles of attack. The shocks which form in this supersonic region induce boundary-layer separation and advance the dynamic stall process. Under such conditions a supercritical airfoil profile is called for to produce a flow field having a weaker leading-edge pressure gradient and no leading-edge shocks. An airfoil having an adaptive-geometry, or dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE), is under development as a unique active flow-control device. The DDLE, formed of carbon-fiber composite and fiberglass, can be flexed between a NACA 0012 profile and a supercritical profile in a controllable fashion while the airfoil is executing an angle-of-attack pitch-up maneuver. The dynamic stall data were recorded using point diffraction interferometry (PDI), a noninvasive measurement technique. A new high-speed cinematography system was developed for recording interferometric images. The system is capable of phase-locking with the pitching airfoil motion for real-time documentation of the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Computer-aided image analysis algorithms were developed for fast and accurate reduction of the images, improving interpretation of the results.

  6. Localisation of flow separation and transition over a pitching NACA0012 airfoil at transitional Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Daniel

    Previous research at RMC has cataloged the occurrence of limit cycle oscillations at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers for an elastically mounted aeroelastic airfoil. These oscillations were attributed to boundary layer separation and the formation of a laminar separation bubble. For this thesis, an instrumented and motor-driven oscillating airfoil rig was designed and fabricated for the purpose of investigating the boundary layer of a NACA-0012 airfoil. The oscillating airfoil was driven by a servo motor to mimic the observed aeroelastic pitching with a sinusoid of matched amplitude and frequency. Hot-wire anemometry was used to investigate the near wake of the new motor-driven airfoil and compare it with the aeroelastic experiment. A chord-wise array of hot-film sensors captured the boundary layer state during the airfoil pitching oscillation. A novel analysis technique is introduced; A sliding window (in time) cross-correlation of adjacent sensors was used to detect dynamic laminar separation. Wind tunnel tests were performed at static angles-of-attack, for quasi-static very low frequency sweeps to verify the technique, and for selected cases of oscillations obtained with the aeroelastic rig. The new detection method was verified against the existing static techniques of phase reversal signature detection and signal cross-correlation by comparing quasi-static and static results. A map of the laminar separation bubble was produced for fixed angles of attack as well as for the pitching airfoil. The presence of a laminar separation was linked to the occurrence and characteristics of the limit cycle oscillations. Keywords: laminar separation, NACA0012, hot-film, hot-wire, anemometry, transitional flow, aeroelasticity.

  7. METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

  8. Morphological characteristics and sand volumes of different coastal dune types in Essaouira Province, Atlantic Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-Blanco, Germán; Flor, Germán; Lharti, Saadia; Pando, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Altogether three coastal dune fields, one located north and two south of the city of Essaouira, Atlantic Morocco, have been investigated to establish the distribution and overall sand volumes of various dune types. The purpose of the study was to characterize and classify the aeolian landforms of the coastal dune belt, to estimate their sand volumes and to assess the effectiveness of coastal dune stabilization measures. The northern dune field is 9 km long and lined by a wide artificial foredune complex fixed by vegetation, fences and branches forming a rectangular grid. Active and ephemeral aklé dunes border the inner backshore, while some intrusive dunes have crossed the foredune belt and are migrating farther inland. The total sand volume of the northern dune belt amounts 13,910,255 m3. The central coastal sector comprises a much smaller dune field located just south of the city. It is only 1.2 km long and, with the exception of intrusive dunes, shows all other dune types. The overall sand volume of the central dune field amounts to about 172,463 m3. The southern dune field is characterized by a narrower foredune belt and overall lower dunes that, in addition, become progressively smaller towards the south. In this sector, embryonic dunes (coppice, shadow dunes), tongue-like and tabular dunes, and sand sheets intrude from the beach, the profile of which has a stepped appearance controlled by irregular outcrops of old aeolianite and beach rock. The total volume of the southern dune field amounts 1,446,389 m3. For the whole study area, i.e. for all three dune fields combined, a sand volume of about 15,529,389 m3 has been estimated. The sand of the dune fields is derived from coastal erosion and especially the Tensift River, which enters the sea at Souira Qedima some 70 km north of Essaouira. After entering the sea, the sand is transported southwards by littoral drift driven by the mainly north-westerly swell climate and the Trade Winds blowing from the NNE. This

  9. Debris flows on the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska: Implications for analogous processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Donald M.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.

    2014-02-01

    We observed niveo-aeolian deposits, denivation features, and small meltwater-induced debris flows that had formed at the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, northwestern interior Alaska in late March 2010. This high-latitude, cold-climate dune field is being studied as a planetary analog to improve our understanding of factors that may trigger debris flows on the lee slopes of martian aeolian dunes. Debris flows consisted of a sand and liquid water mixture that cascaded down the lee slopes of two barchanoid dunes on days when measured ground surface temperatures were below freezing. We hypothesize that relatively dark sand on snow caused local hot spots where solar radiation could be absorbed by the sand and conducted into the underlying snow, enabling meltwater to form and sand to be mobilized. This investigation provides insights into the interactions between niveo-aeolian deposition, slope aspect and insolation, thawing, and initiation of alluvial processes. These debris flows are morphologically similar to those associated with seasonal gullies or erosion tracks visible on the slopes of mid- to high-latitude dune fields in both martian hemispheres. Localized heating and thawing at scales too small for orbital sensors to identify may yield martian debris flows at current climate conditions.

  10. Sensitivity of growth characteristics of tidal sand ridges and long bed waves to formulations of bed shear stress, sand transport and tidal forcing: A numerical model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing; de Swart, Huib E.; Panadès, Carles

    2016-09-01

    Tidal sand ridges and long bed waves are large-scale bedforms that are observed on continental shelves. They differ in their wavelength and in their orientation with respect to the principal direction of tidal currents. Previous studies indicate that tidal sand ridges appear in areas where tidal currents are above 0.5 m s-1, while long bed waves occur in regions where the maximum tidal current velocity is slightly above the critical velocity for sand erosion and the current is elliptical. An idealized nonlinear numerical model was developed to improve the understanding of the initial formation of these bedforms. The model governs the feedbacks between tidally forced depth-averaged currents and the sandy bed on the outer shelf. The effects of different formulations of bed shear stress and sand transport, tidal ellipticity and different tidal constituents on the characteristics of these bedforms (growth rate, wavelength, orientation of the preferred bedforms) during their initial formation were examined systematically. The results show that the formulations for bed shear stress and slope-induced sand transport are not critical for the initial formation of these bedforms. For tidal sand ridges, under rectilinear tidal currents, increasing the critical bed shear stress for sand erosion decreases the growth rate and the wavelength of the preferred bedforms significantly, while the orientation angle slightly decreases. The dependence of the growth rate, wavelength and the orientation of the preferred bedforms on the tidal ellipticity is non-monotonic. A decrease in tidal frequency results in preferred bedforms with larger wavelength and smaller orientation angle, while their growth rate hardly changes. In the case of joint diurnal and semidiurnal tides, or spring-neap tides, the characteristics of the bedforms are determined by the dominant tidal constituent. For long bed waves, the number of anticyclonically/cyclonically oriented bedforms with respect to the principal

  11. Thermal Properties of oil sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, Y.; Lee, H.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Injection or Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are the effective methods for producing heavy oil or bitumen. In any thermal recovery methods, thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity) are closely related to the formation and expansion of steam chamber within a reservoir, which is key factors to control efficiency of thermal recovery. However, thermal properties of heavy oil or bitumen have not been well-studied despite their importance in thermal recovery methods. We measured thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity of 43 oil sand samples from Athabasca, Canada, using a transient thermal property measurement instrument. Thermal conductivity of 43 oil sand samples varies from 0.74 W/mK to 1.57 W/mK with the mean thermal conductivity of 1.09 W/mK. The mean thermal diffusivity is 5.7×10-7 m2/s with the minimum value of 4.2×10-7 m2/s and the maximum value of 8.0×10-7 m2/s. Volumetric heat capacity varies from 1.5×106 J/m3K to 2.11×106 J/m3K with the mean volumetric heat capacity of 1.91×106 J/m3K. In addition, physical and chemical properties (e.g., bitumen content, electric resistivity, porosity, gamma ray and so on) of oil sand samples have been measured by geophysical logging and in the laboratory. We are now proceeding to investigate the relationship between thermal properties and physical/chemical properties of oil sand.

  12. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  13. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...... as well as the flow pattern during discharge of the silo. During discharge a mixed flow pattern has been identified...

  14. Conventional and anti-erosion fluoride toothpastes: effect on enamel erosion and erosion-abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganss, C; Lussi, A; Grunau, O; Klimek, J; Schlueter, N

    2011-01-01

    New toothpastes with anti-erosion claims are marketed, but little is known about their effectiveness. This study investigates these products in comparison with various conventional NaF toothpastes and tin-containing products with respect to their erosion protection/abrasion prevention properties. In experiment 1, samples were demineralised (10 days, 6 × 2 min/day; citric acid, pH 2.4), exposed to toothpaste slurries (2 × 2 min/day) and intermittently stored in a mineral salt solution. In experiment 2, samples were additionally brushed for 15 s during the slurry immersion time. Study products were 8 conventional NaF toothpastes (1,400-1,490 ppm F), 4 formulations with anti-erosion claims (2 F toothpastes: NaF + KNO(3) and NaF + hydroxyapatite; and 2 F-free toothpastes: zinc-carbonate-hydroxyapatite, and chitosan) and 2 Sn-containing products (toothpaste: 3,436 ppm Sn, 1,450 ppm F as SnF(2)/NaF; gel: 970 ppm F, 3,030 ppm Sn as SnF(2)). A mouth rinse (500 ppm F as AmF/NaF, 800 ppm Sn as SnCl(2)) was the positive control. Tissue loss was quantified profilometrically. In experiment 1, most NaF toothpastes and 1 F-free formulation reduced tissue loss significantly (between 19 and 42%); the Sn-containing formulations were the most effective (toothpaste and gel 55 and 78% reduction, respectively). In experiment 2, only 4 NaF toothpastes revealed significant effects compared to the F-free control (reduction between 29 and 37%); the F-free special preparations and the Sn toothpaste had no significant effect. The Sn gel (reduction 75%) revealed the best result. Conventional NaF toothpastes reduced the erosive tissue loss, but had limited efficacy regarding the prevention of brushing abrasion. The special formulations were not superior, or were even less effective.

  15. 水蚀对风蚀影响的室内模拟试验%Effects of Water Erosion on Wind Erosion in Wind Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆印; 樊军; 张晓萍

    2012-01-01

    为了揭示黄土高原水蚀风蚀交错区风水复合侵蚀机制,利用室内风洞,在一定的风速(9.3m/s)、坡度(20°)下,人工模拟不同沟宽、沟深、沟密度对风蚀过程的影响。结果表明,在一定的水蚀沟宽度与密度范围内,风蚀量随着宽度与密度的增加而增加,并且两者与风蚀量都呈线性关系;侵蚀沟深度在4~8cm范围内,风蚀量随着沟深度增加而增加,当沟深大于8cm时,随着沟深度增加,风蚀量有所减少;水蚀沟发生风蚀的部位主要在沟壁和沟头,风沙流的磨蚀作用可能是主要作用力,水蚀沟形成会显著影响风蚀量。%Effect of water erosion on wind erosion was studied by wind tunnel under the different width,depth and density of rill under the condition of wind speed(9.3 m/s) and steep slope(20°) in order to reveal the mechanism of aeolian-fluvial interaction in the water-wind erosion crisscross region on the Loess Plateau.The results show that the sediment yields of wind erosion increased with the rill width and density during the certain range,and the sediment yields of wind erosion presented a positive relation with the rill width and density;in the 4~8 cm range,the sediment yields of wind erosion increased with the depth,while decreased when the depth was over 8 cm.Wall and foreside of rill were eroded easily by wind and the abrasive action of sand-driving wind may be the main force.The width,density and depth of rill were the key factors to influence the sediment yields of wind erosion,therefore,wind erosion was affected significantly by water erosion.

  16. Decomposition and humification of soil organic carbon after land use change on erosion prone slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, Volker; Fischer, Holger; Cadisch, Georg; Stahr, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon decline after land use change from forest to maize usually lead to soil degradation and elevated CO2 emissions. However, limited knowledge is available on the interactions between rates of SOC change and soil erosion and how SOC dynamics vary with soil depth and clay contents. The 13C isotope based CIDE approach (Carbon Input, Decomposition and Erosion) was developed to determine SOC dynamics on erosion prone slopes. The aims of the present study were: (1) to test the applicability of the CIDE approach to determine rates of decomposition and SOC input under particular considerations of concurrent erosion events on three soil types (Alisol, Luvisol, Vertisol), (2) to adapt the CIDE approach to deeper soil layers (10-20 and 20-30 cm) and (3) to determine the variation of decomposition and SOC input with soil depth and soil texture. SOC dynamics were determined for bulk soil and physically separated SOC fractions along three chronosequences after land use change from forest to maize (up to 21 years) in northwestern Vietnam. Consideration of the effects of soil erosion on SOC dynamics by the CIDE approach yielded a higher total SOC loss (6 to 32%), a lower decomposition (13 to 40%) and a lower SOC input (14 to 31%) relative to the values derived from a commonly applied 13C isotope based mass balance approach. Comparison of decomposition between depth layers revealed that tillage accelerated decomposition in the plough layer (0-10 cm), accounting for 3 to 34% of total decomposition. With increasing clay contents SOC input increased. In addition, decomposition increased with increasing clay contents, too, being attributed to decomposition of exposed labile SOC which was attached to clay particles in the sand sized stable aggregate fraction. This study suggests that in situ SOC dynamics on erosion prone slopes are commonly misrepresented by erosion unadjusted approaches.

  17. A durability test rig and methodology for erosion-resistant blade coatings in turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithead, Sean Gregory

    A durability test rig for erosion-resistant gas turbine engine compressor blade coatings was designed, completed and commissioned. Bare and coated 17-4PH steel V103-profile blades were rotated at up to 11500 rpm and impacted with Garnet sand for 5 hours at an average concentration of 2.51 gm3of air , at a blade leading edge Mach number of 0.50. The rig was determined to be an acceptable first stage axial compressor representation. Two types of 16 microm-thick coatings were tested: Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Chromium-Aluminum-Titanium Nitride (CrAlTiN), both applied using an Arc Physical Vapour Deposition technique at the National Research Council in Ottawa, Canada. A Leithead-Allan-Zhao (LAZ) score was created to compare the durability performance of uncoated and coated blades based on mass-loss and blade dimension changes. The bare blades' LAZ score was set as a benchmark of 1.00. The TiN-coated and CrAlTiN-coated blades obtained LAZ scores of 0.69 and 0.41, respectively. A lower score meant a more erosion-resistant coating. Major modes of blade wear included: trailing edge, leading edge and the rear suction surface. Trailing edge thickness was reduced, the leading edge became blunt, and the rear suction surface was scrubbed by overtip and recirculation zone vortices. It was found that the erosion effects of vortex flow were significant. Erosion damage due to reflected particles was not present due to the low blade solidity of 0.7. The rig is best suited for studying the performance of erosion-resistant coatings after they are proven effective in ASTM standardized testing. Keywords: erosion, compressor, coatings, turbomachinery, erosion rate, blade, experimental, gas turbine engine

  18. SOIL EROSION PROCESS RESEARCH AND ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT ON EROSION PREDICTION MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-hua HUANG; Fenli ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    This paper highlights past efforts in developing erosion process concepts that lead to the development of the current process-based erosion prediction model, i.e., WEPP. Recent progress includes the development of a multiple-box system that can simulate hillslope hydrologic conditions. Laboratory procedures enable the quantification of near-surface hydrologic effects, i.e.,artesian seepage vs. drainage, on the soil erosion process and sediment regime, flow hydraulics, and sediment transport and deposition processes. These recent findings improve soil erosion science and provide new erosion control strategies that may have additional environmental benefits relative to the traditional erosion control practices. The paper also discusses the potential impacts of the erosion process on erosion model development and future research directions of soil erosion process research and model development.

  19. Fluvial erosion and post-erosional processes on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Brown, R.H.; Stephan, K.; Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, L.A.; Sotin, C.; Le, Mouelic S.; Clark, R.N.; Soderblom, J.; Buratti, B.J.; Wagner, R.; McCord, T.B.; Rodriguez, S.; Baines, K.H.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Nicholson, P.D.; Griffith, C.A.; Langhans, M.; Lorenz, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Titan has been revealed by Cassini observations in the infrared and radar wavelength ranges as well as locally by the Huygens lander instruments. Sand seas, recently discovered lakes, distinct landscapes and dendritic erosion patterns indicate dynamic surface processes. This study focus on erosional and depositional features that can be used to constrain the amount of liquids involved in the erosional process as well as on the compositional characteristics of depositional areas. Fluvial erosion channels on Titan as identified at the Huygens landing site and in RADAR and Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations have been compared to analogous channel widths on Earth yielding average discharges of up to 1600 m3/s for short recurrence intervals that are sufficient to move centimeter-sized sediment and significantly higher discharges for long intervals. With respect to the associated drainage areas, this roughly translates to 1-150 cm/day runoff production rates with 10 years recurrence intervals and by assuming precipitation this implies 0.6-60 mm/h rainfall rates. Thus the observed surface erosion fits with the methane convective storm models as well as with the rates needed to transport sediment. During Cassini's T20 fly-by, the VIMS observed an extremely eroded area at 30?? W, 7?? S with resolutions of up to 500 m/pixel that extends over thousands of square kilometers. The spectral characteristics of this area change systematically, reflecting continuous compositional and/or particle size variations indicative of transported sediment settling out while flow capacities cease. To account for the estimated runoff production and widespread alluvial deposits of fine-grained material, release of area-dependent large fluid volumes are required. Only frequent storms with heavy rainfall or cryovolcanic induced melting can explain these erosional features. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Slotte, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Rosenlunds sandbankar är ett naturskyddsområde mellan Jönköping och Huskvarna som rasar med ungefär 30 cm per år. Platsen tillåts att årligen krympa men inte att användas. Det görs inga större ansatser för att dokumentera den för framtida generationer eller synliggöra den för nu levande generationer. I detta examensarbete undersöks ett naturligt fenomen som kommer att påverka civilisationer i tusentals år. Examensarbetet syftar i första hand till att återintroducera en bortglömd plats och bes...

  1. Pressure measurements on a pitching airfoil in a water channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Rand N.; Ramaprian, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of unsteady pressures over a symmetric NACA 0015 airfoil performing pitching maneuvers are reported. The tests were performed in an open-surface water channel specially constructed for this purpose. The design of the apparatus allowed the pressure measurements to be made to a very high degree of spatial and temporal resolution. Reynolds numbers in the range of 5.2 x 10(exp 4) to 2.2 x 10(exp 5) were studied. Although the results qualitatively agreed with earlier studies performed at similar Reynolds numbers, the magnitudes of pressure and aerodynamic forces measured were observed to be much larger than those measured in ealier pitchup studies. They were found, in fact, to be closer to those obtained in some recent high-Reynolds-number experiments. This interesting behavior, which was suspected to be caused by the relatively high freestream turbulence level in the water channel, was explored in some detail. In addition, several issues like the quasisteady and dynamic effects of the pitching process are discussed. The experimental data are all archived and are available for use as a database.

  2. Numerical simulations of the NREL S826 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagmo, KF; Bartl, J.; Sætran, L.

    2016-09-01

    2D and 3D steady state simulations were done using the commercial CFD package Star-CCM+ with three different RANS turbulence models. Lift and drag coefficients were simulated at different angles of attack for the NREL S826 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 100 000, and compared to experimental data obtained at NTNU and at DTU. The Spalart-Allmaras and the Realizable k-epsilon turbulence models reproduced experimental results for lift well in the 2D simulations. The 3D simulations with the Realizable two-layer k-epsilon model predicted essentially the same lift coefficients as the 2D Spalart-Allmaras simulations. A comparison between 2D and 3D simulations with the Realizable k-epsilon model showed a significantly lower prediction in drag by the 2D simulations. From the conducted 3D simulations surface pressure predictions along the wing span were presented, along with volumetric renderings of vorticity. Both showed a high degree of span wise flow variation when going into the stall region, and predicted a flow field resembling that of stall cells for angles of attack above peak lift.

  3. On the acoustics of a circulation control airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, R.; Nickels, A.; Ukeiley, L.; Cattafesta, L. N.

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional elliptical circulation control airfoil model is studied in the Florida State Aeroacoustic Tunnel. Far-field acoustics are obtained via a 55 microphone phased array. Single microphone spectra are also obtained, and it is shown that background noise is significant. In order to circumvent this problem, beamforming is employed. The primary sources of background noise are from the tunnel collector and jet/sidewall interaction. The deconvolution approach to mapping acoustic sources (DAMAS) is employed to remove the effects of the array point spread function. Spectra are acquired by integrating the DAMAS result over the source region. The resulting DAMAS spectral levels are significantly below single microphone levels. Although the DAMAS levels are reduced from those of a single microphone or delay and sum beamforming (DAS), they are still above those of a NACA 0012, estimated using NAFNoise, at the same geometric and free-stream conditions. A scaling analysis is performed on the processed array data. With a constant free-stream velocity and a varying jet velocity the data scale as jet Mach number to the 6th power. If the momentum coefficient is held constant and the free-stream velocity is varied the data scale as free-stream Mach number to the 7th power.

  4. Nonlinear aeroelastic analysis of airfoils: bifurcation and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. H. K.; Price, S. J.; Wong, Y. S.

    1999-04-01

    Different types of structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities commonly encountered in aeronautical engineering are discussed. The equations of motion of a two-dimensional airfoil oscillating in pitch and plunge are derived for a structural nonlinearity using subsonic aerodynamics theory. Three classical nonlinearities, namely, cubic, freeplay and hysteresis are investigated in some detail. The governing equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical simulations and analytical investigation of the system stability. The onset of Hopf-bifurcation, and amplitudes and frequencies of limit cycle oscillations are investigated, with examples given for a cubic hardening spring. For various geometries of the freeplay, bifurcations and chaos are discussed via the phase plane, Poincaré maps, and Lyapunov spectrum. The route to chaos is investigated from bifurcation diagrams, and for the freeplay nonlinearity it is shown that frequency doubling is the most commonly observed route. Examples of aerodynamic nonlinearities arising from transonic flow and dynamic stall are discussed, and special attention is paid to numerical simulation results for dynamic stall using a time-synthesized method for the unsteady aerodynamics. The assumption of uniform flow is usually not met in practice since perturbations in velocities are encountered in flight. Longitudinal atmospheric turbulence is introduced to show its effect on both the flutter boundary and the onset of Hopf-bifurcation for a cubic restoring force.

  5. Numerical simulation of the interaction of a vortex with stationary airfoil in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Mccroskey, W. J.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    A perturbation form of an implicit conservative, noniterative numerical algorithm for the two-dimensional thin layer Navier-Stokes and Euler equations is used to compute the interaction flow-field of a vortex with stationary airfoil. A Lamb-like analytical vortex having a finite core is chosen to interact with a thick (NACA 0012) and a thin (NACA 64A006) airfoil independently in transonic flow. Two different configurations of vortex interaction are studied, viz., (1) when the vortex is fixed at one location in the flowfield, and (2) when the vortex is convecting past the airfoil at freestream velocity. Parallel computations of this interacting flowfield are also done using a version of the Transonic Small Disturbance Code (ATRAN2). A special treatment of the leading edge region for thin airfoils is included in this code. With this, the three methods gave qualitatively similar results for the weaker interactions considered in this study. However, the strongest interactions considered proved to be beyond the capabilities of the small disturbance code. The results also show a far greater influence of the vortex on the airfoil flowfield when the vortex is stationary than when it is convecting with the flow.

  6. Numerical analysis of active chordwise flexibility on the performance of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, W. B.; Lim, K. B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of active chordwise flexing on the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of three types of airfoils. The factors studied are the flexing center location, standard two-sided flexing as well as a type of single-sided flexing. The airfoils are simulated to flap with four configurations, and the effects of flexing under these configurations are investigated. Results show that flexing is not necessarily beneficial for the performance of the airfoils. However, with the correct parameters, efficiency is as high as 0.76 by placing the flexing centre at the trailing edge. The average thrust coefficient is more than twice as high, from 1.63 to 3.57 with flapping and flexing under the right conditions. Moreover, the single-sided flexing also gives an average lift coefficient as high as 4.61 for the S1020 airfoil. The shape of the airfoil does alter the effect of flexing too. Deviating the flexing phase angle away from 90° does not give a significant improvement to the airfoil’s performance. These results greatly enhance the design of a better performing ornithopter wing.

  7. On the unsteady motion and stability of a heaving airfoil in ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Molina; Xin Zhang; David Angland

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the fluid mechanics and force generation capabilities of an inverted heaving airfoil placed close to a moving ground using a URANS solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. By varying the mean ground clearance and motion frequency of the airfoil, it was possible to construct a frequency-height diagram of the various forces acting on the airfoil. The ground was found to enhance the downforce and reduce the drag with respect to freestream. The unsteady motion induces hysteresis in the forces' behaviour. At moderate ground clearance, the hysteresis increases with frequency and the airfoil loses energy to the flow, resulting in a stabilizing motion. By analogy with a pitching motion, the airfoil stalls in close proximity to the ground. At low frequencies, the motion is unstable and could lead to stall flutter. A stall flutter analysis was undertaken. At higher frequencies, inviscid effects overcome the large separation and the motion becomes stable. Forced trailing edge vortex shedding appears at high frequencies. The shedding mechanism seems to be independent of ground proximity.However, the wake is altered at low heights as a result of an interaction between the vortices and the ground.

  8. Lift on a Steady Airfoil in Low Reynolds Number Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patrick; Visbal, Miguel; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    Current understanding of airfoil aerodynamics is primarily based on a uniform freestream velocity approaching the airfoil, without consideration for possible presence of shear in the approach flow. Inviscid theory by Tsien (1943) shows that a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack experiences positive lift, i.e. a shift in the zero-lift angle of attack, in the presence of positive mean shear in the approach flow. In the current work, 2D computations are conducted on a steady NACA 0012 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of Re = 12,000, at zero angle of attack. A uniform shear profile (i.e. a linear velocity variation) is used for the approach flow by modifying the FDL3DI Navier-Stokes solver (Visbal and Gaitonde, 1999). Interestingly, opposite to the inviscid prediction of Tsien (1943), the results for the airfoil at zero angle of attack show that the average lift is negative in the shear flow. The magnitude of this lift grows as the shear rate increases. Additional results are presented regarding the physics underlying the shear effect on lift. A companion experimental study is also given in a separate presentation. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  9. Tests and numerical simulation of aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils for general aviation applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lizhen; Wang Xiaoming; Miguel A.González Hernández; Wang Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper was to validate the effects of airfoil thickness ratio on the characteristics of a family of airfoils.Re-search was carried out in different ways.First,tests were conducted in the wind tunnel.And numerical simulation was performed on the basis of tests.Results from calculation were consistent with tests,indicating that numerical method could help evaluate characteristics of airfoils.Then the results were confirmed by compared with empirical data.The study also showed that the determining factor of lift is not only the thickness ratio,but the angle of attack,the relative camber and the camber line.The thickness ratio appears to have little effect on lift coefficient at zero angle of attack,since the angle of zero llft is largely determined by the airfoil camber.According to the research,numerical simulation can be used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in different environment such as in the dusty or hu-mid air.

  10. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Mirzaei; Mohammad-Mahdi Nazemi; Mojtaba Fouladi; Alireza Doostmahmoudi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Exper-iments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 ? 106 over angles of attack from ? 8? to 20?, and then results are compared. Gener-ally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10? and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50%which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4? and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2? and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  11. Transitory Control of the Aerodynamic Loads on an Airfoil in Dynamic Pitch and Plunge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuehan; Crittenden, Thomas; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Transitory control and regulation of trapped vorticity concentrations are exploited in wind tunnel experiments for control of the aerodynamic loads on an airfoil moving in time-periodic 2-DOF (pitch and plunge) beyond the dynamic stall margin. Actuation is effected using a spanwise array of integrated miniature chemical (combustion based) high-impulse actuators that are triggered intermittently relative to the airfoil's motion. Each actuation pulse has sufficient control authority to alter the global aerodynamic performance throughout the motion cycle on a characteristic time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's convective time scale. The effects of the actuation on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil are assessed using time-dependent measurements of the lift force and pitching moment coupled with time-resolved particle image velocimetry that is acquired phased-locked to the motion of the airfoil. It is shown that the aerodynamic loads can be significantly altered using actuation programs based on multiple actuation pulses during the time-periodic pitch/plunge cycle. Superposition of such actuation programs leads to enhancement of cycle lift and pitch stability, and reduced cycle hysteresis and peak pitching moment. Supported by GT-VLRCOE.

  12. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis and plunging (vertical motion. The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  13. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  14. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intesaaf Ashraf; Amit Agrawal; Majid Hassan Khan; Sooraj P; Atul Srivastava; Atul Sharma

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) based investigation of wake structure of a pitching airfoil. PIV measurements have been carried out for NACA0015 airfoil at Re = 2900 with reduced frequency range of 1.82–10.92 and pitching angle of 5°. Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán shedding and deflected vortex shedding) are observed over this parameter range. The vorticity decreases substantially over a distance of two chord-lengths. The velocity profile indicates a jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil. It is shown that the jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil is however not a sufficient condition for the generation of thrust. The vortex strength is found to be invariant of the pitching frequency. Certain differences from the reported results are noted, which may be because of difference in the airfoil shape. These results can help improve understanding of the flow behavior as the low Reynolds number range is not well studied.

  15. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein Pouryoussefi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Experiments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 × 106 over angles of attack from −8° to 20°, and then results are compared. Generally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10° and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50% which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4° and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2° and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  16. Application of a Beamforming Technique to the Measurement of Airfoil Leading Edge Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the use of microphone array technology and beamforming algorithms for the measurement and analysis of noise generated by the interaction of a turbulent flow with the leading edge of an airfoil. Experiments were performed using a setup in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel, where the turbulent inflow is provided by different grids. In order to exactly localize the aeroacoustic noise sources and, moreover, to separate airfoil leading edge noise from grid-generated noise, the selected deconvolution beamforming algorithm is extended to be used on a fully three-dimensional source region. The result of this extended beamforming are three-dimensional mappings of noise source locations. Besides acoustic measurements, the investigation of airfoil leading edge noise requires the measurement of parameters describing the incident turbulence, such as the intensity and a characteristic length scale or time scale. The method used for the determination of these parameters in the present study is explained in detail. To demonstrate the applicability of the extended beamforming algorithm and the experimental setup as a whole, the noise generated at the leading edge of airfoils made of porous materials was measured and compared to that generated at the leading edge of a common nonporous airfoil.

  17. Short-lived increase in erosion during the African Humid Period: Evidence from the northern Kenya Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Yannick; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Torres Acosta, Verónica; Melnick, Daniel; Guillemoteau, Julien; Willenbring, Jane; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2017-02-01

    The African Humid Period (AHP) between ∼15 and 5.5 cal. kyr BP caused major environmental change in East Africa, including filling of the Suguta Valley in the northern Kenya Rift with an extensive (∼2150 km2), deep (∼300 m) lake. Interfingering fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Baragoi paleo-delta provide insights into the lake-level history and how erosion rates changed during this time, as revealed by delta-volume estimates and the concentration of cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sand. Erosion rates derived from delta-volume estimates range from 0.019 to 0.03 mm yr-1. 10Be-derived paleo-erosion rates at ∼11.8 cal. kyr BP ranged from 0.035 to 0.086 mm yr-1, and were 2.7 to 6.6 times faster than at present. In contrast, at ∼8.7 cal. kyr BP, erosion rates were only 1.8 times faster than at present. Because 10Be-derived erosion rates integrate over several millennia, we modeled the erosion-rate history that best explains the 10Be data using established non-linear equations that describe in situ cosmogenic isotope production and decay. Two models with different temporal constraints (15-6.7 and 12-6.7 kyr) suggest erosion rates that were ∼25 to ∼300 times higher than the initial erosion rate (pre-delta formation). That pulse of high erosion rates was short (∼4 kyr or less) and must have been followed by a rapid decrease in rates while climate remained humid to reach the modern 10Be-based erosion rate of ∼0.013 mm yr-1. Our simulations also flag the two highest 10Be-derived erosion rates at ∼11.8 kyr BP related to non-uniform catchment erosion. These changes in erosion rates and processes during the AHP may reflect a strong increase in precipitation, runoff, and erosivity at the arid-to-humid transition either at ∼15 or ∼12 cal. kyr BP, before the landscape stabilized again, possibly due to increased soil production and denser vegetation.

  18. Sand deposit-detecting method and its application in model test of sand flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎伟; 房营光; 莫海鸿; 谷任国; 陈俊生

    2013-01-01

    Against the background of the sand-flow foundation treatment engineering of Guangzhou Zhoutouzui variable cross-section immersed tunnel, a kind of sand deposit-detecting method was devised on the basis of full-scale model test of sand-flow method. The real-time data of sand-deposit height and radius were obtained by the self-developed sand-deposit detectors. The test results show that the detecting method is simple and has high precision. In the use of sand-flow method, the sand-carrying capability of fluid is limited, and sand particles are all transported to the sand-deposit periphery through crater, gap and chutes after the sand deposit formed. The diffusion range of the particles outside the sand-deposit does not exceed 2.0 m. Severe sorting of sand particles is not observed because of the unique oblique-layered depositing process. The temporal and spatial distributions of gap and chutes directly affect the sand-deposit expansion, and the expansion trend of the average sand-deposit radius accords with quadratic time-history curve.

  19. Ion-plasma erosion-resistant nanocoatings based on metal carbides and nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Aleksandrov, D. A.; Gorlov, D. S.

    2010-09-01

    The erosion, corrosion, and heat resistance of alloy/ion-plasma nanolayer coating compositions based on TiC and CrC carbides and TiN, CrN, ZrN, and AlN nitrides are studied. The effect of the nanolayer thickness, composition, and structure of the coatings based on the metal nitrides and carbides on the relative erosion resistance of alloy/coating compositions in a gas-abrasive quartz sand flux is studied at a sand grain size of 300-350 μm, abrasive supply rate of 200 g/min, and an angle of flux incidence of 20° (tangential flow) and 70° (near-head-on attack flow). It is shown that high erosion resistance is characteristic of 15-22 μm thick coatings that are produced by assisted deposition and consist of alternating TiN (70 nm) and CrN (70 nm) layers on a VT1-0 titanium alloy or TiC (70 nm) and CrC (70 nm) layers on an EP866 compressor steel.

  20. Sand Mining Impacts on Long-Term Dune Erosion in Southern Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    estimated to have condominium and hotel in Monterey, as well as 100 m extended 13 km seaward of the present day shoreline of rock rubble and a 200 in...OrthoBase software employed in the overlapping pair, but whose coordinates are unknown. stereo-photogrammetry calculated total horizontal rms The GCPs

  1. Illustrative Experiments of the Erosion of Sand and Accompanying Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Winds in desert regions form the well-known barchan dunes. Frequently, human settlements are threatened by the migration of these dunes. But why do these dunes move? And how is dune migration in deserts connected to scour development in the vicinity of pylons in river beds or to snow cornices in alpine regions? This paper introduces the topic of…

  2. Influence of sand movement in the Sahara on the erosion of pipeline network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azari Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sandblasting on a surface notched of pipeline with API 5L X52 steel is studied. The purpose of this study is to determine the evolution of static characteristics and lifetime of material in both directions of pipeline (Longitudinal (L and Transverse (T. Specimens were taken from a pipeline and the material damage was made by projecting corundum particles (aluminium oxide. In order to justify the evolution of mechanical properties of material, residual stress analysis was realized by the technique of X-ray diffraction. The observation of damage mode and distribution of residual stress under the notch tip show that the material hardening, the notch radius and the compressive stress, play together an important role in stabilizing the material mechanical properties.

  3. Summary of the Blind Test Campaign to predict the High Reynolds number performance of DU00-W-210 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Özlem Ceyhan; Pires, Oscar; Munduate, Xabier;

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a blind test campaign organized in the AVATAR project to predict the high Reynolds number performance of a wind turbine airfoil for wind turbine applications. The DU00-W-210 airfoil was tested in the DNW-HDG pressurized wind tunnel in order to investigate the ...

  4. Lagrangian and Eulerian pressure field evaluation of rod-airfoil flow from time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Moore, P.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the rod-airfoil air flow by time-resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-TOMO PIV) in thin-light volume configuration. Experiments are performed at the region close to the leading edge of a NACA0012 airfoil embedded in the von Karman wake of a cylindrical rod. The

  5. Wind tunnel test on airfoil Riso-B1-18 with an Active Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Andersen, Peter Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the wind turbine airfoil Risø-B1-18 equipped with an Active Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF) was carried out. The ATEF was 9% of the total chord, made of piezo electric actuators attached to the trailing edge of a non-deformable airfoil and actuated using an (electric) amplifier...

  6. Provenance control on chemical indices of weathering (Taiwan river sands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Geochemical parameters obtained from the analysis of sediments and sedimentary rocks are widely used to infer weathering and paleo-weathering conditions in source areas. Chemical indices of weathering, however, may not reflect weathering only, or even principally. The concentration of chemical elements in terrigenous sediments is constrained by the original mineralogy of source rocks, and is thus provenance-dependent. Moreover, the mineralogy and consequently the geochemistry of sediments may undergo substantial modifications by diverse physical processes during transport and deposition, including recycling and hydraulic sorting by size, density or shape, and/or by chemical dissolution and precipitation during diagenesis. Around the island of Taiwan, temperature and rainfall are consistently high and relatively homogeneous, and no significant correlation is observed between geochemical and climatic parameters. Physical erosion, fostered by landslides induced by frequent earthquakes and typhoons, prevails because of high relief and extreme rates of tectonic uplift. In such a dynamic orogenic setting, all chemical indices of weathering are controlled principally by the geology of source terranes. Sedimentaclastic and metasedimentaclastic sands carried by western Taiwan rivers draining the pro-wedge display the strongest depletion in Na, Ca, Mg and Sr relative to average upper continental crust, and no depletion or even enrichment in K, Rb and Ba. Low WIP indices reflect erosion of phyllosilicate-dominated rocks in the Slate Belt and extensive recycling of clastic rocks exposed in the Western Foothills. Instead, metamorphiclastic sands carried by eastern Taiwan rivers draining the retro-wedge show no depletion or even enrichment in Mg and Ca, and low CIA and PIA, reflecting contributions from the Tailuko Belt and Coastal Range. Volcaniclastic sands have the same CIA values of their andesitic source rocks (47 ± 1 versus 47 ± 7), indicating that weathering is

  7. Laboratory experiments for defining scaling relations between rock material properties and rock resistance to erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, L. S.; Beyeler, J. D.; Collins, G. C.; Farrow, J. W.; Hsu, L.; Litwin, K. L.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Rock resistance to erosion is a key variable that limits rates of morphologic change and mass flux in landscapes. However, we have limited knowledge of how measurable material properties influence rock resistance to specific erosion processes. Rock 'erodibility' is commonly a free parameter in surface process models, where users assign or solve for numerical values that lack meaning outside of the model. Moreover, erodibility parameters often lump material resistance to erosion together with aspects of the forces driving erosion that are not explicitly represented in the model. Laboratory experiments in which rock types are varied, while erosive forces are held constant, can be used to develop scaling relationships between rock properties and erosion resistance for individual detachment mechanisms. With knowledge of why erosion rates vary between rock types for constant erosive forces, laboratory and field experiments that vary erosive intensity can be used to quantify the absolute susceptibility to erosion in physically explicit terms. Here we synthesize data collected over the past decade from a suite of laboratory investigations of rock resistance to wear by sediment particle impacts, and wear of sediment particles themselves, in experiments replicating fluvial and granular flow conditions. Materials tested included: field-sampled bedrock and sediment covering the widest feasible range of apparent durability and lithologic type; synthetic sandstones made from mixtures of sand and Portland cement; and water ice, both pure and containing solid impurities, tested over a wide range of temperatures. Material properties measured included: dry-bulk and saturated density, porosity, tensile strength, fracture toughness, elastic moduli, mineralogy, cement type, and the grain size of mineral crystals and cemented clasts. Erosion rates were measured by mass or volume loss divided by run time, in bedrock abrasion mills, barrel tumblers, and a large rotating drum. We find

  8. Validating the Kinematic Wave Approach for Rapid Soil Erosion Assessment and Improved BMP Site Selection to Enhance Training Land Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    For example, landcover spans the range from hot desert to tropical rainforest, soils from lava flows to sand, and landforms from mountains to...rough surfaces. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 23(12):1087-1099 Anderson, J., E. Hardy, J Roach, and R. Witmer. 1976. A land use and land...Processes and Landforms 12: 47–56. Validating the Kinematic Wave Approach for Rapid Soil Erosion Assessment and Improved BMP Site Selection to

  9. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge*

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Williams; Giesen,Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refract...

  10. Aerodynamic Design of Airfoils Based on Variable-Domain Variational Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈池; 刘高联

    2005-01-01

    Designing airfoils according to given pressure (or velocity) distribution is one kind of free boundary problems. Free boundary condition can be coupled with the flow governing equations by variable-domain variational calculus, which makes it possible to calculate simultaneously the flow field and the free boundary. An accurate deduction of the variable-domain variational principles is taken herein to design airfoils in compressible and incompressible flows. Furthermore, two grid types (H and O) are used in the calculation with better results for the O-type grid. It is shown that convergence is accelerated and good results can be obtained even if the initial guessed airfoil shape is a triangle, demonstrating the strong adaptability of this method.

  11. Status of advanced airfoil tests in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladson, C. L.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A joint NASA/U.S. industry program to test advanced technology airfoils in the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Tunnel (TCT) was formulated under the Langley ACEE Project Office. The objectives include providing U.S. industry an opportunity to compare their most advanced airfoils to the latest NASA designs by means of high Reynolds number tests in the same facility. At the same time, industry would again experience in the design and construction of cryogenic test techniques. The status and details of the test program are presented. Typical aerodynamic results obtained, to date, are presented at chord Reynolds number up to 45 x 10(6) and are compared to results from other facilities and theory. Details of a joint agreement between NASA and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsantalt fur Luft- and Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR) for tests of two airfoils are also included. Results of these tests will be made available as soon as practical.

  12. Wind Tunnel Tests of Wind Turbine Airfoils at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, E.; Gorostidi, A.; Jacobs, M.; Timmer, W. A.; Munduate, X.; Pires, O.

    2014-06-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been performed to measure the two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of two different airfoil families at high Reynolds numbers (from 3 to 12 millions) in the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. Also, tests at a Reynolds number of 3 millions have been performed in the Low-Speed Low- Turbulence Wind Tunnel of Delft University, The Netherlands. The airfoils tested belong to two wind turbine dedicated families: the TU-Delft DU family and the ACCIONA Windpower AWA family that was designed in collaboration with CENER. Reynolds number effects on airfoil performance have been obtained in the range of 3 to 12 millions. The availability of data from two different wind tunnels has brought the opportunity to cross compare the results from the two facilities.

  13. Compressible dynamic stall vorticity flux control using a dynamic camber airfoil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Chandrasekhara

    2007-02-01

    This study reports control of compressible dynamic stall through management of its unsteady vorticity using a variable droop leading edge (VDLE) airfoil. Through dynamic adaptation of the airfoil edge incidence, the formation of a dynamic stall vortex was virtually eliminated for Mach numbers of up to 0·4. Consequently, the leading edge vorticity flux was redistributed enabling retention of the dynamic lift. Of even greater importance was the fact that the drag and pitching moment coefficients were reduced by nearly 50%. The camber variations introduced when the leading edge was drooped are explained to be the source of this benefit. Analysis of the peak vorticity flux levels allowed the determination of minimum necessary airfoil adaptation schedule.

  14. Application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced supercritical airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    An application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced airfoils for transonic aircraft showed that low-drag sections can be developed for a given design Mach number without an accompanying drag increase at lower Mach numbers. This is achieved by imposing a constraint on the drag coefficient at an off-design Mach number while minimizing the drag coefficient at the design Mach number. This multiple design-point numerical optimization has been implemented with the use of airfoil shape functions which permit a wide range of attainable profiles during the optimization process. Analytical data for the starting airfoil shape, a single design-point optimized shape, and a double design-point optimized shape are presented. Experimental data obtained in the NASA Ames two-by two-foot wind tunnel are also presented and discussed.

  15. Modeling and computation of flow in a passage with 360 deg turning and multiple airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, W.; Vu, T. C.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the three-dimensional flows in a spiral casing of a hydraulic turbine, containing a passage of 360-deg turning and multiple elements of airfoils (the so-called distributor), is made. The physical model is based on a novel two-level approach, comprising of (1) a global model that adequately accounts for the geometry of the spiral casing but smears out the details of the distributor and represents the multiple airfoils by a porous medium treatment; and (2) a local model that performs detailed analysis of flow in the distributor region. The global analysis supplies the inlet flow condition for the individual cascade of distributor airfoils, while the distributor analysis yields the information needed for modeling the characteristics of the porous medium. Comparisons of pressure and velocity profiles between measurement and prediction have been made to assess the validity of the present approach. Flow characteristics in the spiral casing are also discussed.

  16. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  17. A SIMPLIFIED THEORY FOR UNSTEADY AERODYNAMIC FORCES ACTING ON AN AIRFOIL FLYING ABOVE SEA-WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Qi-hu; WU De-ming; ZHANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    A simplified theoretical method based on the quasi-steady wing theory was proposed to study the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil flying in non-uniform flow. Comparison between the theoretical results and the numerical results based on nonlinear theory was made. It shows that the simplified theory is a good approximation for the investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil flying above sea-waves. From on the simplified theory it is also found that an airfoil can get thrust from a wave-disturbed airflow and thus the total drag is reduced. And the relationship among the thrust, the flying altitude, the flying speed and the wave parameters was worked out and discussed.

  18. Probabilistic Design of Hollow Airfoil Composite Structure by Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sachin M. Shinde

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study represents simulation of Airfoil composite beam by using Monte Carlo method. A three dimensional static analysis of large displacement type has been carried out. Finite element analysis of NACA0012 airfoil composite structure has been carried out and uncertainty in bending stress is analyzed. Bending stress was objective function. Chord length , beam length ,elastic modulus in XY,YZ,XZ and shear modulus of epoxy graphite in XY,YZ,XZ, ply angle and ply thickness of airfoil section, force are varied within effective range and their effect on bending stress has been analyzed. In order to validate the results, one loop of simulation is benchmarked from results in literature. Ultimately, best set of probabilistic design variable is proposed to reduce bending stress under static loading condition.

  19. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  20. Creep Behavior of Frozen Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    temperature and stress range. There was a 2strong stress dependance to S (r =0.95) for saturated Manchester Fine Sand which does not agree with RPT. The...Curves at High Stress 161 Ratio D/Du = 0.505 for Frozen HF’S at w=10% IV-20 Minimum Strain Rate Dependance on Stress 162 Ratio for Frozen MFS IV-21 Minimum...Strain Rate Dependance on Relative 163 Density for Frozen MFS IV-22 Temperature Stage Test on Frozen Saturated 164 MFS under a Load of D=9.24MPa Fig

  1. Taku Glacier: Proglacial Deformation and Subglacial Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriger, E. M.; Motyka, R. J.; Truffer, M.; Bucki, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    Taku Glacier has advanced about 7~km since 1890 and is continuing its advance today. Located in southeastern Alaska, this glacier flows from the Juneau Ice Field down to sea level. In the last several decades the glacier has bulldozed a berm of marine and fluvial sediments from the fjord bottom; this berm now separates the terminus from tidewater. The force of the advancing glacier is causing large-scale deformation within these sediments. In 2001, a series of thrust scarps began to form in front of a 200~m section of the terminus. These scarps were active for several months and produced a series of bulges that grew to be several meters in height above the surrounding sediments. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was used to image the internal structure of these bulges. A trench dug into one of the proglacial ridges revealed that a >2~m clay/sand layer might have played an important role as a thrust zone during deformation. This layer could also be identified in the GPR returns. Beside these scarp-formed bulges there are numerous indicators of the continued advance. Push moraines along the terminus range in height from 1~m to a towering 10~m. In some areas the advancing ice has dug into the sediments and has lifted the vegetation from below. We also observed up to 1~m thick debris freeze-on layers that, when exposed at the terminus, melt and contribute to the development of some moraines. In addition to these observations we performed a series of radio echo-soundings over a grid that extends about 5~km upglacier. These data are compared with depth measurements made in 1989. Since then the glacier has advanced about 180~m. Within 1~km of the present terminus the glacier has deepened its bed by about 15~m, which indicates an erosion rate of about 1~my-1 in this area. This rate agrees with the one observed over the past 100~years. Entrenchment plays an important role in the glacier's dynamics and needs to be taken into account when measuring volume changes.

  2. Liquefaction of Sand under Low Confining Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shaoli; Rolf Sandven; Lars Grande

    2003-01-01

    Undrained behaviour of sand under low cell pressure was studied in static and cyclic triaxial tests. It was found that very loose sand liquefies under static loading with the relative density being a key parameter for the undrained behaviour of sand. In cyclic triaxial tests, pore water pressures built up during the cyclic loading and exceeded the confining cell pressure. This process was accompanied by a large sudden increase in axial deformation. The necessary number of cycles to obtain liquefaction was related to the confining cell pressure, the amplitude of cyclic loading and the relative density of sand.In addition, the patterns of pore water pressure response are different from those of sand samples with different relative densities. The test results are very useful for expounding scour mechanism around coastal structures since they relate to the low stress behaviour of the sand.

  3. Erosion behavior and mechanism of boronised steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立; 凌国平; 刘涛; 郦剑

    2002-01-01

    Boronising of steels is a hardening process to get high surface hardness. The erosion resistance of boronised steels was researched with the use of four kinds of erodent, i.e. glass, alumina, quartz and silicon carbide. The erosion rate increases rapidly with erodent hardness and severe erosion occurs with high impacting angle range of hard particles. SEM analysis indicated that chipping is caused by repetitive impacting of glass and quartz, whereas by alumina and silicon carbide impacting, chipping, and that plastic flow take place simultaneously and the erosion rate reaches the peak value when the impacting angle is above 60°.

  4. Erosion behavior and mechanism of boronised steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立; 凌国平; 刘涛; 郦剑

    2002-01-01

    Boronising of steels is a hardening process to get high surfaoe hardness. The erosion resis-tance of boronised steels was researched with the use of four kinds of erodent, i.e. glass, alumina,quartz and silicon carbide. The erosion rate increases rapidly with erodent hardness and severe erosion occurs with high impacting angle range of hard particles. SEM analysis indicated that chipping is caused by repetitive impacting of glass and quartz, whereas b.y alumina and silicon carbide impacting, chipping,and that plastic flow .take place simultaneously and the erosion rate reaches the peak value when the impacting angle is above 60°.

  5. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  6. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Williams; Giesen, Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refractory. Knowledge of the treatment options for erosive lichen planus is insufficient. Further research is required to clarify their effectiveness, ideally adopting an evidence-based methodology.

  7. INFLUENCES OF SLOPE GRADIENT ON SOIL EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青泉; 陈力; 李家春

    2001-01-01

    The main factors influencing soil erosion include the net rain excess, the water depth, the velocity, the shear stress of overland flows , and the erosion-resisting capacity of soil. The laws of these factors varying with the slope gradient were investigated by using the kinematic wave theory. Furthermore, the critical slope gradient of erosion was driven. The analysis shows that the critical slope gradient of soil erosion is dependent on grain size , soil bulk density , surface roughness, runoff length, net rain excess, and the friction coefficient of soil, etc. The critical slope gradient has been estimated theoretically with its range between 41. 5 °~ 50°.

  8. Parameter study of simplified dragonfly airfoil geometry at Reynolds number of 6000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-10-21

    Aerodynamic study of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil in gliding flight at Reynolds numbers below 10,000 is motivated by both pure scientific interest and technological applications. At these Reynolds numbers, the natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development of Micro UAV's and more. Insect wings are typically characterized by corrugated airfoils. The present study follows a fundamental flow physics study (Levy and Seifert, 2009), that revealed the importance of flow separation from the first corrugation, the roll-up of the separated shear layer to discrete vortices and their role in promoting flow reattachment to the aft arc, as the leading mechanism enabling high-lift, low drag performance of the Dragonfly gliding flight. This paper describes the effect of systematic airfoil geometry variations on the aerodynamic properties of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil at Reynolds number of 6000. The parameter study includes a detailed analysis of small variations of the nominal geometry, such as corrugation placement or height, rear arc and trailing edge shape. Numerical simulations using the 2D laminar Navier-Stokes equations revealed that the flow accelerating over the first corrugation slope is followed by an unsteady pressure recovery, combined with vortex shedding. The latter allows the reattachment of the flow over the rear arc. Also, the drag values are directly linked to the vortices' magnitude. This parametric study shows that geometric variations which reduce the vortices' amplitude, as reduction of the rear cavity depth or the reduction of the rear arc and trailing edge curvature, will reduce the drag values. Other changes will extend the flow reattachment over the rear arc for a larger mean lift coefficients range; such as the negative deflection of the forward flat plate. These changes consequently reduce the drag values at higher mean lift coefficients. The detailed geometry study enabled the definition of a corrugated airfoil

  9. Computational Analysis of the 2415-3S Airfoil Aerodynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Velázquez-Araque

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the numerical simulation of the two-dimensional, incompressible, steady air flow past an airfoil for a solar powered unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV with internal propulsion system. This airfoil results from a NACA 2415 four digits family base airfoil modification [7] and has a propulsive outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. The analysis involved the airfoil's aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficient curves as a function of the angle of attack (AOA for the condition where the engine of the UAV is turned off called the gliding condition and also for the blowing propulsive condition by means computational fluid dynamics. The computational domain has been discretised using a structured mesh of 188 x 200 tetrahedral elements. The RNG k-Ε model is utilized to describe the turbulent flow process as it was followed in [5]. The simulations were held at a Reynolds number of 300000. Results allowed obtaining lift and drag forces and pitching moment coefficient and also the location of the separation and reattachment points in some cases by means of the wall shear stress on the suction surface as well as velocity contours and streamlines for both conditions at different angles of attack, from 0 to 16 degrees with the smallest increment of 4 degrees. Finally, results from both cases were compared and the influence of the propulsive flow on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil has been analysed turning out that it improves significantly the performance of the airfoil reaching values up to 1,8 times in terms of lift at high angles of attack. [5] Rhie C.M., Chow W.L., Numerical Study of the Turbulent Flow Past an Airfoil with Trailing Edge Separation, AIAA Journal, Vol. 21, No. 11, 1983. [7] Velazquez L., Nožička J, Kulhanek R., Oil and Smoke Flow Visualization past Two-Dimensional Airfoils for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, in The 11th Asian Symposium of

  10. Aerodynamic behaviour of NREL S826 airfoil at Re=100,000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sarmast, Sasan;

    2014-01-01

    at Fluid Mechanics laboratory of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Lift coefficient is obtained from the forge gauge measurements while the drag is measured according to the integration of the wake profiles downstream of the airfoil. The pressure distribution is measured by a set of pressure taps......, there is a better agreement between the drag measurements and computations. It is concluded that LES computations are able to capture the lift and drag polars as well as the pressure distribution around the airfoil with an acceptable accuracy....

  11. Nonlinear angle control of a sectioned airfoil by using shape memory alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work illustrates an application of shape memory alloys and nonlinear controller applied to the active angular control of a sectioned airfoil. The main objective of the proposed control system is to modify the shape of the profile based on a reference angle. The change of the sectioned airfoil angle is resultant by the effect of shape memory of the alloy due to heating of the wire caused by an electric current that changes its temperature by Joule effect. Considering the presence of plant’s nonlinear effects, especially in the mathematical model of the alloy, this work proposes the application of an on-off control system.

  12. Nonlinear angle control of a sectioned airfoil by using shape memory alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu G.; Maestá M.; Faria C.; Lopes V.

    2014-01-01

    The present work illustrates an application of shape memory alloys and nonlinear controller applied to the active angular control of a sectioned airfoil. The main objective of the proposed control system is to modify the shape of the profile based on a reference angle. The change of the sectioned airfoil angle is resultant by the effect of shape memory of the alloy due to heating of the wire caused by an electric current that changes its temperature by Joule effect. Considering the presence o...

  13. Finding optimum airfoil shape to get maximum aerodynamic efficiency for a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of S-series wind turbine airfoil of S 825 are investigated to find optimum angle of attack. Aerodynamic performances calculations are carried out by utilization of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method withstand finite capacity approximation by using Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes (RANS) theorem. The lift and pressure coefficients, lift to drag ratio of airfoil S 825 are analyzed with SST turbulence model then obtained results crosscheck with wind tunnel data to verify the precision of computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approximation. The comparison indicates that SST turbulence model used in this study can predict aerodynamics properties of wind blade.

  14. Assessment of PIV-based unsteady load determination of an airfoil with actuated flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenborg, J. J. H. M.; Lindeboom, R. C. J.; Simão Ferreira, C. J.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; Bijl, H.

    2014-02-01

    For complex experimental setups involving movable structures it is not trivial to directly measure unsteady loads. An alternative is to deduce unsteady loads indirectly from measured velocity fields using Noca's method. The ultimate aim is to use this method in future work to determine unsteady loads for fluid-structure interaction problems. The focus in this paper is first on the application and assessment of Noca's method for an airfoil with an oscillating trailing edge flap. To our best knowledge Noca's method has not been applied yet to airfoils with moving control surfaces or fluid-structure interaction problems. In addition, wind tunnel corrections for this type of unsteady flow problem are considered.

  15. Usability of the Selig S1223 Profile Airfoil as a High Lift Hydrofoil for Hydrokinetic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Oller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical analysis of the ability of the high lift airfoil profile Selig S1223 for working as hydrofoil under water conditions. The geometry of the hydrofoil blade is designed through a suitable airfoil profile and then studied carefully by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in order to check its hydrodynamic behavior, i.e., including lift and drag analysis, and determinations of streamlines velocities and pressures fields. Finally conclusions on the use of this profile in a possible application for hydrokinetic turbine blades are detailed.

  16. Self-induced vibrations of a DU96-W-180 airfoil in stall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) non-moving, prescribed motion and elastically mounted airfoil computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations. The elastically mounted airfoil computations were performed by means of a 2D structural model with two d...... are likely to occur at modern wind turbine blades at standstill. In contrast, the predicted cut-in wind speed necessary for the onset of stall-induced vibrations appeared high enough for such vibrations to be unlikely. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  17. Evaluation of a research circulation control airfoil using Navier-Stokes methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds time averaged Navier-Stokes equations were used to obtain solutions for flows about a two dimensional circulation control airfoil. The governing equations were written in conservation form for a body-fitted coordinate system and solved using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure. A modified algebraic eddy viscosity model was used to define the turbulent characteristics of the flow, including the wall jet flow over the Coanda surface at the trailing edge. Numerical results are compared to experimental data obtained for a research circulation control airfoil geometry. Excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  18. Effects of laminar separation bubbles and turbulent separation on airfoil stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, P. [Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States); Coiro, D.P. [Universita di Napoli (Italy)

    1997-12-31

    An existing two-dimensional, interactive, stall prediction program is extended by improving its laminar separation bubble model. The program now accounts correctly for the effects of the bubble on airfoil performance characteristics when it forms at the mid-chord and on the leading edge. Furthermore, the model can now predict bubble bursting on very sharp leading edges at high angles of attack. The details of the model are discussed in depth. Comparisons of the predicted stall and post-stall pressure distributions show excellent agreement with experimental measurements for several different airfoils at different Reynolds numbers.

  19. Recent advances in waterglass sand technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chun-xi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports some new understandings and advances in waterglass sand technologies. The multiple chemical modification process can increase the binding strength of the waterglass sand by up to 50%-70%.Therefore, the additions of the modified waterglass can be decreased to 3.0%-4.0% for CO2 process and to 2.0%-2.5% for organic ester hardening process, and greatly improve the collapsibility and reclaimability of the sand. Based on the new understandings and experimental results reported in this paper, several original ideas, such as nano modification, have been proposed to promote advances of waterglass sand technologies,

  20. PROSPECTS FIXATION DRIFT SANDS PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda MUZAFFAROVA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the theoretical foundations of secure mobile sand being considered for reducing the negative impact of one of the manifestations of exogenous plains on such an important natural-technical system as a railroad. It suggests practical measures to build a system of design protection against sand drifts. The article also suggests ways to conserve resources and rational use of machinery and performers as well as the consolidation of mobile sand wet with water soluble waste of local production of waste dextrin. Consolidation is exposed on dry and wet sand.

  1. Influence of Coating with Some Natural Based Materials on the Erosion Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel Basim Abdul Hussein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, composites were prepared by Hand lay-up molding. The composites constituents were epoxy resin as a matrix, 6% volume fractions of glass fibers (G.F as reinforcement and 3%, 6% volume fractions of preparation natural material (Rice Husk Ash, Carrot Powder, and Sawdust as filler. Studied the erosion wear behavior and coating by natural wastes (Rice Husk Ash with epoxy resin after erosion. The results showed the non – reinforced epoxy have lower resistance erosion than natural based material composites and the specimen (Epoxy+6%glass fiber+6%RHA has higher resistance erosion than composites reinforced with carrot powder and sawdust at 30cm , angle 60°, grin size of sand 425µm , temperature 30Ċ , 300 gm salt content in 2liter of water and 15 hour. Coating specimen with mixed epoxy resin -RHA with particles size in the range (1.4-4.2 µm improves erosion wear resistance characteristics of the coated specimen, coating thickness was (16 ± 1 μm and after erosion at (15 hour the thickness was (10 μm .

  2. Ecogeomorphology of Sand Dunes Shaped by Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoar, H.

    2014-12-01

    Two dune types associated with vegetation are known: Parabolic and Vegetated Linear Dunes (VLDs), the latters are the dominant dune type in the world deserts. Parabolic dunes are formed in humid, sub-humid and semi-arid environments (rather than arid) where vegetation is nearby. VLDs are known today in semiarid and arid lands where the average yearly rainfall is ≥100 mm, enough to support sparse cover of vegetation. These two dune types are formed by unidirectional winds although they demonstrate a different form and have a distinct dynamics. Conceptual and mathematical models of dunes mobility and stability, based on three control parameters: wind power (DP), average annual precipitation (p), and the human impact parameter (μ) show that where human impact is negligible the effect of wind power (DP) on vegetative cover is substantial. The average yearly rainfall of 60-80 mm is the threshold of annual average rainfall for vegetation growth on dune sand. The model is shown to follow a hysteresis path, which explains the bistability of active and stabilized dunes under the same climatic conditions with respect to wind power. We have discerned formation of parabolic dunes from barchans and transverse dunes in the coastal plain of Israel where a decrease in human activity during the second half of the 20th century caused establishment of vegetation on the crest of the dunes, a process that changed the dynamics of these barchans and transverse dunes and led to a change in the shape of the windward slope from convex to concave. These dunes gradually became parabolic. It seems that VLDs in Australia or the Kalahari have always been vegetated to some degree, though the shrubs were sparser in colder periods when the aeolian erosion was sizeable. Those ancient conditions are characterized by higher wind power and lower rainfall that can reduce, but not completely destroy, the vegetation cover, leading to the formation of lee (shadow) dunes behind each shrub. Formation of

  3. Modeling the Economics of Beach Nourishment Decisions in Response to Coastal Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, M.; Ashton, A. D.; Hoagland, P.; Jin, D.; Kite-Powell, H.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.

    2012-12-01

    Beaches are constantly moving and changing. The dynamic transformations of beaches are mostly the result of the erosion of sand, which can occur through movements alongshore caused by waves, movements off-shore due to storms, or submersion due to sea-level rise. Predicted climate change impacts include potential changes in storminess and accelerated sea-level rise, which will lead to increased coastal erosion. At the same time, the number of people residing in coastal communities is increasing. The risks from eroding beaches (increased coastal flooding, damage to infrastructure, and displaced residents) are therefore increasing in number and scale; and coastal residents are taking actions to protect their homes. One such action is beach nourishment, where sand is added to a resident's property in order to widen the beach. We have developed an economic model of beach nourishment decision-making to investigate the relationship between the optimal volume and timing of beach nourishment and factors such as property value, erosion rate, and initial beach width. In this model, waterfront property owners nourish a beach when the losses in net rental income exceed the costs incurred from nourishing the beach. (Rental income is a function of property value, which in turn depends upon the width of the beach.) It is assumed that erosion and sea-level rise are related. We examine different nourishment scenarios, including one-time nourishment in the first year; constant annual nourishment; and a myopic decision process in which the homeowner nourishes the beach if property losses from erosion over the next five years are expected to exceed the cost of nourishment. One-time nourishment delays property flooding for both constant and accelerating sea level rise; however, this delay is more substantial under constant sea level rise. With continual nourishment, the beach can be maintained under constant sea-level rise, provided that the erosion rate is comparable to the additional

  4. A seepage erosion sediment transport function and geometric headcut relationships for predicting seepage erosion undercutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remain a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including n...

  5. Farmers' identification of erosion indicators and related erosion damage in the Central Highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Okoba, B.O.

    2006-01-01

    Most soil and water conservation planning approaches rely on empirical assessment methods and hardly consider farmers' knowledge of soil erosion processes. Farmers' knowledge of on-site erosion indicators could be useful in assessing the site-specific erosion risk before planning any conservation me

  6. Graffiti for science - erosion painting reveals spatially variable erosivity of sediment-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Alexander R.; Kirchner, James W.; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially distributed detection of bedrock erosion is a long-standing challenge. Here we show how the spatial distribution of surface erosion can be visualized and analysed by observing the erosion of paint from natural bedrock surfaces. If the paint is evenly applied, it creates a surface with relatively uniform erodibility, such that spatial variability in the erosion of the paint reflects variations in the erosivity of the flow and its entrained sediment. In a proof-of-concept study, this approach provided direct visual verification that sediment impacts were focused on upstream-facing surfaces in a natural bedrock gorge. Further, erosion painting demonstrated strong cross-stream variations in bedrock erosion, even in the relatively narrow (5 m wide) gorge that we studied. The left side of the gorge experienced high sediment throughput with abundant lateral erosion on the painted wall up to 80 cm above the bed, but the right side of the gorge only showed a narrow erosion band 15-40 cm above the bed, likely due to deposited sediment shielding the lower part of the wall. This erosion pattern therefore reveals spatial stream bed aggradation that occurs during flood events in this channel. The erosion painting method provides a simple technique for mapping sediment impact intensities and qualitatively observing spatially distributed erosion in bedrock stream reaches. It can potentially find wide application in both laboratory and field studies.

  7. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Isehunwa,; Andrew Farotade

    2010-01-01

    Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field ...

  8. The wind-water two-phase erosion and sediment-producing processes in the middle Yellow River basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许炯心

    2000-01-01

    Based on data from the middle Yellow River basin, a wind-water two-phase mechanism for erosion and sediment-producing processes has been found. By using this mechanism, the extremely strong erosion and sediment yield in the study area can be better explained. The operation of wind and water forces is different in different seasons within a year. During winter and spring, strong wind blows large quantities of eolian sand to gullies and river channels, which are temporally stored there. During the next summer, rainstorms cause runoff that contains much fine loessic material and acts as a powerful force to carry the previously prepared coarse material. As a result, hyperconcentrated flows occur, resulting in high-intensity erosion and sediment yield.

  9. Numerical simulation of sediment erosion by submerged jets using an Eulerian model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The erosion of loose beds by submerged circular impinging vertical turbulent jets is simulated using an Eulerian two-phase model which implements Euler-Euler coupled governing equations for fluid and solid phases, and a modified k-ε turbulence closure for the fluid phase. Both flow-particle and particle-particle interactions are considered in this model. The predictions of eroded bed profiles agree well with previous laboratory measurements and self-designed experiments. Analysis of the simulated results reveals that the velocity field of the jet water varies with various scouring intensities, that the scour depth and shape are mainly influenced by the driving force of the water when the density, diameter and porosity of the sand are the same, and that the porosity is an important contributor to sediment erosion. In this study, the scour depth, the height of dune and the velocity of the pore water increase with increasing porosity.

  10. Monitoring gully erosion at Nyaba river of Enugu state southeastern Nigeria, using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwu-Delunzu, V. U.; Enete, I. C.; Abubakar, A. S.; Lamidi, S.

    2013-10-01

    Erosion is a natural, gradual and continuous process of earth surface displacement caused by various agents of denudation. It is also caused by some anthropogenic activities. Erosion rate of an area at any point in time is dependent mainly on climate and geological factors. Physical aspects of the erosive force experienced in gullies are mainly dependent on the local prevailing climate condition. In this study, remotely sensed data was used in the analysis of gully erosion progression at Nyaba River in Enugu Urban, aimed at mapping and monitoring gully erosion at the study site. Methodologies employed include; data acquisition from field observation and satellite images; data processing and analyses using ilwis 3.7 and Arc GIS 9.3 software. The result showed that gully progressed from 578,713,735 square meters in 1986 to 1, 002,819,723 in 2011. Prediction showed that the magnitude of the gully area is expected to increase as the years go by if measures are not taken to control the expansion rate. The forecast put the expected coverage of gully erosion at Nyaba River to be 45,210,440 square meters by the year 2040. Consequently, recommendations made include: constant monitoring to detect early stages of gully formation; regulation of grazing of pasture in the area; restriction of sand mining from the river bank and construction of water ways to stabilize river flow. In conclusion, monitoring clearly showed that there was a geometric progression in gully formation at Nyaba over years; the expansion was aided more by anthropogenic activities than natural factors.

  11. Optimization design study of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils for the high-efficiency propeller of low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil makes a great impact on designing a high-efficiency propeller for low-dynamic vehicles in stratosphere. At high altitude,low-Reynolds-number airfoils are supposed to have high lift-drag ratio or high endurance factor at cruising attack angle along with good stall characteristics. To design such a high-performance low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoil,the paper established a hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform by combing direct search optimization algorithm EXTREM and airfoil flow field solver XFOIL to automatically and quickly calculate aerodynamic performance function of airfoil by computer. It provides an effective solution to multi-point design problem of low-speed low-Reynolds-number airfoil. It can be seen from the results of three typical optimization examples,the new airfoil E387_OPT2,FX63-137_OPT2 and S1223_OPT2 based on hot low-Reynolds-number high-lift airfoils (Eppler 387 airfoil,Wortmann FX63-137 airfoil and S1223 airfoil) can meet the optimization design requirements and have very good aerodynamic characteristics in both design state and non-design state. Thus,the applicability and effectiveness of hierarchical multi-objective optimization platform are verified.

  12. Investigation of detachment and transport processes of sediment using different sand mixtures in high precision rainfall simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Mayer, Marius; Reichle, Elisabeth; Kinnell, Peter I. A.; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Detachment and transport of sediment in the landscape are controlled by many different factors. Beside environmental factors such as soil surface properties, land management and vegetation cover, the dominant ones are rainfall and surface flow characteristics. In order to be able to investigate the change of sediment properties over transport distance and time, it is, therefore, necessary to understand the basic interactions between rainfall kinetic energy and amount, particle size and density as well as flow depth and velocity. So far, the mechanistic understanding of these principal physical interactions is mostly of empirical nature, obtained either under natural, highly complex and uncontrollable conditions, or with rainfall experiments that weren't able to control the conditions with high enough precision. The aim of this study was, therefore, to fill this gap of knowledge in our mechanical process understanding by conducting rainfall experiments on different sand mixtures. In this bottom-up approach, the highly controlled experimental conditions and the use of stable sand ensured that the number of variable factors was kept to a minimum. Thus, specific relations between sand-sizes, drop kinetic energy, force of flow, and resulting erosion rates could be obtained. Although the results are very promising and could lead to a better understanding of the erosion processes in the future, they clearly show that already straightforward sand mixtures behave in a very complex way. Further experiments with simple grain mixtures are, therefore, needed before experiments on more complex, instable sediments can or should be investigated.

  13. Hydro-abrasive erosion of hydraulic turbines caused by sediment - a century of research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    Hydro-abrasive erosion of hydraulic turbines is an economically important issue due to maintenance costs and production losses, in particular at high- and medium-head run-of- river hydropower plants (HPPs) on sediment laden rivers. In this paper, research and development in this field over the last century are reviewed. Facilities for sediment exclusion, typically sand traps, as well as turbine design and materials have been improved considerably. Since the 1980s, hard-coatings have been applied on Francis and Pelton turbine parts of erosion-prone HPPs and became state-of-the-art. These measures have led to increased times between overhauls and smaller efficiency reductions. Analytical, laboratory and field investigations have contributed to a better processes understanding and quantification of sediment-related effects on turbines. More recently, progress has been made in numerical modelling of turbine erosion. To calibrate, validate and further develop prediction models, more measurements from both physical model tests in laboratories and real-scale data from HPPs are required. Significant improvements to mitigate hydro-abrasive erosion have been achieved so far and development is ongoing. A good collaboration between turbine manufacturers, HPP operators, measuring equipment suppliers, engineering consultants, and research institutes is required. This contributes to the energy- and cost-efficient use of the worldwide hydropower potential.

  14. Linking rapid erosion of the Mekong River delta to human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Edward J.; Brunier, Guillaume; Besset, Manon; Goichot, Marc; Dussouillez, Philippe; Nguyen, Van Lap

    2015-10-01

    As international concern for the survival of deltas grows, the Mekong River delta, the world’s third largest delta, densely populated, considered as Southeast Asia’s most important food basket, and rich in biodiversity at the world scale, is also increasingly affected by human activities and exposed to subsidence and coastal erosion. Several dams have been constructed upstream of the delta and many more are now planned. We quantify from high-resolution SPOT 5 satellite images large-scale shoreline erosion and land loss between 2003 and 2012 that now affect over 50% of the once strongly advancing >600 km-long delta shoreline. Erosion, with no identified change in the river’s discharge and in wave and wind conditions over this recent period, is consistent with: (1) a reported significant decrease in coastal surface suspended sediment from the Mekong that may be linked to dam retention of its sediment, (2) large-scale commercial sand mining in the river and delta channels, and (3) subsidence due to groundwater extraction. Shoreline erosion is already responsible for displacement of coastal populations. It is an additional hazard to the integrity of this Asian mega delta now considered particularly vulnerable to accelerated subsidence and sea-level rise, and will be exacerbated by future hydropower dams.

  15. Wind Erosion Induced Soil Degradation in Northern China: Status, Measures and Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongling Guo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation is one of the most serious ecological problems in the world. In arid and semi-arid northern China, soil degradation predominantly arises from wind erosion. Trends in soil degradation caused by wind erosion in northern China frequently change with human activities and climatic change. To decrease soil loss by wind erosion and enhance local ecosystems, the Chinese government has been encouraging residents to reduce wind-induced soil degradation through a series of national policies and several ecological projects, such as the Natural Forest Protection Program, the National Action Program to Combat Desertification, the “Three Norths” Shelter Forest System, the Beijing-Tianjin Sand Source Control Engineering Project, and the Grain for Green Project. All these were implemented a number of decades ago, and have thus created many land management practices and control techniques across different landscapes. These measures include conservation tillage, windbreak networks, checkerboard barriers, the Non-Watering and Tube-Protecting Planting Technique, afforestation, grassland enclosures, etc. As a result, the aeolian degradation of land has been controlled in many regions of arid and semiarid northern China. However, the challenge of mitigating and further reversing soil degradation caused by wind erosion still remains.

  16. Holocene Formation of Heald Sand Bank on the East Texas Inner Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, J. M.; Cleveland, V.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Heald Bank is a Gulf of Mexico sand bank located ~50 km off the coast of east Texas on the inner continental shelf. The bank is proposed to be a remnant of barrier islands drowned and thus preserved during an episode of rapid sea level rise. For this hypothesis to be true, the transgressive ravinement that marks the erosion by the shoreline moving from shelf edge towards the modern location would by definition postdate and thus be stratigraphically above the bank. To test this hypothesis we present ~90 km of Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP) and Multi-channel seismic (MCS) data collected from the University of Texas Geophysics marine field course during 2008, 2013, and 2014. In these data, there are several visible underlying channels beneath Heald Bank. These channels have channel fill which are truncated by an overlying erosional surface, which we interpret to be the transgressive ravinement from sea level rise. However, this interpretation places the ravinement below the sand bank, meaning it could not have been drowned and buried by a rapid sea level rise event. Thus, Heald Bank and potentially the related inner shelf banks (Thomas, Shepard, and Sabine) from eastern Texas to western Louisiana cannot be used as an example of coastal response to climate change and sea level rise. We examine alternate origins for the banks and their sand using published cores as well as age models and integrating them with our seismic data. One possibility is that the sand was sourced from the nearby Sabine River system immediately following local transgression or the sand was remobilized from sediment fill within underlying paleo-river channels imaged below the Heald Bank. In either case Heald Bank appears not to serve as an indicator for rapid sea-level rise, yet could be an important analog for sand transport mechanisms offshore.

  17. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion.......EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion....

  18. Wind erosion potential following application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of biosolids to agricultural land has the potential to improve soil health and crop production. These benefits could also possibly reduce the threat of wind erosion in arid and semiarid regions. Therefore, we assessed the impact of biosolids on wind erosion of agricultural land at Li...

  19. Rainfall erosivity in Brazil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we review the erosivity studies conducted in Brazil to verify the quality and representativeness of the results generated and to provide a greater understanding of the rainfall erosivity (R-factor) in Brazil. We searched the ISI Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, and Google Scholar datab...

  20. Tools for Ephemeral Gully Erosion Process Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques to quantify ephemeral gully erosion have been identified by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) as one of gaps in current erosion assessment tools. One reason that may have contributed to this technology gap is the difficulty to quantify changes in channel geometry to asses...

  1. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, W.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hao, F.; Wang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate as

  2. The erosive potential of candy sprays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. Material and methods The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy volunteer

  3. Present-day erosion of Martian polar terrain by the seasonal CO2 jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Hansen, Candice J.; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2017-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) detected the new troughs during its campaign for seasonal monitoring of the polar areas. The newly detected dendritic troughs are small shallow branching troughs (≈ 1.4 m wide) similar to the seasonal furrows previously detected in the northern hemisphere (Bourke, 2013). The essential difference between the new troughs and furrows lies in the fact that the troughs in the south are persistent while the northern furrows are erased each Martian year by the sand movement due to summer winds. From year to year the new southern troughs extend and develop new tributaries and their overall geometry turns from linear to dendritic, a characteristic shared with araneiform terrains. We believe that furrows have the same origin as the southern dendritic troughs but do not develop into dendritic shapes because of the high mobility of the dune material into which they are carved. Several locations where new dendritic troughs are observed lie in the vicinity of dunes. This gives us an observational indication that presence of erosive sand material is an important factor in creating (or at least starting) erosive processes that lead to the formation of dendritic troughs. By extrapolation the same mechanism should be acting to create the much larger araneiform terrains. Detection of the present day erosion working in polar areas and creating new topographical features is important for understanding of the processes that shape polar areas. Several years of HiRISE observations provide us with the information about the current rate of erosion and hence help estimate minimum ages of the araneiforms and the surface into which they are carved to be 1.3 × 103 Martian years.

  4. CMC blade with pressurized internal cavity for erosion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Goike, Jerome Walter

    2016-02-02

    A ceramic matrix composite blade for use in a gas turbine engine having an airfoil with leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction side surfaces, a blade shank secured to the lower end of each airfoil, one or more interior fluid cavities within the airfoil having inlet flow passages at the lower end which are in fluid communication with the blade shank, one or more passageways in the blade shank corresponding to each one of the interior fluid cavities and a fluid pump (or compressor) that provides pressurized fluid (nominally cool, dry air) to each one of the interior fluid cavities in each airfoil. The fluid (e.g., air) is sufficient in pressure and volume to maintain a minimum fluid flow to each of the interior fluid cavities in the event of a breach due to foreign object damage.

  5. Vulnerability and fate of a coastal sand dune complex, Rosetta-Idku, northwestern Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Banna, Mahmoud M.

    2008-05-01

    Types, distribution, and origin of recent sand dunes between Rosetta and Idku, in the western sector of the Nile Delta, Egypt were investigated. Sand samples from the dunes, beach, and seafloor were studied for grain size distribution and mineralogical composition. It has been found that most of the dunes in the study area have been subjected to deterioration and removal due to the construction of buildings and the International Coastal Highway. The remnant constitutes a damaged belt of foredunes that extends from El Bouseily village to the west of Idku town. The dune’s origin is interpreted to be the result of coastal drifting and the subsequent transport of sediments of the former Canopic Nile branch eastward by the predominant longshore current and by aeolian processes. The blown sand grains accumulated to form a belt of coastal sand dunes of original longitudinal and crescentic forms. Urbanization of the coast has severely altered the landscape. The study area is considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and the expected rise in sea level. The outcome of potential sea level rise is serious; erosion problems are expected to be exacerbated and vast areas from land and property would be lost. Thus, protection and preservation the remaining dunes in the study area are vital requirements for shore protection.

  6. Mesophilic Actinomycetes in the natural and reconstructed sand dune vegetation zones of Fraser Island, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtböke, D I; Neller, R J; Bellgard, S E

    2007-08-01

    The natural coastal habitat of Fraser Island located in the State of Queensland, Australia, has been disturbed in the past for mining of the mineral sand ilmenite. Currently, there is no information available on whether these past mining disturbances have affected the distribution, diversity, and survival of beneficial soil microorganisms in the sand dunes of the island. This in turn could deleteriously affect the success of the natural regeneration, plant growth, and establishment on the sand dunes. To support ongoing restoration efforts at sites like these mesophilic actinomycetes were isolated using conventional techniques, with particular emphasis on the taxa previously reported to produce plant-growth-promoting substances and providing support to mycorrhizal fungi, were studied at disturbed sites and compared with natural sites. In the natural sites, foredunes contained higher densities of micromonosporae replaced by increasing numbers of streptomycete species in the successional dune and finally leading to complex actinomycete communities in the mature hind dunes. Whereas in the disturbed zones affected by previous mining activities, which are currently being rehabilitated, no culturable actinomycete communities were detected. These findings suggest that the paucity of beneficial microflora in the rehabilitated sand dunes may be limiting the successful colonization by pioneer plant species. Failure to establish a cover of plant species would result in the mature hind dune plants being exposed to harsh salt and climatic conditions. This could exacerbate the incidence of wind erosion, resulting in the destabilization of well-defined and vegetated successional dunal zones.

  7. Etiology and pathogenesis of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzow, Philipp; Wegehaupt, Florian J; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2016-04-01

    The condition of dental erosion is defined as acid-related loss of tooth structure which does not involve microorganisms. Depending on the origin of the acid, extrinsic (usually caused by acids in food) and intrinsic (caused by endogenous acid) erosion can be distinguished. The presence and severity of erosive defects depend on various parameters such as nutrition, saliva, general diseases, and mechanical stress by abrasion and attrition. As an example, dietary habits which involve frequent intake of acidic food and beverages, occupational acid exposure, as well as certain drugs or diseases that affect saliva flow rate are accompanied by an increased risk of erosive dental hard tissue defects. By a thorough clinical examination and an accurate anamnesis, various erosion-related risk factors can be identified and strategies to reduce or eliminate these factors be identified.

  8. Modelling rainfall erosion resulting from climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion leads to agricultural productivity decline and contributes to water quality decline. The current widely used models for determining soil erosion for management purposes in agriculture focus on long term (~20 years) average annual soil loss and are not well suited to determining variations that occur over short timespans and as a result of climate change. Soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion is directly dependent on the product of runoff and sediment concentration both of which are likely to be influenced by climate change. This presentation demonstrates the capacity of models like the USLE, USLE-M and WEPP to predict variations in runoff and erosion associated with rainfall events eroding bare fallow plots in the USA with a view to modelling rainfall erosion in areas subject to climate change.

  9. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  10. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  11. Silica sand resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Westerhoff, W.E.; Menkovic, A.; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Maljers, D.

    2009-01-01

    Silica sand, (almost) pure quartz sand, is a valuable and scarce mineral resource within the shallow Dutch subsurface. High-grade deposits are exploited in the southeastemmost part of the country, as raw material for the glass, ceramic, chemical and other process industries. Dutch land-use policy re

  12. Understanding Colombian Amazonian white sand forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peñuela-Mora, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Although progress has been made in studies on white sand forests in the Amazon, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge of the unique species composition of white sand forests and their structure and dynamics, especially in Western Amazon. This thesis aims to fill this gap by addressing t

  13. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  14. Wave climate, sediment supply and the depth of the sand-mud transition: A global survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D.A.; Hill, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The influences of wave climate and sediment supply on the depths of sand-mud transitions (hSMT) are investigated. Depths of sand-mud transitions (SMT) are based on published granulometric data from surface samples gathered from 14 sites in different wave-dominated coastal environments with fluvial input, including high energy (Columbia, Eel, Russian, San Lorenzo, Copper, and Nepean rivers), moderate energy (Ebro, Nile, Santa Clara, Tseng-wen and Kao-ping rivers), and low energy (Po, Pescara and Tronto rivers) regimes. Geometric mean diameter (GMD) and mud percent are compiled from samples along shore-normal transects, and significant correlation is found between these two textural descriptors. Nominally, the SMT is defined as the transition from GMD > 63????m to 25% mud. This dual definition is applied to the 14 systems, and hSMT is tabulated for each system. Correlation is found between hSMT and the depth at which wave-induced bottom shear stress equals the critical erosion shear stress of the largest mud particles and also between hSMT and significant wave height. Lack of correlation between hSMT and sediment load of nearby rivers indicates either that the influence of sediment supply on depth of the sand-mud transition is small or is not adequately represented in this study. Shelf width and slope do not correlate with residuals from a formalized linear relationship between hSMT and significant wave height. The relationship between hSMT and wave climate is useful for calibration of numerical models of erosion and deposition in wave-dominated coastal environments, for prediction of seabed properties in remote or inaccessible areas, and for reconstruction of paleodepth based on facies changes from sand to mud in ancient rocks. ?? 2008.

  15. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  16. Dual 10Be isotope systems constrain the source of sediment and rate of erosion for the tropical Barron River catchment, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Reusser, L. J.; Portenga, E.; Matmon, A.; Rood, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand source of sediment and rate of erosion for Barron River catchment, which heads on the Atherton Tablelands of northeast Australia, crosses the northern Queensland escarpment and drains into the Coral Sea, we collected fluvial sediment and measured both in situ and meteoric 10Be contents on the medium sand fraction. We collected fourteen samples from rivers and streams including large regional drainages and small tributaries. The upland basins are characterized by lower relief and less precipitation than the steeper and wetter escarpment basins. One sample is quartz sand from the Coral Sea beach at Yorkey's Knob, below the escarpment. Sand from the Barron River upstream of the escarpment integrates the upland basins and has an in situ 10Be concentration of 2.31±0.84 x105atoms/g and an erosion rate of 17.2 m/My (calculated using the CRONOS on-line calculator). This is similar to a major upland tributary (2.51±0.40 x105 atoms/g; 15.2 m/My) and two smaller upstream tributaries (20.5 m/My and 21.4 m/My). Escarpment streams have less in situ 10Be in their sediment (mean = 1.64±0.55 x 105 atoms/g, n=8) and higher basin area-weighted erosion rates (37.2 m/My). Based on the in situ measurements, the uplands are eroding at approximately half the rate of the escarpment basins. The beach sand has an in situ 10Be concentration (2.75±0.19 x 105 atoms/g) similar to the upland sediment suggesting that the source of beach sand is the larger but more slowly eroding Tablelands. In contrast, the meteoric 10Be concentrations of Barron River sand-sized sediment collected above the escarpment is ~4 fold lower (2.55x107 atoms/g) than the average meteoric 10Be concentration of the 8 escarpment samples (9.94±4.49 x107 atoms/g). This discrepancy cannot be explained by differences in annual average precipitation which ranges only from 1.9 to 2.3 m/yr but likely results from the deep mobility of meteoric 10Be in oxic Tableland soils. Considering meteoric 10Be as a

  17. Development of a fast shape memory alloy based actuator for morphing airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara-Quintanilla, A.

    2016-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic airfoils are optimized for certain conditions. For instance, the shape of the wings of fixed-wing aircrafts are designed and optimized for a certain flight condition (in terms of altitude, speed, aircraft weight, etc.). However, these flight conditions vary significantly du

  18. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    some models before they can be used in a BEM code. In this article, the airfoil data for the MEXICO (Model EXperiments in Controlled cOnditions) rotor are extracted from CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) results. The azimuthally averaged velocity is used as the sectional velocity to define the angle...

  19. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  20. Cross-Validation of Numerical and Experimental Studies of Transitional Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frere, Ariane; Hillewaert, Koen; Sarlak, Hamid;

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance characteristic of airfoils are the main input for estimating wind turbine blade loading as well as annual energy production of wind farms. For transitional flow regimes these data are difficult to obtain, both experimentally as well as numerically, due to the very high...