WorldWideScience

Sample records for airfoil performance tables

  1. Advanced Airfoils Boost Helicopter Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Carson Helicopters Inc. licensed the Langley RC4 series of airfoils in 1993 to develop a replacement main rotor blade for their Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The company's fleet of S-61 helicopters has been rebuilt to include Langley's patented airfoil design, and the helicopters are now able to carry heavier loads and fly faster and farther, and the main rotor blades have twice the previous service life. In aerial firefighting, the performance-boosting airfoils have helped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service control the spread of wildfires. In 2003, Carson Helicopters signed a contract with Ducommun AeroStructures Inc., to manufacture the composite blades for Carson Helicopters to sell

  2. Comprehensive performance comparison of airfoil fin PCHEs with NACA 00XX series airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fei, E-mail: chenfei@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Heating Technology Research and Development Center, Beijing District Heating Group, Beijing 100028 (China); Zhang, Lishen, E-mail: lishenzhang@sina.com [Heating Technology Research and Development Center, Beijing District Heating Group, Beijing 100028 (China); Huai, Xiulan, E-mail: hxl@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Jufeng, E-mail: lijufeng.net@163.com [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing 100082 (China); Zhang, Hang, E-mail: zhanghang@iet.cn [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Zhigang, E-mail: zgliu9322@163.com [Energy Research Institute of Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan, Shandong 250014 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Pressure drop of NACA 0020 airfoil fin PCHE reduces strikingly in comparison with the zigzag PCHE. • Pressure drop of NACA 00XX airfoil fin PCHE decreases as airfoil thickness increases. • Heat transfer performance of NACA 00XX airfoil fin PCHE increases as airfoil thickness rises. • Comprehensive performance of NACA 00XX airfoil fin PCHE degrades as airfoil thickness increases. - Abstract: Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) can be used in supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle. The present study compares NACA 0020 airfoil fin PCHE with conventional zigzag PCHE by numerical analysis. Pressure drop of the former has a striking reduction while maintaining excellent heat transfer performance. Comparison on four NACA 00XX series airfoil fin PCHEs is performed to investigate the influence of airfoil profile on flow and heat transfer performance. With a fixed vertical pitch, heat transfer performance of NACA series airfoil fin PCHE increases as airfoil thickness increases. However, comprehensive performance, in which both flow and heat transfer are taken into account, degrades with increasing airfoil thickness. Among four NACA airfoil fin PCHEs presented in this paper, NACA 0010 airfoil fin PCHE demonstrates the best comprehensive performance.

  3. Comprehensive performance comparison of airfoil fin PCHEs with NACA 00XX series airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fei; Zhang, Lishen; Huai, Xiulan; Li, Jufeng; Zhang, Hang; Liu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pressure drop of NACA 0020 airfoil fin PCHE reduces strikingly in comparison with the zigzag PCHE. • Pressure drop of NACA 00XX airfoil fin PCHE decreases as airfoil thickness increases. • Heat transfer performance of NACA 00XX airfoil fin PCHE increases as airfoil thickness rises. • Comprehensive performance of NACA 00XX airfoil fin PCHE degrades as airfoil thickness increases. - Abstract: Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) can be used in supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO_2) Brayton cycle. The present study compares NACA 0020 airfoil fin PCHE with conventional zigzag PCHE by numerical analysis. Pressure drop of the former has a striking reduction while maintaining excellent heat transfer performance. Comparison on four NACA 00XX series airfoil fin PCHEs is performed to investigate the influence of airfoil profile on flow and heat transfer performance. With a fixed vertical pitch, heat transfer performance of NACA series airfoil fin PCHE increases as airfoil thickness increases. However, comprehensive performance, in which both flow and heat transfer are taken into account, degrades with increasing airfoil thickness. Among four NACA airfoil fin PCHEs presented in this paper, NACA 0010 airfoil fin PCHE demonstrates the best comprehensive performance.

  4. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance of airfoils with morphing structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, Qing; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Lachenal, Xavier; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance of airfoils fitted with morphing trailing edges are investigated using a coupled structure/fluid/noise model. The control of the flow over the surface of an airfoil using shape optimization techniques can significantly improve the load distribution along the chord and span lengths whilst minimising noise generation. In this study, a NACA 63-418 airfoil is fitted with a morphing flap and various morphing profiles are considered with two features that di...

  5. Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristau, Neil; Siden, Gunnar Leif

    2015-07-21

    An airfoil includes a leading edge, a trailing edge downstream from the leading edge, a pressure surface between the leading and trailing edges, and a suction surface between the leading and trailing edges and opposite the pressure surface. A first convex section on the suction surface decreases in curvature downstream from the leading edge, and a throat on the suction surface is downstream from the first convex section. A second convex section is on the suction surface downstream from the throat, and a first convex segment of the second convex section increases in curvature.

  6. Prediction of the wind turbine performance by using BEM with airfoil data extracted from CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran

    2014-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory with airfoil data is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamic performance, but the reliability of the airfoil data is an important factor for the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power. The airfoil characteristics used in BEM...

  7. Influence of Thickness Variation on the Flapping Performance of Symmetric NACA Airfoils in Plunging Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangyu Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the impact of airfoil thickness on flapping performance, the unsteady flow fields of a family of airfoils from an NACA0002 airfoil to an NACA0020 airfoil in a pure plunging motion and a series of altered NACA0012 airfoils in a pure plunging motion were simulated using computational fluid dynamics techniques. The “class function/shape function transformation“ parametric method was employed to decide the coordinates of these altered NACA0012 airfoils. Under specified plunging kinematics, it is observed that the increase of an airfoil thickness can reduce the leading edge vortex (LEV in strength and delay the LEV shedding. The increase of the maximum thickness can enhance the time-averaged thrust coefficient and the propulsive efficiency without lift reduction. As the maximum thickness location moves towards the leading edge, the airfoil obtains a larger time-averaged thrust coefficient and a higher propulsive efficiency without changing the lift coefficient.

  8. Improved Swimming Performance in Hydrodynamically- coupled Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Sina; Shelley, Michael J.; Kanso, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Collective motion is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom from fish schools to bird flocks. Half of the known fish species are thought to exhibit schooling behavior during some phase of their life cycle. Schooling likely occurs to serve multiple purposes, including foraging for resources and protection from predators. Growing experimental and theoretical evidence supports the hypothesis that fish can benefit from the hydrodynamic interactions with their neighbors, but it is unclear whether this requires particular configurations or regulations. Here, we propose a physics-based approach that account for hydrodynamic interactions among swimmers based on the vortex sheet model. The benefit of this model is that it is scalable to a large number of swimmers. We start by examining the case of two swimmers, heaving plates, moving in parallel and in tandem. We find that for the same heaving amplitude and frequency, the coupled-swimmers move faster and more efficiently. This increase in velocity depends strongly on the configuration and separation distance between the swimmers. Our results are consistent with recent experimental findings on heaving airfoils and underline the role of fluid dynamic interactions in the collective behavior of swimmers.

  9. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Niels N; Zahle, F; Bak, C; Vronsky, T

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two different airfoils at a Reynolds number of 3 million, the FFA- W3-301 and FFA-W3-360, respectively. The computations are compared with wind tunnel measurements from the Stuttgart Laminar Wind Tunnel with respect to lift and drag variation as function of angle of attack. Even though the method does not exactly capture the measured performance, it can be used to compare different VG setups qualitatively with respect to chord- wise position, inter and intra-spacing and inclination of the VGs already in the design phase

  10. The effects of NACA 0012 airfoil modification on aerodynamic performance improvement and obtaining high lift coefficient and post-stall airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci

    2018-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of NACA 0012 airfoils with distinct modification are numerically investigated to obtain high lift coefficient and post-stall airfoils. NACA 0012 airfoil is divided into two part thought chord line then suction sides kept fixed and by changing the thickness of the pressure side new types of airfoil are created. Numerical experiments are then conducted by varying thickness of NACA 0012 from lower surface and different relative thicknesses asymmetrical airfoils are modified and NACA 0012-10, 0012-08, 0012-07, 0012-06, 0012-04, 0012-03, 0012-02, 0012-01 are created and simulated by using COMSOL software.

  11. Local vibrations and lift performance of low Reynolds number airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TariqAmin Khan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved based on the finite volume method and dynamic mesh technique is used to carry out partial fluid structure interaction. The local flexible structure (hereinafter termed as flexible structure vibrates in a single mode located on the upper surface of the airfoil. The Influence of vibration frequency and amplitude are examined and the corresponding fluid flow characteristics are investigated which add complexity to the inherent problem in unsteady flow. The study is conducted for flow over NACA0012 airfoil at 600≤Re≤3000 at a low angle of attack. Vibration of flexible structure induces a secondary vortex which modifies the pressure distribution and lift performance of the airfoil. At some moderate vibration amplitude, frequency synchronization or lock-in phenomenon occurs when the vibration frequency is close to the characteristic frequency of rigid airfoil. Evolution and shedding of vortices corresponding to the deformation of flexible structure depends on the Reynolds number. In the case of Re≤1000, the deformation of flexible structure is considered in-phase with the vortex shedding i.e., increasing maximum lift is linked with the positive deformation of flexible structure. At Re=1500 a phase shift of about 1/π exists while they are out-of-phase at Re>1500. Moreover, the oscillation amplitude of lift coefficient increases with increasing vibration amplitude for Re≤1500 while it decreases with increasing vibration amplitude for Re>1500. As a result of frequency lock-in, the average lift coefficient is increased with increasing vibration amplitude for all investigated Reynolds numbers (Re. The maximum increase in the average lift coefficient is 19.72% within the range of investigated parameters.

  12. The effect of variations in first- and second-order derivatives on airfoil aerodynamic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghui Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric factors which influence airfoil aerodynamic performance are attributed to variations in local first- and second-order curvature derivatives. Based on a self-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD program called UCFD, the influence of local profile variations on airfoil aerodynamic performance in different pressure areas is investigated. The results show that variations in first- and second-order derivatives of the airfoil profiles can cause fluctuations in airfoil aerodynamic performance. The greater the variation in local first- and second-order derivatives, the greater the fluctuation amplitude of the airfoil aerodynamic coefficients. Moreover, at the area near the leading edge and the shock-wave position, the surface pressure is more sensitive to changes in first- and second-order derivatives. These results provide a reference for airfoil aerodynamic shape design.

  13. Airfoil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  14. Research on design methods and aerodynamics performance of CQUDTU-B21 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Wen, Zhong Shen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design methods of CQU-DTU-B21 airfoil for wind turbine. Compared with the traditional method of inverse design, the new method is described directly by a compound objective function to balance several conflicting requirements for design wind turbine airfoils, which based...... on design theory of airfoil profiles, blade element momentum (BEM) theory and airfoil Self-Noise prediction model. And then an optimization model with the target of maximum power performance on a 2D airfoil and low noise emission of design ranges for angle of attack has been developed for designing CQU......-DTU-B21 airfoil. To validate the optimization results, the comparison of the aerodynamics performance by XFOIL and wind tunnels test respectively at Re=3×106 is made between the CQU-DTU-B21 and DU93-W-210 which is widely used in wind turbines. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland....

  15. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Performance of Airfoils Fitted with Morphing Trailing Edges

    OpenAIRE

    Ai, Qing; Kamliya Jawahar, Hasan; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance and wake development of a NACA 0012 airfoil fitted with morphing trailing edges were studied using experimental and computational techniques. The NACA 0012 airfoil was tested with morphing trailing edges having various camber profiles with the same trailing edge tip deflection. The aerodynamic force measurements for the airfoil were carried out for a wide range of chord-based Reynolds number and angles of attack with trailing edge deflection angle of β= 5◦ and 10◦....

  16. Design and validation of the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    with the blade element momentum theory, the viscous-inviscid XFOIL code and an airfoil self-noise prediction model, an optimization algorithm has been developed for designing the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils with targets of maximum power coefficient and low noise emission...... emission between the CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 64618 airfoil, which is used in modern wind turbine blades, are carried out. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  17. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamics performance, but the reliability of airfoil data is an important factor to improve the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power using a BEM code. The airfoil characteristics used...

  18. A Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Performance and Noise of a Bionic Airfoil Based on Owl Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noise reduction and efficiency enhancement are the two important directions in the development of the multiblade centrifugal fan. In this study, we attempt to develop a bionic airfoil based on the owl wing and investigate its aerodynamic performance and noise-reduction mechanism at the relatively low Reynolds number. Firstly, according to the geometric characteristics of the owl wing, a bionic airfoil is constructed as the object of study at Reynolds number of 12,300. Secondly, the large eddy simulation (LES with the Smagorinsky model is adopted to numerically simulate the unsteady flow fields around the bionic airfoil and the standard NACA0006 airfoil. And then, the acoustic sources are extracted from the unsteady flow field data, and the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H equation based on Lighthill's acoustic theory is solved to predict the propagation of these acoustic sources. The numerical results show that the lift-to-drag ratio of bionic airfoil is higher than that of the traditional NACA 0006 airfoil because of its deeply concave lower surface geometry. Finally, the sound field of the bionic airfoil is analyzed in detail. The distribution of the A-weighted sound pressure levels, the scaled directivity of the sound, and the distribution of dP/dt on the airfoil surface are provided so that the characteristics of the acoustic sources could be revealed.

  19. Influences of surface temperature on a low camber airfoil aerodynamic performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current note refers to the comparison between a NACA 2510 airfoil with adiabatic walls and the same airfoil with heated patches. Both suction and pressure sides were divided into two regions covering the leading edge (L.E. and trailing edge (T.E.. A RANS method sensitivity test has been performed in the preliminary stage while for the extended 3D cases a DES-SST approach was used. Results indicate that surface temperature distribution influences the aerodynamics of the airfoil, in particular the viscous drag component but also the lift of the airfoil. Moreover, the influence depends not only on the surface temperature but also on the positioning of the heated surfaces, particularly in the case of pressure lift and drag. Further work will be needed to optimize the temperature distribution for airfoil with higher camber.

  20. Cross-Validation of Numerical and Experimental Studies of Transitional Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frere, Ariane; Hillewaert, Koen; Sarlak, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance characteristic of airfoils are the main input for estimating wind turbine blade loading as well as annual energy production of wind farms. For transitional flow regimes these data are difficult to obtain, both experimentally as well as numerically, due to the very high...... sensitivity of the flow to perturbations, large scale separation and performance hysteresis. The objective of this work is to improve the understanding of the transitional airfoil flow performance by studying the S826 NREL airfoil at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 4:104 and 1:105) with two inherently different...

  1. Enhancement of aerodynamic performance of a heaving airfoil using synthetic-jet based active flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenglei; Tang, Hui

    2018-05-25

    In this study, we explore the use of synthetic jet (SJ) in manipulating the vortices around a rigid heaving airfoil, so as to enhance its aerodynamic performance. The airfoil heaves at two fixed pitching angles, with the Strouhal number, reduced frequency and Reynolds number chosen as St  =  0.3, k  =  0.25 and Re  =  100, respectively, all falling in the ranges for natural flyers. As such, the vortex force plays a dominant role in determining the airfoil's aerodynamic performance. A pair of in-phase SJs is implemented on the airfoil's upper and lower surfaces, operating with the same strength but in opposite directions. Such a fluid-structure interaction problem is numerically solved using a lattice Boltzmann method based numerical framework. It is found that, as the airfoil heaves with zero pitching angle, its lift and drag can be improved concurrently when the SJ phase angle [Formula: see text] relative to the heave motion varies between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. But this concurrent improvement does not occur as the airfoil heaves with [Formula: see text] pitching angle. Detailed inspection of the vortex evolution and fluid stress over the airfoil surface reveals that, if at good timing, the suction and blowing strokes of the SJ pair can effectively delay or promote the shedding of leading edge vortices, and mitigate or even eliminate the generation of trailing edge vortices, so as to enhance the airfoil's aerodynamic performance. Based on these understandings, an intermittent operation of the SJ pair is then proposed to realize concurrent lift and drag improvement for the heaving airfoil with [Formula: see text] pitching angle.

  2. On the influence of airfoil deviations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstroth, J; Seume, J R

    2016-01-01

    The manufacture of large wind turbine rotor blades is a difficult task that still involves a certain degree of manual labor. Due to the complexity, airfoil deviations between the design airfoils and the manufactured blade are certain to arise. Presently, the understanding of the impact of manufacturing uncertainties on the aerodynamic performance is still incomplete. The present work analyzes the influence of a series of airfoil deviations likely to occur during manufacturing by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the aeroelastic code FAST. The average power production of the NREL 5MW wind turbine is used to evaluate the different airfoil deviations. Analyzed deviations include: Mold tilt towards the leading and trailing edge, thick bond lines, thick bond lines with cantilever correction, backward facing steps and airfoil waviness. The most severe influences are observed for mold tilt towards the leading and thick bond lines. By applying the cantilever correction, the influence of thick bond lines is almost compensated. Airfoil waviness is very dependent on amplitude height and the location along the surface of the airfoil. Increased influence is observed for backward facing steps, once they are high enough to trigger boundary layer transition close to the leading edge. (paper)

  3. Aeroelastic performance evaluation of a flexure box morphing airfoil concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankonien, Alexander M.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-04-01

    The flexure-box morphing aileron concept utilizes Macro-Fiber Composites (MFCs) and a compliant box to create a conformal morphing aileron. This work evaluates the impact of the number of MFCs on the performance, power and mass of the aileron by experimentally investigating two different actuator configurations: unimorph and bimorph. Implemented in a NACA 0012 airfoil with 304.8 mm chord, the unimorph and bimorph configurations are experimentally tested over a range of flow speeds from 5 to 20 m/s and angles of attack from -20 to 20 degrees under aerodynamic loads in a wind tunnel. An embedded flexible sensor is installed in the aileron to evaluate the effect of aerodynamic loading on tip position. For both design choices, the effect of actuation on lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients are measured. Finally, the impact on aileron mass and average power consumption due to the added MFCs is considered. The results showed the unimorph exhibiting superior ability to influence flow up to 15 m/s, with equivalent power consumption and lower overall mass. At 20 m/s, the bimorph exhibited superior control over aerodynamic forces and the unimorph experienced significant deformation due to aerodynamic loading.

  4. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two...... different airfoils at a Reynolds number of 3 million, the FFA- W3-301 and FFA-W3-360, respectively. The computations are compared with wind tunnel measurements from the Stuttgart Laminar Wind Tunnel with respect to lift and drag variation as function of angle of attack. Even though the method does...

  5. Numerical study on effect of boundary layer trips on aerodynamic performance of E216 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Sreejith

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is carried out to find the performance of airfoil E216 using Transition γ-Reθ model at Reynolds number of 100,000. Flow behaviour and effect of angle of attack (AOA on laminar separation bubble (LSB formation are examined. The results are validated with wind tunnel experimental results. LSB formation is clearly spotted in the velocity vector plot and coefficient of pressure distribution over airfoil. LSB moved upstream towards the leading edge with increase in AOA. Effect of boundary layer trip on LSB formation over the airfoil and performance of airfoil are studied. Two different trip locations, 17% of chord and 10% of chord from leading edge, and different trip heights (0.3 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.7 mm, 1 mm are investigated in this study. Results showed that boundary layer trip could eliminate LSB partially or completely and improve aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. Maximum improvement in drag by 15.48% and lift to drag ratio by 21.62% are obtained at angle of attack of 60. In all the cases, improvement in performance is observed only up to trip height of 0.5 mm.

  6. RANS Simulations of Aerodynamic Performance of NACA 0015 Flapped Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Obeid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of 2D subsonic flow over an NACA 0015 airfoil with a 30% trailing edge flap at a constant Reynolds number of 106 for various incidence angles and a range of flap deflections is presented. The steady-state governing equations of continuity and momentum conservation are solved combined with the realizable k-ε turbulence model using the ANSYS-Fluent code (Version 13.7, ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA. The primary objective of the study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of flow characteristics around the NACA 0015 airfoil as a function of the angle of attack and flap deflection at Re = 106 using the realizable k-ε turbulence model. The results are validated through comparison of the predictions with the free field experimental measurements. Consistent with the experimental observations, the numerical results show that increased flap deflections increase the maximum lift coefficient, move the zero-lift angle of attack (AoA to a more negative value, decrease the stall AoA, while the slope of the lift curve remains unchanged and the curve just shifts upwards. In addition, the numerical simulations provide limits for lift increment Δ C l and Cl, max values to be 1.1 and 2.2, respectively, obtained at a flap deflection of 50°. This investigation demonstrates that the realizable k-ε turbulence model is capable of predicting flow features over an airfoil with and without flap deflections with reasonable accuracy.

  7. Experimental study of ice accretion effects on aerodynamic performance of an NACA 23012 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein Pouryoussefi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of icing on an NACA 23012 airfoil have been studied. Experiments were applied on the clean airfoil, runback ice, horn ice, and spanwise ridge ice at a Reynolds number of 0.6 × 106 over angles of attack from −8° to 20°, and then results are compared. Generally, it is found that ice accretion on the airfoil can contribute to formation of a flow separation bubble on the upper surface downstream from the leading edge. In addition, it is made clear that spanwise ridge ice provides the greatest negative effect on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. In this case, the stall angle drops about 10° and the maximum lift coefficient reduces about 50% which is hazardous for an airplane. While horn ice leads to a stall angle drop of about 4° and a maximum lift coefficient reduction to 21%, runback ice has the least effect on the flow pattern around the airfoil and the aerodynamic coefficients so as the stall angle decreases 2° and the maximum lift reduces about 8%.

  8. Performance of flapping airfoil propulsion with LBM method and DMD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Hua; Huang, Xian-Wen; Zheng, Yao; Xie, Fang-Fang; Wang, Jing; Zou, Jian-Feng

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the performance of flapping airfoil propulsion at low Reynolds number of Re = 100-400 is studied numerically with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Combined with immersed boundary method (IBM), the LBM has been widely used to simulate moving boundary problems. The influences of the reduced frequency on the plunging and pitching airfoil are explored. It is found that the leading-edge vertex separation and inverted wake structures are two main coherent structures, which dominate the flapping airfoil propulsion. However, the two structures play different roles in the flow and the combination effects on the propulsion need to be clarified. To do so, we adopt the dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) algorithm to reveal the underlying physics. The DMD has been proven to be very suitable for analyzing the complex transient systems like the vortex structure of flapping flight.

  9. High Humidity Aerodynamic Effects Study on Offshore Wind Turbine Airfoil/Blade Performance through CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damp air with high humidity combined with foggy, rainy weather, and icing in winter weather often is found to cause turbine performance degradation, and it is more concerned with offshore wind farm development. To address and understand the high humidity effects on wind turbine performance, our study has been conducted with spread sheet analysis on damp air properties investigation for air density and viscosity; then CFD modeling study using Fluent was carried out on airfoil and blade aerodynamic performance effects due to water vapor partial pressure of mixing flow and water condensation around leading edge and trailing edge of airfoil. It is found that the high humidity effects with water vapor mixing flow and water condensation thin film around airfoil may have insignificant effect directly on airfoil/blade performance; however, the indirect effects such as blade contamination and icing due to the water condensation may have significant effects on turbine performance degradation. Also it is that found the foggy weather with microwater droplet (including rainy weather may cause higher drag that lead to turbine performance degradation. It is found that, at high temperature, the high humidity effect on air density cannot be ignored for annual energy production calculation. The blade contamination and icing phenomenon need to be further investigated in the next study.

  10. Performance assessment of Darrieus wind turbine with symmetric and cambered airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisse, H.; Trifu, O.; Paraschivoiu, I. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Mecanique

    2007-07-01

    This paper outlined the wind turbine and design software used to predict the flow conditions and performance of a straight-bladed Darrieus wind turbine. Three different blade sections were considered, notably the NACA 0018; the SNLA NLF 18/50 symmetrical airfoil; and the FX63-137 cambered airfoil. The numerical predictions of the flow conditions during the operation of the rotors were also presented. Torque yield for each blade section under a variety of operating conditions was presented. The numerical software program used in the study was based on a double-multiple streamtube model which considered a partition of the rotor in streamtubes and considered each of the 2 blade elements as an actuator disk. The actuator disk theory was based on a theory of momentum conservation. Wind velocities were determined in order to calculate forces acting on the actuator disks. A second set of equations was used to determine the forces acting on the upwind and downwind blade elements. Equations were also derived for the downwind interference factor. The following 3 main sets of data were used: (1) a geometry definition of the wind turbine; (2) operational conditions; and (3) main control parameters. Results of the study showed that the cambered airfoil blade section produced 10 times more torque in turbine starting conditions than the NACA 0018. Laminar airfoil lift to drag ratio at low angles of attack, and the use of appropriate Reynolds numbers resulted in higher efficiency. The large static stall angle of the cambered airfoil allowed higher power outputs than symmetrical airfoils. It was concluded that the starting torque of a Darrieus turbine can be increased by using a cambered blade section. 13 refs., 19 figs.

  11. Method determination of aerodynamic performances of profile in the plane airfoil cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. Г. Волянська

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Method determination of aerodynamic forces by direct measurement using three-component aerodynamic balance are given in the article. There are the schematic model of the facility for determination airfoil cascade aerodynamic performances in the article. Drawing and description of slewing pack of blades are shown in the article

  12. Design of low noise airfoil with high aerodynamic performance for use on small wind turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taehyung; KIM; Seungmin; LEE; Hogeon; KIM; Soogab; LEE

    2010-01-01

    Wind power is one of the most reliable renewable energy sources and internationally installed capacity is increasing radically every year.Although wind power has been favored by the public in general,the problem with the impact of wind turbine noise on people living in the vicinity of the turbines has been increased.Low noise wind turbine design is becoming more and more important as noise is spreading more adverse effect of wind turbine to public.This paper demonstrates the design of 10 kW class wind turbines,each of three blades,a rotor diameter 6.4 m,a rated rotating speed 200 r/min and a rated wind speed 10 m/s.The optimized airfoil is dedicated for the 75% spanwise position because the dominant source of a wind turbine blade is trailing edge noise from the outer 25% of the blade.Numerical computations are performed for incompressible flow and for Mach number at 0.145 and for Reynolds numbers at 1.02×106 with a lift performance,which is resistant to surface contamination and turbulence intensity.The objectives in the design process are to reduce noise emission,while sustaining high aerodynamic efficiency.Dominant broadband noise sources are predicted by semi-empirical formulas composed of the groundwork by Brooks et al.and Lowson associated with typical wind turbine operation conditions.During the airfoil redesign process,the aerodynamic performance is analyzed to reduce the wind turbine power loss.The results obtained from the design process show that the design method is capable of designing airfoils with reduced noise using a commercial 10 kW class wind turbine blade airfoil as a basis.Therefore,the new optimized airfoil showing 2.9 dB reductions of total sound pressure level(SPL) and higher aerodynamic performance are achieved.

  13. Characterization of the Effect of Wing Surface Instrumentation on UAV Airfoil Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed flight research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) has prompted study into the aerodynamic effects of modifications made to the surfaces of laminar airfoils. The research is focused on the high-aspect ratio, laminar-flow type wings commonly found on UAVs and other aircraft with a high endurance requirement. A broad range of instrumentation possibilities, such as structural, pressure, and temperature sensing devices may require the alteration of the airfoil outer mold line as part of the installation process. This study attempts to characterize the effect of installing this additiona1 instrumentation on key airfoil performance factors, such as transition location, lift and drag curves, and stall point. In particular, the general case of an airfoil that is channeled in the spanwise direction is considered, and the impact on key performance characteristics is assessed. Particular attention is focused on exploring the limits of channel depth and low-Reynolds number on performance and stall characteristics. To quantify the effect of increased skin friction due to premature transition caused by protruding or recessed instrumentation, two simplified, conservative scenarios are used to consider two potential sources of diaturbance: A) that leading edge alterations would cause linearly expanding areas (triangles) of turbulent flow on both surfaces of the wing upstream of the natural transition point, and B) that a channel or bump on the upper surface would trip turbulent flow across the whole upper surface upstream of the natural transition point. A potentially more important consideration than the skin friction drag increment is the change in overall airfoil performance due to the installation of instrumentation along most of the wingspan. To quantify this effect, 2D CFD simulations of the flow over a representative mid-span airfoil section were conducted in order to assess the change in lift and drag curves for the airfoil in the presence of

  14. Effect of fin-endwall fillet on thermal hydraulic performance of airfoil printed circuit heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ting; Xin, Fei; Li, Lei; Xu, Xiang-yang; Chen, Yi-tung; Wang, Qiu-wang

    2015-01-01

    Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) is recommended to be used for intermediate heat exchanger in Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). One of the key features is that it is manufactured by the photochemical etching in order to maintain the internal structure and metal properties. In this paper, a photochemical etching experiment is conducted to manufacture the airfoil PCHE plate. The result indicates that the airfoil fin is not an ideal airfoil profile, but has a fin-endwall fillet. For the purpose of simplifying the numerical model and saving computational time, a validated model with a single fluid is used to further study the effect of fin-endwall fillet on the thermal hydraulic performance of airfoil PCHE. It is found that the fin-endwall fillet can increase the heat transfer and pressure drop in the cases with the non-dimensional longitudinal pitch being 1.63. The effect of fin-endwall fillet on thermal hydraulic performance decreases with the increase of transverse pitch, but the longitudinal pitch has little effect when the non-dimensional longitudinal pitch is greater than 1.88. In the studied cases, the maximum difference of Nusselt number and friction factor between the two models with and without fin-endwall fillet is up to 6.7% and 6.4%. - Highlights: • Fillets are formed in the endwall of airfoil fins during the photochemical etching. • Two-fluid model can be replaced by single-fluid model to perform simulation. • Fin-endwall fillet can increase heat transfer and pressure drop at ζ_l = 1.63. • Effect of fin-endwall fillet decreases as transverse pitch increases at ζ_l = 1.63. • Longitudinal pitch has little effect at ζ_l ≥ 1.88.

  15. An experimental investigation of the low Reynolds number performance of the Lissaman 7769 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Lissaman 7769 airfoil, used on the Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross human-powered aircraft, was tested in a low turbulence subsonic wind tunnel. Lift and drag data were collected at chord Reynolds numbers of 100,000, 150,000, 200,000, 250,000, and 300,000; at angles of attack from -10 to +20 deg by using an external strain gage force balance. Lift curves, drag curves, and drag polars were generated from both uncorrected data and data corrected for wind tunnel blockage effects. A flow visualization study was performed to correlate with the force data. The results of the investigation have shown that the airfoil exhibits a significant degradation in performance for chord Reynolds numbers below 150,000.

  16. Influence of the positive prewhirl on the performance of centrifugal pumps with different airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, C M; Wang, H M; Huang, X; Lin, H

    2012-01-01

    According to the basic theory of turbomachinery design and inlet guide vanes prewhirl regulation, two different airfoils inlet guide vanes of prewhirl regulation device were designed, the influence of the positive prewhirl to the performance of centrifugal pump were studied based on different airfoils. The results show that, for a single-suction centrifugal pump: Gottingen bowed blade-type inlet guide vane adjustment effect is better than straight blade-type inlet guide; appropriate design of positive prewhirl can elevate the efficiency of centrifugal pumps. Compared with no vane conditions, the efficiency of centrifugal pump with prewhirl vanes has been greatly improved and the power consumption has been reduced significantly, while has little influence on the head.

  17. Numerical simulation of flow characteristics behind the aerodynamic performances on an airfoil with leading edge protuberances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical investigation of the effects of leading-edge protuberances on airfoil stall and post-stall performance. An improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method was adopted. As a result, to clarify the effects of ‘bi-periodic’ phenomenon around stall region, it was found that the flow separation at troughs was the main inducement of aerodynamic lift degradation within pre-stall regime and the flow pattern where vortices diverged was predominant. It was also found that the variations in flow patterns led to the gentle stall process. Furthermore, to study the statistical characteristics of unsteady vortex shedding, corresponding spectrum characteristics were also analyzed from another perspective, suggesting that the vortex shedding frequency was higher where vortices converged. Eventually, the improved performances of tubercled airfoil within post-stall regime could be attributed to the strong streamwise vortices generated by the leading-edge protuberances. Deploying the methods of vortex dynamics, the generation and evolution of the streamwise vortices were depicted. It turned out that the primary and secondary vortices were induced by spanwise pressure gradient at airfoil surface; meanwhile, vortex stretching played a key role in primary vortex evolution, which initially enhanced the strength of vortices corresponding to the acceleration of streamwise velocity.

  18. Aerodynamic Performance of a NREL S809 Airfoil in an Air-Sand Particle Two-Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra C. Douvi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper opens up a new perspective on the aerodynamic performance of a wind turbine airfoil. More specifically, the paper deals with a steady, incompressible two-phase flow, consisting of air and two different concentrations of sand particles, over an airfoil from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL S809. The numerical simulations were performed on turbulence models for aerodynamic operations using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The computational results obtained for the aerodynamic performance of an S809 airfoil at various angles of attack operating at Reynolds numbers of Re = 1 × 106 and Re = 2 × 106 in a dry, dusty environment were compared with existing experimental data on air flow over an S809 airfoil from reliable sources. Notably, a structured mesh consisting of 80,000 cells had already been identified as the most appropriate for numerical simulations. Finally, it was concluded that sand concentration significantly affected the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil; there was an increase in the values of the predicted drag coefficients, as well as a decrease in the values of the predicted lift coefficients caused by increasing concentrations of sand particles. The region around the airfoil was studied by using contours of static pressure and discrete phase model (DPM concentration.

  19. Development of an experimental setup for analyzing the influence of Magnus effect on the performance of airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktharuzzaman, Md; Sarker, Md. Samad; Safa, Wasiul; Sharah, Nahreen; Salam, Md. Abdus

    2017-12-01

    Magnus effect is a phenomenon where pressure difference is created according to Bernoulli's effect due to induced velocity changes caused by a rotating object in a fluid. Using this concept, the idea of delaying boundary layer separation on airfoil by providing moving surface boundary layer control has been developed. In order to analyze the influence of Magnus effect on the aerodynamic performance of an airfoil, there is no alternative of developing an experimental setup. This paper aims to develop such an experimental setup which will be capable of analyzing the influence of Magnus effect on both symmetric and asymmetric airfoils by placing a cylinder at the leading edge. To provide arrangements for a rotating cylinder at the leading edge of airfoil, necessary modifications and additions have been done in the test section of an AF100 subsonic wind tunnel.

  20. RANS Based Methodology for Predicting the Influence of Leading Edge Erosion on Airfoil Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langel, Christopher M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Chow, Raymond C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; van Dam, C. P. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2017-10-01

    The impact of surface roughness on flows over aerodynamically designed surfaces is of interested in a number of different fields. It has long been known the surface roughness will likely accelerate the laminar- turbulent transition process by creating additional disturbances in the boundary layer. However, there are very few tools available to predict the effects surface roughness will have on boundary layer flow. There are numerous implications of the premature appearance of a turbulent boundary layer. Increases in local skin friction, boundary layer thickness, and turbulent mixing can impact global flow properties compounding the effects of surface roughness. With this motivation, an investigation into the effects of surface roughness on boundary layer transition has been conducted. The effort involved both an extensive experimental campaign, and the development of a high fidelity roughness model implemented in a R ANS solver. Vast a mounts of experimental data was generated at the Texas A&M Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel for the calibration and validation of the roughness model described in this work, as well as future efforts. The present work focuses on the development of the computational model including a description of the calibration process. The primary methodology presented introduces a scalar field variable and associated transport equation that interacts with a correlation based transition model. The additional equation allows for non-local effects of surface roughness to be accounted for downstream of rough wall sections while maintaining a "local" formulation. The scalar field is determined through a boundary condition function that has been calibrated to flat plate cases with sand grain roughness. The model was initially tested on a NACA 0012 airfoil with roughness strips applied to the leading edge. Further calibration of the roughness model was performed using results from the companion experimental study on a NACA 633 -418 airfoil

  1. Performance prediction and flow field calculation for airfoil fan with impeller inlet clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shin Hyoung; Cao, Renjing; Zhang, Yangjun

    2000-01-01

    The performance prediction of an airfoil fan using a commercial code, STAR/CD, is verified by comparing the calculated results with measured performance data and velocity fields of an airfoil fan. The effects of inlet tip clearance on performance are investigated. The calculations overestimate the pressure rise performance by about 10-25 percent. However, the performance reduction due to tip clearance is well predicted by numerical simulations. Main source of performance decrease is not only the slip factor but also impeller efficiency. The reduction in performance is 12-16 percent for 1 percent gap of the diameter. The calculated reductions in impeller efficiency and slip factor are also linearly proportional to the gap size. The span-wise distributions of phase averaged velocity and pressure at the impeller exit are strongly influenced by the radial gap size. The radial component of velocity and the flow angle increase over the passage as the gap increases. The slip factor decreases and the loss increases with the gap size. The high velocity of leakage jet affects the impeller inlet and passage flows. With a larger clearance, the main stream moves to the impeller hub side and high loss region extends from the shroud to the hub

  2. Assessment of the performance of various airfoil sections on power generation from a wind turbine using the blade element momentum theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Agarwal, Ramesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is a function of the number of blades, the tip speed ratio (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity) and the lift to drag ratio (CL /CD) of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD) for a given blade and ratio and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. In this study, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given blade and ratio and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter.

  3. Airfoil shape for a turbine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Patik, Joseph Francis; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A first-stage nozzle vane includes an airfoil having a profile according to Table I. The annulus profile of the hot gas path is defined in conjunction with the airfoil profile and the profile of the inner and outer walls by the Cartesian coordinate values given in Tables I and II, respectively. The airfoil is a three-dimensional bowed design, both in the airfoil body and in the trailing edge. The airfoil is steam and air-cooled by flowing cooling mediums through cavities extending in the vane between inner and outer walls.

  4. Investigation of oscillating airfoil shock phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano , Daniel; Fleeter , Sanford

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental experiments were performed in an unsteady flow water table facility to investigate and quantify the unsteady aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil executing torsion mode oscillations at realistic reduced frequencies. A computer-based image enhancement system was used to measure the oscillating supersonic and transonic shock flow phenomena. By utilizing the hydraulic analogy to compare experimental results with a linear theoretical prediction, magnitude and phase relationships for the...

  5. BOUNDARY LAYER AND AMPLIFIED GRID EFFECTS ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF S809 AIRFOIL FOR HORIZONTAL AXIS WIND TURBINE (HAWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUNES EL KHCHINE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of rotor blades has a great effect on the aerodynamics performances of horizontal axis wind turbine and its efficiency. This work presents the effects of mesh refinement and boundary layer on aerodynamic performances of wind turbine S809 rotor. Furthermore, the simulation of fluid flow is taken for S809 airfoil wind turbine blade using ANSYS/FLUENT software. The problem is solved by the conservation of mass and momentum equations for unsteady and incompressible flow using advanced SST k-ω turbulence model, in order to predict the effects of mesh refinement and boundary layer on aerodynamics performances. Lift and drag coefficients are the most important parameters in studying the wind turbine performance, these coefficients are calculated for four meshes refinement and different angles of attacks with Reynolds number is 106. The study is applied to S809 airfoil which has 21% thickness, specially designed by NREL for horizontal axis wind turbines.

  6. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  7. Addition of Passive Dynamics to a Flapping Airfoil to Improve Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Daniel; Young, Jay; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2017-11-01

    Animals which fly or swim typically employ flapping motions of their wings and fins in order to produce thrust and to maneuver. Small, unmanned vehicles might also exploit such motions and are of considerable interest for the purposes of surveillance, environmental monitoring, and search and rescue. Flapping refers to a combination of pitch and heave and has been shown to provide good thrust and efficiency (Read, et al. 2003) when both axes are independently controlled (an Active-Active system). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil actuated only in the heave direction but allowed to pitch passively under the control of a torsion spring (an Active-Passive system). The presence of the spring is simulated in software using a force-feedback control system called Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics, or CPFD (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016). Adding passive pitch to active heave provides significantly improved thrust and efficiency compared with heaving alone, especially when the torsion spring stiffness is selected so that the system operates near resonance (in an Active-Passive system). In many cases, values of thrust and efficiency are comparable to or better than those obtained with two actively controlled degrees of freedom. By using carefully-designed passive dynamics in the pitch direction, we can eliminate one of the two actuators, saving cost, complexity, and weight, while maintaining performance. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  8. Summary of the Blind Test Campaign to predict the High Reynolds number performance of DU00-W-210 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Özlem Ceyhan; Pires, Oscar; Munduate, Xabier

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a blind test campaign organized in the AVATAR project to predict the high Reynolds number performance of a wind turbine airfoil for wind turbine applications. The DU00-W-210 airfoil was tested in the DNW-HDG pressurized wind tunnel in order to investigate...... the flow at high Reynolds number range from 3 to 15 million which is the operating condition of the future large 10MW+ offshore wind turbine rotors. The results of the experiment was used in a blind test campaign to test the prediction capability of the CFD tools used in the wind turbine rotor simulations....... As a result of the blind test campaign it was found that although the codes are in general capable of predicting increased max lift and decreased minimum drag with Re number, the Re trend predictions in particular the glide ratio (lift over drag) need further improvement. In addition to that, the significant...

  9. Predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of 2D airfoil and the performance of 3D wind turbine using a CFD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bum Suk; Kim, Mann Eung [Korean Register of Shipping, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    Despite of the laminar-turbulent transition region co-exist with fully turbulence region around the leading edge of an airfoil, still lots of researchers apply to fully turbulence models to predict aerodynamic characteristics. It is well known that fully turbulent model such as standard k-model couldn't predict the complex stall and the separation behavior on an airfoil accurately, it usually leads to over prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics such as lift and drag forces. So, we apply correlation based transition model to predict aerodynamic performance of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Phase IV wind turbine. And also, compare the computed results from transition model with experimental measurement and fully turbulence results. Results are presented for a range of wind speed, for a NREL Phase IV wind turbine rotor. Low speed shaft torque, power, root bending moment, aerodynamic coefficients of 2D airfoil and several flow field figures results included in this study. As a result, the low speed shaft torque predicted by transitional turbulence model is very good agree with the experimental measurement in whole operating conditions but fully turbulent model(K- {epsilon}) over predict the shaft torque after 7m/s. Root bending moment is also good agreement between the prediction and experiments for most of the operating conditions, especially with the transition model.

  10. Predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of 2D airfoil and the performance of 3D wind turbine using a CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bum Suk; Kim, Mann Eung; Lee, Young Ho

    2008-01-01

    Despite of the laminar-turbulent transition region co-exist with fully turbulence region around the leading edge of an airfoil, still lots of researchers apply to fully turbulence models to predict aerodynamic characteristics. It is well known that fully turbulent model such as standard k-model couldn't predict the complex stall and the separation behavior on an airfoil accurately, it usually leads to over prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics such as lift and drag forces. So, we apply correlation based transition model to predict aerodynamic performance of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Phase IV wind turbine. And also, compare the computed results from transition model with experimental measurement and fully turbulence results. Results are presented for a range of wind speed, for a NREL Phase IV wind turbine rotor. Low speed shaft torque, power, root bending moment, aerodynamic coefficients of 2D airfoil and several flow field figures results included in this study. As a result, the low speed shaft torque predicted by transitional turbulence model is very good agree with the experimental measurement in whole operating conditions but fully turbulent model(K- ε) over predict the shaft torque after 7m/s. Root bending moment is also good agreement between the prediction and experiments for most of the operating conditions, especially with the transition model

  11. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  12. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, N.; Johansen, J.; Fuglsang, P.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which air-foils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so. The airfoils are classified according to the agreement between the numerical results and experimental data. A study correlating the available data and this classification is performed. It is found that transition modelling is to a large extent responsible for the poor quality of the computational results for most of the considered airfoils. The transition model mechanism that leads to these discrepancies is identified. Some advices are given for elaborating future airfoil design processes that would involve the numerical code EllipSys2D in particular, and transition modelling in general. (au)

  13. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel...... method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which airfoils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so. Theairfoils are classified according to the agreement between the numerical results and experimental...... data. A study correlating the available data and this classification is performed. It is found that transition modelling is to a large extent responsible forthe poor quality of the computational results for most of the considered airfoils. The transition model mechanism that leads...

  14. The aerodynamic design of an advanced rotor airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J. A., Jr.; Hinson, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced rotor airfoil, designed utilizing supercritical airfoil technology and advanced design and analysis methodology is described. The airfoil was designed subject to stringent aerodynamic design criteria for improving the performance over the entire rotor operating regime. The design criteria are discussed. The design was accomplished using a physical plane, viscous, transonic inverse design procedure, and a constrained function minimization technique for optimizing the airfoil leading edge shape. The aerodynamic performance objectives of the airfoil are discussed.

  15. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    OpenAIRE

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe; Fuglsang, P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which airfoils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so...

  16. Darrieus wind-turbine airfoil configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, P. G.; Fritschen, J. R.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose was to determine what aerodynamic performance improvement, if any, could be achieved by judiciously choosing the airfoil sections for Darrieus wind turbine blades. Ten different airfoils, having thickness to chord ratios of twelve, fifteen and eighteen percent, were investigated. Performance calculations indicated that the NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients at least as great as the NACA. Furthermore, the power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves were broader and flatter for the 6-series airfoils. Sample calculations for an NACA 63 sub 2-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17 to 27% depending upon rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil. An attempt was made to account for the flow curvature effects associated with Darrieus turbines by transforming the NACA 63 sub 2-015 airfoil to an appropriate shape.

  17. A computational procedure to improve airfoil performance considering shape and flow interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbandi, M.; Taghvaey, M.J.; Schneider, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in shape design issue, there is still room to work on this topic considering different flow field conditions and specific aerodynamic applications. Today, the optimization techniques are known as a major tool to reach the best possible aerodynamic shape for some specific conditions. In general direct optimization techniques, the optimization process is started from choosing a suitable primitive shape and the shape is improved by suitable considerations of the design objectives and constraints. In a similar attempt, we develop a new optimization strategy to improve the airfoil shape for specified applications. The strategy involves several stages. It includes to determine the flow conditions and design parameters, to establish the objective function, to select a suitable primitive shape, to generate a mechanism for inserting gradual shape changes, to generate grids around each defined shape, to solve the flow field for each separate shape, to collect the solution data, to change the discrete data to the continuous distribution functions, to construct the objective function, and to minimize the objective function using the steepest descent approach. No constraint function is incorporated into the constructed objective function. The cruise flight of an aircraft at an specified altitude is supposed to be the flow field conditions around the proposed airfoil. Nevertheless, the flow field is assumed to be viscous and compressible as well as turbulent. The procedure is tested starting from two generic airfoil shapes with and without camber. The developed algorithm works well for both cases; however, it may not converge to identical shapes if the primitive shapes are not identical. (author)

  18. A computational procedure to improve airfoil performance considering shape and flow interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbandi, M.; Taghvaey, M.J. [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: darbandi@sharif.edu; Schneider, G.E. [Univ. of Waterloo, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Despite remarkable progress in shape design issue, there is still room to work on this topic considering different flow field conditions and specific aerodynamic applications. Today, the optimization techniques are known as a major tool to reach the best possible aerodynamic shape for some specific conditions. In general direct optimization techniques, the optimization process is started from choosing a suitable primitive shape and the shape is improved by suitable considerations of the design objectives and constraints. In a similar attempt, we develop a new optimization strategy to improve the airfoil shape for specified applications. The strategy involves several stages. It includes to determine the flow conditions and design parameters, to establish the objective function, to select a suitable primitive shape, to generate a mechanism for inserting gradual shape changes, to generate grids around each defined shape, to solve the flow field for each separate shape, to collect the solution data, to change the discrete data to the continuous distribution functions, to construct the objective function, and to minimize the objective function using the steepest descent approach. No constraint function is incorporated into the constructed objective function. The cruise flight of an aircraft at an specified altitude is supposed to be the flow field conditions around the proposed airfoil. Nevertheless, the flow field is assumed to be viscous and compressible as well as turbulent. The procedure is tested starting from two generic airfoil shapes with and without camber. The developed algorithm works well for both cases; however, it may not converge to identical shapes if the primitive shapes are not identical. (author)

  19. Ice Accretions and Full-Scale Iced Aerodynamic Performance Data for a Two-Dimensional NACA 23012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, Emmanuel; Moens, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the data collected during the large wind tunnel campaigns conducted as part of the SUNSET project (StUdies oN Scaling EffecTs due to ice) also known as the Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation study: a joint effort by NASA, the Office National d'Etudes et Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA), and the University of Illinois. These data form a benchmark database of full-scale ice accretions and corresponding ice-contaminated aerodynamic performance data for a two-dimensional (2D) NACA 23012 airfoil. The wider research effort also included an analysis of ice-contaminated aerodynamics that categorized ice accretions by aerodynamic effects and an investigation of subscale, low- Reynolds-number ice-contaminated aerodynamics for the NACA 23012 airfoil. The low-Reynolds-number investigation included an analysis of the geometric fidelity needed to reliably assess aerodynamic effects of airfoil icing using artificial ice shapes. Included herein are records of the ice accreted during campaigns in NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Two different 2D NACA 23012 airfoil models were used during these campaigns; an 18-in. (45.7-cm) chord (subscale) model and a 72-in. (182.9-cm) chord (full-scale) model. The aircraft icing conditions used during these campaigns were selected from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 25 Appendix C icing envelopes. The records include the test conditions, photographs of the ice accreted, tracings of the ice, and ice depth measurements. Model coordinates and pressure tap locations are also presented. Also included herein are the data recorded during a wind tunnel campaign conducted in the F1 Subsonic Pressurized Wind Tunnel of ONERA. The F1 tunnel is a pressured, high- Reynolds-number facility that could accommodate the full-scale (72-in. (182.9-cm) chord) 2D NACA 23012 model. Molds were made of the ice accreted during selected test runs of the full-scale model

  20. Airfoils and method for designing airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to airfoils and design and design optimization of airfoils, in particular airfoils of rotor blades for wind turbines. One aspect of the invention relates to an airfoil with an external shape provided by an airfoil profile defined by a limited number of parameters......, such as a set of parameters. Another aspect of the invention relates to a method for designing an airfoil by means of an analytical airfoil profile, said method comprising the step of applying a conformal mapping to a near circle in a near circle plane, wherein the near circle is at least partly expressed...... by means of an analytical function, said conformal mapping transforming the near circle in the near circle plane to the airfoil profile in an airfoil plane. L...

  1. Composite airfoil assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  2. Airfoils for wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  3. Pitching Airfoil Boundary Layer Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Raffel, Markus; Richard, Hugues; Richter, Kai; Bosbach, Johannes; Geißler, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The present paper describes an experiment performed in a transonic wind tunnel facility where a new test section has been developed especially for the investigation of the unsteady flow above oscillating airfoils under dynamic stall conditions. Dynamic stall is characterized by the development, movement and shedding of one or more concentrated vortices on the airfoils upper surface. The hysteresis loops of lift-, drag- and pitching moment are highly influenced by these vortices. To understand...

  4. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to an airfoil shaped body with a leading edge and a trailing edge extending along the longitudinal extension of the body and defining a profile chord, the airfoil shaped body comprising an airfoil shaped facing that forms the outer surface of the airfoil shaped body...

  5. Design and optimization of tidal turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    To increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and, thereby, to reduce cost of energy, the use of specially tailored airfoils is needed. This work is focused on the design of an airfoil for marine application. Firstly, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed with reference to the requirements for wind turbine airfoils. Then, the design approach is presented. This is a numerical optimization scheme in which a gradient-based algorithm is used, coupled with the RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints .A section of the present work is dedicated to address this point; particular importance is given to the cavitation phenomenon. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high-efficiency hydrofoil is illustrated, and the results are compared with existing turbine airfoils, considering also the effect on turbine performance due to different airfoils.

  6. Airfoil selection methodology for Small Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salgado Fuentes, Valentin; Troya, Cesar; Moreno, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    On wind turbine technology, the aerodynamic performance is fundamental to increase efficiency. Nowadays there are several databases with airfoils designed and simulated for different applications; that is why it is necessary to select those suitable for a specific application. This work presents...... a new methodology for airfoil selection used in feasibility and optimization of small wind turbines with low cut-in speed. On the first stage, airfoils data is tested on XFOIL software to check its compatibility with the simulator; then, arithmetic mean criteria is recursively used to discard...... underperformed airfoils; the best airfoil data was exported to Matlab for a deeper analysis. In the second part, data points were interpolated using "splines" to calculate glide ratio and stability across multiple angles of attack, those who present a bigger steadiness were conserved. As a result, 3 airfoils...

  7. Numerical Prediction of the Impact of Non-Uniform Leading Edge Coatings On the Aerodynamic Performance of Compressor Airfoils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elmstrom, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation is presented that provides predictions of the aerodynamic impact of uniform and non-uniform coatings applied to the leading edge of a compressor airfoil in a cascade. Using a NACA 65(12...

  8. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  9. Study on Trailing Edge Ramp of Supercritical Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    China Abstract Trailing edge flow control method could improve the performance of supercritical airfoil with a small modification on the original...stall behaviour . As a result, the non-separation ramp could increase the thickness of airfoil, which benefits wing structure and aerodynamic...direction based on the original RAE2822 airfoil, which will thicken the airfoil. The interpolation is implemented as shown in Eqn. 1. This modification could

  10. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  11. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  12. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and tip speed ratio, the optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with an objective of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on the previous in-house airfoil family which were optimized at a Reynolds number of 3...... million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry on the existing airfoils and thus simplify the design procedure. The viscos/inviscid code Xfoil is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization where the Reynolds number is set at 16 million with a free...

  13. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and a tip speed ratio, optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve a high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with the objectives of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on a previous in-house designed airfoil family which was optimized at a Reynolds number...... of 3 million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry based on the existing airfoils which simplifies the design procedure. The viscous/inviscid interactive code XFOIL is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization at a Reynolds number of 16 million...

  14. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Requirements for Performance Tests 5 Table 5 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... XXXX, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Requirements for Performance Tests As stated in § 63...

  15. Airfoil optimization for morphing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Howoong

    Continuous variation of the aircraft wing shape to improve aerodynamic performance over a wide range of flight conditions is one of the objectives of morphing aircraft design efforts. This is being pursued because of the development of new materials and actuation systems that might allow this shape change. The main purpose of this research is to establish appropriate problem formulations and optimization strategies to design an airfoil for morphing aircraft that include the energy required for shape change. A morphing aircraft can deform its wing shape, so the aircraft wing has different optimum shapes as the flight condition changes. The actuation energy needed for moving the airfoil surface is modeled and used as another design objective. Several multi-objective approaches are applied to a low-speed, incompressible flow problem and to a problem involving low-speed and transonic flow. The resulting solutions provide the best tradeoff between low drag, high energy and higher drag, low energy sets of airfoil shapes. From this range of solutions, design decisions can be made about how much energy is needed to achieve a desired aerodynamic performance. Additionally, an approach to model aerodynamic work, which would be more realistic and may allow using pressure on the airfoil to assist a morphing shape change, was formulated and used as part of the energy objective. These results suggest that it may be possible to design a morphing airfoil that exploits the airflow to reduce actuator energy.

  16. Airfoil design and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, T. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik

    2001-07-01

    The aerodynamic efficiency of mildly swept wings is mainly influenced by the characteristics of the airfoil sections. The specific design of airfoils is therefore one of the classical tasks of aerodynamics. Since the airfoil characteristics are directly dependent on the inviscid pressure distribution the application of inverse calculation methods is obvious. The direct numerical airfoil optimization offers an alternative to the manual design and attracts increasing interest. (orig.)

  17. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, L; Ramos-García, N; Sørensen, J N

    2014-01-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the separation point. A calibration of the code through comparison with experiments has been performed using one set of airfoils. A second set of airfoils has been used for the validation of the calibrated model. Predicted aerodynamic forces for a wide range of angles of attack (0 to 90 deg) are in overall good agreement with wind tunnel measurements

  18. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Thin, High-Performance Airfoil for Use in Ground Fluids Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Clark, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The FAA has worked with Transport Canada and others to develop allowance times for aircraft operating in ice-pellet precipitation. Wind-tunnel testing has been carried out to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids contaminated with ice pellets using a thin, high-performance wing section at the National Research Council of Canada Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel. The objective of this paper is to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of this wing section in order to better understand the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination. Aerodynamic performance data, boundary-layer surveys and flow visualization were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 6.0×10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.12. The clean, baseline model exhibited leading-edge stall characteristics including a leading-edge laminar separation bubble and minimal or no separation on the trailing edge of the main element or flap. These results were consistent with expected 2-D aerodynamics and showed no anomalies that could adversely affect the evaluation of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on the wing. Tests conducted with roughness and leading-edge flow disturbances helped to explain the aerodynamic impact of the anti-icing fluids and contamination. The stalling characteristics of the wing section with fluid and contamination appear to be driven at least partially by the effects of a secondary wave of fluid that forms near the leading edge as the wing is rotated in the simulated takeoff profile. These results have provided a much more complete understanding of the adverse aerodynamic effects of anti-icing fluids and ice-pellet contamination on this wing section. This is important since these results are used, in part, to develop the ice-pellet allowance times that are applicable to many different airplanes.

  19. Isocentric rotational performance of the Elekta Precise Table studied using a USB-microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Riis, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The isocentric three-dimensional performance of the Elekta Precise Table was investigated. A pointer was attached to the radiation head of the accelerator and positioned at the geometric rotational axis of the head. A USB-microscope was mounted on the treatment tabletop to measure the table...... position relative to the pointer tip. The table performance was mapped in terms of USB-microscope images of the pointer tip at different table angles and load configurations. The USB-microscope was used as a detector to measure the pointer tip positions with a resolution down to 0.01 mm. A new elastic...

  20. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  1. Experimental investigation of gas turbine airfoil aerodynamic performance without and with film cooling in an annular sector cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiers, S.H.

    2002-02-01

    subject, as well as state of the art in secondary flow, single cooling jet behavior and film cooling. An overview of existing linear, annular and rotating annular test facilities is also given. The second part deals with the design and instrumentation as well as the measuring technique used for the performed investigations. Surface flow visualization has been performed to get a first idea about the secondary flow. Aerodynamic performance measurements have been conducted by means of five-hole pneumatic pressure probe traverses at 98%, 106% and 140% of c{sub ax} downstream of the cascade to gain information about the secondary flow and primary loss distribution. The variation of the Reynolds number and turbulence level show an overall loss increase for higher turbulence levels and Reynolds numbers due to higher mixing losses. Experimental investigations in terms of surface flow visualization and 5 hole pressure probe traverse of the influence of film cooling on the secondary flow effects and the losses of the cascade have been performed on a modem three dimensional nozzle guide vane with shower head cooling at the leading edge, four film cooling rows at the suction side, two film cooling rows at the pressure side and trailing edge ejection. The results of the flow visualization and pressure probe traverse show that the secondary flow region is only slightly effected by the ejection of low momentum cooling air. The cooling jets are deflected towards the hub, due to the low energy contents. With increasing mass flux ratio, respectively momentum flux ratio, the expanded secondary flow area at the trailing edge decreases. A rapid increase of the mixing loss at the midsection for ejection of high mass flow ratios in a highly accelerated flow at the suction side is observed. The coolant is seen, in every case, to increase the loss compared with the uncooled case. This is in accordance with the findings of most authors with regard to airfoil surface cooling, but the decrease in

  2. Aerodynamic shape optimization of Airfoils in 2-D incompressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Srinivethan; Upadhyay, Harshal; Somasekaran, Sandeep; Raghunath, Sreekanth

    2010-11-01

    An optimization framework was developed for maximizing the region of 2-D airfoil immersed in laminar flow with enhanced aerodynamic performance. It uses genetic algorithm over a population of 125, across 1000 generations, to optimize the airfoil. On a stand-alone computer, a run takes about an hour to obtain a converged solution. The airfoil geometry was generated using two Bezier curves; one to represent the thickness and the other the camber of the airfoil. The airfoil profile was generated by adding and subtracting the thickness curve from the camber curve. The coefficient of lift and drag was computed using potential velocity distribution obtained from panel code, and boundary layer transition prediction code was used to predict the location of onset of transition. The objective function of a particular design is evaluated as the weighted-average of aerodynamic characteristics at various angles of attacks. Optimization was carried out for several objective functions and the airfoil designs obtained were analyzed.

  3. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, James L [Boulder, CO; Somers, Dan L [Port Matilda, PA

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  4. Airfoil System for Cruising Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Liu, Tianshu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An airfoil system includes an airfoil body and at least one flexible strip. The airfoil body has a top surface and a bottom surface, a chord length, a span, and a maximum thickness. Each flexible strip is attached along at least one edge thereof to either the top or bottom surface of the airfoil body. The flexible strip has a spanwise length that is a function of the airfoil body's span, a chordwise width that is a function of the airfoil body's chord length, and a thickness that is a function of the airfoil body's maximum thickness.

  5. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  6. Numerical analysis of air-foil shaped fin performance in printed circuit heat exchanger in a supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jin Gyu [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jae Eun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Staggered arrangement affects the pressure drop but does not significantly affect to the heat transfer. • The total pressure drop is reduced, but the amount of acceleration pressure drop increases while that of frictional pressure drop decreases as the horizontal number increases. • For the vertical number, the total pressure drop decreases more largely than the horizontal number. • The objective function shows that the fully staggered arrangement shows best performance. - Abstract: One of the key issues of the PCHE technology in the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is to achieve an efficient and compact designs to be able to enhance heat transfer and reduce pressure drop. The issue is challenging due to the complex configuration of micro-channels in the PCHE. In this study, an innovative micro-channel equipped with an array of airfoil fins is analyzed to evaluate its performance. In so doing, sensitivity analysis with various design parameters is performed to configure the optimal arrangement of airfoil fins by using CFD analysis for Supercritical Carbon dioxide Integral Experimental Loop (SCIEL) in Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Dominant geometric parameters of the fin arrangement that affects to the thermal and hydraulic performances are the horizontal, vertical and staggered pitches. ANSYS ICEM CFD and ANSYS CFX are used for the grid generation and the computational calculation. CO{sub 2} properties are used by using REFPROF software database. The inlet temperature of the hot side is 618 K and that of the cold side is 585 K. The reference mass flow rate is set as 1.2 g/s for the vertical number of 2.0, which is the Reynolds number of about 30,000. The mass flow rate changes from 0.4 to 4.8 g/s in order to investigate the Reynolds number effect. The k-ε model is selected as the turbulence model. In conclusions, the results show that the optimal arrangement of airfoil fins can be examined in terms of an objective

  7. Assessment of the Metrological Performance of Seismic Tables for a QMS Recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A Silva; Costa, A Campos; Candeias, P; Martins, L Lages; Martins, A C Freitas; Ferreira, A C; Sousa, J Alves e

    2016-01-01

    Seismic testing and analysis using large infrastructures, such as shaking tables and reaction walls, is performed worldwide requiring the use of complex instrumentation systems. To assure the accuracy of these systems, conformity assessment is needed to verify the compliance with standards and applications, and the Quality Management Systems (QMS) is being increasingly applied to domains where risk analysis is critical as a way to provide a formal recognition. This paper describes an approach to the assessment of the metrological performance of seismic shake tables as part of a QMS recognition, with the analysis of a case study of LNEC Seismic shake table. (paper)

  8. Assessment of the Metrological Performance of Seismic Tables for a QMS Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Ribeiro, A.; Campos Costa, A.; Candeias, P.; Sousa, J. Alves e.; Lages Martins, L.; Freitas Martins, A. C.; Ferreira, A. C.

    2016-11-01

    Seismic testing and analysis using large infrastructures, such as shaking tables and reaction walls, is performed worldwide requiring the use of complex instrumentation systems. To assure the accuracy of these systems, conformity assessment is needed to verify the compliance with standards and applications, and the Quality Management Systems (QMS) is being increasingly applied to domains where risk analysis is critical as a way to provide a formal recognition. This paper describes an approach to the assessment of the metrological performance of seismic shake tables as part of a QMS recognition, with the analysis of a case study of LNEC Seismic shake table.

  9. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  10. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  11. Development and testing of airfoils for high-altitude aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drela, Mark (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Specific tasks included airfoil design; study of airfoil constraints on pullout maneuver; selection of tail airfoils; examination of wing twist; test section instrumentation and layout; and integrated airfoil/heat-exchanger tests. In the course of designing the airfoil, specifically for the APEX test vehicle, extensive studies were made over the Mach and Reynolds number ranges of interest. It is intended to be representative of airfoils required for lightweight aircraft operating at extreme altitudes, which is the primary research objective of the APEX program. Also considered were thickness, pitching moment, and off-design behavior. The maximum ceiling parameter M(exp 2)C(sub L) value achievable by the Apex-16 airfoil was found to be a strong constraint on the pullout maneuver. The NACA 1410 and 2410 airfoils (inverted) were identified as good candidates for the tail, with predictable behavior at low Reynolds numbers and good tolerance to flap deflections. With regards to wing twist, it was decided that a simple flat wing was a reasonable compromise. The test section instrumentation consisted of surface pressure taps, wake rakes, surface-mounted microphones, and skin-friction gauges. Also, a modest wind tunnel test was performed for an integrated airfoil/heat-exchanger configuration, which is currently on Aurora's 'Theseus' aircraft. Although not directly related to the APEX tests, the aerodynamics or heat exchangers has been identified as a crucial aspect of designing high-altitude aircraft and hence is relevant to the ERAST program.

  12. Improving a two-equation eddy-viscosity turbulence model to predict the aerodynamic performance of thick wind turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangga, Galih; Kusumadewi, Tri; Hutomo, Go; Sabila, Ahmad; Syawitri, Taurista; Setiadi, Herlambang; Faisal, Muhamad; Wiranegara, Raditya; Hendranata, Yongki; Lastomo, Dwi; Putra, Louis; Kristiadi, Stefanus

    2018-03-01

    Numerical simulations for relatively thick airfoils are carried out in the present studies. An attempt to improve the accuracy of the numerical predictions is done by adjusting the turbulent viscosity of the eddy-viscosity Menter Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The modification involves the addition of a damping factor on the wall-bounded flows incorporating the ratio of the turbulent kinetic energy to its specific dissipation rate for separation detection. The results are compared with available experimental data and CFD simulations using the original Menter SST model. The present model improves the lift polar prediction even though the stall angle is still overestimated. The improvement is caused by the better prediction of separated flow under a strong adverse pressure gradient. The results show that the Reynolds stresses are damped near the wall causing variation of the logarithmic velocity profiles.

  13. Wind Tunnel Aeroacoustic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: August 23, 2002 through March 31, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlemans, S.

    2004-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, working through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve our understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. To that end, wind tunnel aerodynamic tests and aeroacoustic tests have been performed on six airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines. Results are documented in this report.

  14. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  15. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  16. First-stage high pressure turbine bucket airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Theresa A.; Ahmadi, Majid; Clemens, Eugene; Perry, II, Jacob C.; Holiday, Allyn K.; Delehanty, Richard A.; Jacala, Ariel Caesar

    2004-05-25

    The first-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  17. Airfoil boundary layer separation and control at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarusevych, S.; Sullivan, P.E. [University of Toronto, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kawall, J.G. [Ryerson University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2005-04-01

    The boundary layer separation on a NACA 0025 airfoil was studied experimentally via hot-wire anemometry and surface pressure measurements. The results provide added insight into periodic boundary layer control, suggesting that matching the excitation frequency with the most amplified disturbance in the separated shear layer is optimal for improving airfoil performance. (orig.)

  18. An Integrated Method for Airfoil Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okrent, Joshua B.

    Design exploration and optimization is a large part of the initial engineering and design process. To evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a design, viscous Navier-Stokes solvers can be used. However this method can prove to be overwhelmingly time consuming when performing an initial design sweep. Therefore, another evaluation method is needed to provide accurate results at a faster pace. To accomplish this goal, a coupled viscous-inviscid method is used. This thesis proposes an integrated method for analyzing, evaluating, and optimizing an airfoil using a coupled viscous-inviscid solver along with a genetic algorithm to find the optimal candidate. The method proposed is different from prior optimization efforts in that it greatly broadens the design space, while allowing the optimization to search for the best candidate that will meet multiple objectives over a characteristic mission profile rather than over a single condition and single optimization parameter. The increased design space is due to the use of multiple parametric airfoil families, namely the NACA 4 series, CST family, and the PARSEC family. Almost all possible airfoil shapes can be created with these three families allowing for all possible configurations to be included. This inclusion of multiple airfoil families addresses a possible criticism of prior optimization attempts since by only focusing on one airfoil family, they were inherently limiting the number of possible airfoil configurations. By using multiple parametric airfoils, it can be assumed that all reasonable airfoil configurations are included in the analysis and optimization and that a global and not local maximum is found. Additionally, the method used is amenable to customization to suit any specific needs as well as including the effects of other physical phenomena or design criteria and/or constraints. This thesis found that an airfoil configuration that met multiple objectives could be found for a given set of nominal

  19. New airfoil sections for straight bladed turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumaza, B.

    1987-07-01

    A theoretical investigation of aerodynamic performance for vertical axis Darrieus wind turbine with new airfoils sections is carried out. The blade section aerodynamics characteristics are determined from turbomachines cascade model. The model is also adapted to the vertical Darrieus turbine for the performance prediction of the machine. In order to choose appropriate value of zero-lift-drag coefficient in calculation, an analytical expression is introduced as function of chord-radius ratio and Reynolds numbers. New airfoils sections are proposed and analyzed for straight-bladed turbine.

  20. New airfoil sections for straight bladed turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boumaza, B.

    1987-07-01

    A theoretical investigation of aerodynamic performance for vertical axis Darrieus wind turbine with new airfoils sections is carried out. The blade section aerodynamics characteristics are determined from turbomachines cascade model. The model is also adapted to the vertical Darrieus turbine for the performance prediction of the machine. In order to choose appropriate value of zero-lift-drag coefficient in calculation, an analytical expression is introduced as function of chord-radius ratio and Reynolds numbers. New airfoils sections are proposed and analyzed for straight-bladed turbine

  1. Investigation of a Novel Turbulence Model and Using Leading-Edge Slots for Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Airfoils and Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhaghi, Saman

    as compared to the baseline DES. In the second part of this study, the focus is on improving the aerodynamic performance of airfoils and wind turbines in terms of lift and drag coefficients and power generation. One special type of add-on feature for wind turbines and airfoils, i.e., leading-edge slots are investigated through numerical simulation and laboratory experiments. Although similar slots are designed and employed for aircrafts, a special slot with a reversed flow direction is drilled in the leading edge of a sample wind turbine airfoil to study its influence on the aerodynamic performance. The objective is to vary the five main geometrical parameters of slot and characterize the performance improvement of the new design under different operating conditions. A number of Design of Experiment and optimization studies are conducted to determine the most suitable slot configuration to maximize the lift or lift-over-drag ratio. Results indicate that proper sizing and placement of slot can improve the lift coefficient, while it has negligible negative impact on the drag. Some recommendations for future investigation on slot are proposed at the end. The performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine blade equipped with leading-edge slot is also studied, and it is concluded that slotted blades can generate about 10% more power than solid blades, for the two operating conditions investigated. The good agreement between the CFD predictions and experimental data confirms the validity of the model and results.

  2. UnoHop: Efficient Distributed Hash Table with O(1 Lookup Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Sitepu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Hash Tables (DHTs with O(1 lookup performance strive to minimize the maintenance traffic which required for propagating membership changes information (events. These events distribution allows each node in the peer-to-peer network maintains accurate routing tables with complete membership information. We present UnoHop, a novel DHT protocol with O(1 lookup performance. The protocol uses an efficient mechanism to distribute events through a dissemination tree that constructed dynamically rooted at the node that detect the events. Our protocol produces symmetric bandwidth usage at all nodes while decreasing the events propagation delay.

  3. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TWO ELEMENT CAMBER MORPHING AIRFOIL IN LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJESH SENTHIL KUMAR T.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic performance of a two-element camber morphing airfoil was investigated at low Reynolds number using the transient SST model in ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 and eN method in XFLR5. The two-element camber morphing concept was employed to morph the baseline airfoil into another airfoil by altering the orientation of mean-line at 35% of the chord to achieve better aerodynamic efficiency. NACA 0012 was selected as baseline airfoil. NACA 23012 was chosen as the test case as it has the camber-line similar to that of the morphed airfoil and as it has the same thickness as that of the baseline airfoil. The simulations were carried out at chord based Reynolds numbers of 2.5×105 and 3.9×105. The aerodynamic force coefficients, aerodynamic efficiency and the location of the transition point of laminar separation bubble over these airfoils were studied for various angles of attack. It was found that the aerodynamic efficiency of the morphed airfoil was 12% higher than that of the target airfoil at 4° angle of attack for Reynolds number of 3.9×105 and 54% rise in aerodynamic performance was noted as Reynolds number was varied from 2.5×105 to 3.9×105. The morphed airfoil exhibited the nature of low Reynolds number airfoil.

  4. Shaking table test study on seismic performance of dehydrogenation fan for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kaiyan; Shi Weixing; Cao Jialiang; Wang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Seismic performance of the dehydrogenation fan for nuclear power plants was evaluated based on the shaking table test of earthquake simulation. Dynamic characteristics including the orthogonal tri-axial fundamental frequencies and equivalent damping ratios were measured by the white noise scanning method. Artificial seismic waves were generated corresponding to the floor acceleration response spectra for nuclear power plants. Furthermore, five OBE and one SSE shaking table tests for dehydrogenation fan were performed by using the artificial seismic waves as the seismic inputs along the orthogonal axis simultaneity. Operating function of dehydrogenation fan was monitored and observed during all seismic tests, and performance indexes of dehydrogenation fan were compared before and after seismic tests. The results show that the structural integrity and operating function of the dehydrogenation fan are perfect during all seismic tests; and the performance indexes of the dehydrogenation fan can remain consistent before and after seismic tests; the seismic performance of the dehydrogenation fan can satisfy relevant technical requirements. (authors)

  5. Water table lowering to improve excavation performance and to reduce acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppe, J.C.; Costa, J.F.; Laurent, O. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyses the water table level fluctuations using wells located adjacent to the stripping cuts at the Butia-Leste coal mine, southernmost of Brazil. Piezometers monitored the water table fluctuations. Geological mapping provided additional information aiding the interpretation of the results. A contouring software was also used as tool to aid the interpretation of the data and the results visualisation. The parameters necessary in selecting the location of the wells and pumping volumes were calculated from the data obtained in the water table lowering tests. The results were used to minimise two main problems: the generation of acid mine drainage and the reduction of the excavation performance of the fleet used in overburden removal. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortovich, C. [PCC Airfoils, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The specific goal of this program is to define manufacturing methods that will allow single crystal technology to be applied to complex-cored airfoils components for power generation applications. Tasks addressed include: alloy melt practice to reduce the sulfur content; improvement of casting process; core materials design; and grain orientation control.

  7. Estimation of supersonic fighter jet airfoil data and low speed aerodynamic analysis of airfoil section at the Mach number 0.15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, some of the NACA 64A series airfoils data are estimated and aerodynamic properties are calculated to facilitate great understandings effect of relative thickness on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil by using COMSOL software. 64A201-64A204 airfoils data are not available in literature therefore 64A210 data are used as reference data to estimate 64A201, 64A202, 64A203, 64A204 airfoil configurations. Numerical calculations are then conducted with the angle of attack from -12° to +16° by using k-w turbulence model based on the finite-volume approach. The lift and drag coefficient are one of the most important parameters in studying the airplane performance. Therefore lift, drag and pressure coefficient around selected airfoil are calculated and compared at the Reynolds numbers of 6 × 106 and also stalling characteristics of airfoil section are investigated and presented numerically.

  8. Drop "impact" on an airfoil surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong

    2018-05-17

    Drop impact on an airfoil surface takes place in drop-laden two-phase flow conditions such as rain and icing, which are encountered by wind turbines or airplanes. This phenomenon is characterized by complex nonlinear interactions that manifest rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, the state of the art of the research about drop impact on airfoil surface in the natural drop-laden two-phase flow environment is presented. The potential flow physics, hazards, characteristic parameters, droplet trajectory calculation, drop impact dynamics and effects are discussed. The most key points in establishing the governing equations for a drop-laden flow lie in the modeling of raindrop splash and water film. The various factors affecting the drop impact dynamics and the effects of drop impact on airfoil aerodynamic performance are summarized. Finally, the principle challenges and future research directions in the field as well as some promising measures to deal with the adverse effects of drop-laden flows on airfoil performance are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Aerodynamic Evaluators on the Multi-Objective Optimization of Flatback Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.; Slew, K. Lee; Matida, E.

    2016-09-01

    With the long lengths of today's wind turbine rotor blades, there is a need to reduce the mass, thereby requiring stiffer airfoils, while maintaining the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoils, particularly in the inboard region of the blade where structural demands are highest. Using a genetic algorithm, the multi-objective aero-structural optimization of 30% thick flatback airfoils was systematically performed for a variety of aerodynamic evaluators such as lift-to-drag ratio (Cl/Cd), torque (Ct), and torque-to-thrust ratio (Ct/Cn) to determine their influence on airfoil shape and performance. The airfoil optimized for Ct possessed a 4.8% thick trailing-edge, and a rather blunt leading-edge region which creates high levels of lift and correspondingly, drag. It's ability to maintain similar levels of lift and drag under forced transition conditions proved it's insensitivity to roughness. The airfoil optimized for Cl/Cd displayed relatively poor insensitivity to roughness due to the rather aft-located free transition points. The Ct/Cn optimized airfoil was found to have a very similar shape to that of the Cl/Cd airfoil, with a slightly more blunt leading-edge which aided in providing higher levels of lift and moderate insensitivity to roughness. The influence of the chosen aerodynamic evaluator under the specified conditions and constraints in the optimization of wind turbine airfoils is shown to have a direct impact on the airfoil shape and performance.

  10. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  11. A Shot Number Based Approach to Performance Analysis in Table Tennis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Sho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study proposes a novel approach that improves the conventional performance analysis in table tennis by introducing the concept of frequency, or the number of shots, of each shot number. The improvements over the conventional method are as follows: better accuracy of the evaluation of skills and tactics of players, additional insights into scoring and returning skills and ease of understanding the results with a single criterion. The performance analysis of matches played at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London was conducted using the proposed method. The results showed some effects of the shot number and gender differences in table tennis. Furthermore, comparisons were made between Chinese players and players from other countries, what threw light on the skills and tactics of the Chinese players. The present findings demonstrate that the proposed method provides useful information and has some advantages over the conventional method.

  12. Design of advanced airfoil for stall-regulated wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Grasso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, all the modern megawatt-class wind turbines make use of pitch control to optimise the rotor performance and control the turbine. However, for kilowatt-range machines, stall-regulated solutions are still attractive and largely used for their simplicity and robustness. In the design phase, the aerodynamics plays a crucial role, especially concerning the selection/design of the necessary airfoils. This is because the airfoil performance is supposed to guarantee high wind turbine performance but also the necessary machine control capabilities. In the present work, the design of a new airfoil dedicated to stall machines is discussed. The design strategy makes use of a numerical optimisation scheme, where a gradient-based algorithm is coupled with the RFOIL code and an original Bezier-curves-based parameterisation to describe the airfoil shape. The performances of the new airfoil are compared in free- and fixed-transition conditions. In addition, the performance of the rotor is analysed, comparing the impact of the new geometry with alternative candidates. The results show that the new airfoil offers better performance and control than existing candidates do.

  13. Motivational profiles in table tennis players: Relations with performance anxiety and subjective vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tsz Lun Alan; Zhang, Tao; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2018-06-27

    Research has suggested the need to use a person-centred approach to examine multidimensionality of motivation. Guided by self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985), the primary aim of the present study was to examine the motivational profiles in table tennis players and their composition by gender, country, training status, and competition levels (from recreational to international). The secondary aim was to examine the differences in performance anxiety and subjective vitality across the motivational profiles. Participants were 281 table tennis players from multiple countries, mostly the U.S. and China. Hierarchical and nonhierarchical cluster analyses were conducted and showed three motivational profiles with distinct quantity and quality: "low", "controlled", and "self-determined". Chi-square tests of independence demonstrated significant differences in their cluster membership by country, formal training with a coach, and competition levels, but not gender. MANCOVA results indicated differences in performance anxiety and subjective vitality across the motivational profiles, in which the controlled profile had the greatest anxiety symptoms. These differences are attributed to the quality over quantity of motivation, which have meaningful implications for table tennis coaches and sport psychology consultants to diagnose and intervene with players in order to reduce their performance anxiety and improve their well-being.

  14. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence......Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect...... that is formed in attached boundary layers, but the freestream turbulence can penetrate the boundary layer. The idea is that the resolved turbulence from the freestream should mix high momentum flow into the boundary layer and thereby increase the resistance against separation and increase the maximum lift...

  15. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Haoran; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2014-01-01

    characteristics of blunt trailing edge airfoils are caused by blunt body vortices at low angles of attack, and by the combined effect of separation and blunt body vortices at large angles of attack. With the increase of thickness of blunt trailing edge, the vibration amplitudes of lift and drag curves increase......The aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils generated from the DU- 91-W2-250, DU-97-W-300 and DU-96-W-350 airfoils by enlarging the thickness of trailing edge symmetrically from the location of maximum thickness to chord to the trailing edge were analyzed by using CFD and RFOIL...... methods at a chord Reynolds number of 3 × 106. The goal of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils with different thicknesses of trailing edge and maximum thicknesses to chord. The steady results calculated by the fully turbulent k-ω SST, transitional k-ω SST...

  16. Active Control of Flow Separation Over an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, S. S.

    1999-01-01

    Designing an aircraft without conventional control surfaces is of interest to aerospace community. In this direction, smart actuator devices such as synthetic jets have been proposed to provide aircraft maneuverability instead of control surfaces. In this article, a numerical study is performed to investigate the effects of unsteady suction and blowing on airfoils. The unsteady suction and blowing is introduced at the leading edge of the airfoil in the form of tangential jet. Numerical solutions are obtained using Reynolds-Averaged viscous compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Unsteady suction and blowing is investigated as a means of separation control to obtain lift on airfoils. The effect of blowing coefficients on lift and drag is investigated. The numerical simulations are compared with experiments from the Tel-Aviv University (TAU). These results indicate that unsteady suction and blowing can be used as a means of separation control to generate lift on airfoils.

  17. Numerical investigation of airfoils for small wind turbine applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed numerical investigation of the aerodynamic performance on the five airfoils namely Mid321a, Mid321b, Mid321c, Mid321d, and Mid321e were carried out at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5×105 to 2.5×105. The airfoils used for small wind turbines are designed for Reynolds number ranges between 3×105 and 5×105 and the blades are tend to work on off-design conditions. The blade element moment method was applied to predict the aerodynamic loads, power coefficient, and blade parameters for the airfoils. Based on the evaluate data, it was found that Mid321c airfoil has better lift to drag ratio over the range of Reynolds numbers and attained maximum power coefficient of 0.4487 at Re = 2×105.

  18. Experimental study of the effect of a slat angle on double-element airfoil and application in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Rosendahl, Lasse; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2015-01-01

    A design of double-element airfoil is proposed for its use in the vertical axis wind turbine. The double-element airfoil system consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. The design parameters of the double-element airfoil system are given by the position and orientation of the trailing edge......-element airfoil system designed in this paper. Further, the performance of new design of a vertical axis wind turbine shows considerable increase in the power coefficient and the total power output as compared to the reference wind turbine...

  19. Modeling the Aerodynamic Lift Produced by Oscillating Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Muhammad Saif Ullah; Akhtar, Imran

    2014-01-01

    For present study, setting Strouhal Number (St) as control parameter, numerical simulations for flow past oscillating NACA-0012 airfoil at 1,000 Reynolds Numbers (Re) are performed. Temporal profiles of unsteady forces; lift and thrust, and their spectral analysis clearly indicate the solution to be a period-1 attractor for low Strouhal numbers. This study reveals that aerodynamic forces produced by plunging airfoil are independent of initial kinematic conditions of airfoil that proves the ex...

  20. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  1. Comparison of NACA 6-series and 4-digit airfoils for Darrieus wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, P. G.

    1983-08-01

    The aerodynamic efficiency of Darrieus wind turbines as effected by blade airfoil geometry was investigated. Analysis was limited to curved-bladed machines having rotor solidities of 7-21 percent and operating at a Reynolds number of 3 x 10 to the 6th. Ten different airfoils, having thickness-to-chord ratios of 12, 15, and 18 percent, were studied. Performance estimates were made using a blade element/momentum theory approach. Results indicated that NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients as great as NACA 4-digit airfoils and have broader and flatter power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves. Sample calculations for an NACA 63(2)-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17-27 percent, depending on rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil.

  2. Load alleviation on wind turbine blades using variable airfoil geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basualdo, S.

    2005-03-01

    A two-dimensional theoretical study of the aeroelastic behaviour of an airfoil has been performed, whose geometry can be altered using a rear-mounted flap. This device is governed by a controller, whose objective is to reduce the airfoil displacements and, therefore, the stresses present in a real blade. The aerodynamic problem was solved numerically by a panel method using the potential theory, suitable for modelling attached flows. It is therefore mostly applicable for Pitch Regulated Variable Speed (PRVS) wind turbines, which mainly operate under this flow condition. The results show evident reductions in the airfoil displacements by using simple control strategies having the airfoil position and its first and second derivatives as input, especially at the system's eigenfrequency. The use of variable airfoil geometry is an effective means of reducing the vibration magnitudes of an airfoil that represents a section of a wind turbine blade, when subject to stochastic wind signals. The results of this investigation encourage further investigations with 3D aeroelastic models to predict the reduction in loads in real wind turbines. (author)

  3. Vortex particle-mesh simulations of vertical axis wind turbine flows: from the airfoil performance to the very far wake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chatelain

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A vortex particle-mesh (VPM method with immersed lifting lines has been developed and validated. Based on the vorticity–velocity formulation of the Navier–Stokes equations, it combines the advantages of a particle method and of a mesh-based approach. The immersed lifting lines handle the creation of vorticity from the blade elements and its early development. Large-eddy simulation (LES of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT flows is performed. The complex wake development is captured in detail and over up to 15 diameters downstream: from the blades to the near-wake coherent vortices and then through the transitional ones to the fully developed turbulent far wake (beyond 10 rotor diameters. The statistics and topology of the mean flow are studied. The computational sizes also allow insights into the detailed unsteady vortex dynamics and topological flow features, such as a recirculation region influenced by the tip speed ratio and the rotor geometry.

  4. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils were designed with an objective of high lift and low noise emission. In the design process, the aerodynamic performance is obtained using XFOIL while noise emission is obtained with the BPM model. In this paper we present some validations of the designed CQU......, the designed Cl and Cl/Cd agrees well with the experiment and are in general higher than those of the NACA airfoil. For the acoustic features, the noise emission of the LN118 airfoil is compared with the acoustic measurements and that of the NACA airfoil. Comparisons show that the BPM model can predict...

  5. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TWO ELEMENT CAMBER MORPHING AIRFOIL IN LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLOWS

    OpenAIRE

    RAJESH SENTHIL KUMAR T.; V. SIVAKUMAR; BALAJEE RAMAKRISHNANANDA; ARJHUN A.K, SURIYAPANDIYAN

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance of a two-element camber morphing airfoil was investigated at low Reynolds number using the transient SST model in ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 and eN method in XFLR5. The two-element camber morphing concept was employed to morph the baseline airfoil into another airfoil by altering the orientation of mean-line at 35% of the chord to achieve better aerodynamic efficiency. NACA 0012 was selected as baseline airfoil. NACA 23012 was chosen as the test case as it has the camber-line s...

  6. Airfoil data sensitivity analysis for actuator disc simulations used in wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karl; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the sensitivity of blade geometry and airfoil characteristics on the prediction of performance characteristics of wind farms, large-eddy simulations using an actuator disc (ACD) method are performed for three different blade/airfoil configurations. The aim of the study is to determine ...

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine wakes; Part I: from the airfoil performance to the very far wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Philippe; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Caprace, Denis-Gabriel; Marichal, Yves; Winckelmans, Gregoire

    2017-11-01

    A vortex particle-mesh (VPM) method with immersed lifting lines has been developed and validated. Based on the vorticity-velocity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, it combines the advantages of a particle method and of a mesh-based approach. The immersed lifting lines handle the creation of vorticity from the blade elements and its early development. Large-eddy simulation (LES) of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) flows is performed. The complex wake development is captured in detail and over up to 15 diameters downstream: from the blades to the near-wake coherent vortices and then through the transitional ones to the fully developed turbulent far wake (beyond 10 rotor diameters). The statistics and topology of the mean flow are studied with respect to the VAWT geometry and its operating point. The computational sizes also allow insights into the detailed unsteady vortex dynamics and topological flow features, such as a recirculation region influenced by the tip speed ratio and the rotor geometry.

  8. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  9. Airfoil stall interpreted through linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Denis; Juniper, Matthew; Richez, Francois; Marquet, Olivier; Sipp, Denis

    2017-11-01

    Although airfoil stall has been widely investigated, the origin of this phenomenon, which manifests as a sudden drop of lift, is still not clearly understood. In the specific case of static stall, multiple steady solutions have been identified experimentally and numerically around the stall angle. We are interested here in investigating the stability of these steady solutions so as to first model and then control the dynamics. The study is performed on a 2D helicopter blade airfoil OA209 at low Mach number, M 0.2 and high Reynolds number, Re 1.8 ×106 . Steady RANS computation using a Spalart-Allmaras model is coupled with continuation methods (pseudo-arclength and Newton's method) to obtain steady states for several angles of incidence. The results show one upper branch (high lift), one lower branch (low lift) connected by a middle branch, characterizing an hysteresis phenomenon. A linear stability analysis performed around these equilibrium states highlights a mode responsible for stall, which starts with a low frequency oscillation. A bifurcation scenario is deduced from the behaviour of this mode. To shed light on the nonlinear behavior, a low order nonlinear model is created with the same linear stability behavior as that observed for that airfoil.

  10. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  11. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  12. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    1999-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are basedon four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum...... theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotorwith LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall...... to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFDcomputations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived...

  13. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, C; Fuglsang, P; Soerensen, N N; Aagaard Madsen, H [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Shen, Wen Zhong; Noerkaer Soerensen, J [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are based on four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotor with LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall at the tip is low and that it is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. The use of these characteristics in aeroelastic calculations shows a good agreement in power and flap moments with measurements. Furthermore, a fatigue analysis shows a reduction in the loads of up to 15 % compared to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFD computations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived that can be used to calculate mean values of power and loads. The lift in stall at the tip is low and at the root it is high compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. In particular the power curves were well calculated by use of the optimised airfoil characteristics. In the quasi-3D CFD computations, the airfoil characteristics are derived directly. This Navier-Stokes model takes into account rotational and 3D effects. The model enables the study of the rotational effect of a rotor blade at computing costs similar to what is typical for 2D airfoil calculations. The depicted results show that the model is capable of determining the correct qualitative behaviour for airfoils subject to rotation. The method shows that lift is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil

  14. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Shen, W.Z.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    1999-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are basedon four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scal...

  15. Leading-Edge Noise Prediction of General Airfoil Profiles with Spanwise-Varying Inflow Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto; De Santana, Leandro Dantas

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the leading-edge noise radiated by an airfoil undergoing a turbulent inflow. The noise prediction of generic airfoil profiles subjected to spanwise-varying inflow conditions is performed with the support of Amiet’s theory and the inverse strip technique. In the

  16. Leading-Edge Noise Prediction of General Airfoil Profiles with Spanwise-Varying Inflow Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto; De Santana, Leandro Dantas

    This paper presents a study of the leading-edge noise radiated by an airfoil undergoing a turbulent inflow. The noise prediction of generic airfoil profiles subjected to spanwise-varying inflow conditions is performed with the support of Amiet’s theory and the inverse strip technique. In the

  17. VISUALISASI DISTRIBUSI TEKANAN PADA AIRFOIL JOUKOWSKY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Maryonoto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to develop a computer based system that can beused to visualize pressure distribution on the Joukowsky's airfoil and streamlinespattern around the airfoil. The pressure on the airfoil is calculdted usingformulasderived from potensial theory. Visualization of pressure distribution implementedby using color gradation technique and coded b.v using Borland Delphi 6programming language. The result of the test shotus lhat lhe system has performedperfectly. Pressure dislribution on some kinds of JoukowslE's airfoil shapes andstresmlines pattern around the airfoils can be presenled and seen clearly byusing this visualization system, where the paltern of the pressure distribution onthe airfoil marked by color gradation.

  18. Airfoil optimization for noise emission problem on small scale turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocmen, Tuhfe; Ozerdem, Baris [Mechanical Engineering Department, Yzmir Institute of Technology (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    Wind power is a preferred natural resource and has had benefits for the energy industry and for the environment all over the world. However, noise emission from wind turbines is becoming a major concern today. This study paid close attention to small scale wind turbines close to urban areas and proposes an optimum number of six airfoils to address noise emission concerns and performance criteria. The optimization process aimed to decrease the noise emission levels and enhance the aerodynamic performance of a small scale wind turbine. This study determined the sources and the operating conditions of broadband noise emissions. A new design is presented which enhances aerodynamic performance and at the same time reduces airfoil self noise. It used popular aerodynamic functions and codes based on aero-acoustic empirical models. Through numerical computations and analyses, it is possible to derive useful improvements that can be made to commercial airfoils for small scale wind turbines.

  19. Design analysis of vertical wind turbine with airfoil variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Qaedy, T. Masykur Al; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    With an ever increasing electrical energy crisis occurring in the Banda Aceh City, it will be important to investigate alternative methods of generating power in ways different than fossil fuels. In fact, one of the biggest sources of energy in Aceh is wind energy. It can be harnessed not only by big corporations but also by individuals using Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). This paper presents a three-dimensional CFD analysis of the influence of airfoil design on performance of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The main objective of this paper is to develop an airfoil design for NACA 63-series vertical axis wind turbine, for average wind velocity 2,5 m/s. To utilize both lift and drag force, some of designs of airfoil are analyzed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such us Fluent. Simulation is performed for this airfoil at different angles of attach rearranging from -12°, -8°, -4°, 0°, 4°, 8°, and 12°. The analysis showed that the significant enhancement in value of lift coefficient for airfoil NACA 63-series is occurred for NACA 63-412.

  20. Integration of Airfoil Design during the design of new blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, L.; Bottasso, L.; Croce, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Power, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Despite the fact that the design of a new blade is a multidisciplinary task, often the different disciplines are combined together at later stage. Looking at the aerodynamic design, it is common practice design/select the airfoils first and then design the blade in terms of chord and twist based on the initial selection of the airfoils. Although this approach is quite diffused, it limits the potentialities of obtaining optimal performance. The present work is focused on investigating the benefits of designing the external shape of the blade including the airfoil shapes together with chord and twist. To accomplish this, a design approach has been developed, where an advanced gradient based optimization algorithm is able to control the shape of the blade. The airfoils described in the work are the NACA 4 digits, while the chord distribution and the twist distribution are described through Bezier curves. In this way, the complexity of the problem is limited while a versatile geometrical description is kept. After the details of the optimization scheme are illustrated, several numerical examples are shown, demonstrating the advantages in terms of performance and development time of integrating the design of the airfoils during the optimization of the blade.

  1. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Performance Testing Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDDD, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart DDDDD.... Hydrogen chloride a. Select sampling ports location and the number of traverse points Method 1 in appendix... part 60 of this chapter. e. Measure the hydrogen chloride emission concentration Method 26 or 26A in...

  2. State estimation of the performance of gravity tables using multispectral image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael A. E.; Kannan, Ananda S.; Lund, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Gravity tables are important machinery that separate dense (healthy) grains from lighter (low yielding varieties) aiding in improving the overall quality of seed and grain processing. This paper aims at evaluating the operating states of such tables, which is a critical criterion required...

  3. Study of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise with special focus on airfoils with blunt trailing edges. Two methods are employed to calculate airfoil noise: The flow/acoustic splitting method and the semi-empirical method. The flow/acoustic splitting method is derived from compressible Navier...... design or optimization. Calculations from both methods are compared with exist experiments. The airfoil blunt noise is found as a function of trailing edge bluntness, Reynolds number, angle of attack, etc....

  4. Characterization of Oscillatory Lift in MFC Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Lang Jr, Joseph Reagle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize the response of an airfoil with an oscillatory morphing, Macro-fiber composite (MFC) trailing edge. Correlation of the airfoil lift with the oscillatory input is presented. Modal analysis of the test airfoil and apparatus is used to determine the frequency response function. The effects of static MFC inputs on the FRF are presented and compared to the unactuated airfoil. The transfer function is then used to determine the lift component du...

  5. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  6. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of an Airfoil Traversing Across a Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Borhan A.; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2017-11-01

    While the aerodynamics of an airfoil in a uniform approach flow is well understood, less attention has been paid to airfoils in non-uniform flows. An aircraft encounters such flow, for example, during landing through the air wake of an aircraft carrier. The present work is focused on investigating the fundamental aerodynamics of airfoils in such an environment using canonical flow experiments. To generate a shear approach flow, a shaped honeycomb block is employed in a wind tunnel setup. Direct force measurements are performed on a NACA 0012 airfoil, with an aspect ratio of 1.8, as the airfoil traverses steadily across the shear region. Measurements are conducted at a chord Reynolds number Rec 75k, based on the mean approach stream velocity at the center of the shear zone, for a range of airfoil traverse velocities and angles of attack (0 - 12 degree). The results are compared to those obtained for the same airfoil when placed statically at different points along the traverse path inside the shear zone. The comparison enables examination of the applicability of quasi-steady analysis in computing the forces on the moving airfoil. This work is supported by ONR Grant Number N00014-16-1-2760.

  8. Cadaver-specific CT scans visualized at the dissection table combined with virtual dissection tables improve learning performance in general gross anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paech, Daniel [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg (Germany); Giesel, Frederik L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Unterhinninghofen, Roland [Institute of Anthropomatics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kuner, Thomas; Doll, Sara [Heidelberg University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefit of the incorporation of radiologic anatomy (RA), in terms of student training in RA seminars, cadaver CT scans and life-size virtual dissection tables on the learning success in general anatomy. Three groups of a total of 238 students were compared in a multiple choice general anatomy exam during first-year gross anatomy: (1) a group (year 2015, n{sub 1} = 50) that received training in radiologic image interpretation (RA seminar) and additional access to cadaver CT scans (CT + seminar group); (2) a group (2011, n{sub 2} = 90) that was trained in the RA seminar only (RA seminar group); (3) a group (2011, n{sub 3} = 98) without any radiologic image interpretation training (conventional anatomy group). Furthermore, the students' perception of the new curriculum was assessed qualitatively through a survey. The average test score of the CT + seminar group (21.8 ± 5.0) was significantly higher when compared to both the RA seminar group (18.3 ± 5.0) and the conventional anatomy group (17.1 ± 4.7) (p < 0.001). The incorporation of cadaver CT scans and life-size virtual dissection tables significantly improved the performance of medical students in general gross anatomy. Medical imaging and virtual dissection should therefore be considered to be part of the standard curriculum of gross anatomy. circle Students provided with cadaver CT scans achieved 27 % higher scores in anatomy. (orig.)

  9. Cadaver-specific CT scans visualized at the dissection table combined with virtual dissection tables improve learning performance in general gross anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paech, Daniel; Giesel, Frederik L.; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kuner, Thomas; Doll, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefit of the incorporation of radiologic anatomy (RA), in terms of student training in RA seminars, cadaver CT scans and life-size virtual dissection tables on the learning success in general anatomy. Three groups of a total of 238 students were compared in a multiple choice general anatomy exam during first-year gross anatomy: (1) a group (year 2015, n_1 = 50) that received training in radiologic image interpretation (RA seminar) and additional access to cadaver CT scans (CT + seminar group); (2) a group (2011, n_2 = 90) that was trained in the RA seminar only (RA seminar group); (3) a group (2011, n_3 = 98) without any radiologic image interpretation training (conventional anatomy group). Furthermore, the students' perception of the new curriculum was assessed qualitatively through a survey. The average test score of the CT + seminar group (21.8 ± 5.0) was significantly higher when compared to both the RA seminar group (18.3 ± 5.0) and the conventional anatomy group (17.1 ± 4.7) (p < 0.001). The incorporation of cadaver CT scans and life-size virtual dissection tables significantly improved the performance of medical students in general gross anatomy. Medical imaging and virtual dissection should therefore be considered to be part of the standard curriculum of gross anatomy. circle Students provided with cadaver CT scans achieved 27 % higher scores in anatomy. (orig.)

  10. Numerical optimization of circulation control airfoil at high subsonic speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, T. C.; Kidwell, G. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical procedure for optimizing the design of the circulation control airfoil for use at high subsonic speeds is presented. The procedure consists of an optimization scheme coupled with a viscous potential flow analysis for the blowing jet. The desired airfoil is defined by a combination of three baseline shapes (cambered ellipse and cambered ellipse with drooped and spiraled trailing edges). The coefficients of these shapes are used as design variables in the optimization process. Under the constraints of lift augmentation and lift-to-drag ratios, the airfoil, optimized at free-stream Mach 0.54 and alpha = -2 degrees can be characterized as a cambered ellipse with a drooped trailing edge. Experimental tests support the performance improvement predicted by numerical optimization.

  11. Unsteady flow model for circulation-control airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis and a numerical lifting surface method are developed for predicting the unsteady airloads on two-dimensional circulation control airfoils in incompressible flow. The analysis and the computer program are validated by correlating the computed unsteady airloads with test data and also with other theoretical solutions. Additionally, a mathematical model for predicting the bending-torsion flutter of a two-dimensional airfoil (a reference section of a wing or rotor blade) and a computer program using an iterative scheme are developed. The flutter program has a provision for using the CC airfoil airloads program or the Theodorsen hard flap solution to compute the unsteady lift and moment used in the flutter equations. The adopted mathematical model and the iterative scheme are used to perform a flutter analysis of a typical CC rotor blade reference section. The program seems to work well within the basic assumption of the incompressible flow.

  12. Performance of rocking systems on shallow improved sand: Shaking table testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos eTsatsis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have highlighted the potential benefits of inelastic foundation response during seismic shaking. According to an emerging seismic design scheme, termed rocking isolation, the foundation is intentionally under–designed to promote rocking and limit the inertia transmitted to the structure. Such reversal of capacity design may improve the seismic performance, drastically increasing the safety margins. However, the benefit comes at the expense of permanent settlement and rotation, which may threaten post-earthquake functionality. Such undesired deformation can be maintained within tolerable limits, provided that the safety factor against vertical loading FSV is adequately large. In such a case, the response is uplifting–dominated and the accumulation of settlement can be limited. However, this is not always feasible as the soil properties may not be ideal. Shallow soil improvement may offer a viable solution and is therefore worth investigating. Its efficiency is related to the nature of rocking, which tends to mobilize a shallow stress bulb. To this end, a series of shaking table tests are conducted, using an idealized slender bridge pier as conceptual prototype. Two systems are studied, both lying on a square foundation of width B. The first corresponds to a lightly-loaded and the second to a heavily-loaded structure. The two systems are first tested on poor and ideal soil conditions to demonstrate the necessity for soil improvement. Then, the efficiency of shallow soil improvement is studied by investigating their performance on soil crusts of depth z/B = 0.5 and 1. It is shown that a z/B = 1 dense sand crust is enough to achieve practically the same performance with the ideal case of dense sand. A shallower z/B = 0.5 improvement layer may also be considered, depending on design requirements. The efficiency of the soil improvement is ameliorated with the increase of rotation amplitude, and with the number of the cycles of the

  13. Airfoil Trailing Edge Noise Generation and Its Surface Pressure Fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flows over a NACA 0015 airfoil is performed. The purpose of such numerical study is to relate the aerodynamic surface pressure with the noise generation. The results from LES are validated against detailed surface pressure measurements...... where the time history pressure data are recorded by the surface pressure microphones. After the flow-field is stabilized, the generated noise from the airfoil Trailing Edge (TE) is predicted using the acoustic analogy solver, where the results from LES are the input. It is found that there is a strong...

  14. Evolving aerodynamic airfoils for wind turbines through a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. J.; Gómez, E.; Grageda, J. I.; Couder, C.; Solís, A.; Hanotel, C. L.; Ledesma, JI

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, genetic algorithms stand out for airfoil optimisation, due to the virtues of mutation and crossing-over techniques. In this work we propose a genetic algorithm with arithmetic crossover rules. The optimisation criteria are taken to be the maximisation of both aerodynamic efficiency and lift coefficient, while minimising drag coefficient. Such algorithm shows greatly improvements in computational costs, as well as a high performance by obtaining optimised airfoils for Mexico City's specific wind conditions from generic wind turbines designed for higher Reynolds numbers, in few iterations.

  15. Competition Field Perceptions of Table-tennis Athletes and their Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ying-Chieh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between positive and negative perceptions is fundamental in perception models. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between field perceptions of table tennis players and the outcome (net result during the matches in a competition. Experimental data were collected from 10 elite table tennis players and analysed. The results addressed the following three competition field perceptions: (1 before the service, the player’s positive perceptions had significant effect on the positive outcome (winning rate of that service; (2 the perception after the net result of the previous service increased the positive outcome of the next service, and (3 the player’s positive/negative perception during the matches affected the win/loss outcome of that competition. In conclusion, the player’s positive perceptions enhanced their winning rate during table tennis competitions. Therefore, during the training program, coaches need to develop positive perceptions and strengthen the psychological quality of table tennis players.

  16. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Haoran; Yang, Hua; Liu, Chao; Shen, Wenzhong; Zhu, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils generated from the DU- 91-W2-250, DU-97-W-300 and DU-96-W-350 airfoils by enlarging the thickness of trailing edge symmetrically from the location of maximum thickness to chord to the trailing edge were analyzed by using CFD and RFOIL methods at a chord Reynolds number of 3 × 10 6 . The goal of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils with different thicknesses of trailing edge and maximum thicknesses to chord. The steady results calculated by the fully turbulent k-ω SST, transitional k-ω SST model and RFOIL all show that with the increase of thickness of trailing edge, the linear region of lift is extended and the maximum lift also increases, the increase rate and amount of lift become limited gradually at low angles of attack, while the drag increases dramatically. For thicker airfoils with larger maximum thickness to chord length, the increment of lift is larger than that of relatively thinner airfoils when the thickness of blunt trailing edge is increased from 5% to 10% chord length. But too large lift can cause abrupt stall which is profitless for power output. The transient characteristics of blunt trailing edge airfoils are caused by blunt body vortices at low angles of attack, and by the combined effect of separation and blunt body vortices at large angles of attack. With the increase of thickness of blunt trailing edge, the vibration amplitudes of lift and drag curves increase. The transient calculations over-predict the lift at large angles of attack and drag at all angles of attack than the steady calculations which is likely to be caused by the artificial restriction of the flow in two dimensions

  17. 40 CFR Table 18 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 18 Table 18 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(2) and (3), you...

  18. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  19. Computational methods for investigation of surface curvature effects on airfoil boundary layer behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Shen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents computational algorithms for the design, analysis, and optimization of airfoil aerodynamic performance. The prescribed surface curvature distribution blade design (CIRCLE method is applied to a symmetrical airfoil NACA0012 and a non-symmetrical airfoil E387 to remove their surface curvature and slope-of-curvature discontinuities. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is used to investigate the effects of curvature distribution on aerodynamic performance of the original and modified airfoils. An inviscid–viscid interaction scheme is introduced to predict the positions of laminar separation bubbles. The results are compared with experimental data obtained from tests on the original airfoil geometry. The computed aerodynamic advantages of the modified airfoils are analyzed in different operating conditions. The leading edge singularity of NACA0012 is removed and it is shown that the surface curvature discontinuity affects aerodynamic performance near the stalling angle of attack. The discontinuous slope-of-curvature distribution of E387 results in a larger laminar separation bubble at lower angles of attack and lower Reynolds numbers. It also affects the inherent performance of the airfoil at higher Reynolds numbers. It is shown that at relatively high angles of attack, a continuous slope-of-curvature distribution reduces the skin friction by suppressing both laminar and turbulent separation, and by delaying laminar-turbulent transition. It is concluded that the surface curvature distribution has significant effects on the boundary layer behavior and consequently an improved curvature distribution will lead to higher aerodynamic efficiency.

  20. Virtual incidence effect on rotating airfoils in Darrieus wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchini, Alessandro; Balduzzi, Francesco; Ferrara, Giovanni; Ferrari, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel methods to reduce CFD results into 1D aerodynamic parameters. • Assessment of the virtual incidence (VI) effect on Darrieus VAWT blades. • It is shown that blades experience a virtual AoA variation with respect to theoretical expectations. • Real AoAs are calculated for different airfoils in motion and compared to BEM predictions. - Abstract: Small Darrieus wind turbines are one of the most interesting emerging technologies in the renewable energies scenario, even if they still are characterized by lower efficiencies than those of conventional horizontal-axis wind turbines due to the more complex aerodynamics involved in their functioning. In case of small rotors, in which the chord-to-radius ratios are generally high not to limit the blade Reynolds number, the performance of turbine blades has been suggested to be moreover influenced by the so-called “flow curvature effects”. Recent works have indeed shown that the curved flowpath encountered by the blades makes them work like virtually cambered airfoils in a rectilinear flow. In the present study, focus is instead given to a further effect that is generated in reason of the curved streamline incoming on the blades, i.e. an extra-incidence seen by the airfoil, generally referred to as “virtual incidence”. In detail, a novel computational method to define the incidence angle has been applied to unsteady CFD simulations of three airfoils in a Darrieus-like motion and their effective angles of attack have been compared to theoretical expectations. The analysis confirmed the presence of an additional virtual incidence on the airfoils and quantified it for different airfoils, chord-to-radius ratios and tip-speed ratios. A comparative discussion on BEM prediction capabilities is finally reported in the study.

  1. Effects of relative thickness on aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at a low Reynolds number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Dongli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characteristics of low Reynolds number flow around airfoil of high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (HAUAVs cruising at low speed. Numerical simulation on the flows around several representative airfoils is carried out to investigate the low Reynolds number flow. The water tunnel model tests further validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the numerical method. Then the effects of the relative thickness of airfoil on aerodynamic performance are explored, using the above numerical method, by simulating flows around airfoils of different relative thicknesses (12%, 14%, 16%, 18%, as well as different locations of the maximum relative thickness (x/c = 22%, 26%, 30%, 34%, at a low Reynolds number of 5 × 105. Results show that performance of airfoils at low Reynolds number is mainly affected by the laminar separation bubble. On the premise of good stall characteristics, the value of maximum relative thickness should be as small as possible, and the location of the maximum relative thickness ought to be closer to the trailing edge to obtain fine airfoil performance. The numerical method is feasible for the simulation of low Reynolds number flow. The study can help to provide a basis for the design of low Reynolds number airfoil.

  2. Cadaver-specific CT scans visualized at the dissection table combined with virtual dissection tables improve learning performance in general gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Daniel; Giesel, Frederik L; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kuner, Thomas; Doll, Sara

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefit of the incorporation of radiologic anatomy (RA), in terms of student training in RA seminars, cadaver CT scans and life-size virtual dissection tables on the learning success in general anatomy. Three groups of a total of 238 students were compared in a multiple choice general anatomy exam during first-year gross anatomy: (1) a group (year 2015, n 1  = 50) that received training in radiologic image interpretation (RA seminar) and additional access to cadaver CT scans (CT + seminar group); (2) a group (2011, n 2  = 90) that was trained in the RA seminar only (RA seminar group); (3) a group (2011, n 3  = 98) without any radiologic image interpretation training (conventional anatomy group). Furthermore, the students' perception of the new curriculum was assessed qualitatively through a survey. The average test score of the CT + seminar group (21.8 ± 5.0) was significantly higher when compared to both the RA seminar group (18.3 ± 5.0) and the conventional anatomy group (17.1 ± 4.7) (p cadaver CT scans and life-size virtual dissection tables significantly improved the performance of medical students in general gross anatomy. Medical imaging and virtual dissection should therefore be considered to be part of the standard curriculum of gross anatomy. • Students provided with cadaver CT scans achieved 27 % higher scores in anatomy. • Radiological education integrated into gross anatomy is highly appreciated by medical students. • Simultaneous physical and virtual dissection provide unique conditions to study anatomy.

  3. 2D CFD Airfoil Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Grace

    2017-11-01

    This work aims to produce a higher fidelity model of the blades for NASA's X-57 all electric propeller driven experimental aircraft. This model will, in turn, allow for more accurate calculations of the thrust each propeller can generate. This work uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to first analyze the propeller blades as a series of 11 differently shaped airfoils and calculate, among other things, the coefficients for lift and drag associated with each airfoil at different angles of attack. OpenFOAM-a C + + library that can be used to create series of applications for pre-processing, solving, and post-processing-is one of the primary tools utilized in these calculations. By comparing the data OpenFOAM generates about the NACA 23012 airfoil with existing experimental data about the NACA 23012 airfoil, the reliability of our model is measured and verified. A trustworthy model can then be used to generate more data and sent to NASA to aid in the design of the actual aircraft.

  4. Four hundred or more participants needed for stable contingency table estimates of clinical prediction rule performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Boyle, Eleanor; Keating, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify variability in the results of statistical analyses based on contingency tables and discuss the implications for the choice of sample size for studies that derive clinical prediction rules. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: An analysis of three pre-existing sets of large cohort data......, odds ratios and risk/prevalence ratios, for each sample size was calculated. RESULTS: There were very wide, and statistically significant, differences in estimates derived from contingency tables from the same dataset when calculated in sample sizes below 400 people, and typically this variability...... stabilized in samples of 400 to 600 people. Although estimates of prevalence also varied significantly in samples below 600 people, that relationship only explains a small component of the variability in these statistical parameters. CONCLUSION: To reduce sample-specific variability, contingency tables...

  5. An Experimental Comparison Between Flexible and Rigid Airfoils at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzodinma, Jaylon; Macphee, David

    2017-11-01

    This study uses experimental and computational research methods to compare the aerodynamic performance of rigid and flexible airfoils at a low Reynolds number throughout varying angles of attack. This research can be used to improve the design of small wind turbines, micro-aerial vehicles, and any other devices that operate at low Reynolds numbers. Experimental testing was conducted in the University of Alabama's low-speed wind tunnel, and computational testing was conducted using the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM. For experimental testing, polyurethane-based (rigid) airfoils and silicone-based (flexible) airfoils were constructed using acrylic molds for NACA 0012 and NACA 2412 airfoil profiles. Computer models of the previously-specified airfoils were also created for a computational analysis. Both experimental and computational data were analyzed to examine the critical angles of attack, the lift and drag coefficients, and the occurrence of laminar boundary separation for each airfoil. Moreover, the computational simulations were used to examine the resulting flow fields, in order to provide possible explanations for the aerodynamic performances of each airfoil type. EEC 1659710.

  6. Transonic airfoil design for helicopter rotor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Jackson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the fact that the flow over a rotor blade is strongly influenced by locally three-dimensional and unsteady effects, practical experience has always demonstrated that substantial improvements in the aerodynamic performance can be gained by improving the steady two-dimensional charateristics of the airfoil(s) employed. The two phenomena known to have great impact on the overall rotor performance are: (1) retreating blade stall with the associated large pressure drag, and (2) compressibility effects on the advancing blade leading to shock formation and the associated wave drag and boundary-layer separation losses. It was concluded that: optimization routines are a powerful tool for finding solutions to multiple design point problems; the optimization process must be guided by the judicious choice of geometric and aerodynamic constraints; optimization routines should be appropriately coupled to viscous, not inviscid, transonic flow solvers; hybrid design procedures in conjunction with optimization routines represent the most efficient approach for rotor airfroil design; unsteady effects resulting in the delay of lift and moment stall should be modeled using simple empirical relations; and inflight optimization of aerodynamic loads (e.g., use of variable rate blowing, flaps, etc.) can satisfy any number of requirements at design and off-design conditions.

  7. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  8. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-01-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs

  9. Parametric analyses for synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Guoqing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of synthetic jet control on separation and stall over rotor airfoils. The preconditioned and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a k − ω shear stream transport turbulence model are employed to accomplish the flowfield simulation of rotor airfoils under jet control. Additionally, a velocity boundary condition modeled by a sinusoidal function is developed to fulfill the perturbation effect of periodic jets. The validity of the present CFD procedure is evaluated by the simulated results of an isolated synthetic jet and the jet control case for airfoil NACA0015. Then, parametric analyses are conducted specifically for an OA213 rotor airfoil to investigate the effects of jet parameters (forcing frequency, jet location and momentum coefficient, jet direction, and distribution of jet arrays on the control effect of the aerodynamic characteristics of a rotor airfoil. Preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of jet control can be improved with specific frequencies (the best lift-drag ratio at F+ = 2.0 and jet angles (40° or 75° when the jets are located near the separation point of the rotor airfoil. Furthermore, as a result of a suitable combination of jet arrays, the lift coefficient of the airfoil can be improved by nearly 100%, and the corresponding drag coefficient decreased by 26.5% in comparison with the single point control case.

  10. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces and a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-07-15

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can be used for various applications which up to now have been possible only using much more computational costly methods. The propulsive performance of a soft heaving propulsor, and the influence of airfoil camberline elasticity on the flutter limit are two computational examples given in the report that highlight this feature. (au)

  11. Design and optimization of tidal turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    In order to increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and thereby to reduce cost of energy, the use of specially tailored airfoils is needed. This work is focused on the design of an airfoil for marine application. Firstly, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed with reference to the requirements for wind turbine airfoils. Then, the design approach is presented. This is a numerical optimization scheme in which a gradient based algorithm is used, coupled with RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints; in order to formalize in the most complete and effective way the design requirements, the effects of activating specific constraints are discussed. Particularly importance is given to the cavitation phenomenon. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high efficiency, tidal turbine airfoil is illustrated and the results are compared with existing turbine airfoils.

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Deformable Thin Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, William Paul

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic theories are essential in the analysis of bird and insect flight. The study of these types of locomotion is vital in the development of flapping wing aircraft. This paper uses potential flow aerodynamics to extend the unsteady aerodynamic theory of Theodorsen and Garrick (which is restricted to rigid airfoil motion) to deformable thin airfoils. Frequency-domain lift, pitching moment and thrust expressions are derived for an airfoil undergoing harmonic oscillations and def...

  13. VISUALISASI DISTRIBUSI TEKANAN PADA AIRFOIL JOUKOWSKY

    OpenAIRE

    Eddy Maryonoto

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a computer based system that can beused to visualize pressure distribution on the Joukowsky's airfoil and streamlinespattern around the airfoil. The pressure on the airfoil is calculdted usingformulasderived from potensial theory. Visualization of pressure distribution implementedby using color gradation technique and coded b.v using Borland Delphi 6programming language. The result of the test shotus lhat lhe system has performedperfectly. Pressure disl...

  14. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  15. Acoustics of a Mixed Porosity Felt Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,212 6 June 2016 Acoustics of a Mixed Porosity Felt Airfoil Aren M. Hellum Undersea Warfare Weapons...Felt Airfoil 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Aren M. Hellum 5.d PROJECT NUMBER 5e...existing literature. Geyer et al. [5] measured a sound reduction of 5 to 15 dB for airfoils made entirely of porous material. A 1973 patent

  16. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Quan; Cheng Bangqin; Li Yinghong; Cui Wei; Jin Di; Li Jun

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation

  17. Desirable airfoil features for smaller-capacity straight-bladed VAWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Mazharul; Ting, D.S.-K.; Fartaj, Amir

    2007-05-15

    In the small scale wind turbine market, the simple straight-bladed Darrieus type vertical axis wind turbine (SB-VAWT) is very attractive for its simple blade design. A detailed aerodynamic performance analysis was conducted on a smaller capacity fixed-pitch SB-VAWT. Brief analyses of the main aerodynamic challenges of this type of wind turbine were first discussed and subsequently the authors conducted further literature survey and computational analysis to shortlist aerodynamic characteristics of a desirable airfoil for a self-starting and better performing SB-VAWT. The required geometric features of the desirable airfoil to achieve the short listed characteristics were also discussed. It has been found out that conventionally used NACA symmetric airfoils are not suitable for smaller capacity SB-VAWT. Rather, it is advantageous to utilize a high-lift and low-drag asymmetric thick airfoil suitable for low speed operation typically encountered by SB-VAWT. (author)

  18. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl’s Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl’s wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl’s wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44% compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  19. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weijun; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jiyue; Li, Ming; Ma, Yi; Cong, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  20. Computation of airfoil buffet boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, L. L., Jr.; Bailey, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The ILLIAC IV computer has been programmed with an implicit, finite-difference code for solving the thin layer compressible Navier-Stokes equation. Results presented for the case of the buffet boundaries of a conventional and a supercritical airfoil section at high Reynolds numbers are found to be in agreement with experimentally determined buffet boundaries, especially at the higher freestream Mach numbers and lower lift coefficients where the onset of unsteady flows is associated with shock wave-induced boundary layer separation.

  1. Optimization of airfoil-type PCHE for the recuperator of small scale brayton cycle by cost-based objective function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jin Gyu; Kim, Tae Ho; Park, Hyun Sun; Cha, Jae Eun; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Suggest the Nusselt number and Fanning friction factor correlation for airfoil-type PCHE. • Show that cost-based optimization is available to airfoil-type PCHE. • Suggest the recuperator design for SCIEL test loop at KAERI by cost-based objective function with correlations from numerical analysis. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO_2) Brayton cycle gives high efficiency of power cycle with small size. Printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are proper selection for the Brayton cycle because their operability at high temperature and high pressure with small size. Airfoil fin PCHE was suggested by Kim et al. (2008b), it can provide high heat transfer-like zigzag channel PCHE with low pressure drop-like straight channel PCHE. Optimization of the airfoil fin PCHE was not performed like the zigzag channel PCHE. For optimization of the airfoil fin PCHE, the operating condition of the recuperator of SCO_2 Integral Experiment Loop (SCIEL) Brayton cycle test loop at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was used. We performed CFD analysis for various airfoil fin configurations using ANSYS CFX 15.0, and made correlations for predicting the Nusselt number and the Fanning friction factor. The recuperator was designed by the simple energy balance code with our correlations. Using the cost-based objective function with production cost and operation cost from size and pressure drop of the recuperator, we evaluated airfoil fin configuration by using total cost and suggested the optimization configuration of the airfoil fin PCHE.

  2. Optimization of airfoil-type PCHE for the recuperator of small scale brayton cycle by cost-based objective function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jin Gyu [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ho [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jae Eun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Suggest the Nusselt number and Fanning friction factor correlation for airfoil-type PCHE. • Show that cost-based optimization is available to airfoil-type PCHE. • Suggest the recuperator design for SCIEL test loop at KAERI by cost-based objective function with correlations from numerical analysis. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle gives high efficiency of power cycle with small size. Printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are proper selection for the Brayton cycle because their operability at high temperature and high pressure with small size. Airfoil fin PCHE was suggested by Kim et al. (2008b), it can provide high heat transfer-like zigzag channel PCHE with low pressure drop-like straight channel PCHE. Optimization of the airfoil fin PCHE was not performed like the zigzag channel PCHE. For optimization of the airfoil fin PCHE, the operating condition of the recuperator of SCO{sub 2} Integral Experiment Loop (SCIEL) Brayton cycle test loop at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was used. We performed CFD analysis for various airfoil fin configurations using ANSYS CFX 15.0, and made correlations for predicting the Nusselt number and the Fanning friction factor. The recuperator was designed by the simple energy balance code with our correlations. Using the cost-based objective function with production cost and operation cost from size and pressure drop of the recuperator, we evaluated airfoil fin configuration by using total cost and suggested the optimization configuration of the airfoil fin PCHE.

  3. Family of airfoil shapes for rotating blades. [for increased power efficiency and blade stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, K. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An airfoil which has particular application to the blade or blades of rotor aircraft such as helicopters and aircraft propellers is described. The airfoil thickness distribution and camber are shaped to maintain a near zero pitching moment coefficient over a wide range of lift coefficients and provide a zero pitching moment coefficient at section Mach numbers near 0.80 and to increase the drag divergence Mach number resulting in superior aircraft performance.

  4. Cognitive Predictors of Performance in Well-Trained Table Tennis Players With Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Mactavish, Jennifer; Kerremans, Janne; Vanlandewijck, Yves C

    2016-10-01

    Evidence-based classification systems in Paralympic sport require knowledge of the underlying effect of impairment in a specific sport. This study investigated the relationship between cognition and tactical proficiency in 88 well-trained table tennis players with intellectual disability (ID; 29 women, 59 men, M ± SD IQ 59.9 ± 9.6). Data were collected at 3 competitions sanctioned by the International Federation for Para-Athletes with Intellectual Disabilities (INAS). A generic cognitive test consisting of 8 neuropsychological subtests was used to assess cognitive abilities relevant to sport (reaction time, processing speed, and decision speed; spatial visualization; fluid reasoning; memory; executive functioning; and visual processing). The backward stepwise-regression analysis model revealed that 18% of the variance in tactical proficiency was attributed to spatial visualization and simple reaction time. Applications of these findings resulted in an evidence-based classification system that led to the reinclusion of athletes with ID in Paralympic table tennis and provide the basis for future research in this important area.

  5. Self-induced vibrations of a DU96-W-180 airfoil in stall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) non-moving, prescribed motion and elastically mounted airfoil computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations. The elastically mounted airfoil computations were performed by means of a 2D structural model with two...... degrees of freedom. The computations aimed at investigating the mechanisms of both vortex-induced and stall-induced vibrations related to a wind turbine blade at standstill conditions. In this work, a DU96-W-180 airfoil was used in the angle-of-attack region potentially corresponding to stallinduced...... vibrations. The analysis showed significant differences between the aerodynamic stability limits predicted by 2D and 3D CFD computations. A general agreement was reached between the prescribed motion and elastically mounted airfoil computations. 3D computations indicated that vortex-induced vibrations...

  6. CFD study on NACA 4415 airfoil implementing spherical and sinusoidal Tubercle Leading Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, S M A; Ahmad, K A

    2017-01-01

    The Humpback whale tubercles have been studied for more than a decade. Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) effectively reduces the separation bubble size and helps in delaying stall. They are very effective in case of low Reynolds number flows. The current Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study is on NACA 4415 airfoil, at a Reynolds number 120,000. Two TLE shapes are tested on NACA 4415 airfoil. The tubercle designs implemented on the airfoil are sinusoidal and spherical. A parametric study is also carried out considering three amplitudes (0.025c, 0.05c and 0.075c), the wavelength (0.25c) is fixed. Structured mesh is utilized to generate grid and Transition SST turbulence model is used to capture the flow physics. Results clearly show spherical tubercles outperform sinusoidal tubercles. Furthermore experimental study considering spherical TLE is carried out at Reynolds number 200,000. The experimental results show that spherical TLE improve performance compared to clean airfoil.

  7. Effect of Reynolds Number on Aerodynamics of Airfoil with Gurney Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady state, two-dimensional computational investigations performed on NACA 0012 airfoil to analyze the effect of variation in Reynolds number on the aerodynamics of the airfoil without and with a Gurney flap of height of 3% chord are presented in this paper. RANS based one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model is used for the computations. Both lift and drag coefficients increase with Gurney flap compared to those without Gurney flap at all Reynolds numbers at all angles of attack. The zero lift angle of attack seems to become more negative as Reynolds number increases due to effective increase of the airfoil camber. However the stall angle of attack decreased by 2° for the airfoil with Gurney flap. Lift coefficient decreases rapidly and drag coefficient increases rapidly when Reynolds number is decreased below critical range. This occurs due to change in flow pattern near Gurney flap at low Reynolds numbers.

  8. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manela, A.

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  9. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manela, A. [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-07-15

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  10. Predicted Aerodynamic Characteristics of a NACA 0015 Airfoil Having a 25% Integral-Type Trailing Edge Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    Using the two-dimensional ARC2D Navier-Stokes flow solver analyses were conducted to predict the sectional aerodynamic characteristics of the flapped NACA-0015 airfoil section. To facilitate the analyses and the generation of the computational grids, the airfoil with the deflected trailing edge flap was treated as a single element airfoil with no allowance for a gap between the flap's leading edge and the base of the forward portion of the airfoil. Generation of the O-type computational grids was accomplished using the HYGRID hyperbolic grid generation program. Results were obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers, angles of attack and flap deflections. The predicted sectional lift, drag and pitching moment values for the airfoil were then cast in tabular format (C81) to be used in lifting-line helicopter rotor aerodynamic performance calculations. Similar were also generated for the flap. Mathematical expressions providing the variation of the sectional lift and pitching moment coefficients for the airfoil and for the flap as a function of flap chord length and flap deflection angle were derived within the context of thin airfoil theory. The airfoil's sectional drag coefficient were derived using the ARC2D drag predictions for equivalent two dimensional flow conditions.

  11. Turbulent flow simulation of the NREL S809 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerri, Ouahiba; Bouhadef, Khadidja; Harhad, Ameziane

    2006-05-15

    Numerical computations are carried out for the NREL S809 airfoil. The flow is modelled using an unsteady incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Two turbulence models (SST {kappa}/{omega}of Menter and RNG {kappa}/{epsilon}) are applied to close the RANS equations. All computations are performed assuming fully turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed at various angles of attack from 0 to 20 degrees. Lift and drag forces are obtained from the computations by integrating the pressure and shear stress over the blade surface. The performance of the two turbulence models is compared and the influence of the free stream turbulence intensity is checked. The results confirm the satisfactory performance of the SST {kappa}/{omega} model of Menter for modelling turbulent flow around airfoils. (author)

  12. Aeroacoustic Computations for Turbulent Airfoil Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2009-01-01

    a NACA 0015 airfoil at a Mach number of 0.2 and a Reynolds number of 1.6 x 10(5) for different angles of attack. The flow solutions are validated by comparing lift and drag characteristics with experimental data. The comparisons show good agreements between the computed and measured airfoil lift...

  13. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  14. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  15. Hybrid Optimization for Wind Turbine Thick Airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    One important element in aerodynamic design of wind turbines is the use of specially tailored airfoils to increase the ratio of energy capture and reduce cost of energy. This work is focused on the design of thick airfoils for wind turbines by using numerical optimization. A hybrid scheme is proposed in which genetic and gradient based algorithms are combined together to improve the accuracy and the reliability of the design. Firstly, the requirements and the constraints for this class of airfoils are described; then, the hybrid approach is presented. The final part of this work is dedicated to illustrate a numerical example regarding the design of a new thick airfoil. The results are discussed and compared to existing airfoils.

  16. Airfoil Shape Optimization in Transonic Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Z.

    2004-01-01

    A computationally efficient and adaptable design tool is constructed by coupling a flow analysis code based on Euler equations, with the well established numerical optimization algorithms. Optimization technique involving two analysis methods of Simplex and Rosenbrock have been used. The optimization study involves the minimization of wave drag for two different airfoils with geometric constraints on the airfoil maximum thickness or the cross sectional area along with aerodynamic constraint on lift coefficient. The method is applied to these airfoils transonic flow design points, and the results are compared with the original values. This study shows that the conventional low speed airfoils can be optimized to become supercritical for transonic flight speeds, while existing supercritical airfoils can still be improved further at particular design condition. (author)

  17. Ice Roughness and Thickness Evolution on a Swept NACA 0012 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Several recent studies have been performed in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Glenn Research Center focusing on the evolution, spatial variations, and proper scaling of ice roughness on airfoils without sweep exposed to icing conditions employed in classical roughness studies. For this study, experiments were performed in the IRT to investigate the ice roughness and thickness evolution on a 91.44-cm (36-in.) chord NACA 0012 airfoil, swept at 30-deg with 0deg angle of attack, and exposed to both Appendix C and Appendix O (SLD) icing conditions. The ice accretion event times used in the study were less than the time required to form substantially three-dimensional structures, such as scallops, on the airfoil surface. Following each ice accretion event, the iced airfoils were scanned using a ROMER Absolute Arm laser-scanning system. The resulting point clouds were then analyzed using the self-organizing map approach of McClain and Kreeger to determine the spatial roughness variations along the surfaces of the iced airfoils. The resulting measurements demonstrate linearly increasing roughness and thickness parameters with ice accretion time. Further, when compared to dimensionless or scaled results from unswept airfoil investigations, the results of this investigation indicate that the mechanisms for early stage roughness and thickness formation on swept wings are similar to those for unswept wings.

  18. Turbulence intensity measurement in the wind tunnel used for airfoil flutter investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on hot wire turbulence intensity measurements performed in the entry of a suction-type wind tunnel, used for investigation of flow-induced vibration of airfoils and slender structures. The airfoil is elastically supported with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge in the test section of the wind tunnel with lateral optical access for interferometric measurements, and free to oscillate. The turbulence intensity was measured for velocities up to M = 0.3 i with the airfoil blocked, ii with the airfoil self-oscillating. Measurements were performed for a free inlet and further with two different turbulence grids generating increased turbulence intensity levels. For the free inlet and static airfoil, the turbulence intensity lies below 0.4%. The turbulence grids G1 and G2 increase the turbulence level up to 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively. When the airfoil is free to oscillate due to fluid-structure interaction, its motion disturbs the surrounding flow field and increases the measured turbulence intensity levels up to 5%.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  20. A Low-Complexity and High-Performance 2D Look-Up Table for LDPC Hardware Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jung-Chieh; Yang, Po-Hui; Lain, Jenn-Kaie; Chung, Tzu-Wen

    In this paper, we propose a low-complexity, high-efficiency two-dimensional look-up table (2D LUT) for carrying out the sum-product algorithm in the decoding of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Instead of employing adders for the core operation when updating check node messages, in the proposed scheme, the main term and correction factor of the core operation are successfully merged into a compact 2D LUT. Simulation results indicate that the proposed 2D LUT not only attains close-to-optimal bit error rate performance but also enjoys a low complexity advantage that is suitable for hardware implementation.

  1. Design of a 3 kW wind turbine generator with thin airfoil blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameku, Kazumasa; Nagai, Baku M.; Roy, Jitendro Nath [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    Three blades of a 3 kW prototype wind turbine generator were designed with thin airfoil and a tip speed ratio of 3. The wind turbine has been controlled via two control methods: the variable pitch angle and by regulation of the field current of the generator and examined under real wind conditions. The characteristics of the thin airfoil, called ''Seven arcs thin airfoil'' named so because the airfoil is composed of seven circular arcs, are analyzed with the airfoil design and analysis program XFOIL. The thin airfoil blade is designed and calculated by blade element and momentum theory. The performance characteristics of the machine such as rotational speed, generator output as well as stability for wind speed changes are described. In the case of average wind speeds of 10 m/s and a maximum of 19 m/s, the automatically controlled wind turbine ran safely through rough wind conditions and showed an average generator output of 1105 W and a power coefficient 0.14. (author)

  2. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position

  3. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, T.C. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Jeon, W.P.; Kang, S.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    Hot-wire measurements are performed in boundary layers developing on a NACA0012 airfoil over which wakes pass periodically. The Reynolds number based on chord length of the airfoil is 2X10{sup 5} and the wakes are generated by circular cylinders rotating clockwise and counterclockwise around the airfoil. This paper and its companion Part II describe the phenomena of wake-induced transition of the boundary layers on the airfoil using measured data; phase- and time-averaged streamwise mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations, integral parameters and wall skin frictions. This paper describes the background and facility together with results of time-averaged quantities. Due to the passing wake with mean velocity defects and high turbulence intensities, the laminar boundary layer is periodically disturbed at the upstream station and becomes steady-state transitional boundary layer at the downstream station. The velocity defect in the passing wake changes the local pressure at the leading of the airfoil, significantly affects the time-mean pressure distribution on the airfoil and eventually, has influence on the transition process of the boundary layer. (author). 22 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Nonlinear aeroelastic behavior of compliant airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwapiah, G; Campanile, L F

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of aviation and up to the present time, airfoils have always been built as rigid structures. They are designed to fly under their divergence speed in order to avoid static aeroelastic instabilities and the resulting large deformations, which are not compatible with the typically low compliance of such airfoils. In recent years, research on airfoil morphing has generated interest in innovative ideas like the use of compliant systems, i.e. systems built to allow for large deformations without failure, in airfoil construction. Such systems can operate in the neighborhood of divergence and take advantage of large aeroelastic servo-effects. This, in turn, allows compact, advanced actuators to control the airfoil's deformation and loads, and hence complement or even replace conventional flaps. In order to analyze and design such compliant, active aeroelastic structures a nonlinear approach to static aeroelasticity is needed, which takes into account the effect of large deformations on aerodynamics and structure. Such an analytical approach is presented in this paper and applied to a compliant passive airfoil as the preliminary step in the realization of a piezoelectrically driven, active aeroelastic airfoil. Wind tunnel test results are also presented and compared with the analytic prediction. The good agreement and the observed behavior in the wind tunnel give confidence in the potential of this innovative idea

  5. Nonlinear aeroelastic behavior of compliant airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwapiah, G.; Campanile, L. F.

    2010-03-01

    Since the beginning of aviation and up to the present time, airfoils have always been built as rigid structures. They are designed to fly under their divergence speed in order to avoid static aeroelastic instabilities and the resulting large deformations, which are not compatible with the typically low compliance of such airfoils. In recent years, research on airfoil morphing has generated interest in innovative ideas like the use of compliant systems, i.e. systems built to allow for large deformations without failure, in airfoil construction. Such systems can operate in the neighborhood of divergence and take advantage of large aeroelastic servo-effects. This, in turn, allows compact, advanced actuators to control the airfoil's deformation and loads, and hence complement or even replace conventional flaps. In order to analyze and design such compliant, active aeroelastic structures a nonlinear approach to static aeroelasticity is needed, which takes into account the effect of large deformations on aerodynamics and structure. Such an analytical approach is presented in this paper and applied to a compliant passive airfoil as the preliminary step in the realization of a piezoelectrically driven, active aeroelastic airfoil. Wind tunnel test results are also presented and compared with the analytic prediction. The good agreement and the observed behavior in the wind tunnel give confidence in the potential of this innovative idea.

  6. Performance Appraisal and Merit Compensation. Community Colleges: Quality Education for a Learning Society. Round Table Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert A., Jr.

    Detailed information is provided on the Performance Appraisal/Salary System adopted by the New Mexico Junior College (NMJC) Board in 1981 as the basis for the performance evaluation of all college employees. Introductory material discusses the concepts of performance appraisal and merit compensation and provides an update on changes in NMJC's…

  7. Numerical optimization of circulation control airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, T. C.; Kidwell, G. H., Jr.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1981-01-01

    A numerical procedure for optimizing circulation control airfoils, which consists of the coupling of an optimization scheme with a viscous potential flow analysis for blowing jet, is presented. The desired airfoil is defined by a combination of three baseline shapes (cambered ellipse, and cambered ellipse with drooped and spiralled trailing edges). The coefficients of these shapes are used as design variables in the optimization process. Under the constraints of lift augmentation and lift-to-drag ratios, the optimal airfoils are found to lie between those of cambered ellipse and the drooped trailing edge, towards the latter as the angle of attack increases. Results agree qualitatively with available experimental data.

  8. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  9. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Executive Summary and Table of Contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curley, G. Michael [North American Electric Reliability Corporation (United States); Mandula, Jiri [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This document serves as a supporting paper. Sections include: features of Italian energy and electricity; the evolution of liberalisation; support mechanism for renewables; connection to wind farm transmission network; wind source integration into power system; and, final comments. The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 1 (WG1). WG1's primary focus is to analyse the best ways to measure, evaluate, and apply power plant performance and availability data to promote plant performance improvements worldwide. The paper explores the specific work activities of 2004-2007 to extend traditional analysis and benchmarking frameworks. It is divided into two major topics: Overview of current electric supply industry issues/trends; and, Technical Methods/Tools to evaluate performance in today's ESI.

  10. Inverse airfoil design method for low-speed straight-bladed Darrieus-type VAWT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, F. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Paraschivoiu, I.; Trifu, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Hess, M.; Gabrys, C. [Mariah Power Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Inverse airfoil design of a low-speed straight-bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) can help improve aerodynamic performance and power output by eliminating undesirable flow field characteristics at very low Reynolds number. This study used an interactive inverse airfoil design method (PROFOIL) that allows specification of velocity and boundary-layer characteristics over different segments of the airfoil subject to constraints on the geometry (closure) and the flow field (far field boundary). Additional constraints were also considered to address pitching moment coefficient, thickness and the power output for a given tip-speed ratio. Performance analyses of the airfoil and the VAWT were carried out using state-of-the-art analyses codes XFOIL and CARDAAV, respectively. XFOIL is a panel method with a coupled boundary-layer scheme and is used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of resulting airfoil shapes. The final airfoil geometry is obtained through a multi-dimensional Newton iteration. The study showed that the strength of the method lies in the inverse design methodology whereas its weaknesses is in reliably predicting aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils at low Reynolds numbers and high angles of attack. A 10-15 per cent increase in the relative performance of the VAWT was achieved with this method. Although the results of the study showed that the method has great application potential for VAWTs in general, there is much room for improvement in flow analysis capabilities for low Re flows in reliably predicting post-stall aerodynamic characteristics. In the absence of such analysis capabilities, the authors suggested that the results should be viewed qualitatively and not quantitatively. 36 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  11. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    is hypothesized, and verified with experimental and computational data, that LEV formation always occurs at the same critical value of LESP irrespective of motion kinematics. Further, the applicability of the LESP criterion in influencing the occurrence of LEV formation is demonstrated. To model the growth and convection of leading-edge vortices, the unsteady thin-airfoil theory is augmented with discrete-vortex shedding from the leading edge. The LESP criterion is used to predict and modulate the shedding of leading-edge vorticity. Comparisons with experiments and CFD for test-cases with different airfoils, Reynolds numbers and motion kinematics, show that the method performs remarkably well in predicting force coefficients and flowfields for unsteady flows. The use of a single empirical parameter - the critical LESP value, allows the determination of onset, growth and termination of leading-edge vortex shedding. In the final part of the research, the discrete-vortex model is extended to flows where the freestream velocity is varying or small in comparison with motion velocity. With this extension, the method is made applicable to a larger set of 2D flows such as perching and hovering maneuvers, gusts, and sinusoidally varying freestream. Abstractions of perching and hovering are designed as test cases and used to validate the low-order model's performance in highly-unsteady, vortex-dominated flows. Alongside development of the low-order methodology, several features of unsteady flows are studied and analyzed with the aid of CFD and experiments. While remaining computationally inexpensive and retaining the essential flow-physics, the method is seen to be successful in prediction of both force coefficients and flow histories.

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccc of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... port's location and the number of traverse points Method 1* 3. Measure volumetric flow rate. Method 2* 4. Perform gas analysis to determine the dry molecular weight of the stack gas Method 3* 5...

  13. Transonic buffet control research with two types of shock control bump based on RAE2822 airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun TIAN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current research shows that the traditional shock control bump (SCB can weaken the intensity of shock and better the transonic buffet performance. The author finds that when SCB is placed downstream of the shock, it can decrease the adverse pressure gradient. This may prevent the shock foot separation bubble to merge with the trailing edge separation and finally improve the buffet performance. Based on RAE2822 airfoil, two types of SCB are designed according to the two different mechanisms. By using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS methods to analyze the properties of RAE2822 airfoil with and without SCB, the results show that the downstream SCB can better the buffet performance under a wide range of freestream Mach number and the steady aerodynamics characteristic is similar to that of RAE2822 airfoil. The traditional SCB can only weaken the intensity of the shock under the design condition. Under the off-design conditions, the SCB does not do much to or even worsen the buffet performance. Indeed, the use of backward bump can flatten the leeward side of the airfoil, and this is similar to the mechanism that supercritical airfoil can weaken the recompression of shock wave.

  14. Turbine airfoil to shroud attachment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Kulkarni, Anand A; James, Allister W; Wessell, Brian J; Gear, Paul J

    2014-12-23

    Bi-casting a platform (50) onto an end portion (42) of a turbine airfoil (31) after forming a coating of a fugitive material (56) on the end portion. After bi-casting the platform, the coating is dissolved and removed to relieve differential thermal shrinkage stress between the airfoil and platform. The thickness of the coating is varied around the end portion in proportion to varying amounts of local differential process shrinkage. The coating may be sprayed (76A, 76B) onto the end portion in opposite directions parallel to a chord line (41) of the airfoil or parallel to a mid-platform length (80) of the platform to form respective layers tapering in thickness from the leading (32) and trailing (34) edges along the suction side (36) of the airfoil.

  15. Flow control at low Reynolds numbers using periodic airfoil morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Santer, Matthew; Papadakis, George; Bouremel, Yann; Debiasi, Marco; Imperial-NUS Joint PhD Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The performance of airfoils operating at low Reynolds numbers is known to suffer from flow separation even at low angles of attack as a result of their boundary layers remaining laminar. The lack of mixing---a characteristic of turbulent boundary layers---leaves laminar boundary layers with insufficient energy to overcome the adverse pressure gradient that occurs in the pressure recovery region. This study looks at periodic surface morphing as an active flow control technique for airfoils in such a flight regime. It was discovered that at sufficiently high frequencies an oscillating surface is capable of not only reducing the size of the separated region---and consequently significantly reducing drag whilst simultaneously increasing lift---but it is also capable of delaying stall and as a result increasing CLmax. Furthermore, by bonding Macro Fiber Composite actuators (MFCs) to the underside of an airfoil skin and driving them with a sinusoidal frequency, it is shown that this control technique can be practically implemented in a lightweight, energy efficient way. Imperial-NUS Joint Ph.D. Programme.

  16. CFD Study of NACA 0018 Airfoil with Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Christopher A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2017-01-01

    The abilities of two different Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes codes to predict the effects of an active flow control device are evaluated. The flow control device consists of a blowing slot located on the upper surface of an NACA 0018 airfoil, near the leading edge. A second blowing slot present on the airfoil near mid-chord is not evaluated here. Experimental results from a wind tunnel test show that a slot blowing with high momentum coefficient will increase the lift of the airfoil (compared to no blowing) and delay flow separation. A slot with low momentum coefficient will decrease the lift and induce separation even at low angles of attack. Two codes, CFL3D and FUN3D, are used in two-dimensional computations along with several different turbulence models. Two of these produced reasonable results for this flow, when run fully turbulent. A more advanced transition model failed to predict reasonable results, but warrants further study using different inputs. Including inviscid upper and lower tunnel walls in the simulations was found to be important in obtaining pressure distributions and lift coefficients that best matched experimental data. A limited number of three-dimensional computations were also performed.

  17. Airfoil Drag Reduction using Controlled Trapped Vorticity Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Michael; Glezer, Ari

    2017-11-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a lifting surface at low angles of attack (when the base flow is fully attached) is improved through fluidic modification of its ``apparent'' shape by superposition of near-surface trapped vorticity concentrations. In the present wind tunnel investigations, a controlled trapped vorticity concentration is formed on the pressure surface of an airfoil (NACA 4415) using a hybrid actuator comprising a passive obstruction of scale O(0.01c) and an integral synthetic jet actuator. The jet actuation frequency [Stact O(10)] is selected to be at least an order of magnitude higher than the characteristic unstable frequency of the airfoil wake, thereby decoupling the actuation from the global instabilities of the base flow. Regulation of vorticity accumulation in the vicinity of the actuator by the jet effects changes in the local pressure, leading in turn to changes in the airfoil's drag and lift. Trapped vorticity can lead to a significant reduction in drag and reduced lift (owing to the sense of the vorticity), e.g. at α =4° and Re = 6.7 .105 the drag and lift reductions are 14% and 2%, respectively. PIV measurements show the spatial variation in the distribution of vorticity concentrations and yield estimates of the corresponding changes in circulation.

  18. Macro-Fiber Composite actuated simply supported thin airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgen, Onur; Kochersberger, Kevin B; Inman, Daniel J; Ohanian, Osgar J III

    2010-01-01

    A piezoceramic composite actuator known as Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) is used for actuation in the design of a variable camber airfoil intended for a ducted fan aircraft. The study focuses on response characterization under aerodynamic loads for circular arc airfoils with variable pinned boundary conditions. A parametric study of fluid–structure interaction is employed to find pin locations along the chordwise direction that result in high lift generation. Wind tunnel experiments are conducted on a 1.0% thick, 127 mm chord MFC actuated bimorph airfoil that is simply supported at 5% and 50% of the chord. Aerodynamic and structural performance results are presented for a flow rate of 15 m s −1 and a Reynolds number of 127 000. Non-linear effects due to aerodynamic and piezoceramic hysteresis are identified and discussed. A lift coefficient change of 1.46 is observed, purely due to voltage actuation. A maximum 2D L/D ratio of 17.8 is recorded through voltage excitation

  19. Airfoil for a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George [Palm City, FL

    2011-01-18

    An airfoil is provided for a gas turbine comprising an outer structure comprising a first wall, an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced relative to the first wall such that a cooling gap is defined between at least portions of the first and second walls, and seal structure provided within the cooling gap between the first and second walls for separating the cooling gap into first and second cooling fluid impingement gaps. An inner surface of the second wall may define an inner cavity. The inner structure may further comprise a separating member for separating the inner cavity of the inner structure into a cooling fluid supply cavity and a cooling fluid collector cavity. The second wall may comprise at least one first impingement passage, at least one second impingement passage, and at least one bleed passage.

  20. Cardiopulmonary performance testing using a robotics-assisted tilt table: feasibility assessment in able-bodied subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengsuwan, J; Laubacher, M; Nef, T; Hunt, K J

    2014-01-01

    Robotics-assisted tilt table technology was introduced for early rehabilitation of neurological patients. It provides cyclical stepping movement and physiological loading of the legs. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of this type of device for peak cardiopulmonary performance testing using able-bodied subjects. A robotics-assisted tilt table was augmented with force sensors in the thigh cuffs and a work rate estimation algorithm. A custom visual feedback system was employed to guide the subjects' work rate and to provide real time feedback of actual work rate. Feasibility assessment focused on: (i) implementation (technical feasibility), and (ii) responsiveness (was there a measurable, high-level cardiopulmonary reaction?). For responsiveness testing, each subject carried out an incremental exercise test to the limit of functional capacity with a work rate increment of 5 W/min in female subjects and 8 W/min in males. 11 able-bodied subjects were included (9 male, 2 female; age 29.6 ± 7.1 years: mean ± SD). Resting oxygen uptake (O_{2}) was 4.6 ± 0.7 mL/min/kg and O_{2}peak was 32.4 ± 5.1 mL/min/kg; this mean O_{2}peak was 81.1% of the predicted peak value for cycle ergometry. Peak heart rate (HRpeak) was 177.5 ± 9.7 beats/min; all subjects reached at least 85% of their predicted HRpeak value. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) at O_{2}peak was 1.02 ± 0.07. Peak work rate) was 61.3 ± 15.1 W. All subjects reported a Borg CR10 value for exertion and leg fatigue of 7 or more. The robotics-assisted tilt table is deemed feasible for peak cardiopulmonary performance testing: the approach was found to be technically implementable and substantial cardiopulmonary responses were observed. Further testing in neurologically-impaired subjects is warranted.

  1. The MAM-CAP table: A new tool for monitoring panel performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltier, C.; Brockhoff, Per B.; Visalli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Assessor performances in sensory analysis are usually represented by three indicators: repeatability, discrimination and agreement. However, assessors can also differ on the range of their scores, the so-called “scaling effect”. Brockhoff, Schlich, and Skovgaard (2013) proposed the mixed assessor...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Kkkkk of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... block average pressure drop values for the three test runs, and determine and record the 3-hour block... limit for the limestone feeder setting Data from the limestone feeder during the performance test You must ensure that you maintain an adequate amount of limestone in the limestone hopper, storage bin...

  3. Aerodynamics of S809 Airfoil at Low and Transitional Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Jaime J.; Laal-Dehghani, Nader; Gorumlu, Serdar; Mehdi, Faraz; Castillo, Luciano; Aksak, Burak; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The S809 is a thick airfoil extensively used in wind turbine design applications and model studies in wind tunnel. With increased interests in reducing energy production cost and understanding turbulence and turbine interactions, scaled down models (Re ~103) are often used as an alternative to full scale field experimentation (Re >106). This Reynolds number discrepancy raises the issue of scaling for the airfoil performance from laboratory studies to field scale applications. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies existing in literature to characterize the lift- and drag-coefficients of S809 airfoil at Re less than 3 ×105 . This study is to fill the deficit in the current state of knowledge by performing high resolution force measurements. The lift and drag measurements are carried out in Texas Tech Wind Tunnel Facility using an in-house developed dual-cell force balance. The configuration eliminates the large torque and torsion often accompanied by conventional mounts. This unique design allows us to reach a measurement accuracy of 0.02N (0.1%). Comparative studies are performed on a two-dimensional airfoil with a smooth- as well as a well-engineered surface covered by micro-pillar array to simulate the surface conditions of a real life airfoil.

  4. Airfoil data sensitivity analysis for actuator disc simulations used in wind turbine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Karl; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Ivanell, Stefan; Sørensen, Jens N

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the sensitivity of blade geometry and airfoil characteristics on the prediction of performance characteristics of wind farms, large-eddy simulations using an actuator disc (ACD) method are performed for three different blade/airfoil configurations. The aim of the study is to determine how the mean characteristics of wake flow, mean power production and thrust depend on the choice of airfoil data and blade geometry. In order to simulate realistic conditions, pre-generated turbulence and wind shear are imposed in the computational domain. Using three different turbulence intensities and varying the spacing between the turbines, the flow around 4-8 aligned turbines is simulated. The analysis is based on normalized mean streamwise velocity, turbulence intensity, relative mean power production and thrust. From the computations it can be concluded that the actual airfoil characteristics and blade geometry only are of importance at very low inflow turbulence. At realistic turbulence conditions for an atmospheric boundary layer the specific blade characteristics play an minor role on power performance and the resulting wake characteristics. The results therefore give a hint that the choice of airfoil data in ACD simulations is not crucial if the intention of the simulations is to compute mean wake characteristics using a turbulent inflow

  5. Pressure distribution over an NACA 23012 airfoil with an NACA 23012 external-airfoil flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzinger, Carl J

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of pressure-distribution tests of an NACA 23012 airfoil with an NACA 23012 external airfoil flap made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section on both the main airfoil and on the flap for several different flap deflections and at several angles of attack. A test installation was used in which the airfoil was mounted horizontally in the wind tunnel between vertical end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are presented in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as graphs of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combination and for the flap alone.

  6. Active flow control on a NACA 23012 airfoil model by means of magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskiy, P N; Moralev, I A; Bityurin, V A; Efimov, A V

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of high speed flow control around the airfoil by means of the Lorentz force. The latter is formed by creating the pulsed arc filament, moving in the magnetic field along the upper airfoil surface. The research was performed for the NACA23012 airfoil model at flow velocities up to 60 m/s (134 mph). The dynamic measurement of the aerodynamic forces on the airfoil was made. Changes up to 5% in an average value of lift and pitching moment were obtained at pulse repetition frequency up to 13 Hz and average discharge power less than 200 W. The amplitude of lift force oscillation was obtained as high as 10%, with the integration time of the balance 30 ms. The dynamic flow visualization of an airfoil model after a single discharge ignition was performed. It is shown that interaction of the main flow with the arc-induced disturbance leads to the dramatic changes in the flow structure. It was shown that the upstream movement of the arc channel (I = 40-700 A) leads to the local flow separation and simultaneously to the formation of a high pressure region above the model surface. Current paper presents investigation of previous work. (paper)

  7. A comparison of hierarchical cluster analysis and league table rankings as methods for analysis and presentation of district health system performance data in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashobya, Christine K; Dubourg, Dominique; Ssengooba, Freddie; Speybroeck, Niko; Macq, Jean; Criel, Bart

    2016-03-01

    In 2003, the Uganda Ministry of Health introduced the district league table for district health system performance assessment. The league table presents district performance against a number of input, process and output indicators and a composite index to rank districts. This study explores the use of hierarchical cluster analysis for analysing and presenting district health systems performance data and compares this approach with the use of the league table in Uganda. Ministry of Health and district plans and reports, and published documents were used to provide information on the development and utilization of the Uganda district league table. Quantitative data were accessed from the Ministry of Health databases. Statistical analysis using SPSS version 20 and hierarchical cluster analysis, utilizing Wards' method was used. The hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted on the basis of seven clusters determined for each year from 2003 to 2010, ranging from a cluster of good through moderate-to-poor performers. The characteristics and membership of clusters varied from year to year and were determined by the identity and magnitude of performance of the individual variables. Criticisms of the league table include: perceived unfairness, as it did not take into consideration district peculiarities; and being oversummarized and not adequately informative. Clustering organizes the many data points into clusters of similar entities according to an agreed set of indicators and can provide the beginning point for identifying factors behind the observed performance of districts. Although league table ranking emphasize summation and external control, clustering has the potential to encourage a formative, learning approach. More research is required to shed more light on factors behind observed performance of the different clusters. Other countries especially low-income countries that share many similarities with Uganda can learn from these experiences. © The Author 2015

  8. Performance of methods for estimation of table beet water requirement in Alagoas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella P. dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Optimization of water use in agriculture is fundamental, particularly in regions where water scarcity is intense, requiring the adoption of technologies that promote increased irrigation efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate evapotranspiration models and to estimate the crop coefficients of beet grown in a drainage lysimeter in the Agreste region of Alagoas. The experiment was conducted at the Campus of the Federal University of Alagoas - UFAL, in the municipality of Arapiraca, AL, between March and April 2014. Crop evapotranspiration (ETc was estimated in drainage lysimeters and reference evapotranspiration (ETo by Penman-Monteith-FAO 56 and Hargreaves-Samani methods. The Hargreaves-Samani method presented a good performance index for ETo estimation compared with the Penman-Monteith-FAO method, indicating that it is adequate for the study area. Beet ETc showed a cumulative demand of 202.11 mm for a cumulative reference evapotranspiration of 152.00 mm. Kc values determined using the Penman-Monteith-FAO 56 and Hargreaves-Samani methods were overestimated, in comparison to the Kc values of the FAO-56 standard method. With the obtained results, it is possible to correct the equations of the methods for the region, allowing for adequate irrigation management.

  9. LES of High-Reynolds-Number Coanda Flow Separating from a Rounded Trailing Edge of a Circulation Control Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichino, Takafumi; Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Large Eddy Simulation of a high reynolds number Coanda flow that is separated from a round trailing edge of a ciruclation control airfoil. The objectives of the study are: (1) To investigate detailed physics (flow structures and statistics) of the fully turbulent Coanda jet applied to a CC airfoil, by using LES (2) To compare LES and RANS results to figure out how to improve the performance of existing RANS models for this type of flow.

  10. 2-D and 3-D CFD Investigation of NREL S826 Airfoil at Low Reynolds Numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakmakcioglu, S C; Sert, I O; Tugluk, O; Sezer-Uzol, N

    2014-01-01

    In this study CFD investigation of flow over the NREL S826 airfoil is performed. NREL S826 airfoil was designed for HAWTs of 10-15 meter diameters. However, it is used in the NTNU wind turbine rotor model and low Reynolds number flow characteristics become important in the validations with the test cases of this rotor model. The airfoil CFD simulations are carried out in 2-D and 3-D computational domains. The k-rn SST turbulence model with Langtry-Menter (γ-Re θ ) transition prediction model for turbulence closure is used in the calculations. The Delayed DES is also performed in the stall region for comparisons. The results are compared with the available METUWIND experimental data, and are shown to be in fair agreement. It is observed that 3-D CFD analysis provides increased accuracy at increased computational cost

  11. Implementation of different turbulence model to find proper model to estimate aerodynamic properties of airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, aerodynamic calculations of NACA 4 series airfoil of 0012 are performed by using Finite-Volume Method and obtained results are compared with experimental data to correlate the numerical accuracy of CFD approximation. Then other airfoils are simulated with k-ɛ, k-w Spalart-Allmaras and SST model. The governing equations are the Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The performance of different airfoils (NACA 0008, 0009, 0010, 0012, 0015, 0018, 0021, 0024) at different angle of attack are investigated and compared with most used turbulence models for industrial applications. According to the results of the comparison of numerical calculations and experimental data, k-w and SST models are considered to be closest to experimental results for the calculation of the lift coefficient.

  12. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  13. Finding optimum airfoil shape to get maximum aerodynamic efficiency for a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of S-series wind turbine airfoil of S 825 are investigated to find optimum angle of attack. Aerodynamic performances calculations are carried out by utilization of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method withstand finite capacity approximation by using Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes (RANS) theorem. The lift and pressure coefficients, lift to drag ratio of airfoil S 825 are analyzed with SST turbulence model then obtained results crosscheck with wind tunnel data to verify the precision of computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approximation. The comparison indicates that SST turbulence model used in this study can predict aerodynamics properties of wind blade.

  14. METHOD FOR NUMERICAL MODELING OF UNSTEADY SEPARATED FLOW AROUND AIRFOILS MOVING CLOSE TO FLAT SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pogrebnaya Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article an attempt is made to explain the nature of differences in measurements of forces and moments, which influence an aircraft at take-off and landing when testing on different types of stands. An algorithm for numerical simulation of unsteady separated flow around airfoil is given. The algorithm is based on the combination of discrete vortex method and turbulent boundary layer equations. An unsteady flow separation modeling has been used. At each interval vortex method was used to calculate the potential flow around airfoils located near a screen. Calculated pressures and velocities were then used in boundary layer calculations to determine flow separation points and separated vortex in- tensities. After that calculation were made to determine free vortex positions to next time step and the process was fulfilled for next time step. The proposed algorithm allows using numeric visualization to understand physical picture of flow around airfoil moving close to screen. Three different ways of flow modeling (mirror method, fixed or movable screens were tested. In each case the flow separation process, which determines pressure distribution over airfoil surface and influ- ences aerodynamic performance, was viewed. The results of the calculations showed that at low atitudes of airfoil over screen mirror method over predicts lift force compared with movable screen, while fixed screen under predicts it. The data obtained can be used when designing equipment for testing in wind tunnels.

  15. Usage of advanced thick airfoils for the outer part of very large offshore turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, F; Ceyhan, O

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays one of the big challenges in wind energy is connected to the development of very large wind turbines with 100 m blades and 8-10MW power production. The European project INNWIND.EU plays an important role in this challenge because it is focused on exploring and exploiting technical innovations to make these machines not only feasible but also cost effective. In this context, the present work investigates the benefits of adopting thick airfoils also at the outer part of the blade. In fact, if these airfoils are comparable to the existing thinner ones in terms of aerodynamics, the extra thickness would lead to a save in weight. Lightweight blades would visibly contribute to reduce the cost of energy of the turbines and make them cost effective. The reference turbine defined in INNWIND.EU project has been adjusted to use the new airfoils. The results show that the rotor performance is not sacrificed when the 24% airfoils are replaced by the ECN 30% thick airfoils, while 24% extra thickness can be obtained

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of Flows over an NACA-0012 Airfoil at Low and Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow over an NACA-0012 airfoil are performed at a low and a moderate Reynolds numbers of Re(sub c)=50 times10(exp 3) and 1times 10(exp 6). The angles of attack are 5 and 15 degrees at the low and the moderate Reynolds number cases respectively. The three-dimensional unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. The flow field in the low Reynolds number case consists of a long separation bubble near the leading-edge region and an attached boundary layer on the aft part of the airfoil. The shear layer that formed in the separated region persisted up to the end of the airfoil. The roles of the turbulent diffusion, advection, and dissipation terms in the turbulent kinetic-energy balance equation change as the boundary layer evolves over the airfoil. In the higher Reynolds number case, the leading-edge separation bubble is very small in length and in height. A fully developed turbulent boundary layer is observed in a short distance downstream of the reattachment point. The boundary layer velocity near the wall gradually decreases along the airfoil. Eventually, the boundary layer separates near the trailing edge. The Reynolds stresses peak in the outer part of the boundary layer and the maximum amplitude also gradually increases along the chord.

  17. Stochastic estimation of flow near the trailing edge of a NACA0012 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sagrado, Ana [University of Cambridge, Whittle Laboratory, Department of Engineering, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Applied Modelling and Computation Group, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Hynes, Tom [University of Cambridge, Whittle Laboratory, Department of Engineering, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    A stochastic estimation technique has been applied to simultaneously acquired data of velocity and surface pressure as a tool to identify the sources of wall-pressure fluctuations. The measurements have been done on a NACA0012 airfoil at a Reynolds number of Re{sub c} = 2 x 10 {sup 5}, based on the chord of the airfoil, where a separated laminar boundary layer was present. By performing simultaneous measurements of the surface pressure fluctuations and of the velocity field in the boundary layer and wake of the airfoil, the wall-pressure sources near the trailing edge (TE) have been studied. The mechanisms and flow structures associated with the generation of the surface pressure have been investigated. The ''quasi-instantaneous'' velocity field resulting from the application of the technique has led to a picture of the evolution in time of the convecting surface pressure generating flow structures and revealed information about the sources of the wall-pressure fluctuations, their nature and variability. These sources are closely related to those of the radiated noise from the TE of an airfoil and to the vibration issues encountered in ship hulls for example. The NACA0012 airfoil had a 30 cm chord and aspect ratio of 1. (orig.)

  18. Application of a Beamforming Technique to the Measurement of Airfoil Leading Edge Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the use of microphone array technology and beamforming algorithms for the measurement and analysis of noise generated by the interaction of a turbulent flow with the leading edge of an airfoil. Experiments were performed using a setup in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel, where the turbulent inflow is provided by different grids. In order to exactly localize the aeroacoustic noise sources and, moreover, to separate airfoil leading edge noise from grid-generated noise, the selected deconvolution beamforming algorithm is extended to be used on a fully three-dimensional source region. The result of this extended beamforming are three-dimensional mappings of noise source locations. Besides acoustic measurements, the investigation of airfoil leading edge noise requires the measurement of parameters describing the incident turbulence, such as the intensity and a characteristic length scale or time scale. The method used for the determination of these parameters in the present study is explained in detail. To demonstrate the applicability of the extended beamforming algorithm and the experimental setup as a whole, the noise generated at the leading edge of airfoils made of porous materials was measured and compared to that generated at the leading edge of a common nonporous airfoil.

  19. Numerical calculation of aerodynamics wind turbine blade S809 airfoil and comparison of theoretical calculations with experimental measurements and confirming with NREL data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2018-02-01

    Aerodynamic performance of the airfoil plays the most important role to obtain economically maximum efficiency from a wind turbine. Therefore airfoil should have an ideal aerodynamic shape. In this study, aerodynamic simulation of S809 airfoil is conducted and obtained result compared with previously made NASA experimental result and NREL theoretical data. At first, Lift coefficient, lift to drag ratio and pressure coefficient around S809 airfoil are calculated with SST turbulence model, and are compared with experimental and other theoretical data to correlate simulation correctness of the computational approaches. And result indicates good correlation with both experimental and theoretical data. This calculation point out that as the increasing relative velocity, lift to drag ratio increases. Lift to drag ratio attain maximum at the angle around 6 degree and after that starts to decrease again. Comparison shows that CFD code used in this calculation can predict aerodynamic properties of airfoil.

  20. Airfoil wake and linear theory gust response including sub and superresonant flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic gust response of a high solidity stator vane row is examined in terms of the fundamental gust modeling assumptions with particular attention given to the effects near an acoustic resonance. A series of experiments was performed with gusts generated by rotors comprised of perforated plates and airfoils. It is concluded that, for both the perforated plate and airfoil wake generated gusts, the unsteady pressure responses do not agree with the linear-theory gust predictions near an acoustic resonance. The effects of the acoustic resonance phenomena are clearly evident on the airfoil surface unsteady pressure responses. The transition of the measured lift coefficients across the acoustic resonance from the subresonant regime to the superresonant regime occurs in a simple linear fashion.

  1. Aerodynamic behaviour of NREL S826 airfoil at Re=100,000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sarmast, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents wind tunnel measurements of the NREL S826 airfoil at Reynolds number Re = 100,000 for angles of attack in a range of -10° to 25° the corresponding Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for selected angles of attack. The measurements have been performed at the low speed wind tunnel located...... at Fluid Mechanics laboratory of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Lift coefficient is obtained from the forge gauge measurements while the drag is measured according to the integration of the wake profiles downstream of the airfoil. The pressure distribution is measured by a set of pressure taps...... on the airfoil surface. The lift and drag polars are obtained from the LES computations using DTU's inhouse CFD solver, EllipSys3D, and good agreement is found between the measurement and the simulations. At high angles of attack, the numerical computations tend to over-predict the lift coefficients, however...

  2. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldacchino, D; Ferreira, C; Florentie, L; Timmer, N; Van Zuijlen, A; Manolesos, M; Chaviaropoulos, T; Diakakis, K; Papadakis, G; Voutsinas, S; González Salcedo, Á; Aparicio, M; García, N R.; Sørensen, N N.; Troldborg, N

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30% thick DU97W300 and an 18% thick NTUA T18 have been used for benchmarking several simulation tools. These tools span low-to-high complexity, ranging from engineering-level integral boundary layer tools to fully-resolved computational fluid dynamics codes. Results indicate that with appropriate calibration, engineering-type tools can capture the effects of vortex generators and outperform more complex tools. Fully resolved CFD comes at a much higher computational cost and does not necessarily capture the increased lift due to the VGs. However, in lieu of the limited experimental data available for calibration, high fidelity tools are still required for assessing the effect of vortex generators on airfoil performance. (paper)

  3. Optimation of a Table Conveyor Type Grading Machine to Increase the Performance of Green Coffee Manual Sortation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee consumers request a good quality of green coffee to get a good coffee cup taste. Defective beans e.g. black bean, brown bean and broken bean are associated to low coffee quality which give negative effects to final taste. To meet the standard export requirement, coffee beans have to be graded before being traded. Until now, grading process is generally carried out manually. The method gives better product, so the grading cost is very expensive about 40% of total processing cost. Meanwhile, shortage of skill workers is a limiting factor of the process. Therefore, improving the manual sorting by providing machine for grading of green coffee is good alternative to reduce the grading cost. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed a table conveyor type grading machine in order to improve the performance of the manual grading productivity and consistent quality and to reduce the grading cost. The conveyor belt has a dimension of 5700 mm of length, 610 mm of width and 6 mm of thickness. The rotating of belt conveyor powered by an electro motor 3 HP, 3 phase and 1420 rpm. The result showed that the optimum capacity of grading machine was 390 kg/hour reached when the speed 16 rpm and 3 kg/m 2 of green beans on belt conveyor with productivity 1870 kg/man-day compared to the productivity full manually process 743 kg/man-day. Percentage of product in outlet 1 was 4.2% as broken beans, 0.26% as brown beans, 0.68% as one hole in beans and 0.61% as more than one hole in beans. Percentage of product in outlet 2 was 39.54% as broken beans, 4.23% as brown beans 7.19% as black beans, 4.47% as one hole in beans and 4.43% as more than one hole in beans. Cost of grading process per kg of green coffee is Rp20,-. Key words : Coffee, Grading, Conveyor table, Quality

  4. An overview of NACA 6-digit airfoil series characteristics with reference to airfoils for large wind turbine blades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the NACA 63 and 64 6-digit series of airfoils tested in the NACA LTPT in view to verify the RFOIL calculated airfoil characteristics for high Reynolds numbers. Some anomalies in the zero-lift angles of 15% and 18% thick airfoils from these series are identified, both in the

  5. Compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David A.; Pu, Zhengxiang

    2015-08-18

    A compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system for reducing a gap between a tip of a compressor airfoil and a radially adjacent component of a turbine engine is disclosed. The turbine engine may include ID and OD flowpath boundaries configured to minimize compressor airfoil tip clearances during turbine engine operation in cooperation with one or more clearance reduction systems that are configured to move the rotor assembly axially to reduce tip clearance. The configurations of the ID and OD flowpath boundaries enhance the effectiveness of the axial movement of the rotor assembly, which includes movement of the ID flowpath boundary. During operation of the turbine engine, the rotor assembly may be moved axially to increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  6. Turbine airfoil fabricated from tapered extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2013-07-16

    An airfoil (30) and fabrication process for turbine blades with cooling channels (26). Tapered tubes (32A-32D) are bonded together in a parallel sequence, forming a leading edge (21), a trailing edge (22), and pressure and suction side walls (23, 24) connected by internal ribs (25). The tapered tubes may be extruded without camber to simplify the extrusion process, then bonded along matching surfaces (34), forming a non-cambered airfoil (28), which may be cambered in a hot forming process and cut (48) to length. The tubes may have tapered walls that are thinner at the blade tip (T1) than at the base (T2), reducing mass. A cap (50) may be attached to the blade tip. A mounting lug (58) may be forged (60) on the airfoil base and then machined, completing the blade for mounting in a turbine rotor disk.

  7. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  8. EUDP Project: Low Noise Airfoil - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project `Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side...... to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (DK), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel....... In particular, the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model could be significantly improved by introducing turbulence anisotropy in its formulation, as well as the influence of the boundary layer mean pressure gradient. This two characteristics are inherent to airfoil flows but were neglected in the original...

  9. Modelling of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics for the prediction of blade standstill vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, CFD simulations of the DU96-W-180 airfoil at 26 and 24 deg. angles of attack were performed. 2D RANS and 3D DES computations with non-moving and prescribed motion airfoil suspensions were carried out. The openings of the lift coefficient loops predicted by CFD were different than those predicted by engineering models. The average lift slope of the loops from the 3D CFD had opposite sign than the one from 2D CFD. Trying to model the 3D behaviour with the engineering models...

  10. Modelling of unsteady airfoil aerodynamics for the prediction of blade standstill vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, CFD simulations of the DU96-W-180 airfoil at 26 and 24 deg. angles of attack were performed. 2D RANS and 3D DES computations with non-moving and prescribed motion airfoil suspensions were carried out. The openings of the lift coefficient loops predicted by CFD were different...... than those predicted by engineering models. The average lift slope of the loops from the 3D CFD had opposite sign than the one from 2D CFD. Trying to model the 3D behaviour with the engineering models proved difficult. The disagreement between the 2D CFD, 3D CFD and the engineering models indicates...

  11. Effects of laminar separation bubbles and turbulent separation on airfoil stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, P. [Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States); Coiro, D.P. [Universita di Napoli (Italy)

    1997-12-31

    An existing two-dimensional, interactive, stall prediction program is extended by improving its laminar separation bubble model. The program now accounts correctly for the effects of the bubble on airfoil performance characteristics when it forms at the mid-chord and on the leading edge. Furthermore, the model can now predict bubble bursting on very sharp leading edges at high angles of attack. The details of the model are discussed in depth. Comparisons of the predicted stall and post-stall pressure distributions show excellent agreement with experimental measurements for several different airfoils at different Reynolds numbers.

  12. Design of a new urban wind turbine airfoil using a pressure-load inverse method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, J.C.C.; Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques da Silva, F. [LNEC - Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Av. Brasil, 101, 1700-066 Lisboa (Portugal); Estanqueiro, A.I. [INETI - Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents the design methodology of a new wind turbine airfoil that achieves high performance in urban environment by increasing the maximum lift. For this purpose, an inverse method was applied to obtain a new wind turbine blade section with constant pressure-load along the chord, at the design inlet angle. In comparison with conventional blade section designs, the new airfoil has increased maximum lift, reduced leading edge suction peak and controlled soft-stall behaviour, due to a reduction of the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side. Wind tunnel experimental results confirmed the computational results. (author)

  13. Airfoil flow instabilities induced by background flow oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selerowicz, W.C.; Szumowski, A.P. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland)

    2002-04-01

    The effect of background flow oscillations on transonic airfoil (NACA 0012) flow was investigated experimentally. The oscillations were generated by means of a rotating plate placed downstream of the airfoil. Owing to oscillating chocking of the flow caused by the plate, the airfoil flow periodically accelerated and decelerated. This led to strong variations in the surface pressure and the airfoil loading. The results are presented for two angles of attack, {alpha}=4 and {alpha}=8.5 , which correspond to the attached and separated steady airfoil flows, respectively. (orig.)

  14. Multiple piece turbine engine airfoil with a structural spar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven J [Orlando, FL

    2011-10-11

    A multiple piece turbine airfoil having an outer shell with an airfoil tip that is attached to a root with an internal structural spar is disclosed. The root may be formed from first and second sections that include an internal cavity configured to receive and secure the one or more components forming the generally elongated airfoil. The internal structural spar may be attached to an airfoil tip and place the generally elongated airfoil in compression. The configuration enables each component to be formed from different materials to reduce the cost of the materials and to optimize the choice of material for each component.

  15. Wind Tunnel and Numerical Analysis of Thick Blunt Trailing Edge Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Anthony William

    Two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of several thick blunt trailing edge airfoils are presented. These airfoils are not only directly applicable to the root section of wind turbine blades, where they provide the required structural strength at a fraction of the material and weight of an equivalent sharp trailing edge airfoil, but are also applicable to the root sections of UAVs having high aspect ratios, that also encounter heavy root bending forces. The Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code, ARC2D, was the primary numerical tool used to analyze each airfoil. The UCD-38-095, referred to as the Pareto B airfoil in this thesis, was also tested in the University of California, Davis Aeronautical Wind Tunnel. The Pareto B has an experimentally determined maximum lift coefficient of 1.64 at 14 degrees incidence, minimum drag coefficient of 0.0385, and maximum lift over drag ratio of 35.9 at a lift coefficient of 1.38, 10 degrees incidence at a Reynolds number of 666,000. Zig-zag tape at 2% and 5% of the chord was placed on the leading edge pressure and suction side of the Pareto B model in order to determine the aerodynamic performance characteristics at turbulent flow conditions. Experimental Pareto B wind tunnel data and previous FB-3500-0875 data is also presented and used to validate the ARC2D results obtained in this study. Additionally MBFLO, a detached eddy simulation Navier-Stokes code, was used to analyze the Pareto B airfoil for comparison and validation purposes.

  16. Experimental parameter study for passive vortex generators on a 30% thick airfoil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldacchino, D.; Simao Ferreira, C.; De Tavernier, D.A.M.; Timmer, W.A.; van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2018-01-01

    Passive vane-type vortex generators (VGs) are commonly used on wind turbine blades to mitigate the effects of flow separation. However, significant uncertainty surrounds VG design guidelines. Understanding the influence of VG parameters on airfoil performance requires a systematic approach

  17. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  18. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  19. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform...

  20. ANALYSIS OF TRANSONIC FLOW PAST CUSPED AIRFOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Stodůlka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transonic flow past two cusped airfoils is numerically solved and achieved results are analyzed by means of flow behavior and oblique shocks formation.Regions around sharp trailing edges are studied in detail and parameters of shock waves are solved and compared using classical shock polar approach and verified by reduction parameters for symmetric configurations.

  1. Optimization Criteria and Sailplane Airfoil Design

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popelka, Lukáš; Matějka, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2007), s. 74-78 ISSN 0744-8996 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2076403; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aerodynamic optimization * airfoil Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  2. Genetic Algorithms in Wind Turbine Airfoil Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Bizzarrini, N.; Coiro, D.P. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Napoli ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    One key element in the aerodynamic design of wind turbines is the use of specially tailored airfoils to increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and thereby to reduce cost of energy. This work is focused on the design of a wind turbine airfoil by using numerical optimization. Firstly, the optimization approach is presented; a genetic algorithm is used, coupled with RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints; in order to formalize in the most complete and effective way the design requirements, the effects of activating specific constraints are discussed. A numerical example regarding the design of a high efficiency airfoil for the outer part of a blade by using genetic algorithms is illustrated and the results are compared with existing wind turbine airfoils. Finally a new hybrid design strategy is illustrated and discussed, in which the genetic algorithms are used at the beginning of the design process to explore a wide domain. Then, the gradient based algorithms are used in order to improve the first stage optimum.

  3. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  4. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Irene R; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Faber, Niels R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be included in a talent

  5. Iced airfoil separation bubble measurements by particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jason J.

    Not long after the birth of aviation, pilots began to recognize the dangers posed by aircraft icing. Since that time, research has improved the awareness of this problem and the scientific understanding of the associated aerodynamic impacts, however, few studies have involved detailed, quantitative, flowfield measurements. For this reason, the current investigation was conducted in which high spatial-resolution flowfield measurements were acquired of a NACA 0012 airfoil with two- and three-dimensional, simulated, leading-edge, horn-ice accretions utilizing particle image velocimetry (PIV). These measurements complemented existing iced airfoil performance measurements, revealed previously unknown details regarding the structure and behavior of these flowfields, and could potentially facilitate the development and improvement of computational schemes used to predict largely separated flows, including that of an iced airfoil near stall. Previous iced airfoil investigations have demonstrated somewhat reduced aerodynamic penalties resulting from a three-dimensional ice simulation, compared to those of a two-dimensional ice simulation of a representative cross section. Correspondingly, the current measurements revealed accelerated transition of the separated shear layer emanating from a three-dimensional ice simulation and therefore enhanced pressure recovery and reduced mean separation bubble length, each relative to the flowfield of a representative two-dimensional ice simulation. These effects appeared to result from the quasi-steady distribution of discrete, streamwise vortices which aided the turbulent entrainment of fluid from the recirculation region of the three-dimensional ice simulation separation bubble flowfield. These vortices were generated by a streamwise-vortex instability excited by roughness along the three-dimensional ice simulation and produced spanwise-cell structures throughout this flowfield, as well as significant spanwise variation in peak

  6. Scanning table

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Before the invention of wire chambers, particles tracks were analysed on scanning tables like this one. Today, the process is electronic and much faster. Bubble chamber film - currently available - (links can be found below) was used for this analysis of the particle tracks.

  7. Ground effects on the stability of separated flow around an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yu, Peng; Li, Larry K. B.

    2017-11-01

    We perform a BiGlobal stability analysis on the separated flow around a NACA 4415 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 300 - 1000) and a high angle of attack α =20° with a focus on the effect of the airfoil's proximity to a moving ground. The results show that the most dominant perturbation is the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode and that this traveling mode becomes less unstable as the airfoil approaches the ground, although this stabilizing effect diminishes with increasing Reynolds number. By performing a Floquet analysis, we find that this ground effect can also stabilize secondary instabilities. This numerical-theoretical study shows that the ground can have a significant influence on the stability of separated flow around an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers, which could have implications for the design of micro aerial vehicles and for the understanding of natural flyers such as insects and birds. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (Project No. 16235716 and 26202815) and the Special Program for Applied Research on Super Computation of the NSFC-Guangdong Joint Fund (the second phase) under Grant No.U1501501.

  8. The effect of electrohydrodynamic force on the lift coefficient of a NACA 0015 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Y.; Hossain, A.; Abdullah, A. H.; Nasir, Rizal M. E.; Hamid, A.; Muthmainnah, N.; N, M.

    2017-11-01

    Lift, the force component that is perpendicular to the line of flight, is generated when a small aircraft moves through the air. With the help of the sets of flaps and slats on its wing, the pilot controls his aircraft manoeuvring in the air. In this study, we preferred to cut the drawbacks of the flaps system by introducing the electrohydrodynamic actuator. Widely known as plasma actuator, it is able to improve the induced lift force as well as the efficiency of a small aircraft system. A dielectric-barrier-discharge actuator using a 6 kV AC power supply was developed and tested on a NACA 0015 airfoil using copper as the electrodes and kapton as its dielectric component. The experimental results showed that it was successful in presenting a positive effect of the plasma actuator on the lift coefficient of the airfoil at smaller angle of attack, where enhancements ranged between 0.7% and 1.8%. However, at a higher angle, the results were not as swayed as it was desired since the energy exerted by the plasma actuator on the lift performance of the airfoil was inadequate. Further tests are needed using higher rated voltage supply and other equipment to improve the capability of the actuator in refining the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil.

  9. Time-Dependent Effects of Glaze Ice on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Tabatabaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to estimate the dynamic loads acting over a glaze-iced airfoil. This work studies the performance of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS simulations in predicting the oscillations over an iced airfoil. The structure and size of time-averaged vortices are compared to measurements. Furthermore, the accuracy of a two-equation eddy viscosity turbulence model, the shear stress transport (SST model, is investigated in the case of the dynamic load analysis over a glaze-iced airfoil. The computational fluid dynamic analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of critical ice accretions on a 0.610 m chord NACA 0011 airfoil. Leading edge glaze ice accretion was simulated with flat plates (spoiler-ice extending along the span of the blade. Aerodynamic performance coefficients and pressure profiles were calculated and validated for the Reynolds number of 1.83 × 106. Furthermore, turbulent separation bubbles were studied. The numerical results confirm both time-dependent phenomena observed in previous similar measurements: (1 low-frequency mode, with a Strouhal number Sth≈0,013–0.02, and (2 higher frequency mode with a Strouhal number StL≈0,059–0.69. The higher frequency motion has the same characteristics as the shedding mode and the lower frequency motion has the flapping mode characteristics.

  10. An experimental study of airfoil-spoiler aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Karamcheti, K.

    1985-01-01

    The steady/unsteady flow field generated by a typical two dimensional airfoil with a statically deflected flap type spoiler was investigated. Subsonic wind tunnel tests were made over a range of parameters: spoiler deflection, angle of attack, and two Reynolds numbers; and comprehensive measurements of the mean and fluctuating surface pressures, velocities in the boundary layer, and velocities in the wake. Schlieren flow visualization of the near wake structure was performed. The mean lift, moment, and surface pressure characteristics are in agreement with previous investigations of spoiler aerodynamics. At large spoiler deflections, boundary layer character affects the static pressure distribution in the spoiler hingeline region; and, the wake mean velocity fields reveals a closed region of reversed flow aft of the spoiler. It is shown that the unsteady flow field characteristics are as follows: (1) the unsteady nature of the wake is characterized by vortex shedding; (2) the character of the vortex shedding changes with spoiler deflection; (3) the vortex shedding characteristics are in agreement with other bluff body investigations; and (4) the vortex shedding frequency component of the fluctuating surface pressure field is of appreciable magnitude at large spoiler deflections. The flow past an airfoil with deflected spoiler is a particular problem in bluff body aerodynamics is considered.

  11. A Comparative Study Using CFD to Predict Iced Airfoil Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, x.; Li, Y.; Chen, H.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Y. K.; Shih, T. I-P.

    2005-01-01

    WIND, Fluent, and PowerFLOW were used to predict the lift, drag, and moment coefficients of a business-jet airfoil with a rime ice (rough and jagged, but no protruding horns) and with a glaze ice (rough and jagged end has two or more protruding horns) for angles of attack from zero to and after stall. The performance of the following turbulence models were examined by comparing predictions with available experimental data. Spalart-Allmaras (S-A), RNG k-epsilon, shear-stress transport, v(sup 2)-f, and a differential Reynolds stress model with and without non-equilibrium wall functions. For steady RANS simulations, WIND and FLUENT were found to give nearly identical results if the grid about the iced airfoil, the turbulence model, and the order of accuracy of the numerical schemes used are the same. The use of wall functions was found to be acceptable for the rime ice configuration and the flow conditions examined. For rime ice, the S-A model was found to predict accurately until near the stall angle. For glaze ice, the CFD predictions were much less satisfactory for all turbulence models and codes investigated because of the large separated region produced by the horns. For unsteady RANS, WIND and FLUENT did not provide better results. PowerFLOW, based on the Lattice Boltzmann method, gave excellent results for the lift coefficient at and near stall for the rime ice, where the flow is inherently unsteady.

  12. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, M A; Banks, D W; Garzon, G A; Matisheck, J R

    2015-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings. (paper)

  13. Turbine airfoil having near-wall cooling insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jr., Nicholas F.; Wiebe, David J.

    2017-09-12

    A turbine airfoil is provided with at least one insert positioned in a cavity in an airfoil interior. The insert extends along a span-wise extent of the turbine airfoil and includes first and second opposite faces. A first near-wall cooling channel is defined between the first face and a pressure sidewall of an airfoil outer wall. A second near-wall cooling channel is defined between the second face and a suction sidewall of the airfoil outer wall. The insert is configured to occupy an inactive volume in the airfoil interior so as to displace a coolant flow in the cavity toward the first and second near-wall cooling channels. A locating feature engages the insert with the outer wall for supporting the insert in position. The locating feature is configured to control flow of the coolant through the first or second near-wall cooling channel.

  14. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  15. Design Of An Aerodynamic Measurement System For Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and validation of a measurement system for aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles. An aerodynamic balance was designed in order to measure the lift, drag forces and pitching moment for different airfoils. During the design process, several aspects were analyzed in order to produce an efficient design, for instance the range of changes of the angle of attack with and a small increment and the versatility of being adapted to different type of airfoils, since it is a wire balance it was aligned and calibrated as well. Wind tunnel tests of a two dimensional NACA four digits family airfoil and four different modifications of this airfoil were performed to validate the aerodynamic measurement system. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, four different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack experimentally for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off, called the no blowing condition, by means of wind tunnel tests. The experiments were performed in a closed circuit wind tunnel with an open test section. Finally, results of the wind tunnel tests were compared with numerical results obtained by means of computational fluid dynamics as well as with other experimental references and found to be in good agreement.

  16. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A.; Gomez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-06-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling.

  17. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  18. Computations of droplet impingement on airfoils in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Dug; Song, Dong Joo

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of leading-edge accretion can raise important safety concerns since the formulation of ice causes severe degradation in aerodynamic performance as compared with the clean airfoil. The objective of this study is to develop a numerical simulation strategy for predicting the particle trajectory around an MS-0317 airfoil in the test section of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and to investigate the impingement characteristics of droplets on the airfoil surface. In particular, predictions of the mean velocity and turbulence diffusion using turbulent flow solver and continuous random walk method were desired throughout this flow domain in order to investigate droplet dispersion. The collection efficiency distributions over the airfoil surface in simulations with different numbers of droplets, various integration time-steps and particle sizes were compared with experimental data. The large droplet impingement data indicated the trends in impingement characteristics with respect to particle size; the maximum collection efficiency located at the upper surface near the leading edge, and the maximum value and total collection efficiency were increased as the particle size was increased. The extent of the area impinged on by particles also increased with the increment of the particle size, which is similar as compared with experimental data

  19. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, A; Gomez-Iradi, S; Munduate, X

    2014-01-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling

  20. Aerodynamic behaviour of NREL S826 airfoil at Re=100,000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarlak, H; Mikkelsen, R; Sarmast, S; Sørensen, J N

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents wind tunnel measurements of the NREL S826 airfoil at Reynolds number Re = 100,000 for angles of attack in a range of -10° to 25° the corresponding Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for selected angles of attack. The measurements have been performed at the low speed wind tunnel located at Fluid Mechanics laboratory of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Lift coefficient is obtained from the forge gauge measurements while the drag is measured according to the integration of the wake profiles downstream of the airfoil. The pressure distribution is measured by a set of pressure taps on the airfoil surface. The lift and drag polars are obtained from the LES computations using DTU's inhouse CFD solver, EllipSys3D, and good agreement is found between the measurement and the simulations. At high angles of attack, the numerical computations tend to over-predict the lift coefficients, however, there is a better agreement between the drag measurements and computations. It is concluded that LES computations are able to capture the lift and drag polars as well as the pressure distribution around the airfoil with an acceptable accuracy

  1. CFD study on NACA 4415 airfoil implementing spherical and sinusoidal Tubercle Leading Edge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M A Aftab

    Full Text Available The Humpback whale tubercles have been studied for more than a decade. Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE effectively reduces the separation bubble size and helps in delaying stall. They are very effective in case of low Reynolds number flows. The current Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study is on NACA 4415 airfoil, at a Reynolds number 120,000. Two TLE shapes are tested on NACA 4415 airfoil. The tubercle designs implemented on the airfoil are sinusoidal and spherical. A parametric study is also carried out considering three amplitudes (0.025c, 0.05c and 0.075c, the wavelength (0.25c is fixed. Structured mesh is utilized to generate grid and Transition SST turbulence model is used to capture the flow physics. Results clearly show spherical tubercles outperform sinusoidal tubercles. Furthermore experimental study considering spherical TLE is carried out at Reynolds number 200,000. The experimental results show that spherical TLE improve performance compared to clean airfoil.

  2. Computational Investigations on the Effects of Gurney Flap on Airfoil Aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shubham; Sitaram, Nekkanti; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    The present study comprises steady state, two-dimensional computational investigations performed on NACA 0012 airfoil to analyze the effect of Gurney flap (GF) on airfoil aerodynamics using k-ε RNG turbulence model of FLUENT. Airfoil with GF is analyzed for six different heights from 0.5% to 4% of the chord length, seven positions from 0% to 20% of the chord length from the trailing edge, and seven mounting angles from 30° to 120° with the chord. Computed values of lift and drag coefficients with angle of attack are compared with experimental values and good agreement is found at low angles of attack. In addition static pressure distribution on the airfoil surface and pathlines and turbulence intensities near the trailing edge are present. From the computational investigation, it is recommended that Gurney flaps with a height of 1.5% chord be installed perpendicular to chord and as close to the trailing edge as possible to obtain maximum lift enhancement with minimum drag penalty.

  3. Experimental study of boundary-layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, W.P. [Center for Turbulence and Flow Control Research Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design, Seoul National University (Korea); Park, T.C.; Kang, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    Hot-wire measurements are performed in boundary-layer flows developing on a NACA 0012 airfoil over which wakes pass periodically. The periodic wakes are generated by rotating circular cylinders clockwise or counterclockwise around the airfoil. The time- and phase-averaged mean streamwise velocities and turbulence fluctuations are measured to investigate the phenomena of wake-induced transition. Especially, the phase-averaged wall shear stresses are evaluated using a computational Preston tube method. The passing wakes significantly change the pressure distribution on the airfoil, which has influence on the transition process of the boundary layer. The orientation of the passing wake alters the pressure distribution in a different manner. Due to the passing wake, the turbulent patches are generated inside the laminar boundary layer on the airfoil, and the boundary layer becomes temporarily transitional. The patches propagate downstream at a speed smaller than the free-stream velocity and merge together further downstream. Relatively high values of phase-averaged turbulence fluctuations in the outer part of the boundary layer indicate the possibility that breakdown occurs in the outer layer away from the wall. It is confirmed that the phase-averaged mean velocity profile has two dips in the outer region of the transitional boundary layer for each passing cycle. (orig.)

  4. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D...... Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils....

  5. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  6. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N; Vronsky, Tomas; Gaudern, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils

  7. Profile catalogue for airfoil sections based on 3D computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    This report is a continuation of the Wind Turbine Airfoil Catalogue [1] which objective was, firstly to provide a database of aerodynamic characteristics for a wide range of airfoil profiles aimed at wind turbine applications, and secondly to test thetwo-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D...... and the actual fluid flow, and thereby the incorrect prediction of airfoil characteristics. In addition, other features of the flow solver, such astransition and turbulence modelling, and their influence onto the numerical results are investigated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the evaluation of airfoil...

  8. EUDP project 'Low noise airfoil' - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F. (ed.)

    2012-06-15

    This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project 'Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (Denmark), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel at the Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA, USA), also a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel but equipped with an anechoic chamber that allow to perform acoustic measurements. On the theoretical side, the above experiments yield a series of model validations and improvements. In particular, the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model could be significantly improved by introducing turbulence anisotropy in its formulation, as well as the influence of the boundary layer mean pressure gradient. This two characteristics are inherent to airfoil flows but were neglected in the original approach. In addition, the experimental results are confronted to detailed Large Eddy Simulations of the airfoil flow giving more insight into the flow turbulence characteristics. The methodology which consists in measuring surface pressure spectra directly on the airfoil surface using flush-mounted microphones in order to evaluate far-field noise emission using additional theoretical results has been validated. This technique presents the advantage that it can easily be used in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel and does not require the use of an anechoic facility. It was developed as a substitute to the original plan that consisted in measuring acoustic waves using hot-wire velocimetry. This last technique proved ineffective in the LM Wind

  9. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  10. Turbine engine airfoil and platform assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; James, Allister W [Chuluota, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-07-31

    A turbine airfoil (22A) is formed by a first process using a first material. A platform (30A) is formed by a second process using a second material that may be different from the first material. The platform (30A) is assembled around a shank (23A) of the airfoil. One or more pins (36A) extend from the platform into holes (28) in the shank (23A). The platform may be formed in two portions (32A, 34A) and placed around the shank, enclosing it. The two platform portions may be bonded to each other. Alternately, the platform (30B) may be cast around the shank (23B) using a metal alloy with better castability than that of the blade and shank, which may be specialized for thermal tolerance. The pins (36A-36D) or holes for them do not extend to an outer surface (31) of the platform, avoiding stress concentrations.

  11. Numerical Investigation on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Supercritical Liquefied Natural Gas in an Airfoil Fin Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongchao Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a new kind of highly compact and efficient micro-channel heat exchanger, the printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE is a promising candidate satisfying the heat exchange requirements of liquefied natural gas (LNG vaporization at low and high pressure. The effects of airfoil fin arrangement on heat transfer and flow resistance were numerically investigated using supercritical liquefied natural gas (LNG as working fluid. The thermal properties of supercritical LNG were tested by utilizing the REFPROF software database. Numerical simulations were performed using FLUENT. The inlet temperature of supercritical LNG was 121 K, and its pressure was 10.5 MPa. The reference mass flow rate of LNG was set as 1.22 g/s for the vertical pitch Lv = 1.67 mm and the staggered pitch Ls = 0 mm, with the Reynolds number of about 3750. The SST k-ω model was selected and verified by comparing with the experimental data using supercritical liquid nitrogen as cold fluid. The airfoil fin PCHE had better thermal-hydraulic performance than that of the straight channel PCHE. Moreover, the airfoil fins with staggered arrangement displayed better thermal performance than that of the fins with parallel arrangement. The thermal-hydraulic performance of airfoil fin PCHE was improved with increasing Ls and Lv. Moreover, Lv affected the Nusselt number and pressure drop of airfoil fin PCHE more obviously. In conclusion, a sparser staggered arrangement of fins showed a better thermal-hydraulic performance in airfoil fin PCHE.

  12. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  13. Simple Parametric Model for Airfoil Shape Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, David

    2017-12-01

    We show a simple, analytic equation describing a class of two-dimensional shapes well suited for representation of aircraft airfoil profiles. Our goal was to create a description characterized by a small number of parameters with easily understandable meaning, providing a tool to alter the shape with optimization procedures as well as manual tweaks by the designer. The generated shapes are well suited for numerical analysis with 2D flow solving software such as XFOIL.

  14. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds. [design analysis and aerodynamic characteristics of the GAW-1 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil is examined that has an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency. Diagrams illustrating supersonic flow and shock waves over the airfoil are shown.

  15. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform of our in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The flow solution is first obtained from the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), the acoustic part is then carried out based on the instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity field. To obtain the time history data of sound pressure, the flow quantities are integrated around the airfoil surface through the FWH approach. For all the simulations, the chord based Reynolds number is around 1.5x10 6 . In the test matrix, the effects from angle of attack, the TE flap angle, the length/width of the TES are investigated. Even though the airfoil under investigation is already optimized for low noise emission, most numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments show that the noise level is further decreased by adding the TES device. (paper)

  16. Active Subspaces of Airfoil Shape Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Zachary J.; Constantine, Paul G.

    2018-05-01

    Design and optimization benefit from understanding the dependence of a quantity of interest (e.g., a design objective or constraint function) on the design variables. A low-dimensional active subspace, when present, identifies important directions in the space of design variables; perturbing a design along the active subspace associated with a particular quantity of interest changes that quantity more, on average, than perturbing the design orthogonally to the active subspace. This low-dimensional structure provides insights that characterize the dependence of quantities of interest on design variables. Airfoil design in a transonic flow field with a parameterized geometry is a popular test problem for design methodologies. We examine two particular airfoil shape parameterizations, PARSEC and CST, and study the active subspaces present in two common design quantities of interest, transonic lift and drag coefficients, under each shape parameterization. We mathematically relate the two parameterizations with a common polynomial series. The active subspaces enable low-dimensional approximations of lift and drag that relate to physical airfoil properties. In particular, we obtain and interpret a two-dimensional approximation of both transonic lift and drag, and we show how these approximation inform a multi-objective design problem.

  17. 基于海鸥翼型的小型风力机叶片仿生设计与试验%Bionic design and test of small-sized wind turbine blade based on seagull airfoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骥月; 丛茜; 梁宁; 毛士佳; 关欢欢; 刘林鹏; 陈创发

    2015-01-01

    针对现有小型风力发电机效率远低于理论值问题,对100 W水平轴风力机叶片进行仿生改进。采用Spalart-Allmaras模型分析不同攻角下海鸥翼型与标准翼型的气动特性;以标准100 W水平轴风力机叶片为原型,结合海鸥翼型、标准弦长和计算得出的安装角,设计得到仿海鸥翼型叶片;利用SST k-ω模型进行仿海鸥翼型叶片与标准叶片气动特性数值模拟;搭建室内风力机效率测试平台,进行仿海鸥翼型风力机与标准风力机效率对比试验。结果表明:海鸥翼型气动性能优良,最大升力系数是标准翼型的2.19倍,最大升阻比是标准翼型的1.34倍;仿海鸥翼型叶片与标准叶片相比,输出功率提高25.77%。该研究可为小型风力发电机的改进设计提供参考。%Power of the existing small-sized wind turbine blades is much less than the theoretical value. This study improved 100 W wind turbine blades to increase the power of wind turbine. First of all, Spalart-Allmaras model which was suitable for airfoil stalling characteristics research was used to analyze the aerodynamic characteristics of seagull airfoil and standard airfoil with different angles of attack (AOA). Seagull airfoil and standard airfoil were got from seagull wing and standard blade by portable three-dimension scanner, Imageware software and Geomagic Studio software through standard blade scan, seagull wing scan, point cloud processing, reverse engineering modeling and cross section capture. Lift coefficients and lift-drag ratios of seagull airfoil and standard airfoil were calculated by Fluent software. Secondly, bionic blade was designed based on standard 100 W blades and Glauert theory. Thirdly, numerical simulations of bionic blade and standard blade were performed by using SST(shear stress transport) k-ω model which was suitable for blade performance research to analyze the aerodynamic characteristics of bionic blade and standard

  18. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper. Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10-7 and 10-6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0. It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics nearly remain unchanged. In

  19. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Unexpected performance degradation occurs in wind turbine blades due to leading edge defect when suffering from continuous impacts with rain drops, hails, insects, or solid particles during its operation life. To assess this issue, this paper numerically investigates the steady and dynamic stall characteristics of an S809 airfoil with various leading edge defects. More leading edge defect sizes and much closer to practical parameters are investigated in the paper.Numerical computation is conducted using the SST k-ω turbulence model, and the method has been validated by comparison with existed published data. In order to ensure the calculation convergence, the residuals for the continuity equation are set to be less than 10-7 and 10-6 in steady state and dynamic stall cases. The simulations are conducted with the software ANSYS Fluent 13.0.It is found that the characteristics of aerodynamic coefficients and flow fields are sensitive to leading edge defect both in steady and dynamic conditions. For airfoils with the defect thickness of 6%tc, leading edge defect has a relative small influence on the aerodynamics of S809 airfoil. For other investigated defect thicknesses, leading edge defect has much greater influence on the flow field structures, pressure coefficients and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil at relative small defect lengths. For example, the lift coefficients decrease and drag coefficients increase sharply after the appearance of leading edge defect. However, the aerodynamic characteristics could reach a constant value when the defect length is large enough. The flow field, pressure coefficient distribution and aerodynamic coefficients do not change a lot when the defect lengths reach to 0.5%c,1%c, 2%c and 3%c with defect thicknesses of 6%tc, 12%tc,18%tc and 25%tc, respectively. In addition, the results also show that the critical defect length/thickness ratio is 0.5, beyond which the aerodynamic characteristics nearly remain

  20. Investigation of a bio-inspired lift-enhancing effector on a 2D airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Joe; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2012-09-01

    A flap mounted on the upper surface of an airfoil, called a 'lift-enhancing effector', has been shown in wind tunnel tests to have a similar function to a bird's covert feathers, which rise off the wing's surface in response to separated flows. The effector, fabricated from a thin Mylar sheet, is allowed to rotate freely about its leading edge. The tests were performed in the NCSU subsonic wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4 × 10(5). The maximum lift coefficient with the effector was the same as that for the clean airfoil, but was maintained over an angle-of-attack range from 12° to almost 20°, resulting in a very gentle stall behavior. To better understand the aerodynamics and to estimate the deployment angle of the free-moving effector, fixed-angle effectors fabricated out of stiff wood were also tested. A progressive increase in the stall angle of attack with increasing effector angle was observed, with diminishing returns beyond the effector angle of 60°. Drag tests on both the free-moving and fixed effectors showed a marked improvement in drag at high angles of attack. Oil flow visualization on the airfoil with and without the fixed-angle effectors proved that the effector causes the separation point to move aft on the airfoil, as compared to the clean airfoil. This is thought to be the main mechanism by which an effector improves both lift and drag. A comparison of the fixed-effector results with those from the free-effector tests shows that the free effector's deployment angle is between 30° and 45°. When operating at and beyond the clean airfoil's stall angle, the free effector automatically deploys to progressively higher angles with increasing angles of attack. This slows down the rapid upstream movement of the separation point and avoids the severe reduction in the lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient that are seen on the clean airfoil at the onset of stall. Thus, the effector postpones the stall by 4-8° and makes the

  1. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R Faber

    Full Text Available Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years. Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05. Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%. Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%. This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be

  2. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7–11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players’ potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player’s future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7–11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items ‘aiming at target’, ‘throwing a ball’, and ‘eye-hand coordination’ in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment’s outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be

  3. Estimation of morphing airfoil shapes and aerodynamic loads using artificial hair sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathan Scott

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape, as well as the aerodynamic loads, in real time. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors (AHS) developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this study, AHS measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the AHS measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network (ANN) based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Additionally, an aerodynamic formulation based on the finite-state inflow theory has been developed to calculate the aerodynamic loads on thin airfoils with arbitrary camber deformations. Various aerodynamic properties approximated from the AHS/ANN system will be compared with the results of the finite-state inflow aerodynamic formulation in order to validate the approximation approach.

  4. Life table analysis of the performance of aphid Sitobion avenae (Homoptera: Aphididae nymphs exposed to a static magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Juan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the age-stage two-sex life table, this work was undertaken in order to determine the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs at two flux densities (0.176T and 0.065T applied at increasing times of duration (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 h on the development, fecundity and reproduction of the aphid, Sitobion avenae. Exposed nymphs had a statistically significant shortened first instar period and adult longevity and prolonged fourth instar periods compared to controls. There were significant differences in the population parameters for two exposure combinations, 0.176T for 0.5 h and 0.065T for 1 h. The intrinsic rate of increase (r, net reproductive rate (R0 and mean generation time (T were 0.1165, 3.5 and 11.7 days, respectively, 0.176 T for 0.5 h and -0.0198, 0.7 and 11.8 days, respectively, 0.065T for 1 h. We therefore recommend using the age-stage, two-sex life table to study the effect of the static magnetic field on development and growth of the aphid, Sitobion avenae.

  5. High-fidelity simulations of moving and flexible airfoils at low Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visbal, Miguel R.; Gordnier, Raymond E.; Galbraith, Marshall C. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Computational Sciences Branch, Air Vehicles Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    2009-05-15

    }), transition effects are observed to be minor and the dynamic stall vortex system remains fairly coherent. For Re{sub c}=4 x 10 {sup 4}, the dynamic-stall vortex system is laminar at is inception, however shortly afterwards, it experiences an abrupt breakdown associated with the onset of spanwise instability effects. The computed phased-averaged structures for both values of Reynolds number are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the effect of structural compliance on the unsteady flow past a membrane airfoil is investigated. The membrane deformation results in mean camber and large fluctuations which improve aerodynamic performance. Larger values of lift and a delay in stall are achieved relative to a rigid airfoil configuration. For Re{sub c}=4.85 x 10 {sup 4}, it is shown that correct prediction of the transitional process is critical to capturing the proper membrane structural response. (orig.)

  6. Innovative Design of a Darrieus Straight Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine by using Multi Element Airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougle, Prasad Devendra

    . Mainly, there is the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) and vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). HAWTs are more popular than VAWTs due to failure of VAWT commercialization during the late of 1980s on a large scale. However, in recent research work it has been documented that VAWTs are more economical......, and the wind tunnel testing of double-element airfoil is performed. It is found that the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil increased considerably by delaying the angle of stall. These two facts are very suitable for vertical axis wind turbine since they operate in a larger range of angle of attack......, ±40_, compared to the horizontal axis wind turbines which operate in the range of attack, ±15_. A new design of vertical axis wind turbine is then proposed, and aerodynamic performance is evaluated based on double multiple stream tube methods. The performance parameters are almost doubled compared...

  7. Sealing apparatus for airfoils of gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.B.

    1998-05-19

    An improved airfoil tip sealing apparatus is disclosed wherein brush seals are attached to airfoil tips with the distal ends of the brush seal fibers sealingly contacting opposing wall surfaces. Embodiments for variable vanes, stators and both cooled and uncooled turbine blade applications are disclosed. 17 figs.

  8. Geometrical effects on the airfoil flow separation and transition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Wan; Gao, Wei; Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible flow over two airfoils, NACA-4412 and NACA-0012-64, to investigate the effects of the airfoil geometry on the flow separation and transition patterns at Re=104 and 10

  9. Airfoil noise prediction from 2D3C PIV data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, Leandro Dantas; Schram, C.; Desmet, W.

    2015-01-01

    The noise emitted by incoming turbulence interacting with an airfoil has many technological applications, and has accordingly received much attention in the literature. While numerous developments are focused on the determination of the airfoil response to a given incoming gust, the characterization

  10. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez, B; Munduate, X; Miguel, U San

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  11. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  12. Dynamic stall study of a multi-element airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chee; Mcalister, Kenneth W.; Wang, Clin M.

    1992-01-01

    Unsteady flow behavior and load characteristics of a VR-7 airfoil with and without a slat were studied in the water tunnel of the Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, NASA Ames Research Center. Both airfoils were oscillated sinusoidally between 5 and 25 degrees at a Reynolds number of 200,000 to obtain the unsteady lift, drag and pitching moment data. A fluorescing dye was released from an orifice located at the leading edge of the airfoil for the purpose of visualizing the boundary layer and wake flow. The flow field and load predictions of an incompressible Navier-Stokes code based on a velocity-vorticity formulation were compared with the test data. The test and predictions both confirm that the slatted VR-7 airfoil delays both static and dynamic stall as compared to the VR-7 airfoil alone.

  13. Modeling of Airfoil Trailing Edge Flap with Immersed Boundary Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    The present work considers incompressible flow over a 2D airfoil with a deformable trailing edge. The aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with a trailing edge flap is numerically investigated using computational fluid dynamics. A novel hybrid immersed boundary (IB) technique is applied...... to simulate the moving part of the trailing edge. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique whereas the moving trailing edge flap is simulated with the immersed boundary method on a curvilinear mesh. The obtained...... results show that the hybrid approach is an efficient and accurate method for solving turbulent flows past airfoils with a trailing edge flap and flow control using trailing edge flap is an efficient way to regulate the aerodynamic loading on airfoils....

  14. Separation control of NACA0015 airfoil using plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Daisuke; Sakakibara, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Separation control of NACA0015 airfoil by means of plasma actuators was investigated. Plasma actuators in spanwise intermittent layout on the suction surface of the airfoil were activated with spanwise phase difference φ = 0 or φ = π in the case of dimensionless burst frequencyF+ = 6 and F+ = 0.5 at Re = 6.3 ×104 . The lift and drag of the airfoil were measured using a two component force balance. The flow around the airfoil was measured by PIV analysis. In the condition of F+ = 6 and φ = π at around stall angle, which is 10 degrees, the lift-to-drag ratio was higher than that ofF+ = 6 and φ = 0 . Therefore, it was confirmed that aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil improved by disturbances with temporal and spatial phase difference.

  15. Usage of Numerical Optimization in Wind Turbine Airfoil Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    One important key element in the aerodynamic design of wind turbines is the use of specially tailored airfoils to increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and thereby to reduce the cost of energy. This work is focused on the design of a wind turbine airfoil by using numerical optimization. First, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed in order to have an exhaustive outline of the complexity of the problem. Then the optimization approach is presented; a gradient-based algorithm is used, coupled with RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints; to formalize the design requirements in the most complete and effective way, the effects of activating specific constraints are discussed. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high-efficiency airfoil for the outer part of a blade is illustrated, and the results are compared with existing wind turbine airfoils.

  16. Reversible airfoils for stopped rotors in high speed flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemiec, Robert; Jacobellis, George; Gandhi, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    This study starts with the design of a reversible airfoil rib for stopped-rotor applications, where the sharp trailing-edge morphs into the rounded leading-edge, and vice-versa. A NACA0012 airfoil is approximated in a piecewise linear manner and straight, rigid outer profile links used to define the airfoil contour. The end points of the profile links connect to control links, each set on a central actuation rod via an offset. Chordwise motion of the actuation rod moves the control and the profile links and reverses the airfoil. The paper describes the design methodology and evolution of the final design, based on which two reversible airfoil ribs were fabricated and used to assemble a finite span reversible rotor/wing demonstrator. The profile links were connected by Aluminum strips running in the spanwise direction which provided stiffness as well as support for a pre-tensioned elastomeric skin. An inter-rib connector with a curved-front nose piece supports the leading-edge. The model functioned well and was able to reverse smoothly back-and-forth, on application and reversal of a voltage to the motor. Navier–Stokes CFD simulations (using the TURNS code) show that the drag coefficient of the reversible airfoil (which had a 13% maximum thickness due to the thickness of the profile links) was comparable to that of the NACA0013 airfoil. The drag of a 16% thick elliptical airfoil was, on average, about twice as large, while that of a NACA0012 in reverse flow was 4–5 times as large, even prior to stall. The maximum lift coefficient of the reversible airfoil was lower than the elliptical airfoil, but higher than the NACA0012 in reverse flow operation. (paper)

  17. CFD modelling of laminar-turbulent transition for airfoils and rotors using the gamma-(Re)over-tilde (theta) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.

    2009-01-01

    When predicting the flow over airfoils and rotors, the laminar-turbulent transition process can be important for the aerodynamic performance. Today, the most widespread approach is to use fully turbulent computations, where the transitional process is ignored and the entire boundary layer...... to flow over a flat plate, flow over the S809 and the NACA63-415 airfoils, flow over a prolate spheroid at zero and thirty degrees angle of attack, and finally to the NREL Phase VI wind turbine rotor for the zero yaw upwind cases from the NREL/NASA Ames wind tunnel test. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons...

  18. Wind turbine airfoil design method with low noise and experimental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Quan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the noise characteristic of wind turbine airfoils, the airfoil optimal design mathematic model was built based on airfoil functional integrated theory and noise calculated model. The new optimized objective function of maximizing lift/drag to noise was developed on the design......, though there is a certain difference between the theory results and experiment data. Compared with NACA-64-618 airfoil, the CQU-DTU-B18 airfoil exhibits lower noise, which validates the feasibility of this design method. It is a guide to design wind turbine airfoil with lower noise and to reduce airfoil...

  19. A Computational Study of an Oscillating VR-12 Airfoil with a Gurney Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Myung

    2004-01-01

    Computations of the flow over an oscillating airfoil with a Gurney-flap are performed using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code and compared with recent experimental data. The experimental results have been generated for different sizes of the Gurney flaps. The computations are focused mainly on a configuration. The baseline airfoil without a Gurney flap is computed and compared with the experiments in both steady and unsteady cases for the purpose of initial testing of the code performance. The are carried out with different turbulence models. Effects of the grid refinement are also examined and unsteady cases, in addition to the assessment of solver effects. The results of the comparisons of steady lift and drag computations indicate that the code is reasonably accurate in the attached flow of the steady condition but largely overpredicts the lift and underpredicts the drag in the higher angle steady flow.

  20. Turbine airfoil having outboard and inboard sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Stefan; Marra, John J

    2015-03-17

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and formed from at least an outboard section and an inboard section such that an inner end of the outboard section is attached to an outer end of the inboard section. The outboard section may be configured to provide a tip having adequate thickness and may extend radially inward from the tip with a generally constant cross-sectional area. The inboard section may be configured with a tapered cross-sectional area to support the outboard section.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Large Scale Separated Flow around Oscillating Airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Isogai, Koji; 磯貝, 紘二

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamic stall phenomenon of NACA0012 airfoil oscillating in pitch near static stalling angle are performed by using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. In the present computations, a TVD scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed for the simulations of the unsteady separated flows at Reynolds number of 1.1x105. The hysteresis loops of the unsteady pitching moment during dynamic stall are compared with the existing experimental data. The flow pattern a...

  2. On the effects of leading edge vortex generators on an OA209 airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Heine, Benjamin; Mulleners, Karen; Gardner, Anthony; Mai, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Leading edge vortex generators have been found to significantly increase the aerodynamic performance of an airfoil under dynamic stall conditions. However, the principle of operation of these devices is still unclear. Therefore static wind and water tunnel experiments as well as CFD simulations have been conducted on a rotary aircraft wing profile OA209. A POD analysis applied to the vector fields generated by PIV measurements showed that the vortex generators break larger flow structures...

  3. Features of vertical axis wind turbine and development of airfoils sections; Chokusen yokugata suichoku jiku fusha no tokucho to yokugata ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, K; Shimizu, Y; Yasui, T [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan); Nakayama, H [Oriental Kiden Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Features of a straight wing type vertical axis wind turbine (VAW) and its airfoil sections were studied. The wind turbine in which various aerodynamic work components are mounted on the rotation axis normal to the ground surface is named VAW. Like the airfoil section of aircraft, in lift type VAW, wind turbines were driven by lift 70-90 times as large as drag in some cases. Features of the VAW airfoil section which is a straight wing in plan and a fixed pitch wing (with a fixed angle to a blade support arm) in cross section, and those of wind turbines were studied. Some factors affecting the features, work principle and performance of VAW were clarified. On airfoil sections, products of each weight function and each corresponding aerodynamic factor (lift, drag and pitching moment factors) were plotted on an attack angle ({alpha}) axis. From the conditions for increasing the total sum of areas drawn by the products on the {alpha} axis, various characteristics required for airfoil sections were clarified. Such characteristics nearly agreed between an airfoil section for favorable starting characteristics and that for high efficiency. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Airfoil-Wake Modification with Gurney Flap at Low Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan Meena, Muralikrishnan; Taira, Kunihiko; Asai, Keisuke

    2018-04-01

    The complex wake modifications produced by a Gurney flap on symmetric NACA airfoils at low Reynolds number are investigated. Two-dimensional incompressible flows over NACA 0000 (flat plate), 0006, 0012 and 0018 airfoils at a Reynolds number of $Re = 1000$ are analyzed numerically to examine the flow modifications generated by the flaps for achieving lift enhancement. While high lift can be attained by the Gurney flap on airfoils at high angles of attack, highly unsteady nature of the aerodynamic forces are also observed. Analysis of the wake structures along with the lift spectra reveals four characteristic wake modes (steady, 2S, P and 2P), influencing the aerodynamic performance. The effects of the flap over wide range of angles of attack and flap heights are considered to identify the occurrence of these wake modes, and are encapsulated in a wake classification diagram. Companion three-dimensional simulations are also performed to examine the influence of three-dimensionality on the wake regimes. The spanwise instabilities that appear for higher angles of attack are found to suppress the emergence of the 2P mode. The use of the wake classification diagram as a guidance for Gurney flap selection at different operating conditions to achieve the required aerodynamic performance is discussed.

  5. High-efficiency airfoil rudders applied to submarines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Yimei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern submarine design puts forward higher and higher requirements for control surfaces, and this creates a requirement for designers to constantly innovate new types of rudder so as to improve the efficiency of control surfaces. Adopting the high-efficiency airfoil rudder is one of the most effective measures for improving the efficiency of control surfaces. In this paper, we put forward an optimization method for a high-efficiency airfoil rudder on the basis of a comparative analysis of the various strengths and weaknesses of the airfoil, and the numerical calculation method is adopted to analyze the influence rule of the hydrodynamic characteristics and wake field by using the high-efficiency airfoil rudder and the conventional NACA rudder comparatively; at the same time, a model load test in a towing tank was carried out, and the test results and simulation calculation obtained good consistency:the error between them was less than 10%. The experimental results show that the steerage of a high-efficiency airfoil rudder is increased by more than 40% when compared with the conventional rudder, but the total resistance is close:the error is no more than 4%. Adopting a high-efficiency airfoil rudder brings much greater lifting efficiency than the total resistance of the boat. The results show that high-efficiency airfoil rudder has obvious advantages for improving the efficiency of control, giving it good application prospects.

  6. Linearized propulsion theory of flapping airfoils revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2016-11-01

    A vortical impulse theory is used to compute the thrust of a plunging and pitching airfoil in forward flight within the framework of linear potential flow theory. The result is significantly different from the classical one of Garrick that considered the leading-edge suction and the projection in the flight direction of the pressure force. By taking into account the complete vorticity distribution on the airfoil and the wake the mean thrust coefficient contains a new term that generalizes the leading-edge suction term and depends on Theodorsen function C (k) and on a new complex function C1 (k) of the reduced frequency k. The main qualitative difference with Garrick's theory is that the propulsive efficiency tends to zero as the reduced frequency increases to infinity (as 1 / k), in contrast to Garrick's efficiency that tends to a constant (1 / 2). Consequently, for pure pitching and combined pitching and plunging motions, the maximum of the propulsive efficiency is not reached as k -> ∞ like in Garrick's theory, but at a finite value of the reduced frequency that depends on the remaining non-dimensional parameters. The present analytical results are in good agreement with experimental data and numerical results for small amplitude oscillations. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grant No. DPI2013-40479-P.

  7. Airfoil Shape Optimization based on Surrogate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh, R.; Lingadurai, K.; Selvakumar, U.

    2018-02-01

    Engineering design problems always require enormous amount of real-time experiments and computational simulations in order to assess and ensure the design objectives of the problems subject to various constraints. In most of the cases, the computational resources and time required per simulation are large. In certain cases like sensitivity analysis, design optimisation etc where thousands and millions of simulations have to be carried out, it leads to have a life time of difficulty for designers. Nowadays approximation models, otherwise called as surrogate models (SM), are more widely employed in order to reduce the requirement of computational resources and time in analysing various engineering systems. Various approaches such as Kriging, neural networks, polynomials, Gaussian processes etc are used to construct the approximation models. The primary intention of this work is to employ the k-fold cross validation approach to study and evaluate the influence of various theoretical variogram models on the accuracy of the surrogate model construction. Ordinary Kriging and design of experiments (DOE) approaches are used to construct the SMs by approximating panel and viscous solution algorithms which are primarily used to solve the flow around airfoils and aircraft wings. The method of coupling the SMs with a suitable optimisation scheme to carryout an aerodynamic design optimisation process for airfoil shapes is also discussed.

  8. Airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George [Palm City, FL

    2011-05-24

    An airfoil is provided for a turbine of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil comprises: an outer structure comprising a first wall including a leading edge, a trailing edge, a pressure side, and a suction side; an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced from the first wall and at least one intermediate wall; and structure extending between the first and second walls so as to define first and second gaps between the first and second walls. The second wall and the at least one intermediate wall define at least one pressure side supply cavity and at least one suction side supply cavity. The second wall may include at least one first opening near the leading edge of the first wall. The first opening may extend from the at least one pressure side supply cavity to the first gap. The second wall may further comprise at least one second opening near the trailing edge of the outer structure. The second opening may extend from the at least one suction side supply cavity to the second gap. The first wall may comprise at least one first exit opening extending from the first gap through the pressure side of the first wall and at least one second exit opening extending from the second gap through the suction side of the second wall.

  9. FLEET Velocimetry Measurements on a Transonic Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) velocimetry was used to study the flowfield around a symmetric, transonic airfoil in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT facility. A nominal Mach number of 0.85 was investigated with a total pressure of 125 kPa and total temperature of 280 K. Two-components of velocity were measured along vertical profiles at different locations above, below, and aft of the airfoil at angles of attack of 0 deg, 3.5 deg, and 7deg. Measurements were assessed for their accuracy, precision, dynamic range, spatial resolution, and overall measurement uncertainty in the context of the applied flowfield. Measurement precisions as low as 1 m/s were observed, while overall uncertainties ranged from 4 to 5 percent. Velocity profiles within the wake showed sufficient accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to resolve both the mean and fluctuating velocities and general flow physics such as shear layer growth. Evidence of flow separation is found at high angles of attack.

  10. Parameter study of simplified dragonfly airfoil geometry at Reynolds number of 6000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-10-21

    Aerodynamic study of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil in gliding flight at Reynolds numbers below 10,000 is motivated by both pure scientific interest and technological applications. At these Reynolds numbers, the natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development of Micro UAV's and more. Insect wings are typically characterized by corrugated airfoils. The present study follows a fundamental flow physics study (Levy and Seifert, 2009), that revealed the importance of flow separation from the first corrugation, the roll-up of the separated shear layer to discrete vortices and their role in promoting flow reattachment to the aft arc, as the leading mechanism enabling high-lift, low drag performance of the Dragonfly gliding flight. This paper describes the effect of systematic airfoil geometry variations on the aerodynamic properties of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil at Reynolds number of 6000. The parameter study includes a detailed analysis of small variations of the nominal geometry, such as corrugation placement or height, rear arc and trailing edge shape. Numerical simulations using the 2D laminar Navier-Stokes equations revealed that the flow accelerating over the first corrugation slope is followed by an unsteady pressure recovery, combined with vortex shedding. The latter allows the reattachment of the flow over the rear arc. Also, the drag values are directly linked to the vortices' magnitude. This parametric study shows that geometric variations which reduce the vortices' amplitude, as reduction of the rear cavity depth or the reduction of the rear arc and trailing edge curvature, will reduce the drag values. Other changes will extend the flow reattachment over the rear arc for a larger mean lift coefficients range; such as the negative deflection of the forward flat plate. These changes consequently reduce the drag values at higher mean lift coefficients. The detailed geometry study enabled the definition of a corrugated airfoil

  11. SRTC - Gap Analysis Table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.L. Johnson

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to review the existing SRTC design against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards and supplemental requirements can not fully meet these safety requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Site Rail Transfer Cart (SRTC) Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 14]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements are provided in the SRTC and associated rails gap analysis table in Appendix A. Because SRTCs are credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the SRTC and rail design perform required safety Functions and meet performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis table supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed

  12. Numerical and experimental study of blowing jet on a high lift airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonea, A.; Pricop, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    Active manipulation of separated flows over airfoils at moderate and high angles of attack in order to improve efficiency or performance has been the focus of a number of numerical and experimental investigations for many years. One of the main methods used in active flow control is the usage of blowing devices with constant and pulsed blowing. Through CFD simulation over a 2D high-lift airfoil, this study is trying to highlight the impact of pulsed blowing over its aerodynamic characteristics. The available wind tunnel data from INCAS low speed facility are also beneficial for the validation of the numerical analysis. This study intends to analyze the impact of the blowing jet velocity and slot geometry on the efficiency of an active flow control.

  13. Investigation of the two-element airfoil with flap structure for the vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y; Li, C

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is not as simple as its structure because of the large changing range of angle of attack. We have designed a new kind of two-element airfoil for VAWT on the basis of NACA0012. CFD calculation has been confirmed to have high accuracy by comparison with the experiment data and Xfoil result. The aerodynamic parameter of two-element airfoil has been acquired by CFD calculation in using the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model and the Simple scheme. The relationship between changings of angle of attack and flap's tilt angle has been found and quantified. The analysis will lay the foundation for further research on the control method for VAWT

  14. CFD aerodynamic analysis of non-conventional airfoil sections for very large rotor blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis, G; Voutsinas, S; Sieros, G; Chaviaropoulos, T

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of flat-back and elliptically shaped airfoils is analyzed on the basis of CFD simulations. Incompressible and low-Mach preconditioned compressible unsteady simulations have been carried out using the k-w SST and the Spalart Allmaras turbulence models. Time averaged lift and drag coefficients are compared to wind tunnel data for the FB 3500-1750 flat back airfoil while amplitudes and frequencies are also recorded. Prior to separation averaged lift is well predicted while drag is overestimated keeping however the trend in the tests. The CFD models considered, predict separation with a 5° delay which is reflected on the load results. Similar results are provided for a modified NACA0035 with a rounded (elliptically shaped) trailing edge. Finally as regards the dynamic characteristics in the load signals, there is fair agreement in terms of Str number but significant differences in terms of lift and drag amplitudes

  15. Prediction of unsteady separated flows on oscillating airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for calculating high Reynolds number flow around an airfoil undergoing dynamic stall are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on predicting the values of lift, drag, and pitching moments. Methods discussed include: the discrete potential vortex method; thin boundary layer method; strong interaction between inviscid and viscous flows; and solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Empirical methods for estimating unsteady airloads on oscillating airfoils are also described. These methods correlate force and moment data from wind tunnel tests to indicate the effects of various parameters, such as airfoil shape, Mach number, amplitude and frequency of sinosoidal oscillations, mean angle, and type of motion.

  16. Numerical simulation of the RISOe1-airfoil dynamic stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, N. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper we are concerned with the numerical computation of the dynamic stall that occur in the viscous flowfield over an airfoil. These results are compared to experimental data that were obtained with the new designed RISOe1-airfoil, both for a motionless airfoil and for a pitching motion. Moreover, we present some numerical computations of the plunging and lead-lag motions. We also investigate the possibility of using the pitching motion to simulate the plunging and lead-lag situations. (au)

  17. Geometrical effects on the airfoil flow separation and transition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-25

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible flow over two airfoils, NACA-4412 and NACA-0012-64, to investigate the effects of the airfoil geometry on the flow separation and transition patterns at Re=104 and 10 degrees incidence. The two chosen airfoils are geometrically similar except for maximum camber (respectively 4%C and 0 with C the chord length), which results in a larger projection area with respect to the incoming flow for the NACA-4412 airfoil, and a larger leeward surface curvature at the leading edge for the NACA-0012-64 airfoil. The governing equations are discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order spatial discretization scheme. An assessment on the two-point correlation indicates that a spanwise domain size of 0.8C is sufficiently large for the present simulations. We discuss flow separation at the airfoil leading edge, transition of the separated shear layer to three-dimensional flow and subsequently to turbulence. Numerical results reveal a stronger adverse pressure gradient field in the leading edge region of the NACA-0012-64 airfoil due to the rapidly varying surface curvature. As a result, the flow experiences detachment at x/C=0.08, and the separated shear layer transition via Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism occurs at x/C=0.29 with fully developed turbulent flow around x/C=0.80. These flow development phases are delayed to occur at much downstream positions, respectively, observed around x/C=0.25, 0.71 and 1.15 for the NACA-4412 airfoil. The turbulent intensity, measured by the turbulent fluctuations and turbulent Reynolds stresses, are much larger for NACA-0012-64 from the transition onset until the airfoil trailing edge, while turbulence develops significantly downstream of the trailing edge for the NACA-4412 airfoil. For both airfoils, our DNS results indicate that the mean Reynolds stress u\\'u\\'/U02 reaches its maximum value at a distance from the surface approximately equal to the displacement

  18. Effects of finite aspect ratio on wind turbine airfoil measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines partly operate in stalled conditions within their operational cycle. To simulate these conditions, it is also necessary to obtain 2-D airfoil data in terms of lift and drag coefficients at high angles of attack. Such data has been obtained previously, but often at low aspect ratios...... and only barely past the stall point, where strong wall boundary layer influence is expected. In this study, the influence of the wall boundary layer on 2D airfoil data, especially in the post stall domain, is investigated. Here, a wind turbine airfoil is tested at different angles of attack and with two...

  19. Active Control of Separation from the Slat Shoulder of a Supercritical Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Seifert, Avi

    2002-01-01

    Active flow control in the form of zero-mass-flux excitation was applied at the slat shoulder of a simplified high-lift airfoil to delay flow separation. The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) supercritical airfoil was equipped with a 15% chord simply hinged leading edge slat and a 25% chord simply hinged trailing edge flap. The cruise configuration data was successfully reproduced, repeating previous experiments. The effects of flap and slat deflection angles on the performance of the airfoil integral parameters were quantified. Detailed flow features were measured as well, in an attempt to identify optimal actuator placement. The measurements included: steady and unsteady model and tunnel wall pressures, wake surveys, arrays of surface hot-films, flow visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). High frequency periodic excitation was applied to delay the occurrence of slat stall and improve the maximum lift by 10 to 15%. Low frequency amplitude modulation was used to reduce the oscillatory momentum coefficient by roughly 50% with similar aerodynamic performance.

  20. LPV Modeling and Control for Active Flutter Suppression of a Smart Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hajjar, Ali M. H.; Al-Jiboory, Ali Khudhair; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Zhu, Guoming

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a novel technique of linear parameter varying (LPV) modeling and control of a smart airfoil for active flutter suppression is proposed, where the smart airfoil has a groove along its chord and contains a moving mass that is used to control the airfoil pitching and plunging motions. The new LPV modeling technique is proposed that uses mass position as a scheduling parameter to describe the physical constraint of the moving mass, in addition the hard constraint at the boundaries is realized by proper selection of the parameter varying function. Therefore, the position of the moving mass and the free stream airspeed are considered the scheduling parameters in the study. A state-feedback based LPV gain-scheduling controller with guaranteed H infinity performance is presented by utilizing the dynamics of the moving mass as scheduling parameter at a given airspeed. The numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed LPV control architecture by significantly improving the performance while reducing the control effort.

  1. Experimental demonstration of wind turbine noise reduction through optimized airfoil shape and trailing-edge serrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlemans, S. [National Aerospace Laboratory NLR, Emmeloord (Netherlands); Schepers, J.G. [Unit Wind Energy, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Guidati, G.; Wagner, S. [Institut fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik IAG, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2001-07-15

    The objective of the European project DATA (Design and Testing of Acoustically Optimized Airfoils for Wind Turbines) is a reduction of trailing-edge (TE) noise by modifying the airfoil shape and/or the application of trailing-edge serrations. This paper describes validation measurements that were performed in the DNW-LLF wind tunnel, on a model scale wind turbine with a two-bladed 4.5 m diameter rotor which was designed in the project. Measurements were done for one reference- and two acoustically optimized rotors, for varying flow conditions. The aerodynamic performance of the rotors was measured using a torque meter in the hub, and further aerodynamic information was obtained from flow visualization on the blades. The acoustic measurements were done with a 136 microphone out-of-flow acoustic array. Besides the location of the noise sources in the (stationary) rotor plane, a new acoustic processing method enabled identification of dominant noise source regions on the rotating blades. The results show dominant noise sources at the trailing-edge of the blade, close to the tip. The optimized airfoil shapes result in a significant reduction of TE noise levels with respect to the reference rotor, without loss in power production. A further reduction can be achieved by the application of trailing-edge serrations. The aerodynamic measurements are generally in good agreement with the aerodynamic predictions made during the design of the model turbine.

  2. Reynolds number effect on airfoil wake structures under pitching and heaving motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Karbasian, Hamidreza; ExpTENsys Team

    2017-11-01

    Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to investigate the wake flow characteristics of an airfoil under pitching and heaving motion. A NACA0012 airfoil was selected for the numerical simulation and experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel and a water tunnel at Reynolds number of 15,000 and 90,000, respectively. The airfoil oscillated around an axis located 1/4 distance from the leading edge chord. Two different angles of attack, 20° and 30°, were selected with +/-10° maximum amplitude of oscillation. In order to extract the coherent flow structures from time-resolved PIV data, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis was performed on 1,000 instantaneous realisations for each condition using the method of snapshots. Vorticity contour and velocity profiles for both PIV and DES results are in good agreement for pitching and heaving motion. At high Reynolds number, 3D stream-wise vortices appeared after generating span-wise vortices. The higher maximum angle of attack allows the leading edge vortex to grow stronger and that the angle of attack appears to be more important in influencing the growth of the leading edge vortex structure than the reduced frequency. National Research Foundation of Korea (No. 2011-0030013).

  3. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, M; Uzol, O; Akmandor, I S

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x10 5 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x10 5 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack

  4. Effects of a trapped vortex cell on a thick wing airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasagna, Davide; Iuso, Gaetano [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aeronautica e Spaziale, Torino (Italy); Donelli, Raffaele; De Gregorio, Fabrizio [Centro Italiano di Ricerca Aerospaziale (C.I.R.A), Capua (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    The effects of a trapped vortex cell (TVC) on the aerodynamic performance of a NACA0024 wing model were investigated experimentally at Re = 10{sup 6} and 6.67 x 10{sup 5}. The static pressure distributions around the model and the wake velocity profiles were measured to obtain lift and drag coefficients, for both the clean airfoil and the controlled configurations. Suction was applied in the cavity region to stabilize the trapped vortex. For comparison, a classical boundary layer suction configuration was also tested. The drag coefficient curve of the TVC-controlled airfoil showed sharp discontinuities and bifurcative behavior, generating two drag modes. A strong influence of the angle of attack, the suction rate and the Reynolds number on the drag coefficient was observed. With respect to the clean airfoil, the control led to a drag reduction only if the suction was high enough. Compared to the classical boundary layer suction configuration, the drag reduction was higher for the same amount of suction only in a specific range of incidence, i.e., {alpha} = -2 to {alpha} = 6 and only for the higher Reynolds number. For all the other conditions, the classical boundary layer suction configuration gave better drag performances. Moderate increments of lift were observed for the TVC-controlled airfoil at low incidence, while a 20% lift enhancement was observed in the stall region with respect to the baseline. However, the same lift increments were also observed for the classical boundary layer suction configuration. Pressure fluctuation measurements in the cavity region suggested a very complex interaction of several flow features. The two drag modes were characterized by typical unsteady phenomena observed in rectangular cavity flows, namely the shear layer mode and the wake mode. (orig.)

  5. A parametric study of quasi-2D LES on Low-Reynolds-number transitional flows past an airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, W.; Xu, H.; Khalid, M. [National Research Council (NRC), Inst. for Aerospace Research (IAR), Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Weixing.Yuan@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2004-07-01

    Low-Reynolds-number aerodynamic performance of small sized air vehicles is an area of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate low-Reynolds-number flows past an SD7003 airfoil to understand substantial viscous features of laminar separation and transitional flow followed by the intractable behavior of reattachment. In order to satisfy the three-dimensional (3D) requirement of the code, a simple '3D wing' is constructed from a two-dimensional (2D) airfoil and only four grid points are used in the spanwise direction. A parametric study of quasi-2D LES on the low-Reynolds-number airfoil flows at Re=60000 is performed. Effects of grid resolution and sub-grid scale (SGS) models are investigated. Although three-dimensional effects cannot be accurately captured, the quasi-2D LES calculations do reveal some important flow characteristics such as leading edge laminar separation and vortex shedding from the primary laminar separation bubble on the low-Reynolds-number airfoil. (author)

  6. Table 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mcabuk

    Effect of a dietary essential oil mixture on performance of laying hens ... Keywords: Essential oils, mannan oligosaccharide, antibiotic, egg production, laying hen, .... essential oils derived from selected herbs: Oregano oil (Origanum sp.), laurel ...

  7. Prediction of unsteady airfoil flows at large angles of incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Tuncer; Jang, H. M.; Chen, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the unsteady motion of an airfoil on its stall behavior is of considerable interest to many practical applications including the blades of helicopter rotors and of axial compressors and turbines. Experiments with oscillating airfoils, for example, have shown that the flow can remain attached for angles of attack greater than those which would cause stall to occur in a stationary system. This result appears to stem from the formation of a vortex close to the surface of the airfoil which continues to provide lift. It is also evident that the onset of dynamic stall depends strongly on the airfoil section, and as a result, great care is required in the development of a calculation method which will accurately predict this behavior.

  8. Extraction of airfoil data using PIV and pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    of the rotor. The extraction technique is verified by employing the derived airfoil characteristics as input to computations using the BEM technique and comparing the calculated axial and tangential forces to the measured data. The comparison also demonstrates that the used technique of determining the AOA...... airfoil data are compared to 2D data from wind tunnel experiments and XFOIL computations. The comparison suggests that the rotor is subject to severe 3D effects originating from the geometry of the rotor, and explains why the Blade Element Momentum technique with 2D airfoil data over‐predicts the loading......A newly developed technique for determining the angle of attack (AOA) on a rotating blade is used to extract AOAs and airfoil data from measurements obtained during the MEXICO (Model rotor EXperiments in COntrolled conditions) rotor experiment. Detailed surface pressure and Particle Image...

  9. Profile catalogue for airfoil sections based on 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2006-12-15

    This report is a continuation of the Wind Turbine Airfoil Catalogue which objective was, firstly to provide a database of aerodynamic characteristics for a wide range of airfoil profiles aimed at wind turbine applications, and secondly to test the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D by comparing its results with experimental data. In the present work, the original two-dimensional results are compared with three-dimensional calculations as it was surmised that the two-dimensional assumption might be in some cases responsible for discrepancies between the numerical flow solution and the actual fluid flow, and thereby the incorrect prediction of airfoil characteristics. In addition, other features of the flow solver, such as transition and turbulence modelling, and their influence onto the numerical results are investigated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the evaluation of airfoil aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the use of the Navier-Stokes solver for fluid flow calculations in general. (au)

  10. Numerical simulation of airfoil trailing edge serration noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    In the present work, numerical simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with and without serrated Trailing Edge. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy is implemented into the in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity...... field are obtained using Large Eddy Simulation. To obtain the time history data of sound pressure, the flow quantities are integrated around the airfoil surface through the FW-H approach. The extended length of the serration is about 16.7% of the airfoil chord and the geometric angle of the serration...... is 28 degrees. The chord based Reynolds number is around 1.5x106. Simulations are compared with existing wind tunnel experiments at various angles of attack. Even though the airfoil under investigation is already optimized for low noise emission, numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments show...

  11. Boundary layer development on turbine airfoil suction surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, O. P.; Wells, R. A.; Schlinker, R. H.; Bailey, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study supported by NASA under the Energy Efficient Engine Program, conducted to investigate the development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions that simulate the suction sides of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils, are presented. One velocity distribution represented a forward loaded airfoil ('squared-off' design), while the other represented an aft loaded airfoil ('aft loaded' design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a low-speed, high-aspect-ratio wind tunnel specifically designed for boundary layer investigations. It is intended that the detailed data presented in this paper be used to develop improved turbulence model suitable for application to turbine airfoil design.

  12. Wake structure and similar behavior of wake profiles downstream of a plunging airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. DAVARI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Very limited attention has already been paid to the velocity behavior in the wake region in unsteady aerodynamic problems. A series of tests has been performed on a flapping airfoil in a subsonic wind tunnel to study the wake structure for different sets of mean angle of attack, plunging amplitude and reduced frequency. In this study, the velocity profiles in the wake for various oscillation parameters have been measured using a wide shoulder rake, especially designed for the present experiments. The airfoil under consideration was a critical section of a 660 kW wind turbine. The results show that for a flapping airfoil the wake structure can be of drag producing type, thrust producing or neutral, depending on the mean angle of attack, oscillation amplitude and reduced frequency. In a thrust producing wake, a high-momentum high-velocity jet flow is formed in the core region of the wake instead of the conventional low-momentum flow. As a result, the drag force normally experienced by the body due to the momentum deficit would be replaced by a thrust force. According to the results, the momentum loss in the wake decreases as the reduced frequency increases. The thrust producing wake pattern for the flapping airfoil has been observed for sufficiently low angles of attack in the absence of the viscous effects. This phenomenon has also been observed for either high oscillation amplitudes or high reduced frequencies. According to the results, for different reduced frequencies and plunging amplitudes, such that the product of them be a constant, the velocity profiles exhibit similar behavior and coalesce on each other. This similarity parameter works excellently at small angles of attack. However, at near stall boundaries, the similarity is not as evident as before.

  13. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragni, D; Ashok, A; Van Oudheusden, B W; Scarano, F

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to evaluate pressure fields, whereas lift and drag coefficients are inferred from the evaluation of momentum contour and wake integrals. The PIV-based results are compared to those derived from conventional loads determination procedures involving surface pressure transducers and a wake rake. The method applied in this investigation is an extension to the compressible flow regime of that considered by van Oudheusden et al (2006 Non-intrusive load characterization of an airfoil using PIV Exp. Fluids 40 988–92) at low speed conditions. The application of a high-speed imaging system allows the acquisition in relatively short time of a sufficient ensemble size to compute converged velocity statistics, further translated in turbulent fluctuations included in the pressure and loads calculation, notwithstanding their verified negligible influence in the computation. Measurements are performed at varying spatial resolution to optimize the loads determination in the wake region and around the airfoil, further allowing us to assess the influence of spatial resolution in the proposed procedure. Specific interest is given to the comparisons between the PIV-based method and the conventional procedures for determining the pressure coefficient on the surface, the drag and lift coefficients at different angles of attack. Results are presented for the experiments at a free-stream Mach number M = 0.6, with the angle of attack ranging from 0° to 8°

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmmm of... - Performance Test Requirements for New or Reconstructed Flame Lamination Affected Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... data only required for venturi scrubbers) every 15 minutes during the entire duration of each 1-hour... (pressure drop data only required for Venturi scrubbers) over the period of the performance test by... liquid flow rate, scrubber effluent pH, and pressure drop (pressure drop data only required for venturi...

  15. Interaction of an Artificially Thickened Boundary Layer with a Vertically Mounted Pitching Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2011-11-01

    Wind energy represents a large portion of the growing market in alternative energy technologies and the current landscape has been dominated by the more prevalent horizontal axis wind turbine. However, there are several advantages to the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) or Darrieus type design and yet there is much to be understood about how the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) affects their performance. In this study the ABL was simulated in a wind tunnel through the use of elliptical shaped vortex generators, a castellated wall, and floor roughness elements as described in the method of Counihan (1967) and then verified its validity by hot wire measurement of the mean velocity profile as well as the turbulence intensity. The motion of an blade element around a vertical axis is approximated through the use of a pitching airfoil. The wake of the airfoil is investigated through hot wire anemometry in both uniform flow and in the simulated boundary layer both at Re = 1 . 37 ×105 based on the chord of the airfoil. Sponsored by Hopewell Wind Power (Hong Kong) Limited.

  16. Aerodynamic analysis of S series wind turbine airfoils by using X foil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaheer, M.A.; Munir, M.A.; Zahid, I.; Rizwan, M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to attain supreme energy from wind turbine economically, blade profile enactment must be acquired. For extracting extreme power from wind, it is necessary to develop rotor models of wind turbine which have high rotation rates and power coefficients. Maximum power can also be haul out by using suitable airfoils at root and tip sections of wind turbine blades. In this research four different S-series airfoils have been selected to study their behavior for maximum power extraction from wind. The wind conditions during the research were scertained from the wind speeds over Kallar Kahar Pakistan. In order to study the wind turbine operation, the extremely important parameters are lift and drag forces. Therefore an endeavor to study lift force and drag force at various sections of wind turbine blade is shown in current research. In order to acquire the utmost power from wind turbine, highest value of sliding ratio is prerequisite. At various wind speeds, performance of several blade profiles was analyzed and for every wind speed, the appropriate blade profile is ascertained grounded on the utmost sliding ratio. For every airfoil, prime angle of attack is resolute at numerous wind speeds. (author)

  17. Global shape optimization of airfoil using multi-objective genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Sang Hwan; Park, Kyoung Woo

    2005-01-01

    The shape optimization of an airfoil has been performed for an incompressible viscous flow. In this study, Pareto frontier sets, which are global and non-dominated solutions, can be obtained without various weighting factors by using the multi-objective genetic algorithm. An NACA0012 airfoil is considered as a baseline model, and the profile of the airfoil is parameterized and rebuilt with four Bezier curves. Two curves, from leading to maximum thickness, are composed of five control points and the rest, from maximum thickness to tailing edge, are composed of four control points. There are eighteen design variables and two objective functions such as the lift and drag coefficients. A generation is made up of forty-five individuals. After fifteenth evolutions, the Pareto individuals of twenty can be achieved. One Pareto, which is the best of the reduction of the drag force, improves its drag to 13% and lift-drag ratio to 2%. Another Pareto, however, which is focused on increasing the lift force, can improve its lift force to 61%, while sustaining its drag force, compared to those of the baseline model

  18. Dynamic Stall Control on the Wind Turbine Airfoil via a Co-Flow Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He-Yong Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stall control of a S809 airfoil is numerically investigated by implementing a co-flow jet (CFJ. The numerical methods of the solver are validated by comparing results with the baseline experiment as well as a NACA 6415-based CFJ experiment, showing good agreement in both static and dynamic characteristics. The CFJ airfoil with inactive jet is simulated to study the impact that the jet channel imposes upon the dynamic characteristics. It is shown that the presence of a long jet channel could cause a negative effect of decreasing lift and increasing drag, leading to fluctuating extreme loads in terms of drag and moment. The main focus of the present research is the investigation of the dynamic characteristics of the CFJ airfoil with three different jet momentum coefficients, which are compared with the baseline, giving encouraging results. Dynamic stall can be greatly suppressed, showing a very good control performance of significantly increased lift and reduced drag and moment. Analysis of the amplitude of variation in the aerodynamic coefficients indicates that the fluctuating extreme aerodynamic loads are significantly alleviated, which is conducive to structural reliability and improved life cycle. The energy consumption analysis shows that the CFJ concept is applicable and economical in controlling dynamic stall.

  19. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoil Using Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm and Pareto Optimal Front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaul Huque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and response surface-based multiobjective design optimization were performed for six different 2D airfoil profiles, and the Pareto optimal front of each airfoil is presented. FLUENT, which is a commercial CFD simulation code, was used to determine the relevant aerodynamic loads. The Lift Coefficient (CL and Drag Coefficient (CD data at a range of 0° to 12° angles of attack (α and at three different Reynolds numbers (Re=68,459, 479, 210, and 958, 422 for all the six airfoils were obtained. Realizable k-ε turbulence model with a second-order upwind solution method was used in the simulations. The standard least square method was used to generate response surface by the statistical code JMP. Elitist Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II was used to determine the Pareto optimal set based on the response surfaces. Each Pareto optimal solution represents a different compromise between design objectives. This gives the designer a choice to select a design compromise that best suits the requirements from a set of optimal solutions. The Pareto solution set is presented in the form of a Pareto optimal front.

  20. Global shape optimization of airfoil using multi-objective genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Sang Hwan [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyoung Woo [Hoseo Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-01

    The shape optimization of an airfoil has been performed for an incompressible viscous flow. In this study, Pareto frontier sets, which are global and non-dominated solutions, can be obtained without various weighting factors by using the multi-objective genetic algorithm. An NACA0012 airfoil is considered as a baseline model, and the profile of the airfoil is parameterized and rebuilt with four Bezier curves. Two curves, from leading to maximum thickness, are composed of five control points and the rest, from maximum thickness to tailing edge, are composed of four control points. There are eighteen design variables and two objective functions such as the lift and drag coefficients. A generation is made up of forty-five individuals. After fifteenth evolutions, the Pareto individuals of twenty can be achieved. One Pareto, which is the best of the reduction of the drag force, improves its drag to 13% and lift-drag ratio to 2%. Another Pareto, however, which is focused on increasing the lift force, can improve its lift force to 61%, while sustaining its drag force, compared to those of the baseline model.

  1. Zonal Detached-Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Unsteady Flow over Iced Airfoils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-07-23

    This paper presentsamultiscale finite-element formulation for the second modeofzonal detached-eddy simulation. The multiscale formulation corrects the lack of stability of the standard Galerkin formulation by incorporating the effect of unresolved scales to the grid (resolved) scales. The stabilization terms arise naturally and are free of userdefined stability parameters. Validation of the method is accomplished via the turbulent flow over tandem cylinders. The boundary-layer separation, free shear-layer rollup, vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, and interaction with the downstream cylinder are well reproduced. Good agreement with experimental measurements gives credence to the accuracy of zonal detached-eddy simulation in modeling turbulent separated flows. A comprehensive study is then conducted on the performance degradation of ice-contaminated airfoils. NACA 23012 airfoil with a spanwise ice ridge and Gates Learjet Corporation-305 airfoil with a leading-edge horn-shape glaze ice are selected for investigation. Appropriate spanwise domain size and sufficient grid density are determined to enhance the reliability of the simulations. A comparison of lift coefficient and flowfield variables demonstrates the added advantage that the zonal detached-eddy simulation model brings to the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Spectral analysis and instantaneous visualization of turbulent structures are also highlighted via zonal detached-eddy simulation. Copyright © 2015 by the CFD Lab of McGill University. Published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  2. AirborneWind Energy: Airfoil-Airmass Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zanon , Mario; Gros , Sebastien; Meyers , Johan; Diehl , Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The Airborne Wind Energy paradigm proposes to generate energy by flying a tethered airfoil across the wind flow at a high velocity. While Airborne Wind Energy enables flight in higher-altitude, stronger wind layers, the extra drag generated by the tether motion imposes a significant limit to the overall system efficiency. To address this issue, two airfoils with a shared tether can reduce overall system drag. A study proposed in Zanon et al. (2013) confirms this claim by showing that, in the ...

  3. Aerodynamic sound of flow past an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng

    1995-01-01

    The long term objective of this project is to develop a computational method for predicting the noise of turbulence-airfoil interactions, particularly at the trailing edge. We seek to obtain the energy-containing features of the turbulent boundary layers and the near-wake using Navier-Stokes Simulation (LES or DNS), and then to calculate the far-field acoustic characteristics by means of acoustic analogy theories, using the simulation data as acoustic source functions. Two distinct types of noise can be emitted from airfoil trailing edges. The first, a tonal or narrowband sound caused by vortex shedding, is normally associated with blunt trailing edges, high angles of attack, or laminar flow airfoils. The second source is of broadband nature arising from the aeroacoustic scattering of turbulent eddies by the trailing edge. Due to its importance to airframe noise, rotor and propeller noise, etc., trailing edge noise has been the subject of extensive theoretical (e.g. Crighton & Leppington 1971; Howe 1978) as well as experimental investigations (e.g. Brooks & Hodgson 1981; Blake & Gershfeld 1988). A number of challenges exist concerning acoustic analogy based noise computations. These include the elimination of spurious sound caused by vortices crossing permeable computational boundaries in the wake, the treatment of noncompact source regions, and the accurate description of wave reflection by the solid surface and scattering near the edge. In addition, accurate turbulence statistics in the flow field are required for the evaluation of acoustic source functions. Major efforts to date have been focused on the first two challenges. To this end, a paradigm problem of laminar vortex shedding, generated by a two dimensional, uniform stream past a NACA0012 airfoil, is used to address the relevant numerical issues. Under the low Mach number approximation, the near-field flow quantities are obtained by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically at chord

  4. Cooled airfoil in a turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitt, Paul H; Kemp, David A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2015-04-21

    An airfoil in a gas turbine engine includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The outer wall includes a leading edge, a trailing edge opposed from the leading edge in a chordal direction, a pressure side, and a suction side. The inner wall is coupled to the outer wall at a single chordal location and includes portions spaced from the pressure and suction sides of the outer wall so as to form first and second gaps between the inner wall and the respective pressure and suction sides. The inner wall defines a chamber therein and includes openings that provide fluid communication between the respective gaps and the chamber. The gaps receive cooling fluid that provides cooling to the outer wall as it flows through the gaps. The cooling fluid, after traversing at least substantial portions of the gaps, passes into the chamber through the openings in the inner wall.

  5. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  6. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... METHODS Procedures for Testing Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53... Solid VOAG produced aerosol at 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr Dp50 = 2.5 µm ± 0.2 µm Numerical Analysis Results... fractionator under static conditions Dp50 = 2.5 µm ± 0.2 µm Numerical Analysis Results: 95% ≤ Rc ≤ 105%. § 53...

  7. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  8. Aerodynamic loading on a cylinder behind an airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.J.; Huang, L.; Zhou, Y. [Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2005-05-01

    The interaction between the wake of a rotor blade and a downstream cylinder holds the key to the understanding and control of electronic cooling fan noise. In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristics of a circular cylinder are experimentally studied in the presence of an upstream NACA 4412 airfoil for the cylinder-diameter-based Reynolds numbers of Re{sub d}=2,100-20,000, and the airfoil chord-length-based Reynolds numbers of Re{sub c}=14,700-140,000. Lift and drag fluctuations on the cylinder, and the longitudinal velocity fluctuations of the flow behind the cylinder were measured simultaneously using a load cell and two hot wires, respectively. Data analysis shows that unsteady forces on the cylinder increase significantly in the presence of the airfoil wake. The dependence of the forces on two parameters is investigated, that is, the lateral distance (T) between the airfoil and the cylinder, and the Reynolds number. The forces decline quickly as Tincreases. For Re{sub c}<60,000, the vortices shed from the upstream airfoil make a major contribution to the unsteady forces on the cylinder compared to the vortex shedding from the cylinder itself. For Re{sub c}>60,000, no vortices are generated from the airfoil, and the fluctuating forces on the cylinder are caused by its own vortex shedding. (orig.)

  9. Method for evaluating environmental performance of technologies by using the interindustry relations table; Sangyo renkanhyo wo mochiita gijutsu no kankyosei hyoka shuho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondo, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    This paper describes a proposal of a method for evaluating environmental performance of technologies by using the interindustry relations table, and the case studies thereof. This method is characterized in that it can evaluate two effects affecting the environment: structuring of capital facilities required in association with introduction of the technologies and the changes in social structures. As a parameter to compare the technologies considering these effects, a concept of life cycle limited emission amount was introduced. In the case studies, life cycle limited CO2 emission amounts from using seven kinds of technologies were calculated, and environmental performances of each technology were compared. The result indicated that introduction in Japan of coal, oil and LNG fired thermal power generation will increase CO2 emission amount from the whole society. Conversely, introduction of hydraulic, nuclear, photovoltaic, and wind power generation technologies will reduce the CO2 emission amount. It is pointed out particularly that hydraulic and nuclear power generation can minimize CO2 emission from structuring capital facilities, and is an excellent technology from a viewpoint of reducing CO2 emission from the society as a whole. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. An Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Surface Pressure on an Airfoil in Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mish, Patrick F.; Devenport, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of fluctuating surface pressure were made on a NACA 0015 airfoil immersed in grid generated turbulence. The airfoil model has a 2 ft chord and spans the 6 ft Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel test section. Two grids were used to investigate the effects of turbulence length scale on the surface pressure response. A large grid which produced turbulence with an integral scale 13% of the chord and a smaller grid which produced turbulence with an integral scale 1.3% of the chord. Measurements were performed at angles of attack, alpha from 0 to 20 . An array of microphones mounted subsurface was used to measure the unsteady surface pressure. The goal of this measurement was to characterize the effects of angle of attack on the inviscid response. Lift spectra calculated from pressure measurements at each angle of attack revealed two distinct interaction regions; for omega(sub r) = omega b / U(sub infinity) is less than 10 a reduction in unsteady lift of up to 7 decibels (dB) occurs while an increase occurs for omega(sub r) is greater than 10 as the angle of attack is increased. The reduction in unsteady lift at low omega(sub r) with increasing angle of attack is a result that has never before been shown either experimentally or theoretically. The source of the reduction in lift spectral level appears to be closely related to the distortion of inflow turbulence based on analysis of surface pressure spanwise correlation length scales. Furthermore, while the distortion of the inflow appears to be critical in this experiment, this effect does not seem to be significant in larger integral scale (relative to the chord) flows based on the previous experimental work of McKeough suggesting the airfoils size relative to the inflow integral scale is critical in defining how the airfoil will respond under variation of angle of attack. A prediction scheme is developed that correctly accounts for the effects of distortion when the inflow integral scale is small relative

  11. Aero-elastic stability of airfoil flow using 2-D CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A three degrees-of-freedom structural dynamics model has been coupled to a two-dimensional incompressible CFD code. The numerical investigation considers aero-elastic stability for two different airfoils; the NACA0012 and the LM 2 18 % airfoils. Stable and unstable configurations and limit cycle oscillations are predicted in accordance with literature for the first airfoil. An attempt to predict stall induced edge-wise vibrations on a wind turbine airfoil fails using this two-dimensional approach. (au)

  12. Self-sustained Flow-acoustic Interactions in Airfoil Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0235 Self-sustained flow-acoustic interactions in airfoil transitional boundary layers Vladimir Golubev EMBRY-RIDDLE...From - To)      01-04-2012 to 31-03-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Self-sustained flow-acoustic interactions in airfoil transitional boundary layers 5a...complementary experimental and numerical studies of flow-acoustic resonant interactions in transitional airfoils and their impact on airfoil surface

  13. Numerical computation of gust aerodynamic response for realistic airfoils : Application of Amiet’s theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto; de Santana, Leandro Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge on the noise generation mechanisms of an airfoil subjected to a turbulent flow indicates that an increment to the airfoil thickness leads to a reduction of the leading-edge noise. This effect is generally attributed to the turbulence distortion occurring close upstream the airfoil

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoils at high angles-of-attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Airfoil characteristics at deep stall angles were investigated. It appeared that the maximum drag coefficient as a function of the airfoil upwind y/c ordinate at x/c=0.0125 can be approximated by a straight line. The lift-drag ratios in deep stall of a number of airfoils with moderate lower surface

  15. Design and verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Gaunaa, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design and experimental verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for MW-size wind turbines with variable speed and pitch control. Seven airfoils were designed with thickness-to-chord ratios between 15% and 53% to cover the entire span of a wind turbine blade. The airfoils...

  16. Design and Wind Tunnel Testing of a Thick, Multi-Element High-Lift Airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    In this work a 2D CFD solver has been used to optimize the shape of a leading edge slat with a chord length of 30% of the main airfoil which was 40% thick. The airfoil configuration was subsequently tested in a wind tunnel and compared to numerical predictions. The multi-element airfoil was predi...

  17. 2D URANS simulation of aerodynamic loads on a pitching airfoil: Impact of computational parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, F.; Kalkman, I.M.; Suiker, A.S.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.

    2017-01-01

    A numerical study of aerodynamic loads on pitching airfoils using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is challenging due complicated airfoil-vortex interactions and the possible occurrence of dynamic stall. In the latter case the combination of boundary layer transitions and airfoil oscillations

  18. Recent progress in the analysis of iced airfoils and wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Tuncer; Chen, Hsun H.; Kaups, Kalle; Schimke, Sue

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the analysis of iced airfoils and wings is described. Ice shapes for multielement airfoils and wings are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code that was developed for single airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The newly developed LEWICE multielement code is amplified to a high-lift configuration to calculate the ice shapes on the slat and on the main airfoil and on a four-element airfoil. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered iced wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  19. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhard, T; Carolus, T; Erbslöh, S

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length

  20. Aerodynamic Response of a Pitching Airfoil with Pulsed Circulation Control for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Chad C.

    Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) have experienced a renewed interest in development for urban, remote, and offshore applications. Past research has shown that VAWTs cannot compete with Horizontals Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in terms of energy capture efficiency. VAWT performance is plagued by dynamic stall (DS) effects at low tip-speed ratios (lambda), where each blade pitches beyond static stall multiple times per revolution. Furthermore, for lambdaoperate outside of stall during over 70% of rotation. However, VAWTs offer many advantages such as omnidirectional operation, ground proximity of generator, lower sound emission, and non-cantilevered blades with longer life. Thus, mitigating dynamic stall and improving VAWT blade aerodynamics for competitive power efficiency has been a popular research topic in recent years and the directive of this study. Past research at WVU focused on the addition of circulation control (CC) technology to improve VAWT aerodynamics and expand the operational envelope. A novel blade design was generated from the augmentation of a NACA0018 airfoil to include CC capabilities. Static wind tunnel data was collected for a range of steady jet momentum coefficients (0.01≤ Cmu≤0.10) for analytical vortex model performance projections. Control strategies were developed to optimize CC jet conditions throughout rotation, resulting in improved power output for 2≤lambda≤5. However, the pumping power required to produce steady CC jets reduced net power gains of the augmented turbine by approximately 15%. The goal of this work was to investigate pulsed CC jet actuation to match steady jet performance with reduced mass flow requirements. To date, no experimental studies have been completed to analyze pulsed CC performance on a pitching airfoil. The research described herein details the first study on the impact of steady and pulsed jet CC on pitching VAWT blade aerodynamics. Both numerical and experimental studies were implemented, varying

  1. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S801 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculation of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. A S801 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3x5 subsonic wind tunnel (3x5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers used for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used, {plus_minus} 5.5 {degrees}and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees} 14{degrees} and 20{degrees} For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means that the airfoil model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  2. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2018.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  3. Pension Insurance Data Tables

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — Find out about retirement trends in PBGC's data tables. The tables include statistics on the people and pensions that PBGC protects, including how many Americans are...

  4. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  5. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and selected...

  7. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  8. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  9. NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Vibriosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year), and selected...

  10. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  11. Nonlinear Characteristics of Helicopter Rotor Blade Airfoils: An Analytical Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Rotaru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some results are presented about the study of airloads of the helicopter rotor blades, the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil sections, the physical features, and the techniques for modeling the unsteady effects found on airfoil operating under nominally attached flow conditions away from stall. The unsteady problem was approached on the basis of Theodorsen's theory, where the aerodynamic response (lift and pitching moment is considered as a sum of noncirculatory and circulatory parts. The noncirculatory or apparent mass accounts for the pressure forces required to accelerate the fluid in the vicinity of the airfoil. The apparent mass contributions to the forces and pitching moments, which are proportional to the instantaneous motion, are included as part of the quasi-steady result.

  12. Computation of viscous transonic flow about a lifting airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, L.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The viscous transonic flow about a stationary body in free air was numerically investigated. The geometry chosen was a symmetric NACA 64A010 airfoil at a freestream Mach number of 0.8, a Reynolds number of 4 million based on chord, and angles of attack of 0 and 2 degrees. These conditions were such that, at 2 degrees incidence unsteady periodic motion was calculated along the aft portion of the airfoil and in its wake. Although no unsteady measurements were made for the NACA 64A010 airfoil at these flow conditions, interpolated steady measurements of lift, drag, and surface static pressures compared favorably with corresponding computed time-averaged lift, drag, and surface static pressures.

  13. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    function approximation. Stability of the full aeroservoelastic system is determined through eigenvalue analysis by state-space formulation of the indicial approximation. Validation is carried out against an implementation of the recursive method by Theodorsen and Garrick for flexure-torsion-aileron flutter...... for fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...... on measurements of either heave displacement, local angle of attack or aerodynamic pressure difference measured over the airfoil. The purpose of the controlled deformable flap is to reduce fluctuations in the aerodynamic forces on the airfoil, which, according to recent studies, have a significant potential...

  14. Enhancements to NURBS-Based FEA Airfoil Modeler: SABER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Trowbridge, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) have become a common way for CAD programs to fit a smooth surface to discrete geometric data. This concept has been extended to allow for the fitting of analysis data in a similar manner and "attaching" the analysis data to the geometric definition of the structure. The "attaching" of analysis data to the geometric definition allows for a more seamless sharing of data between analysis disciplines. NURBS have become a useful tool in the modeling of airfoils. The use of NURBS has allowed for the development of software that easily and consistently generates plate finite element models of the midcamber surface of a given airfoil. The resulting displacements can then be applied to the original airfoil surface and the deformed shape calculated.

  15. Contribution to finite element modelling of airfoil aeroelastic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horáček J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear equations of motion for a flexibly supported rigid airfoil with additional degree of freedom for controlling of the profile motion by a trailing edge flap are derived for large vibration amplitudes. Preliminary results for numerical simulation of flow-induced airfoil vibrations in a laminar incompressible flow are presented for the NACA profile 0012 with three-degrees of freedom (vertical translation, rotation around the elastic axis and rotation of the flap. The developed numerical solution of the Navier – Stokes equations and the Arbitrary Eulerian-Lagrangian approach enable to consider the moving grid for the finite element modelling of the fluid flow around the oscillating airfoil. A sequence of numerical simulation examples is presented for Reynolds numbers up to about Re~10^5, when the system loses the aeroelastic stability, and when the large displacements of the profile and a post-critical behaviour of the system take place.

  16. Linear Strength Vortex Panel Method for NACA 4412 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this article is to formulate numerical models for two-dimensional potential flow over the NACA 4412 Airfoil using linear vortex panel methods. By satisfying the no penetration boundary condition and Kutta condition, the circulation density on each boundary points (end point of every panel) are obtained and according to which, surface pressure distribution and lift coefficients of the airfoil are predicted and validated by Xfoil, an interactive program for the design and analysis of airfoil. The sensitivity of results to the number of panels is also investigated in the end, which shows that the results are sensitive to the number of panels when panel number ranges from 10 to 160. With the increasing panel number (N>160), the results become relatively insensitive to it.

  17. Vortex scale of unsteady separation on a pitching airfoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchiwaki, Masaki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2002-10-01

    The streaklines of unsteady separation on two kinds of pitching airfoils, the NACA65-0910 and a blunt trailing edge airfoil, were studied by dye flow visualization and by the Schlieren method. The latter visualized the discrete vortices shed from the leading edge. The results of these visualization studies allow a comparison between the dynamic behavior of the streakline of unsteady separation and that of the discrete vortices shed from the leading edge. The influence of the airfoil configuration on the flow characteristics was also examined. Furthermore, the scale of a discrete vortex forming the recirculation region was investigated. The non-dimensional pitching rate was k = 0.377, the angle of attack alpha(m) = 16 degrees and the pitching amplitude was fixed to A = +/-6 degrees for Re = 4.0 x 10(3) in this experiment.

  18. Investigation of Airfoil Aeroacoustics with Blowing Control Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baha ZAFER

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, it is dealt with computational aero-acoustic analysis of an airfoil with jet blowing. The airfoil shape is selected as NACA0015 profile with jet blowing on upper surface. The calculations of analysis are done by using commercial finite volume solver. The k-ε turbulence model is used for the turbulence modeling and the Ffowcs Williams and Hawking acoustic analogy model is run for determination of acoustic data. The numerical results are compared with experimental data for computed Sound Pressure Level without jet blowing and well agreement is observed. In the case of jet blowing, the effects of different jet angle, velocity ratio and angle of attack on airfoil are investigated and noise levels of non jet cases and jet blowing cases are studied.

  19. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  20. AcuTable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dibbern, Simon; Rasmussen, Kasper Vestergaard; Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe AcuTable, a new tangible user interface. AcuTable is a shapeable surface that employs capacitive touch sensors. The goal of AcuTable was to enable the exploration of the capabilities of such haptic interface and its applications. We describe its design and implementation...

  1. Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Table Tennis Club

    2013-01-01

    Apparently table tennis plays an important role in physics, not so much because physicists are interested in the theory of table tennis ball scattering, but probably because it provides useful breaks from their deep intellectual occupation. It seems that many of the greatest physicists took table tennis very seriously. For instance, Heisenberg could not even bear to lose a game of table tennis, Otto Frisch played a lot of table tennis, and had a table set up in his library, and Niels Bohr apparently beat everybody at table tennis. Therefore, as the CERN Table Tennis Club advertises on a poster for the next CERN Table Tennis Tournament: “if you want to be a great physicist, perhaps you should play table tennis”. Outdoor table at restaurant n° 1 For this reason, and also as part of the campaign launched by the CERN medical service “Move! & Eat better”, to encourage everyone at CERN to take regular exercise, the CERN Table Tennis Club, with the supp...

  2. Periodic Table of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  3. Quantification of Airfoil Geometry-Induced Aerodynamic Uncertainties---Comparison of Approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dishi; Litvinenko, Alexander; Schillings, Claudia; Schulz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification in aerodynamic simulations calls for efficient numerical methods to reduce computational cost, especially for uncertainties caused by random geometry variations which involve a large number of variables. This paper compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and by point collocation, radial basis function and a gradient-enhanced version of kriging, and examines their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry which is parameterized by independent Gaussian variables. The results show that gradient-enhanced surrogate methods achieve better accuracy than direct integration methods with the same computational cost.

  4. Simulation of self-induced unsteady motion in the near wake of a Joukowski airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghia, K. N.; Osswald, G. A.; Ghia, U.

    1986-01-01

    The unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis is shown to be capable of analyzing the massively separated, persistently unsteady flow in the post-stall regime of a Joukowski airfoil for an angle of attack as high as 53 degrees. The analysis has provided the detailed flow structure, showing the complex vortex interaction for this configuration. The aerodynamic coefficients for lift, drag, and moment were calculated. So far only the spatial structure of the vortex interaction was computed. It is now important to potentially use the large-scale vortex interactions, an additional energy source, to improve the aerodynamic performance.

  5. Quantification of Airfoil Geometry-Induced Aerodynamic Uncertainties---Comparison of Approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dishi

    2015-04-14

    Uncertainty quantification in aerodynamic simulations calls for efficient numerical methods to reduce computational cost, especially for uncertainties caused by random geometry variations which involve a large number of variables. This paper compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and by point collocation, radial basis function and a gradient-enhanced version of kriging, and examines their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry which is parameterized by independent Gaussian variables. The results show that gradient-enhanced surrogate methods achieve better accuracy than direct integration methods with the same computational cost.

  6. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model is tested and validated by comparing with other results from the literature. Finally, this model is used in the optimization process of two reference airfoils in order to reduce their noise signature: the RISOE-B1-18 and the S809 airfoils. (au)

  7. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Dan Christian

    2007-01-01

    on an airfoil section undergoing arbitrary motion in heave, lead-lag, pitch, Trailing Edge (TE) flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model of Gaunaa [4], which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed......The present work contains an extension of the Beddoes-Leishman (B-L) type dynamic stall model, as described by Hansen et al. [7]. In this work a Deformable Trailing Edge Geometry (DTEG) has been added to the dynamic stall model. The model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments...

  8. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks......, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed...

  9. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free...... stream velocity. The subsonic flow around a NACA 0015 airfoil is studied at Reynolds number 1.6 × 106 and at various angles of attack before and after stall. Simulations with turbulent inflow are compared to experiments and to simulations without turbulent inflow. The results show that the flow...

  10. Numerical investigation on exterior conformal mappings with application to airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Rashidi Md Razali; Hu Laey Nee

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is described in computing a conformal map from an exterior region onto the exterior of the unit disk. The numerical method is based on a boundary integral equation which is similar to the Kerzman-Stein integral equation for interior mapping. Some examples show that numerical results of high accuracy can be obtained provided that the boundaries are smooth. This numerical method has been applied to the mapping airfoils. However, due to the fact that the parametric representation of an air foil is not known, a cubic spline interpolation method has been used. Some numerical examples with satisfying results have been obtained for the symmetrical and cambered airfoils. (Author)

  11. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...... that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved....

  12. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S814 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the design of new rotor airfoils. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can also be used to validate analytical computer codes. An S814 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 X 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 X 5) under steady flow with both stationary model conditions and pitch oscillations. To study the extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. While the model underwent pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions {+-}5.5{degrees} and {+-}10{degrees}, were used; at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation.

  13. Aerodynamic behavior of an airfoil with morphing trailing edge for wind turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, T.; Ernst, B.; Seume, J. R.

    2014-06-01

    The length of wind turbine rotor blades has been increased during the last decades. Higher stresses arise especially at the blade root because of the longer lever arm. One way to reduce unsteady blade-root stresses caused by turbulence, gusts, or wind shear is to actively control the lift in the blade tip region. One promising method involves airfoils with morphing trailing edges to control the lift and consequently the loads acting on the blade. In the present study, the steady and unsteady behavior of an airfoil with a morphing trailing edge is investigated. Two-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are performed for a typical thin wind turbine airfoil with a morphing trailing edge. Steady-state simulations are used to design optimal geometry, size, and deflection angles of the morphing trailing edge. The resulting steady aerodynamic coefficients are then analyzed at different angles of attack in order to determine the effectiveness of the morphing trailing edge. In order to investigate the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of the optimal morphing trailing edge, time- resolved RANS-simulations are performed using a deformable grid. In order to analyze the phase shift between the variable trailing edge deflection and the dynamic lift coefficient, the trailing edge is deflected at four different reduced frequencies for each different angle of attack. As expected, a phase shift between the deflection and the lift occurs. While deflecting the trailing edge at angles of attack near stall, additionally an overshoot above and beyond the steady lift coefficient is observed and evaluated.

  14. Aerodynamic behavior of an airfoil with morphing trailing edge for wind turbine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, T; Ernst, B; Seume, J R

    2014-01-01

    The length of wind turbine rotor blades has been increased during the last decades. Higher stresses arise especially at the blade root because of the longer lever arm. One way to reduce unsteady blade-root stresses caused by turbulence, gusts, or wind shear is to actively control the lift in the blade tip region. One promising method involves airfoils with morphing trailing edges to control the lift and consequently the loads acting on the blade. In the present study, the steady and unsteady behavior of an airfoil with a morphing trailing edge is investigated. Two-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are performed for a typical thin wind turbine airfoil with a morphing trailing edge. Steady-state simulations are used to design optimal geometry, size, and deflection angles of the morphing trailing edge. The resulting steady aerodynamic coefficients are then analyzed at different angles of attack in order to determine the effectiveness of the morphing trailing edge. In order to investigate the unsteady aerodynamic behavior of the optimal morphing trailing edge, time- resolved RANS-simulations are performed using a deformable grid. In order to analyze the phase shift between the variable trailing edge deflection and the dynamic lift coefficient, the trailing edge is deflected at four different reduced frequencies for each different angle of attack. As expected, a phase shift between the deflection and the lift occurs. While deflecting the trailing edge at angles of attack near stall, additionally an overshoot above and beyond the steady lift coefficient is observed and evaluated

  15. Aerodynamic shape optimization for alleviating dynamic stall characteristics of helicopter rotor airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qing

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to alleviate the dynamic stall effects in helicopter rotor, the sequential quadratic programming (SQP method is employed to optimize the characteristics of airfoil under dynamic stall conditions based on the SC1095 airfoil. The geometry of airfoil is parameterized by the class-shape-transformation (CST method, and the C-topology body-fitted mesh is then automatically generated around the airfoil by solving the Poisson equations. Based on the grid generation technology, the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations are chosen as the governing equations for predicting airfoil flow field and the highly-efficient implicit scheme of lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS is adopted for temporal discretization. To capture the dynamic stall phenomenon of the rotor more accurately, the Spalart–Allmaras turbulence model is employed to close the RANS equations. The optimized airfoil with a larger leading edge radius and camber is obtained. The leading edge vortex and trailing edge separation of the optimized airfoil under unsteady conditions are obviously weakened, and the dynamic stall characteristics of optimized airfoil at different Mach numbers, reduced frequencies and angles of attack are also obviously improved compared with the baseline SC1095 airfoil. It is demonstrated that the optimized method is effective and the optimized airfoil is suitable as the helicopter rotor airfoil.

  16. Design of the new Risoe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P; Dahl, K S [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A new airfoil family for wind turbines was developed by use of a design method using numerical optimization and the flow solver, XFOIL. The results were evaluated with the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D. The airfoil family constitutes 6 airfoils ranging in thickness from 15% to 30%. The airfoils were designed to have a maximum lift coefficient around 1.5 in natural conditions and high lift-drag ratios below maximum lift. Insensitivity to leading edge roughness was obtained by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurred close to the leading edge just before stall. The airfoil family was designed for a 600 kW wind turbine and provides a basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  17. Artificial intelligence metamodel comparison and application to wind turbine airfoil uncertainty analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Ju

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Monte Carlo simulation method for turbomachinery uncertainty analysis often requires performing a huge number of simulations, the computational cost of which can be greatly alleviated with the help of metamodeling techniques. An intensive comparative study was performed on the approximation performance of three prospective artificial intelligence metamodels, that is, artificial neural network, radial basis function, and support vector regression. The genetic algorithm was used to optimize the predetermined parameters of each metamodel for the sake of a fair comparison. Through testing on 10 nonlinear functions with different problem scales and sample sizes, the genetic algorithm–support vector regression metamodel was found more accurate and robust than the other two counterparts. Accordingly, the genetic algorithm–support vector regression metamodel was selected and combined with the Monte Carlo simulation method for the uncertainty analysis of a wind turbine airfoil under two types of surface roughness uncertainties. The results show that the genetic algorithm–support vector regression metamodel can capture well the uncertainty propagation from the surface roughness to the airfoil aerodynamic performance. This work is useful to the application of metamodeling techniques in the robust design optimization of turbomachinery.

  18. Influence of transition on steady and unsteady wind-turbine airfoil aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Eric; Lavely, Adam; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Brasseur, James

    2011-11-01

    Laminar-flow airfoils for large stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines are designed to achieve a restrained maximum lift coefficient and a broad laminar low- drag bucket under steady flow conditions and at specific Reynolds numbers. Blind- comparisons of the 2000 NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment showed large discrepancies and illustrated the need for improved physics modeling. We have studied the S809 airfoil under static and dynamic (ramp-up, ramp-down, and oscillatory) conditions, using the four-equation transition model of Langtry and Menter (2009), which has been implemented as a library accessible by an OpenFOAM RANS solver. Model validation is performed using surface-pressure and lift/drag data from U. Glasgow (2009) and OSU (1995) wind tunnel experiments. Performance of the transition model is assessed by analyzing integrated performance metrics, as well as detailed surface pressure and pressure gradient, wall-shear stress, and boundary-layer profiles and separation points. Demonstration of model performance in the light- and deep-stall regimes of dynamic stall is an important step in reducing uncertainties in full 3D simulations of turbines operating in the atmospheric boundary layer. Supported by NSF Grant 0933647.

  19. Mortality table construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  20. CERN Table Tennis Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Table Tennis Club

    2014-01-01

    CERN Table Tennis Club Announcing CERN 60th Anniversary Table Tennis Tournament to take place at CERN, from July 1 to July 15, 2014   The CERN Table Tennis Club, reborn in 2008, is encouraging people at CERN to take more regular exercise. This is why the Club, thanks to the strong support of the CERN Staff Association, installed last season a first outdoor table on the terrace of restaurant # 1, and will install another one this season on the terrace of Restaurant # 2. Table tennis provides both physical exercise and friendly social interactions. The CERN Table Tennis club is happy to use the unique opportunity of the 60th CERN anniversary to promote table tennis at CERN, as it is a game that everybody can easily play, regardless of level. Table tennis is particularly well suited for CERN, as many great physicists play table tennis, as you might already know: “Heisenberg could not even bear to lose a game of table tennis”; “Otto Frisch played a lot of table tennis;...

  1. Effect of Moving Surface on NACA 63218 Aerodynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahiaoui Tayeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 63218 airfoil by using moving surface. Different numerical cases are considered: the first one is the numerical simulation of non-modified airfoil NACA 63218 according at different angle of attack and the second one a set of moving cylinder is placed on leading edge of the airfoil. The rotational velocity of the cylinder is varied to establish the effect of momentum injection on modified airfoil aerodynamic performances. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model.

  2. Time-resolved and volumetric PIV measurements of a transitional separation bubble on an SD7003 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgmann, S.; Dannemann, J.; Schroeder, W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Aerodynamics, Aachen (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    To comprehensively understand the effects of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities on a transitional separation bubble on the suction side of an airfoil regarding as to flapping of the bubble and its impact on the airfoil performance, the temporal and spatial structure of the vortices occurring at the downstream end of the separation bubble is investigated. Since the bubble variation leads to a change of the pressure distribution, the investigation of the instantaneous velocity field is essential to understand the details of the overall airfoil performance. This vortex formation in the reattachment region on the upper surface of an SD7003 airfoil is analyzed in detail at different angles of attack. At a Reynolds number Re{sub c} < 100,000 the laminar boundary layer separates at angles of attack >4 . Due to transition processes, turbulent reattachment of the separated shear layer occurs enclosing a locally confined recirculation region. To identify the location of the separation bubble and to describe the dynamics of the reattachment, a time-resolved PIV measurement in a single light-sheet is performed. To elucidate the spatial structure of the flow patterns in the reattachment region in time and space, a stereo scanning PIV set-up is applied. The flow field is recorded in at least ten successive light-sheet planes with two high-speed cameras enclosing a viewing angle of 65 to detect all three velocity components within a light-sheet leading to a time-resolved volumetric measurement due to a high scanning speed. The measurements evidence the development of quasi-periodic vortex structures. The temporal dynamics of the vortex roll-up, initialized by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, is shown as well as the spatial development of the vortex roll-up process. Based on these measurements a model for the evolving vortex structure consisting of the formation of c-shape vortices and their transformation into screwdriver vortices is introduced. (orig.)

  3. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the NACA 4415 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, M.J.; Reuss Ramsay, R.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    A NACA 4415 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory 3 x 5 subsonic wind tunnel under steady state and unsteady conditions. The test defined baseline conditions for steady state angles of attack from {minus}10{degree} to +40{degree} and examined unsteady behavior by oscillating the model about its pitch axis for three mean angles, three frequencies, and two amplitudes. For all cases, Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million were used. In addition, these were repeated after the application of leading edge grit roughness (LEGR) to determine contamination effects on the airfoil performance. Steady state results of the NACA 4415 testing at Reynolds number of 1.25 million showed a baseline maximum lift coefficient of 1.30 at 12.3{degree} angle of attack. The application of LEGR reduced the maximum lift coefficient by 20% and increased the 0.0090 minimum drag coefficient value by 62%. The zero lift pitching moment of {minus}0.0967 showed a 13% reduction in magnitude to {minus}0.0842 with LEGR applied. Data were also obtained for two pitch oscillation amplitudes: {+-}5.5{degree} and {+-}10{degree}. The larger amplitude consistently gave a higher maximum lift coefficient than the smaller amplitude, and both unsteady maximum lift coefficients were greater than the steady state values. Stall is delayed on the airfoil while the angle of attack is increasing, thereby causing an increase in maximum lift coefficient. A hysteresis behavior was exhibited for all the unsteady test cases. The hysteresis loops were larger for the higher reduced frequencies and for the larger amplitude oscillations. As in the steady case, the effect of LEGR in the unsteady case was to reduce the lift coefficient at high angles of attack. In addition, with LEGR, the hysteresis behavior persisted into lower angles of attack than for the clean case.

  4. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S810 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    An S810 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory 3 x 5 subsonic wind tunnel under steady state and unsteady conditions. The test defined baseline conditions for steady state angles of attack from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees} and examined unsteady behavior by oscillating the model about its pitch axis for three mean angles, three frequencies, and two amplitudes. For all cases, Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million were used. In addition, the above conditions were repeated after the application of leading edge grit roughness (LEGR) to determine contamination effects on the airfoil performance. Baseline steady state results of the S810 testing showed a maximum lift coefficient of 1.15 at 15.2{degrees}angle of attack. The application of LEGR reduced the maximum lift coefficient by 12% and increased the 0.0085 minimum drag coefficient value by 88%. The zero lift pitching moment of -0.0286 showed a 16% reduction in magnitude to -0.0241 with LEGR applied. Data were also obtained for two pitch oscillation amplitudes: {plus_minus}5.5{degrees} and {plus_minus}10{degrees}. The larger amplitude consistently gave a higher maximum lift coefficient than the smaller amplitude and both sets of unsteady maximum lift coefficients were greater than the steady state values. Stall was delayed on the airfoil while the angle of attack was increasing, thereby causing an increase in maximum lift coefficient. A hysteresis behavior was exhibited for all the unsteady test cases. The hysteresis loops were larger for the higher reduced frequencies and for the larger amplitude oscillations. In addition to the hysteresis behavior, an unusual feature of these data were a sudden increase in the lift coefficient where the onset of stall was expected. As in the steady case, the effect of LEGR in the unsteady case was to reduce the lift coefficient at high angles of attack.

  5. Periodic and aperiodic flow patterns around an airfoil with leading-edge protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chang; Zuo, Zhigang; Maeda, Takao; Kamada, Yasunari; Li, Qing'an; Shimamoto, Kensei; Liu, Shuhong

    2017-11-01

    Recently leading-edge protuberances have attracted great attention as a passive method for separation control. In this paper, the effect of multiple leading-edge protuberances on the performance of a two-dimensional airfoil is investigated through experimental measurement of aerodynamic forces, surface tuft visualization, and numerical simulation. In contrast to the sharp stall of the baseline airfoil with large hysteresis effect during AOA (angle of attack) increasing and decreasing, the stall process of the modified airfoil with leading-edge protuberances is gentle and stable. Flow visualization revealed that the flow past each protuberance is periodic and symmetric at small AOAs. Streamwise vortices are generated on the shoulders of the protuberance, leading to a larger separation around the valley sections and a longer attachment along the peak sections. When some critical AOA is exceeded, aperiodic and asymmetric flow patterns occur on the protuberances at different spanwise positions, with leading-edge separation on some of the valley sections and non-stalled condition elsewhere. A combined mechanism, involving both the compartmentalization effect of the slender momentum-enhanced attached flows on the protuberance peaks and the downwash effect of the local stalled region with low circulation, is proposed to explain the generation of the aperiodic flow patterns. The influence of the number of protuberances is also investigated, which shows similar aperiodic flow patterns. The distance between the neighboring local stalled valley sections is found to be in the range of 4-7 times the protuberance wavelength. According to the proposed mechanism, it is speculated that the distance between the neighboring local stalled valley sections is inclined to increase with a smaller protuberance amplitude or at a larger AOA.

  6. Decomposing the aerodynamic forces of low-Reynolds flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriche, Manuel; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Flores, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of flow around flapping NACA0012 airfoils at relatively small Reynolds numbers, Re = 1000 . The simulations are carried out with TUCAN, an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible flow with an immersed boundary method to model the presence of the airfoil. The motion of the airfoil is composed of a vertical translation, heaving, and a rotation about the quarter of the chord, pitching. Both motions are prescribed by sinusoidal laws, with a reduced frequency of k = 1 . 41 , a pitching amplitude of 30deg and a heaving amplitude of one chord. Both, the mean pitch angle and the phase shift between pitching and heaving motions are varied, to build a database with 18 configurations. Four of these cases are analysed in detail using the force decomposition algorithm of Chang (1992) and Martín Alcántara et al. (2015). This method decomposes the total aerodynamic force into added-mass (translation and rotation of the airfoil), a volumetric contribution from the vorticity (circulatory effects) and a surface contribution proportional to viscosity. In particular we will focus on the second, analysing the contribution of the leading and trailing edge vortices that typically appear in these flows. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P. The authors thankfully acknowledge the computer resources provided by the Red Española de Supercomputacion.

  7. Numerical computation of aeroacoustic transfer functions for realistic airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, Leandro Dantas; Miotto, Renato Fuzaro; Wolf, William Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Based on Amiet's theory formalism, we propose a numerical framework to compute the aeroacoustic transfer function of realistic airfoil geometries. The aeroacoustic transfer function relates the amplitude and phase of an incoming periodic gust to the respective unsteady lift response permitting,

  8. Overview of results from 2D airfoil testing at Risoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    This paper gives an overview of the results from two dimensional airfoil testing at Risoe. A two dimensional testing method was recently developed where a test rig is inserted into an open jet flow in a wind tunnel of the close return loop type with an open test section. Pressure measurements provide the lift and drag forces. Both stationary flow and dynamic inflow from pitch motion are possible. The wind tunnel static pressure and total dynamic pressures were calibrated and wind tunnel boundary corrections were found. So far, the testing method was verified by comparison of NACA 63-215 airfoil measurements to numerical predictions and to measurements. Furthermore, the Risoe-1, FFA-W3-241, FFA-W3-301 and NACA 63-430 airfoils were measured. Different types of leading edge roughness and vortex generators were investigated. For all airfoils, good agreements with predictions were obtained on both pressure distribution and on lift coefficient. The drag coefficients were slightly higher than predicted. (eg) 10 refs.

  9. Unsteady Double Wake Model for the Simulation of Stalled Airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Cayron, Antoine; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the recent developed Unsteady Double Wake Model, USDWM, is used to simulate separated flows past a wind turbine airfoil at high angles of attack. The solver is basically an unsteady two-dimensional panel method which uses the unsteady double wake technique to model flow separ...

  10. CFD code comparison for 2D airfoil flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Méndez, B.; Muñoz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The current paper presents the effort, in the EU AVATAR project, to establish the necessary requirements to obtain consistent lift over drag ratios among seven CFD codes. The flow around a 2D airfoil case is studied, for both transitional and fully turbulent conditions at Reynolds numbers of 3...

  11. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2010-01-01

    Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...

  12. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  13. SPIV study of passive flow control on a WT airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2010-01-01

    to free stream velocity U=15 m/s. The objective was to investigate the flow structures induced by and separation controlling behavior of vortex generators on the airfoil. The experimental results show strong separation of the uncontrolled flow whereas an intermittent behavior appears for the controlled...

  14. Close-loop Dynamic Stall Control on a Pitching Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Ian; Corke, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    A closed-loop control scheme utilizing a plasma actuator to control dynamic stall is presented. The plasma actuator is located at the leading-edge of a pitching airfoil. It initially pulses at an unsteady frequency that perturbs the boundary layer flow over the suction surface of the airfoil. As the airfoil approaches and enters stall, the amplification of the unsteady disturbance is detected by an onboard pressure sensor also located near the leading edge. Once detected, the actuator is switched to a higher voltage control state that in static airfoil experiments would reattach the flow. The threshold level of the detection is a parameter in the control scheme. Three stall regimes were examined: light, medium, and deep stall, that were defined by their stall penetration angles. The results showed that in general, the closed-loop control scheme was effective at controlling dynamic stall. The cycle-integrated lift improved in all cases, and increased by as much as 15% at the lowest stall penetration angle. As important, the cycle-integrated aerodynamic damping coefficient also increased in all cases, and was made to be positive at the light stall regime where it traditionally is negative. The latter is important in applications where negative damping can lead to stall flutter.

  15. Airfoil Computations using the γ - Reθ Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.

    computations. Based on this, an estimate of the error in the computations is determined to be approximately one percent in the attached region. Following the verification of the implemented model, the model is applied to four airfoils, NACA64- 018, NACA64-218, NACA64-418 and NACA64-618 and the results...

  16. Numerical study of unsteady viscous flow past oscillating airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Yan; Yuan Xin [Tsinghua Univ., Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2001-07-01

    Accurate simulation of the dynamic stall of an oscillating airfoil is of major importance to wing and wind turbine blade design. However, dynamic stall is complicated and influenced by many factors, such as geometry shape of the airfoil, reduced frequency, etc. The difficulties of simulation are both mathematical (numerical method) and physical (turbulence model). The present paper has introduced a new numerical method (new LU-type scheme and fourth-order higher resolution MUSCL TVD scheme) and q-{omega} turbulence modelling to calculate the unsteady flowfields of an oscillating NACA0015 airfoil. The test targets include attached flow, light-stall and deep-stall of the airfoil. The calculated results for attached flow and light-stall are in good agreement with those of experiments. The calculated results for deep-stall also show improvement, especially during the downstroke of the oscillation. However, there is still a significant difference between the results of calculation and experiment in the hysteresis curves of the drag coefficient. One reason is that the q-{omega} turbulence model still has limitations. Another is that the drag coefficient is difficult to measure and the experiments are not reliable. (Author)

  17. Large eddy simulations of an airfoil in turbulent inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2008-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  18. Numerical Investigation of an Oscillating Flat Plate Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Fazlolah; Janechek, Matthew; Buchholz, James; Udaykumar, Hs

    2017-11-01

    This research investigates the vortex dynamics of a plunging flat plate airfoil by analyzing the vorticity transport in 2D simulations. A horizontal airfoil is subject to a freestream flow at Re =10000. A prescribed vertical sinusoidal motion is applied to the airfoil. Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) models the fluid-structure interaction. SPM as a diffuse interface model considers a thickness for the interface and applies a smooth transition from solid to fluid. As the forces on the airfoil are highly affected by the interaction of the generated vortices from the surface, it is very important to find out whether a diffuse interface solver can model a flow dominated by vorticities. The results show that variation of lift coefficient with time agrees well with the experiment. Study of vortex evolution shows that similar to experiments, when the plate starts moving downward from top, the boundary layer is attached to the surface and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) is very small. By time, LEV grows and rolls up and a secondary vortex emerges. Meanwhile, the boundary layer starts to separate and finally LEV detaches from the surface. In overall, SPM as a diffuse interface model can predict the lift force and vortex pattern accurately.

  19. Turbine Airfoil Optimization Using Quasi-3D Analysis Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Goel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to optimize the geometry of a turbine airfoil by simultaneously designing multiple 2D sections of the airfoil is presented in this paper. The complexity of 3D geometry modeling is circumvented by generating multiple 2D airfoil sections and constraining their geometry in the radial direction using first- and second-order polynomials that ensure smoothness in the radial direction. The flow fields of candidate geometries obtained during optimization are evaluated using a quasi-3D, inviscid, CFD analysis code. An inviscid flow solver is used to reduce the execution time of the analysis. Multiple evaluation criteria based on the Mach number profile obtained from the analysis of each airfoil cross-section are used for computing a quality metric. A key contribution of the paper is the development of metrics that emulate the perception of the human designer in visually evaluating the Mach Number distribution. A mathematical representation of the evaluation criteria coupled with a parametric geometry generator enables the use of formal optimization techniques in the design. The proposed approach is implemented in the optimal design of a low-pressure turbine nozzle.

  20. TABLE TENNIS CLUB

    CERN Document Server

    TABLE TENNIS CLUB

    2010-01-01

    2010 CERN Table Tennis Tournament The CERN Table Tennis Club organizes its traditional CERN Table Tennis Tournament, at the Meyrin club, 2 rue de livron, in Meyrin, Saturday August 21st, in the afternoon. The tournament is open to all CERN staff, users, visitors and families, including of course summer students. See below for details. In order to register, simply send an E-mail to Jean-Pierre Revol (jean-pierre.revol@cern.ch). You can also download the registration form from the Club Web page (http://www.cern.ch/tabletennis), and send it via internal mail. Photo taken on August 22, 2009 showing some of the participants in the 2nd CERN Table Tennis tournament. INFORMATION ON CERN TABLE TENNIS CLUB CERN used to have a tradition of table tennis activities at CERN. For some reason, at the beginning of the 1980’s, the CERN Table Tennis club merged with the Meyrin Table Tennis club, a member of the Association Genevoise de Tennis de Table (AGTT). Therefore, if you want to practice table tennis, you...

  1. Study on bird's & insect's wing aerodynamics and comparison of its analytical value with standard airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md. Nesar; Alam, Mahbubul; Hossain, Md. Abed; Ahmed, Md. Imteaz

    2017-06-01

    Flight is the main mode of locomotion used by most of the world's bird & insect species. This article discusses the mechanics of bird flight, with emphasis on the varied forms of bird's & insect's wings. The fundamentals of bird flight are similar to those of aircraft. Flying animals flap their wings to generate lift and thrust as well as to perform remarkable maneuvers with rapid accelerations and decelerations. Insects and birds provide illuminating examples of unsteady aerodynamics. Lift force is produced by the action of air flow on the wing, which is an airfoil. The airfoil is shaped such that the air provides a net upward force on the wing, while the movement of air is directed downward. Additional net lift may come from airflow around the bird's & insect's body in some species, especially during intermittent flight while the wings are folded or semi-folded. Bird's & insect's flight in nature are sub-divided into two stages. They are Unpowered Flight: Gliding and Soaring & Powered Flight: Flapping. When gliding, birds and insects obtain both a vertical and a forward force from their wings. When a bird & insect flaps, as opposed to gliding, its wings continue to develop lift as before, but the lift is rotated forward to provide thrust, which counteracts drag and increases its speed, which has the effect of also increasing lift to counteract its weight, allowing it to maintain height or to climb. Flapping flight is more complicated than flight with fixed wings because of the structural movement and the resulting unsteady fluid dynamics. Flapping involves two stages: the down-stroke, which provides the majority of the thrust, and the up-stroke, which can also (depending on the bird's & insect's wings) provide some thrust. Most kinds of bird & insect wing can be grouped into four types, with some falling between two of these types. These types of wings are elliptical wings, high speed wings, high aspect ratio wings and soaring wings with slots. Hovering is used

  2. Numerical study of the static and pitching RISOe-B1-18 airfoil[STALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this report is the better understanding of the physics of the aeroelastic motion of wind turbine blades in order to improve the numerical models used for their design. In this study, the case of the RISOe-B1-18 airfoil which was equipped and measured in an open jet wind tunnel is studied. Two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculations using the k-w SST and Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence models are conducted. An engineering semi-empirical dynamic stall model is also used for performing calculations. Computational results are compared to the experimental results that are available both for the static airfoil and in the case of pitching motions. It is shown that the Navier-Stokes simulations can reproduced the main characteristic features of the flow. The DES model seems also to be able to reproduce some details of the unsteady aerodynamics. The Navier-Stokes computations can then be used to improve the performance of the engineering model. (au)

  3. A data-driven decomposition approach to model aerodynamic forces on flapping airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiola, Marco; Discetti, Stefano; Ianiro, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we exploit a data-driven decomposition of experimental data from a flapping airfoil experiment with the aim of isolating the main contributions to the aerodynamic force and obtaining a phenomenological model. Experiments are carried out on a NACA 0012 airfoil in forward flight with both heaving and pitching motion. Velocity measurements of the near field are carried out with Planar PIV while force measurements are performed with a load cell. The phase-averaged velocity fields are transformed into the wing-fixed reference frame, allowing for a description of the field in a domain with fixed boundaries. The decomposition of the flow field is performed by means of the POD applied on the velocity fluctuations and then extended to the phase-averaged force data by means of the Extended POD approach. This choice is justified by the simple consideration that aerodynamic forces determine the largest contributions to the energetic balance in the flow field. Only the first 6 modes have a relevant contribution to the force. A clear relationship can be drawn between the force and the flow field modes. Moreover, the force modes are closely related (yet slightly different) to the contributions of the classic potential models in literature, allowing for their correction. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P.

  4. Standard Reference Tables -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Standard Reference Tables (SRT) provide consistent reference data for the various applications that support Flight Standards Service (AFS) business processes and...

  5. Unsteady effects in flows past stationary airfoils with Gurney flaps due to unsteady flow separations at low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan MATEESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the unsteady flows past stationary airfoils equipped with Gurney flaps at low Reynolds numbers, aiming to study the unsteady behavior of the aerodynamic coefficients due to the flow separations occurring at these Reynolds numbers. The Gurney flaps are simple but very efficient lift-increasing devices, which due to their mechanical simplicity are of particular interest for the small size micro-air-vehicles (MAV flying at low speed and very low Reynolds number. The unsteady aerodynamic analysis is performed with an efficient time-accurate numerical method developed for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations at low Reynolds numbers, which is second-order-accurate in time and space. The paper presents solutions for the unsteady aerodynamic coefficients of lift and drag and for the lift-to-drag ratio of several symmetric and cambered airfoils with Gurney flaps. It was found that although the airfoil is considered stationary, starting from a relatively small incidence (about 8 degrees the flow becomes unsteady due to the unsteadiness of the flow separations occurring at low Reynolds numbers, and the aerodynamic coefficients display periodic oscillations in time. A detailed study is presented in the paper on the influence of various geometric and flow parameters, such as the Gurney flap height, Reynolds number, airfoil relative thickness and relative camber, on the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag and lift-to-drag ratio. The flow separation is also studied with the aid of flow visualizations illustrating the changes in the flow pattern at various moments in time.

  6. About the effects of an oscillating miniflap upon the wake on an airfoil, all immersed in turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delnero, J S; Marañón Di Leo, J; Colman, J; Camocardi, M; García Sainz, M; Muñoz, F

    2011-01-01

    The present research analyzes the asymmetry in the rolling up shear layers behind the blunt trailing edge of an airfoil 4412 with a miniflap acting as active flow control device and its wake organization. Experimental investigations relating the asymmetry of the vortex flow in the near wake region, able to distort the flow increasing the downwash of an airfoil, have been performed. All of these in a free upstream turbulent flow (1.8% intensity). We examine the near wake region characteristics of a wing model with a 4412 airfoil without and with a rotating miniflap located on the lower surface, near the trailing edge. The flow in the near wake, for 3 x-positions (along chord line) and 20 vertical points in each x-position, was explored, for three different rotating frequencies, in order to identify signs of asymmetry of the initial counter rotating vortex structures. Experimental evidence is presented showing that for typical lifting conditions the shear layer rollup process within the near wake is different for the upper and lower vortices: the shear layer separating from the pressure side of the airfoil begins its rollup immediately behind the trailing edge, creating a stronger vortex while the shear layer from the suction side begins its rollup more downstream creating a weaker vortex. The experimental data were processed by classical statistics methods. Aspects of a mechanism connecting the different evolution and pattern of these initial vortex structures with lift changes and wake alleviating processes, due to these miniflaps, will be studied in future works.

  7. About the effects of an oscillating miniflap upon the wake on an airfoil, all immersed in turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnero, J S; Maranon Di Leo, J; Colman, J; Camocardi, M; Garcia Sainz, M; Munoz, F, E-mail: delnero@ing.unlp.edu.ar [LaCLyFA, Departamento Aeronautica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-12-22

    The present research analyzes the asymmetry in the rolling up shear layers behind the blunt trailing edge of an airfoil 4412 with a miniflap acting as active flow control device and its wake organization. Experimental investigations relating the asymmetry of the vortex flow in the near wake region, able to distort the flow increasing the downwash of an airfoil, have been performed. All of these in a free upstream turbulent flow (1.8% intensity). We examine the near wake region characteristics of a wing model with a 4412 airfoil without and with a rotating miniflap located on the lower surface, near the trailing edge. The flow in the near wake, for 3 x-positions (along chord line) and 20 vertical points in each x-position, was explored, for three different rotating frequencies, in order to identify signs of asymmetry of the initial counter rotating vortex structures. Experimental evidence is presented showing that for typical lifting conditions the shear layer rollup process within the near wake is different for the upper and lower vortices: the shear layer separating from the pressure side of the airfoil begins its rollup immediately behind the trailing edge, creating a stronger vortex while the shear layer from the suction side begins its rollup more downstream creating a weaker vortex. The experimental data were processed by classical statistics methods. Aspects of a mechanism connecting the different evolution and pattern of these initial vortex structures with lift changes and wake alleviating processes, due to these miniflaps, will be studied in future works.

  8. Generalized Kutta–Joukowski theorem for multi-vortex and multi-airfoil flow (a lumped vortex model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chenyuan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For purpose of easy identification of the role of free vortices on the lift and drag and for purpose of fast or engineering evaluation of forces for each individual body, we will extend in this paper the Kutta–Joukowski (KJ theorem to the case of inviscid flow with multiple free vortices and multiple airfoils. The major simplification used in this paper is that each airfoil is represented by a lumped vortex, which may hold true when the distances between vortices and bodies are large enough. It is found that the Kutta–Joukowski theorem still holds provided that the local freestream velocity and the circulation of the bound vortex are modified by the induced velocity due to the outside vortices and airfoils. We will demonstrate how to use the present result to identify the role of vortices on the forces according to their position, strength and rotation direction. Moreover, we will apply the present results to a two-cylinder example of Crowdy and the Wagner example to demonstrate how to perform fast force approximation for multi-body and multi-vortex problems. The lumped vortex assumption has the advantage of giving such kinds of approximate results which are very easy to use. The lack of accuracy for such a fast evaluation will be compensated by a rigorous extension, with the lumped vortex assumption removed and with vortex production included, in a forthcoming paper.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of an Airfoil with Sand Grain Roughness on the Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Andre F. P.; Casalino, Damiano; Fares, Ehab; Choudhari, Meelan

    2016-01-01

    As part of a computational study of acoustic radiation due to the passage of turbulent boundary layer eddies over the trailing edge of an airfoil, the Lattice-Boltzmann method is used to perform direct numerical simulations of compressible, low Mach number flow past an NACA 0012 airfoil at zero degrees angle of attack. The chord Reynolds number of approximately 0.657 million models one of the test conditions from a previous experiment by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini at NASA Langley Research Center. A unique feature of these simulations involves direct modeling of the sand grain roughness on the leading edge, which was used in the abovementioned experiment to trip the boundary layer to fully turbulent flow. This report documents the findings of preliminary, proof-of-concept simulations based on a narrow spanwise domain and a limited time interval. The inclusion of fully-resolved leading edge roughness in this simulation leads to significantly earlier transition than that in the absence of any roughness. The simulation data is used in conjunction with both the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy and a semi-analytical model by Roger and Moreau to predict the farfield noise. The encouraging agreement between the computed noise spectrum and that measured in the experiment indicates the potential payoff from a full-fledged numerical investigation based on the current approach. Analysis of the computed data is used to identify the required improvements to the preliminary simulations described herein.

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics of an oscillating airfoil. [For Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickens, R H

    1986-03-01

    Results are reported from wind tunnel tests to study the effects of dynamic aerodynamics on the efficiency of a NACA 0018 airfoil used on a Darreius vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). The topic is of interest because of uncontrolled pitching which occurs during operation and which produces stall, turbulence and separation effects that reduce efficiency. Present stream-tube theory and axial momentum models are not applicable in the unstable regimes. The wind tunnel tests were conducted with a 45 m/sec flow with an Re of 1.5 million. The situation mimicked typical wind turbine operational conditions. The airfoil was mounted on a hydraulic actuator to allow it to rotate about its quarter-chord location and to control the extent and frequency of oscillations. Data were also gathered on the performance in a steady flow for comparative purposes. Summary data are provided on the static and total pressures over a complete cycle of oscillation, and related to the angles of attack, time of onset of stall, and the lift and drag coefficients. The limitations of the study with regard to the absence of consideration of the flow acceleration experienced by an advancing blade are noted. 13 references.

  11. Computational Simulation of the Flow Past an Airfoil for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the numerical simulation of the two-dimensional, incompressible, steady air flow past a NACA 2415 airfoil and four modifications of this one. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, five different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off called the no blowing condition by means computational fluid dynamics. The RNG k-ε model is utilized to describe the turbulent flow process. The simulations were held at a Reynolds number of 105. Results allowed obtaining lift and drag forces and pitching moment coefficient and also the location of the separation and reattachment point in some cases for different angles of attack, from 0 to 16 degrees with the smallest increment of 4 degrees. Finally, numerical results were compared with results obtained from wind tunnel tests by means of an aerodynamic balance and also oil and smoke visualization techniques and found to be in very good agreement.

  12. Suppression of dynamic stall with a leading-edge slat on a VR-7 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Tung, C.

    1993-01-01

    The VR-7 airfoil was experimentally studied with and without a leading-edge slat at fixed angles of attack from 0 deg to 30 deg at Re = 200,000 and for unsteady pitching motions described by alpha equals alpha(sub m) + 10 deg(sin(wt)). The models were two dimensional, and the test was performed in a water tunnel at Ames Research Center. The unsteady conditions ranged over Re equals 100,000 to 250,000, k equals 0.001 to 0.2, and alpha(sub m) = 10 deg to 20 deg. Unsteady lift, drag, and pitching-moment measurements were obtained along with fluorescent-dye flow visualizations. The addition of the slat was found to delay the static-drag and static-moment stall by about 5 degrees and to eliminate completely the development of a dynamic-stall vortex during unsteady motions that reached angles as high as 25 degrees. In all of the unsteady cases studied, the slat caused a significant reduction in the force and moment hysteresis amplitudes. The reduced frequency was found to have the greatest effect on the results, whereas the Reynolds number had little effect on the behavior of either the basic or the slatted airfoil. The slat caused a slight drag penalty at low angles of attack, but generally increased the lift/drag ratio when averaged over the full cycle of oscillation.

  13. A study on the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil in the flapping adjustment stage during forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Xingwei; Huang, Panpan; Xie, Lingwang

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of a flapping airfoil in the adjustment stage between two specific flight patterns during the forward flight. Four flapping movement models in adjustment stage are firstly established by using the multi-objective optimization algorithm. Then, a numerical experiment is carried out by using finite volume method to solve the two-dimensional time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The attack angles are selected from -5° to 7.5° with an increase of 2.5°. The results are systematically analyzed and special attention is paid to the corresponding changes of aerodynamic forces, vortex shedding mechanism in the wake structure and thrust efficiency. Present results show that output aerodynamic performance of flapping airfoil can be improved by the increasement of amplitude and frequency in the flapping adjustment stage, which further validates and complements previous studies. Moreover, it is also show that the manner using multi-objective optimization algorithm to generate a movement model in adjustment stage, to connect other two specific plunging motions, is a feasible and effective method. Current study is dedicated to providing some helpful references for the design and control of artificial flapping wing air vehicles.

  14. Horn–Schunck optical flow applied to deformation measurement of a birdlike airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Xiaoliang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current deformation measurement techniques suffer from limited spatial resolution. In this work, a highly accurate and high-resolution Horn–Schunck optical flow method is developed and then applied to measuring the static deformation of a birdlike flexible airfoil at a series of angles of attack at Reynolds number 100,000 in a low speed, low noise wind tunnel. To allow relatively large displacements, a nonlinear Horn–Schunck model and a coarse-to-fine warping process are adopted. To preserve optical flow discontinuities, a nonquadratic penalization function, a multi-cue driven bilateral filtering and a principle component analysis of local image patterns are used. First, the accuracy and convergence of this Horn–Schunck technique are verified on a benchmark. Then, the maximum displacement that can be reliably calculated by this technique is studied on synthetic images. Both studies are compared with the performance of a Lucas–Kanade optical flow method. Finally, the Horn–Schunck technique is used to estimate the 3-D deformation of the birdlike airfoil through a stereoscopic camera setup. The results are compared with those computed by Lucas–Kanade optical flow, image correlation and numerical simulation.

  15. The Living Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  16. Experimental verification of the new RISOe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, K S; Fuglsang, P; Antoniou, I [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper concerns the experimental verification of a new airfoil family for wind turbines. The family consist of airfoils in the relative thickness range from 15% to 30%. Three airfoils, Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21, and Risoe-A1-24 were tested in a wind tunnel. The verification consisted of both static and dynamic measurements. Here, the static results are presented for a Reynolds number of 1.6x10{sup 6} for the following airfoil configurations: smooth surface (all three airfoils) and Risoe-A1-24 mounted with leading edge roughness, vortex generators, and Gurney-flaps, respectively. All three airfoils have constant lift curve slope and almost constant drag coefficient until the maximum lift coefficient of about 1.4 is reached. The experimental results are compared with corresponding computational from the general purpose flow solver, EllipSys2D, showing good agreement. (au)

  17. The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-09-01

    A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

  18. Effect of camber and thickness on the aerodynamic properties of an airfoil in ground proximity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad, M.; Kazemi, F. J.

    2001-01-01

    A linear vortex panel method is extended to include the effect of ground proximity on the aerodynamic properties of two dimensional airfoils. The image method is used to model the ground effect. According to the results, lift coefficient of an airfoil may increase or decrease in ground effect based on a combinative effect of its camber, thickness, angle of attack and ground clearance. Airfoils with different section parameters are analysed and their relative effectiveness are compared

  19. S833, S834, and S835 Airfoils: November 2001--November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S833, S834, and S835, for 1 - 3-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  20. S830, S831, and S832 Airfoils: November 2001-November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S830, S831, and S832, for 40 - 50-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  1. Holography and LDV techniques, their status and use in airfoil research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The measurement capabilities of laser velocimetry and holographic interferometry in transonic airfoil testing were demonstrated. Presented are representative results obtained with these two nonintrusive techniques on a 15.24 cm chord airfoil section. These results include the density field about the airfoil, flow angles in the inviscid flow and viscous flow properties including the turbulent Reynolds stresses. The accuracies of the density fields obtained by interferometry were verified from comparisons with surface pressure and laser velocimeter measurements.

  2. Some practical issues in the computational design of airfoils for the helicopter main rotor blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Very important requirement for the helicopter rotor airfoils is zero, or nearly zero moment coefficient about the aerodynamic center. Unlike the old technologies used for metal blades, modern production involving application of plastic composites has imposed the necessity of adding a flat tab extension to the blade trailing edge, thus changing the original airfoil shape. Using computer program TRANPRO, the author has developed and verified an algorithm for numerical analysis in this design stage, applied it on asymmetrical reflex camber airfoils, determined the influence of angular tab positioning on the moment coefficient value and redesigned some existing airfoils to include properly positioned tabs that satisfy very low moment coefficient requirement. .

  3. Airfoil lance apparatus for homogeneous humidification and sorbent dispersion in a gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Robert B.; Yagiela, Anthony S.

    1990-12-25

    An apparatus for spraying an atomized mixture into a gas stream comprises a stream line airfoil member having a large radius leading edge and a small radius trailing edge. A nozzle assembly pierces the trailing edge of the airfoil member and is concentrically surrounded by a nacelle which directs shielding gas from the interior of the airfoil member around the nozzle assembly. Flowable medium to be atomized and atomizing gas for atomizing the medium are supplied in concentric conduits to the nozzle. A plurality of nozzles each surrounded by a nacelle are spaced along the trailing edge of the airfoil member.

  4. Application of unsteady airfoil theory to rotary wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kvaternik, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A clarification is presented on recent work concerning the application of unsteady airfoil theory to rotary wings. The application of this theory may be seen as consisting of four steps: (1) the selection of an appropriate unsteady airfoil theory; (2) the resolution of that velocity which is the resultant of aerodynamic and dynamic velocities at a point on the elastic axis into radial, tangential and perpendicular components, and the angular velocity of a blade section about the deformed axis; (3) the expression of lift and pitching moments in terms of the three components; and (4) the derivation of explicit expressions for the components in terms of flight velocity, induced flow, rotor rotational speed, blade motion variables, etc.

  5. A strong viscous–inviscid interaction model for rotating airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three dimensional (3D), steady and unsteady, viscous–inviscid interactive codes capable of predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbine airfoils are presented. The model is based on a viscous–inviscid interaction technique using strong coupling between...... a boundary-layer trip or computed using an en envelope transition method. Validation of the incompressible 2D version of the code is carried out against measurements and other numerical codes for different airfoil geometries at various Reynolds numbers, ranging from 0.9 ⋅ 106 to 8.2 ⋅ 106. In the quasi-3D...... version, a parametric study on rotational effects induced by the Coriolis and centrifugal forces in the boundary-layer equations shows that the effects of rotation are to decrease the growth of the boundary-layer and delay the onset of separation, hence increasing the lift coefficient slightly while...

  6. Aerodynamic coefficients in generalized unsteady thin airfoil theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    Two cases are considered: (1) rigid body motion of an airfoil-flap combination consisting of vertical translation of given amplitude, rotation of given amplitude about a specified axis, and rotation of given amplitude of the control surface alone about its hinge; the upwash for this problem is defined mathematically; and (2) sinusoidal gust of given amplitude and wave number, for which the upwash is defined mathematically. Simple universal formulas are presented for the most important aerodynamic coefficients in unsteady thin airfoil theory. The lift and moment induced by a generalized gust are evaluated explicitly in terms of the gust wavelength. Similarly, in the control surface problem, the lift, moment, and hinge moments are given as explicit algebraic functions of hinge location. These results can be used together with any of the standard numerical inversion routines for the elementary loads (pitch and heave).

  7. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Christian

    2009-01-01

    , lead-lag, pitch, trailing-edge flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model, which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered a crossover between the work of Gaunaa......The present work contains an extension of the Beddoes-Leishman-type dynamic stall model. In this work, a deformable trailing-edge flap has been added to the dynamic stall model. The model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on an airfoil section undergoing arbitrary motion in heave...... for the attached flow region and Hansen et al. The model is compared qualitatively to wind tunnel measurements of a Riso/ B1-18 blade section equipped with deformable trailing-edge flap devices in the form of piezoelectric devices. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  8. Drag Reduction of an Airfoil Using Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chiyu; Sun, Anzhu; Marcus, Philip

    2017-11-01

    We reduced the drag of a 2D airfoil by starting with a NACA-0012 airfoil and used deep learning methods. We created a database which consists of simulations of 2D external flow over randomly generated shapes. We then developed a machine learning framework for external flow field inference given input shapes. Past work which utilized machine learning in Computational Fluid Dynamics focused on estimations of specific flow parameters, but this work is novel in the inference of entire flow fields. We further showed that learned flow patterns are transferable to cases that share certain similarities. This study illustrates the prospects of deeper integration of data-based modeling into current CFD simulation frameworks for faster flow inference and more accurate flow modeling.

  9. Numerical simulation of a wind turbine airfoil : part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdenee, D.; Minea, I.S.; Tardiff d' Hamonville, T.; Illinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de Recherche en Energie Eolienne

    2010-07-01

    This 2-part study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to identify and model the aerodynamic and aeroelastic phenomena around wind turbine blades. The aim of the study was to better understand the mechanisms surrounding unsteady flow-structure interactions. Aerodynamic and elastic models were coupled using an ANSYS multi-domain program to simulate the aeroelastic divergence of a typical section airfoil with a single rotational structural degree of freedom. Solvers were used to realize a sequence of multi-domain time steps and coupling iterations between time steps. Each element of the airfoil was divided into interpolation faces which were then transformed into 2-D polygons. An intersection process was used to create a large number of control surfaces that were used to study interactions between the structural and fluid domains. The calculations were used to determine the divergence speed and Eigen modes of vibration. A literature review was also included. 19 refs., 7 figs.

  10. A Dynamic Stall Model for Airfoils with Deformable Trailing Edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Peter Bjoern; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2007-01-01

    The present work contains an extension of the Beddoes-Leishman (B-L) type dynamic stall model, as described by Hansen et al. In this work a Deformable Trailing Edge Geometry (DTEG) has been added to the dynamic stall model. The model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on an airfoil section undergoing arbitrary motion in heave, lead-lag, pitch, Trailing Edge (TE) flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model of Gaunaa, which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered a crossover between the work of Gaunaa for the attached flow region and Hansen et al. The model will be compared to wind tunnel measurements from Velux described by Bak et al

  11. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  12. Experimental investigation of the flowfield of an oscillating airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The flowfield of an airfoil oscillated periodically over a wide range of reduced frequencies, 0 less than or = k less than or = 1.6 is studied experimentally at chord Reynolds numbers of R sub c = 22,000 and 44,000. The NACA0012 airfoil is pitched sinusoidally about one quarter chord between angles of attack (alpha) of 5 and 25 degrees. Detailed flow visualization and phase averaged vorticity measurements are carried out for k = 0.2 to document the evolution and the shedding of the dynamic stall vortex (DSV). In addition to the DSV, an intense vortex of opposite sign originates from the trailing edge just when the DSV is shed. After being shed into the wake, the two together take the shape of a large 'mushroom' while being convected away from the airfoil. The unsteady circulation around the airfoil and, therefore, the time varying component of the lift is estimated in a novel way from the shed vorticity flux and is found to be in good agreement with the lift variation reported by others. The delay in the shedding of the DSV with increasing k, as observed by previous researchers, is documented for the full range of k. The DSV, for example, is shed nearly at the maximum alpha of 25 degrees at k = 0.2, but is shed at the minimum alpha of 5 degrees at k = 0.8. At low k, the flowfield appears quasi-steady and the bluff body shedding corresponding to the maximum alpha (25 degrees) dominates the unsteady fluctuations in the wake.

  13. Computation of subsonic flow around airfoil systems with multiple separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method for computing the subsonic flow around multi-element airfoil systems was developed, allowing for flow separation at one or more elements. Besides multiple rear separation also sort bubbles on the upper surface and cove bubbles can approximately be taken into account. Also, compressibility effects for pure subsonic flow are approximately accounted for. After presentation the method is applied to several examples and improved in some details. Finally, the present limitations and desirable extensions are discussed.

  14. Trailing Edge Noise Model Validation and Application to Airfoil Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, an existing trailing edge noise model is validated by comparing with airfoil surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound pressure levels measured in three different experiments. The agreement is satisfactory in one case but poor in two other cases...... across the boundary layer near the trailing edge and to a lesser extent by a smaller boundary layer displacement thickness. ©2010 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  15. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  16. Elementary Statistics Tables

    CERN Document Server

    Neave, Henry R

    2012-01-01

    This book, designed for students taking a basic introductory course in statistical analysis, is far more than just a book of tables. Each table is accompanied by a careful but concise explanation and useful worked examples. Requiring little mathematical background, Elementary Statistics Tables is thus not just a reference book but a positive and user-friendly teaching and learning aid. The new edition contains a new and comprehensive "teach-yourself" section on a simple but powerful approach, now well-known in parts of industry but less so in academia, to analysing and interpreting process dat

  17. Low-Reynolds number compressible flow around a triangular airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Phillip; Taira, Kunihiko; Suwa, Tetsuya; Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    We report on the combined numerical and experimental effort to analyze the nonlinear aerodynamics of a triangular airfoil in low-Reynolds number compressible flow that is representative of wings on future Martian air vehicles. The flow field around this airfoil is examined for a wide range of angles of attack and Mach numbers with three-dimensional direct numerical simulations at Re = 3000 . Companion experiments are conducted in a unique Martian wind tunnel that is placed in a vacuum chamber to simulate the Martian atmosphere. Computational findings are compared with pressure sensitive paint and direct force measurements and are found to be in agreement. The separated flow from the leading edge is found to form a large leading-edge vortex that sits directly above the apex of the airfoil and provides enhanced lift at post stall angles of attack. For higher subsonic flows, the vortical structures elongate in the streamwise direction resulting in reduced lift enhancement. We also observe that the onset of spanwise instability for higher angles of attack is delayed at lower Mach numbers. Currently at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki.

  18. Simulasi Numerik Dynamic Stall Pada Airfoil Yang Berosilasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih S.T.A. Bangga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan analisa pada sudu helikopter, kompresor, kincir angin dan struktur streamline lainya yang beroperasi pada angle of attack yang tinggi dan melibatkan instationary effects yang disebut dynamic stall menjadi semakin penting. Fenomena ini ditandai dengan naiknya dynamic lift melewati static lift maksimum pada critical static stall angle, vortex yang terbentuk pada leading edge mengakibatkan naiknya suction contribution yang kemudian terkonveksi sepanjang permukaan hingga mencapai trailling edge diikuti terbentuknya trailling edge vortex yang menunjukkan terjadinya lift stall. Fenomena ini sangat berbahaya terhadap struktur airfoil itu sendiri. Secara umum, beban fatique yang ditimbulkan oleh adanya efek histerisis karena fluktuasi gaya lift akibat induksi vibrasi lebih besar dibandingkan kondisi statis. Simulasi numerik dilakukan secara 2D dengan menggunakan profil Boeing-Vertol V23010-1.58 pada α0 = 14.92°. Standard-kω dan SST-kω digunakan sebagai URANS turbulence modelling. Model osilasi dari airfoil disusun dalam suatu user defined function (UDF. Gerakan meshing beserta airfoil diakomodasi dengan menggunakan dynamic mesh approach. Simulasi numerik menunjukkan bahwa, model SST-kω menunjukkan performa yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan Standard-kω. Fenomena travelling vortex yang terjadi mampu ditangkap dengan baik, meski pada angle of attack yang tinggi URANS turbulence model gagal memprediksikan fenomena yang terjadi karena dominasi efek 3D.

  19. Skin design studies for variable camber morphing airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Farhan; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies the desirable attributes of a flexible skin of a morphing wing. The study is conducted using airfoil camber morphing as an example. The ideal flex-skin would be highly anisotropic, having a low in-plane axial stiffness but a high out-of-plane flexural stiffness. Reduced skin axial stiffness allows morphing at low actuation cost. However, for some substructure and actuation designs, a lower limit on the skin's in-plane axial stiffness may be required to prevent unacceptable global camber deformation under aerodynamic loads. High flexural stiffness prevents local deformation of skin sections between supports due to aerodynamic pressure loads, and avoids buckling of skin sections under compression as the airfoil cambers under actuation force. For the camber morphing application the strain levels in the flex-skin are not expected to exceed around 2%. If the axial stiffness of the flex-skin is reduced significantly, it may be necessary to consider aerodynamic stiffness (negligible vis-à-vis structural stiffness for classical airfoils) to accurately calculate deformation under loading. The approach followed in the study can be used to identify specifications for the skin and then reverse engineer and design highly anisotropic composite skins that meet the specifications

  20. Empirical yield tables for Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn; Joan M. Stelman

    1984-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1980 Forest Survey of Michigan and presents ways the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Michigan's four Forest Survey Units, 14 forest types, and 5 site-index classes.

  1. Empirical yield tables for Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn; Joan M. Stelman

    1989-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1983 Forest Survey of Wisconsin and presents ways the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Wisconsin`s five Forest Survey Units and 14 forest types.

  2. Permit.LOA table

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table includes the effective dates by vessel and permit number for each issued letter of authorization (LOA) by the Permit Office (APSD)

  3. VMS forms Output Tables

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These output tables contain parsed and format validated data from the various VMS forms that are sent from any given vessel, while at sea, from the VMS devices on...

  4. The Periodic Table CD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  5. Setting the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  6. Body Mass Index Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Body Mass Index Table 1 for BMI greater than 35, go ... Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health Department of ...

  7. Decision table languages and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Metzner, John R

    1977-01-01

    ACM Monograph Series: Decision Table Languages and Systems focuses on linguistic examination of decision tables and survey of the features of existing decision table languages and systems. The book first offers information on semiotics, programming language features, and generalization. Discussions focus on semantic broadening, outer language enrichments, generalization of syntax, limitations, implementation improvements, syntactic and semantic features, decision table syntax, semantics of decision table languages, and decision table programming languages. The text then elaborates on design im

  8. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu≁oz, A.; Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations.

  9. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, A; Méndez, B; Munduate, X

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations. (paper)

  10. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R K

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved

  11. SHAKING TABLE TEST AND EFFECTIVE STRESS ANALYSIS ON SEISMIC PERFORMANCE WITH SEISMIC ISOLATION RUBBER TO THE INTERMEDIATE PART OF PILE FOUNDATION IN LIQUEFACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kunihiko; Otsuka, Hisanori; Mitou, Masaaki

    The pile foundation is heavily damaged at the boundary division of the ground types, liquefied ground and non-liquefied ground, during an earthquake and there is a possibility of the collapse of the piles. In this study, we conduct a shaking table test and effective stress analysis of the influence of soil liquefaction and the seismic inertial force exerted on the pile foundation. When the intermediate part of the pile, there is at the boundary division, is subjected to section force, this part increases in size as compared to the pile head in certain instances. Further, we develop a seismic resistance method for a pile foundation in liquefaction using seismic isolation rubber and it is shown the middle part seismic isolation system is very effective.

  12. Boundary-Layer Separation Control under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    transition. Gad-el-Hak provides a review of various techniques for flow control in general and Volino discusses recent studies on separation control under low-pressure-turbine conditions utilizing passive as well as active devices. As pointed out by Volino, passive devices optimized for separation control at low Reynolds numbers tend to increase losses at high Reynolds numbers, Active devices have the attractive feature that they can be utilized only in operational regimes where they are needed and when turned off would not affect the flow. The focus in the present paper is an experimental Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) Gee-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface- flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control. of active separation control using glow discharge plasma actuators.

  13. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the LS(1)-0417MOD airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculations of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation caused by surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. An LS(l)-0417MOD airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used, {plus_minus} 5.5%{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions foil model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  14. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S815 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss Ramsay, R.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics due to wind shear when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the calculation of rotor performance and loads. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are cause by the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can be used to validate analytical computer codes. A S815 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 x 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 x 5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, as well as with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers used for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20{degree} to +40{degree}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {+-}5.5{degree} and {+-}10{degree}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degree}, 14{degree}, and 20{degree}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means that the model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord.

  15. Steady and Unsteady Analysis of NACA 0018 Airfoil in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowski, Krzysztof; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Maronski, Ryszard

    2018-01-01

    Numerical results are presented for aerodynamic unsteady and steady airfoil characteristtcs of the NACA 0018 airfoil of a two-dimensional vertical-axis wind turbine. A geometrical model of the Darrieus-type wind turbine and the rotor operating parameters used for nurnerieal simulation are taken...

  16. Airfoil gust response and the sound produced by airifoil-vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contributes to the understanding of the noise generation process of an airfoil encountering an unsteady upwash. By using a fast Fourier transform together with accurate airfoil response functions, the lift-time waveform for an airfoil encountering a delta function gust (the indicial function) is calculated for a flat plate airfoil in a compressible flow. This shows the interesting property that the lift is constant until the generated acoustic wave reaches the trailing edge. Expressions are given for the magnitude of this constant and for the pressure distribution on the airfoil during this time interval. The case of an airfoil cutting through a line vortex is also analyzed. The pressure-time waveform in the far field is closely related to the left-time waveform for the above problem of an airfoil entering a delta function gust. The effects of varying the relevant parameters in the problem are studied, including the observed position, the core diameter of the vortex, the vortex orientation and the airfoil span. The far field sound varies significantly with observer position, illustrating the importance of non-compactness effects. Increasing the viscous core diameter tends to smooth the pressure-time waveform. For small viscous core radius and infinite span, changing the vortex orientation changes only the amplitude of the pressure-time waveform, and not the shape.

  17. Design and Experimental Validation of Thick Airfoils for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrgovan, Iva; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, two new airfoils with thickness to chord ratios of 30 and 36 % are presented, which were designed with an objective of good aerodynamic and structural features. Airfoil design is based on a direct method using shape perturbation function. The optimization algorithm is coupled wit...

  18. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  19. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30...

  20. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.