WorldWideScience

Sample records for aircraft by size

  1. Optimal Sizing of a Photovoltaic-Hydrogen Power System for HALE Aircraft by means of Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade there has been a growing interest in the research of feasibility to use high altitude long endurance (HALE aircrafts in order to provide mobile communications. The use of HALEs for telecommunication networks has the potential to deliver a wide range of communication services (from high-quality voice to high-definition videos, as well as high-data-rate wireless channels cost effectively. One of the main challenges of this technology is to design its power supply system, which must provide the enough energy for long time flights in a reliable way. In this paper a photovoltaic/hydrogen system is proposed as power system for a HALE aircraft due its high power density characteristic. In order to obtain the optimal sizing for photovoltaic/hydrogen system a particle swarm optimizer (PSO is used. As a case study, theoretical design of the photovoltaic/hydrogen power system for three different HALE aircrafts located at 18° latitude is presented. At this latitude, the range of solar radiation intensity was from 310 to 450 Wh/sq·m/day. The results obtained show that the photovoltaic/hydrogen systems calculated by PSO can operate during one year with efficacies ranging between 45.82% and 47.81%. The obtained sizing result ensures that the photovoltaic/hydrogen system supplies adequate energy for HALE aircrafts.

  2. Choice of Aircraft Size - Explanations and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Givoni, Moshe; Rietveld, Piet

    2006-01-01

    To keep load factors high while offering high frequency service, airlines tend to reduce the size of the aircraft they use. At many of the world’s largest airports there are fewer than 100 passengers per air transport movement, although congestion and delays are growing. Furthermore, demand for air transport is predicted to continue growing but aircraft size is not. This paper aims to investigate and explain this phenomenon, the choice of relatively small aircraft. It seems that this choice i...

  3. Study on Size Distributions of Airborne Particles by Aircraft Observation in Spring over Eastern Coastal Areas of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LIU Hongjie; YUE Xin; LI Hong; CHEN Jianhua; TANG Dagang

    2005-01-01

    The authors studied the size distributions of particles at an altitude of 2000 m by aircraft observation over eastern costal areas of China from Zhuhai, Guangdong to Dalian, Liaoning (0.47-30 μm, 57 channels,including number concentration distribution, surface area concentration distribution and mass concentration distribution). In these cities, the average daily concentrations of PM10 are very high. They are among the most heavily polluted cities in China. The main pollution sources are anthropogenic activities such as wood, coal and oil burning. The observed size distributions show a broad spectrum and unique multi-peak characteristics, indicating no significant impacts of individual sources from urban areas. These results are far different from the distribution type at ground level. It may reflect the comprehensive effect of the regional pollution characteristics. Monitoring results over big cities could to some extent reflect their pollution characteristics.

  4. Aircraft studies of size-dependent aerosol sampling through inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J. N.; Clarke, A. D.; Ferry, G.; Pueschel, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Representative measurement of aerosol from aircraft-aspirated systems requires special efforts in order to maintain near isokinetic sampling conditions, estimate aerosol losses in the sample system, and obtain a measurement of sufficient duration to be statistically significant for all sizes of interest. This last point is especially critical for aircraft measurements which typically require fast response times while sampling in clean remote regions. This paper presents size-resolved tests, intercomparisons, and analysis of aerosol inlet performance as determined by a custom laser optical particle counter. Measurements discussed here took place during the Global Backscatter Experiment (1988-1989) and the Central Pacific Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (1988). System configurations are discussed including (1) nozzle design and performance, (2) system transmission efficiency, (3) nonadiabatic effects in the sample line and its effect on the sample-line relative humidity, and (4) the use and calibration of a virtual impactor.

  5. Mission Analysis and Aircraft Sizing of a Hybrid-Electric Regional Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antcliff, Kevin R.; Guynn, Mark D.; Marien, Ty V.; Wells, Douglas P.; Schneider, Steven J.; Tong, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore advanced airframe and propulsion technologies for a small regional transport aircraft concept (approximately 50 passengers), with the goal of creating a conceptual design that delivers significant cost and performance advantages over current aircraft in that class. In turn, this could encourage airlines to open up new markets, reestablish service at smaller airports, and increase mobility and connectivity for all passengers. To meet these study goals, hybrid-electric propulsion was analyzed as the primary enabling technology. The advanced regional aircraft is analyzed with four levels of electrification, 0 percent electric with 100 percent conventional, 25 percent electric with 75 percent conventional, 50 percent electric with 50 percent conventional, and 75 percent electric with 25 percent conventional for comparison purposes. Engine models were developed to represent projected future turboprop engine performance with advanced technology and estimates of the engine weights and flowpath dimensions were developed. A low-order multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) environment was created that could capture the unique features of parallel hybrid-electric aircraft. It is determined that at the size and range of the advanced turboprop: The battery specific energy must be 750 watt-hours per kilogram or greater for the total energy to be less than for a conventional aircraft. A hybrid vehicle would likely not be economically feasible with a battery specific energy of 500 or 750 watt-hours per kilogram based on the higher gross weight, operating empty weight, and energy costs compared to a conventional turboprop. The battery specific energy would need to reach 1000 watt-hours per kilogram by 2030 to make the electrification of its propulsion an economically feasible option. A shorter range and/or an altered propulsion-airframe integration could provide more favorable results.

  6. Simultaneous calculation of aircraft design loads and structural member sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.; Mccullers, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A design process which accounts for the interaction between aerodynamic loads and changes in member sizes during sizing of aircraft structures is described. A simultaneous iteration procedure is used wherein both design loads and member sizes are updated during each cycle yielding converged, compatible loads and member sizes. A description is also given of a system of programs which incorporates this process using lifting surface theory to calculate aerodynamic pressure distributions, using a finite-element method for structural analysis, and using a fully stressed design technique to size structural members. This system is tailored to perform the entire process with computational efficiency in a single computer run so that it can be used effectively during preliminary design. Selected results, considering maneuver, taxi, and fatigue design conditions, are presented to illustrate convergence characteristics of this iterative procedure.

  7. Detection and sizing of short fatigue cracks in a simulated aircraft structure of aluminum thin plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Jung Chan; Kwon, Oh Yang [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-15

    Since the fatigue damage usually occurs around the rivet holes in aircraft structures, the detection and sizing of short fatigue cracks emanating from rivet holes is extremely important. The initiation of fatigue cracks in a simulated aircraft structures with a series of rivet holes was detected by acoustic emission(AE), and the crack length was determined by the surface acoustic wave(SAW) technique. AE events increased intermittently with the initiation and growth of short cracks to form a stepwise incremental curve of cumulative AE events. with the SAW technique employed, the crack sizing in the range of 1-8 mm long was possible but it was impossible in the range shorter than 1 mm.

  8. An optical particle size spectrometer for aircraft-borne measurements in IAGOS-CARIBIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Markus; Weigelt, Andreas; Assmann, Denise; Pfeifer, Sascha; Muller, Thomas; Conrath, Thomas; Voigtlander, Jens; Heintzenberg, Jost; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Martinsson, Bengt G.; Deshler, Terry; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The particle number size distribution is an important parameter to characterize the atmospheric aerosol and its influence on the Earth's climate. Here we describe a new optical particle size spectrometer (OPSS) for measurements of the accumulation mode particle number size distribution in the tropopause region on board a passenger aircraft (IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory: In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System - Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container). A modified KS93 particle sensor from RION Co., Ltd., together with a new airflow system and a dedicated data acquisition system, is the key component of the CARIBIC OPSS. The instrument records individual particle pulse signal curves in the particle size range 130-1110 nm diameter (for a particle refractive index of 1.47-i0.006) together with a time stamp and thus allows the post-flight choice of the time resolution and the size distribution bin width. The CARIBIC OPSS has a 50 % particle detection diameter of 152 nm and a maximum asymptotic counting efficiency of 98 %. The instrument's measurement performance shows no pressure dependency and no particle coincidence for free tropospheric conditions. The size response function of the CARIBIC OPSS was obtained by a polystyrene latex calibration in combination with model calculations. Particle number size distributions measured with the new OPSS in the lowermost stratosphere agreed within a factor of 2 in concentration with balloon-borne measurements over western North America. Since June 2010 the CARIBIC OPSS is deployed once per month in the IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory.

  9. Vehicle Design Evaluation Program (VDEP). A computer program for weight sizing, economic, performance and mission analysis of fuel-conservative aircraft, multibodied aircraft and large cargo aircraft using both JP and alternative fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, B. H.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center vehicle design evaluation program (VDEP-2) was expanded by (1) incorporating into the program a capability to conduct preliminary design studies on subsonic commercial transport type aircraft using both JP and such alternate fuels as hydrogen and methane;(2) incorporating an aircraft detailed mission and performance analysis capability; and (3) developing and incorporating an external loads analysis capability. The resulting computer program (VDEP-3) provides a preliminary design tool that enables the user to perform integrated sizing, structural analysis, and cost studies on subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Both versions of the VDEP-3 Program which are designated preliminary Analysis VDEP-3 and detailed Analysis VDEP utilize the same vehicle sizing subprogram which includes a detailed mission analysis capability, as well as a geometry and weight analysis for multibodied configurations.

  10. Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports – Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Cherie; Morrell, Peter

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing trend of charging for externalities and the aim of encouraging the sustainable development of the air transport industry, there is a need to evaluate the social costs of these undesirable side effects, mainly aircraft noise and engine emissions, for different airports. The aircraft noise and engine emissions social costs are calculated in monetary terms for five different sized airports, ranging from hub airports to small regional airports. The number of residences within ...

  11. Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  12. Inhomogeneity of the grain size of aircraft engine turbine polycrystalline blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chmiela

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the behaviour of inhomogeneous materials with a complex microstructure requires taking into account the inhomogeneity of the grain size, as it is the basis for the process of designing and modelling effective behaviours. Therefore, the functional description of the inhomogeneity is becoming an important issue. The paper presents an analytical approach to the grain size inhomogeneity, based on the derivative of a logarithmic-logistic function. The solution applied enabled an effective evaluation of the inhomogeneity of two macrostructures of aircraft engine turbine blades, characterized by a high degree of diversity in the grain size. For the investigated single-modal and bimodal grain size distributions on a perpendicular projection and for grains with a non-planar surface, we identified the parameters that describe the degree of inhomogeneity of the constituents of weight distributions and we also derived a formula describing the overall degree of inhomogeneity of bimodal distributions. The solution presented in the paper is of a general nature and it can be used to describe the degree of inhomogeneity of multi-modal distributions. All the calculations were performed using the Mathematica® package.

  13. Ultrafine particle size as a tracer for aircraft turbine emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Erin A.; Gould, Timothy; Hartin, Kris; Fruin, Scott A.; Simpson, Christopher D.; Yost, Michael G.; Larson, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafine particle number (UFPN) and size distributions, black carbon, and nitrogen dioxide concentrations were measured downwind of two of the busiest airports in the world, Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL - Atlanta, GA) using a mobile monitoring platform. Transects were located between 5 km and 10 km from the ATL and LAX airports. In addition, measurements were taken at 43 additional urban neighborhood locations in each city and on freeways. We found a 3-5 fold increase in UFPN concentrations in transects under the landing approach path to both airports relative to surrounding urban areas with similar ground traffic characteristics. The latter UFPN concentrations measured were distinct in size distributional properties from both freeways and across urban neighborhoods, clearly indicating different sources. Elevated concentrations of Black Carbon (BC) and NO2 were also observed on airport transects, and the corresponding pattern of elevated BC was consistent with the observed excess UFPN concentrations relative to other urban locations.

  14. Particle size independent spectrometric determination of wear metals in aircraft lubricating oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the particle size independent determination of Ni, Fe, Mg, Cu, Al, Sn, Mo, and Ti in synthetic ester lubricating oils by spectrometric analysis is presented. Partial dissolution of Cr, Si, Pb, and Ag also occurs. Used ester lubricating oils as well as samples prepared with -325 mesh (44 μm) or -200 mesh (74 μm) metal powders were reacted with a small amount of hydrofluoric acid and aqua regia at 650C for 45 min with ultrasonic agitation. The reacted mixture was then diluted with a methyl isobutyl ketone and isopropyl alcohol mixture and analyzed spectrometrically. The recoveries for metal powder suspensions of Ni, Fe, Mg, Cu, Al, Sn, Mo, and Ti ranged from 97 to 103% and the relative standard deviation ranged from 4 to 10%. In addition to the metal powder suspensions, over 200 aircraft oil samples were analyzed. The method is much faster and more convenient than previously reported particle size independent methods using ashing techniques

  15. Radiative forcing from particle emissions by future supersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we focus on the direct radiative forcing (RF of black carbon (BC and sulphuric acid particles emitted by future supersonic aircraft, as well as on the ozone RF due to changes produced by emissions of both gas species (NOx, H2O and aerosol particles capable of affecting stratospheric ozone chemistry. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on the surface of sulphuric acid stratospheric particles (SSA-SAD are the main link between ozone chemistry and supersonic aircraft emissions of sulphur precursors (SO2 and particles (H2O-H2SO4. Photochemical O3 changes are compared from four independent 3-D atmosphere-chemistry models (ACMs, using as input the perturbation of SSA-SAD calculated in the University of L'Aquila model, which includes on-line a microphysics code for aerosol formation and growth. The ACMs in this study use aircraft emission scenarios for the year 2050 developed by AIRBUS as a part of the EU project SCENIC, assessing options for fleet size, engine technology (NOx emission index, Mach number, range and cruising altitude. From our baseline modelling simulation, the impact of supersonic aircraft on sulphuric acid aerosol and BC mass burdens is 53 and 1.5 μg/m2, respectively, with a direct RF of −11.4 and 4.6 mW/m2 (net RF=−6.8 mW/m2. This paper discusses the similarities and differences amongst the participating models in terms of O3 precursors changes due to aircraft emissions (NOx, HOx,Clx,Brx and stratospheric ozone sensitivity to them. In the baseline case, the calculated global ozone change is −0.4±0.3 DU, with a net radiative forcing (IR+UV of −2.5±2 mW/m2. The fraction of this O3-RF attributable to SSA-SAD changes is, however, highly variable among the models, depending on the NOx removal efficiency from

  16. Radiative forcing from particle emissions by future supersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitari

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we focus on the direct radiative forcing (RF of black carbon (BC and sulphuric acid particles emitted by future supersonic aircraft, as well as on the ozone RF due to changes produced by emissions of both gas species (NOx, H2O and aerosol particles capable of affecting stratospheric ozone chemistry. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on the surface of sulphuric acid stratospheric particles (SSA-SAD are the main link between ozone chemistry and supersonic aircraft emissions of sulphur precursors (SO2 and particles (H2O–H2SO4. Photochemical O3 changes are compared from four independent 3-D atmosphere-chemistry models (ACMs, using as input the perturbation of SSA-SAD calculated in the University of L'Aquila model, which includes on-line a microphysics code for aerosol formation and growth. The ACMs in this study use aircraft emission scenarios for the year 2050 developed by AIRBUS as a part of the EU project SCENIC, assessing options for fleet size, engine technology (NOx emission index, Mach number, range and cruising altitude. From our baseline modeling simulation, the impact of supersonic aircraft on sulphuric acid aerosol and BC mass burdens is 53 and 1.5 μg/m2, respectively, with a direct RF of −11.4 and 4.6 mW/m2 (net RF=−6.8 mW/m2. This paper discusses the similarities and differences amongst the participating models in terms of changes to O3 precursors due to aircraft emissions (NOx, HOx,Clx,Brx and the stratospheric ozone sensitivity to them. In the baseline case, the calculated global ozone change is −0.4 ±0.3 DU, with a net radiative forcing (IR+UV of −2.5± 2 mW/m2. The fraction of this O3-RF attributable to SSA-SAD changes is, however, highly variable among the models, depending on the NOx removal

  17. Monitoring Aircraft Motion at Airports by LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C.; Jozkow, G.; Koppanyi, Z.; Young, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.

    2016-06-01

    Improving sensor performance, combined with better affordability, provides better object space observability, resulting in new applications. Remote sensing systems are primarily concerned with acquiring data of the static components of our environment, such as the topographic surface of the earth, transportation infrastructure, city models, etc. Observing the dynamic component of the object space is still rather rare in the geospatial application field; vehicle extraction and traffic flow monitoring are a few examples of using remote sensing to detect and model moving objects. Deploying a network of inexpensive LiDAR sensors along taxiways and runways can provide both geometrically and temporally rich geospatial data that aircraft body can be extracted from the point cloud, and then, based on consecutive point clouds motion parameters can be estimated. Acquiring accurate aircraft trajectory data is essential to improve aviation safety at airports. This paper reports about the initial experiences obtained by using a network of four Velodyne VLP- 16 sensors to acquire data along a runway segment.

  18. Exploratory flight investigation of aircraft response to the wing vortex wake generated by the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R. A.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1975-01-01

    A brief exploratory flight program was conducted at Ames Research Center to investigate the vortex wake hazard of a powered-lift STOL aircraft. The study was made by flying an instrumented Cessna 210 aircraft into the wake of the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft at separation distances from 1 to 4 n.mi. Characteristics of the wake were evaluated in terms of the magnitude of the upset of the probing aircraft. Results indicated that within 1 n.mi. separation the wake could cause rolling moments in excess of roll control power and yawing moments equivalent to rudder control power of the probe aircraft. Subjective evaluations by the pilots of the Cessna 210 aircraft, supported by response measurements, indicated that the upset caused by the wake of the STOL aircraft was comparable to that of a DC-9 in the landing configuration.

  19. Air-sampling inlet contamination by aircraft emissions on the NASA CV-990 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, E. P.; Vedder, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the contamination of air sampling inlets by aircraft emissions from the NASA CV-990 research aircraft are presented. This four-engine jet aircraft is a NASA facility used for many different atmospheric and meteorological experiments, as well as for developing spacecraft instrumentation for remote measurements. Our investigations were performed to provide information on which to base the selection of sampling locations for a series of multi-instrument missions for measuring tropospheric trace gases. The major source of contamination is the exhaust from the jet engines, which generate many of the same gases that are of interest in atmospheric chemistry, as well as other gases that may interfere with sampling measurements. The engine exhaust contains these gases in mixing ratios many orders of magnitude greater than those that occur in the clean atmosphere which the missions seek to quantify. Pressurized samples of air were collected simultaneously from a scoop located forward of the engines to represent clean air and from other multiport scoops at various aft positions on the aircraft. The air samples were analyzed in the laboratory by gas chromatography for carbon monoxide, an abundant combustion by-product. Data are presented for various scoop locations under various flight conditions.

  20. Advancement of proprotor technology. Task 1: Design study summary. [aerodynamic concept of minimum size tilt proprotor research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    A tilt-proprotor proof-of-concept aircraft design study has been conducted. The results are presented. The ojective of the contract is to advance the state of proprotor technology through design studies and full-scale wind-tunnel tests. The specific objective is to conduct preliminary design studies to define a minimum-size tilt-proprotor research aircraft that can perform proof-of-concept flight research. The aircraft that results from these studies is a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft with 25-foot, three-bladed tilt proprotors mounted on pylons at the wingtips. Each pylon houses a Pratt and Whitney PT6C-40 engine with a takeoff rating of 1150 horsepower. Empty weight is estimated at 6876 pounds. The normal gross weight is 9500 pounds, and the maximum gross weight is 12,400 pounds.

  1. Modern trends of aircraft fly-by-wire systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. С. Юцкевич

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Specifics of civil aviation modern transport aircraft fly-by-wire control systems are described. A comparison of the systems-level hardware and software, expressed through modes of guidance, provision of aircraft Airbus A-320, Boeing B-777, Tupolev Tu-214, Sukhoi Superjet SSJ-100 are carried out. The possibility of transition from mechanical control wiring to control through fly-by-wire system in the backup channel is shown.

  2. Near-field commercial aircraft contribution to nitrogen oxides by engine, aircraft type, and airline by individual plume sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, David C; Ropkins, Karl; Laxen, Duncan; Moorcroft, Stephen; Marner, Ben; Williams, Martin L

    2008-03-15

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations were measured in individual plumes from aircraft departing on the northern runway at Heathrow Airport in west London. Over a period of four weeks 5618 individual plumes were sampled by a chemiluminescence monitor located 180 m from the runway. Results were processed and matched with detailed aircraft movement and aircraft engine data using chromatographic techniques. Peak concentrations associated with 29 commonly used engines were calculated and found to have a good relationship with N0x emissions taken from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databank. However, it is found that engines with higher reported NOx emissions result in proportionately lower NOx concentrations than engines with lower emissions. We show that it is likely that aircraft operational factors such as takeoff weight and aircraftthrust setting have a measurable and important effect on concentrations of N0x. For example, NOx concentrations can differ by up to 41% for aircraft using the same airframe and engine type, while those due to the same engine type in different airframes can differ by 28%. These differences are as great as, if not greater than, the reported differences in NOx emissions between different engine manufacturers for engines used on the same airframe.

  3. A model study of the size and composition distribution of aerosols in an aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, A.A. [SRC `ECOLEN`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A two-dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model which includes water and sulphate aerosol formation represented by moments of the size and composition distribution function is used to calculate the effect of radial turbulent jet mixing on the aerosol size distribution and mean modal composition. (author) 6 refs.

  4. Impact Response Study on Covering Cap of Aircraft Big-Size Integral Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Jia, Senqing; Wang, Yi; Yue, Zhufeng

    2016-10-01

    In order to assess various design concepts and choose a kind of covering cap design scheme which can meet the requirements of airworthiness standard and ensure the safety of fuel tank. Using finite element software ANSYS/LS- DYNA, the impact process of covering cap of aircraft fuel tank by projectile were simulated, in which dynamical characteristics of simple single covering cap and gland double-layer covering cap impacted by titanium alloy projectile and rubber projectile were studied, as well as factor effects on simple single covering cap and gland double-layer covering cap under impact region, impact angle and impact energy were also studied. Though the comparison of critical damage velocity and element deleted number of the covering caps, it shows that the external covering cap has a good protection effect on internal covering cap. The regions close to boundary are vulnerable to appear impact damage with titanium alloy projectile while the regions close to center is vulnerable to occur damage with rubber projectile. Equivalent strain in covering cap is very little when impact angle is less than 15°. Element deleted number in covering cap reaches the maximum when impact angle is between 60°and 65°by titanium alloy projectile. While the bigger the impact angle and the more serious damage of the covering cap will be when rubber projectile impact composite covering cap. The energy needed for occurring damage on external covering cap and internal covering cap is less than and higher than that when single covering cap occur damage, respectively. The energy needed for complete breakdown of double-layer covering cap is much higher than that of single covering cap.

  5. Analytical study of interior noise control by fuselage design techniques on high-speed, propeller-driven aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, J. D.; Balena, F. J.; Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustical treatment mass penalties required to achieve an interior noise level of 80 dBA for high speed, fuel efficient propfan-powered aircraft are determined. The prediction method used is based on theory developed for the outer shell dynamics, and a modified approach for add-on noise control element performance. The present synthesis of these methods is supported by experimental data. Three different sized aircraft are studied, including a widebody, a narrowbody and a business sized aircraft. Noise control penalties are calculated for each aircraft for two kinds of noise control designs: add-on designs, where the outer wall structure cannot be changed, and advanced designs where the outer wall stiffness level and the materials usage can be altered. For the add-on designs, the mass penalties range from 1.7 to 2.4 percent of the takeoff gross weight (TOGW) of the various aircraft, similar to preliminary estimates. Results for advanced designs show significant reductions of the mass penalties. For the advanced aluminum designs the penalties are 1.5% of TOGW, and for an all composite aircraft the penalties range from 0.74 to 1.4% of TOGW.

  6. Reducing costs by reducing size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper discusses briefly the many factors, including capital cost, which have to be taken into account in determining whether a series of power stations based on a small nuclear plant can be competitive with a series based on traditional large unit sizes giving the guaranteed level of supply. The 320 MWe UK/US Safe Integral Reactor is described as a good example of how the factors discussed can be beneficially incorporated into a design using proven technology. Finally it goes on to illustrate how the overall costs of a generating system can indeed by reduced by use of the 320 MWe Safe Integral Reactor rather than conventional units of around 1200 MWe. (author). 9 figs

  7. Specification and testing for power by wire aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.; Kenney, Barbara H.

    1993-08-01

    A power by wire aircraft is one in which all active functions other than propulsion are implemented electrically. Other nomenclature are 'all electric airplane,' or 'more electric airplane.' What is involved is the task of developing and certifying electrical equipment to replace existing hydraulics and pneumatics. When such functions, however, are primary flight controls which are implemented electrically, new requirements are imposed that were not anticipated by existing power system designs. Standards of particular impact are the requirements of ultra-high reliability, high peak transient bi-directional power flow, and immunity to electromagnetic interference and lightning. Not only must the electromagnetic immunity of the total system be verifiable, but box level tests and meaningful system models must be established to allow system evaluation. This paper discusses some of the problems, the system modifications involved, and early results in establishing wiring harness and interface susceptibility requirements.

  8. Specification and testing for power by wire aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Irving G.; Kenney, Barbara H.

    1993-01-01

    A power by wire aircraft is one in which all active functions other than propulsion are implemented electrically. Other nomenclature are 'all electric airplane,' or 'more electric airplane.' What is involved is the task of developing and certifying electrical equipment to replace existing hydraulics and pneumatics. When such functions, however, are primary flight controls which are implemented electrically, new requirements are imposed that were not anticipated by existing power system designs. Standards of particular impact are the requirements of ultra-high reliability, high peak transient bi-directional power flow, and immunity to electromagnetic interference and lightning. Not only must the electromagnetic immunity of the total system be verifiable, but box level tests and meaningful system models must be established to allow system evaluation. This paper discusses some of the problems, the system modifications involved, and early results in establishing wiring harness and interface susceptibility requirements.

  9. 26 CFR 48.4041-14 - Exemption for sale to or use by certain aircraft museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... museums. 48.4041-14 Section 48.4041-14 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....4041-14 Exemption for sale to or use by certain aircraft museums. (a) In general. (1) The tax imposed by section 4041 does not apply to liquids which are sold for use or used by an aircraft museum in...

  10. Effect of drop size on the impact thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet in aircraft icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled large droplet (SLD), which can cause abnormal icing, is a well-known issue in aerospace engineering. Although efforts have been exerted to understand large droplet impact dynamics and the supercooled feature in the film/substrate interface, respectively, the thermodynamic effect during the SLD impact process has not received sufficient attention. This work conducts experimental studies to determine the effects of drop size on the thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet impingement. Through phenomenological reproduction, the rapid-freezing characteristics are observed in diameters of 400, 800, and 1300 μm. The experimental analysis provides information on the maximum spreading rate and the shrinkage rate of the drop, the supercooled diffusive rate, and the freezing time. A physical explanation of this unsteady heat transfer process is proposed theoretically, which indicates that the drop size is a critical factor influencing the supercooled heat exchange and effective heat transfer duration between the film/substrate interface. On the basis of the present experimental data and theoretical analysis, an impinging heating model is developed and applied to typical SLD cases. The model behaves as anticipated, which underlines the wide applicability to SLD icing problems in related fields.

  11. 14 CFR 119.53 - Wet leasing of aircraft and other arrangements for transportation by air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet leasing of aircraft and other arrangements for transportation by air. 119.53 Section 119.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Chapter § 119.53 Wet leasing of aircraft and other arrangements for transportation by air. (a)...

  12. Effective density measurements of fresh particulate matter emitted by an aircraft engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Durdina, Lukas; Mensah, Amewu; Brem, Benjamin; Corbin, Joel; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Wang, Jing; Lohmann, Ulrike; Sierau, Berko

    2014-05-01

    Introduction Carbonaceous particulate matter (commonly referred to as soot), once emitted into the atmosphere affects the global radiation budget by absorbing and scattering solar radiation. Furthermore, it can alter the formation, lifetime and distribution of clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The ability of soot particles to act as CCN and IN depends on their size, morphology and chemical composition. Soot particles are known to consist of spherical, primary particles that tend to arrange in chain-like structures. The structure of soot particles typically changes in the atmosphere when the particles are coated with secondary material, thus changing their radiative and cloud microphysical properties. Bond et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research, 2013: Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System.) estimated the total industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon to be 1.1 W/m2 ranging from the uncertainty bonds of 0.17 W/m2 to 2.1 W/m2. Facing the large uncertainty range, there is a need for a better characterization of soot particles abundant in the atmosphere. We provide experimental data on physical properties such as size, mass, density and morphology of freshly produced soot particles from a regularly used aircraft engine and from four laboratory generated soot types. This was done using a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) and a Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyzer (CPMA), a relatively new instrument that records mass distributions of aerosol particles. Experimental Aircraft engine exhaust particles were collected and analysed during the Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiments (A-PRIDE) campaigns in a test facility at the Zurich airport in November 2012 and August 2013. The engines were operated at different relative thrust levels spanning 7 % to 100 %. The sample was led into a heated line in order to prevent condensation of water and evolution of secondary

  13. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  14. Effect of noise reducing components on nose landing gear stability for a mid-size aircraft coupled with vortex shedding and freeplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eret, Petr; Kennedy, John; Bennett, Gareth J.

    2015-10-01

    In the pursuit of quieter aircraft, significant effort has been dedicated to airframe noise identification and reduction. The landing gear is one of the main sources of airframe noise on approach. The addition of noise abatement technologies such as fairings or wheel hub caps is usually considered to be the simplest solution to reduce this noise. After touchdown, noise abatement components can potentially affect the inherently nonlinear and dynamically complex behaviour (shimmy) of landing gear. Moreover, fairings can influence the aerodynamic load on the system and interact with the mechanical freeplay in the torque link. This paper presents a numerical study of nose landing gear stability for a mid-size aircraft with low noise solutions, which are modelled by an increase of the relevant model structural parameters to address a hypothetical effect of additional fairings and wheel hub caps. The study shows that the wheel hub caps are not a threat to stability. A fairing has a destabilising effect due to the increased moment of inertia of the strut and a stabilising effect due to the increased torsional stiffness of the strut. As the torsional stiffness is dependent on the method of attachment, in situations where the fairing increases the torsional inertia with little increase to the torsional stiffness, a net destabilising effect can result. Alternatively, it is possible that for the case that if the fairing were to increase equally both the torsional stiffness and the moment of inertia of the strut, then their effects could be mutually negated. However, it has been found here that for small and simple fairings, typical of current landing gear noise abatement design, their implementation will not affect the dynamics and stability of the system in an operational range (Fz ≤ 50 000 N, V ≤ 100 m/s). This generalisation is strictly dependent on size and installation methods. The aerodynamic load, which would be influenced by the presence of fairings, was modelled

  15. 19 CFR 10.183 - Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Duty-free entry of civil aircraft, aircraft engines, ground flight simulators, parts, components, and... aircraft, aircraft engines, and ground flight simulators, including their parts, components, and... United States (HTSUS) by meeting the following requirements: (1) The aircraft, aircraft engines,...

  16. Reduction of JT8D powered aircraft noise by engine refanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, L. E.; Medeiros, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the Refan Program is to establish the technical feasibility of substantially reducing the noise levels of existing JT8D powered aircraft. This would be accomplished by retrofitting the existing fleet with quieter refan engines and new acoustically treated nacelles. No major technical problems exist that preclude the development and installation of refanned engines on aircraft currently powered by the JT8D engine. The refan concept is technically feasible and provides calculated noise reductions of from 7 to 8 EPNdB for the B727-200 aircraft and from 10 to 12 EPNdB for the DC-9-32 aircraft at the FAR Part 36 measuring stations. Corresponding reductions in the 90 EPNdB footprint area are estimated to vary from about 70 percent for the DC-9 to about 80 percent for the B727.

  17. Interference Cancellation in Aircraft Cockpit by Adaptive Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates on the development and implementation of adaptive noise cancellation (ANC algorithm meant for mitigating the high level engine noise in the cockpit of an aircraft, which makes the speech signal unintelligible. Adaptive filters configured as interference canceller have the potential application in mitigating the above interference. A comparative study of Gradient based adaptive Infinite Impulse Response (IIR algorithm and its modified version is performed using MATLAB simulator in terms of converging speed. From the simulation result the best IIR algorithm is used for implementation in Performance Optimized with Enhanced RISC PC (Power PC 7448.

  18. Aircraft optical cable plant: the physical layer for fly-by-light control networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Thomas L.

    1996-10-01

    A program was completed with joint industry and government funding to apply fiber optic technologies to aircraft. The technology offers many potential benefits. Among them are increased electromagnetic interference immunity and the possibility of reduced weight, increased reliability, and enlarged capability by redesigning architectures to use the large bandwidth of fiber optics. Those benefits can be realized if fiber optics meets the unique requirements of aircraft networks. Many independent efforts have been made in the development of the systems, known as cable plants, to link opto-electronic components. The FLASH program built on that work. Over the last two years, FLASH expanded on the cable plant efforts by building components based on a cohesive aircraft plant system concept. The concept was rooted in not just optical performance, but also cost, manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support. To do that, the FLASH team evaluated requirements, delineated environmental and use conditions, designed, built, and tested components, such as cables, connectors, splices and backplanes for transport aircraft, tactical aircraft, and helicopters. In addition, the FLASH team developed installation and test methods, and support equipment for aircraft optical cable plants. The results of that design, development, and test effort are reported here.

  19. Particle size characterization by ultrasonic attenuation spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxu Su; Minghua Xue; Xiaoshu Cai; Zhitao Shang; Feng Xu

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to extracting information from signals of broadband ultrasonic attenuation spectrum for effective utilization in particle size characterization. The single particle scattering model and the coupled-phase model are formulated simultaneously, the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is established, and a convergence criterion for calculation is quantified. Demonsa'ation inversion by the optimum regularization factor method is carded out to yield typical numerical results for discussion. With the experimental set-up developed by the Institute of Particle and Two-Phase Flow Measurement (IPTFM) at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, sand sediment particle size is measured by attenuation spectrum and analyzed using the above inversion algorithm and theoretical models. To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method, results are compared with those obtained by microscopy.

  20. Emission of ions and charged soot particles by aircraft engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorokin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a model which examines the formation and evolution of chemiions in an aircraft engine is proposed. This model which includes chemiionisation, electron thermo-emission, electron attachment to soot particles and to neutral molecules, electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, ion-soot interaction, allows the determination of the ion concentration at the exit of the combustor and at the nozzle exit of the engine. It also allows the determination of the charge of the soot particles. For the engine considered, the upper limit for the ion emission index EIi is of the order of (2-5 x1016 ions/kg-fuel if ion-soot interactions are ignored and the introduction of ion-soot interactions lead about to a 50% reduction. The results also show that most of the soot particles are either positively or negatively charged, the remaining neutral particles representing approximately 20% of the total particles. A comparison of the model results with the available ground-based experimental data obtained on the ATTAS research aircraft engines during the SULFUR experiments (Schumann, 2002 shows an excellent agreement.

  1. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  2. Surface roughness measurement on a wing aircraft by speckle correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-09-05

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given.

  3. "Supplier Network and Aircraft Production in Japan, 1939-1945: A Case of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd."(in Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuji Okazaki

    2007-01-01

    During the Second World War, aircraft production in Japan, which had been negligible before that, increased sharply. The rapid expansion of the aircraft industry involved numerous small and medium-sized machinery factories, which were organized to be parts suppliers by aircraft assemblers. Focusing on the case of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., a major aircraft assembler, this paper explores the expansion of the supplier network and its implication on aircraft production.

  4. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  5. Combined Effect of Aircraft Noise and Pollutant Emissions by using ANN Model to Determine Healthy Risk Level

    OpenAIRE

    SETIA KURNIAWAN, Jermanto; KATILI, Irwan; MOERSIDIK, Setyo Sarwanto; Khardi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft noise and pollutant emissions are an important part of the sources of pollution around airport that directly or indirectly will affect harmful to human health and ecosystems. The effects of aircraft noise and emissions on the populations around airport are deal with annoying and sometimes dangerous. In order to address this issue, the research propose an integrating model of aircraft noise and pollutant emissions by combining effects of both noise and pollutant emissions using Artifi...

  6. Aircraft-on-ground path following control by dynamical adaptive backstepping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Bihua; Jiao Zongxia; Shuzhi Sam Ge

    2013-01-01

    The necessity of improving the air traffic and reducing the aviation emissions drives to investigate automatic steering for aircraft to effectively roll on the ground.This paper addresses the path following control problem of aircraft-on-ground and focuses on the task that the aircraft is required to follow the desired path on the runway by nose wheel automatic steering.The proposed approach is based on dynamical adaptive backstepping so that the system model does not have to be transformed into a canonical triangular form which is necessary in conventional backstepping design.This adaptive controller performs well despite the lack of information on the aerodynamic load and the tire cornering stiffness parameters.Simulation results clearly demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  8. 31 CFR 515.548 - Services rendered by Cuba to United States aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Services rendered by Cuba to United... REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.548 Services rendered by Cuba to United States aircraft. Specific licenses are issued for payment to Cuba of charges for...

  9. Active aeroelastic control aspects of an aircraft wing by using synthetic jet actuators: modeling, simulations, experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnell, K.O.; Schober, S.; Stolk, M.; Marzocca, P.; De Breuker, R.; Abdalla M.; Nicolini, E.; Gürdal, Z.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses modeling, simulations and experimental aspects of active aeroelastic control on aircraft wings by using Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs). SJAs, a particular class of zero-net mass-flux actuators, have shown very promising results in numerous aeronautical applications, such as boun

  10. 75 FR 39795 - Airworthiness Directives; Aircraft Industries a.s. (Type Certificate G60EU Previously Held by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... new AD: 2010-14-15 Aircraft Industries a.s. (Type Certificate G60EU Previously Held by LETECK Z VODY a...-031-AD; Amendment 39-16360; AD 2010-14-15] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Aircraft Industries a.s. (Type Certificate G60EU Previously Held by LETECK Z VODY a.s. and LET Aeronautical Works)...

  11. 75 FR 52250 - Airworthiness Directives; Aircraft Industries a.s. (Type Certificate G24EU Previously Held by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... adding the following new AD: 2010-18-05 Aircraft Industries a.s. (Type Certificate G24EU Previously Held...-042-AD; Amendment 39-16418; AD 2010-18-05] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Aircraft Industries a.s. (Type Certificate G24EU Previously Held by LETECK Z VODY a.s. and LET Aeronautical Works)...

  12. Standard Test Method to Determine Color Change and Staining Caused by Aircraft Maintenance Chemicals upon Aircraft Cabin Interior Hard Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of color change and staining from liquid solutions, such as cleaning or disinfecting chemicals or both, on painted metallic surfaces and nonmetallic surfaces of materials being used inside the aircraft cabin. The effects upon the exposed specimens are measured with the AATCC Gray Scale for Color Change and AATCC Gray Color Scale for Staining. Note 1—This test method is applicable to any colored nonmetallic hard surface in contact with liquids. The selected test specimens are chosen because these materials are present in the majority of aircraft cabin interiors. 1.2This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Numerical modelling of the internal mixing by coagulation of black carbon particles in aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsson, S.; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1997-12-31

    When exhaust gases from an aircraft engine mix with ambient air the humidity may reach water saturation and water droplets will form on the available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is still not resolved if the CCN, on which the cloud droplets form, are mainly particles present in the ambient air or particles emitted by the aircraft. It the exhaust from a jet engine the particles are believed to consist mainly of black carbon (BC) and sulfate. The aim is to study, with the help of a numerical model, how a two-component aerosol (i.e. BC and sulfate) in an exhaust trail may be transformed in terms of hygroscopicity by coagulation mixing and how this may depend on the sulfur content in the fuel. (R.P.) 15 refs.

  14. Aircraft Engine Noise Scattering by Fuselage and Wings: A Computational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Farassat, F.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a time-domain method for computation of sound radiation from aircraft engine sources to the far-field. The effects of nonuniform flow around the aircraft and scattering of sound by fuselage and wings are accounted for in the formulation. The approach is based on the discretization of the inviscid flow equations through a collocation form of the Discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method. An isoparametric representation of the underlying geometry is used in order to take full advantage of the spectral accuracy of the method. Large-scale computations are made possible by a parallel implementation based on message passing. Results obtained for radiation from an axisymmetric nacelle alone are compared with those obtained when the same nacelle is installed in a generic configuration, with and without a wing.

  15. Validation of Aura OMI by Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Kroon, M.

    2006-12-01

    Both aircraft-based and ground-based measurements have been used to validate ozone measurements by the OMI instrument on Aura. Three Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) flights have been conducted, in November 2004 and June 2005 with the NASA WB57, and in January/February 2005 with the NASA DC-8. On these flights, validation of OMI was primarily done using data from the CAFS (CCD Actinic Flux Spectroradiometer) instrument, which is used to measure total column ozone above the aircraft. These measurements are used to differentiate changes in stratospheric ozone from changes in total column ozone. Also, changes in ozone over high clouds measured by OMI were checked in a flight over tropical storm Arlene on a flight on June 11th. Ground-based measurements were made during the SAUNA campaign in Sodankyla, Finland, in March and April 2006. Both total column ozone and the ozone vertical distribution were validated.

  16. A new principle and device for large aircraft components gaining accurate support by ball joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-gui QIU; Jun-xia JIANG; Ying-lin KE

    2011-01-01

    How to obtain an accurate support for large components by ball joint is a key process in aircraft digital assembly. A novel principle and device is developed to solve the problem. Firstly, the working principle of the device is introduced. When three or four displacement sensors installed in the localizer are touched by the ball-head, the spatial relation is calculated between the large aircraft component's ball-head and the localizer's ball-socket. The localizer is driven to achieve a new position by compensation. Relatively, a support revising algorithm is proposed. The localizer's ball-socket approaches the ball-head based on the displacement sensors. According to the points selected from its spherical surface, the coordinates of ball-head spherical center are computed by geometry. Finally, as a typical application, the device is used to conduct a test-fuselage's ball-head into a localizer's ball-socket. Positional deviations of the spherical centers between the ball-head and the ball-socket in the x, y, and z directions are all controlled within ±0.05 mm under various working conditions. The results of the experiments show that the device has the characteristics of high precision, excellent stability, strong operability, and great potential to be applied widely in the modern aircraft industry.

  17. Determination of standards for transportation of radioactive material by aircrafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notification is defined under the provisions of the regulations for execution of the aviation law. Terms of exclusive loading and container are explained. Transportable radioactive materials hereunder exclude naturally igniting fluid materials, substances necessary to be contained in vessels which filtrate interior gas with filters or refrigerate contents with cooling devices, etc., or BM loads necessary to be continuously ventilated. Radioactive materials to be conveyed as radioactive loads and L loads are prescribed with tables attached. Technical standards for radioactive loads are stipulated for L, A, BM and BU loads respectively. Confirmation of safety of radioactive loads may be made by examiniation of documents prepared by persons acknowledged proper by the Minister of Transportation. Radioactive materials are uranium 233 and 235, plutonium 238, 239 and 241, their compounds and those materials which include one or more than two of such substances. Materials whose quantities or quantities of components are less than 15 grams and natural or depleted uranium are excluded. The maximum doses of containers with radioactive loads shall not exceed for an hour 200 mili-rem on the surface and 10 mili-rem at a distance of 1 meter from the surface. Confirmation of safety of transport, method of loading, prevention of criticality, restriction of mixed shipment, transport index, signals and others are provided for in detail. (Okada, K.)

  18. 14 CFR 39.23 - May I fly my aircraft to a repair facility to do the work required by an airworthiness directive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May I fly my aircraft to a repair facility... May I fly my aircraft to a repair facility to do the work required by an airworthiness directive? Yes... allow them to fly their aircraft to a repair facility to do the work required by an...

  19. A new measurement method for separating airborne and structureborne noise radiated by aircraft type panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical basis for and experimental validation of a measurement method for separating airborne and structure borne noise radiated by aircraft type panels are presented. An extension of the two microphone, cross spectral, acoustic intensity method combined with existing theory of sound radiation of thin shell structures of various designs, is restricted to the frequency range below the coincidence frequency of the structure. Consequently, the method lends itself to low frequency noise problems such as propeller harmonics. Both an aluminum sheet and two built up aircraft panel designs (two aluminum panels with frames and stringers) with and without added damping were measured. Results indicate that the method is quick, reliable, inexpensive, and can be applied to thin shell structures of various designs.

  20. Estimation Methods for Determination of Drag Characteristics of Fly-by-Wire Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Girija

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available "In this paper, several parameter/state estimation approaches for the determination of drag polars from flight data are described and evaluated for a fly-by-wire (FBW aircraft. Both model-based approaches (MBAs and non-model-based approaches (NMBAs are considered. Dynamic response data from roller coaster and wind- up-turn manoeuvres are generated in a FBW aircraft flight simulator at different flight conditions and the typical performance results are presented. A novel approach to estimate the drag polar has been evaluated. It has been found that the NMBAs perform better than the MBAs. Classically, the MBAs have been used for the determination of drag polars. The merits of an NMBA are that it does not require specification of the detailed model of the aerodynamic coefficients and it can be suitably used for online estimation of drag polars from the flight data of aerospace vehicles

  1. Monitoring and forecasting of great radiation hazards for spacecraft and aircrafts by online cosmic ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorman

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that an exact forecast of great radiation hazard in space, in the magnetosphere, in the atmosphere and on the ground can be made by using high-energy particles (few GeV/nucleon and higher whose transportation from the Sun is characterized by a much bigger diffusion coefficient than for small and middle energy particles. Therefore, high energy particles come from the Sun much earlier (8-20 min after acceleration and escaping into solar wind than the main part of smaller energy particles (more than 30-60 min later, causing radiation hazard for electronics and personal health, as well as spacecraft and aircrafts. We describe here principles of an automatic set of programs that begin with "FEP-Search", used to determine the beginning of a large FEP event. After a positive signal from "FEP-Search", the following programs start working: "FEP-Research/Spectrum", and then "FEP-Research/Time of Ejection", "FEP-Research /Source" and "FEP-Research/Diffusion", which online determine properties of FEP generation and propagation. On the basis of the obtained information, the next set of programs immediately start to work: "FEP-Forecasting/Spacecrafts", "FEP-Forecasting/Aircrafts", "FEP-Forecasting/Ground", which determine the expected differential and integral fluxes and total fluency for spacecraft on different orbits, aircrafts on different airlines, and on the ground, depending on altitude and cutoff rigidity. If the level of radiation hazard is expected to be dangerous for high level technology or/and personal health, the following programs will be used "FEP-Alert/Spacecrafts", "FEP-Alert/ Aircrafts", "FEP-Alert/Ground".

  2. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian pilots flying aircraft not used by SAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U.

    1997-05-01

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots flying a great diversity of different aircrafts. Aircrafts that appear in the time-tables of the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) have been treated in an earlier report. The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircrafts in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for the work in this report is information provided by several active pilots, members of the Pilots Associations, along with calculations performed using US Federal Aviation Administration`s computer code CARI-3N. 2 refs.

  3. Cosmic radiation and airline pilots. Exposure patterns of Norwegian pilots flying aircraft not used by SAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work which is presented in this report is part of a Norwegian epidemiological project, carried out in cooperation between Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE), the Norwegian Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA). The project has been partially financed by the Norwegian Research Council. Originating from the Norwegian project, a number of similar projects have been started or are in the planning stage in a number of European countries. The present report lays the ground for estimation of individual exposure histories to cosmic radiation of pilots flying a great diversity of different aircrafts. Aircrafts that appear in the time-tables of the Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) have been treated in an earlier report. The results presented in this report (radiation doserates for the different types of aircrafts in the different years) will, in a later stage of the project be utilized to estimate the individual radiation exposure histories. The major sources of information used as basis for the work in this report is information provided by several active pilots, members of the Pilots Associations, along with calculations performed using US Federal Aviation Administration's computer code CARI-3N. 2 refs

  4. Sonic booms produced by US Air Force and US Navy aircraft: Measured data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. A.; Downing, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    A sonic measurement program was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base. Sonic boom signatures, produced by F-4, F-14, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-111, SR-71, and T-38 aircraft, were obtained under the flight track and at various lateral sites which were located up to 18 miles off-track. Thirteen monitors developed by Det 1 AL/BBE were used to collect full sonic boom waveforms, and nine modified dosimeters were used to collect supplemental peak overpressures and the C-weighted Sound Exposure Levels (CSEL) for 43 near steady supersonic flights of the above United States Air Force and United States Navy aircraft. This report describes the measured database (BOOMFILE) that contains sonic boom signatures and overpressures, aircraft tracking, and local weather data. These measured data highlight the major influences on sonic boom propagation and generation. The data from this study show that a constant offset of 26 from the peak overpressure expressed in dB gives a good estimate of the CSEL of a sonic boom.

  5. Two-dimensional structure of mountain wave observed by aircraft during the PYREX experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Attié

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental analysis from aircraft measurements above the Pyrenees chain during the PYREX experiment. The Pyrenees chain, roughly WE oriented, is a major barrier for northerly and southerly airflows. We present a case of southerly flow (15 October 1990 and three successive cases of northerly flows above the Pyrenees (14, 15 and 16 November 1990 documented by two aircraft. The aircraft have described a vertical cross section perpendicular to the Pyrenean ridge. This area is described via the thermodynamical and dynamical fields which have a horizontal resolution of 10 km. Three methods for computing the vertical velocity of the air are presented. The horizontal advection terms which play a role in the budget equations are also evaluated. The altitude turbulence zone of 15 October are shown via turbulent fluxes, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, dissipation rate of TKE and inertial length-scale. A comparison of results obtained by eddy-correlation and inertial-dissipation method is presented. The experimental results show a warm and dry downdraft for the southerly flow with large values for advection terms. All the mountain wave cases are also shown to present an important dynamical perturbation just above the Pyrenees at upper altitudes.

  6. Atmospheric concentrations and size distributions of aircraft-sampled Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn over the southern bight of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injuk, J.; Otten, Ph.; Laane, R.; Maenhaut, W.; Van Grieken, R.

    In an effort to assess the atmospheric input of heavy metals to the Southern Bight of the North Sea, aircraft-based aerosol samplings in the lower troposphere were performed between September 1988 and October 1989. Total atmospheric particulate and size-differentiated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined as a function of altitude, wind direction, air-mass history and season. The obtained data are compared with results of ship-based measurements carried out previously and with literature values of Cu, Pb and Zn, for the marine troposphere of the southern North Sea. The results point out the high variability of the concentrations with the meterological conditions, as well as with time and location. The experimentally found particle size distribution are bimodal with a significant difference in fractions of small and large particles. These large aerosol particles have a direct and essential impact on the air-to-sea transfer of anthropogenic trace metals, in spite of their low numerical abundance and relatively low heavy metal content.

  7. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  8. Aircraft Detection from VHR Images Based on Circle-Frequency Filter and Multilevel Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft automatic detection from very high-resolution (VHR images plays an important role in a wide variety of applications. This paper proposes a novel detector for aircraft detection from very high-resolution (VHR remote sensing images. To accurately distinguish aircrafts from background, a circle-frequency filter (CF-filter is used to extract the candidate locations of aircrafts from a large size image. A multi-level feature model is then employed to represent both local appearance and spatial layout of aircrafts by means of Robust Hue Descriptor and Histogram of Oriented Gradients. The experimental results demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method.

  9. Fuzzy Q learning algorithm for dual-aircraft path planning to cooperatively detect targets by passive radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Gao; Yangwang Fang; Youli Wu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of passive detection discussed in this paper involves searching and locating an aerial emitter by dual-aircraft using passive radars. In order to improve the detection probability and accuracy, a fuzzy Q learning algorithm for dual-aircraft flight path planning is proposed. The passive detection task model of the dual-aircraft is set up based on the partition of the target active radar’s radiation area. The problem is formulated as a Markov decision process (MDP) by using the fuzzy theory to make a generalization of the state space and defining the transition functions, action space and reward function properly. Details of the path planning algorithm are presented. Simulation results indicate that the algorithm can provide adaptive strategies for dual-aircraft to control their flight paths to detect a non-maneuvering or maneu-vering target.

  10. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft...

  11. Conceptualization of relative size by honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore eAvargues-Weber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to process visual information using relational rules allows for decisions independent of the specific physical attributes of individual stimuli. Until recently, the manipulation of relational concepts was considered as a prerogative of large mammalian brains. Here we show that individual free flying honeybees can learn to use size relationship rules to choose either the larger or smaller stimulus as the correct solution in a given context, and subsequently apply the learnt rule to novel colors and shapes providing that there is sufficient input to the long wavelength (green photoreceptor channel. Our results add a novel, size-based conceptual rule to the set of relational concepts that honeybees have been shown to master and underline the value of bees as an animal model for studying the emergence of conceptualization abilities.

  12. Fly-by-light flight control system architectures for tactical military aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Jack; Jones, Jack E.; Shaw, Brad

    1995-05-01

    Requirements for future advanced tactical aircraft identify the need for flight control system architectures that provide a higher degree of performance with regard to electromagnetic interference immunity, communication bus data rate, propulsion/utility subsystem integration, and affordability. Evolution of highly centralized, digital, fly-by-wire flight/propulsion/utility control system is achieved as modular functions are implemented and integrated by serial, digital, fiber optics communication links. These adaptable architectures allow the user to configure the fly-by-light system to meet unique safety requirements, system performance, and design to cost targets.

  13. Penetrating injury of the lungs and multiple injuries of lower extremities caused by aircraft bombs splinters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Injuries caused by aircraft bombs cause severe damages to the human body. They are characterized by massive destruction of injured tissues and organs, primary contamination by polymorph bacterial flora and modified reactivity of the body. Upon being wounded by aircraft bombs projectiles a victim simultaneously sustains severe damages of many organs and organ systems due to the fact that a large number of projectiles at the same time injure the chest, stomach, head and extremities. Case report. We presented a patient, 41 years of age, injured by aircraft bomb with hemo-pneumothorax and destruction of the bone and soft tissue structures of the foot, as well as the treatment result of such heavy injuries. After receiving thoracocentesis and short reanimation, the patient underwent surgical procedure. The team performed thoracotomy, primary treatment of the wound and atypical resection of the left lung. Thoracic drains were placed. The wounds on the lower leg and feet were treated primarily. Due to massive destruction of bone tissue of the right foot by cluster bomb splinters, and impossibility of reconstruction of the foot, guillotine amputation of the right lower leg was performed. Twelve days after the wounding caused by cluster bomb splinters, soft tissue of the left lower leg was covered by Tirsch free transplantant and the defect in the area of the left foot was covered by dorsalis pedis flap. The transplant and flap were accepted and the donor sites were epithelized. Twenty-six days following the wounding reamputation was performed and amputation stump of the right lower leg was closed. The patient was given a lower leg prosthesis with which he could move. Conclusion. Upon being wounded by aircraft bomb splinters, the injured person sustains severe wounds of multiple organs and organ systems due to simultaneous injuries caused by a large number of projectiles. It is necessary to take care of the vital organs first because they

  14. Lightning effects on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  15. An Ultra-Sensitive, Size Resolved Particle Mass Measurement Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The characterization of aircraft particulate matter (PM) emissions has benefited greatly by the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) by providing size resolved...

  16. Anticipated Effectiveness of Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft Interiors as Determined by Sound Quality Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, using sound quality engineering practices, to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two tests differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons in the first test and numerical category scaling in the second. Although the results of the two tests were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference.

  17. Aircraft optical cable plant program plan: the approach for the physical layer for fly-by-light control networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Thomas L.; Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    A program was created with joint industry and government funding to apply fiber optic technologies to aircraft. The technology offers many potential benefits. Among them are increased electromagnetic interference immunity and the possibility of reduced weight, increased reliability, and enlarged capability by redesigning architectures to use the large bandwidth of fiber optics. Those benefits will only be realized if fiber optics meets the unique requirements of aircraft networks. Over the past two decades, considerable effort has been expended on applying photonic technologies to aircraft. Great successes have occurred in optoelectronic components development. In the development of these systems to link those components, known as the cable plant, progress has also been made, but only recently has it been organized in a coordinated, systems-oriented fashion. The FLASH program will expand on the nascent cable plant systems efforts by building upon recent work in individual components, and integrating that work into a cohesive aircraft cable plant. Therefore, the FLASH program will develop the low cost, reliable cables, connectors, splices, backplanes, manufacturing and installation methods, test methods, support equipment, and training systems needed to form a true optical cable plant for transport aircraft, tactical aircraft, and helicopters.

  18. Effect of power system technology and mission requirements on high altitude long endurance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine how various power system components and mission requirements affect the sizing of a solar powered long endurance aircraft. The aircraft power system consists of photovoltaic cells and a regenerative fuel cell. Various characteristics of these components, such as PV cell type, PV cell mass, PV cell efficiency, fuel cell efficiency, and fuel cell specific mass, were varied to determine what effect they had on the aircraft sizing for a given mission. Mission parameters, such as time of year, flight altitude, flight latitude, and payload mass and power, were also altered to determine how mission constraints affect the aircraft sizing. An aircraft analysis method which determines the aircraft configuration, aspect ratio, wing area, and total mass, for maximum endurance or minimum required power based on the stated power system and mission parameters is presented. The results indicate that, for the power system, the greatest benefit can be gained by increasing the fuel cell specific energy. Mission requirements also substantially affect the aircraft size. By limiting the time of year the aircraft is required to fly at high northern or southern latitudes, a significant reduction in aircraft size or increase in payload capacity can be achieved.

  19. Local damage to Ultra High Performance Concrete structures caused by an impact of aircraft engine missiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, Werner [Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institute, Eckerstrasse 4, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Noeldgen, Markus, E-mail: mnoeldgen@schuessler-plan.d [Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institute, Eckerstrasse 4, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Schuessler-Plan Engineering Ltd., St.-Franziskus-Str. 148, D-40470 Duesseldorf (Germany); Strassburger, Elmar; Thoma, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institute, Eckerstrasse 4, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Fehling, Ekkehard [University of Kassel, Chair of Structural Concrete, Kurt-Wolters Str. 3, D-34109 Kassel (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Experimental series on UHPC panels subjected to aircraft engine impact. {yields} Improved ballistic limit of fiber reinforced UHPC in comparison to conventional R/C. {yields} Detailed investigation of failure mechanisms of fiber reinforced UHPC panel. - Abstract: The impact of an aircraft engine missile causes high stresses, deformations and a severe local damage to conventional reinforced concrete. As a consequence the design of R/C protective structural elements results in components with rather large dimensions. Fiber reinforced Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a concrete based material which combines ultra high strength, high packing density and an improved ductility with a significantly increased energy dissipation capacity due to the addition of fiber reinforcement. With those attributes the material is potentially suitable for improved protective structural elements with a reduced need for material resources. The presented paper reports on an experimental series of scaled aircraft engine impact tests with reinforced UHPC panels. The investigations are focused on the material behavior and the damage intensity in comparison to conventional concrete. The fundamental work of is taken as reference for the evaluation of the results. The impactor model of a Phantom F4 GE-J79 engine developed and validated by Sugano et al. is used as defined in the original work. In order to achieve best comparability, the experimental configuration and method are adapted for the UHPC experiments. With 'penetration', 'scabbing' and 'perforation' all relevant damage modes defined in are investigated so that a full set of results are provided for a representative UHPC structural configuration.

  20. 民用飞机机身中等开口结构的设计与研究%The Design and Research of the Middle-size Cutout Fuselage Structure for Civil Aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳醉

    2014-01-01

    民用飞机机身的开口设计是飞机设计过程中的重要组成部分,一个成功的机型必须要有优秀的开口设计。以某型飞机为例,详细分析和探讨了机身中等尺寸开口的结构设计过程,具体包括开口载荷分析、相关零部件设计、间隙及阶差设计、密封及表面防护设计等方面的内容。%The design of middle-size cutout fuselage structures of civil aircraft is an important part in aircraft de-sign process. A successful aircraft must have an excellent design of the cutout structure. As an example of some type of aircraft, the design procedure of the middle-size cutout fuselage structure has been analyzed and discussed in detail in this article,such as Load analysis, design of relevant components, gap and differential, seals and sur-face protection.

  1. Chemistry Characterization of Jet Aircraft Engine Particulate by XPS: Results from APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports XPS analysis of jet exhaust particulate from a B737, Lear, ERJ, and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and platforms. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20 percent or more. By lower resolution survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N, and O in the form of oxides. Burning additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their presence can be used as a tracer for identifying soots from aircraft engines as well as diagnostic for monitoring engine performance and wear.

  2. Chemistry characterization of jet aircraft engine particulate matter by XPS: Results from APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.; Huang, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of jet exhaust particulate matter (PM) from a B737, Lear, ERJ and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and powers. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20% or more. By survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N and O in the form of oxides. Additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their collective presence could serve as an environmental tracer for identifying PM originating from aircraft engines and serving as a diagnostic for engine performance and wear.

  3. An Ultra-Sensitive, Size Resolved Particle Mass Measurement Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By providing size resolved compositional information, the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) has greatly advanced understanding of aircraft particulate matter (PM)...

  4. A Versatile Laser-Induced Incandescence System for Non-Intrusive Measurements of Particle Size and Mass in Aircraft Emissions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a versatile and affordable system to measure the average diameter of primary soot particles along with their mass concentration in aircraft...

  5. Size-Dependent Melting Behaviour of Nanometre-Sized Pb Particles Studied by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-Min; FEI Guang-Tao; CUI Ping

    2006-01-01

    Nanometre-sized (hereafter nano-)Pb particles embedded in an Al matrix are prepared by ball milling.It is found that the size of nano-Pb particles was decreased with increasing milling time.The melting behaviour of nano-Pb particles embedded in the Al matrix is studied by means of dynamic mechanical analysis,and a single internal friction peak in the vicinity of Pb melting temperature is observed.The onset temperature of the peak moves to lower temperature with the decrease of particles size and the internal friction peak height is increased,which indicates a size-dependent melting behaviour of nano-Pb particles.It is suggested that the size-dependent melting behaviour is associated with surface melting.

  6. Amphibious Aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A brief self composed research article on Amphibious Aircrafts discussing their use, origin and modern day applications along with their advantages and...

  7. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Handling for Autonomous Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren

    Unmanned Aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones are used increasingly for missions where piloted aircraft are unsuitable. The unmanned aircraft has a number of advantages with respect to size, weight and manoeuvrability that makes it possible for them to solve tasks that an aircraft previously has been...... unable to solve. The primary cause that UAVs has reached the current level of development is their military potential. Both for surveillance operations and direct strikes, UAVs has many benefits compared to manned aircraft, and the biggest of those are that no pilots are put in direct contact with enemy...... a specific UAV, used by the Danish military, it is investigated how a number of critical faults can be detected and handled. One of the challenges using telemetry data for the fault diagnosis is the limited bandwidth in the radio link between the aircraft and the base-station on ground. This combined...

  8. Demonstration results of fly-by-light flight control system architectures for tactical military aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Jack; Shaw, Brad; Jones, Jack E.

    1996-10-01

    Requirements for future advanced tactical aircraft identify the need for flight control system architectures that provide a higher degree of performance with regard to electromagnetic interference immunity, communication bus data rate, propulsion/utility subsystem integration, and affordability. Evolution for highly centralized, digital, fly-by-light flight/propulsion/utility control system is achieved as modular functions are implemented and integrated by serial digital fiberoptic communication links. These adaptable architectures allow the user to configure the fly- by-light system to meet unique safety requirements, system performance, and design-to-cost targets. This paper presents results of the open and closed loop system demonstrations of Fly-By-Light Advanced System Hardware architecture building blocks integrated with SAE AS-1773 communication bus at MDA.

  9. Auralization of novel aircraft configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Arntzen, M.; Bertsch, E.L.; Simons, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    A joint initiative of NLR, DLR, and TU Delft has been initiated to streamline the process of generating audible impressions of novel aircraft configurations. The integrated approach adds to the value of the individual tools and allows predicting the sound of future aircraft before they actually fly. Hence, an existing process for the aircraft design and system noise prediction at DLR has been upgraded to generate the required input data for an aircraft auralization framework developed by NLR ...

  10. Cornering characteristics of a 40 by 14-16 type 7 aircraft tire and a comparison with characteristics of a C40 by 14-21 cantilever aircraft tire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J. A.; Dreher, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility to determine the cornering characteristics of a 40 x 14-16 type VII aircraft tire. These characteristics, which include the cornering-force and drag-force friction coefficients and self-alining torque, were obtained for the tire operating on dry, damp and flooded runway surfaces over a range of yaw angles from 0 deg to 20 deg and at ground speeds from 5 to 100 knots, both with and without braking. The results of this investigation indicated that the cornering capability of the 40 x 14-16 type VII aircraft tire is degraded by high ground speeds, thin-film lubrication and tire hydroplaning effects on the wet surfaces, and brake torque. The cornering capability is greatly diminished when locked-wheel skids are encountered.

  11. Modelling concentrations of volcanic ash encountered by aircraft in past eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Claire; Webster, Helen; Hort, Matthew; Jones, Andrew; Thomson, David

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged disruption to aviation during the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland resulted in pressure to predict volcanic ash plume concentrations for the purpose of allowing aircraft to fly in regions with low ash contamination. Over the past few decades there have been a number of incidents where aircraft have encountered volcanic ash resulting in damage to the aircraft and loss of power to engines. Understanding the volcanic ash concentrations that these aircraft have encountered provides important input to determining a safe concentration limit. Aircraft encounters with six volcanic eruption plumes have been studied and ash concentrations predicted using the atmospheric dispersion model NAME. The eruptions considered are Galunggung 1982, Soputan 1985, Redoubt 1989, Pinatubo 1991, Hekla 2000 and Manam 2006. Uncertainties in the eruption source details (start time, stop time and eruption height) and in the aircraft encounter location and flight path are found to be major limitations in some cases. Errors in the driving meteorological data (which is often coarse in resolution for historic studies) and the lack of eruption plume dynamics (e.g. umbrella cloud representation) results in further uncertainties in the predicted ash concentrations. In most of the case studies, the dispersion modelling shows the presence of ash at the aircraft encounter location. Maximum ash concentrations in the vicinity of the aircraft are predicted to be at least 4000 μg m -3 although confidence in the estimated concentrations is low and uncertainties of orders of magnitude are shown to be possible.

  12. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, A. M.; Schuck, T. J.; Baker, A. K.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-05-01

    More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) region by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2) mixing ratios (χ(H2)) and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD). More than 120 of the analyzed samples contained air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). These show that χ(H2) does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal tropopause (TP), whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D); the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (χ(CH4)) and nitrous oxide (χ(N2O)), as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δD[‰]=-0.35 · χ(CH4)[ppb]+768 and δD[‰]=-1.90· χ(N2O)[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally for the LMS. Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in χ(H2), but δD is up to 12.3‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD decrease is correlated with the χ(CH4) increase in these samples. The significant correlation with χ(CH4) and the absence of a perceptible χ(H2) increase that accompanies the δD decrease indicates that microbial production of very D-depleted H2 in the wet season may contribute to this phenomenon. Some of the samples have very high χ(H2) and very low δD values, which indicates a pollution effect. Aircraft engine exhaust plumes are a suspected cause, since the effect mostly occurs in samples

  13. Aerosol Size Distribution in a City Influenced by Both Rural and Urban Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R. M.; Polanco, J.; Lozano, A.

    2006-12-01

    Most atmospheric studies have focused on sites located in either rural or urban areas. However, there are regions affected by air from both, such as the city of El Paso. Adjacent to the neighboring city of Juarez, Mexico, and in close proximity to rural areas, it is affected by desert particles and both biogenic, anthropogenic emissions. Aerosol properties largely depend upon particle size and this makes it the most important parameter for characterizing the aerosol. We focus on studies using inverse reconstruction models for particle size distribution using aerosol optical depth data. Our methodology uses Twomey's regularization technique that suppresses ill-posedness by imposing smoothing and non-negativity constraints on the desired size distributions. We have also applied T-matrix codes to study the scattering from irregularly shaped particles that exhibit rotational symmetry. Furthermore, our studies include analysis of aerosol size distributions using optic probes and soot photometers, sampled from aircraft at different heights. This work will lead to better characterization of aerosols and their impact in our rural-urban interface region. In addition, it will provide a more accurate assessment of regional transport and better boundary conditions for air quality models.

  14. The influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišer, J.; Jícha, M.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with instigation of influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation. CFD approach was used for investigation and model geometry was based on small aircraft cabin mock-up geometry. Model was also equipped by nine seats and five manikins that represent passengers. The air jet direction was observed for selected ambient environment parameters and several types of air duct geometry and influence of main air duct geometry on jets direction is discussed. The model was created in StarCCM+ ver. 6.04.014 software and polyhedral mesh was used.

  15. The influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with instigation of influence of air duct geometry on air jet direction in aircraft cabin ventilated by mixing ventilation. CFD approach was used for investigation and model geometry was based on small aircraft cabin mock-up geometry. Model was also equipped by nine seats and five manikins that represent passengers. The air jet direction was observed for selected ambient environment parameters and several types of air duct geometry and influence of main air duct geometry on jets direction is discussed. The model was created in StarCCM+ ver. 6.04.014 software and polyhedral mesh was used.

  16. Aircraft Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  17. Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  18. Topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft, controlled by a nanosecond pulse discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Shi, Zhiwei; Cheng, Keming; Wei, Dechen; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Danjie; He, Haibo; Yao, Junkai; He, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    Vortex control is a thriving research area, particularly in relation to flying wing or delta wing aircraft. This paper presents the topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft controlled by a nanosecond plasma dielectric barrier discharge actuator. Experiments, including oil flow visualization and two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV), were conducted in a wind tunnel with a Reynolds number of 0.5 × 106. Both oil and PIV results show that the vortex can be controlled. Oil topological structures on the aircraft surface coincide with spatial PIV flow structures. Both indicate vortex convergence and enhancement when the plasma discharge is switched on, leading to a reduced region of separated flow.

  19. Aircraft measurements of O3, HNO3, and N2O in the winter Arctic lower stratosphere during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiment by Aircraft Measurements (STREAM) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, A.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Wienhold, F. G.; Fischer, H.; Zenker, T.; Waibel, A.; Frenzel, A.; Arnold, F.; Harris, G. W.; Bolder, M. J. A.; Lelieveld, J.

    1995-06-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of O3, HNO3, and N2O were performed in the Arctic (68°-74°N) lower stratosphere during February 1993 on board a Cessna Citation aircraft up to 12.5 km altitude, during the first Stratosphere-Troposphere Experiment by Aircraft Measurements (STREAM) campaign. Strong variations in the concentrations, distributions, and ratios of these trace gases were found from the maximum altitude down to the tropopause. Close to the tropopause, vortex air was present with relatively low N2O concentrations. The observed N2O-HNO3 relation agrees with earlier measurements of total nitrogen and N2O inside the vortex, suggesting subsidence of vortex air across the bottom of the vortex. This air also contained low O3 concentrations relative to N2O, indicating enhanced O3 loss by chemical reactions involving stratospheric particles. Based on trajectory calculations and assuming a potential temperature cooling rate of 0.6 K d-1, we estimate an O3 loss of 4-7 ppbv d-1 (0.9-1.2% d-1), in the Arctic lower stratosphere for the period January-February 1993. Air parcels originating from middle latitudes, containing relatively low O3 and N2O concentrations, may have originated from the vortex earlier in the winter. In addition, the results also show high HNO3 concentrations relative to O3 and N2O. Air parcels originating from high latitudes may have been enriched in HNO3 by sedimentation and evaporation of nitric acid containing particles, which would explain the relatively high HNO3 concentrations and HNO3/O3 ratios measured. Heterogeneous chemistry on sulfuric acid particles, probably enhanced in concentration by gravitational settling of the Pinatubo aerosol, is the most plausible explanation for the observed high HNO3 concentrations relative to N2O in air parcels originating from midlatitudes.

  20. Cross-tropopause transport by deep convective storms : model simulations and satellite/aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    More and more evidences have shown that deep convective storms play an important role in the transport of water vapor from the troposphere into the stratosphere. Such transport has been observed to occur not only in midlatitudes but in lower latitudes as well. Observational evidences include elongated storm overshooting top cirrus plumes in the presence of strong upper level wind shear and pancake clouds above storm clouds in weak shear environment as observed in satellite visible and infrared images. In addition, jumping cirrus phenomenon observed by aircraft and ground based photography corroborates with satellite observations to further confirm the deep convective transport. Simulations of deep convective storms using a cloud resolving model provide more details on the physics and dynamics of this mechanism and also suggest potential techniques of using satellite data to estimate the deep convective transport. All these will be reviewed and summarized in this paper.

  1. Noise simulation of aircraft engine fans by the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatunin, K. R.; Arkharova, N. V.; Remizov, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation results of the civil aircraft engine fan stage noise in the far field are presented. Non-steady-state rotor-stator interaction is calculated the commercial software that solves the Navier-Stokes equations using differentturbulence models. Noise propagation to the far acoustic field is calculated by the boundary element method using acoustic Lighthill analogies without taking into account the mean current in the air inlet duct. The calculated sound pressure levels at points 50 m from the engine are presented, and the directional patterns of the acoustic radiation are shown. The use of the eddy resolving turbulence model to calculate rotor-stator interaction increases the accuracy in predicting fan stage noise.

  2. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  3. Protection by Face Masks against H1N1 Virus on Trans-Pacific Passenger Aircraft, 2009

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-10

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ article, Protection by Face Masks against H1N1 Virus on Trans-Pacific Passenger Aircraft, 2009.  Created: 7/10/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/11/2013.

  4. Variable Geometry Aircraft Wing Supported by Struts And/Or Trusses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, John E. (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides an aircraft having variable airframe geometry for accommodating efficient flight. The aircraft includes an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, and a brace operably connected between said oblique wing and said fuselage. The present invention also provides an aircraft having an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, a propulsion system pivotally connected with said oblique wing, and a brace operably connected between said propulsion system and said fuselage.

  5. Size Controlled Synthesis of Starch Nanoparticles by a Microemulsion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Fun Chin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controllable particles sizes of starch nanoparticles were synthesized via a precipitation in water-in-oil microemulsion approach. Microemulsion method offers the advantages of ultralow interfacial tension, large interfacial area, and being thermodynamically stable and affords monodispersed nanoparticles. The synthesis parameters such as stirring rates, ratios of oil/cosurfactant, oil phases, cosurfactants, and ratios of water/oil were found to affect the mean particle size of starch nanoparticles. Starch nanoparticles with mean particles sizes of 109 nm were synthesized by direct nanoprecipitation method, whereas by using precipitation in microemulsion approach, starch nanoparticles with smaller mean particles sizes of 83 nm were obtained.

  6. Braking performance of aircraft tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Satish K.

    This paper brings under one cover the subject of aircraft braking performance and a variety of related phenomena that lead to aircraft hydroplaning, overruns, and loss of directional control. Complex processes involving tire deformation, tire slipping, and fluid pressures in the tire-runway contact area develop the friction forces for retarding the aircraft; this paper describes the physics of these processes. The paper reviews the past and present research efforts and concludes that the most effective way to combat the hazards associated with aircraft landings and takeoffs on contaminated runways is by measuring and displaying in realtime the braking performance parameters in the aircraft cockpit.

  7. Calibrating optical bubble size by the displaced-mass method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Leeuw, G. de; Kunz, G.; Cohen, L.H.

    2003-01-01

    Bubble sizing by optical means is very common, but requires calibration by non-optical means. This is particularly important since apparent bubble size increases with decreasing threshold intensity. A calibration experiment was conducted comparing the displaced water mass from captured bubbles with

  8. 3D pressure imaging of an aircraft propeller blade-tip flow by phase-locked stereoscopic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragni, D.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2011-01-01

    The flow field at the tip region of a scaled DHC Beaver aircraft propeller, running at transonic speed, has been investigated by means of a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup. Velocity fields, phase-locked with the blade rotational motion, are acquired across several planes pe

  9. 31 CFR 500.585 - Payments for services rendered by North Korea to United States aircraft authorized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payments for services rendered by North Korea to United States aircraft authorized. 500.585 Section 500.585 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL...

  10. Nuisance Caused by Aircraft Noise in the Vicinity of Tehran International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Frost

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise measurement and social questionnaire surveys in three residential areas around Mehrabad International Airport (Tehran, Iran were based upon randomly selected dwellings in each area. A total of 193 individuals responded and many are annoyed and dissatisfied with aircraft noise and in consequence they would like to move. Aircraft noise is the strongest negative environmental factor affecting the residents in the vicinity of Mehrabad Airport and it could be a hazard for their health.

  11. 14 CFR 141.39 - Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft. 141.39 Section 141.39 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.39 Aircraft. (a... certificate or provisional pilot school certificate must show that each aircraft used by the school for...

  12. Development and testing of advanced redundancy management methods for the F-8 DFBW aircraft. [failure detection for Digital Fly By Wire systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyst, J.; Deckert, J.; Desai, M.; Willsky, A.

    1977-01-01

    A reliable aircraft sensor failure detection and identification (FDI) technique is presented. The technique exploits the kinematic and dynamic relationships that exist between variables measured by dissimilar sensors to identify failures in the sensors. The method is applied to management of dual redundant sensors on the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) research aircraft.

  13. Solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  14. Using Fly-By-Wire Technology in Future Models of the UH-60 and Other Rotary Wing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Courtney K.

    2011-01-01

    Several fixed-winged airplanes have successfully used fly-by-wire (FBW) technology for the last 40 years. This technology is now beginning to be incorporated into rotary wing aircraft. By using FBW technology, manufacturers are expecting to improve upon the weight, maintenance time and costs, handling and reliability of the aircraft. Before mass production of this new system begins in new models such as the UH-60MU, testing must be conducted to insure the safety of this technology as well as to reassure others it will be worth the time and money to make such a dramatic change to a perfectly functional machine. The RASCAL JUH-60A has been modified for these purposes. This Black Hawk helicopter has already been equipped with the FBW technology and can be configured as a near perfect representation of the UH-60MU. Because both machines have very similar qualities, the data collected from the RASCAL can be used to make future decisions about the UH-60MU. The U.S. Army AFDD Flight Project Office oversees all the design modifications for every hardware system used in the RASCAL aircraft. This project deals with specific designs and analyses of unique RASCAL aircraft subsystems and their modifications to conduct flight mechanics research.

  15. Cell size checkpoint control by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Chiung Fang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Size control is essential for all proliferating cells, and is thought to be regulated by checkpoints that couple cell size to cell cycle progression. The aberrant cell-size phenotypes caused by mutations in the retinoblastoma (RB tumor suppressor pathway are consistent with a role in size checkpoint control, but indirect effects on size caused by altered cell cycle kinetics are difficult to rule out. The multiple fission cell cycle of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii uncouples growth from division, allowing direct assessment of the relationship between size phenotypes and checkpoint function. Mutations in the C. reinhardtii RB homolog encoded by MAT3 cause supernumerous cell divisions and small cells, suggesting a role for MAT3 in size control. We identified suppressors of an mat3 null allele that had recessive mutations in DP1 or dominant mutations in E2F1, loci encoding homologs of a heterodimeric transcription factor that is targeted by RB-related proteins. Significantly, we determined that the dp1 and e2f1 phenotypes were caused by defects in size checkpoint control and were not due to a lengthened cell cycle. Despite their cell division defects, mat3, dp1, and e2f1 mutants showed almost no changes in periodic transcription of genes induced during S phase and mitosis, many of which are conserved targets of the RB pathway. Conversely, we found that regulation of cell size was unaffected when S phase and mitotic transcription were inhibited. Our data provide direct evidence that the RB pathway mediates cell size checkpoint control and suggest that such control is not directly coupled to the magnitude of periodic cell cycle transcription.

  16. Size speed bias or size arrival effect-How judgments of vehicles' approach speed and time to arrival are influenced by the vehicles' size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    Crashes at railway level crossings are a key problem for railway operations. It has been suggested that a potential explanation for such crashes might lie in a so-called size speed bias, which describes the phenomenon that observers underestimate the speed of larger objects, such as aircraft or trains. While there is some evidence that this size speed bias indeed exists, it is somewhat at odds with another well researched phenomenon, the size arrival effect. When asked to judge the time it takes an approaching object to arrive at a predefined position (time to arrival, TTA), observers tend to provide lower estimates for larger objects. In that case, road users' crossing decisions when confronted with larger vehicles should be rather conservative, which has been confirmed in multiple studies on gap acceptance. The aim of the experiment reported in this paper was to clarify the relationship between size speed bias and size arrival effect. Employing a relative judgment task, both speed and TTA estimates were assessed for virtual depictions of a train and a truck, using a car as a reference to compare against. The results confirmed the size speed bias for the speed judgments, with both train and truck being perceived as travelling slower than the car. A comparable bias was also present in the TTA estimates for the truck. In contrast, no size arrival effect could be found for the train or the truck, neither in the speed nor the TTA judgments. This finding is inconsistent with the fact that crossing behaviour when confronted with larger vehicles appears to be consistently more conservative. This discrepancy might be interpreted as an indication that factors other than perceived speed or TTA play an important role for the differences in gap acceptance between different types of vehicles.

  17. Size speed bias or size arrival effect-How judgments of vehicles' approach speed and time to arrival are influenced by the vehicles' size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    Crashes at railway level crossings are a key problem for railway operations. It has been suggested that a potential explanation for such crashes might lie in a so-called size speed bias, which describes the phenomenon that observers underestimate the speed of larger objects, such as aircraft or trains. While there is some evidence that this size speed bias indeed exists, it is somewhat at odds with another well researched phenomenon, the size arrival effect. When asked to judge the time it takes an approaching object to arrive at a predefined position (time to arrival, TTA), observers tend to provide lower estimates for larger objects. In that case, road users' crossing decisions when confronted with larger vehicles should be rather conservative, which has been confirmed in multiple studies on gap acceptance. The aim of the experiment reported in this paper was to clarify the relationship between size speed bias and size arrival effect. Employing a relative judgment task, both speed and TTA estimates were assessed for virtual depictions of a train and a truck, using a car as a reference to compare against. The results confirmed the size speed bias for the speed judgments, with both train and truck being perceived as travelling slower than the car. A comparable bias was also present in the TTA estimates for the truck. In contrast, no size arrival effect could be found for the train or the truck, neither in the speed nor the TTA judgments. This finding is inconsistent with the fact that crossing behaviour when confronted with larger vehicles appears to be consistently more conservative. This discrepancy might be interpreted as an indication that factors other than perceived speed or TTA play an important role for the differences in gap acceptance between different types of vehicles. PMID:27428866

  18. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Batenburg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere – lower stratosphere (UTLS region by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2 mixing ratios (χ(H2 and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD.

    More than 120 of the analyzed samples contained air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS. These show that χ(H2 does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal tropopause (TP, whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D; the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (χ(CH4 and nitrous oxide (χ(N2O, as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δD[‰]=−0.35 · χ(CH4[ppb]+768 and δD[‰]=−1.90· χ(N2O[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally for the LMS.

    Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in χ(H2, but δD is up to 12.3‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD decrease is correlated with the χ(CH4 increase in these samples. The significant correlation with χ(CH4 and the absence of a perceptible χ(H2 increase that accompanies the δD decrease indicates that microbial production of

  19. 32 CFR 705.5 - Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft and installations by members of the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft... Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.5 Taking of photos on board naval ships, aircraft and installations by...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7)

  1. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7)

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  3. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  4. Tropospheric ozone variability during the East Asian summer monsoon as observed by satellite (IASI), aircraft (MOZAIC) and ground stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, Sarah; Boynard, Anne; Hao, Nan; Huang, Fuxiang; Wang, Lili; Ji, Dongsheng; Barret, Brice; Ghude, Sachin D.; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    Satellite measurements from the thermal Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), aircraft data from the MOZAIC/IAGOS project, as well as observations from ground-based stations, are used to assess the tropospheric ozone (O3) variability during the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). Six years 2008-2013 of IASI data analysis reveals the ability of the instrument to detect the onset and the progression of the monsoon seen by a decrease in the tropospheric 0-6 km O3 column due to the EASM, and to reproduce this decrease from one year to the other. The year-to-year variability is found to be mainly dependent on meteorology. Focusing on the period of May-August 2011, taken as an example year, IASI data show clear inverse relationship between tropospheric 0-6 km O3 on one hand and meteorological parameters such as cloud cover, relative humidity and wind speed, on the other hand. Aircraft data from the MOZAIC/IAGOS project for the EASM of 2008-2013 are used to validate the IASI data and to assess the effect of the monsoon on the vertical distribution of the tropospheric O3 at different locations. Results show good agreement with a correlation coefficient of 0.73 (12 %) between the 0-6 km O3 column derived from IASI and aircraft data. IASI captures very well the inter-annual variation of tropospheric O3 observed by the aircraft data over the studied domain. Analysis of vertical profiles of the aircraft data shows a decrease in the tropospheric O3 that is more important in the free troposphere than in the boundary layer and at 10-20° N than elsewhere. Ground station data at different locations in India and China show a spatiotemporal dependence on meteorology during the monsoon, with a decrease up to 22 ppbv in Hyderabad, and up to 5 ppbv in the North China Plain.

  5. Reduction of glycine particle size by impinging jet crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Tímea; Fekete, Zoltán; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Aigner, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The parameters of crystallization processes determine the habit and particle size distribution of the products. A narrow particle size distribution and a small average particle size are crucial for the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble pharmacons. Thus, particle size reduction is often required during crystallization processes. Impinging jet crystallization is a method that results in a product with a reduced particle size due to the homogeneous and high degree of supersaturation at the impingement point. In this work, the applicability of the impinging jet technique as a new approach in crystallization was investigated for the antisolvent crystallization of glycine. A factorial design was applied to choose the relevant crystallization factors. The results were analysed by means of a statistical program. The particle size distribution of the crystallized products was investigated with a laser diffraction particle size analyser. The roundness and morphology were determined with the use of a light microscopic image analysis system and a scanning electron microscope. Polymorphism was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Headspace gas chromatography was utilized to determine the residual solvent content. Impinging jet crystallization proved to reduce the particle size of glycine. The particle size distribution was appropriate, and the average particle size was an order of magnitude smaller (d(0.5)=8-35 μm) than that achieved with conventional crystallization (d(0.5)=82-680 μm). The polymorphic forms of the products were influenced by the solvent ratio. The quantity of residual solvent in the crystallized products was in compliance with the requirements of the International Conference on Harmonization.

  6. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles.

  7. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles. PMID:21087645

  8. Annoyance and acceptability judgements of noise produced by three types of aircraft by residents living near JFK Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    A random sample of selected communities near JFK Airport were interviewed. Subsamples, with differing feelings of fear of aircraft crashes and different locations of residence were invited to participate in a laboratory experiment. The subjects were exposed to tape recordings of simulated flyovers of aircraft in approach and departure operations at nominal distances from the airport. The subjects judged the extent of noise annoyance and acceptability of the aircraft noises. Results indicate that level of noise is most significant in affecting annoyance judgements. Subjects with feelings of high fear report significantly more annoyance and less acceptability of aircraft noise than subjects with feelings of low fear.

  9. Aircraft systems design methodology and dispatch reliability prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Bineid, Mansour

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft despatch reliability was the main subject of this research in the wider content of aircraft reliability. The factors effecting dispatch reliability, aircraft delay, causes of aircraft delays, and aircraft delay costs and magnitudes were examined. Delay cost elements and aircraft delay scenarios were also studied. It concluded that aircraft dispatch reliability is affected by technical and non-technical factors, and that the former are under the designer's control. It showed that ...

  10. Mining the Shirt Sizes for Indian Men by Clustered Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaravel Appavoo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In garment production engineering, sizing system plays an important role for manufacturing of clothing. The standards for defining the size label are a critical issue. Locating the right garment size for a customer depends on the label as an interface. In this research work intend to approach that it could be used for developing sizing systems by data mining techniques applied to Indian anthropometric dataset. We propose a new approach of two-stage data mining procedure for labelling the shirt types exclusively for Indian men. In the first stage , clustering technique applied on the original dataset, to categorise the size labels. Then these clusters are used for supervised learning in the second stage for classification. A sizing system classifies a specific population into homogeneous subgroups based on some key body dimensions. The space with these dimensions gives raise to complexity for finding uniform standards. This enables us to have an interface as a communication tool among manufacturers, retailers and consumers. This sizing system is developed for the men’s age ranges between 25 and 66 years. Main attribute happens to be the chest size as clearly visible in the data set. We have obtained classifications for men’s shirt attributes based on clustering techniques.

  11. Aircraft Data Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena BALMUS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of digital systems instead of analog ones has created a major separation in the aviation technology. Although the digital equipment made possible that the increasingly faster controllers take over, we should say that the real world remains essentially analogue [4]. Fly-by-wire designers attempting to control and measure the real feedback of an aircraft were forced to find a way to connect the analogue environment to their digital equipment. In order to manage the implications of this division in aviation, data optimization and comparison has been quite an important task. The interest in using data acquisition boards is being driven by the technology and design standards in the new generation of aircraft and the ongoing efforts of reducing weight and, in some cases addressing the safety risks. This paper presents a sum of technical report data from post processing and diversification of data acquisition from Arinc 429 interface on a research aircraft platform. Arinc 429 is by far the most common data bus in use on civil transport aircraft, regional jets and executive business jets today. Since its introduction on the Boeing 757/767 and Airbus aircraft in the early 1980s hardly any aircraft has been produced without the use of this data bus. It was used widely by the air transport indu

  12. Nanometer sized structures grown by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    ElZein, Basma

    2015-10-01

    Nanometer sized materials can be produced by exposing a target to a laser source to remove material from the target and deposit the removed material onto a surface of a substrate to grow a thin film in a vacuum chamber

  13. Optimal Combination of Aircraft Maintenance Tasks by a Novel Simplex Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining maintenance tasks into work packages is not only necessary for arranging maintenance activities, but also critical for the reduction of maintenance cost. In order to optimize the combination of maintenance tasks by fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm, an improved fuzzy C-means clustering model is introduced in this paper. In order to reduce the dimension, variables representing clustering centers are eliminated in the improved cluster model. So the improved clustering model can be directly solved by the optimization method. To optimize the clustering model, a novel nonlinear simplex optimization method is also proposed in this paper. The novel method searches along all rays emitting from the center to each vertex, and those search directions are rightly n+1 positive basis. The algorithm has both theoretical convergence and good experimental effect. Taking the optimal combination of some maintenance tasks of a certain aircraft as an instance, the novel simplex optimization method and the clustering model both exhibit excellent performance.

  14. Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Types and Electrical Field Information Observed by High Altitude Aircraft Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Blakeslee, Richard; Cecil, Daniel; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Heymsfield, Gerald; Marks, Frank

    2004-01-01

    During the 1998 and 200 1 hurricane seasons of the Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high altitude aircraft as part of the Third Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) and the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). Several hurricanes and tropical storms were sampled during these experiments. A rainfall screening technique has been developed using AMPR passive microwave observations of these tropical cyclones (TC) collected at frequencies of 10.7, 19.35,37.1, and 85.5 GHz and verified using vertical profiles of EDOP reflectivity and lower altitude horizontal reflectivity scam collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOM) P-3 radar. Matching the rainfall classification results with coincident electrical field information collected by the LIP readily identifl convective rain regions within the TC precipitation fields. Strengths and weaknesses of the rainfall classification procedure will be discussed as well as its potential as a real-time analysis tool for monitoring vertical updrafl strength and convective intensity from a remotely operated or uninhabited aerial vehicle.

  15. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  16. Effect of electromagnetic interference by neonatal transport equipment on aircraft operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nish, W A; Walsh, W F; Land, P; Swedenburg, M

    1989-06-01

    The number of civilian air ambulance services operating in the United States has been steadily increasing. The quantity and sophistication of electronic equipment used during neonatal transport have also increased. All medical equipment generates some electromagnetic interference (EMI). Excessive EMI can interfere with any of an aircraft's electrical systems, including navigation and communications. The United States military has strict standards for maximum EMI in transport equipment. Over the past 15 years, approximately 70% of neonatal transport monitors, ventilators, and incubators have failed testing due to excessive EMI. As neonatal transport equipment becomes more sophisticated, EMI is increased, and there is greater potential for aircraft malfunction. The Federal Aviation Administration should develop civilian standards for acceptable EMI, civilian aircraft operators must be aware of the possible dangers of excessive EMI, and equipment which does not meet future FAA standards should not be purchased. PMID:2751593

  17. Greenhouse effects of aircraft emissions as calculated by a radiative transfer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. F. Fortuin

    Full Text Available With a radiative transfer model, assessments are made of the radiative forcing in northern mid-latitudes due to aircraft emissions up to 1990. Considered are the direct climate effects from the major combustion products carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and sulphur dioxide, as well as the indirect effect of ozone production from NOx emissions. Our study indicates a local radiative forcing at the tropopause which should be negative in summer (–0.5 to 0.0 W/m2 and either negative or positive in winter (–0.3 to 0.2 W/m2. To these values the indirect effect of contrails has to be added, which for the North Atlantic Flight Corridor covers the range –0.2 to 0.3 W/m2 in summer and 0.0 to 0.3 W/m2 in winter. Apart from optically dense non-aged contrails during summer, negative forcings are due to solar screening by sulphate aerosols. The major positive contributions come from contrails, stratospheric water vapor in winter and ozone in summer. The direct effect of NO2 is negligible and the contribution of CO2 is relatively small.

  18. Flux measurements by the NRC Twin Otter atmospheric research aircraft: 1987-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Raymond L.; Worth, Devon E.; MacPherson, J. Ian; Bastian, Matthew; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Over the past 30 years, the Canadian Twin Otter research group has operated an aircraft platform for the study of atmospheric greenhouse gas fluxes (carbon dioxide, ozone, nitrous oxide and methane) and energy exchange (latent and sensible heat) over a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems in North America. Some of the acquired data from these projects have now been archived at the Flight Research Laboratory and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. The dataset, which contains the measurements obtained in eight projects from 1987 to 2011 are now publicly available. All these projects were carried out in order to improve our understanding of the biophysical controls acting on land-surface atmosphere fluxes. Some of the projects also attempted to quantify the impacts of agroecosystems on the environment. To provide information on the data available, we briefly describe each project and some of the key findings by referring to previously published relevant work. As new flux analysis techniques are being developed, we are confident that much additional information can be extracted from this unique data set.

  19. On the unification of aircraft ultrafine particle emission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Busen, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Turco, R.P.; Yu Fangqun [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Danilin, M.Y.; Weisenstein, D.K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miake-Lye, R.C. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    To predict the environmental impacts of future commercial aviation, intensive studies have been launched to measure the properties and effects of aircraft emissions. These observations have revealed an extremely wide variance with respect to the number and sizes of the particles produced in the exhaust plumes. Aircraft aerosol ultimately contributes to the population of cloud-forming nuclei, and may lead to significant global radiative and chemical perturbations. In this paper, recent discoveries are coordinated and unified in the form of a physically consistent plume aerosol model that explains most of the observational variance. Using this new approach, it is now practical to carry out reliable global atmospheric simulations of aircraft effects, as demonstrated by a novel assessment of the perturbation of the stratospheric aerosol layer by a supersonic aircraft fleet. (orig.)

  20. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. OBJECTIVE: To identify...... the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. METHODS: Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic...... stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...

  1. Size fractionation by slalom chromatography and hydrodynamic chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo P. Dias

    2008-01-01

    Hydrodynamic chromatography, also called separation by flow, is based on the use of the parabolic flow profile occurring in open capillaries or in the pores from a column filled with non-porous particles. The hydrodynamic chromatography separation medium, if any, is much simpler than that from size exclusion chromatography (porous particles), the former technique being used in the size-fractionation of many colloids and macromolecules. The transition between hydrodynamic chromatography (obtai...

  2. Termites assess wood size by using vibration signals

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Theodore A.; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Toledano, Emilie; McDowall, Lee; Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Lenz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    International audience Contrary to the common perception that termites are indiscrimi-nant eaters, termites choose their food carefully; however, the methods by which they choose food are not well understood. Using choice experiments and recordings of termites feeding on wooden blocks of different sizes, we show that worker drywood termites (Cryptotermes domesticus) use the resonant frequency of a block of wood to assess its size. Drywood termites showed differences in their response to vi...

  3. Egg size matching by an intraspecific brood parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Patrick R.; Sedinger, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Avian brood parasitism provides an ideal system with which to understand animal recognition and its affect on fitness. This phenomenon of laying eggs in the nests of other individuals has classically been framed from the perspective of interspecific brood parasitism and host recognition of parasitic eggs. Few examples exist of strategies adopted by intraspecific brood parasites to maximize success of parasitic eggs. Intraspecific brood parasitism within precocial birds can be a risky strategy in that hatch synchrony is essential to reproductive success. Given that egg size is positively correlated with incubation time, parasitic birds would benefit by recognizing and selecting hosts with a similar egg size. Intraspecific brood parasitism is an alternative reproductive strategy in black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans), a colonial nesting goose with precocial young. Based on a randomization test, parasitic eggs in this study differed less in size from eggs in their host's nests than did random eggs placed in random nests. Parasitic eggs were remarkably similar in size to hosts’ eggs, differing by parasitic brant match the egg size of hosts in our study supports our hypothesis that brant match egg size of hosts, thereby maximizing hatching success of their parasitic eggs.

  4. Modal analysis by holographic interferometry of a turbine blade for aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponero, Michele A.; De Angelis, Alberto; Filetti, V. R.; Gammella, S.

    1994-11-01

    Within the planning stage devoted to realize an innovative turbine for an aircraft engine, an experimental prototype has been made. Several measurements have been carried out to experimentally verify the expected structural and dynamic features of such a prototype. Expected properties were worked out by finite elements method, using the well-known Nastran software package. Natural frequencies and vibration modes of the designed prototype were computed assuming the turbine being in both `dynamic condition' (rotating turbine at running speed and temperature), and in `static condition' (still turbine at room temperature). We present the experimental modal analysis carried out by time average holographic interferometry, being the prototype in `static condition;' results show the modal behavior of the prototype. Experimental and computed modal features are compared to evaluate the reliability of the finite elements model of the turbine used for computation by the Nastran package; reliability of the finite elements model must be checked to validate results computed assuming the turbine blade is in hostile environments, such as `dynamic condition,' which could hardly be tested by experimental measurements. A piezoelectric transducer was used to excite the turbine blade by sine variable pressure. To better estimate the natural vibration modes, two holographic interferograms have been made for each identified natural frequency, being the sensitivity vector directions of the two interferograms perpendicular to each other. The first ten lower natural frequencies and vibration modes of the blade have been analyzed; experimental and computed results are compared and discussed. Experimental and computed values of natural frequencies are in good agrement between each other. Several differences are present between experimental and computed modal patterns; a possible cause of such discrepancies is identified in wrong structural constraints imposed at nodes of the finite elements

  5. Ecosystem size matters: the dimensionality of intralacustrine diversification in Icelandic stickleback is predicted by lake size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucek, Kay; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Skúlason, Skúli; Seehausen, Ole

    2016-08-01

    Cases of evolutionary diversification can be characterized along a continuum from weak to strong genetic and phenotypic differentiation. Several factors may facilitate or constrain the differentiation process. Comparative analyses of replicates of the same taxon at different stages of differentiation can be useful to identify these factors. We estimated the number of distinct phenotypic groups in three-spine stickleback populations from nine lakes in Iceland and in one marine population. Using the inferred number of phenotypic groups in each lake, genetic divergence from the marine population, and physical lake and landscape variables, we tested whether ecosystem size, approximated by lake size and depth, or isolation from the ancestral marine gene pool predicts the occurrence and the extent of phenotypic and genetic diversification within lakes. We find intralacustrine phenotypic diversification to be the rule rather than the exception, occurring in all but the youngest lake population and being manifest in ecologically important phenotypic traits. Neutral genetic data further indicate nonrandom mating in four of nine studied lakes, and restricted gene flow between sympatric phenotypic groups in two. Although neither the phenotypic variation nor the number of intralacustrine phenotypic groups was associated with any of our environmental variables, the number of phenotypic traits that were differentiated was significantly positively related to lake size, and evidence for restricted gene flow between sympatric phenotypic groups was only found in the largest lakes where trait specific phenotypic differentiation was highest. PMID:27551381

  6. GeoTrack: bio-inspired global video tracking by networks of unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barooah, Prabir; Collins, Gaemus E.; Hespanha, João P.

    2009-05-01

    Research from the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB) at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) has identified swarming algorithms used by flocks of birds and schools of fish that enable these animals to move in tight formation and cooperatively track prey with minimal estimation errors, while relying solely on local communication between the animals. This paper describes ongoing work by UCSB, the University of Florida (UF), and the Toyon Research Corporation on the utilization of these algorithms to dramatically improve the capabilities of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to cooperatively locate and track ground targets. Our goal is to construct an electronic system, called GeoTrack, through which a network of hand-launched UAS use dedicated on-board processors to perform multi-sensor data fusion. The nominal sensors employed by the system will EO/IR video cameras on the UAS. When GMTI or other wide-area sensors are available, as in a layered sensing architecture, data from the standoff sensors will also be fused into the GeoTrack system. The output of the system will be position and orientation information on stationary or mobile targets in a global geo-stationary coordinate system. The design of the GeoTrack system requires significant advances beyond the current state-of-the-art in distributed control for a swarm of UAS to accomplish autonomous coordinated tracking; target geo-location using distributed sensor fusion by a network of UAS, communicating over an unreliable channel; and unsupervised real-time image-plane video tracking in low-powered computing platforms.

  7. Mission management aircraft operations manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This manual prescribes the NASA mission management aircraft program and provides policies and criteria for the safe and economical operation, maintenance, and inspection of NASA mission management aircraft. The operation of NASA mission management aircraft is based on the concept that safety has the highest priority. Operations involving unwarranted risks will not be tolerated. NASA mission management aircraft will be designated by the Associate Administrator for Management Systems and Facilities. NASA mission management aircraft are public aircraft as defined by the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. Maintenance standards, as a minimum, will meet those required for retention of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness certification. Federal Aviation Regulation Part 91, Subparts A and B, will apply except when requirements of this manual are more restrictive.

  8. Lifetime and structures of TLEs captured by high-speed camera on board aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sanmiya, Y.; Sato, M.; Kudo, T.; Inoue, T.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal development of sprite streamer is the manifestation of the local electric field and conductivity. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms of sprite, which show a large variety in temporal and spatial structures, the detailed analysis of both fine and macro-structures with high time resolution are to be the key approach. However, due to the long distance from the optical equipments to the phenomena and to the contamination by aerosols, it's not easy to get clear images of TLEs on the ground. In the period of June 27 - July 10, 2011, a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign, in support of NHK Cosmic Shore project, was carried with two jet airplanes under collaboration between NHK, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, and universities. On 8 nights out of 16 standing-by, the jets took off from the airport near Denver, Colorado, and an airborne high speed camera captured over 60 TLE events at a frame rate of 8000-10,000 /sec. Some of them show several tens of streamers in one sprite event, which repeat splitting at the down-going end of streamers or beads. The velocities of the bottom ends and the variations of their brightness are traced carefully. It is found that the top velocity is maintained only for the brightest beads and others become slow just after the splitting. Also the whole luminosity of one sprite event has short time duration with rapid downward motion if the charge moment change of the parent lightning is large. The relationship between diffuse glows such as elves and sprite halos, and subsequent discrete structure of sprite streamers is also examined. In most cases the halo and elves seem to show inhomogenous structures before being accompanied by streamers, which develop to bright spots or streamers with acceleration of the velocity. Those characteristics of velocity and lifetime of TLEs provide key information of their generation mechanism.

  9. 75 FR 28504 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Aircraft Equipped With Rotax Aircraft Engines 912 A Series Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Directives; Various Aircraft Equipped With Rotax Aircraft Engines 912 A Series Engines AGENCY: Federal... 912 A series engine installed in various aircraft does not have an engine type certificate; instead, the engine is part of the aircraft type design. You may obtain further information by examining...

  10. 76 FR 31465 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Aircraft Equipped With Rotax Aircraft Engines 912 A Series Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... Aircraft Equipped With Rotax Aircraft Engines 912 A Series Engine AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...://www.rotax-aircraft-engines.com . You may review copies of the referenced service information at the... by examining the MCAI in the AD docket. Relevant Service Information Rotax Aircraft Engines...

  11. Kinetics of crystallite size evolution by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdujić Miodrag V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the distinguishing features of mechanochemical treatment is crystallite size reduction. The crystallite size of the powder subjected to milling decreases to some minimal value characteristic for the given material. Two processes occur concurrently during milling: reduction of the crystallite size and grain growth, whereby the steady-state crystallite size is attained when the rates of these processes are in equilibrium. This study deals with the kinetics of crystallite size evolution by milling. Published experimental data were analyzed using three kinetic models: dr / dt=-k1r2 + k2r-1; dr / dt=-k1r3 + k2r and dr / dt=-nktn-1(r - rs, where r and rs are the crystallite radius and steady-state crystallite radius respectively, t time, k1 and k2 the rate constants of crystallite reduction and grain growth, respectively, k the rate constant and n the Avrami exponent. The applied kinetic relations describe the crystallite size dependence on milling time in a satisfactory manner.

  12. Aircraft cybernetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  13. Insights Into Precipitation Processes As Revealed By Profiling Radar, Disdrometer and Aircraft Observations During The MC3E Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, S. E.; Toto, T.; Mishra, S.; Ryzhkov, A.; Bansemer, A.; Kumjian, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. This campaign was held at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) in north-central Oklahoma, with the programs joining forces to deploy an extensive array of airborne, radiosonde and ground-based instrumentation towards an unprecedented set of deep convective environment and cloud property observations. An overarching motivation was to capitalize on the wealth of aircraft observations and new multi-frequency dual-polarization radars to provide insights for improving the treatments of cloud processes in convective models. This study considers a coupled aircraft, radar and surface disdrometer approach for identifying key cloud processes and linking those to possible radar-based microphysical fingerprints and/or cloud properties. Our emphasis is on the MC3E observations collected during aircraft spirals over the column of the ARM CF. We focus on those spirals associated with radar 'bright band' signatures and Doppler spectral anomalies observed within trailing stratifrom precipitation. Two cases are highlighted, one following a weaker convective event, and one following a stronger squall line. For each event, we investigate the usefulness of radar to inform on processes including aggregation and riming as viewed by the vertically-pointing ARM wind profiler (915 MHz) and cloud radar Doppler spectral observations (35 GHz). Matching dual-polarization radar signatures from nearby cm-wavelength radar are also consulted for complementary insights. For one event, the successive Citation II aircraft spirals through the melting layer and associated ground observations indicate a fortunate capture of the transition from a region of riming to one favoring aggregation

  14. Synthesis of size-controlled Bi particles by electrochemical deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N Tharamani; H C Thejaswini; S Sampath

    2008-06-01

    Small sized bismuth particles are prepared by an electrochemical method using a triple voltage pulse technique. The bath composition and electrochemical parameters are optimized to yield monodisperse particles. The particles have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. The particles, as deposited, are highly crystalline in nature and the particle size and shape get tuned depending on the conditions of deposition.

  15. Distortions of glacial landform sizes by manual mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, John K.; Smith, Mike J.

    2016-04-01

    Mapped topographic features are important for understanding processes that sculpt the Earth's surface. Subjective manual techniques are commonly used for mapping, yet how effective they are in quantitative terms is poorly constrained. Here 12,121 outlines drawn by 25 interpreters searching for a total of 21,625 drumlins in 5 synthetic DEMs are interpreted in terms of how the manual mapping process distorts the height (H), width (W) and length (L) of the reported features. Bias in the size-frequency distributions is caused by the sub-set of the forms 'found', even assuming perfect extraction of sizes, and is governed by H driving detectability. Bias is then compounded in sizes that are extracted using the mapped outlines but, remarkably, the size-frequency distribution is not altered further when mappers' incorrect guesses (i.e. outline corresponds to no input synthetic drumlin) are then included; it seems possible that, once mappers have their 'eye in' based on the most clearly defined features, they are very effective at identifying similar morphologies. Of the metrics available to quantify the size of a population, maximum size and λ, the exponent of its tail, are the most robust to these distortions. The drumlins in the study area resemble UK drumlins, permitting extrapolation of the conclusions. These are the first results to give such granular insights into the impacts of the various stages in manually mapping glacial landforms, permitted by the development of the synthetic DEMs. Arguments will always exist about how realistic any synthetic is, but this work demonstrates another use of synthetic DEMs that may be applied more widely in geomorphology.

  16. Non-intrusive measurement of emission indices. A new approach to the evaluation of infrared spectra emitted by aircraft engine exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindermeir, E.; Haschberger, P.; Tank, V. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Optoelektronik

    1997-12-31

    A non-intrusive method is used to determine the emission indices of a research aircraft`s engine in-flight. The principle is based on the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer MIROR which was specifically designed and built for operation aboard aircrafts. This device measures the spectrum of the infrared radiation emitted by the hot exhaust gas under cruise conditions. From these spectra mixing ratios and emission indices can be derived. An extension to previously applied evaluation schemes is proposed: Whereas formerly the plume was assumed a homogeneous layer of gas, temperature and concentration profiles are now introduced to the evaluation procedure. (author) 5 refs.

  17. LCC-OPS: Life Cycle Cost Application in Aircraft Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwondo, E.

    2007-01-01

    Observation of current practices in aircraft operations and maintenance shows limited consideration of cost savings applied by aircraft modifications, maintenance program optimisation and aircraft selection. This is due to hidden (maintenance dependent) costs and difficulties in quantifying the util

  18. Innovative production technology in aircraft construction: CIAM Forming 'made by MBB' - A highly productive example

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel production technology in aircraft construction was developed for manufacturing parts of shapes and dimensions that involve only small quantities for one machine. The process, called computerized integrated and automated manufacturing (CIAM), makes it possible to make ready-to-install sheet-metal parts for all types of aircraft. All of the system's job sequences, which include milling the flat sheet-metal parts in stacks, deburring, heat treatment, and forming under the high-pressure rubber-pad press, are automated. The CIAM production center, called SIAM Forming, fulfills the prerequisites for the cost-effective production of sheet-metal parts made of aluminum alloys, titanium, or steel. The SIAM procedure results in negligible material loss through computerizing both component-contour nesting of the sheet-metal parts and contour milling.

  19. Modelling of the automatic stabilization system of the aircraft course by a fuzzy logic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonova, T.; Syryamkin, V.; Vasilyeva, T.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of the present paper concerns the development of a fuzzy model of the system of an aircraft course stabilization. In this work modelling of the aircraft course stabilization system with the application of fuzzy logic is specified. Thus the authors have used the data taken for an ordinary passenger plane. As a result of the study the stabilization system models were realised in the environment of Matlab package Simulink on the basis of the PID-regulator and fuzzy logic. The authors of the paper have shown that the use of the method of artificial intelligence allows reducing the time of regulation to 1, which is 50 times faster than the time when standard receptions of the management theory are used. This fact demonstrates a positive influence of the use of fuzzy regulation.

  20. On the maximum grain size entrained by photoevaporative winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Mark A.; Laibe, Guillaume; Maddison, Sarah T.

    2016-09-01

    We model the behaviour of dust grains entrained by photoevaporation-driven winds from protoplanetary discs assuming a non-rotating, plane-parallel disc. We obtain an analytic expression for the maximum entrainable grain size in extreme-UV radiation-driven winds, which we demonstrate to be proportional to the mass loss rate of the disc. When compared with our hydrodynamic simulations, the model reproduces almost all of the wind properties for the gas and dust. In typical turbulent discs, the entrained grain sizes in the wind are smaller than the theoretical maximum everywhere but the inner disc due to dust settling.

  1. Credit rationing by loan size: a synthesized model

    OpenAIRE

    Kjenstad, Einar; Su, Xunhua

    2012-01-01

    We construct a unified framework to study credit rationing by the loan size. Due to default risk, the loan offer curve is positive-sloping. At the equilibrium interest rate, increasing the loan size reduces the average cost of the loan, so the borrower always demands a larger loan than that the lender can offer even in a perfect credit market. We show that any agency cost may shift the loan offer curve upwards, enlarging the excess demand further. If agency costs are sufficiently high, the bo...

  2. Size estimates of nobel gas clusters by Rayleigh scattering experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinpin Zhu (朱频频); Guoquan Ni (倪国权); Zhizhan Xu (徐至展)

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases (argon, krypton, and xenon) are puffed into vacuum through a nozzle to produce clusters for studying laser-cluster interactions. Good estimates of the average size of the argon, krypton and xenon clusters are made by carrying out a series of Rayleigh scattering experiments. In the experiments, we have found that the scattered signal intensity varied greatly with the opening area of the pulsed valve. A new method is put forward to choose the appropriate scattered signal and measure the size of Kr cluster.

  3. On the maximum grain size entrained by photoevaporative winds

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchison, Mark A; Maddison, Sarah T

    2016-01-01

    We model the behaviour of dust grains entrained by photoevaporation-driven winds from protoplanetary discs assuming a non-rotating, plane-parallel disc. We obtain an analytic expression for the maximum entrainable grain size in extreme-UV radiation-driven winds, which we demonstrate to be proportional to the mass loss rate of the disc. When compared with our hydrodynamic simulations, the model reproduces almost all of the wind properties for the gas and dust. In typical turbulent discs, the entrained grain sizes in the wind are smaller than the theoretical maximum everywhere but the inner disc due to dust settling.

  4. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called \\textit{jet drops}. In this paper, the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine, and discuss, the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, in the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a new scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity and surface tension in the \\textit{end-pinching} of the bubble bursting jet.

  5. Greenhouse effects of aircraft emissions as calculated by a radiative transfer model

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuin, J.P.F.; Dorland, R.; Wauben, W. M. F.; Kelder, H.

    1995-01-01

    With a radiative transfer model, assessments are made of the radiative forcing in northern mid-latitudes due to aircraft emissions up to 1990. Considered are the direct climate effects from the major combustion products carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and sulphur dioxide, as well as the indirect effect of ozone production from NOx emissions. Our study indicates a local radiative forcing at the tropopause which should be negative in summe...

  6. Time series and correlation of pulsations observed simultaneously by two aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geomagnetic pulsations are an interesting and ubiquitous component of the geomagnetic field and they have been studied extensively for several decades. Numerous comparisons have been made of pulsations at a variety of sites for various objectives. However, conductivity anomalies introduce a number of complexities into the interpretations of pulsations at ground sites through the action of the primary fields on the electrical properties of the local geologic structure. To avoid the difficulties associated with conductivity irregularities, Ochadlick et al. [1985] described an aeromagnetic approach using two aircraft for studying the relationship between pulsations observed over a deep ocean area. Relative to land regions, a deep sea is presumably a more uniform conductor. Using the dual aeromagnetic results, Ochadlick found that the correlation coefficient of pulsations remained relatively constant for observation points spaced apart from a few to about 150 km. Beyond 150 km the correlation coefficient was found to decrease. This letter summarizes the time series records of pulsations, totaling about 9 h, acquired during several dual aircraft flights performed between 20 May and 15 Aug 1985 and presents the associated correlation coefficient between the dual aircraft data sets. Apparently, those measurements show for the first time that a strong similarity of pulsations weakens quickly at a distance of ∼150 km which is remarkably close to the ionospheric height and is thus suggestive of a strong ionospheric control on the spatial coherence of pulsations

  7. Assessing Aircraft Timeliness Variations By Major Airlines: Passenger Travel Practice In Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Wesonga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Flight delays do not only affect passenger satisfaction but also carry along costly consequences to airlines. The overall objective of the study was to assess aircraft timeliness variations by major airlines so as to determine passenger travel practice in Uganda. The study hypotheses were tested using a two-way ANOVA F-test and further measures of associations. The study found out that the number of schedules of each airline per day had a positive effect on the delay duration, whereby an additional schedule increased the average delay by a proportion of 11%. Whereas the day of the week F(16, 1129 = 1.36, p >0.01 had no significant difference in the delays amongst the airlines, the month of the year F(33, 1107 = 1.88, p < 0.001 showed a significant difference. However, the total variance of the delays was attributed to the airline (29%. It was also demonstrated from the analysis that Eagle Air (EA, Kenya Airways (KA and South African Airways (SAA experienced more delays than the British Airways (BAW by 33%, 62% and 55% respectively. Other than Wednesday, flights were delayed more on all the days of the week and less delayed in the months of October and November than in June by 26% and 3% respectively. On Saturdays and Sundays, flights were found to have longer periods of delay (p<0.05 that averaged 14 and 13 minutes respectively. The flights in January and March had longer delays (15 and 14 minutes than that recorded in the other months. Therefore, it can be concluded that the passengers who use BAW are less likely to delay than the other (EA, KA and SAA airlines and travelling in the months of October and November is highly recommended. Given that airline delay is positively correlated with the number of scheduled flights, a policy framework could be developed to optimise schedules and airline delays during departure at the airport. The template is used to format your paper and style the text. All margins, column widths, line spaces, and text

  8. Aircraft Design Analysis, CFD And Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa El-Sadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft design, manufacturing and CFD analysis as part of aerodynamic course, the students achieve sizing from a conceptual sketch, select the airfoil geometry and the tail geometry, calculate thrust to weight ratio and wing loading, use initial sizing and calculate the aerodynamic forces. The students design their aircraft based on the geometrical dimensions resulted from the calculations and use the model to build a prototype, test it in wind tunnel and achieve CFD analysis to be compared with the experimental results. The theory of aerodynamic is taught and applied as a project based. In this paper, the design process, aircraft manufacturing and CFD analysis are presented to show the effect of project based on student’s learning of aerodynamic course. This project based learning has improved and accelerated students understanding of aerodynamic concepts and involved students in a constructive exploration. The analysis of the aircraft resulted in a study that revolved around the lift and drag generation of this particular aircraft. As to determine the lift and drag forces generated by this plane, a model was created in Solidworks a 3-D model-rendering program. After this model was created it was 3-D printed in a reduced scale, and subjected to wind tunnel testing. The results from the wind tunnel lab experiment were recorded. For accuracy, the same 3-D model was then simulated using CFD simulation software within Solidworks and compared with the results from the wind tunnel test. The values derived from both the simulation and the wind tunnel tests were then compared with the theoretical calculations for further proof of accuracy.

  9. Grain size reduction by electromagnetic stirring inside gold alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R.; Mangelinck-Noël, N.; Hamburger, J.; Garnier, C.; Ramoni, P.

    2005-06-01

    The final properties of cast materials depend greatly on the solidification process undergone by the material. In this paper, we study gold alloys dedicated to the watch industry and jewellery in the framework of a research collaboration with the Metalor Company. The aim is to improve the concentration homogeneity of the ingots by controlling the solidification step. It can be achieved by reducing segregations by a decrease in the grain size. For this purpose, we set up a multiphase electromagnetic stirring of the melt to favour the growth of finer grains and improve the homogeneity of the composition. We first design an electromagnetic stirrer by numerical simulation. The stirrer is then implemented on a model experiment. Eventually, the alloys are characterised by metallography and etching to evidence the grain structure. As expected, we obtain a substantial reduction of the grain size although, some work remains to be done to attain the final goal of even finer grains.

  10. Seat Capacity Selection for an Advanced Short-Haul Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marien, Ty V.

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the target seat capacity for a proposed advanced short-haul aircraft concept projected to enter the fleet by 2030. This analysis projected the potential demand in the U.S. for a short-haul aircraft using a transportation theory approach, rather than selecting a target seat capacity based on recent industry trends or current market demand. A transportation systems model was used to create a point-to-point network of short-haul trips and then predict the number of annual origin-destination trips on this network. Aircraft of varying seat capacities were used to meet the demand on this network, assuming a single aircraft type for the entire short-haul fleet. For each aircraft size, the ticket revenue and operational costs were used to calculate a total market profitability metric for all feasible flights. The different aircraft sizes were compared, based on this market profitability metric and also the total number of annual round trips and markets served. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of changing the aircraft cruise speed and maximum trip length. Using this analysis, the advanced short-haul aircraft design team was able to select a target seat capacity for their design.

  11. MISSILES AND AIRCRAFT (PART1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Meyer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Many sources maintain that the role played by air power in the 1973 Yom Kippur War was important. Other interpretations state that control of air space over the battlefield areas, (either by aircraft or anti-aircraft defences, was vital.

  12. 14 CFR 298.63 - Reporting of aircraft operating expenses and related statistics by small certificated air carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the space provided for “Aircraft Type.” “Aircraft Type” refers to aircraft models such as Beech-18... and oil taxes. (iii) Line 5 “Other” expenses shall include general (hull) insurance, and all other... insurance, advertising and other promotion and publicity expenses, and the fringe benefit expenses...

  13. IFA and PIFA Size Reduction by Using a Stub Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Alfredo Tirado-Mendez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A proposed technique for size reduction of a conventional inverted-F antenna (IFA and a planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA by employing a reactive load generated by a short-circuited stub is presented. The reduction factor of both antennas is around 30%, and the main parameters of the devices are preserved, including a fractional bandwidth of 4% and a gain of −2 dB. Both antennas operate around 1.5 GHz.

  14. IFA and PIFA Size Reduction by Using a Stub Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Alfredo Tirado-Mendez; Rene Acevo-Herrera; Ruben Flores-Leal; Roberto Linares-Miranda; Hildeberto Jardon-Aguilar

    2013-01-01

    A proposed technique for size reduction of a conventional inverted-F antenna (IFA) and a planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) by employing a reactive load generated by a short-circuited stub is presented. The reduction factor of both antennas is around 30%, and the main parameters of the devices are preserved, including a fractional bandwidth of 4% and a gain of −2 dB. Both antennas operate around 1.5 GHz.

  15. Human vocal attractiveness as signaled by body size projection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xu

    Full Text Available Voice, as a secondary sexual characteristic, is known to affect the perceived attractiveness of human individuals. But the underlying mechanism of vocal attractiveness has remained unclear. Here, we presented human listeners with acoustically altered natural sentences and fully synthetic sentences with systematically manipulated pitch, formants and voice quality based on a principle of body size projection reported for animal calls and emotional human vocal expressions. The results show that male listeners preferred a female voice that signals a small body size, with relatively high pitch, wide formant dispersion and breathy voice, while female listeners preferred a male voice that signals a large body size with low pitch and narrow formant dispersion. Interestingly, however, male vocal attractiveness was also enhanced by breathiness, which presumably softened the aggressiveness associated with a large body size. These results, together with the additional finding that the same vocal dimensions also affect emotion judgment, indicate that humans still employ a vocal interaction strategy used in animal calls despite the development of complex language.

  16. Particle size and packing characterization by diffuse light transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henrik Ehlers; Jyrki Hein(a)m(a)ki; Jouko Yliruusi

    2012-01-01

    Particle size,packing density and blend composition of glass ballotini,microcrystalline cellulose pellets and theophylline granules were studied by diffuse light transmission.Diffuse visible light was directed to the sample and the intensity of the light transmitted to the opposite side of the sample was measured through a diffusing lens using a phototransistor.Light transmission was found to decrease with decreasing particle size and with increasing packing density.There was a correlation,though somewhat irregular,between light transmission and particle size for glass ballotini and microcrystalline cellulose pellets,and a strong near-linear correlation between light transmission and particle size for theophylline granules.The effect of packing density on light transmission was significant.Differentiating the composition of binary blends of microcrystalline cellulose pellets and glass ballotini and blends of theophylline granules was found possible on the basis of light transmission.The method proposed showed potential as a rapid,simple and inexpensive analytical tool for basic process diagnostics.

  17. Measurement of DNA size by fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers research on measuring the size of very large DNA molecules by fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy. The primary reason was to measure the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells by agents such as ionizing radiation, and to measure the repair of these breaks. Fluorescence-fluctuation spectroscopy was employed because it is known to be able to measure the size of DNA of molecular weight greater than 109 (Weissman, et al., 1976). Most of this report is devoted to the techniques of fluorescent fluctuation spectroscopy. Using the procedures described here, it is likely that measurements could be made of DNA of molecular weight 1010, which would be formed in mammalian cells given 1000 rads of x-rays

  18. APPLICATION FOR AIRCRAFT TRACKING

    OpenAIRE

    Ostroumov, Ivan; Kuz’menko, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. In the article the important problems of software development for aircraft tracking have beendiscussed. Position reports of ACARS have been used for aircraft tracking around the world.An algorithm of aircraft coordinates decoding and visualization of aircraft position on the map has beenrepresented.Keywords: ACARS, aircraft, internet, position, software, tracking.

  19. Assessment of aircraft structural integrity by detecting disbonds through ultrasonic scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M. N.; Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of nondestructive evaluation of aircraft bonded joints using the contact scanning technique is presented. Reflected signals acquired through the contacting transducer characterize the test region as being bonded or disbonded. Ultrasonic signals are attenuated more rapidly in the bonded regions when compared to disbonded regions. A peak amplitude based method and an artificial neural network are used to classify the signals. Results obtained using an artificial neural network exhibited significant insensitivity to signal variation when compared to the peak amplitude. Very good agreement is observed between results obtained using the present technique and those obtained using immersion scanning.

  20. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS - From dedicated field studies to routine observations of the atmosphere by instrumented passenger aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Volz-Thomas, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Thouret, Valerie; Cammas, Jean-Pierre; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Iagos Team

    2013-04-01

    The global distribution of trace species is controlled by a complex interplay between natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks, atmospheric short- to long-range transport, and in future by diverse, largely not yet quantified feedback mechanisms such as enhanced evaporation of water vapour in a warming climate or possibly the release of methane from melting marine clathrates. Improving global trace gas budgets and reducing the uncertainty of climate predictions crucially requires representative data from routine long-term observations as independent constraint for the evaluation and improvement of model parameterizations. IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) is a new European Research Infrastructure which operates a unique global observing system by deploying autonomous instruments aboard a fleet of passenger aircraft. IAGOS consists of two complementary building blocks: IAGOS-CORE deploys newly developed high-tech instrumentation for regular in-situ measurements of atmospheric chemical species (O3, CO, CO2, NOx, NOy, H2O, CH4), aerosols and cloud particles. Involved airlines ensure global operation of the network. In IAGOS-CARIBIC a cargo container is operated as a flying laboratory aboard one passenger aircraft. IAGOS aims at the provision of long-term, frequent, regular, accurate, and spatially resolved in-situ observations of the atmospheric chemical composition in the UTLS and the extra tropical troposphere and on vertical profiles of greenhouse gases, reactive trace gases and aerosols throughout the troposphere. It builds on almost 20 years of scientific and technological expertise gained in the research projects MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapour on Airbus In-service Aircraft) and CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container). The European consortium includes research centres, universities, national weather services, airline operators and aviation

  1. Measurement of ozone and water vapor by Airbus in-service aircraft: The MOZAIC airborne program, An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, Alain; Thouret, ValéRie; NéDéLec, Philippe; Smit, Herman; Helten, Manfred; Kley, Dieter; Karcher, Fernand; Simon, Pascal; Law, Kathy; Pyle, John; Poschmann, Georg; von Wrede, Rainer; Hume, Chris; Cook, Tim

    1998-10-01

    Tentative estimates, using three-dimensional chemistry and transport models, have suggested small ozone increases in the upper troposphere resulting from current aircraft emissions, but have also concluded to significant deficiencies in today's models and to the need to improve them through comparison with extended data sets. The Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) program was initiated in 1993 by European scientists, aircraft manufacturers, and airlines to collect experimental data. Its goal is to help understand the atmosphere and how it is changing under the influence of human activity, with particular interest in the effects of aircraft. MOZAIC consists of automatic and regular measurements of ozone and water vapor by five long range passenger airliners flying all over the world. The aim is not to detect direct effects of aircraft emissions on the ozone budget inside the air traffic corridors but to build a large database of measurements to allow studies of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, and hence to validate global chemistry transport models. MOZAIC data provide, in particular, detailed ozone and water vapor climatologies at 9-12 km where subsonic aircraft emit most of their exhaust and which is a very critical domain (e.g., radiatively and stratosphere/troposphere exchanges) still imperfectly described in existing models. This will be valuable to improve knowledge about the processes occuring in the upper troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere, and the model treatment of near tropopause chemistry and transport. During MOZAIC I (January 1993-September 1996), fully automatic devices were developed, installed aboard five commercial Airbus A340s, and flown in normal airline service. A second phase, MOZAIC II, started in October 1996 with the aim of continuing the O3 and H2O measurements and doing a feasibility study of new airborne devices (CO, NOy). Between September 1994 and December 1997, 7500

  2. Termites assess wood size by using vibration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Theodore A; Lai, Joseph C S; Toledano, Emilie; McDowall, Lee; Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Lenz, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Contrary to the common perception that termites are indiscriminant eaters, termites choose their food carefully; however, the methods by which they choose food are not well understood. Using choice experiments and recordings of termites feeding on wooden blocks of different sizes, we show that worker drywood termites (Cryptotermes domesticus) use the resonant frequency of a block of wood to assess its size. Drywood termites showed differences in their response to vibration recordings of termites compared with artificially generated signals, suggesting that they can discriminate the source of vibration. Furthermore, fewer workers matured into neotenic reproductives when recorded termite signals were played, suggesting that vibration signals play an important role in termite communication. PMID:15734796

  3. Residents' Annoyance Responses to Aircraft Noise Events

    OpenAIRE

    United States, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    1983-01-01

    In a study conducted in the vicinity of Salt Lake City International Airport, community residents reported their annoyance with individual aircraft flyovers during rating sessions conducted in their homes. Annoyance ratings were obtained at different times of the day. Aircraft noise levels were measured, and other characteristics of the aircraft were noted by trained observers. Metrics commonly used for assessing aircraft noise were compared, but none performed significantly better than A-...

  4. Aerial navigation : on the problem of guiding aircraft in a fog or by night when there is no visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, William

    1922-01-01

    The use of magnetic fields and wire to navigate aircraft in conditions of poor visibility is presented. This field may be considered to be derived from a double lemniscate, considered in the particular case where the origin is a double point formed from the magnetic field of the slack wire, from the field produced by the return currents and from the field due to the currents induced in the conducting mass. These fields are dephased in two ways, one in the direction of the wire, the other in a direction perpendicular to it.

  5. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  6. Policy and the evaluation of aircraft noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.; Molin, E.J.E.; Van Wee, G.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we hypothesize and test the ideas that (1) people’s subjectivity in relation to aircraft noise is shaped by the policy discourse, (2) this results in a limited number of frames towards aircraft noise, (3) the frames inform people how to think and feel about aircraft noise and (4) the

  7. 14 CFR 91.117 - Aircraft speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft speed. 91.117 Section 91.117... speed. (a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator, no person may operate an aircraft below 10... than the maximum speed prescribed in this section, the aircraft may be operated at that minimum speed....

  8. HUMAN FACTOR IMPACT IN MILITARY AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

    OpenAIRE

    MARINKOVIC SRBOLJUB J.; DRENOVAC ALEKSANDAR Z.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft maintenance, as a specific field of military materiel maintenance, is characterized by high reliability standards, based on regulations and technical standards. A system approach to maintenance represents the key element of maintenance quality, while aircraft maintenance staff has a crucial influence on the final outcome of aircraft maintenance.

  9. Fish egg size: a characteristic determined by parental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana RM Mazzoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a trade-off between relative batch fecundity and egg size has been widely documented (e.g. Brown & Shine 2009. Studies on the evolution of parental care and its relationship with fish egg size were stimulated by the work of Shine (1978, who proposed several possible hypotheses, including one that predicted that the onset of parental care preceded the increase in egg size. This hypothesis has since been challenged by Nussbaum & Schultz (1989 and more recently by Summers et al. (2006, who proposed an alternative hypothesis in which the evolution of large eggs was said to precede the evolution of parental care and not the reverse. Here, we examined 313 species of bony fish, including 152 species with parental care (PC and 161 species without parental care (NPC, and found evidence that fully supports the hypothesis of Shine (1978. Additionally, we explain how strengthening this hypothesis could impact the development of phylogenies. We also make suggestions for future studies on gene regulatory mechanisms that could explain the evolution of parental care and egg size in bony fish within a more modern context of developmental ecology. Our analysis uses data describing the mean size of ripe eggs and the occurrence of parental care in 313 species of bony fish belonging to 53 families in 11 orders. Data for 22 of the 313 species were collected by us from the Tocantins River. Data for the remaining species were obtained from the literature: 6 species from the Paraná River (Suzuki et al. 2000, 149 species from large African lakes and some pelagic marine species (Duponchelle et al. 2008, 74 marine species (Pauly & Pullin 1988, and 65 species from the Tocantins River (Neuberger 2010. Of these 313 total species, 161 (51.4% are PC species and 152 (48.6% are NPC species. We analyzed a minimum of eight mature females from each of the 16 species we collected, and for each female, we measured 10 mature oocytes and derived the mean diameter of

  10. Time step size limitation introduced by the BSSN Gamma Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: schnetter@cct.lsu.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, LA (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Many mesh refinement simulations currently performed in numerical relativity counteract instabilities near the outer boundary of the simulation domain either by changes to the mesh refinement scheme or by changes to the gauge condition. We point out that the BSSN Gamma Driver gauge condition introduces a time step size limitation in a similar manner as a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition, but which is independent of the spatial resolution. We give a didactic explanation of this issue, show why, especially, mesh refinement simulations suffer from it, and point to a simple remedy. (note)

  11. One portion size of foods frequently consumed by Korean adults

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Mi-Kyeong; Hyun, Wha-Jin; Lee, Sim-Yeol; Park, Hong-Ju; Kim, Se-Na; Song, Kyung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to define a one portion size of food items frequently consumed for convenient use by Koreans in food selection, diet planning, and nutritional evaluation. We analyzed using the original data on 5,436 persons (60.87%) aged 20 ~ 64 years among 8,930 persons to whom NHANES 2005 and selected food items consumed by the intake frequency of 30 or higher among the 500 most frequently consumed food items. A total of 374 varieties of food items of regular use were selected. And the por...

  12. Relationship between structures of sprite streamers and inhomogeneity of preceding halos captured by high-speed camera during a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Kudo, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, T.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; McHarg, M. G.; Haaland, R. K.; Kammae, T.; Yair, Y.; Lyons, W. A.; Cummer, S. A.; Ahrns, J.; Yukman, P.; Warner, T. A.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Li, J.; Lu, G.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between diffuse glows such as elves and sprite halos and subsequent discrete structure of sprite streamers is considered to be one of the keys to solve the mechanism causing a large variation of sprite structures. However, it's not easy to image at high frame rate both the diffuse and discrete structures simultaneously, since it requires high sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. To capture the real spatial structure of TLEs without influence of atmospheric absorption, spacecraft would be the best solution. However, since the imaging observation from space is mostly made for TLEs appeared near the horizon, the range from spacecraft to TLEs becomes large, such as few thousand km, resulting in low spatial resolution. The aircraft can approach thunderstorm up to a few hundred km or less and can carry heavy high-speed cameras with huge size data memories. In the period of June 27 - July 10, 2011, a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign, in support of NHK Cosmic Shore project, was carried with two jet airplanes under collaboration between NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) and universities. On 8 nights out of 16 standing-by, the jets took off from the airport near Denver, Colorado, and an airborne high speed camera captured over 40 TLE events at a frame rate of 8300 /sec. Here we introduce the time development of sprite streamers and the both large and fine structures of preceding halos showing inhomogeneity, suggesting a mechanism to cause the large variation of sprite types, such as crown like sprites.

  13. Meeting Air Transportation Demand in 2025 by Using Larger Aircraft and Alternative Routing to Complement NextGen Operational Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Viken, Jeffrey K.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Fenbert, James W.

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed that investigates the use of larger aircraft and alternative routing to complement the capacity benefits expected from the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) in 2025. National Airspace System (NAS) delays for the 2025 demand projected by the Transportation Systems Analysis Models (TSAM) were assessed using NASA s Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). The shift in demand from commercial airline to automobile and from one airline route to another was investigated by adding the route delays determined from the ACES simulation to the travel times used in the TSAM and re-generating new flight scenarios. The ACES simulation results from this study determined that NextGen Operational Improvements alone do not provide sufficient airport capacity to meet the projected demand for passenger air travel in 2025 without significant system delays. Using larger aircraft with more seats on high-demand routes and introducing new direct routes, where demand warrants, significantly reduces delays, complementing NextGen improvements. Another significant finding of this study is that the adaptive behavior of passengers to avoid congested airline-routes is an important factor when projecting demand for transportation systems. Passengers will choose an alternative mode of transportation or alternative airline routes to avoid congested routes, thereby reducing delays to acceptable levels for the 2025 scenario; the penalty being that alternative routes and the option to drive increases overall trip time by 0.4% and may be less convenient than the first-choice route.

  14. Observations of the 2008 Kasatochi volcanic SO2 plume by CARIBIC aircraft DOAS and the GOME-2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Slemr

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The 2008 Kasatochi volcanic eruption emitted ≈1.5–2.5 Tg SO2 into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Parts of the main volcanic plume (gases and particles reached central Europe a week after the eruption and were detected there by the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for Regular investigation of the Atmosphere based on an Instrument Container flying observatory. The plume was also observed by the GOME-2 satellite instrument, only a few hours after the CARIBIC aircraft had crossed the plume, thus giving a unique opportunity to compare results. Trajectories and local wind speeds are investigated in detail using the GOME-2 and CARIBIC observations for better comparison of the results from these two observational systems. A comparison of the satellite spatial pattern with the local observations of the wind speed and the trajectory model TRAJKS showed a slight discrepancy, which has to be considered for satellite validation. Hence, it appears that detailed analyses of wind speeds are required. Emitted and secondary particles, partly measured and sampled by the CARIBIC in situ instruments, affected the DOAS SO2 measurements, of both CARIBIC and GOME-2. Overall GOME-2 and the CARIBIC SO2 measurements agree very well. The major uncertainties remain the actual wind speed needed to properly correct for the advection of the plume between the different overpass times and effects of aerosols on DOAS retrievals. The good agreement can be seen as validation for both GOME-2 and CARIBIC DOAS observations.

  15. Modelling and simulation of flexible aircraft : handling qualities with active load control

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Stuart P.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the motion of manoeuvring aircraft has traditionally considered the aircraft to be rigid. This simplifying assumption has been shown to give quite accurate results for the flight dynamics of many aircraft types. As modern transport aircraft have developed however, there has been a marked increase in the size and weight of these aircraft. This trend is likely to continue with the development of future blended-wing-body and supersonic transport aircraft. This increas...

  16. Fabrication of a uniformly sized fenofibrate microemulsion by membrane emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Roshan; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-01-01

    Fenofibrate-loaded microemulsions composed of Labrafil M 1944 CS, Capryol PGMC and fenofibrate as the dispersed phase and Labrasol in demineralised water as the continuous phase were prepared by utilising a Shirasu-porous-glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique. The process parameters were optimised by adjusting the feed pressure (15-45 kPa), agitator speed (250-800 rpm) and temperature of the continuous phase (25-45°C). As a result, narrowly distributed microemulsions were obtained via SPG membrane emulsification at an agitator speed of 250 rpm, a feed pressure of 30 kPa and a continuous phase temperature of 25°C. Furthermore, TEM images clearly showed that the microemulsion prepared by SPG membrane emulsification had a uniform, spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution. Our results indicated that the SPG membrane emulsification technique is highly efficient for the preparation of narrowly distributed microemulsions with relatively smaller particle sizes compared with the common stirring method. PMID:22657749

  17. Forward Looking Radar Imaging by Truncated Singular Value Decomposition and Its Application for Adverse Weather Aircraft Landing

    OpenAIRE

    Yulin Huang; Yuebo Zha; Yue Wang; Jianyu Yang

    2015-01-01

    The forward looking radar imaging task is a practical and challenging problem for adverse weather aircraft landing industry. Deconvolution method can realize the forward looking imaging but it often leads to the noise amplification in the radar image. In this paper, a forward looking radar imaging based on deconvolution method is presented for adverse weather aircraft landing. We first present the theoretical background of forward looking radar imaging task and its application for aircraft la...

  18. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  19. 49 CFR 172.448 - CARGO AIRCRAFT ONLY label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CARGO AIRCRAFT ONLY label. 172.448 Section 172.448... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.448 CARGO AIRCRAFT ONLY label. (a) Except for size and color, the CARGO AIRCRAFT ONLY label must be as follows: ER14JA09.001 (b) The CARGO AIRCRAFT ONLY label must be black on...

  20. Inference by Minimizing Size, Divergence, or their Sum

    CERN Document Server

    Riedel, Sebastian; McCallum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We speed up marginal inference by ignoring factors that do not significantly contribute to overall accuracy. In order to pick a suitable subset of factors to ignore, we propose three schemes: minimizing the number of model factors under a bound on the KL divergence between pruned and full models; minimizing the KL divergence under a bound on factor count; and minimizing the weighted sum of KL divergence and factor count. All three problems are solved using an approximation of the KL divergence than can be calculated in terms of marginals computed on a simple seed graph. Applied to synthetic image denoising and to three different types of NLP parsing models, this technique performs marginal inference up to 11 times faster than loopy BP, with graph sizes reduced up to 98%-at comparable error in marginals and parsing accuracy. We also show that minimizing the weighted sum of divergence and size is substantially faster than minimizing either of the other objectives based on the approximation to divergence present...

  1. Measurement of nugget size of spot weld by digital shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianxiang; Samala, Praveen R.; Liu, Sheng; Long, Kah Wah; Lee, Yung-Li

    2005-08-01

    Resistance spot welding is now widely used in the fabrication of sheet metals, mainly due to the cost and time considerations. Friction stir spot welding is getting more and more acceptance in the automotive industries. Such spot welds are found in nearly all products where sheet metal is joined. Obviously the quality of the spot weld has a direct impact on the quality of the product. The most important quality target of spot welds is the size of the weld nuggets. If the weld nuggets are improperly or incompletely formed, or the area surrounding the nugget is smaller than required, the structural integrity of the entire part may be uncertain. Furthermore these inconsistencies are usually internal and are seldom visible to optical inspection. This study is focused on the quality analysis of the spot welds by using "Digital Shearography". The paper mainly focuses on developing a novel, whole field technique for non-destructive inspecting the size of spot-welds, both for the resistance spot weld and the friction stir spot weld.

  2. Determination of lesion size by ultrasound during radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, S; Eick, O

    2003-01-01

    The catheter tip temperature that is used to control the radiofrequency generator output poorly correlates to lesion size. We, therefore, evaluated lesions created in vitro using a B-mode ultrasound imaging device as a potential means to assess lesion generation during RF applications non-invasively. Porcine ventricular tissue was immersed in saline solution at 37 degrees C. The catheter was fixed in a holder and positioned in a parallel orientation to the tissue with an array transducer (7.5 MHz) app. 3 cm above the tissue. Lesions were produced either in a temperature controlled mode with a 4-mm tip catheter with different target temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C, 80 W maximum output) or in a power controlled mode (25, 50 and 75 W, 20 ml/min irrigation flow) using an irrigated tip catheter. Different contact forces (0.5 N, 1.0 N) were tested, and RF was delivered for 60 s. A total of 138 lesions was produced. Out of these, 128 could be identified on the ultrasound image. The lesion depth and volume was on average 4.1 +/- 1.6 mm and 52 +/- 53 mm3 as determined by ultrasound and 3.9 +/- 1.7 mm and 52 +/- 55 mm3 as measured thereafter, respectively. A linear correlation between the lesion size determined by ultrasound and that measured thereafter was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.87 for lesion depth and r = 0.93 for lesion volume. We conclude that lesions can be assessed by B-mode ultrasound imaging. PMID:12910859

  3. Lignin profiling in extracted xylans by size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Christian; Schild, Gabriele; Kliba, Gerhard; Potthast, Antje

    2016-10-20

    Utilization of the polymeric parts of lignocellulose is expected to gain increasing importance in future biorefinery scenarios. In that respect, a particular focus is placed on hemicelluloses from different wood species gained from an industrially feasible upgrading step in the production of dissolving pulps from paper pulps. During alkaline post-extractions for hemicellulose removal, residual lignins are extracted as well. They are either covalently linked to the extracted hardwood xylans or simply co-dissolved in the alkaline lye. In order to better describe the lignin in xylan containing lyes, a method for lignin profiling was set up by hyphenating size-exclusion chromatography of xylans with UV detection which facilitates visualization of the residual lignin distribution. Simultaneous lignin quantification was achieved with lignin standards prepared from Kraft cooking liquors. The setup presented may serve as advanced characterization for novel xylan products. PMID:27474629

  4. NASA Glenn's Contributions to Aircraft Engine Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation reviews engine noise research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center over the past 70 years. This report includes a historical perspective of the Center and the facilities used to conduct the research. Major noise research programs are highlighted to show their impact on industry and on the development of aircraft noise reduction technology. Noise reduction trends are discussed, and future aircraft concepts are presented. Since the 1960s, research results show that the average perceived noise level has been reduced by about 20 decibels (dB). Studies also show that, depending on the size of the airport, the aircraft fleet mix, and the actual growth in air travel, another 15 to 17 dB reduction will be required to achieve NASAs long-term goal of providing technologies to limit objectionable noise to the boundaries of an average airport.

  5. Structural Integrity Evaluation of the Lear Fan 2100 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, H. P.; Dyer, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    An in-situ nondestructive inspection was conducted to detect manufacturing and assembly induced defects in the upper two wing surfaces (skin s) and upper fuselage skin of the Lear Fan 2100 aircraft E009. The effects of the defects, detected during the inspection, on the integrity of the structure was analytically evaluated. A systematic evaluation was also conducted to determine the damage tolerance capability of the upper wing skin against impact threats and assembly induced damage. The upper wing skin was divided into small regions for damage tolerance evaluations. Structural reliability, margin of safety, allowable strains, and allowable damage size were computed. The results indicated that the impact damage threat imposed on composite military aircraft structures is too severe for the Lear Fan 2100 upper wing skin. However, the structural integrity is not significantly degraded by the assembly induced damage for properly assembled structures, such as the E009 aircraft.

  6. Fly in Atmosphere by Drag Force - Easy Thrust Generation Aircraft Engine Based Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Celestin, Mwizerwa

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to present to the science community another way to fly in atmosphere, a way which is much more cheaper, efficient, safe and easy. Over the years scientists have been trying to find a way to built the vertically taking off vehicles but there have been no satisfactory success(what have been found was very expensive), Even aircrafts we know now need very sophisticated and expensive engines and not efficient enough. This way of flying may help our governments to spend less money on technologies and will help people to travel at very low prices so that, it may be a solution to the crisis which the world faces nowadays. In other words, it is my proposal to the next generation technologies we was looking for for years because everything can fly from the car to the trucks, the spaceships and even the hotels maybe constructed and fly as we construct the ships which sail in the oceans. My way of flying will have many applications in all the aspect of travel as it is going to be explained.

  7. Estimation of Nanoparticle Size Distributions by Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Rune; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt;

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the nanoparticle size distribution is important for the interpretation of experimental results in many studies of nanoparticle properties. An automated method is needed for accurate and robust estimation of particle size distribution from nanoparticle images with thousands of particles...

  8. Size histograms of gold nanoparticles measured by gravitational sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Colleen M; Goodisman, Jerry

    2014-03-15

    Sedimentation curves of gold nanoparticles in water were obtained by measuring the optical density of a suspension over time. The results are not subject to sampling errors, and refer to the particles in situ. Curves obtained simultaneously at several wave lengths were analyzed together to derive the size histogram of the sedimenting particles. The bins in the histogram were 5 nm wide and centered at diameters 60, 65, …, 110 nm. To get the histogram, we weighted previously calculated solutions to the Mason-Weaver sedimentation-diffusion equation for various particle diameters with absorption/scattering coefficients and size (diameter) abundances {c(j)}, and found the {c(j)} which gave the best fit to all the theoretical sedimentation curves. The effects of changing the number of bins and the wave lengths used were studied. Going to smaller bins would mean determining more parameters and require more wave lengths. The histograms derived from sedimentation agreed quite well in general with the histogram derived from TEM. Differences found for the smallest particle diameters are partly due to statistical fluctuations (TEM found only 1-2 particles out of 103 with these diameters). More important is that the TEM histogram indicates 12% of the particles have diameters of 75±2.5 nm, and the sedimentation histogram shows none. We show that this reflects the difference between the particles in situ, which possess a low-density shell about 1 nm thick, and the bare particles on the TEM stage. Correcting for this makes agreement between the two histograms excellent. Comparing sedimentation-derived with TEM-derived histograms thus shows differences between the particles in situ and on the TEM stage.

  9. A NASA study of the impact of technology on future multimission aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Jeffrey J.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual aircraft design study was recently completed which compared three supersonic multimission tactical aircraft. The aircraft were evaluated in two technology timeframes and were sized with consistent methods and technology assumptions so that the aircraft could be compared in operational utility or cost analysis trends. The three aircraft are a carrier-based Fighter/Attack aircraft, a land-based Multirole Fighter, and a Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft. This paper describes the design study ground rules used and the aircraft designed. The aircraft descriptions include weights, dimensions and layout, design mission and maneuver performance, and fallout mission performance. The effect of changing technology and mission requirements on the STOVL aircraft and the impact of aircraft navalization are discussed. Also discussed are the effects on the STOVL aircraft of both Thrust/Weight required in hover and design mission radius.

  10. Transport of north China air pollution by midlatitude cyclones: Case study of aircraft measurements in summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aijun; Wang, Tao; Xue, Likun; Gao, Jian; Stohl, Andreas; Lei, Hengchi; Jin, Dezhen; Ren, Yu; Wang, Xuezhong; Wei, Xiaolin; Qi, Yanbin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2009-04-01

    Warm conveyor belts (WCBs) and frontal activity play important roles in the long-range transport of air pollutants by lifting them from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into the free troposphere (FT) in midlatitudes. In summer 2007, an aircraft study was carried out in northeast (NE) China in order to understand the role of midlatitude cyclones in air pollution transport in north and east China in warm seasons. During a flight on 27 June, high concentrations of ozone and related trace gases were observed, with maximum concentrations (O3 ˜ 140 ppbv, SO2 ˜ 14.6 ppbv, CO ˜ 1185 ppbv) recorded at an altitude of 2.6 km. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of this flight. The mesoscale meteorological model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and a Lagrangian dispersion model called FLEXPART were used to aid the diagnostic analysis of the atmospheric dynamic structure and the understanding of the transport characteristics of regional and local air pollution. The flight took place in a region adjacent to a warm front associated with a weak cyclone in north China. The aircraft sampled both the WCB and warm air frontal zone of the cyclone. The simulations show that the observed high air pollution in the FT mostly originated from the North China Plain, especially the megacities Beijing and Tianjin. Their plumes were vented by a stagnant front, probably through, in part, topographic lifting by the mountains in the north, and then were quickly transported in the FT to the study region. Trajectory analysis and satellite data suggest that the observed air masses were further lifted by the WCB into the middle and upper troposphere and were exported from Asia toward North America and the Arctic.

  11. Program to compute the positions of the aircraft and of the aircraft sensor footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The positions of the ground track of the aircraft and of the aircraft sensor footprints, in particular the metric camera and the radar scatterometer on the C-130 aircraft, are estimated by a program called ACTRK. The program uses the altitude, speed, and attitude informaton contained in the radar scatterometer data files to calculate the positions. The ACTRK program is documented.

  12. Phytodegradation of Ethanolamines by Cyperus alternifolius: Effect of Molecular Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphen, R; Thiravetyan, P

    2015-01-01

    Our screening of plants showed that Cyperus alternifolius (Umbrella papyrus) had the highest efficiency removal in real wastewater containing monoethanolamine-higher than Echinodorus cordifolius (Creeping Burrhead), Thalia geniculata (Alligator Flag), Acorus calamus (Sweet Flag), and Dracaena sanderiana (Lucky Bamboo). Therefore, this research studied the degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA) by C. alternifolius. Plants could degrade TEA into DEA, then into MEA, and then further into acetic acid. The accumulation of ethanolamines was found mainly in plant stems, which had the highest biomass. This demonstrated that the molecular size is closely related to a diffusion coefficient that affects the removal rate through plant bodies. A smaller molecular weight-MEA (MW = 61.08 g mol(-1))-was taken up the fastest, followed by DEA (MW = 105.14 g mol(-1)) and TEA (MW = 149.19 g mol(-1)), the highest molecular weight. The plants' toxicity when exposed to ethanolamines elucidated that MEA had the highest toxicity, followed by DEA and TEA. In addition, the application of C. alternifolius in monoethanolamine-contaminated wastewater revealed that plant could completely uptake MEA at day 5 from an initial MEA concentration of 18 mM. The result indicated that C. alternifolius has the potential to remove ethanolamines and can be applied to ethanolamine-contaminated wastewater. PMID:25976882

  13. Mapping Nonsquare and Unevenly Spaced 2-D SLDV Data of an Aircraft Fuselage by Using Spatial DFT-IDFT Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Xinzuo Li

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (SLDV technique provides velocities of a structure at 2-dimensional (2-D angularly evenly spaced (in the laser scanning sense data points. This causes an unevenly spaced data point distribution on the surface of the test structure. In many cases evenly spaced data point distribution with square or rectangular grids is highly desirable. In this study the SLDV velocity data of a partial surface area of an aircraft fuselage were mapped to truly spatial evenly spaced coordinates by using the spatial DFT-IDFT technique with minimum distortion. This 2-D data mapping technique certainly is not limited to the fuselage, hut can he very useful for many other 3-D structures.

  14. Particle Size Influences Fibronectin Internalization and Degradation by Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozavikov, Peter

    Particle size is a crucial factor that influences the fate and biological impact of particles and their surface proteins upon internalization. Here, using fibronectin-coated polystyrene nanoparticles and microparticles we examined the effect of particle size on degradation of fibronectin. Microparticle uptake depended primarily on beta1 integrins and actin filaments, while nanoparticle uptake relied mainly on lipid rafts and specifically on clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Further, biotinylated fibronectin when coated on microparticles underwent more intracellular processing than fibronectin coated on to nanoparticles. Thus, particle size affects actin and clathrin- dependent internalization, which in turn regulates intracellular fibronectin degradation.

  15. Evaluation on the structural soundness of the transport package for low-level radioactive waste for subsurface disposal against aircraft impact by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural analysis of aircraft crush on the transport package for low-level radioactive waste was performed using the impact force which was already used for the evaluation of the high-level waste transport package by LSDYNA code. The transport package was deformed, and stresses due to the crush exceeded elastic range. However, plastic strains yieled in the package were far than the elongation of the materials and the body of the package did not contact the disposal packages due to the deformation of the package. Therefore, it was confirmed that the package keeps its integrity against aircraft crush. (author)

  16. Effects of impurities on particle sizing by acoustic attenuation spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Inam, Muhammad Asif; Frances, Christine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to have correct information regarding particle size in order to interpret, control, and optimize many industrial processes. Prior to the recent advent of acoustic attenuation spectroscopy, it was difficult to study particle size distribution online and under real process conditions in processes involving concentrated dispersions (suspensions or emulsions). The technique still needs improvement because it is less known how and under which conditions to employ the technique when...

  17. Size Controlled Synthesis of Starch Nanoparticles by a Microemulsion Method

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Controllable particles sizes of starch nanoparticles were synthesized via a precipitation in water-in-oil microemulsion approach. Microemulsion method offers the advantages of ultralow interfacial tension, large interfacial area, and being thermodynamically stable and affords monodispersed nanoparticles. The synthesis parameters such as stirring rates, ratios of oil/cosurfactant, oil phases, cosurfactants, and ratios of water/oil were found to affect the mean particle size of starch nanoparti...

  18. Challenges in Aircraft Noise Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Filippone A

    2014-01-01

    This contribution addresses the problem of aircraft noise prediction using theoretical methods. The problem is set in context with the needs at several levels to produce noise characterisation from commercial aircraft powered by gas turbine engines. We describe very briefly the computational model (whilst referring the reader to the appropriate literature), and provide examples of noise predictions and comparisons with measured data, where possible. We focus on the issue of stochastic analysi...

  19. Aircraft recognition and tracking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filis, Dimitrios P.; Renios, Christos I.

    2011-11-01

    The technology of aircraft recognition and tracking has various applications in all areas of air navigation, be they civil or military, spanning from air traffic control and regulation at civilian airports to anti-aircraft weapon handling and guidance for military purposes.1, 18 The system presented in this thesis is an alternative implementation of identifying and tracking flying objects, which benefits from the optical spectrum by using an optical camera built into a servo motor (pan-tilt unit). More specifically, through the purpose-developed software, when a target (aircraft) enters the field of view of the camera18, it is both detected and identified.5, 22 Then the servo motor, being provided with data on target position and velocity, tracks the aircraft while it is in constant communication with the camera (Fig. 1). All the features are so designed as to operate under real time conditions.

  20. Physics-based Radiator Design, Sizing & Weight Estimation Tool for Conceptual Design of More-, Hybrid-, and All-Electric Next Gen Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hybrid electric distributed propulsion (HEDP) systems have proven worthy for further consideration by approaching NASA's goals for N+2 and N+3 energy consumption,...

  1. Special analysis of community annoyance with aircraft noise reported by residents in the vicinity of JFK Airport, 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsky, P. N.

    1975-01-01

    During the summer of 1972, about 1500 residents were interviewed twice in 11 communities near JFK airport. Detailed aircraft operations reports were also collected for this period, and an effort has been made to analyze recorded human response data in relation to a number of physical exposure parameters. A series of exposure indexes, based on an arithmetic integration of aircraft operations, were correlated with summated aircraft noise annoyance responses. None of these correlations were as good as the CNR index which assumes a logrithmetic integration of numbers of aircraft exposures and includes a day-night differential weighting of 10:1. There were substantial variations in average annoyance responses among communities with similar CNR exposures, substantiating previous findings that attitudinal and other personal variables also play an important role in determining annoyance differences.

  2. 26 CFR 48.4221-4 - Tax-free sale of articles for use by the purchaser as supplies for vessels or aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Tax-free sale of articles for use by the purchaser as supplies for vessels or aircraft. 48.4221-4 Section 48.4221-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... this section, vessels engaged in sport fishing are not considered to be employed in the fisheries....

  3. Sample size in qualitative interview studies: guided by information power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane

    2016-01-01

    the concept “information power” to guide adequate sample size for qualitative studies. Information power indicates that the more information the sample holds, relevant for the actual study, the lower amount of participants is needed. We suggest that the size of a sample with sufficient information power...... depends on (a) the aim of the study, (b) sample specificity, (c) use of established theory, (d) quality of dialogue, and (e) analysis strategy. We present a model where these elements of information and their relevant dimensions are related to information power. Application of this model in the planning...

  4. Mammal Reproductive Strategies Driven by Offspring Mortality-Size Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibly, Richard M.; Brown, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Trade-offs have long been a major theme in life-history theory, but they have been hard to document. We introduce a new method that reveals patterns of divergent trade-offs after adjusting for the pervasive variation in rate of resource allocation to offspring as a function of body size and lifes......Trade-offs have long been a major theme in life-history theory, but they have been hard to document. We introduce a new method that reveals patterns of divergent trade-offs after adjusting for the pervasive variation in rate of resource allocation to offspring as a function of body size...

  5. MONODISPERSE MICRON-SIZED POLYACRYLAMIDE PARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY DISPERSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Hou; Bo Gao; Zhe-guo Zhang; Kang-de Yao

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse micron-sized polyacrylamide (PAM) particles with a regular shape have been successfully prepared through dispersion polymerization of the monomer using a rotary reactor. FTIR and NMR spectroscopic results demonstrated the formation of PAM. POM and TEM observations revealed that PAM particles had a regular shape and good dispersity. A thick layer of surfactant (PVP) still existed on PAM particles after multiple centrifugation and ultrasonic re-dispersion in ethanol, which indicates a strong interaction between PVP and PAM. The effects of various polymerization factors on the average size of PAM particles have also been studied.

  6. Flying and handling qualities of a fly-by-wire blended-wing-body civil transport aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    de Castro, Helena V.

    2003-01-01

    The blended-wing-body (BWB) configuration appears as a promising contender for the next generation of large transport aircraft. The idea of blending the wing with the fuselage and eliminating the tail is not new, it has long been known that tailless aircraft can suffer from stability and control problems that must be addressed early in the design. This thesis is concerned with identifying and then evaluating the flight dynamics, stability, flight controls and handling qualities of a generic B...

  7. Optimization in fractional aircraft ownership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiani, R. D.; Pasaribu, H. M.; Soewono, E.; Fayalita, R. A.

    2012-05-01

    Fractional Aircraft Ownership is a new concept in flight ownership management system where each individual or corporation may own a fraction of an aircraft. In this system, the owners have privilege to schedule their flight according to their needs. Fractional management companies (FMC) manages all aspects of aircraft operations, including utilization of FMC's aircraft in combination of outsourced aircrafts. This gives the owners the right to enjoy the benefits of private aviations. However, FMC may have complicated business requirements that neither commercial airlines nor charter airlines faces. Here, optimization models are constructed to minimize the number of aircrafts in order to maximize the profit and to minimize the daily operating cost. In this paper, three kinds of demand scenarios are made to represent different flight operations from different types of fractional owners. The problems are formulated as an optimization of profit and a daily operational cost to find the optimum flight assignments satisfying the weekly and daily demand respectively from the owners. Numerical results are obtained by Genetic Algorithm method.

  8. Optimised Cockpit Heat Load Analysis using Skin Temperature Predicted by CFD and Validation by Thermal Mapping to Improve the Performance of Fighter Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing of optimum environmental control system (ECS plays a major role for increasing performance of fighter aircraft depending upon requirement of engine bleed air for running of ECS. Accurate estimation of cockpit skin temperature for obtaining optimised cockpit heat load helps in estimation of engine bleed air for ECS. Present research evolved a methodology for comparing the theoretically calculated skin temperature with computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis to obtain optimum skin temperature. Results are validated by flight tests under critical flight conditions using thermal crayons. Based on which the optimized heat load and bleed air requirements has been computed. Uncertainty analysis of skin temperature measurement for thermal crayons have been undertaken. The results indicate that the theoretical skin temperature is -26.70 per cent as that of CFD estimated skin temperature. Optimized average cockpit heat load at critical flight profiles is 0.74 times the theoretical cockpit heat load, leading to reduction of bleed air requirement by 26 per cent as compared to theoretical. Due to this literature survey has pridicted the increase in performance parameters like increase in bleed air pressure by 78 per cent, increase in thrust by 60 per cent, and decrease in specific fuel consumption (SFC by 40 per cent to improve the endurance of aircraft. The research has generated governing equations for variation of cockpit heat loads w.r.t aircraft skin temperatures.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 1, January 2015, pp.12-24, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.7200

  9. Variations of GHGs from the lower-troposphere to the UT/LS revealed by two Japanese regular aircraft observation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Yosuke; Machida, Toshinobu; Sawa, Yousuke; Tsuboi, Kazuhiro; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Imasu, Ryoichi

    2014-05-01

    A Japan-centered observation network consisting of two regular aircraft programs have revealed the greenhouse gases variations from the lower-troposphere to the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere (UT/LS) regions. In the Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airliner (CONTRAIL) project, in-situ continuous measurement equipment (CME) onboard commercial passenger aircraft world-widely observes CO2 profiles in vertical over tens of airports and in horizontal in the UT/LS regions. The CONTRAIL-CME has revealed three-dimensional structure of the global CO2 distribution and has exposed significant inter-hemispheric transport of CO2 through the upper-troposphere. In inverse modeling, the CME data have provided strong constraints on CO2 flux estimation especially for the Asian tropics. Automatic flask air sampling equipment (ASE) is also onboard the CONTRAIL aircraft and has been observing CO2 mixing ratios as well as those of methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide and other trace species in the upper-troposphere between Japan and Australia. The observation period of the ASE has reached 20 years. In recent years, the ASE program has extended to the northern subarctic UT/LS region and has given an insight of transport mechanisms in the UT/LS by observing seasonal GHGs variations. In the other aircraft observation program by Japan Meteorological Agency, variations of GHGs have been observed by flask-sampling onboard a C-130H aircraft horizontally in the mid-troposphere over the western North Pacific as well as vertically over Minamitorishima-Island. The C-130H aircraft has persistently observed high mixing ratios of CH4 in the mid-troposphere, which seems to be originated from fossil fuel combustion throughout the year as well as from biogenic sources during summer in the Asian regions. Those above aircraft observation programs have a significant role for constraining GHGs flux estimates by filling the data gap of the existing surface measurement network

  10. Transport of north China air pollution by mid-latitude cyclones: A case study of aircraft measurements in summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, A.; Wang, T.; Xue, L.; Gao, J.; Stohl, A.; Lei, H.; Jin, D.; Ren, Y.; Wang, X.; Wei, X.; Qi, Y.; Liu, J.; Zhang, X.

    2008-12-01

    Meteorological processes such as warm conveyor belts (WCBs) and frontal activities, which are related to extratropical cyclones, have been recognized to play important roles in the long-range transport of air pollutants by lifting them from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into the free troposphere (FT) in mid- latitudes. To understand the transport mechanism and regional impact of air pollution transport in north and east China by mid-latitude cyclones in warm seasons, an aircraft study was carried out in northeast (NE) China in the summer of 2007. During a flight on 27 June, high concentrations of ozone and related trace gases as well as high values of the aerosol scattering coefficient (Bsp) were observed, with maximum concentrations (O3~ 140 ppbv, SO2 ~ 14.6 ppbv, CO ~ 1185 ppbv) recorded at an altitude of 2.6 km in the FT. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of this flight. Mesoscale meteorological simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model aided the diagnostic analysis of the atmospheric dynamic structure in the low troposphere and helped in the understanding of the transport characteristics of regional and local air pollution. Based on the WRF output, a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, FLEXPART, was used to conduct backward simulations and calculate the source-receptor relationship. The study was undertaken in a region in NE China adjacent to a warm front associated with a weak cyclone in north China. Trajectory analysis and atmospheric structure analysis suggest that the aircraft sampled both the WCB and warm air frontal zone of the cyclone. The backward Lagrangian simulations show that the observed high air pollution in the FT mostly originated from the North China Plain (NCP), especially the northern part containing the megacities Beijing and Tianjin. Their plumes were vented by a stagnant front, probably through, in part, topographic lifting by the mountains in the north, and then were quickly (within 1 to 2 days

  11. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of size-tunable zinc oxide architectures by multiple size reduction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Ho Park, Xin Zhang, Seon-Yong Hwang, Sang Hyun Jung, Semin Kang, Hyun-Beom Shin, Ho Kwan Kang, Hyung-Ho Park, Ross H Hill and Chul Ki Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple size reduction technique for fabricating 400 nm zinc oxide (ZnO architectures using a silicon master containing only microscale architectures. In this approach, the overall fabrication, from the master to the molds and the final ZnO architectures, features cost-effective UV photolithography, instead of electron beam lithography or deep-UV photolithography. A photosensitive Zn-containing sol–gel precursor was used to imprint architectures by direct UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL. The resulting Zn-containing architectures were then converted to ZnO architectures with reduced feature sizes by thermal annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. The imprinted and annealed ZnO architectures were also used as new masters for the size reduction technique. ZnO pillars of 400 nm diameter were obtained from a silicon master with pillars of 1000 nm diameter by simply repeating the size reduction technique. The photosensitivity and contrast of the Zn-containing precursor were measured as 6.5 J cm−2 and 16.5, respectively. Interesting complex ZnO patterns, with both microscale pillars and nanoscale holes, were demonstrated by the combination of dose-controlled UV exposure and a two-step UV-NIL.

  12. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt, Howard M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRP bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent

  13. Nitrogen uptake by size-fractionated phytoplankton in mangrove waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dham, V.V.; Wafar, M.V.M.; Heredia, A.M.

    & Dortch 1996) and temporal (Glibert et al. 1982, Furnas 1983, Chang et al. 1992, Riegman & Noordeloos 1998, Riegman et al. 1998) scales have lent support to this. The patterns of N nutrition demonstrated in these studies are more or less similar: larger...), the dominance of larger cells in areas enriched with nitrate does not appear to be the result of a link between cell size and preference for either nitrate or ammonium. Nitrate–ammonium interactions in phytoplankton N nutrition could also be more complex than a...

  14. Inverse size scaling of the nucleolus by a concentration-dependent phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stephanie C; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-03-01

    Just as organ size typically increases with body size, the size of intracellular structures changes as cells grow and divide. Indeed, many organelles, such as the nucleus [1, 2], mitochondria [3], mitotic spindle [4, 5], and centrosome [6], exhibit size scaling, a phenomenon in which organelle size depends linearly on cell size. However, the mechanisms of organelle size scaling remain unclear. Here, we show that the size of the nucleolus, a membraneless organelle important for cell-size homeostasis [7], is coupled to cell size by an intracellular phase transition. We find that nucleolar size directly scales with cell size in early C. elegans embryos. Surprisingly, however, when embryo size is altered, we observe inverse scaling: nucleolar size increases in small cells and decreases in large cells. We demonstrate that this seemingly contradictory result arises from maternal loading of a fixed number rather than a fixed concentration of nucleolar components, which condense into nucleoli only above a threshold concentration. Our results suggest that the physics of phase transitions can dictate whether an organelle assembles, and, if so, its size, providing a mechanistic link between organelle assembly and cell size. Since the nucleolus is known to play a key role in cell growth, this biophysical readout of cell size could provide a novel feedback mechanism for growth control.

  15. 3D pressure imaging of an aircraft propeller blade-tip flow by phase-locked stereoscopic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragni, D.; Oudheusden, B.W. van; Scarano, F. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    The flow field at the tip region of a scaled DHC Beaver aircraft propeller, running at transonic speed, has been investigated by means of a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup. Velocity fields, phase-locked with the blade rotational motion, are acquired across several planes perpendicular to the blade axis and merged to form a 3D measurement volume. Transonic conditions have been reached at the tip region, with a revolution frequency of 19,800 rpm and a relative free-stream Mach number of 0.73 at the tip. The pressure field and the surface pressure distribution are inferred from the 3D velocity data through integration of the momentum Navier-Stokes equation in differential form, allowing for the simultaneous flow visualization and the aerodynamic loads computation, with respect to a reference frame moving with the blade. The momentum and pressure data are further integrated by means of a contour-approach to yield the aerodynamic sectional force components as well as the blade torsional moment. A steady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulation of the entire propeller model has been used for comparison to the measurement data. (orig.)

  16. Standard guide for planar flaw height sizing by ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides tutorial information and a description of the principles and ultrasonic examination techniques for measuring the height of planar flaws which are open to the surface. The practices and technology described in this standard guide are intended as a reference to be used when selecting a specific ultrasonic flaw sizing technique as well as establishing a means for instrument standardization. 1.2 This standard guide does not provide or suggest accuracy or tolerances of the techniques described. Parameters such as search units, examination surface conditions, material composition, etc. can all have a bearing on the accuracy of results. It is recommended that users assess accuracy and tolerances applicable for each application. 1.3 This document does not purport to provide instruction to measure flaw length. 1.4 This standard guide does not provide, suggest, or specify acceptance standards. After flaw-sizing evaluation has been made, the results should be applied to an appropriate code or...

  17. Policy and the evaluation of aircraft noise

    OpenAIRE

    Kroesen, M.; Molin, E.J.E.; Van Wee, G.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we hypothesize and test the ideas that (1) people’s subjectivity in relation to aircraft noise is shaped by the policy discourse, (2) this results in a limited number of frames towards aircraft noise, (3) the frames inform people how to think and feel about aircraft noise and (4) the distribution of the frames in the population is dependent on structural variables related to the individual. To reveal subjects’ frames of aircraft noise a latent class model is estimated based on ...

  18. Challenges for the aircraft structural integrity program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-six years ago the United States Air Force established the USAF Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP) because flight safety had been degraded by fatigue failures of operational aircraft. This initial program evolved, but has been stable since the issuance of MIL-STD-1530A in 1975. Today, the program faces new challenges because of a need to maintain aircraft longer in an environment of reduced funding levels. Also, there is increased pressure to reduce cost of the acquisition of new aircraft. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the challenges for the ASIP and identify the changes in the program that will meet these challenges in the future.

  19. Poeciliid male mate preference is influenced by female size but not by fecundity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. Arriaga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available While female mate preference is very well studied, male preference has only recently begun to receive significant attention. Its existence is found in numerous taxa, but empirical research has mostly been limited to a descriptive level and does not fully address the factors influencing its evolution. We attempted to address this issue using preference functions by comparing the strength of male preference for females of different sizes in nine populations of four poeciliid species. Due to environmental constraints (water toxicity and surface versus cave habitat, females from these populations vary in the degree to which their size is correlated to their fecundity. Hence, they vary in how their size signals their quality as mates. Since female size is strongly correlated with fecundity in this subfamily, males were sequentially presented with conspecific females of three different size categories and the strength of their preference for each was measured. Males preferred larger females in all populations, as predicted. However, the degree to which males preferred each size category, as measured by association time, was not correlated with its fecundity. In addition, cave males discriminated against smaller females more than surface males. Assuming that male preference is correlated with female fitness, these results suggest that factors other than fecundity have a strong influence on female fitness in these species.

  20. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  1. Forward Looking Radar Imaging by Truncated Singular Value Decomposition and Its Application for Adverse Weather Aircraft Landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The forward looking radar imaging task is a practical and challenging problem for adverse weather aircraft landing industry. Deconvolution method can realize the forward looking imaging but it often leads to the noise amplification in the radar image. In this paper, a forward looking radar imaging based on deconvolution method is presented for adverse weather aircraft landing. We first present the theoretical background of forward looking radar imaging task and its application for aircraft landing. Then, we convert the forward looking radar imaging task into a corresponding deconvolution problem, which is solved in the framework of algebraic theory using truncated singular decomposition method. The key issue regarding the selecting of the truncated parameter is addressed using generalized cross validation approach. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in achieving angular resolution enhancement with suppressing the noise amplification in forward looking radar imaging.

  2. Forward Looking Radar Imaging by Truncated Singular Value Decomposition and Its Application for Adverse Weather Aircraft Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yulin; Zha, Yuebo; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    The forward looking radar imaging task is a practical and challenging problem for adverse weather aircraft landing industry. Deconvolution method can realize the forward looking imaging but it often leads to the noise amplification in the radar image. In this paper, a forward looking radar imaging based on deconvolution method is presented for adverse weather aircraft landing. We first present the theoretical background of forward looking radar imaging task and its application for aircraft landing. Then, we convert the forward looking radar imaging task into a corresponding deconvolution problem, which is solved in the framework of algebraic theory using truncated singular decomposition method. The key issue regarding the selecting of the truncated parameter is addressed using generalized cross validation approach. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in achieving angular resolution enhancement with suppressing the noise amplification in forward looking radar imaging. PMID:26094627

  3. Impact of the chosen turbulent flow empirical model on the prediction of sound radiation and vibration by aircraft panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Joana

    2016-07-01

    A precise definition of the turbulent boundary layer excitation is required to accurately predict the sound radiation and surface vibration levels, produced by an aircraft panel excited turbulent flow during flight. Hence, any existing inaccuracy on turbulent boundary layer excitation models leads to an inaccurate prediction of the panel response. A number of empirical models have been developed over the years to provide the turbulent boundary layer wall pressure spectral density. However, different empirical models provide dissimilar predictions for the wall pressure spectral density. The objective of the present study is to investigate and quantify the impact of the chosen empirical model on the predicted radiated sound power, and on the predicted panel surface acceleration levels. This study provides a novel approach and a detailed analysis on the use of different turbulent boundary layer wall pressure empirical models, and impact on mathematical predictions. Closed-form mathematical relationships are developed, and recommendations are provided for the level of deviation and uncertainty associated to different models, in relation to a baseline model, both for panel surface acceleration and radiated sound power.

  4. Experimental investigation of the cornering characteristics of 18 by 5.5, type 7, aircraft tires with different tread patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, R. C.; Tanner, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics, which include the cornering-force and drag-force friction coefficients and self-alining torque, were obtained on dry, damp, and flooded runway surfaces over a range of yaw angles from 0 deg to 12 deg and at ground speeds from approximately 5 to 90 knots. The results indicate that a tread pattern with pinholes in the ribs reduces the tire cornering capability at high yaw angles on a damp surface but improves cornering on a dry surface. A tread pattern which has transverse grooves across the entire width of the tread improves the tire cornering performance slightly at high speeds on the flooded runway surface. The cornering capability of all the tires is degraded at high ground speeds by thin film lubrication and/or tire hydroplaning effects. Alterations to the conventional tread pattern provide only marginal improvements in the tire cornering capability which suggests that runway surface treatments may be a more effective way of improving aircraft ground performance during wet operations.

  5. DESCRIPTION OF THE MANAGEMENT TASK OF PROVIDING QUALIFIED HUMAN RESOURCES TO RUSSIAN AIRCRAFT INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES BY THE UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernov Vasily Mikhaylovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the organizational and economic mechanism for providing the qualified human resources to the enterprises of Russian Aviation Industrial Complex by the universities. The author focuses on forming a system of general assumptions, choosing the management object, the subject area, the operating parties, and the subject of control; forming the objectives of the operating parties; choosing the management purposes, a set of management actions, the external impacts on the management object except for the management actions; identifying inadmissible conditions of the control object and inadmissible administrative impacts on the control object. In terms of content the management task of providing qualified human resources to Russian aircraft industrial enterprises is to identify and justify the need to improve the human resource capacity of an entity so as to ensure maximum achievement of the set management objectives in the presence of external influences that do not result in an unacceptable state of the management object and do not exceed the allowable area of ​​management.

  6. Arc reattachment driven by a turbulent boundary layer: implications for the sweeping of lightning arcs along aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Nguyen, N. C.; Peraire, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2016-09-01

    A lightning channel attached to an aircraft in flight will be swept along the aircraft’s surface in response to the relative velocity between the arc’s root (attached to a moving electrode) and the bulk of the arc, which is stationary with respect to the air. During this process, the reattachment of the arc to new locations often occurs. The detailed description of this swept stroke is still at an early stage of research, and it entails the interaction between an electrical arc and the flow boundary layer. In this paper we examine the implications of the structure of the boundary layer for the arc sweeping and reattachment process by considering different velocity profiles, both for laminar and turbulent flow, as well as a high fidelity description, using large eddy simulation, of transitional flow over an airfoil. It is found that the local velocity fluctuations in a turbulent flow may be important contributors to the reattachment of the arc, through a combination of an increased potential drop along the arc and local approaches of the arc to the surface. Specific flow features, such as the presence of a laminar recirculation bubble, can also contribute to the possibility of reattachment.

  7. 77 FR 20012 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Corporate Aircraft Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Corporate Aircraft Costs AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General... collection requirement concerning corporate aircraft costs. Public comments are particularly invited on..., Corporate Aircraft Costs, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  8. Research on Emerging and Descending Aircraft Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bartkevičiūtė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Along with an increase in the aircraft engine power and growth in air traffic, noise level at airports and their surrounding environs significantly increases. Aircraft noise is high level noise spreading within large radius and intensively irritating the human body. Air transport is one of the main sources of noise having a particularly strong negative impact on the environment. The article deals with activities and noises taking place in the largest nationwide Vilnius International Airport.The level of noise and its dispersion was evaluated conducting research on the noise generated by emerging and descending aircrafts in National Vilnius Airport. Investigation was carried out at 2 measuring points located in a residential area. There are different types of aircrafts causing different sound levels. It has been estimated the largest exceedances that occur when an aircraft is approaching. In this case, the noisiest types of aircrafts are B733, B738 and AT72. The sound level varies from 70 to 85 dBA. The quietest aircrafts are RJ1H and F70. When taking off, the equivalent of the maximum sound level value of these aircrafts does not exceed the authorized limits. The paper describes the causes of noise in aircrafts, the sources of origin and the impact of noise on humans and the environment.Article in Lithuanian

  9. Prediction of flow separation from aircraft tails using a RSM turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Andrea; Benton, Jeremy; Tucker, Paul G.

    2014-11-01

    Enhancing engineers' capability to predict flow separation would generate important benefits in aircraft design. In this study the attention is focused on the vertical tail plane (VTP), which consists of a fixed part (the fin) and a moveable control surface (the rudder). For standard two-engine aircraft configurations, the size of the VTP is driven by the condition of loss of an engine during takeoff and low speed climb: in this condition the fin and the rudder have to be sufficient in size to balance the aircraft. Due to uncertainties in prediction of VTP effectiveness, aircraft designers keep to a conservative approach, risking specifying a larger size for the VTP than it is probably necessary. Uncertainties come from difficulties in predicting the separation of the flow from the surfaces of the aircraft using current CFD techniques, which are based on the use of RANS equations with eddy viscosity turbulence models. The CFD simulations presented in this study investigate the use of a RSM turbulence model with RANS and URANS. The introduction of a time-dependency gives benefits in the accuracy of the flow solution in presence of massive flow separation. This leads to the investigation of hybrid RANS/LES techniques with the aim of improving the solution of the detached flow. EU FP7 project ANADE (Grant Agreement Number 289428).

  10. RESEARCH OF NIGHT LIGHT EFFECTS ON COLORIMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF IMAGE PERCEIVED BY THE PILOT IN AN AIRCRAFT COCKPIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Zharinov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The influence of radiation spectra from the source of artificial night light on colorimetric characteristics of image perceived by the pilot in the aircraft cockpit has been studied. The image is displayed on the LCD screen of multifunctional color indication equipment unit. Night illumination of the cockpit is performed with the use of artificial lamps of red, green, blue and, rarely, white light. Method. Any given color to be displayed on the screen is perceived by an observer differently with presence and absence of external illumination. When external light of white color is used, perceived color depends upon color temperature of the light source; if illumination source has any arbitrary spectral characteristics, then perceivable color depends upon whole spectral content of the used source. The color, perceived by an observer, is formed as the mixture of the color displayed on the screen (image element color with the color presented by diffuse reflection of external illumination source from the surface of the screen. The brightness of both colors is added. Mathematical expressions, that define calculation rule for chromaticity coordinates of color perceived by an observer, are based on the Grassmann’s law of additive color mixing. Quantitative analysis of the effect, caused by radiation spectra from an external source of artificial light on color gamut area, corresponding to image, perceived by an observer, has been performed through simulation in MathCad 15.0. Main Results. It was shown, that the color palette of on-board indication equipment, obtained on automated working place for any preset source of external illumination of fluorescent spectrum, corresponding to white light, is not usable correctly in the aircraft night flight mode. An observer loses ability to perceive properly saturated primary colors of red and blue in the case of green-blue light source of external illumination; and the same issue occurs with

  11. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models by comparison with research aircraft observations. Part 1: Concepts and overall model performance

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J; Rogers, H. L.; Köhler, M. O.; Pyle, J.A.; Hauglustaine, D.; Jourdain, L.; Berntsen, T. K.; Gauss, M.; I. S. A. Isaksen; MEIJER E.; Van Velthoven, P.; Pitari, G.; Mancini, E; Grewe, V

    2003-01-01

    A rigorous evaluation of five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by several different groups in Europe was performed by comparing the models with trace gas observations from a number of research aircraft measurement campaigns. Whenever possible the models were run over the four-year period 1995–1998 and at each simulation time step the instantaneous tracer fields were interpolated to all coinciding observation points. This approach allows for a ...

  12. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models by comparison with research aircraft observations. Part 1: Concepts and overall model performance

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J; Rogers, H. L.; Köhler, M. O.; Pyle, J.A.; Hauglustaine, D.; Jourdain, L.; Berntsen, T. K.; Gauss, M.; I. S. A. Isaksen; MEIJER E.; Van Velthoven, P.; Pitari, G.; Mancini, E; Grewe, V

    2003-01-01

    International audience A rigorous evaluation of five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by several different groups in Europe was performed by comparing the models with trace gas observations from a number of research aircraft measurement campaigns. Whenever possible the models were run over the four-year period 1995–1998 and at each simulation time step the instantaneous tracer fields were interpolated to all coinciding observation points. This approach a...

  13. Onset of size independent cationic exchange in nano-sized CoFe2O4 induced by electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electronic excitation induced crystalline order in CoFe2O4. • No change of metallic valence state under dense electronic excitation. • Size independent control of cations in CoFe2O4. - Abstract: Present work investigates electronic excitation induced cationic exchange phenomena in nano-sized cobalt ferrites using Mössabaur and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The electronic excitations were produced by irradiation of 100 MeV O+7 at different fluences ranging from 1 × 1011 to 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. Cubic spinel phase of cobalt ferrite remains preserved after irradiation. However, attributes of crystalline disorder were observed in irradiated materials. Crystallite size remain almost same for pristine and irradiated materials. X-ray absorption fine structure measurements show the preservation of valence state and spin state of metal ions under intense electronic excitation. These measurements also envisage bond breaking process induced by the electronic excitation. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements also corroborate with the fine structure measurements that the valence state of Fe remains same after irradiation. Paramagnetic doublet which presents in the Mössabaur spectrum of pristine material disappears after irradiation, showing the evolution of irradiation induced magnetic ordering. Fe3+ ion increases with irradiation at octahedral site of spinel lattice. Magnetization of the material slightly increases after irradiation at the fluence of 5 × 1013 and 1 × 1014 ions/cm2

  14. Determination of Size Distribution of Nano-particles by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan XUE; Hai Ying YANG; Yong Tan YANG

    2005-01-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of the size distribution of nano-particles by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Scattering effect of nanoparticles was studied. This method for the determination of size distribution was statistical.

  15. Distributed Data Mining for Aircraft Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA) programs are implemented by most of the aircraft operators. Vast amounts of FOQA data are distributed between...

  16. Ecological Risk Assessment Framework for Low-Altitude Overflights by Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Military Aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2001-01-12

    This is a companion report to the risk assessment framework proposed by Suter et al. (1998): ''A Framework for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources,'' hereafter referred to as the ''generic framework.'' The generic framework is an ecological risk assessment methodology for use in environmental assessments on Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In the generic framework, the ecological risk assessment framework of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1998) is modified for use in the context of (1) multiple and diverse stressors and activities at a military installation and (2) risks resulting from causal chains, e.g., effects on habitat that indirectly impact wildlife. Both modifications are important if the EPA framework is to be used on military installations. In order for the generic risk assessment framework to be useful to DoD environmental staff and contractors, the framework must be applied to specific training and testing activities. Three activity-specific ecological risk assessment frameworks have been written (1) to aid environmental staff in conducting risk assessments that involve these activities and (2) to guide staff in the development of analogous frameworks for other DoD activities. The three activities are: (1) low-altitude overflights by fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft (this volume), (2) firing at targets on land, and (3) ocean explosions. The activities were selected as priority training and testing activities by the advisory committee for this project.

  17. Power Management Strategy by Enhancing the Mission Profile Configuration of Solar-Powered Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathy Rajendran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy offers solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV the possibility of unlimited endurance. Some researchers have developed techniques to achieve perpetual flight by maximizing the power from the sun and by flying in accordance with its azimuth angles. However, flying in a path that follows the sun consumes more energy to sustain level flight. This study optimizes the overall power ratio by adopting the mission profile configuration of optimal solar energy exploitation. Extensive simulation is conducted to optimize and restructure the mission profile phases of UAV and to determine the optimal phase definition of the start, ascent, and descent periods, thereby maximizing the energy from the sun. In addition, a vertical cylindrical flight trajectory instead of maximizing the solar inclination angle has been adopted. This approach improves the net power ratio by 30.84% compared with other techniques. As a result, the battery weight may be massively reduced by 75.23%. In conclusion, the proposed mission profile configuration with the optimal power ratio of the trajectory of the path planning effectively prolongs UAV operation.

  18. Experimental analysis of buckling in aircraft skin panels by fibre optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güemes, J. A.; Menendez, J. M.; Frövel, M.; Fernandez, I.; Pintado, J. M.

    2001-06-01

    Three blade-stiffened CFRP panels with co-cured stiffener webs, manufactured by means of an elastomeric mould, have been tested under compressive load. Several Bragg grating sensors have been surface bonded on two of the stiffened panels and have been embedded into the stiffener webs of the third panel. The Bragg grating sensors measured the strain distribution in the stiffener web and in the skin panels. The bucking onset was clearly detected in every case, the post-buckling behaviour can be tracked, but the information is heavily dependent on the right choice of the sensor position and the buckling mode. To calibrate the system, and to evaluate the influence of different curing pressures, and the use of unidirectional or fabric prepreg material, tensile test specimens were made on flat panels. The strain measurements provided by the optical fibre sensors in tensile tests were compared with the strain measurements provided by conventional clamp extensometers.

  19. Research on uncertainty in measurement assisted alignment in aircraft assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhehan; Du Fuzhou; Tang Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Operations in assembling and joining large size aircraft components are changed to novel digital and flexible ways by digital measurement assisted alignment. Positions and orientations (P&O) of aligned components are critical characters which assure geometrical positions and rela-tionships of those components. Therefore, evaluating the P&O of a component is considered nec-essary and critical for ensuring accuracy in aircraft assembly. Uncertainty of position and orientation (U-P&O), as a part of the evaluating result of P&O, needs to be given for ensuring the integrity and credibility of the result; furthermore, U-P&O is necessary for error tracing and quality evaluating of measurement assisted aircraft assembly. However, current research mainly focuses on the process integration of measurement with assembly, and usually ignores the uncer-tainty of measured result and its influence on quality evaluation. This paper focuses on the expres-sion, analysis, and application of U-P&O in measurement assisted alignment. The geometrical and algebraical connotations of U-P&O are presented. Then, an analytical algorithm for evaluating the multi-dimensional U-P&O is given, and the effect factors and characteristics of U-P&O are dis-cussed. Finally, U-P&O is used to evaluate alignment in aircraft assembly for quality evaluating and improving. Cases are introduced with the methodology.

  20. Aircraft type influence on contrail properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jeßberger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the impact of aircraft parameters on contrail properties helps to better understand the climate impact from aviation. Yet, in observations, it is a challenge to separate aircraft and meteorological influences on contrail formation. During the CONCERT campaign in November 2008, contrails from 3 Airbus passenger aircraft of type A319-111, A340-311 and A380-841 were probed at cruise under similar meteorological conditions with in-situ instruments on board the DLR research aircraft Falcon. Within the 2 min old contrails detected near ice saturation, we find similar effective diameters Deff (5.2–5.9 μm, but differences in particle number densities nice (162–235 cm−3 and in vertical contrail extensions (120–290 m, resulting in large differences in contrail optical depths τ (0.25–0.94. Hence larger aircraft produce optically thicker contrails. Based on the observations, we apply the EULAG-LCM model with explicit ice microphysics and in addition the Contrail and Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP to calculate the aircraft type impact on young contrails under identical meteorological conditions. The observed increase in τ for heavier aircraft is confirmed by the models, yet for generally smaller τ. An aircraft dependence of climate relevant contrail properties persists during contrail lifetime, adding importance to aircraft dependent model initialization. We finally derive an analytical relationship between contrail, aircraft and meteorological parameters. Near ice saturation, contrail width × τ scales linearly with fuel flow rate as confirmed by observations. For higher saturation ratios approximations from theory suggest a non-linear increase in the form (RHI–12/3. Summarized our combined results could help to more accurately assess the climate impact from aviation using an aircraft dependent contrail parameterization.

  1. Preparation of Nano-Sized TiO2 Particles by Microemulsion Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaohua Zhang; Bing Xie; Fengyi Li; Peng Xu

    2006-01-01

    Nano-sized titania powders have been prepared by hydrolysis of tetrabutyl titanate in the droplet of water/OP-7/pentanol/cyclohexane microemulsion system. The effects of ingredient change on the water drop size and particle size were investigated. The prepared TiO2 was in the form of anatase after annealing. TiO2 was characterized by TG-TGA,FTIR, XRD to measure the transformation temperature, surface adsorption and average size.

  2. 75 FR 82329 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. (Type Certificate Previously Held by The New Piper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... new service information. We are proposing this AD to prevent improper engine operation caused by... FULL RICH mixture to assure adequate fuel flow for engine cooling. (2) If the turbine inlet temperature... revised related service information and added an airplane model to the list of affected airplanes....

  3. Turboprop aircraft against terrorism: a SWOT analysis of turboprop aircraft in CAS operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Murat; Akkas, Ali; Aslan, Yavuz

    2012-06-01

    Today, the threat perception is changing. Not only for countries but also for defence organisations like NATO, new threat perception is pointing terrorism. Many countries' air forces become responsible of fighting against terorism or Counter-Insurgency (COIN) Operations. Different from conventional warfare, alternative weapon or weapon systems are required for such operatioins. In counter-terrorism operations modern fighter jets are used as well as helicopters, subsonic jets, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), turboprop aircraft, baloons and similar platforms. Succes and efficiency of the use of these platforms can be determined by evaluating the conditions, the threats and the area together. Obviously, each platform has advantages and disadvantages for different cases. In this research, examples of turboprop aircraft usage against terrorism and with a more general approach, turboprop aircraft for Close Air Support (CAS) missions from all around the world are reviewed. In this effort, a closer look is taken at the countries using turboprop aircraft in CAS missions while observing the fields these aircraft are used in, type of operations, specifications of the aircraft, cost and the maintenance factors. Thus, an idea about the convenience of using these aircraft in such operations can be obtained. A SWOT analysis of turboprop aircraft in CAS operations is performed. This study shows that turboprop aircraft are suitable to be used in counter-terrorism and COIN operations in low threat environment and is cost benefical compared to jets.

  4. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models by comparison with research aircraft observations. Part 1: Concepts and overall model performance

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J; Rogers, H. L.; Köhler, M. O.; Pyle, J.A.; Hauglustaine, D.; Jourdain, L.; Berntsen, T. K.; Gauss, M.; I. S. A. Isaksen; MEIJER E.; Van Velthoven, P.; Pitari, G.; Mancini, E; Grewe, G.

    2003-01-01

    A rigorous evaluation of five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by several different groups in Europe, was performed. Comparisons were made of the models with trace gas observations from a number of research aircraft measurement campaigns during the four-year period 1995-1998. Whenever possible the models were run over the same four-year period and at each simulation time step the instantaneous tracer fields were interpolated to all coinciding observati...

  5. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models by comparison with research aircraft observations. Part 1: Concepts and overall model performance

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J; Rogers, H. L.; Köhler, M. O.; Pyle, J.A.; Hauglustaine, D.; Jourdain, L.; Berntsen, T. K.; Gauss, M.; I. S. A. Isaksen; MEIJER E.; Van Velthoven, P.; Pitari, G.; Mancini, E; Grewe, G.

    2003-01-01

    International audience A rigorous evaluation of five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by several different groups in Europe, was performed. Comparisons were made of the models with trace gas observations from a number of research aircraft measurement campaigns during the four-year period 1995-1998. Whenever possible the models were run over the same four-year period and at each simulation time step the instantaneous tracer fields were interpolated to all...

  6. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models by comparison with research aircraft observations. Part 1: Concepts and overall model performance

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, D.; Staehelin, J; Rogers, H. L.; Köhler, M. O.; Pyle, J.A.; Hauglustaine, D.; Jourdain, L.; Berntsen, T. K.; Gauss, M.; I. S. A. Isaksen; MEIJER E.; Van Velthoven, P.; Pitari, G.; Mancini, E; Grewe, G.

    2003-01-01

    A rigorous evaluation of five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by several different groups in Europe, was performed. Comparisons were made of the models with trace gas observations from a number of research aircraft measurement campaigns during the four-year period 1995-1998. Whenever possible the models were run over the same four-year period and at each simulation time step the instantaneous tracer fields were interpol...

  7. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing

  8. Pursing Contamination Detection on Aircraft CFRP Surfaces By Artificial Olfaction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Saverio; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2011-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structures can be easily bonded via adhesive assembly procedures but their cleanliness is of fundamental importance to ensure the strength of the adhesive bonding. Actually, surface contamination by several aeronautics fluids eventually results in weak or kissing bonds. The goal of our research work is to investigate solid state chemical sensors and artificial olfaction techniques (AO) for the detection of CFRP surface contamination by aeronautic fluids. This result will allow the implementation of an instrumental NDT procedure for CFRP surface cleanliness assessment prior to bonding. Herein, results of our first experimental setup, based on the use of an array of polymer sensors for the detection of aeronautic fluids contamination, are presented.

  9. The Attenuation of a Detonation Wave by an Aircraft Engine Axial Turbine Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane; Turner, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    A Constant Volume Combustion Cycle Engine concept consisting of a Pulse Detonation Combustor (PDC) followed by a conventional axial turbine was simulated numerically to determine the attenuation and reflection of a notional PDC pulse by the turbine. The multi-stage, time-accurate, turbomachinery solver TURBO was used to perform the calculation. The solution domain consisted of one notional detonation tube coupled to 5 vane passages and 8 rotor passages representing 1/8th of the annulus. The detonation tube was implemented as an initial value problem with the thermodynamic state of the tube contents, when the detonation wave is about to exit, provided by a 1D code. Pressure time history data from the numerical simulation was compared to experimental data from a similar configuration to verify that the simulation is giving reasonable results. Analysis of the pressure data showed a spectrally averaged attenuation of about 15 dB across the turbine stage. An evaluation of turbine performance is also presented.

  10. Light shaping diffusers{trademark} improve aircraft inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagam, R.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shie, R.; Lerner, J. [Physical Optics Corp., Torrance, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Physical Optical Corporation has introduced a Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) for the specialized illumination requirements of aircraft inspection. Attached to a handheld, battery-powered flashlight, this light-weight, holographic diffuser element provides bright, even illumination as aircraft inspectors perform the important task of visually examining aircraft for possible structural defects. Field trials conducted by the Aging Aircraft Program at Sandia National Laboratories confirm that the LSD-equipped flashlights are preferred by visual inspectors over stock flashlights.

  11. Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 by microorganisms isolated from aircraft fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Christopher J; Perry, Thomas D; Leard, Ryan; Bearce, Ktisten; Dante, James; Mitchell, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms frequently contaminate jet fuel and cause corrosion of fuel tank metals. In the past, jet fuel contaminants included a diverse group of bacteria and fungi. The most common contaminant was the fungus Hormoconis resinae. However, the jet fuel community has been altered by changes in the composition of the fuel and is now dominated by bacterial contaminants. The purpose of this research was to determine the composition of the microbial community found in fuel tanks containing jet propellant-8 (JP-8) and to determine the potential of this community to cause corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 (AA2024). Isolates cultured from fuel tanks containing JP-8 were closely related to the genus Bacillus and the fungi Aureobasidium and Penicillium. Biocidal activity of the fuel system icing inhibitor diethylene glycol monomethyl ether is the most likely cause of the prevalence of endospore forming bacteria. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and metallographic analysis of AA2024 exposed to the fuel tank environment indicated that the isolates caused corrosion of AA2024. Despite the limited taxonomic diversity of microorganisms recovered from jet fuel, the community has the potential to corrode fuel tanks. PMID:16522539

  12. Nondestructive damage characterization of complex aircraft structures by inverse methods: Advances in multiscale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Zhou, Liming; Bernacchi, William; Aldrin, John C.; Forsyth, David; Lindgren, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The use of coupled integral equations and anomalous currents allows us to efficiently remove `background effects' in either forward or inverse modeling. This is especially true when computing the change in impedance due to a small flaw in the presence of a larger background anomaly. It is more accurate than simply computing the response with and without the flaw and then subtracting the two nearly equal values to obtain the small difference due to the flaw. The problem that we address in this paper involves a 'SplitD' probe that includes complex, noncircular coils, as well as ferrite cores, inserted within a bolt hole, and exciting both the bolt hole and an adjacent flaw. This introduces three coupled anomalies, each with its on 'scale.' The largest, of course, is the bolt hole, followed (generally) by the probe, and then the flaw. The overall system is represented mathematically by three coupled volume-integral equations. We describe the development of the model and its code, which is a part of the general eddy-current modeling code, VIC-3D®. We present initial validation results, as well as a number of model computations with flaws located at various places within the bolt hole.

  13. Literature study of climate effects of contrails caused by aircraft emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pultau, V.E.

    1998-07-01

    By order of EUROCONTROL, a study of the most recent literature concerning contrails was performed. Attention was paid to the latest research findings concerning the formation, the lifetime, the frequency, the microphysical properties and the radiative forcing of contrails and their climate effects. Contrails form when saturation with respect to water is temporarily reached in the plume and they persist in ice supersaturated air masses. The ambient temperature necessary for contrail formation can be predicted accurately. Contrail particles consist of ice crystals. Young persistent contrails are composed of more, but smaller ice crystals than typical cirrus. Persistent contrails develop towards cirrus clouds in the course of time. The average contrail coverage exhibits a value of around 0.5% over Europe. The mean global contrail cover is estimated to be of order of 0.1%. The net radiation effect of contrails is believed to enhance warming of the troposphere on average. 59 refs.

  14. The structure of the unstable marine boundary layer viewed by lidar and aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, D.; Walter, B.; Chou, S.-H.; Sheu, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) during a cold-air outbreak off the Atlantic coast between New York and Virginia on January 20, 1983 is characterized on the basis of airborne lidar observations, vertical soundings (potential temperature, vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, and wind), and horizontal (770-m) temperature records. The data are presented in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail. The organization of the MABL is defined by 1-2-km-scale roll vortices with up and downdrafts of 2-4 m/s at 210 m; north-south orientation of the roll axes (parallel to the low-level winds); rising arms coinciding with updrafts rich in moisture, aerosols, and heat; and 150-200-m (peak-to-trough) undulations of the inversion. Consideration is given to problems inherent in the interpretation of lidar data for MABL studies.

  15. Aircraft landing using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  16. Narrow size distributed Ag nanoparticles grown by spin coating and thermal reduction: effect of processing parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A. A.; Sartale, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    A simple method to grow uniform sized Ag nanoparticles with narrow size distribution on flat support (glass and Si substrates) via spin coating of Ag+ ions (AgNO3) solution followed by thermal reduction in H2 is presented. These grown nanoparticles can be used as model catalytic system to study size dependent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. Ag nanoparticles formation was confirmed by local surface plasmon resonance and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Influences of process parameters (revolution per minute (rpm), ramp and salt concentration) on grown Ag nanoparticles size, density and size uniformity are studied. With increase in rpm and ramp the size decreases and the particle number density increases, whereas the size dispersion improves. The catalytic activity of the grown Ag particles for ORR is studied and it is found that the catalytic performance is dependent on the size as well as the number density of the grown Ag nanoparticles.

  17. Introduction to unmanned aircraft systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Douglas M; Hottman, Stephen B; Shappee, Eric; Most, Michael Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems is the editors' response to their unsuccessful search for suitable university-level textbooks on this subject. A collection of contributions from top experts, this book applies the depth of their expertise to identify and survey the fundamentals of unmanned aircraft system (UAS) operations. Written from a nonengineering civilian operational perspective, the book starts by detailing the history of UASs and then explores current technology and what is expected for the future. Covering all facets of UAS elements and operation-including an examination of s

  18. Designing A Conventional Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Sonei, Arash

    2014-01-01

    This paper is explaining the important design phases of dimensioning an unmanned conventional aircraft from scratch and will also design one according to a few chosen requirements. The design phases discussed will be all from wing dimensioning to stability and spin recovery, aircraft performance requirements and how to select a motor which overcomes these. As well as the optimal rate of climb for improved efficiency is discussed. In the end an aircraft which manages the set requirements and i...

  19. U.S. Geological Survey Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Roadmap 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Jill J.; Hutt, Michael E.; Sloan, Jeff L.; Bauer, Mark A.; Feller, Mark R.; Goplen, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) is responsible for protecting the natural resources and heritage contained on almost 20 percent of the land in the United States. This responsibility requires acquisition of remotely sensed data throughout vast lands, including areas that are remote and potentially dangerous to access. One promising new technology for data collection is unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), which may be better suited (achieving superior science, safety, and savings) than traditional methods. UAS, regardless of their size, have the same operational components: aircraft, payloads, communications unit, and operator control unit. The aircraft is the platform that flies and carries any required payloads. For Department of the Interior missions these payloads will be either a sensor or set of sensors that can acquire the specific type of remotely sensed data that is needed. The aircraft will also carry the payload that is responsible for transmitting live airborne video images, compass headings, and location information to the operator control unit. The communications unit, which transfers information between the aircraft and the operator control unit, consists of the hardware and software required to establish both uplink and downlink communications. Finally, the operator control unit both controls and monitors the aircraft and can be operated either by a pilot on the ground or autonomously.

  20. Size-Dependent Optical Properties of Dendronized Perylenediimide Nanoparticle Prepared by Laser Ablation in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yasukuni, Ryohei; Sliwa, Michel; Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C.; Herrmann, Andreas; Mullen, Klaus; Asahi, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles of dendronized perylenediimide (DPDI) were fabricated by laser ablation in water. We succeeded in the preparation of colloidal nanoparticles of different sizes (150-400 nm) and examined their size-dependent optical absorption and fluorescence properties. The size-dependent

  1. A high ozone episode in winter 2013 in the Uinta Basin oil and gas region characterized by aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Karion, A.; Schnell, R. C.; Pétron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Wolter, S.; Neff, D.; Montzka, S. A.; Miller, B. R.; Helmig, D.; Johnson, B. J.; Hueber, J.

    2014-08-01

    During the winter of 2012-2013 atmospheric surface ozone mole fractions exceeded the US 8 h standard of 75 ppb on 39 days in the Uinta Basin of Utah. As part of the Uinta Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) aircraft flights were conducted throughout the basin with continuous measurements of ozone (O3), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and discrete whole air flask samples for determination of ∼50 trace gases including a number of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). During the course of seven flights conducted between 31 January and 7 February 2013, coinciding with strong, multi-day temperature inversions, O3 levels gradually built up in the shallow boundary layer from ∼45 ppb to ∼140 ppb. Near-surface CH4 mole fractions increased during the episode from near background levels of ∼2 ppm to over 10 ppm. Based on elevated levels of CH4 across the basin and high correlations of CH4 with NMHCs from the discrete air samples, O3 precursor NMHCs were also inferred to be elevated throughout the basin. Discrete plumes of high NO2 were observed in the gas production region of the basin suggesting that gas processing plants and compressor facilities were important point sources of reactive nitrogen oxides (NOx). Vertical profiles obtained during the flights showed that the high O3 mole fractions (as well as other elevated constituents) were confined to a shallow layer from near the ground to 300-400 m above ground level (m a.g.l.) capped by a strong temperature inversion. The highest mole fractions of the measured constituents during the study period were in an isothermal cold layer that varied from ∼300 m depth on 4 February to ∼150 m on 5 February. A gradient layer with declining mole fractions with altitude extended above the isothermal layer to ∼1900 m a.s.l. (300-400 m a.g.l.) indicative of some mixing of air out of the boundary layer. O3 mole fractions continued to increase within the basin as the high O3 episode

  2. A high ozone episode in winter 2013 in the Uinta Basin oil and gas region characterized by aircraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Oltmans

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the winter of 2012–2013 atmospheric surface ozone mole fractions exceeded the US 8 h standard of 75 ppb on 39 days in the Uinta Basin of Utah. As part of the Uinta Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS aircraft flights were conducted throughout the basin with continuous measurements of ozone (O3, methane (CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and discrete whole air flask samples for determination of ∼50 trace gases including a number of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs. During the course of seven flights conducted between 31 January and 7 February 2013, coinciding with strong, multi-day temperature inversions, O3 levels gradually built up in the shallow boundary layer from ∼45 ppb to ∼140 ppb. Near-surface CH4 mole fractions increased during the episode from near background levels of ∼2 ppm to over 10 ppm. Based on elevated levels of CH4 across the basin and high correlations of CH4 with NMHCs from the discrete air samples, O3 precursor NMHCs were also inferred to be elevated throughout the basin. Discrete plumes of high NO2 were observed in the gas production region of the basin suggesting that gas processing plants and compressor facilities were important point sources of reactive nitrogen oxides (NOx. Vertical profiles obtained during the flights showed that the high O3 mole fractions (as well as other elevated constituents were confined to a shallow layer from near the ground to 300–400 m above ground level (m a.g.l. capped by a strong temperature inversion. The highest mole fractions of the measured constituents during the study period were in an isothermal cold layer that varied from ∼300 m depth on 4 February to ∼150 m on 5 February. A gradient layer with declining mole fractions with altitude extended above the isothermal layer to ∼1900 m a.s.l. (300–400 m a.g.l. indicative of some mixing of air out of the boundary layer. O3 mole fractions continued to increase within the basin as the

  3. Roosevelt County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  4. Mora County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  5. Otero County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  6. De Baca County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  7. Sandoval County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  8. Santa Fe County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  9. Bernalillo County Blocks, Average Household Size by Tenure (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The once-a-decade decennial census was conducted in April 2010 by the U.S. Census Bureau. This count of every resident in the United States was mandated by Article...

  10. Direct and Indirect Evidence of Size-Selective Grazing on Pelagic Bacteria by Freshwater Nanoflagellates

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, Karel; Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Size-selective grazing of three heterotrophic nanoflagellates (with cell sizes of 21, 44, and 66 μm3) isolated from Lake Arlington, Texas was examined by using a natural mixture of fluorescence labelled lake bacteria. Sizes of ingested bacteria in food vacuoles were directly measured. Larger bacterial cells were ingested at a frequency much higher than that at which they occurred in the assemblage, indicating preferential flagellate grazing on the larger size classes within the lake bacteriop...

  11. Human Response to Aircraft Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.

    2011-01-01

    How can it be that one person is extremely annoyed by the sounds of aircrafts, while his neighbour claims not to be bothered at all? The present thesis attempts to explain this observation by applying a range of quantitative methods to field data gathered among residents living near large airports.

  12. Grain and Oilseed Shipment Sizes and Distance Hauled by Rail

    OpenAIRE

    Prater, Marvin; Sparger, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Grain and railroads have an interdependent relationship. Grain is one of the most important commodities for railroads. It is the primary agricultural commodity moved by rail, comprising 7.9 percent by tons of all commodities, 94 percent by tons of all farm commodities, and 8.4 percent of total rail revenue in 2009. In turn, railroads represent a vital component of the grain network, hauling 33 percent of all grain transported in the United States in 2007. As domestic and export markets have e...

  13. Vision assisted aircraft lateral navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohideen, Mohamed Ibrahim; Ramegowda, Dinesh; Seiler, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Surface operation is currently one of the least technologically equipped phases of aircraft operation. The increased air traffic congestion necessitates more aircraft operations in degraded weather and at night. The traditional surface procedures worked well in most cases as airport surfaces have not been congested and airport layouts were less complex. Despite the best efforts of FAA and other safety agencies, runway incursions continue to occur frequently due to incorrect surface operation. Several studies conducted by FAA suggest that pilot induced error contributes significantly to runway incursions. Further, the report attributes pilot's lack of situational awareness - local (e.g., minimizing lateral deviation), global (e.g., traffic in the vicinity) and route (e.g., distance to next turn) - to the problem. An Enhanced Vision System (EVS) is one concept that is being considered to resolve these issues. These systems use on-board sensors to provide situational awareness under poor visibility conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of an Image processing based system to estimate the aircraft position and orientation relative to taxiway markings to use as lateral guidance aid. We estimate aircraft yaw angle and lateral offset from slope of the taxiway centerline and horizontal position of vanishing line. Unlike automotive applications, several cues such as aircraft maneuvers along assigned route with minimal deviations, clear ground markings, even taxiway surface, limited aircraft speed are available and enable us to implement significant algorithm optimizations. We present experimental results to show high precision navigation accuracy with sensitivity analysis with respect to camera mount, optics, and image processing error.

  14. Impact of Advanced Propeller Technology on Aircraft/Mission Characteristics of Several General Aviation Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of several General Aviation aircraft indicated that the application of advanced technologies to General Aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft by a significant amount. Propeller blade weight reductions achieved through the use of composites, propeller efficiency and noise improvements achieved through the use of advanced concepts and improved propeller analytical design methods result in aircraft with lower operating cost, acquisition cost and gross weight.

  15. The contribution of aircraft emissions to the atmospheric sulfur budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, E. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Feichter, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Sausen, R.; Hein, R. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model including the atmospheric sulfur cycle has been used to investigate the impact of aircraft sulfur emissions on the global sulfur budget of the atmosphere. The relative contribution from aircraft sulfur to the atmospheric sulfate burden is larger than the ratio between aircraft emissions and surface emissions due to the calculated long turn-over time of aircraft sulfate (about 12 days). However, in terms of the sulfate mass balance, aircraft emissions are small, contributing about 1% of the total sulfate mass north of 40 deg C where the aircraft emissions are largest. Despite this small contribution to sulfate mass, the aircraft emissions could potentially significantly enhance the background number concentration of aerosol particles. Based on the model calculations the increased stratospheric background aerosol mass observed during the last decades can not be explained by increased aircraft sulfur emissions 50 refs, 9 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Aircraft detection based on probability model of structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Jiang, Zhiguo

    2014-11-01

    Detecting aircrafts is important in the field of remote sensing. In past decades, researchers used various approaches to detect aircrafts based on classifiers for overall aircrafts. However, with the development of high-resolution images, the internal structures of aircrafts should also be taken into consideration now. To address this issue, a novel aircrafts detection method for satellite images based on probabilistic topic model is presented. We model aircrafts as the connected structural elements rather than features. The proposed method contains two major steps: 1) Use Cascade-Adaboost classier to identify the structural elements of aircraft firstly. 2) Connect these structural elements to aircrafts, where the relationships between elements are estimated by hierarchical topic model. The model places strict spatial constraints on structural elements which can identify differences between similar features. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  17. Laser Mode-Dependent Size of Plasma Zones Induced by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Fused Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shan-Chun; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Yi; GONG Qi-Huang

    2008-01-01

    We carry out the numerical simulations of #emtosecond laser propagation with TEM00 mode, TEM10 mode and a beam combining both the modes in fused silica. It is found that the transverse size of plasma zones induced by laser pulses with the TEM10 mode is smaller than that induced by the TEMoo mode, while the longitudinal size is almost the same, and the saturated plasma density is higher. The transverse size, the longitudinal size and the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse size, for the beam combining both the modes, all could be reduced at the same time in comparison with the TEMoo mode under the same focusing conditions.

  18. Effect of DOM Size on Organic Micropollutant Adsorption by GAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anthony M; Summers, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption of the micropollutants 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and warfarin (WFN) at ng/L levels was investigated in five waters with isolated natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) held at a constant dissolved organic carbon concentration. Each water was evaluated for competitive adsorption effects based on the pretreatment of ultrafiltration, coagulation, and additional background micropollutants. Using the breakthrough with unfractionated DOM as a baseline, on average, the water with lower molecular weight (MW) DOM decreased MIB and WFN adsorption capacity by 59%, whereas the water with higher MW DOM increased MIB and WFN adsorption capacity by 64%. All waters showed similar decreasing MIB and WFN adsorption capacity with increasing empty bed contact time (EBCT), with more dramatic effects seen for the more strongly adsorbing WFN. On average, MIB and WFN adsorption kinetics were two times slower in the water with higher MW DOM compared to the water with lower MW DOM, as described by the intraparticle pore diffusion tortuosity. Increased adsorption competition from 27 micropollutants other than MIB and WFN at environmentally relevant concentrations had little to no effect on MIB and WFN breakthrough behavior. Any competitive effect from background micropollutants became indiscernible at longer EBCTs. PMID:25955134

  19. Fire occurrence and tussock size modulate facilitation by Ampelodesmos mauritanicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, Guido; Giordano, Daniele; Stinca, Adriano; Senatore, Mauro; Termolino, Pasquale; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2013-05-01

    Facilitation has been reported for a wide range of plant communities, with evidence of interactions between protégé and nurse plants shifting during their ontogenetic cycles. This study showed that large Ampelodesmos mauritanicus tussocks can act as nurse for different species, but only after fire occurrence. Large tussocks are typically composed by an external belt of living tillers surrounding dead standing tillers in the inner area, thus being arranged as a “ring” shape. A low plant diversity in unburned sites, dominated by intact Ampelodesmos tussocks, was related to the intense aboveground competition due to space physical limitation by standing tillers, as well as to the reduction of light availability at ground level. In contrast, after burning, tussocks resprouted only in their external belts, leaving empty inner areas. During post-fire recovery, several species (e.g. Plantago spp., Trifolium spp., Carlina spp.) recolonize the bare soil among different tussocks. On the other hand, a moss (Funaria hygrometrica) and several herbaceous and woody plants (e.g. Spartium junceum, Calicotome villosa, Quercus pubescens subsp. pubescens) were selectively distributed within the ash-full central areas of burned Ampelodesmos tussocks. In summary, the study reported evidence of changing prevalence in the interplay of competition and facilitation effects between small and large Ampelodesmos tussocks, respectively. These results suggest a broad significance of the interactions between fire occurrence and ontogenetic phases of the dominant species in affecting the restoration dynamics of natural plant communities.

  20. NASA/RAE collaboration on nonlinear control using the F-8C digital fly-by-wire aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, G. F.; Corbin, M. J.; Mepham, S.; Stewart, J. F.; Larson, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Design procedures are reviewed for variable integral control to optimize response (VICTOR) algorithms and results of preliminary flight tests are presented. The F-8C aircraft is operated in the remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) mode, with the control laws implemented as FORTRAN programs on a ground-based computer. Pilot commands and sensor information are telemetered to the ground, where the data are processed to form surface commands which are then telemetered back to the aircraft. The RAV mode represents a singlestring (simplex) system and is therefore vulnerable to a hardover since comparison monitoring is not possible. Hence, extensive error checking is conducted on both the ground and airborne computers to prevent the development of potentially hazardous situations. Experience with the RAV monitoring and validation procedures is described.

  1. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  2. Aircraft Stand Allocation with Associated Resource Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tor Fog; Larsen, Jesper; Lusby, Richard Martin;

    An aircraft turn-round refers to the set of processes taking place from when an aircraft parks at its arrival stand until the time it departs from its departure stand. When handling a turn-round, the different processes involved (arrival, disembarkation of passengers, cleaning, etc.) require...... different ground handling resources (taxiways, aircraft stands, gates, etc) at different times. Each resource can be claimed by at most one turn-round at a time. The aircraft stand allocation problem with associated resource scheduling is the problem of allocating the required ground handling resources...... to handle a given set of aircraft turn-rounds. We develop a set packing-based model formulation of the problem which is both flexible in the sense that it can encapsulate any type of resource required during the handling of a turn-round and strong in the sense that conflicts that occur when two or more turn...

  3. Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Volume 4: Future requirements of dedicated freighter aircraft to year 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The 1978 fleet operations are extended to the year 1992, thus providing an evaluation of current aircraft types in meeting the ensuing increased market demand. Possible changes in the fleet mix and the resulting economic situation are defined in terms of the number of units of each type aircraft and the resulting growth in operational frequency. Among the economic parameters considered are the associated investment required by the airline, the return on investment to the airline, and the accompanying levels of cash flow and operating income. Against this background the potential for a derivative aircraft to enter fleet operations in 1985 is defined as a function of payload size and as affected by 1980 technology. In a similar manner, the size and potential for a new dedicated 1990 technology, freighter aircraft to become operational in 1995 is established. The resulting aircraft and fleet operational and economic characteristics are evaluated over the period 1994 to 2008. The impacts of restricted growth in operational frequency, reduced market demand, variations in aircraft configurations, and military participation, are assessed.

  4. Decontamination of radioactive P[sup 32] and I[sup 131] from aircraft and car surfaces by detergent compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, H.M. (King Abdulazis Military Academy, Dept. of Chemistry, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)); Badawi, A.M. (Petroleum Research Inst., Dept. of Application, Cairo (Egypt)); Mokhtar, W.M.

    Sheets from aircrafts and cars having the same surfaces were contaminated with solutions of radioactive phosphorus salts and solutions of radioactive iodine salts. Different compositions from synthetic detergents and locally available complexing salts were prepared and their efficiencies in decontaminating the sheets were measured under the same conditions. The most effective compositions were those in which 'Berol Lanco' and 'Nestabon' were used. (orig.)

  5. Nonlinear transient vibrations and coexistences of multi-instabilities induced by friction in an aircraft braking system

    OpenAIRE

    Chevillot, Fabrice; Sinou, Jean-Jacques; Hardouin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    International audience Friction-induced vibration is still a cause for concern in a wide variety of mechanical systems, because it can lead to structural damage if high vibration levels are reached. Another effect is the noise produced that can be very unpleasant for end-users, thereby making it a major problem in the field of terrestrial transport. In this work the case of an aircraft braking system is examined. An analytical model with polynomial nonlinearity in the contact between rotor...

  6. Small Scale Motions Observed by Aircraft in the Tropical Tropopause Layer - Convective and Non-Convective Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, T. P.; Dean-Day, J.

    2016-01-01

    Indirect evidence indicates a role for vertical mixing in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). In particular, detailed model studies suggest that such vertical mixing may be required to explain the value of the water vapor minimum in the TTL. There have been previous observations during the STEP Tropical aircraft campaign (1987) of bursts of high frequency activity associated with convectively generated gravity waves in the tropical western Pacific. Higher frequency, higher quality measurements from NASA high altitude aircraft (ER-2, WB-57, and Global Hawk) have been made available in the last 20 years. These include measurements of vertical velocity and other meteorological parameters. Most recently, during the ATTREX Global Hawk aircraft mission (Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment), there have been extensive measurements at all altitudes of the TTL in both convective (winter western Pacific) and less convective (winter eastern Pacific) regions. This presentation represents an initial analysis of high frequency small scale (a few km max) meteorological measurements from the ATTREX dataset. We obtain some basic information about the distribution and character of high frequency activity in vertical velocity in the TTL. In particular, we focus on relating the high frequency activity to nearby tropical convection and to vertical shears associated with gravity and inertia-gravity waves.

  7. Role of convective transport on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available During the wet season of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA campaign, airborne measurements of several chemical species were made onboard the French Falcon-20 (FF20 aircraft. The scientific flights were planned in order to document, on one hand the regional distribution of trace gas species related to the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere, and on the other hand their spatial variability in the outflow of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs. The main objectives of this paper are the analysis of the main transport processes responsible for the observed variability, and the discussion of differences and similarities related to the convective transport by 4 different MCSs. This work is needed before using this data set for future studies of the convective transport of chemical species or for modeling work in the frame of the AMMA project. Regarding the regional distribution, five air masses types have been identified using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, and by considering relationship between the measured trace gas concentrations (O3, CO, NOx, H2O, and hydroperoxides. This paper specifically discusses the advantage of hydroperoxide measurements in order to document the impact of recent or aged convection. The highest values of O3 are found to be related to transport from the subtropical tropopause region into the mid-troposphere at latitudes as low as 10° N. The lowest ozone values have been always explained by recent uplifting from the monsoon layer where O3 is photochemically destroyed. Regarding the analysis of the MCS outflow, the CO and H2O2 enhancements are related to the age and the southernmost position of the MCS. The analysis of the long range transport of the air masses where convection occurred, shows a connection with the Persian Gulf emissions for the largest CO concentrations in MCS outflow. However for our

  8. Aircraft Simulators and Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Paul W.

    Flight simulators are built as realistically as possible, presumably to enhance their training value. Yet, their training value is determined by the way they are used. Traditionally, simulators have been less important for training than have aircraft, but they are currently emerging as primary pilot training vehicles. This new emphasis is an…

  9. The Role of Aircraft Motion in Airborne Gravity Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, V. A.; Damiani, T.; Weil, C.; Preaux, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many factors contribute to the quality of airborne gravity data measured with LaCoste and Romberg-type sensors, such as the Micro-g LaCoste Turnkey Airborne Gravity System used by the National Geodetic Survey's GRAV-D (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum) Project. For example, it is well documented that turbulence is a big factor in the overall noise level of the measurement. Turbulence is best controlled by avoidance; thus flights in the GRAV-D Project are only undertaken when the predicted wind speeds at flight level are ≤ 40 kts. Tail winds are known to be particularly problematic. The GRAV-D survey operates on a number of aircraft in a variety of wind conditions and geographic locations, and an obvious conclusion from our work to date is that the aircraft itself plays an enormous role in the quality of the airborne gravity measurement. We have identified a number of features of the various aircraft which can be determined to play a role: the autopilot, the size and speed of the aircraft, inherent motion characteristics of the airframe, tip tanks and other modifications to the airframe to reduce motion, to name the most important. This study evaluates the motion of a number of the GRAV-D aircraft and looks at the correlation between this motion and the noise characteristics of the gravity data. The GRAV-D Project spans 7 years and 42 surveys, so we have a significant body of data for this evaluation. Throughout the project, the sensor suite has included an inertial measurement unit (IMU), first the Applanix POSAv, and then later the Honeywell MicroIRS IMU as a part of a NovAtel SPAN GPS/IMU system. We compare the noise characteristics of the data with measures of aircraft motion (via pitch, roll, and yaw captured by the IMU) using a variety of statistical tools. It is expected that this comparison will support the conclusion that certain aircraft tend to work well with this type of gravity sensor while others tend to be problematic in

  10. Aircraft radar antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, Helmut E.

    1987-04-01

    Many changes have taken place in airborne radar antennas since their beginnings over forty years ago. A brief historical review of the advances in technology is presented, from mechanically scanned reflectors to modern multiple function phased arrays. However, emphasis is not on history but on the state-of-the-art technology and trends for future airborne radar systems. The status of rotating surveillance antennas is illustrated by the AN/APY-1 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) slotted waveguide array, which achieved a significant breakthrough in sidelobe suppression. Gimballed flat plate arrays in nose radomes are typified by the AN/APG-66 (F-16) antenna. Multifunction phased arrays are presented by the Electronically Agile Radar (EAR) antenna, which has achieved significant advances in performance versatility and reliability. Trends toward active aperture, adaptive, and digital beamforming arrays are briefly discussed. Antennas for future aircraft radar systems must provide multiple functions in less aperture space, and must perform more reliably.

  11. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  12. Aircraft operations management manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  13. Genotype by environment interaction for litter size in pigs as quantified by reaction norms analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, P W; Su, G

    2008-01-01

    A Bayesian procedure was used to estimate linear reaction norms (i.e. individual G × E plots) on 297 518 litter size records of 121 104 sows, daughters of 2040 sires, recorded on 144 farms in North and Latin America, Europe, Asia and Australia. The method allowed for simultaneous estimation of all...... in the estimates of the additive genetic effect; the reaction norms model removes this confounding. The intercept estimates from the largest data subset show correlations with litter size estimated breeding values (EBV) from routine genetic evaluation (without reaction norms included) of 0.78 to 0.85 for sows...... with one to seven litter records, and 0.75 for sires. Hence, including reaction norms in genetic evaluation would increase the reliability of the EBV of young selection candidates without own performance or progeny data by considerably more than 100 × (1/0.75-1) = 33%. Reaction norm slope estimates turn...

  14. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagam, R.N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lerner, J.; Shie, R. [Physical Optics Corp., Torrance, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.

  15. Improved portable lighting for visual aircraft inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagam, Richard N.; Lerner, Jeremy M.; Shie, Rick

    1995-07-01

    The most common tool used by aircraft inspectors is the personal flashlight. While it is compact and very portable, it is generally typified by poor beam quality which can interfere with the ability for an inspector to detect small defects and anomalies, such as cracks and corrosion sites, which may be indicators of major structural problems. A Light Shaping Diffuser TM (LSD) installed in a stock flashlight as a replacement to the lens can improve the uniformity of an average flashlight and improve the quality of the inspection. Field trials at aircraft maintenance facilities have demonstrated general acceptance of the LSD by aircraft inspection and maintenance personnel.

  16. Survival analysis of aging aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Samuel

    This study pushes systems engineering of aging aircraft beyond the boundaries of empirical and deterministic modeling by making a sharp break with the traditional laboratory-derived corrosion prediction algorithms that have shrouded real-world failures of aircraft structure. At the heart of this problem is the aeronautical industry's inability to be forthcoming in an accurate model that predicts corrosion failures in aircraft in spite of advances in corrosion algorithms or improvements in simulation and modeling. The struggle to develop accurate corrosion probabilistic models stems from a multitude of real-world interacting variables that synergistically influence corrosion in convoluted and complex ways. This dissertation, in essence, offers a statistical framework for the analysis of structural airframe corrosion failure by utilizing real-world data while considering the effects of interacting corrosion variables. This study injects realism into corrosion failures of aging aircraft systems by accomplishing four major goals related to the conceptual and methodological framework of corrosion modeling. First, this work connects corrosion modeling from the traditional, laboratory derived algorithms to corrosion failures in actual operating aircraft. This work augments physics-based modeling by examining the many confounding and interacting variables, such as environmental, geographical and operational, that impact failure of airframe structure. Examined through the lens of censored failure data from aircraft flying in a maritime environment, this study enhances the understanding between the triad of the theoretical, laboratory and real-world corrosion. Secondly, this study explores the importation and successful application of an advanced biomedical statistical tool---survival analysis---to model censored corrosion failure data. This well-grounded statistical methodology is inverted from a methodology that analyzes survival to one that examines failures. Third, this

  17. Commercial aircraft composite technology

    CERN Document Server

    Breuer, Ulf Paul

    2016-01-01

    This book is based on lectures held at the faculty of mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern. The focus is on the central theme of societies overall aircraft requirements to specific material requirements and highlights the most important advantages and challenges of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) compared to conventional materials. As it is fundamental to decide on the right material at the right place early on the main activities and milestones of the development and certification process and the systematic of defining clear requirements are discussed. The process of material qualification - verifying material requirements is explained in detail. All state-of-the-art composite manufacturing technologies are described, including changes and complemented by examples, and their improvement potential for future applications is discussed. Tangible case studies of high lift and wing structures emphasize the specific advantages and challenges of composite technology. Finally,...

  18. Aircraft impact on a spherical shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear power plants located in the immediate vicinity of cities and airports safeguarding against an accidental aircraft strike is important. Because of the complexity of such an aircraft crash the building is ordinarily designed for loading by an idealized dynamical load F(t), which follows from measurements (aircraft striking a rigid wall). The extent to which the elastic displacements of a structure influence the impact load F(t) is investigatd in this paper. The aircraft is idealized by a linear mass-spring-dashpot combination which can easily be treated in computations and which can suffer elastic as well as plastic deformations. This 'aircraft' normally strikes a spherical shell at the apex. The time-dependent reactions of the shell as a function of the unknown impact load F(t) are expanded in terms of the normal modes, which are Legendre functions. The continuity condition at the impact point leads to an integral equation for F(t) which may be solved by Laplace transformation. F(t) is computed for hemispheres with several ratios of thickness to radius, several edge conditions and several 'aircraft' parameters. In all cases F(t) differs very little from that function obtained for the case of the aircraft striking a rigid wall. (Auth.)

  19. A facile synthesis of Tenanoparticles with binary size distribution by green chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weidong; Krejci, Alex; Lin, Junhao; Osmulski, Max E.; Dickerson, James H.

    2011-04-01

    Our work reports a facile route to colloidal Tenanocrystals with binary uniform size distributions at room temperature. The binary-sized Tenanocrystals were well separated into two size regimes and assembled into films by electrophoretic deposition. The research provides a new platform for nanomaterials to be efficiently synthesized and manipulated.Our work reports a facile route to colloidal Tenanocrystals with binary uniform size distributions at room temperature. The binary-sized Tenanocrystals were well separated into two size regimes and assembled into films by electrophoretic deposition. The research provides a new platform for nanomaterials to be efficiently synthesized and manipulated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic procedures, FTIR analysis, ED pattern, AFM image, and EPD current curve. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10025d

  20. Influence of inter-annual variations of stratospheric dynamics in model simulations of ozone losses by aircraft emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadin, E.A. [Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The questions of model predictions of aircraft emission impacts on the ozone variations are considered. Using the NMC data it is shown that the stratospheric circulation underwent the abrupt transition to a new regime in summer 1980. The strong correlations are found between the monthly mean total ozone and stratospheric angular momentum anomalies during 1979-1991. The natural long-term changes of transport processes are necessary to take into account in model simulations of anthropogenic impacts on the ozone layer. (author) 12 refs.

  1. Method of radial velocities for the estimation of aircraft wake vortex parameters from data measured by coherent Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalikho, I N; Banakh, V A; Holzäpfel, F; Rahm, S

    2015-09-21

    The method of radial velocities (RV) is applied to estimate aircraft wake vortex parameters from measurements conducted with pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (PCDL). Operations of the Stream Line lidar and the 2-µm PCDL are simulated numerically to analyze the accuracy of the estimated wake vortex parameters with the RV method. The RV method is also used to estimate wake vortex trajectories and circulation from lidar measurements at Tomsk and Munich airports. The method of velocity envelopes and the RV method are compared employing data gathered with the 2-µm PCDL. The domain of applicability of the RV method is determined. PMID:26406749

  2. Comparison of the chemical evolution and characteristics of 495 biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the ARCTAS/CARB-2008 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecobian, A.; Liu, Z.; Hennigan, C. J.; Huey, L. G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Vay, S.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Liao, J.; Knapp, D. J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kürten, A.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J.; Wang, Y.; Weber, R. J.

    2011-06-01

    This paper compares measurements of gaseous and particulate emissions from a wide range of biomass-burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 research aircraft during the three phases of the ARCTAS-2008 experiment: ARCTAS-A, based out of Fairbanks, Alaska USA (3 April to 19 April 2008); ARCTAS-B based out of Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada (29 June to 13 July 2008); and ARCTAS-CARB, based out of Palmdale, California, USA (18 June to 24 June 2008). Extensive investigations of boreal fire plume evolution were undertaken during ARCTAS-B, where four distinct fire plumes that were intercepted by the aircraft over a range of down-wind distances (0.1 to 16 hr transport times) were studied in detail. Based on these analyses, there was no evidence for ozone production and a box model simulation of the data confirmed that net ozone production was slow (on average 1 ppbv h-1 in the first 3 h and much lower afterwards) due to limited NOx. Peroxyacetyl nitrate concentrations (PAN) increased with plume age and the box model estimated an average production rate of ~80 pptv h-1 in the first 3 h. Like ozone, there was also no evidence for net secondary inorganic or organic aerosol formation. There was no apparent increase in aerosol mass concentrations in the boreal fire plumes due to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation; however, there were indications of chemical processing of the organic aerosols. In addition to the detailed studies of boreal fire plume evolution, about 500 smoke plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 aircraft were segregated by fire source region. The normalized excess mixing ratios (i.e. ΔX/ΔCO) of gaseous (carbon dioxide, acetonitrile, hydrogen cyanide, toluene, benzene, methane, oxides of nitrogen (NOx), ozone, PAN) and fine aerosol particulate components (nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, chloride, organic aerosols and water soluble organic carbon) of these plumes were compared.

  3. Effect of pore size on gas resistance of nanofiber membrane by the bubble electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Jing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the influence of pore size on gas resistance by comparing micron non-woven and nanofiber membrane. The result shows that membrane with a higher filtration and lower gas resistance can be received by controlling the pore size of nanofiber membrane.

  4. The characteristics of changes in construction companies to become insolvent by size following macroeconomic fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Taein Kwon; Sanghyo Lee; Jaejun Kim

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, individual groups of construction companies were first classified according to size, and then the processes of changes needed for them to become insolvent were examined utilizing KMV models. Another objective of the present study was to analyze the relationship between macroeconomic fluctuations and the changes needed for construction companies to become insolvent (based on their size). In the present study, construction companies were classified by size, and the relatio...

  5. Review of Aircraft Electric Power Systems and Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xin; Guerrero, Josep M.; Wu, Xiaohao

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the electrical power capacity is increasing rapidly in more electric aircraft (MEA), since the conventional mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic energy systems are partly replaced by electrical power system. As a consequence, capacity and complexity of aircraft electric power...... systems (EPS) will increase dramatically and more advanced aircraft EPSs need to be developed. This paper gives a brief description of the constant frequency (CF) EPS, variable frequency (VF) EPS and advanced high voltage (HV) EPS. Power electronics in the three EPS is overviewed. Keywords: Aircraft Power...... System, More Electric Aircraft, Constant Frequency, Variable Frequency, High Voltage....

  6. An Analysis of Ball Lightning-Aircraft Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, R. K.; Keul, A. G.; Bychkov, V.

    2009-12-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Research and design have created aircraft that withstand average lightning strikes. Ball lightning (BL), a metastable, rare lightning type, is also observed from (and within) aircraft. Science and the media focused on individual BL incidents and did not analyze general patterns. Lacking established incident reporting channels, most BL observations are still passed on as “aviation lore”. To overcome this unsatisfactory condition, the authors collected and analyzed an international data bank of 87 BL-aircraft case histories from 1938 to 2007. 37 Russian military and civil BL reports were provided by the third author. Of the whole sample, 36 (41%) cases occurred over Russia/RF/SU, 24 (28%) over USA/Canada, 23 (26%) over Europe, and 4 (5%) over Asia/Pacific. Various types of military (US: C-54/141, B-52, KC-97/135 Stratotankers, C130, P-3 Orion, RF/SU: PO-2, IL, SU, TU, MIG; Nimrod, Saab-105) and civilian aircraft (US: DC-3/6, Metroliner, B-727/737/757/777, RF/SU: AN, TU; VC-10, Fokker F-28, CRJ-200), as well as general aviation (C-172, Falcon-20), were involved. BL reports show a flat annual April to August maximum. At BL impact, 15 aircraft were climbing, 7 descending; most were at cruising altitude. 42 (48%) reported BL outside the aircraft, 37 (43%) inside, 7 (8%) both in-and outside. No damage was reported in 34 (39%) cases, 39 objects (45%) caused minor damage, 11 major damage (13%), 3 even resulted in military aircraft losses. 3 objects caused minor, 1 major crew injury. 23 damage cases were associated with BL inside the fuselage; all 4 crew injury cases were of that BL type. Mean size is described as 25 cm, sometimes over 1 m, color 30% in the yellow-red, 10% in the blue-green spectral region, 8% white, duration around 10 seconds, sometimes over 1 minute. 33 (38%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. Thunderstorm conditions were reported by 25 (29%) of the observers, 9 (10%) said there

  7. Uptake characteristics of liposomes by rat alveolar macrophages: influence of particle size and surface mannose modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The influence of particle size and surface mannose modification on the uptake of liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was investigated in-vitro and in-vivo. Non-modified liposomes of five different particle sizes (100, 200, 400, 1000 and 2000 nm) and mannosylated liposomes with 4-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (particle size 1000 nm) were prepared, and the uptake characteristics by rat AMs in-vitro and in-vivo were examined. The uptake of non-modified liposomes by rat AMs in-vitro increased with an increase in particle size over the range of 100-1000 nm, and became constant at over 1000 nm. The uptake of non-modified liposomes by AMs after pulmonary administration to rats in-vivo increased with an increase in particle size in the range 100-2000 nm. The uptake of mannosylated liposomes (particle size 1000 nm) by rat AMs both in-vitro and in-vivo was significantly greater than that of non-modified liposomes (particle size 1000 nm). The results indicate that the uptake of liposomes by rat AMs is dependent on particle size and is increased by surface mannose modification.

  8. SOLAR AIRCRAFT DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    RAHMATI, Sadegh; GHASED, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Generally domain Aircraft uses conventional fuel. These fuel having limited life, high cost and pollutant. Also nowadays price of petrol and other fuels are going to be higher, because of scarcity of those fuels. So there is great demand of use of non-exhaustible unlimited source of energy like solar energy. Solar aircraft is one of the ways to utilize solar energy. Solar aircraft uses solar panel to collect the solar radiation for immediate use but it also store the remaining part ...

  9. Conceptual design of high speed supersonic aircraft: A brief review on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Khawaja, H.; Moatamedi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the conceptual design of high-speed supersonic aircraft. The study focuses on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft. The input to the conceptual design is a mission profile. Mission profile is a flight profile of the aircraft defined by the customer. This paper gives the SR-71 aircraft mission profile specified by US air force. Mission profile helps in defining the attributes the aircraft such as wing profile, vertical tail configuration, propulsion system, etc. Wing profile and vertical tail configurations have direct impact on lift, drag, stability, performance and maneuverability of the aircraft. A propulsion system directly influences the performance of the aircraft. By combining the wing profile and the propulsion system, two important parameters, known as wing loading and thrust to weight ratio can be calculated. In this work, conceptual design procedure given by D. P. Raymer (AIAA Educational Series) is applied to calculate wing loading and thrust to weight ratio. The calculated values are compared against the actual values of the SR-71 aircraft. Results indicates that the values are in agreement with the trend of developments in aviation.

  10. Aircraft de-icer: Recycling can cut carbon emissions in half

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flight-safety regulations in most countries require aircraft to be ice-free upon takeoff. In icy weather, this means that the aircraft usually must be de-iced (existing ice is removed) and sometimes anti-iced (to protect against ice-reformation). For both processes, aircraft typically are sprayed with an ‘antifreeze’ solution, consisting mainly of glycol diluted with water. This de/anti-icing creates an impact on the environment, of which environmental regulators have grown increasingly conscious. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for example, recently introduced stricter rules that require airports above minimum size to collect de-icing effluents and send them to wastewater treatment. De-icer collection and treatment is already done at most major airports, but a few have gone one step further: rather than putting the effluent to wastewater, they recycle it. This study examines the carbon savings that can be achieved by recycling de-icer. There are two key findings. One, recycling, as opposed to not recycling, cuts the footprint of aircraft de-icing by 40–50% — and even more, in regions where electricity-generation is cleaner. Two, recycling petrochemical-based de-icer generates a 15–30% lower footprint than using ‘bio’ de-icer without recycling. - Highlights: ► Carbon footprint of aircraft de-icing can be measured. ► Recycling aircraft de-icer cuts the footprint of aircraft de-icing by 40–50%. ► Recycling ‘fossil’ de-icer is lower carbon than not recycling ‘bio’ de-icer.

  11. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Wen-Li; Bond, Leonard J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost 300, heavy wet snow removal can cost 3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to 10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  12. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions

  13. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, Wen-Li [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150090 (China); Bond, Leonard J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, 151 ASC II, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  14. 14 CFR 121.709 - Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry... Airworthiness release or aircraft log entry. (a) No certificate holder may operate an aircraft after maintenance... appropriate entry in the aircraft log. (b) The airworthiness release or log entry required by paragraph (a)...

  15. Production of various sizes and some properties of beryllium pebbles by the rotating electrode method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadachi, T.; Sakamoto, N.; Nishida, K. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The particle size distribution of beryllium pebbles produced by the rotating electrode method was investigated. Particle size depends on some physical properties and process parameters, which can practicaly be controlled by varying electrode angular velocities. The average particle sizes produced were expressed by the hyperbolic function with electrode angular velocity. Particles within the range of 0.3 and 2.0 mm in diameter are readily produced by the rotating electrode method while those of 0.2 mm in diameter are also fabricable. Sphericity and surface roughness were good in each size of pebble. Grain sizes of the pebbles are 17 {mu} m in 0.25 mm diameter pebbles and 260 {mu} m in 1.8 mm diameter pebbles. (author)

  16. Processing infrared images of aircraft lapjoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Hazari; Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for processing IR images of aging aircraft lapjoint data are discussed. Attention is given to a technique for detecting disbonds in aircraft lapjoints which clearly delineates the disbonded region from the bonded regions. The technique is weak on unpainted aircraft skin surfaces, but can be overridden by using a self-adhering contact sheet. Neural network analysis on raw temperature data has been shown to be an effective tool for visualization of images. Numerical simulation results show the above processing technique to be an effective tool in delineating the disbonds.

  17. Intriguing structures and magic sizes of heavy noble metal nanoclusters around size 55 governed by relativistic effect and covalent bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X. J.; Xue, X. L.; Jia, Yu [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Guo, Z. X. [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Department of Chemistry and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H (United Kingdom); Li, S. F., E-mail: sflizzu@zzu.edu.cn [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); ICQD, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Zhenyu, E-mail: zhangzy@ustc.edu.cn [ICQD, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Gao, Y. F., E-mail: ygao7@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    Nanoclusters usually display exotic physical and chemical properties due to their intriguing geometric structures in contrast to their bulk counterparts. By means of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we find that heavy noble metal Pt{sub N} nanoclusters around the size N = 55 begin to prefer an open configuration, rather than previously reported close-packed icosahedron or core-shell structures. Particularly, for Pt{sub N}, the widely supposed icosahedronal magic cluster is changed to a three-atomic-layered structure with D{sub 6h} symmetry, which can be well addressed by our recently established generalized Wulff construction principle (GWCP). However, the magic number of Pt{sub N} clusters around 55 is shifted to a new odd number of 57. The high symmetric three-layered Pt{sub 57} motif is mainly stabilized by the enhanced covalent bonding contributed by both spin-orbital coupling effect and the open d orbital (5d{sup 9}6s{sup 1}) of Pt, which result in a delicate balance between the enhanced Pt–Pt covalent bonding of the interlayers and negligible d dangling bonds on the cluster edges. These findings about Pt{sub N} clusters are also applicable to Ir{sub N} clusters, but qualitatively different from their earlier neighboring element Os and their later neighboring element Au. The magic numbers for Os and Au are even, being 56 and 58, respectively. The findings of the new odd magic number 57 are the important supplementary of the recently established GWCP.

  18. Thermal Decoating of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys for Aircraft Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz Lerma, Jose Alberto; Jung, In-Ho; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Recycling of aircraft aluminum alloys can be complex due to the presence of their corrosion protection coating that includes inorganic compounds containing Cr(VI). In this study, the characterization and thermal degradation behavior of the coating on aluminum substrates coming from an aircraft destined for recycling are presented. Elements such as Sr, Cr, Si, Ba, Ti, S, C, and O were found in three different layers by EDS elemental mapping corresponding to SrCrO4, Rutile-TiO2, SiO2, and BaSO4 with an overall particle size D 50 = 1.96 µm. The thermal degradation profile analyzed by TGA showed four different stages. The temperature of complete degradation at the fourth stage occurred at 753.15 K (480 °C) at lower heating rates. At higher heating rates and holding an isotherm at the same temperature, the residence time to fully decompose the aircraft coating has been estimated as 4.0 ± 0.2 minutes. The activation energy calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and the modified Coats-Redfern methods for multiple fraction of decomposition showed a non-constant behavior indicating the complexity of the reaction. Finally, the concentration of Cr(VI) released to the environment during thermal decoating was obtained by UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that 2.6 ± 0.1 µg of Cr(VI)/mm2 of aluminum substrate could be released unless adequate particle controls are used.

  19. Engineering students win NASA aircraft design competition

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2004-01-01

    Centuria," a single-engine jet aircraft designed by undergraduate engineering students from Virginia Tech and their counterparts at Loughborough University in the U.K., has won the Best Overall Award in NASA's 2004 Revolutionary Vehicles and Concepts Competition.

  20. Thermal Management System for Superconducting Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft powered by hydrogen power plants or gas turbines driving electric generators connected to distributed electric motors for propulsion have the potential to...

  1. Design of heavy lift cargo aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the bird of the skies of the future. The heavy lift cargo aircraft which is currently being developed by me has twice the payload capacity of an Antonov...

  2. Source attribution and interannual variability of Arctic pollution in spring constrained by aircraft (ARCTAS, ARCPAC and satellite (AIRS observations of carbon monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Fisher

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We use aircraft observations of carbon monoxide (CO from the NASA ARCTAS and NOAA ARCPAC campaigns in April 2008 together with multiyear (2003–2008 CO satellite data from the AIRS instrument and a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem to better understand the sources, transport, and interannual variability of pollution in the Arctic in spring. Model simulation of the aircraft data gives best estimates of CO emissions in April 2008 of 26 Tg month−1 for Asian anthropogenic, 9.4 for European anthropogenic, 4.1 for North American anthropogenic, 15 for Russian biomass burning (anomalously large that year, and 23 for Southeast Asian biomass burning. We find that Asian anthropogenic emissions are the dominant source of Arctic CO pollution everywhere except in surface air where European anthropogenic emissions are of similar importance. Russian biomass burning makes little contribution to mean CO (reflecting the long CO lifetime but makes a large contribution to CO variability in the form of combustion plumes. Analysis of two pollution events sampled by the aircraft demonstrates that AIRS can successfully observe pollution transport to the Arctic in the mid-troposphere. The 2003–2008 record of CO from AIRS shows that interannual variability averaged over the Arctic cap is very small. AIRS CO columns over Alaska are highly correlated with the Ocean Niño Index, suggesting a link between El Niño and Asian pollution transport to the Arctic. AIRS shows lower-than-average CO columns over Alaska during April 2008, despite the Russian fires, due to a weakened Aleutian Low hindering transport from Asia and associated with the moderate 2007–2008 La Niña. This suggests that Asian pollution influence over the Arctic may be particularly large under strong El Niño conditions.

  3. Airborne aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft: Measurement by HPLC with UV absorbance detection of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Bibiana; Wrbitzky, Renate

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the strategy and results of in-flight measurements of airborne aldehydes during normal operation and reported "smell events" on commercial aircraft. The aldehyde-measurement is a part of a large-scale study on cabin-air quality. The aims of this study were to describe cabin-air quality in general and to detect chemical abnormalities during the so-called "smell-events". Adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica gel (DNPH-cartridge) was applied using tailor-made sampling kits. Samples were collected with battery supplied personal air sampling pumps during different flight phases. Furthermore, the influence of ozone was investigated by simultaneous sampling with and without ozone absorption unit (ozone converter) assembled to the DNPH-cartridges and found to be negligible. The method was validated for 14 aldehydes and found to be precise (RSD, 5.5-10.6%) and accurate (recovery, 98-103 %), with LOD levels being 0.3-0.6 μg/m(3). According to occupational exposure limits (OEL) or indoor air guidelines no unusual or noticeable aldehyde pollution was observed. In total, 353 aldehyde samples were taken from two types of aircraft. Formaldehyde (overall average 5.7 μg/m(3), overall median 4.9 μg/m(3), range 0.4-44 μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (overall average 6.5 μg/m(3), overall median 4.6, range 0.3-90 μg/m(3)) and mostly very low concentrations of other aldehydes were measured on 108 flights. Simultaneous adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on DNPH-cartridges to the Schiff bases and their HPLC analysis with UV absorbance detection is a useful method to measure aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft. PMID:26376451

  4. Airborne aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft: Measurement by HPLC with UV absorbance detection of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Bibiana; Wrbitzky, Renate

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the strategy and results of in-flight measurements of airborne aldehydes during normal operation and reported "smell events" on commercial aircraft. The aldehyde-measurement is a part of a large-scale study on cabin-air quality. The aims of this study were to describe cabin-air quality in general and to detect chemical abnormalities during the so-called "smell-events". Adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica gel (DNPH-cartridge) was applied using tailor-made sampling kits. Samples were collected with battery supplied personal air sampling pumps during different flight phases. Furthermore, the influence of ozone was investigated by simultaneous sampling with and without ozone absorption unit (ozone converter) assembled to the DNPH-cartridges and found to be negligible. The method was validated for 14 aldehydes and found to be precise (RSD, 5.5-10.6%) and accurate (recovery, 98-103 %), with LOD levels being 0.3-0.6 μg/m(3). According to occupational exposure limits (OEL) or indoor air guidelines no unusual or noticeable aldehyde pollution was observed. In total, 353 aldehyde samples were taken from two types of aircraft. Formaldehyde (overall average 5.7 μg/m(3), overall median 4.9 μg/m(3), range 0.4-44 μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (overall average 6.5 μg/m(3), overall median 4.6, range 0.3-90 μg/m(3)) and mostly very low concentrations of other aldehydes were measured on 108 flights. Simultaneous adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on DNPH-cartridges to the Schiff bases and their HPLC analysis with UV absorbance detection is a useful method to measure aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft.

  5. Brain size regulations by cbp haploinsufficiency evaluated by in-vivo MRI based volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateca-Cabarga, Juan C.; Cosa, Alejandro; Pallarés, Vicente; López-Atalaya, José P.; Barco, Ángel; Canals, Santiago; Moratal, David

    2015-11-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS) is a congenital disease that affects brain development causing severe cognitive deficits. In most cases the disease is associated with dominant mutations in the gene encoding the CREB binding protein (CBP). In this work, we present the first quantitative analysis of brain abnormalities in a mouse model of RSTS using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two novel self-developed automated algorithms for image volumetric analysis. Our results quantitatively confirm key syndromic features observed in RSTS patients, such as reductions in brain size (-16.31%, p < 0.05), white matter volume (-16.00%, p < 0.05), and corpus callosum (-12.40%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, they provide new insight into the developmental origin of the disease. By comparing brain tissues in a region by region basis between cbp+/- and cbp+/+ littermates, we found that cbp haploinsufficiency is specifically associated with significant reductions in prosencephalic tissue, such us in the olfactory bulb and neocortex, whereas regions evolved from the embryonic rhombencephalon were spared. Despite the large volume reductions, the proportion between gray-, white-matter and cerebrospinal fluid were conserved, suggesting a role of CBP in brain size regulation. The commonalities with holoprosencephaly and arhinencephaly conditions suggest the inclusion of RSTS in the family of neuronal migration disorders.

  6. Spray adjuvant effects on droplet size spectra measured by three laser-based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray droplet size has long been recognized as the most important variable that aerial applicators can influence to mitigate spray drift from the application site. There are several different technologies that are used by researchers to measure droplet size from spray nozzles. The objective of thes...

  7. Nano-sized Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles prepared by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles with nano-sized and non-aggregation characteristics were prepared by spray pyrolysis using spraying solution containing polymeric precursors and Li2CO3 flux material. The post-treated phosphor particles with fine size and high brightness were ball milled to reduce the aggregation degree of the nano-sized Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles. The mean particle size, morphology, and brightness of Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles were strongly affected by contents of the additives and post-treatment temperature. The Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles prepared from the solution containing 0.3 M citric acid, 0.3 M ethylene glycol and 5 wt.% Li2CO3 had fine size and good morphology after post-treatment. The Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles post-treated at 1000 deg. C for 3 h had the mean size of 300 nm. Nano-sized Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles prepared by spray pyrolysis had similar photoluminescence intensity to the micron-sized Y2O3:Eu commercial product prepared by solid state reaction method. The Y2O3:Eu phosphor particles had aggregation-free and regular morphology characteristics even after 30 min ball milling process

  8. Determination of Size Distributions in Nanocrystalline Powders by TEM, XRD and SAXS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Pedersen, Jørgen Houe; Jørgensen, Jens Erik;

    2006-01-01

    Crystallite size distributions and particle size distributions were determined by TEM, XRD, and SAXS for three commercially available TiO2 samples and one homemade. The theoretical Guinier Model was fitted to the experimental data and compared to analytical expressions. Modeling of the XRD spectr...

  9. Preparation and particle size characterization of Cu nanopartides prepared by anodic arc plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Copper nanoparticles were successfully prepared in large scale by means of anodic arc discharging plasma method in inert atmosphere. The particle size, specific surface area, crystal structure, and morphology of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET equation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The experimental results indicate that the crystal structure of the samples is fcc structure the same as that of the bulk materials. The specific surface area is 11 m2/g, the particle size distribution is 30 to 90nm, and the average particle size is about 67 nm obtained from TEM and confirmed from XRD and BET results. The nanoparticles with uniform size, high purity, narrow size distribution and spherical shape can be prepared by this convenient and effective method.

  10. Solving point reactor kinetic equations by time step-size adaptable numerical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the analysis of effects of time step-size on numerical solutions, this paper showed the necessity of step-size adaptation. Based on the relationship between error and step-size, two-step adaptation methods for solving initial value problems (IVPs) were introduced. They are Two-Step Method and Embedded Runge-Kutta Method. PRKEs were solved by implicit Euler method with step-sizes optimized by using Two-Step Method. It was observed that the control error has important influence on the step-size and the accuracy of solutions. With suitable control errors, the solutions of PRKEs computed by the above mentioned method are accurate reasonably. The accuracy and usage of MATLAB built-in ODE solvers ode23 and ode45, both of which adopt Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method, were also studied and discussed. (authors)

  11. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems. The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  12. Depreciation of aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  13. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  14. Magnetic levitation assisted aircraft take-off and landing (feasibility study - GABRIEL concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacs, Daniel; Rohacs, Jozsef

    2016-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap 2013 developed by the International Air Transport Association envisions the option of flying without an undercarriage to be in operation by 2032. Preliminary investigations clearly indicate that magnetic levitation technology (MagLev) might be an appealing solution to assist the aircraft take-off and landing. The EU supported research project, abbreviated as GABRIEL, was dealing with (i) the concept development, (ii) the identification, evaluation and selection of the deployable magnetic levitation technology, (iii) the definition of the core system elements (including the required aircraft modifications, the ground-based system and airport elements, and the rendezvous control system), (iv) the analysis of the safety and security aspects, (v) the concept validation and (vi) the estimation of the proposed concept impact in terms of aircraft weight, noise, emission, cost-benefit). All results introduced here are compared to a medium size hypothetic passenger aircraft (identical with an Airbus A320). This paper gives a systematic overview of (i) the applied methods, (ii) the investigation of the possible use of magnetic levitation technology to assist the commercial aircraft take-off and landing processes and (iii) the demonstrations, validations showing the feasibility of the radically new concept. All major results are outlined.

  15. Direct and Indirect Evidence of Size-Selective Grazing on Pelagic Bacteria by Freshwater Nanoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimek, Karel; Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Size-selective grazing of three heterotrophic nanoflagellates (with cell sizes of 21, 44, and 66 μm3) isolated from Lake Arlington, Texas was examined by using a natural mixture of fluorescence labelled lake bacteria. Sizes of ingested bacteria in food vacuoles were directly measured. Larger bacterial cells were ingested at a frequency much higher than that at which they occurred in the assemblage, indicating preferential flagellate grazing on the larger size classes within the lake bacterioplankton. Water samples were collected biweekly from June through September, 1989, fractionated by filtration, and incubated for 40 h at in situ temperatures. The average bacterial size was always larger in water which was passed through 1-μm-pore-size filters (1-μm-filtered water) (which was predator free) than in 5-μm-filtered water (which contained flagellates only) or in unfiltered water (in which all bacterivores were present). The increase of bacterial-cell size in 1-μm-filtered water was caused by a shift in the size structure of the bacterioplankton population. Larger cells became more abundant in the absence of flagellate grazing. PMID:16348811

  16. Direct and indirect evidence of size-selective grazing on pelagic bacteria by freshwater nanoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, K; Chrzanowski, T H

    1992-11-01

    Size-selective grazing of three heterotrophic nanoflagellates (with cell sizes of 21, 44, and 66 mum) isolated from Lake Arlington, Texas was examined by using a natural mixture of fluorescence labelled lake bacteria. Sizes of ingested bacteria in food vacuoles were directly measured. Larger bacterial cells were ingested at a frequency much higher than that at which they occurred in the assemblage, indicating preferential flagellate grazing on the larger size classes within the lake bacterioplankton. Water samples were collected biweekly from June through September, 1989, fractionated by filtration, and incubated for 40 h at in situ temperatures. The average bacterial size was always larger in water which was passed through 1-mum-pore-size filters (1-mum-filtered water) (which was predator free) than in 5-mum-filtered water (which contained flagellates only) or in unfiltered water (in which all bacterivores were present). The increase of bacterial-cell size in 1-mum-filtered water was caused by a shift in the size structure of the bacterioplankton population. Larger cells became more abundant in the absence of flagellate grazing.

  17. The neural processing of musical instrument size information in the brain investigated by magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Andre; van Dinther, Ralph; Patterson, Roy D.

    2005-04-01

    The specific cortical representation of size was investigated by recording auditory evoked fields (AEFs) elicited by changes of instrument size and pitch. In Experiment 1, a French horn and one scaled to double the size played a three note melody around F3 or its octave, F4. Many copies of these four melodies were played in random order and the AEF was measured continuously. A similar procedure was applied to saxophone sounds in a separate run. In Experiment 2, the size and type of instrument (French horn and saxophone) were varied without changing the octave. AEFs were recorded in five subjects using magnetoencephalography and evaluated by spatio-temporal source analysis with one equivalent dipole in each hemisphere. The morphology of the source waveforms revealed that each note within the melody elicits a well-defined P1-N1-P2 AEF-complex with adaptation for the 2nd and 3rd note. At the transition of size, pitch, or both, a larger AEF-complex was evoked. However, size changes elicited a stronger N1 than pitch changes. Furthermore, this size-related N1 enhancement was larger for French horn than saxophone. The results indicate that the N1 plays an important role in the specific representation of instrument size.

  18. Gradient enhanced damage sizing for structural health management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gradient enhanced method is proposed to extract a probability distribution of damage size based on damage images from structural health monitoring. The method provides comprehensive information about damage size and enables prediction of remaining useful life (RUL) of aircraft plate-like structures. A three-step procedure is designed to construct a likelihood function about damage size from intensity image, and a gradient function is employed a priori to obtain a narrow distribution of damage size in the Bayesian framework, providing the empirical probability density function of damage size, from which the probability of damage size larger than critical crack size can be calculated. RUL of plate-like structures can be obtained by calculating the cycles after which the crack size would reach a critical value by a damage growth model. The proposed method converts an ultrasonic damage imaging result to probability density function of damage size, with potential to provide accurate and precise estimation of RUL. (paper)

  19. Directional monitoring terminal for aircraft noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genescà, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a concept of an aircraft noise monitoring terminal (NMT) that reduces background noise and the influence of ground reflection, in comparison with a single microphone. Also, it automatically identifies aircraft sound events based on the direction of arrival of the sound rather than on the sound pressure level (or radar data). And moreover, it provides an indicator of the quality of the sound pressure level measurement, i.e. if it is possibly disturbed by extraneous sources. The performance of this NMT is experimentally tested under real conditions in a measurement site close to Zurich airport. The results show that the NMT unambiguously identifies the noise events generated by the target aircraft, correctly detects those aircraft noise events that may be disturbed by the presence of other sources, and offers a substantial reduction in background and ground reflected sound.

  20. Active structural acoustic control of aircraft interior flow noise via the use of active trim panels

    OpenAIRE

    Mahnken, Brian W.

    1996-01-01

    Modem jet aircraft interior noise can be categorized into two main types: tonal noise caused by engine imbalance or blade passage, and mid frequency broadband noise resulting from turbulent flow. This project addresses aircraft interior flow noise caused by a flow separation over the crown of the aircraft. The noise control approach is to mount piezoelectric actuators to the aircraft interior cockpit crown trim panel and use them to actively control aircraft interior noise with...

  1. Brain size regulations by cbp haploinsufficiency evaluated by in-vivo MRI based volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateca-Cabarga, Juan C.; Cosa, Alejandro; Pallarés, Vicente; López-Atalaya, José P.; Barco, Ángel; Canals, Santiago; Moratal, David

    2015-11-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS) is a congenital disease that affects brain development causing severe cognitive deficits. In most cases the disease is associated with dominant mutations in the gene encoding the CREB binding protein (CBP). In this work, we present the first quantitative analysis of brain abnormalities in a mouse model of RSTS using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two novel self-developed automated algorithms for image volumetric analysis. Our results quantitatively confirm key syndromic features observed in RSTS patients, such as reductions in brain size (-16.31%, p brain tissues in a region by region basis between cbp+/- and cbp+/+ littermates, we found that cbp haploinsufficiency is specifically associated with significant reductions in prosencephalic tissue, such us in the olfactory bulb and neocortex, whereas regions evolved from the embryonic rhombencephalon were spared. Despite the large volume reductions, the proportion between gray-, white-matter and cerebrospinal fluid were conserved, suggesting a role of CBP in brain size regulation. The commonalities with holoprosencephaly and arhinencephaly conditions suggest the inclusion of RSTS in the family of neuronal migration disorders.

  2. An analysis of the size distribution of Italian firms by age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Pasquale

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we analyze the size distribution of Italian firms by age. In other words, we want to establish whether the way that the size of firms is distributed varies as firms become old. As a proxy of size we use capital. In [L.M.B. Cabral, J. Mata, On the evolution of the firm size distribution: Facts and theory, American Economic Review 93 (2003) 1075-1090], the authors study the distribution of Portuguese firms and they find out that, while the size distribution of all firms is fairly stable over time, the distributions of firms by age groups are appreciably different. In particular, as the age of the firms increases, their size distribution on the log scale shifts to the right, the left tails becomes thinner and the right tail thicker, with a clear decrease of the skewness. In this paper, we perform a similar analysis with Italian firms using the CEBI database, also considering firms’ growth rates. Although there are several papers dealing with Italian firms and their size distribution, to our knowledge a similar study concerning size and age has not been performed yet for Italy, especially with such a big panel.

  3. High sintering resistance of size-selected platinum cluster catalysts by suppressed ostwald ripening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Deiana, Davide;

    2014-01-01

    Employing rationally designed model systems with precise atom-by-atom particle size control, we demonstrate by means of combining noninvasive in situ indirect nanoplasmonic sensing and ex situ scanning transmission electron microscopy that monomodal size-selected platinum cluster catalysts...... on different supports exhibit remarkable intrinsic sintering resistance even under reaction conditions. The observed stability is related to suppression of Ostwald ripening by elimination of its main driving force via size-selection. This study thus constitutes a general blueprint for the rational design...

  4. Determination of the particle size distribution of aerosols by means of a diffusion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different methods allowing to determine the particle size distribution of aerosols by means of diffusion batteries are described. To that purpose, a new method for the processing of experimental data (percentages of particles trapped by the battery vs flow rate) was developed on the basis of calculation principles which are described and assessed. This method was first tested by numerical simulation from a priori particle size distributions and then verified experimentally using a fine uranine aerosol whose particle size distribution as determined by our method was compared with the distribution previously obtained by electron microscopy. The method can be applied to the determination of particle size distribution spectra of fine aerosols produced by 'radiolysis' of atmospheric gaseous impurities. Two other applications concern the detection threshold of the condensation nuclei counter and the 'critical' radii of 'radiolysis' particles

  5. Recent Observations of Increased Thinning of the Greenland Ice Sheet Measured by Aircraft GPS and Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabill, William B.

    2004-01-01

    The Arctic Ice Mapping group (Project AIM) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility has been conducting systematic topographic surveys of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIs) since 1993, using scanning airborne laser altimeters combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology onboard NASA's P-3 aircraft. Flight lines have covered all major ice drainage basins, with repeating surveys after a 5-year interval during the decade of the 90's. Analysis of this data documented significant thinning in many areas near the ice sheet margins and an overall negative mass balance of the GIS (Science, 2000). In 2001, 2002, and 2003 many of these flight lines were re-surveyed, providing evidence of continued or accelerated thinning in all observed areas around the margin of the GIs. Additionally, however, a highly-anomalous snowfall was observed between 2002 and 2003 in SE Greenland - perhaps an indicator of a shift in the regional climate?

  6. Turbulence as observed by concurrent measurements made at NSSL using weather radar, Doppler radar, Doppler lidar and aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jean T.

    1987-01-01

    As air traffic increases and aircraft capability increases in range and operating altitude, the exposure to weather hazards increases. Turbulence and wind shears are two of the most important of these hazards that must be taken into account if safe flight operations are to be accomplished. Beginning in the early 1960's, Project Rough Rider began thunderstorm investigations. Past and present efforts at the National Severe Storm Laboratory (NSSL) to measure these flight safety hazards and to describe the use of Doppler radar to detect and qualify these hazards are summarized. In particular, the evolution of the Doppler-measured radial velocity spectrum width and its applicability to the problem of safe flight is presented.

  7. Optimizing human embryonic stem cells differentiation efficiency by screening size-tunable homogenous embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Jongil; Park, Soon-Jung; Bae, Daekyeong; Chung, Hyung-Min; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are generally induced to differentiate by forming spherical structures termed embryoid bodies (EBs) in the presence of soluble growth factors. hEBs are generated by suspending small clumps of hESC colonies; however, the resulting hEBs are heterogeneous because this method lacks the ability to control the number of cells in individual EBs. This heterogeneity affects factors that influence differentiation such as cell-cell contact and the diffusion of soluble factors, and consequently, the differentiation capacity of each EB varies. Here, we fabricated size-tunable concave microwells to control the physical environment, thereby regulating the size of EBs formed from single hESCs. Defined numbers of single hESCs were forced to aggregate and generate uniformly sized EBs with high fidelity, and the size of the EBs was controlled using concave microwells of different diameters. Differentiation patterns in H9- and CHA15-hESCs were affected by EB size in both the absence and presence of growth factors. By screening EB size in the presence of various BMP4 concentrations, a two-fold increase in endothelial cell differentiation was achieved. Because each hESC line has unique characteristics, the findings of this study demonstrate that concave microwells could be used to screen different EB sizes and growth factor concentrations to optimize differentiation for each hESC line.

  8. Improvement of Biohydrogen Production under Increased the Reactor Size by C. acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham S. Alshiyab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the main factors influenced the bacterial productivity and total yield of hydrogen is the partial pressure of produced gas. A novel solution to enhance the bacterial productivity was through reduction of gas pressure. Approach: Increasing the reactor size showed to enhance the bacterial production of hydrogen. Results: The technique of increasing reactor size resulted to enhance the hydrogen yield (YP/S from 269 mL g-1 glucose utilized to maximum yield of 448 mL g-1 glucose utilized by using 125 mL and 2 L reactor size respectively. The hydrogen productivity was also enhanced from 71 mL-1 h-1 to maximum of 91 mL L-1 h-1 was obtained by using 125 mL and 1 L reactor size respectively. Biomass concentration was enhanced from 1.03 g L-1 to maximum of 1.68 g L-1 by using 125 mL and 2 L reactor size were used respectively, hydrogen yield per biomass (YP/X of 267 mL g-1 L-1, biomass per substrate utilized (YX/S of 0.336 and produced hydrogen in gram per gram of glucose utilized (YH2/s of 0.04 when 2 L reactor size was employed. Conclusion: By using bigger reactor size, the effect of gaseous products in fermentation medium was reduced and enhanced both bacterial productivity and biomass concentration.

  9. The Parametric Aircraft Noise Analysis Module - status overview and recent applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bertsch, Lothar; Guerin, Sebastien; Looye, Gertjan; Pott-Polenske, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is investigating aircraft noise prediction and noise reduction capabilities. The Parametric Aircraft Noise Analysis Module (PANAM) is a fast prediction tool by the DLR Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology to address overall aircraft noise. It was initially developed to (1) enable comparative design studies with respect to overall aircraft ground noise and to (2) indentify promising low-noise technologies at early aircraft design stages. A brief surve...

  10. Aircraft Noise: Annoyance, House Prices and Valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Brooker, Peter

    2006-01-01

    “Nobody wants to buy your house. It’s the aircraft noise. You’ll have to reduce the price a lot.” Aircraft noise around airports causes annoyance, and tends to reduce the price of affected properties. Can annoyance be ‘costed’ by examining house price reductions? Are there other ways of valuing annoyance in monetary terms? This short paper summarises key research results and poses some questions.

  11. Size and shape controllable preparation of graphene sponge by freezing, lyophilizing and reducing in container

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO LianQin; YU BaoWei; ZHANG XiaoLiang; WU RuiHan; LIU XiaoYang; LIAO Rong; YANG ShengTao

    2016-01-01

    Graphene sponge (GS) is a porous 3D structure of graphene.Although hydrothermal reduction,chemical vapor deposition,solution reduction and high temperature annealing could be used for the preparation of GS,the size and shape cannot be well controlled.Herein,we reported a facile method to prepare GS under mild condition in a size and shape controllable way.Graphene oxide was lyophilized to form the spongy structure and reduced by steamy hydrazine hydrate to produce GS.The size and shape of GS prepared were nearly identical to that of the container.The reduction degree of GS could be regulated by the reduction temperature and time.

  12. Characterization of energy barrier and particle size distribution of lyophilized ferrofluids by magnetic relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidl, Frank [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)]. E-mail: Frank.Schmidl@uni-jena.de; Weber, Peter [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Koettig, Torsten [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Buettner, Markus [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Prass, Stefan [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Becker, Christoph [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Mans, Michael [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Heinrich, Jochen [Innovent Technologieentwicklung, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Roeder, Michael [Innovent Technologieentwicklung, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Wagner, Kerstin [Innovent Technologieentwicklung, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Berkov, Dimitr V. [Innovent Technologieentwicklung, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Goernert, Peter [Innovent Technologieentwicklung, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Gloeckl, Gunnar [Institute of Pharmacy, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany); Weitschies, Werner [Institute of Pharmacy, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany); Seidel, Paul [Institut of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    The magnetic properties of a ferrofluid are strongly influenced by its particle size distribution. We analyzed a ferrofluid with an unknown particle size distribution as well as fractionated samples of the original material. The ferrofluid in our investigations consists of a mixture of maghemite and magnetite. We investigated these different samples using temperature-dependent magnetorelaxometry method. The evaluation of the Neel relaxation signal allows us a direct determination of the energy barrier distribution, which is one of the most important parameters of such systems of magnetic nanoparticles. The calculated particle volumes were compared with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Acute effects of aircraft noise on cardiovascular admissions - an interrupted time-series analysis of a six-day closure of London Heathrow Airport caused by volcanic ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Tim; Campbell, Michael J; Maheswaran, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Acute noise exposure may acutely increase blood pressure but the hypothesis that acute exposure to aircraft noise may trigger cardiovascular events has not been investigated. This study took advantage of a six-day closure of a major airport in April 2010 caused by volcanic ash to examine if there was a decrease in emergency cardiovascular hospital admissions during or immediately after the closure period, using an interrupted daily time-series study design. The population living within the 55dB(A) noise contour was substantial at 0.7 million. The average daily admission count was 13.9 (SD 4.4). After adjustment for covariates, there was no evidence of a decreased risk of hospital admission from cardiovascular disease during the closure period (relative risk 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26)). Using lags of 1-7 days gave similar results. Further studies are needed to investigate if transient aircraft noise exposure can trigger acute cardiovascular events. PMID:27494958

  14. In-service fatigue cracking of the propeller shafts joined by a spline-pinned construction to the engines of AN-24, AN-26, and IL-18 aircrafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shanyavskiy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper delivers a critical review of the research data on the crack initiation and crack growth patterns characteristic of the components of the spline-bolted joints between the propeller shaft and reducer shaft at An-24, An-26, and Il-18 aircrafts. Cracks in the shafts nucleated because of reduced bolt-fastening force. Actually, the bolt (bolts failed first (also by fatigue and then fatigue cracks nucleated and grew in the shafts, the spline surface fretting zones and/or sharp edges of the attachment (bolt-conducting holes making the crack origin sites. The crack growth history shows itself through the regular Macro-Beach Marks, each mark sequentially pointing to the next loading event of the propeller shaft, i.e., to each next flight. The cracks cease growing for some while in the airscrews and their shafts just replaced to another aircraft. For the airscrew shafts, the critically assessed data show the crack growth period Np ranging as five to ten percent of a total running period Nf . We recommend performing nondestructive inspection of the airscrew shafts on every 250- hour running period to ensure the safety flights.

  15. Broadening of Photoluminescence by Nonhomogeneous Size Distribution of Self-Assembled InAs Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xi-Feng; LIU Zhao-Lin; CHEN Ping-Ping; CHEN Xiao-Shuang; LI Tian-Xin; LU Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ The photoluminescence spectrum (PL) of InAs quantum dots (QDs) at 80 K is studied by comparison between the theoretical calculation and experimental measurement. The Gaussian line shape is used to approximate the size distribution of QDs. Its mean volume and the standard size deviation are well correlated with the peak and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the PL spectrum. The experimental PL spectrum is well reproduced by the theoretical model based on the effect mass approximation including the size distribution without any adjustable parameters. Compared with the standard size deviation value σs = 9 × 10-2 determined by atomic force microscopic method a small value σs = 7 × 10-2 is obtained by the best fitting process from the measured and calculated PL spectra.

  16. The drive for Aircraft Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R. L., Jr.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1984-01-01

    NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program, which began in 1976, has mounted a development effort in four major transport aircraft technology fields: laminar flow systems, advanced aerodynamics, flight controls, and composite structures. ACEE has explored two basic methods for achieving drag-reducing boundary layer laminarization: the use of suction through the wing structure (via slots or perforations) to remove boundary layer turbulence, and the encouragement of natural laminar flow maintenance through refined design practices. Wind tunnel tests have been conducted for wide bodied aircraft equipped with high aspect ratio supercritical wings and winglets. Maneuver load control and pitch-active stability augmentation control systems reduce fuel consumption by reducing the drag associated with high aircraft stability margins. Composite structures yield lighter airframes that in turn call for smaller wing and empennage areas, reducing induced drag for a given payload. In combination, all four areas of development are expected to yield a fuel consumption reduction of 40 percent.

  17. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Pundrik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicellularity in cellular slime molds is achieved by aggregation of several hundreds to thousands of cells. In the model slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, adenosine is known to increase the aggregate size and its antagonist caffeine reduces the aggregate size. However, it is not clear if the actions of adenosine and caffeine are evolutionarily conserved among other slime molds known to use structurally unrelated chemoattractants. We have examined how the known factors affecting aggregate size are modulated by adenosine and caffeine. Result Adenosine and caffeine induced the formation of large and small aggregates respectively, in evolutionarily distinct slime molds known to use diverse chemoattractants for their aggregation. Due to its genetic tractability, we chose D. discoideum to further investigate the factors affecting aggregate size. The changes in aggregate size are caused by the effect of the compounds on several parameters such as cell number and size, cell-cell adhesion, cAMP signal relay and cell counting mechanisms. While some of the effects of these two compounds are opposite to each other, interestingly, both compounds increase the intracellular glucose level and strengthen cell-cell adhesion. These compounds also inhibit the synthesis of cAMP phosphodiesterase (PdsA, weakening the relay of extracellular cAMP signal. Adenosine as well as caffeine rescue mutants impaired in stream formation (pde4- and pdiA- and colony size (smlA- and ctnA- and restore their parental aggregate size. Conclusion Adenosine increased the cell division timings thereby making large number of cells available for aggregation and also it marginally increased the cell size contributing to large aggregate size. Reduced cell division rates and decreased cell size in the presence of caffeine makes the aggregates smaller than controls. Both the compounds altered the speed of the chemotactic amoebae causing a variation in aggregate size

  18. Size control of monodisperse nonporous silica particles by seed particle growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beibei Zhao; Caihua Tian; Yan Zhang; Tao Tang; Fengyun Wang

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse nonporous silica particles were prepared by sol-precipitation via seed particle growth method, and the particle size, which varied from 1.0 to 4.7 μm, was strictly controlled in our experiment.The formation of secondary particles, which resulted in a multimodal distribution of particle size, was suppressed by changing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) concentration and reaction temperature. Furthermore,the effect of adding small amounts of electrolyte to the hydrolysis mixture was examined.

  19. Perception of aircraft Deviation Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynne; Azuma, Ronald; Fox, Jason; Verma, Savita; Lozito, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    To begin to address the need for new displays, required by a future airspace concept to support new roles that will be assigned to flight crews, a study of potentially informative display cues was undertaken. Two cues were tested on a simple plan display - aircraft trajectory and flight corridor. Of particular interest was the speed and accuracy with which participants could detect an aircraft deviating outside its flight corridor. Presence of the trajectory cue significantly reduced participant reaction time to a deviation while the flight corridor cue did not. Although non-significant, the flight corridor cue seemed to have a relationship with the accuracy of participants judgments rather than their speed. As this is the second of a series of studies, these issues will be addressed further in future studies.

  20. DYNAMIC RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF CARRIER-BASED AIRCRAFT DURING LANDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段萍萍; 聂宏; 魏小辉

    2013-01-01

    In view of the complexity of landing on the deck of aircraft carrier ,a systematic model ,composed of six-degree-of-freedom mathematic model of carrier-based aircraft ,four-degree-of-freedom model of landing gears and six-degree-of-freedom mathematic model of carrier , is established in the Matlab-Simulink environment , with damping function of landing gears and dynamic characteristics of tires being considered .The model ,where the car-rier movement is introduced ,is applicable for any abnormal landing condition .Moreover ,the equations of motion and relevant parameter are also derived .The dynamic response of aircraft is calculated via the variable step-size Runge-Kuta algorithm .The effect of attitude angles of aircraft and carrier movement during the process of landing is illustrated in details .The analytical results can provide some reference for carrier-based aircraft design and main-tenance .

  1. Particle sizing in dense two-phase droplet systems by ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distribution of particles in particulate two-phase flow play an important role in a wide variety of industrial areas,while their measurement still remains a hard task till now.Ultrasonic wave as a mechanical vibration contains plenty of information about medium when it passes through.Thus the size distribution could be extracted from the measured ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra by means of well established models and data processing techniques.This paper contributes to the extraction of information of droplet size of a two-phase fat emulsion simultaneously from signals of broad-band ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra.According to the formulated single particle scattering model,the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is estab-lished.The sensitivities of ultrasonic spectra to the variation of particle size are illustrated.Distin-guishing features for attenuation and velocity spectra are summarized.Demonstration calculations of inversion by optimum regularization factor method are carried out to yield the typical numerical results for discussion.Based on the proposed inversion algorithm and theoretical model,a fat emulsion sam-ple with a volume fraction up to 20% is measured and analyzed.To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method,the results are compared to those obtained from optical measure-ment.

  2. Particle sizing in dense two-phase droplet systems by ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU MingXu; CAI XiaoShu; XUE MingHua; DONG LiLi; XU Feng

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distribution of particles in particulate two-phase flow play an important role in a wide va-riety of industrial areas, while their measurement still remains a hard task till now. Ultrasonic wave as a mechanical vibration contains plenty of information about medium when it passes through. Thus the size distribution could be extracted from the measured ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra by means of well established models and data processing techniques. This paper contributes to the ex-traction of information of droplet size of a two-phase fat emulsion simultaneously from signals of broad-band ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra. According to the formulated single particle scattering model, the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is estab-lished. The sensitivilles of ultrasonic spectra to the variation of particle size are illustrated. Distin-guishing features for attenuation and velocity spectra are summarized. Demonstration calculations of inversion by optimum regularization factor method are carried out to yield the typical numerical results for discussion. Based on the proposed inversion algorithm and theoretical model, a fat emulsion sam-ple with a volume fraction up to 20% is measured and analyzed. To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method, the results are compared to those obtained from optical measure-ment.

  3. Nano-sized ceria particles prepared by spray pyrolysis using polymeric precursor solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-sized ceria particles were prepared from the aqueous solution containing the polymeric precursors by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at the severe preparation conditions such as high flow rate of carrier gas and short residence time. The key idea to produce nanoparticles was to prepare hollow ceria particles which are easily turned to aggregates of nano-sized primary particles during the post-thermal treatment and thereafter disintegrate such aggregates to nano-sized particles by a simple ball milling process. It was found that using the polymeric precursor strongly influences the crystallization characteristics and morphological changes of the as-prepared particles during the post-thermal treatment. The as-prepared particles prepared from the polymeric precursor solution had non-spherical shape and fractured structure with a thin shell, whereas the as-prepared and calcined ceria particles obtained from the aqueous solution had spherical shape and hollow morphology with a thick shell. Also, nano-sized ceria particles prepared from the polymeric precursor solution had less aggregated structure than those prepared from the aqueous solution. For the ceria particles prepared from the polymeric precursor solution, the degree of aggregation between the primary particles was reduced as increasing the calcination temperature. As a result, aggregation-free nano-sized ceria particles were obtained above 1200 deg. C without a milling process. The mean size of the primary particles increased from several tens nanometer to submicrometer size as the calcination temperature changed from 800 to 1300 deg. C

  4. The Nano-Sized In2O3 Powder Synthesis by Sol-Gel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘庆谊; 程知萱; 等

    2002-01-01

    Wiwh InCl3·4H2O being used as raw materials,the precursor of nano-sized In2O3 powder was prepared by hydrolysis,peptization and gelation of InCl3·4H2O.After calcination,nano-sized In2O3 powder was obtained.The powder was characterized by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis(TG-DTA).X-ray diffractometry(XRD)and transmission electron microscopy(TEM),respectively,Calculation revealed that the mean crystablline size increased with increasing the calcination temperature,but crystal lattice distortion rate decreased with the increasing in the average crystalline size.This indicated that the smaller the particle size,the bigger the crystal lattice distortion,the worse the crystal growing.The activation energies for growth of nano-sized In2O3 were calculated to be 4.75kJ·mol-1 at the calcination temperature up tp 500℃ and 66.40kJ· mol-1 at the calcination temperature over 600℃.TEM photos revealed that the addition of the chemical additive(OP-10)greatly influenced the morphology and size of In2O3 particles.

  5. Effect of particle size on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites produced by ARB process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Microstructure of MMC with larger particles becomes completely uniform, sooner. → When the number of cycles increased, tensile strength for both samples improved. → Up to the seventh cycle, tensile strength of MMC with larger particles was bigger. → First, the tensile elongation of MMCs was decreased, and then it was improved. - Abstract: In the present work, Al/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) was manufactured by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process. The silicon carbide particles with two various particle sizes of 40 and 2 μm were used. Effect of particle size on microstructure (by scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation) at various ARB cycles was investigated. It was found that the microstructural evolution in MMC with 40 μm particle size was more salient compared to the MMCs with 2 μm particle size. Also, the composite strip with 40 μm particle size became uniform with high bonding quality and without any porosity sooner than the strip of 2 μm particle size. Moreover, when the number of cycles was increased, the tensile strength for both samples was improved. The tensile strength of the composite strip with 40 μm particle size was more than the composite strip with 2 μm up to the seventh cycle. By increasing the number of cycles after the seventh cycle, the value of tensile strength of MMC with 40 μm particle size became saturated and then decreased, and its tensile strength became less than that of the composite with 2 μm particle size for the ninth and eleventh cycles. Up to the seventh cycle, when the number of ARB cycles was increased, the elongation of composite strips was decreased, but after the ninth cycle, the tensile elongation for both samples was improved.

  6. Tunability of Size and Magnetic Moment of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Forced Hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Sutens

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To utilize iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications, a sufficient magnetic moment is crucial. Since this magnetic moment is directly proportional to the size of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles, synthesis methods of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with tunable size are desirable. However, most existing protocols are plagued by several drawbacks. Presented here is a one-pot synthesis method resulting in monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a controllable size and magnetic moment using cost-effective reagents. The obtained nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR measurements. Furthermore, the influence of the size on the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles is analyzed by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID magnetometry. To emphasize the potential use in biomedical applications, magnetic heating experiments were performed.

  7. Indication of the radiofrequency induced lesion size by pre-ablation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stagegaard, Niels; Petersen, Helen Høgh; Chen, Xu;

    2005-01-01

    for assessing these factors prior to ablation may indicate the lesion size which will be obtained for any given catheter position. METHODS AND RESULTS: Radiofrequency ablation was performed in vitro on strips of left ventricular porcine myocardium during two different levels of convective cooling (0 or 0.1 m......, during unchanged conditions, radiofrequency ablation was performed as either temperature-controlled, power-controlled or irrigated tip ablation and lesion size was determined. DeltaIMP increased significantly (P convective cooling. Delta......T was significantly increased by increasing contact pressure (P correlation between the obtained lesion size and power output...

  8. Vertical Beam Size Measurement by Streak Camera under Colliding and Single Beam Conditions in KEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Hitomi; Fukuma, Hitoshi; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Mitsuhashi, Toshiyuki; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Uehara, Sadaharu

    2005-01-01

    Beam behavior of KEKB was studied by measurement of the beam size using a streak camera. Effect of the electron-cloud and the parasitic collision on the vertical beam size was examined in beam collision. We intentionally injected a test bunch of positrons after 2 rf buckets of a bunch to enhance the electron cloud effect and changed electron beam conditions to see the beam-beam effect. The beam size was also measured with a single positron beam and compared with that during collision. The result of the measurement is reported in this paper.

  9. Size measuring techniques as tool to monitor pea proteins intramolecular crosslinking by transglutaminase treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoullah, Attaf; Krechiche, Ghali; Husson, Florence; Saurel, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, techniques for monitoring the intramolecular transglutaminase cross-links of pea proteins, based on protein size determination, were developed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles of transglutaminase-treated low concentration (0.01% w/w) pea albumin samples, compared to the untreated one (control), showed a higher electrophoretic migration of the major albumin fraction band (26 kDa), reflecting a decrease in protein size. This protein size decrease was confirmed, after DEAE column purification, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) where the hydrodynamic radius of treated samples appears to be reduced compared to the control one.

  10. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  11. Fore and aft elastic response characteristics of size 34x9.9, type 7, 14 ply-rated aircraft tires of bias ply, bias belted, and radial belted design. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fore-and-aft elastic response characteristics of aircraft tires of bias ply, bias-belted, and radial-belted design. The investigation consisted of: (1)static and rolling tests, (2)a statistical analysis which related the measured tire elastic characteristics to variations in the vertical load, inflation pressure, braking force and/or tire vertical deflection, and (3) a semi-empirical analysis which related the tire elastic behavior to measured wheel slippage during a steady-state braking. The results of this investigation indicate that the bias-belted tire has the largest spring constant value for most loading conditions and the radial-belted tire has the smallest spring constant value.

  12. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  13. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  14. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  15. Preparation of uniform-sized agarose beads by microporous membrane emulsification technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Lian-Yan; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2007-07-01

    Uniform-sized agarose beads were prepared by membrane emulsification technique in this study. Agarose was dissolved in boiling water (containing 0.9% sodium chloride) and used as water phase. A mixture of liquid paraffin and petroleum ether containing 4 wt% of hexaglycerin penta ester (PO-500) emulsifier was used as oil phase. At 55 degrees C, the water phase permeated through uniform pores of microporous membrane into the oil phase by a pressure of nitrogen gas to form uniform W/O emulsion. Then the emulsion was cooled down to room temperature under gentle agitation to form gel beads. The effect of oil phase, emulsifier, especially temperature on the uniformity of the beads were investigated and interpreted from interfacial tension between water phase and oil phase. Under optimized condition, the coefficient variation (C.V.) showing the size distribution of the beads was under 15%. This was the first report to prepare uniform agarose beads by membrane emulsification, and to investigate the effect of temperature on the size distribution of the droplets and beads. The beads with different size can be prepared by using membranes with different pore size, and the result showed that there was a linear relationship between the average diameter of beads and pore size of the membranes; beads with diameter from 15 to 60 microm were able to obtain in this study. PMID:17362974

  16. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal Pundrik; Soldati Thierry; Thewes Sascha; Baskar Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multicellularity in cellular slime molds is achieved by aggregation of several hundreds to thousands of cells. In the model slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, adenosine is known to increase the aggregate size and its antagonist caffeine reduces the aggregate size. However, it is not clear if the actions of adenosine and caffeine are evolutionarily conserved among other slime molds known to use structurally unrelated chemoattractants. We have examined how the known factor...

  17. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fabricated by depositing size-selected aerosols on various substrates using electrophoresis. This novel deposition method opens the route to embed plasmonic nanoparticles in the intermediate reflecto...

  18. Metal uptake by corn grown on media treated with particle-size fractionated biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weiping [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: chenweip@yahoo.com.cn; Chang, Andrew C.; Wu, Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhang, Yongsong [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 31009 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Particle-size of biosolids may affect plant uptake of heavy metals when the biosolids are land applied. In this study, corn (Zea mays L.) was grown on sand media treated with biosolids to study how particle-size of biosolids affected the plant uptake of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). Two biosolids, the Nu-Earth biosolids and the Los Angeles biosolids, of dissimilar surface morphology were utilized. The former exhibited a porous and spongy structure and had considerably greater specific surface area than that of the latter, which was granular and blocky. The specific surface area of the Los Angeles biosolids was inversely proportional to its particle-size, while that of Nu-Earth biosolids did not change significantly with particle-size. For each biosolid, the metal concentrations were not affected by particle sizes. The biomass yields of plants grown on the treated media increased as the biosolid particle-size decreased, indicating that plant uptake of nutrients from biosolids was dependent on interactions at the root-biosolids interface. The effect of particle-size on a metal's availability to plants was element-specific. The uptake rate of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Ni was correlated with the surface area of the particles, i.e., smaller particles having higher specific area provided greater root-biosolids contact and resulted in enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn and slightly less increased uptake of Cu and Ni. The particle morphology of biosolids had limited influence on the plant tissue concentrations of Cr and Pb. For both types of biosolids, total metal uptake increased as biosolid particle-size decreased. Our research indicates that biosolid particle-size distribution plays a deciding role in plant uptake of heavy metals when they are land applied.

  19. Comparison of the chemical evolution and characteristics of 495 biomass burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the ARCTAS/CARB-2008 field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hecobian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares measurements of gaseous and particulate emissions from a wide range of biomass-burning plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 research aircraft during the three phases of the ARCTAS-2008 experiment: ARCTAS-A, based out of Fairbanks, Alaska USA (3 April to 19 April 2008; ARCTAS-B based out of Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada (29 June to 13 July 2008; and ARCTAS-CARB, based out of Palmdale, California, USA (18 June to 24 June 2008. Extensive investigations of boreal fire plume evolution were undertaken during ARCTAS-B, where four distinct fire plumes that were intercepted by the aircraft over a range of down-wind distances (0.1 to 16 hr transport times were studied in detail. Based on these analyses, there was no evidence for ozone production and a box model simulation of the data confirmed that net ozone production was slow (on average 1 ppbv h−1 in the first 3 h and much lower afterwards due to limited NOx. Peroxyacetyl nitrate concentrations (PAN increased with plume age and the box model estimated an average production rate of ~80 pptv h−1 in the first 3 h. Like ozone, there was also no evidence for net secondary inorganic or organic aerosol formation. There was no apparent increase in aerosol mass concentrations in the boreal fire plumes due to secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation; however, there were indications of chemical processing of the organic aerosols. In addition to the detailed studies of boreal fire plume evolution, about 500 smoke plumes intercepted by the NASA DC-8 aircraft were segregated by fire source region. The normalized excess mixing ratios (i.e. ΔX/ΔCO of gaseous (carbon dioxide, acetonitrile, hydrogen cyanide, toluene, benzene, methane, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, ozone, PAN and fine aerosol particulate components (nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, chloride, organic aerosols and water soluble organic carbon of these plumes were compared.

  20. Habitat selection by breeding waterbirds at ponds with size-structured fish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloskowski, Janusz; Nieoczym, Marek; Polak, Marcin; Pitucha, Piotr

    2010-07-01

    Fish may significantly affect habitat use by birds, either as their prey or as competitors. Fish communities are often distinctly size-structured, but the consequences for waterbird assemblages remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of size structure of common carp ( Cyprinus carpio) cohorts together with other biotic and abiotic pond characteristics on the distribution of breeding waterbirds in a seminatural system of monocultured ponds, where three fish age classes were separately stocked. Fish age corresponded to a distinct fish size gradient. Fish age and total biomass, macroinvertebrate and amphibian abundance, and emergent vegetation best explained the differences in bird density between ponds. Abundance of animal prey other than fish (aquatic macroinvertebrates and larval amphibians) decreased with increasing carp age in the ponds. Densities of ducks and smaller grebes were strongly negatively associated with fish age/size gradient. The largest of the grebes, the piscivorous great crested grebe ( Podiceps cristatus), was the only species that preferred ponds with medium-sized fish and was positively associated with total fish biomass. Habitat selection by bitterns and most rallids was instead strongly influenced by the relative amount of emergent vegetation cover in the ponds. Our results show that fish size structure may be an important cue for breeding habitat choice and a factor affording an opportunity for niche diversification in avian communities.

  1. Control of root meristem size by DA1-RELATED PROTEIN2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuancheng; Ma, Wenying; Chen, Liangliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shengjun; Zhao, Hongtao; Zhao, Yankun; Jin, Weihuan; Li, Na; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Xia; Tong, Yiping; Li, Yunhai

    2013-03-01

    The control of organ growth by coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is a fundamental developmental process. In plants, postembryonic root growth is sustained by the root meristem. For maintenance of root meristem size, the rate of cell differentiation must equal the rate of cell division. Cytokinin and auxin interact to affect the cell proliferation and differentiation balance and thus control root meristem size. However, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine root meristem size still remain largely unknown. Here, we report that da1-related protein2 (dar2) mutants produce small root meristems due to decreased cell division and early cell differentiation in the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). dar2 mutants also exhibit reduced stem cell niche activity in the root meristem. DAR2 encodes a Lin-11, Isl-1, and Mec-3 domain-containing protein and shows an expression peak in the border between the transition zone and the elongation zone. Genetic analyses show that DAR2 functions downstream of cytokinin and SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 to maintain normal auxin distribution by influencing auxin transport. Further results indicate that DAR2 acts through the PLETHORA pathway to influence root stem cell niche activity and therefore control root meristem size. Collectively, our findings identify the role of DAR2 in root meristem size control and provide a novel link between several key regulators influencing root meristem size.

  2. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  3. Aircraft Anomaly Detection Using Performance Models Trained on Fleet Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinevsky, Dimitry; Matthews, Bryan L.; Martin, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an application of data mining technology called Distributed Fleet Monitoring (DFM) to Flight Operational Quality Assurance (FOQA) data collected from a fleet of commercial aircraft. DFM transforms the data into aircraft performance models, flight-to-flight trends, and individual flight anomalies by fitting a multi-level regression model to the data. The model represents aircraft flight performance and takes into account fixed effects: flight-to-flight and vehicle-to-vehicle variability. The regression parameters include aerodynamic coefficients and other aircraft performance parameters that are usually identified by aircraft manufacturers in flight tests. Using DFM, the multi-terabyte FOQA data set with half-million flights was processed in a few hours. The anomalies found include wrong values of competed variables, (e.g., aircraft weight), sensor failures and baises, failures, biases, and trends in flight actuators. These anomalies were missed by the existing airline monitoring of FOQA data exceedances.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of nano-sized MgB2 powder by spray pyrolysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nano-sized MgB2 powder was prepared by spray pyrolysis method in order to improve its flux pinning properties by increasing the number of grain boundaries. MgB2 powder was synthesized using spray pyrolysis technique followed by a post-annealing process without excessive magnesium addition. The feed solution was prepared by dissolving the correct amounts of Boric acid and Magnesium acetate tetrahydrate into distillated water and ethanol solution and the overall concentration were fixed at 0.1 mol/L. During the decomposition, 96% Ar-4% H2 was used as carrier gas. The collected powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, particle size analyzer, and physical property measurement system. The particles prepared by spray pyrolysis showed spherical morphology and uniform distribution with the average size of 1 μm. The onset of superconducting Tc for synthesized MgB2 powder was around 38 K

  5. Reduction of effective terahertz focal spot size by means of nested concentric parabolic reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Neumann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An ongoing limitation of terahertz spectroscopy is that the technique is generally limited to the study of relatively large samples of order 4 mm across due to the generally large size of the focal beam spot. We present a nested concentric parabolic reflector design which can reduce the terahertz focal spot size. This parabolic reflector design takes advantage of the feature that reflected rays experience a relative time delay which is the same for all paths. The increase in effective optical path for reflected light is equivalent to the aperture diameter itself. We have shown that the light throughput of an aperture of 2 mm can be increased by a factor 15 as compared to a regular aperture of the same size at low frequencies. This technique can potentially be used to reduce the focal spot size in terahertz spectroscopy and enable the study of smaller samples.

  6. Reduction of effective terahertz focal spot size by means of nested concentric parabolic reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, V. A., E-mail: v.a.neumann@student.utwente.nl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 21218 (United States); Faculty of Science & Technology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Laurita, N. J.; Pan, LiDong; Armitage, N. P., E-mail: npa@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 21218 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An ongoing limitation of terahertz spectroscopy is that the technique is generally limited to the study of relatively large samples of order 4 mm across due to the generally large size of the focal beam spot. We present a nested concentric parabolic reflector design which can reduce the terahertz focal spot size. This parabolic reflector design takes advantage of the feature that reflected rays experience a relative time delay which is the same for all paths. The increase in effective optical path for reflected light is equivalent to the aperture diameter itself. We have shown that the light throughput of an aperture of 2 mm can be increased by a factor 15 as compared to a regular aperture of the same size at low frequencies. This technique can potentially be used to reduce the focal spot size in terahertz spectroscopy and enable the study of smaller samples.

  7. Advanced Aircraft Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Prince

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been long debate on “advanced aircraft material” from past decades & researchers too came out with lots of new advanced material like composites and different aluminum alloys. Now days a new advancement that is in great talk is third generation Aluminum-lithium alloy. Newest Aluminum-lithium alloys are found out to have low density, higher elastic modulus, greater stiffness, greater cryogenic toughness, high resistance to fatigue cracking and improved corrosion resistance properties over the earlier used aircraft material as mentioned in Table 3 [1-5]. Comparison had been made with nowadays used composite material and is found out to be more superior then that

  8. Wind-tunnel investigation of a large-scale VTOL aircraft model with wing root and wing thrust augmentors. [Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, K.; Aiken, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale V/STOL aircraft model with thrust augmentors. The model had a double-delta wing of aspect ratio 1.65 with augmentors located in the wing root and the wing trailing edge. The supply air for the augmentor primary nozzles was provided by the YJ-97 turbojet engine. The airflow was apportioned approximately 74 percent to the wing root augmentor and 24 percent to wing augmentor. Results were obtained at several trailing-edge flap deflections with the nozzle jet-momentum coefficients ranging from 0 to 7.9. Three-component longitudinal data are presented with the agumentor operating with and without the horizontal tail. A limited amount of six component data are also presented.

  9. Modeling size controlled nanoparticle precipitation with the co-solvency method by spinodal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keßler, Simon; Schmid, Friederike; Drese, Klaus

    2016-09-14

    The co-solvency method is a method for the size controlled preparation of nanoparticles like polymersomes, where a poor co-solvent is mixed into a homogeneous copolymer solution to trigger precipitation of the polymer. The size of the resulting particles is determined by the rate of co-solvent addition. We use the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a Flory-Huggins free energy model to describe the precipitation of a polymer under changing solvent quality by applying a time dependent Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. The analysis focuses on the characteristic size R of polymer aggregates that form during the initial spinodal decomposition stage, and especially on how R depends on the rate s of solvent quality change. Both numerical results and a perturbation analysis predict a power law dependence R∼s(-⅙), which is in agreement with power laws for the final particle sizes that have been reported from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Hence, our model results suggest that the nanoparticle size in size-controlled precipitation is essentially determined during the spinodal decomposition stage. PMID:27502026

  10. Detection of Vehicle Tracks and Vegetation Damages Caused by use of Snowmobiles in the Longyearbyen Area on Svalbard using Unmanned Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storvold, R.; Karlsen, S. R.; Solbø, S. A.; Johansen, B.; Johansen, K.; Høgda, K. A.; Tømmervik, H.; Zmarz, A.; Joly, D.

    2013-12-01

    The study area in the surroundings of Longyearbyen on Svalbard, Arctic Norway, located at 71.2°N and 16°E is characterized by dry Arctic climate with a snow season of more than eight months, annual precipitation of less than 200mm, and a mean July temperature of about 6°C. Longyearbyen is the main settlement on Svalbard, with about 2000 inhabitants. During the last two decades the number of snowmobiles have increased from a few hundred to a number almost equals the number of inhabitants, and snowmobile trips are today the one of the main leisure activities. In addition, thousands of tourist visits every spring, and many of these go on organized snowmobile trips. Due to the often thin snow cover, and use of snowmobile even during the spring snow melt in May and early June, the rapid growth in use of snowmobile has made some damage to the vegetation. Damage on the fragile vegetation caused by the skids and belts of the snowmobile can be observed in most parts of the Adventdalen valley, close to Longyearbyen. The main aim of this study is to explore the feasibility and accuracy of using data from Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to identify vehicle tracks and damages on vegetation caused by the use of snowmobiles. Use of UAS give the opportunity to carry out research in a manner that minimizes the environmental footprint of the research activities. Small unmanned aircraft, combining both fixed wing multi rotor types allow us to collect image data for vegetation mapping without having any personnel walking into the field disturbing the sensitive High Arctic ecosystems. UAS used here are inexpensive and simple to operate. They are being developed with the goal of providing airborne capabilities for scientists at an affordable cost. The aircraft were instrumented with a normal Canon Powershot S100 RGB compact camera and a modified Canon Powershot SX230 NDVI camera. The fixed wing aircraft was taking pictures from 100 meters altitude with ground resolution of 2.5 cm

  11. Size-controllable fabrication of Cu nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by simple heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun; Wu, Shujing; Zheng, He; Cao, Fan; Sheng, Huaping; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles were synthesized on the surface of carbon nanotubes by heating. • The particle size could be tuned by controlling the temperature and duration. • The possible nucleation and growth mechanisms of nanoparticles were discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, employing simple heating inside the transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated the decoration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Cu nanoparticles (NPs). More significantly, the particle sizes could be effectively controlled by simply controlling the temperature and duration. It is believed that the nucleation and growth of NPs results from the deposition of generated Cu vapor as well as the surface diffusion of Cu on the CNTs at elevated temperature.

  12. Size-controllable fabrication of Cu nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by simple heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles were synthesized on the surface of carbon nanotubes by heating. • The particle size could be tuned by controlling the temperature and duration. • The possible nucleation and growth mechanisms of nanoparticles were discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, employing simple heating inside the transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated the decoration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by Cu nanoparticles (NPs). More significantly, the particle sizes could be effectively controlled by simply controlling the temperature and duration. It is believed that the nucleation and growth of NPs results from the deposition of generated Cu vapor as well as the surface diffusion of Cu on the CNTs at elevated temperature

  13. Long Range Aircraft Trajectory Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Magister, Tone

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the paper is the improvement of the aircraft future trajectory prediction accuracy for long-range airborne separation assurance. The strategic planning of safe aircraft flights and effective conflict avoidance tactics demand timely and accurate conflict detection based upon future four–dimensional airborne traffic situation prediction which is as accurate as each aircraft flight trajectory prediction. The improved kinematics model of aircraft relative flight considering flight ...

  14. Conversion of the dual training aircraft (DC into single control advanced training aircraft (SC. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan ŞTEFĂNESCU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Converting the DC school jet aircraft into SC advanced training aircraft - and use them forthe combat training of military pilots from the operational units, has become a necessity due to thebudget cuts for Air Force, with direct implications on reducing the number of hours of flight assignedto operating personnel for preparing and training.The purpose of adopting such a program is to reduce the number of flight hours allocated annuallyfor preparing and training in advanced stages of instruction, for every pilot, by more intensive use ofthis type of aircraft, which has the advantage of lower flight hour costs as compared to a supersoniccombat plane.

  15. Chemical composition shape form and size of suspended solids in the atmosphere carried by rain water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest of this work is to know about shape form, size and chemical composition of the suspended solids in the atmosphere of Toluca city and which are carried by the rains. The harvest of the samples was carried out during january to november 1999. The separation of the particulate matter from the rain water was realized through centrifugation. The solids were analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy to know the shape form and size and the chemical composition was determined by X-ray dispersive energy in general form and of some particles individually analysed. The p H was measured to the solutions and the quantification of some dissolved ions by the Icp technique was realized. The results of the solids showed C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, P, K, Ca, Ti and Fe. Moreover they present sizes which varying from a ten of nanometers until some tens of microns. (Author)

  16. Passive Tracking by Dual Aircraft Cooperation Based on UKF Algorithm%基于UKF算法的双机协同无源跟踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张平; 方洋旺; 朱剑辉; 乔治军

    2012-01-01

    Passive target locating and tracking by single airborne observer may not show complete observability under some special conditions. To solve the problem, a mathematical model for target tracking by dual aircraft cooperation was established. With the azimuth and pitch angle of the target measured by the dual aircrafts, nonlinear filtering algorithm was used to estimate the position and velocity of the target. To solve the problems of traditional nonlinear filtering of large error and liable to diverge,the novel algorithm of Unscented Kalman Filter ( UKF) was introduced in this paper. Simulation results show that; compared with Extended Kalman Filter(EKF) ,UKF is superior in solving the nonlinear system problem and has better filtering effects.%针对单机对目标被动定位跟踪不具有完全可观测性,建立了双机协同探测定位跟踪模型,利用双机探测到的目标方位角和俯仰角,结合非线性滤波算法估计出目标的位置和速度参数.为解决传统的非线性滤波误差比较大、容易发散的问题,引入无迹卡尔曼滤波(UKF)算法.仿真实验表明,与扩展卡尔曼滤波相比较,UKF能更好地解决量测方程的非线性问题,滤波效果更好.

  17. AIRTV: Broadband Direct to Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbello, R.; Stone, R.; Bennett, S. B.; Bertenyi, E.

    2002-01-01

    Airlines have been continuously upgrading their wide-body, long-haul aircraft with IFE (in-flight entertainment) systems that can support from 12 to 24 channels of video entertainment as well as provide the infrastructure to enable in-seat delivery of email and internet services. This is a direct consequence of increased passenger demands for improved in-flight services along with the expectations that broadband delivery systems capable of providing live entertainment (news, sports, financial information, etc.) and high speed data delivery will soon be available. The recent events of Sept. 11 have slowed the airline's upgrade of their IFE systems, but have also highlighted the compelling need for broadband aeronautical delivery systems to include operational and safety information. Despite the impact of these events, it is estimated that by 2005 more than 3000 long haul aircraft (servicing approximately 1 billion passengers annually) will be fully equipped with modern IFE systems. Current aircraft data delivery systems, which use either Inmarsat or NATS, are lacking in bandwidth and consequently are unsuitable to satisfy passenger demands for broadband email/internet services or the airlines' burgeoning data requirements. Present live video delivery services are limited to regional coverage and are not readily expandable to global or multiregional service. Faced with a compelling market demand for high data transport to aircraft, AirTV has been developing a broadband delivery system that will meet both passengers' and airlines' needs. AirTV is a global content delivery system designed to provide a range of video programming and data services to commercial airlines. When AirTV is operational in 2004, it will provide a broadband connection directly to the aircraft, delivering live video entertainment, internet/email service and essential operational and safety data. The system has been designed to provide seamless global service to all airline routes except for those

  18. PREDICTION OF AIRCRAFT NOISE LEVELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center for predicting the noise contributions from various aircraft noise sources have been incorporated into a computer program for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground test. The noise sources accounted for include fan inlet and exhaust, jet, flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine, and airframe. Noise propagation corrections are available in the program for atmospheric attenuation, ground reflections, extra ground attenuation, and shielding. The capacity to solve the geometrical relationships between an aircraft in flight and an observer on the ground has been included in the program to make it useful in evaluating noise estimates and footprints for various proposed engine installations. The program contains two main routines for employing the noise prediction routines. The first main routine consists of a procedure to calculate at various observer stations the time history of the noise from an aircraft flying at a specified set of speeds, orientations, and space coordinates. The various components of the noise are computed by the program. For each individual source, the noise levels are free field with no corrections for propagation losses other than spherical divergence. The total spectra may then be corrected for the usual effects of atmospheric attenuation, extra ground attenuation, ground reflection, and aircraft shielding. Next, the corresponding values of overall sound pressure level, perceived noise level, and tone-weighted perceived noise level are calculated. From the time history at each point, true effective perceived noise levels are calculated. Thus, values of effective perceived noise levels, maximum perceived noise levels, and tone-weighted perceived noise levels are found for a grid of specified points on the ground. The second main routine is designed to give the usual format of one-third octave sound pressure level values at a fixed radius for a number of user

  19. Effect of weed patch size on seed removal by harvester ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westermann, Paula R.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In dryland cereals in North-eastern Spain, the harvester ant, Messor barbarus L., is responsible for removal of a large proportion of the newly produced weed seeds (40-100%. The probability that seeds will be found by the ants may be influenced by weed patch size. To investigate this source of variability, 30 seed patches were created in each of three, 50 × 50 m, blocks in a cereal field after harvest, by sequentially seeding (10, 16 and 17 August 2010 with 2000 seeds m-2 of Avena sativa L.. Patch size varied from 0.25 to 9 m2. Twenty four hours after seeding, the remaining seeds were collected and seed removal rates estimated. Average seed removal rate was lowest in the smallest (78-94% and highest in the largest patches (99-100%. Differences were mainly caused by the fact that some of the smaller patches (9.7% were not found. However, when patches were found, they were exploited at equal rates (98-100%. As predicted, the probability of finding a patch increased slightly, but significantly, with increasing patch size. When a patch was found, it was almost always fully exploited, resulting in very high seed removal rates, irrespective of patch size. These results indicate that the size of the seed patch is only a minor source of variation influencing this form of biological control of weeds.

  20. Formation and characterization of varied size germanium nanocrystals by electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Liu, Chuan;

    2011-01-01

    and crystallization. The samples of different size Ge nanocrystals embedded in the SiO2 matrix were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence. Interplayed size and strain effect of Ge nanocystals was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy after excluding the thermal effect with proper excitation laser......Germanium nanocrystals are being extensively examined. Their unique optical properties (brought about by the quantum confinement effect) could potentially be applied in wide areas of nonlinear optics, light emission and solid state memory etc. In this paper, Ge nanocrystals embedded in a SiO2...

  1. Dedicated Solutions for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Components

    OpenAIRE

    Pitropakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft structures, like any other mechanical structure, are subjected to various external factors that influence their lifetime. Mechanicalnbsp;and the environment are only some of the factors that can degrade the structure of aircraft components. Monitoring of these degradations by regular inspections or automated data recording is vital for the structural health of the critical components of an aircraft. This research proposes a number of dedicated solutions for structural health monitori...

  2. Review of Aircraft Electric Power Systems and Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xin; Guerrero, Josep M.; Wu, Xiaohao

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the electrical power capacity is increasing rapidly in more electric aircraft (MEA), since the conventional mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic energy systems are partly replaced by electrical power system. As a consequence, capacity and complexity of aircraft electric power systems (EPS) will increase dramatically and more advanced aircraft EPSs need to be developed. This paper gives a brief description of the constant frequency (CF) EPS, variable frequency (VF) EPS and adva...

  3. Relationship between Cloud Characteristics and Radar Reflectivity Based on Aircraft and Cloud Radar Co-observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Rong; LIU Liping; YIN Yan

    2013-01-01

    Cloud properties were investigated based on aircraft and cloud radar co-observation conducted at Yitong,Jilin,Northeast China.The aircraft provided in situ measurements of cloud droplet size distribution,while the millimeter-wavelength cloud radar vertically scanned the same cloud that the aircraft penetrated.The reflectivity factor calculated from aircraft measurements was compared in detail with simultaneous radar observations.The results showed that the two reflectivities were comparable in warm clouds,but in ice cloud there were more differences,which were probably associated with the occurrence of liquid water.The acceptable agreement between reflectivities obtained in water cloud confirmed that it is feasible to derive cloud properties by using aircraft data,and hence for cloud radar to remotely sense cloud properties.Based on the dataset collected in warm clouds,the threshold of reflectivity to diagnose drizzle and cloud particles was studied by analyses of the probability distribution function of reflectivity from cloud particles and drizzle drops.The relationship between reflectivity factor (Z) and cloud liquid water content (LWC) was also derived from data on both cloud particles and drizzle.In comparison with cloud droplets,the relationship for drizzle was blurred by many scatter points and thus was less evident.However,these scatters could be partly removed by filtering out the drop size distribution with a large ratio of reflectivity and large extinction coefficient but small effective radius.Empirical relationships of Z-LWC for both cloud particles and drizzle could then be derived.

  4. XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft on VTOL stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft undergoing tests on the VTOL stand. This allowed the engine and rotor system to undergo realistic testing before being committed to actual free flight. The XV-15s, manufactured by Bell, were involved in limited research at NASA/Dryden in 1980 and 1981. The development of the XV-15 Tiltrotor research aircraft was initiated in 1973 with joint Army/NASA funding as a 'proof of concept', or 'technology demonstrator' program, with two aircraft being built by Bell Helicopter Textron (BHT) in 1977. NASA Ames Research Center, where most of the NASA research is conducted, continues to be in charge of the joint NASA/Army/Bell program. The aircraft are powered by twin Lycoming T-53 turboshaft engines that are connected by a cross-shaft and drive three-bladed, 25 ft diameter metal rotors (the size extensively tested in a wind tunnel). The engines and main transmissions are located in wingtip nacelles to minimize the operational loads on the cross-shaft system and, with the rotors, tilt as a single unit. For takeoff, the proprotors and their engines are used in the straight-up position where the thrust is directed downward. The XV-15 then climbs vertically into the air like a helicopter. In this VTOL mode, the vehicle can lift off and hover for approximately one hour. Once off the ground, the XV-15 has the ability to fly in one of two different modes. It can fly as a helicopter, in the partially converted airplane mode. The XV-15 can also then convert from the helicopter mode to the airplane mode. This is accomplished by continuous rotation of the proprotors from the helicopter rotor position to the conventional airplane propeller position. During the ten to fifteen second conversion period, the aircraft speed increases and lift is transferred from the rotors to the wing. To land, the proprotors are rotated up to the helicopter rotor position and flown as a helicopter to a vertical landing.

  5. Aircraft noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  6. Robots for Aircraft Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center charged USBI (now Pratt & Whitney) with the task of developing an advanced stripping system based on hydroblasting to strip paint and thermal protection material from Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. A robot, mounted on a transportable platform, controls the waterjet angle, water pressure and flow rate. This technology, now known as ARMS, has found commercial applications in the removal of coatings from jet engine components. The system is significantly faster than manual procedures and uses only minimal labor. Because the amount of "substrate" lost is minimal, the life of the component is extended. The need for toxic chemicals is reduced, as is waste disposal and human protection equipment. Users of the ARMS work cell include Delta Air Lines and the Air Force, which later contracted with USBI for development of a Large Aircraft Paint Stripping system (LARPS). LARPS' advantages are similar to ARMS, and it has enormous potential in military and civil aircraft maintenance. The technology may also be adapted to aircraft painting, aircraft inspection techniques and paint stripping of large objects like ships and railcars.

  7. Impact of temperature on zinc oxide particle size by using sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keanchuan, E-mail: lee.kc@petronas.com.my; Ching, Dennis Ling Chuan, E-mail: dennis.ling@petronas.com.my [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Saipolbahri, Zulhilmi Akmal bin, E-mail: zulhilmiakmal@gmail.com [Geoscience and Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Guan, Beh Hoe, E-mail: beh.hoeguan@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hassan.soleimani@petronas.com.my; Soleimani, Hassan, E-mail: beh.hoeguan@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hassan.soleimani@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were prepared and synthesized via sol-gel method, by using citric acid as a precursor. The impact of annealing on the particle size was investigated. Based on the results from the Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), three different annealing temperature which is 500, 600 and 700 °C were chosen followed by the characterization of the ZnO nanoparticle by using Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). Results showed that the crystallite size estimated from PXRD increased with the annealing temperature which was hexagonal structure for ZnO. TEM further revealed the same tendency which the Zn NPs size also increased with the annealing temperature.

  8. Determining proportions of lunar crater populations by fitting crater size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We determine the proportions of two mixed crater populations distinguishable by size distributions on the Moon. A "multiple power-law" model is built to formulate crater size distribution $N(D) \\propto D^{-\\alpha}$ whose slope $\\alpha$ varies with crater diameter $D$. Fitted size distribution of lunar highland craters characterized by $\\alpha = 1.17 \\pm 0.04$, $1.88 \\pm 0.07$, $3.17 \\pm 0.10$ and $1.40 \\pm 0.15$ for consecutive $D$ intervals divided by 49, 120 and 251 km and that of lunar Class 1 craters with a single slope $\\alpha = 1.96 \\pm 0.14$, are taken as Population 1 and 2 crater size distribution respectively, whose sum is then fitted to the size distribution of global lunar craters with $D$ between 10 and 100 km. Estimated crater densities of Population 1 and 2 are $44 \\times 10^{-5}$ and $5 \\times 10^{-5}$ km$^{-2}$ respectively, leading to the proportion of the latter $10 \\%$. The results underlines the need for considering the Population 1 craters and the relevant impactors, the primordial main-b...

  9. Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans body size and male tail development by the novel gene lon-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korswagen Hendrik C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In C. elegans and other nematode species, body size is determined by the composition of the extracellular cuticle as well as by the nuclear DNA content of the underlying hypodermis. Mutants that are defective in these processes can exhibit either a short or a long body size phenotype. Several mutations that give a long body size (Lon phenotype have been characterized and found to be regulated by the DBL-1/TGF-β pathway, that controls post-embryonic growth and male tail development. Results Here we characterize a novel gene affecting body size. lon-8 encodes a secreted product of the hypodermis that is highly conserved in Rhabditid nematodes. lon-8 regulates larval elongation as well as male tail development. In both processes, lon-8 appears to function independently of the Sma/Mab pathway. Rather, lon-8 genetically interacts with dpy-11 and dpy-18, which encode cuticle collagen modifying enzymes. Conclusion The novel gene lon-8 encodes a secreted product of the hypodermis that controls body size and male ray morphology in C. elegans. lon-8 genetically interacts with enzymes that affect the composition of the cuticle.

  10. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study. Volume 2: Preliminary design of research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to establish a minimum sized, low cost V/STOL tilt-rotor research aircraft with the capability of performing proof-of-concept flight research investigations applicable to a wide range of useful military and commercial configurations. The analysis and design approach was based on state-of-the-art methods and maximum use of off-the-shelf hardware and systems to reduce development risk, procurement cost and schedules impact. The rotors to be used are of 26 foot diameter and are the same as currently under construction and test as part of NASA Tilt-Rotor Contract NAS2-6505. The aircraft has a design gross weight of 12,000 lbs. The proposed engines to be used are Lycoming T53-L-13B rated at 1550 shaft horsepower which are fully qualified. A flight test investigation is recommended which will determine the capabilities and limitations of the research aircraft.

  11. Pore Size Distribution in Chicken Eggs as Determined by Mercury Porosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Scala Jr N

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the application of mercury porosimetry technique into the determination of porosity features in 28 week old hen eggshells. Our results have shown that the majority of the pores have sizes between 1 to 10 mu m in the eggshells studied. By applying mercury porosimetry technique we were able to describe the porosity features better, by determining a pore size distribution in the eggshells. Here, we introduce mercury porosimetry technique as a new routine technique applied into the study of eggshells.

  12. A Grounded Theory Study of Aircraft Maintenance Technician Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Robert

    Aircraft maintenance technician decision-making and actions have resulted in aircraft system errors causing aircraft incidents and accidents. Aircraft accident investigators and researchers examined the factors that influence aircraft maintenance technician errors and categorized the types of errors in an attempt to prevent similar occurrences. New aircraft technology introduced to improve aviation safety and efficiency incur failures that have no information contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, aircraft maintenance technicians must use only approved aircraft maintenance documents to repair, modify, and service aircraft. This qualitative research used a grounded theory approach to explore the decision-making processes and actions taken by aircraft maintenance technicians when confronted with an aircraft problem not contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. The target population for the research was Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft and power plant mechanics from across the United States. Nonprobability purposeful sampling was used to obtain aircraft maintenance technicians with the experience sought in the study problem. The sample population recruitment yielded 19 participants for eight focus group sessions to obtain opinions, perceptions, and experiences related to the study problem. All data collected was entered into the Atlas ti qualitative analysis software. The emergence of Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making themes regarding Aircraft Maintenance Manual content, Aircraft Maintenance Technician experience, and legal implications of not following Aircraft Maintenance Manuals surfaced. Conclusions from this study suggest Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making were influenced by experience, gaps in the Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, reliance on others, realizing the impact of decisions concerning aircraft airworthiness, management pressures, and legal concerns

  13. Preparation of Small Particle Sized ZnAl-Hydrotalcite-Like Compounds by Ultrasonic Crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianmei Xie; Xiurong Ren; Jinping Li; Xiaojun Hu; Zhizhong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasonic technology has been intensively studied recently due to its special features. In this paper, an ultrasonic crystallization method was introduced for the preparation of ZnAl-Hydrotalcite-Like compounds (ZnAl-HTLcs). Samples with high crystallinity, small particle size and narrow particle size distribution were obtained and fully characterized using conventional techniques of XRD, FT-IR and TG-DTA. The results prove that both ultrasonic frequency and ultrasonic power have effects on the sizes of the product particles. By varying the ultrasonic power from 250 W to 88 W, with the ultrasonic frequency fixed at 59 kHz, the median particle size of the samples increased from 0.37μm to 0.82μm. By altering the hydrothermal treatment time from 1 h to 5 h at 110 ℃, the median particle size of ZnAl-HTLcs synthesized via ultrasonic crystallization increased from 0.88 μm to 1.11 μm.

  14. Pore size evaluation of mesoporous organosilicate films by non-destructive X-ray reflectivity methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    200-nm-thick organosilicate films deposited by mixture of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) dissolving in different cetrimonium bromide (CTAB)/ethanol ratios were characterized in terms of pore size determination and its distribution. Under the toluene ambient, the pores would adsorb the gas hence elevating the whole film density. The X-ray reflectivity (XRR) equipped with mass flow control was utilized to detect the film density increasing. By fitting with Gaussian function and conversing with Kelvin's equation, the pore size was increased from 6.2 to 10.8 Å as the CTAB/ethanol ratio increasing to 0.075. It was attributed to the ethanol and CTAB enhanced the TEOS hollow droplets stability and dissolvability. As the CTAB/ethanol ratio is further increased, the pore size is reversely decreased, owing to the formation of solid microspheres. The non-destructive XRR measurement can evaluate the sub-nano pore sizes and its size distribution, which would fascinate the development and characterization of back-end of line process. (author)

  15. Size modulation of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in amorphous silicon oxide by Cat-CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different issues related to controlling size of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiOx:H) deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) have been reported. Films were deposited using tantalum (Ta) and tungsten (W) filaments and it is observed that films deposited using tantalum filament resulted in good control on the properties. The parameters which can affect the size of nc-Si domains have been studied which include hydrogen flow rate, catalyst and substrate temperatures. The deposited samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, HRTEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy, for determining the size of the deposited nc-Si. The crystallite formation starts for Ta-catalyst around the temperature of 1700 oC.

  16. Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles prepared by precipitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Dong; Yanjiao Chang; Qian Wang; Jin Tong; Jiang Zhou

    2016-02-01

    The present work investigated the influence of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles (ANPs) prepared through precipitation. ANPs were fabricated using absolute ethanol containing surfactants (Tween80, Span80 and mixtures of Tween80 and Span80 with ratios of 25/75, 50/50 and 75/25, respectively) as non-solvents. The obtained ANPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that surfactant type, concentration and hydrophilic–lipophilic balance (HLB) value had great impact on size of precipitated ANPs. The smallest ANPs with mean size of 155 nm determined by DLS were obtained by using 0.5% (in proportion of the amylose solution volume) of Tween80/Span80 mixture (HLB = 12.33). The precipitated ANPs possessed the V-type crystalline structure no matter whether using the surfactants or not.

  17. Microstructural study and size control of iron oxide nanoparticles produced by microemulsion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutzarova, T.; Kolev, S.; Ghelev, Ch.; Paneva, D.; Nedkov, I.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we study the possibility to control the size of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles by the microemulsion technique. We used a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion system with n-hexadecil trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant, n-butanol as a co-surfactant, n-hexanol as a continuous oil phase, and aqueous phase. The magnetite nanopowders were synthesized by a single microemulsion technique in which the aqueous phase contains only metal ions (Fe2+ and Fe3+). The particle size of the powders varied in the range of 14-36 nm depending on the preparation conditions. We studied the influence of changing the water/surfactant ratio (W 0 = 5, 10, 15, 20) and the metallic ion (Fe2+ and Fe3+) concentration on the particle size distribution and crystallinity of Fe3O4.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Sub-cooled Cavitating Flow by Using Bubble Size Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka ITO; Hideki WAKAMATSU; Takao NAGASAKI

    2003-01-01

    A new cavitating model by using bubble size distribution based on mass of bubbles is proposed. Liquid phase is treated with Eulerian framework as a mixture containing minute cavitating bubbles. Vapor phase consists of various sizes of minute vapor bubbles, which is distributed to classes based on their mass. The change of bubble number density for each class was solved by considering the change of bubble mass due to phase change as well as generation of new bubbles due to heterogeneous nucleation. In this method the mass of bubbles is treated as an independent variable, in other word, a new coordinate, and dependant variables are solved in Eulerian framework for spatial coordinates and bubble-mass coordinate. The present method is applied to a cavitating flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle, and the two-phase flow with bubble size distribution and phase change was successfully predicted.

  19. The Cambrian explosion triggered by critical turning point in genome size evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dirson Jian; Zhang, Shengli

    2010-02-01

    The Cambrian explosion is a grand challenge to science today and involves multidisciplinary study. This event is generally believed as a result of genetic innovations, environmental factors and ecological interactions, even though there are many conflicts on nature and timing of metazoan origins. The crux of the matter is that an entire roadmap of the evolution is missing to discern the biological complexity transition and to evaluate the critical role of the Cambrian explosion in the overall evolutionary context. Here, we calculate the time of the Cambrian explosion by a "C-value clock"; our result quite fits the fossil records. We clarify that the intrinsic reason of genome evolution determined the Cambrian explosion. A general formula for evaluating genome size of different species has been found, by which the genome size evolution can be illustrated. The Cambrian explosion, as a major transition of biological complexity, essentially corresponds to a critical turning point in genome size evolution. PMID:20074549

  20. The Pilatus Unmanned Aircraft System for Lower Atmospheric Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, Gijs; Palo, Scott; Agrow, Brian; LoDolce, Gabriel; Mack, James; Gao, Ru-Shan; Telg, Hagen; Trussell, Cameron; Fromm, Joshua; Long, Charles N.; Bland, Geoff I.; Maslanik, James; Schmid, Beat; Hock, Terry

    2016-04-28

    This paper presents the University of Colorado Pilatus unmanned research aircraft, assembled to provide measurements of aerosols, radiation and thermodynamics in the lower troposphere. This aircraft has a wingspan of 3.2 meters and a maximum take off weight of 25 kg and is pow-ered by an electric motor to reduce engine exhaust and concerns about carburetor icing. It carries instrumentation to make measurements of broadband up- and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, aerosol particle size distribution, atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and pressure and to collect video of flights for subsequent analysis of atmospheric conditions during flight. In order to make the shortwave radiation measurements, care was taken to carefully position a high-quality compact inertial measurement unit (IMU) and characterize the orientation offset between it and the upward looking radiation sensor. Using measurements from both of these sensors, a cor-rection is applied to the raw measurements to correct for aircraft attitude and sensor tilt relative to he sun. The data acquisition system was designed from the ground up in order to accommodate the variety of sensors deployed. Initial test flights completed in Colorado provide promising results with measurements from the radiation sensors generally agreeing with those from a nearby surface site. Additionally, estimates of surface albedo from onboard sensors were consistent with local surface conditions, including melting snow and bright runway surface. Aerosol size distributions collected are internally consistent and have previously been shown to agree well with larger, surface-based instrumentation. Finally the atmospheric state measurements evolve as would be expected, with the near-surface atmosphere warming over time as the day goes on, and the atmospheric relative humidity decreasing with increased temperature. No directional bias on measured temperature, as might be expected due to uneven heating of the sensor

  1. Modeling group size and scalar stress by logistic regression from an archaeological perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Alberti

    Full Text Available Johnson's scalar stress theory, describing the mechanics of (and the remedies to the increase in in-group conflictuality that parallels the increase in groups' size, provides scholars with a useful theoretical framework for the understanding of different aspects of the material culture of past communities (i.e., social organization, communal food consumption, ceramic style, architecture and settlement layout. Due to its relevance in archaeology and anthropology, the article aims at proposing a predictive model of critical level of scalar stress on the basis of community size. Drawing upon Johnson's theory and on Dunbar's findings on the cognitive constrains to human group size, a model is built by means of Logistic Regression on the basis of the data on colony fissioning among the Hutterites of North America. On the grounds of the theoretical framework sketched in the first part of the article, the absence or presence of colony fissioning is considered expression of not critical vs. critical level of scalar stress for the sake of the model building. The model, which is also tested against a sample of archaeological and ethnographic cases: a confirms the existence of a significant relationship between critical scalar stress and group size, setting the issue on firmer statistical grounds; b allows calculating the intercept and slope of the logistic regression model, which can be used in any time to estimate the probability that a community experienced a critical level of scalar stress; c allows locating a critical scalar stress threshold at community size 127 (95% CI: 122-132, while the maximum probability of critical scale stress is predicted at size 158 (95% CI: 147-170. The model ultimately provides grounds to assess, for the sake of any further archaeological/anthropological interpretation, the probability that a group reached a hot spot of size development critical for its internal cohesion.

  2. Effect of population size on genetic variation levels in Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae detected by RAPDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshang Nosrati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population size of plants affects on population genetic variation. Materials and Methods: We studied the impact of population size on genetic variation in populations of Capparis spinosa (caper, Capparaceae using RAPDs in East Azerbaijan (Iran. Within-population genetic diversity was estimated based on Nei`s and Shanonn`s diversity using Popgen, and genetic similarity among the populations was studied from a UPGMA dendrogram based the matrix of Nei’s distances obtained through SHAN. Difference in the level genetic variation between small-sized and large-sized populations was tested using Mann-Whitney U test, and correlation between geographical and genetic distances among populations was examined by Pearson test (SPSS, 11.3. Total genetic variation was partitioned into within and among populations based on AMOVA using Arlequin. Results: The polymorphism levels of RAPDs bands among the populations ranged from 48.8% to 81.4%, and within-population Nei’s diversity varied from 0.1667 to 0.2630. Genetic variation in small-sized populations (0.1667 to 0.1809 was significantly lower than the variations in large-sized populations (0.2158 -0.2630 (N= 7, P0.674, Pearson correlation test. Conclusions: Population size has a dramatic impact on its genetic diversity. The results revealed that fragmentation of caper population in the study region has most likely occurred recently. The low genetic diversity revealed within caper populations indicates high risk of extinction and suggests that urgent conservation action is needed to recover diversity in these populations.

  3. Conceptual design of hybrid-electric transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornet, C.; Isikveren, A. T.

    2015-11-01

    The European Flightpath 2050 and corresponding Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) as well as the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation N+ series have elaborated aggressive emissions and external noise reduction targets according to chronological waypoints. In order to deliver ultra-low or even zero in-flight emissions levels, there exists an increasing amount of international research and development emphasis on electrification of the propulsion and power systems of aircraft. Since the late 1990s, a series of experimental and a host of burgeouning commercial activities for fixed-wing aviation have focused on glider, ultra-light and light-sport airplane, and this is proving to serve as a cornerstone for more ambitious transport aircraft design and integration technical approaches. The introduction of hybrid-electric technology has dramatically expanded the design space and the full-potential of these technologies will be drawn through synergetic, tightly-coupled morphological and systems integration emphasizing propulsion - as exemplified by the potential afforded by distributed propulsion solutions. With the aim of expanding upon the current repository of knowledge associated with hybrid-electric propulsion systems a quad-fan arranged narrow-body transport aircraft equipped with two advanced Geared-Turbofans (GTF) and two Electrical Fans (EF) in an under-wing podded installation is presented in this technical article. The assessment and implications of an increasing Degree-of-Hybridization for Useful Power (HP,USE) on the overall sizing, performance as well as flight technique optimization of fuel-battery hybrid-electric aircraft is addressed herein. The integrated performance of the concept was analyzed in terms of potential block fuel burn reduction and change in vehicular efficiency in comparison to a suitably projected conventional aircraft employing GTF-only propulsion targeting year 2035. Results showed that by increasing HP,USE, significant

  4. Escorting commercial aircraft to reduce the MANPAD threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Nicholas; Richardson, M. A.; Butters, B.; Walmsley, R.; Ayling, R.; Taylor, B.

    2005-11-01

    This paper studies the Man-Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) threat against large commercial aircraft using flight profile analysis, engagement modelling and simulation. Non-countermeasure equipped commercial aircraft are at risk during approach and departure due to the large areas around airports that would need to be secured to prevent the use of highly portable and concealable MANPADs. A software model (CounterSim) has been developed and was used to simulate an SA-7b and large commercial aircraft engagement. The results of this simulation have found that the threat was lessened when a escort fighter aircraft is flown in the 'Centreline Low' position, or 25 m rearward from the large aircraft and 15 m lower, similar to the Air-to-Air refuelling position. In the model a large aircraft on approach had a 50% chance of being hit or having a near miss (within 20m) whereas escorted by a countermeasure equipped F-16 in the 'Centerline Low' position, this was reduced to only 14%. Departure is a particularly vulnerable time for large aircraft due to slow climb rates and the inability to fly evasive manoeuvres. The 'Centreline Low' escorted departure greatly reduced the threat to 16% hit or near miss from 62% for an unescorted heavy aircraft. Overall the CounterSim modelling has showed that escorting a civilian aircraft on approach and departure can reduce the MANPAD threat by 3 to 4 times.

  5. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahige G. Abdallah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also

  6. AIRTV: Broadband Direct to Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbello, R.; Stone, R.; Bennett, S. B.; Bertenyi, E.

    2002-01-01

    Airlines have been continuously upgrading their wide-body, long-haul aircraft with IFE (in-flight entertainment) systems that can support from 12 to 24 channels of video entertainment as well as provide the infrastructure to enable in-seat delivery of email and internet services. This is a direct consequence of increased passenger demands for improved in-flight services along with the expectations that broadband delivery systems capable of providing live entertainment (news, sports, financial information, etc.) and high speed data delivery will soon be available. The recent events of Sept. 11 have slowed the airline's upgrade of their IFE systems, but have also highlighted the compelling need for broadband aeronautical delivery systems to include operational and safety information. Despite the impact of these events, it is estimated that by 2005 more than 3000 long haul aircraft (servicing approximately 1 billion passengers annually) will be fully equipped with modern IFE systems. Current aircraft data delivery systems, which use either Inmarsat or NATS, are lacking in bandwidth and consequently are unsuitable to satisfy passenger demands for broadband email/internet services or the airlines' burgeoning data requirements. Present live video delivery services are limited to regional coverage and are not readily expandable to global or multiregional service. Faced with a compelling market demand for high data transport to aircraft, AirTV has been developing a broadband delivery system that will meet both passengers' and airlines' needs. AirTV is a global content delivery system designed to provide a range of video programming and data services to commercial airlines. When AirTV is operational in 2004, it will provide a broadband connection directly to the aircraft, delivering live video entertainment, internet/email service and essential operational and safety data. The system has been designed to provide seamless global service to all airline routes except for those

  7. Comparison of lesion size estimated by dynamic MR imaging, mammography and histopathology in breast neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the accordance of size measurements of malignant breast lesions 65 women with 76 malignant lesions were preoperatively examined with triple diagnosis (mammography was performed in three views with additional views if necessary) and dynamic MR imaging using a subtraction technique with a 3D T1-weighted sequence. Maximum lesion size at histopathology was used as gold standard and compared with maximum lesion size at MRI and mammography. All measurements were made independently for each method. Histopathology verified 48 invasive, 5 in situ, and 23 mixed lesions. No significant difference was found for the pure invasive lesions (p=0.366). In the mixed lesions a slightly better result for MRI was indicated (p=0.116), although there was a great spread. Only five pure in situ lesions were assessed, too few to draw any statistical conclusions (p>0.5). An overall difference indicated a slight superiority of MRI (p=0.097). The MR imaging and mammography are both good at measuring the size of detected invasive breast malignancies. The total sizes of mixed lesions are frequently underestimated by both MRI and mammography, although the invasive parts were equally well described and measured with both methods. (orig.)

  8. Pitfalls and novel applications of particle sizing by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karl; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    After briefly introducing the theoretical equations for DLS based particle size analysis, the need for angular dependent DLS investigations is emphasized to obtain correct particle sizes. Practical examples are given that demonstrate the possible magnitudes of errors in particle size if DLS is measured at one large scattering angle, only, as done by essentially all, most frequently utilized commercial "single angle" particle sizers. The second part is focused on a novel DLS application to sensitively trace (nano)particle interactions with concentrated blood serum or plasma that leads to the formation of large aggregates in a size regime of ≫100 nm. Most likely, such aggregates originate from protein induced bridging of nanoparticles, since it is well known that serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of essentially all nanoparticles utilized in medical applications. Thus, the protein corona around nanoparticles does not only change their biological identity but to a large extend also their size, thus possibly affecting biodistribution and in vivo circulation time.

  9. Writing and reading training effects on font type and size preferences by students with low vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasavun Uysal, Songül; Düger, Tülin

    2012-06-01

    The effect of writing and reading training on preferred font type and size in low-vision students was evaluated in 35 children. An ophthalmologist confirmed low vision according to ICD-10-CM. Children identified the font type and size they could best read. The writing subtest of the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, read in 1 min., and legibility as measured by the number of readable written letters were used in evaluating the children. A writing and reading treatment program was conducted, beginning with the child's preferred font type and size, for 3 months, 2 days per week, for 45 min. per day at the child's school. Before treatment, the most preferred font type was Verdana; after treatment, the preferred font type and size changed. Students had gained reading and writing speed after training, but their writing legibility was not significantly better. Training might affect the preferred font type and size of students with low vision. Surprisingly, serif and sans-serif fonts were preferred about equally after treatment.

  10. Synapse clusters are preferentially formed by synapses with large recycling pool sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Welzel

    Full Text Available Synapses are distributed heterogeneously in neural networks. The relationship between the spatial arrangement of synapses and an individual synapse's structural and functional features remains to be elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of the number of adjacent synapses on individual synaptic recycling pool sizes. When measuring the discharge of the styryl dye FM1-43 from electrically stimulated synapses in rat hippocampal tissue cultures, a strong positive correlation between the number of neighbouring synapses and recycling vesicle pool sizes was observed. Accordingly, vesicle-rich synapses were found to preferentially reside next to neighbours with large recycling pool sizes. Although these synapses with large recycling pool sizes were rare, they were densely arranged and thus exhibited a high amount of release per volume. To consolidate these findings, functional terminals were marked by live-cell antibody staining with anti-synaptotagmin-1-cypHer or overexpression of synaptopHluorin. Analysis of synapse distributions in these systems confirmed the results obtained with FM 1-43. Our findings support the idea that clustering of synapses with large recycling pool sizes is a distinct developmental feature of newly formed neural networks and may contribute to functional plasticity.

  11. Refinement of packet size in low carbon bainitic steel by special thermo-mechanical control process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjia Shang; Xuemin Wang; Shanwu Yang; Xinlai He

    2004-01-01

    The packet size of bainitic steel can be refined by a special relaxation-precipitation-control phase transformation (RPC)technology. When processed by RPC process, the low carbon bainitic steel composes of two kinds of main intermediate transformation phases. One is ultra-fine lath-like bainitic ferrite and the lath is less than 1 μm in width and about 6 μm in length; the alignment of laths forms a refined packet, and the size of packets is about 5-7 μm in length and about 3-4 μm in width. The other is acicular structure. The morphology and distribution of these acicular structures are influenced by relaxation process, the thin and short acicular structures cut the prior austenite grain and refine the bainitic packet size. For the optimum relaxation time, the packet size can be refined to the finest. The mechanical properties are influenced by relaxation time and the 800 Mpa grade low carbon bainitic steel with excellent toughness can be obtained by RPC process.

  12. Size-controlled bismuth nanoparticles physically grown by the support of cobalt atomic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Noh, Jin-Seo

    2016-04-01

    Bi nanoparticle arrays with the almost monodispersity were synthesized using a magnetically assisted physical method. The average size and the overall morphology of Bi nanoparticles could be controlled by the adjustment of several parameters such as relative powers applied to Bi and Co targets, substrate temperature, and growth time. It was disclosed that Bi nanoparticles grow larger at a higher relative power to Bi, higher substrate temperature, and longer growth time, accompanying the deterioration of well-developed faceted structures. This physical method may provide a facile and fast route to achieving quality Bi nanoparticle arrays with a certain extent of size and morphology controllability.

  13. Size Effect of Lattice Thermal Conductivity Across Nanoscale Thin Films by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiao-Li; LI Zhi-Xin; GUO Zeng-Yuan

    2001-01-01

    Thermal conductivity in the normal direction of ultra-thin dielectric films is predicted by molecular dynamics calculations for argon crystal. For film thicknesses of about 2-10nm within which real measurements cannot yet be implemented, the size dependence of lattice thermal conductivity is captured and a remarkable thermal conductivity drop is found as compared with bulk experimental data. This size effect demonstrates that phonon-boundary scattering in thin films may also be very significant at high temperatures even above the Debye temperature. The influence of different potential models is examined according to the comparison between results from the Lennard-Jones potential and a soft-sphere potential.

  14. Improvement in accuracy of defect size measurement by automatic defect classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Bhamidipati; Pereira, Mark; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Gi-Sung; Jung, Hong-Yul

    2015-10-01

    The blank mask defect review process involves detailed analysis of defects observed across a substrate's multiple preparation stages, such as cleaning and resist-coating. The detailed knowledge of these defects plays an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using the blank. Defect knowledge predominantly comprises of details such as the number of defects observed, and their accurate sizes. Mask usability assessment at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect size gives an idea of eventual wafer defect printability. Furthermore, monitoring defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, aids in obtaining process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. Blank mask defect review process is largely manual in nature. However, the large number of defects, observed for latest technology nodes with reducing half-pitch sizes; and the associated amount of information, together make the process increasingly inefficient in terms of review time, accuracy and consistency. The usage of additional tools such as CDSEM may be required to further aid the review process resulting in increasing costs. Calibre® MDPAutoClassify™ provides an automated software alternative, in the form of a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of blank defects. Elaborate post-processing algorithms are applied on defect images generated by inspection machines, to extract and report significant defect information such as defect size, affecting defect printability and mask usability. The algorithm's capabilities are challenged by the variety and complexity of defects encountered, in terms of defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect [1]. This paper mainly focuses on the results from the evaluation of Calibre® MDPAutoClassify™ product. The main objective of this evaluation is to assess the capability of

  15. Can adult and juvenile European rabbits be differentiated by their pellet sizes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibes-Mateos, Miguel; Rouco, Carlos; Villafuerte, Rafael

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a new method for differentiating juvenile and adult rabbits based on faecal pellet size was published. According to this method, pellets >6 mm diameter are inferred to be deposited by adults, while those test the accuracy of this methodology. Twelve adult rabbits were housed in individual outdoor cages and their pellets were removed every day for 10 consecutive days. Pellets were separated using a sieve according to their size and counted. Results showed that adult rabbits produce pellets >6 mm diameter in the same proportion as those 6 mm, whereas others deposit mostly pellets animals in the absence of validating studies.

  16. Finding Mars-Sized Planets in Inner Orbits of Other Stars by Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, W.; Cullers, K.; Dunham, E.; Koch, D.; Mena-Werth, J.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    High precision photometry from a spaceborne telescope has the potential of discovering sub-earth sized inner planets. Model calculations by Wetherill indicate that Mars-sized planets can be expected to form throughout the range of orbits from that of Mercury to Mars. While a transit of an Earth-sized planet causes a 0.084% decrease in brightness from a solar-like star, a transit of a planet as small as Mars causes a flux decrease of only 0.023%. Stellar variability will be the limiting factor for transit measurements. Recent analysis of solar variability from the SOLSTICE experiment shows that much of the variability is in the UV at planet as small as Mars should be reliably detectable. If Wetherill's models are correct in postulating that Mars-like planets are present in Mercury-like orbits, then a six year search should be able to find them.

  17. SEE characteristics of small feature size devices by using laser backside testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Guoqiang; Shangguan Shipeng; Ma Yingqi; Han Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents single event upset (SEU) and single event latch-up (SEL) characteristics of small feature size devices by laser backside testing method,which is dedicated to dealing with the increasing metal layers on the front side of integrated circuits.The influence of test data pattern on SEU threshold and cross-section is investigated.The supply current state of micro latch-up for deep sub-micron SRAM is described.The laser energy thresholds were correlated to heavy ion thresholds LET to determine an empirical relationship between laser energy threshold and heavy ion LET.This empirical relationship was used to estimate the equivalent laser LETs for devices fabricated in small feature sizes.Moreover,the SEU of a Power PC CPU fabricated with 90 nm SOI CMOS process has been tested,which indicates that the laser backside method could be used to evaluate SOI small feature size devices.

  18. INSTALLATION FOR LARGE SIZE STAMP HARDENING TRANINIG BY WATER-AIR MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Glazkov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The BNTU has developed a technological process for large-size stamp hardening by means of a water-air mixture.  The  basic  requirements  imposed on an hardening  installation using  a  water-air mixture are the following: provision of smooth cooling of a part in order to achieve the required  hardness and structure; possibility of machining parts of various sizes; change of modes for machining parts of various grades of steel according to any hardness rate.The peculiar features of the given installation are: a presence of microprocessor control of water-air mixture supply, possibility of simultaneous machining of a stamp set (2 parts and position change of parts to be hardened in the process of thermal treatment.Installation for large-sized stamp hardening has been manufactured and introduced at theMinskplant of special tools and machining attachments.

  19. Size-dependent ligand layer dynamics in semiconductor nanocrystals probed by anisotropy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Ido; Abir, Tsafrir; Halivni, Shira; Faust, Adam; Banin, Uri

    2015-10-12

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NC) have reached a high level of synthetic control allowing the tuning of their properties, and their use in various applications. However, the surface of NCs and in particular their size-dependent capping organic ligand behavior, which play an important role in the NC synthesis, dispersibility, and optoelectronic properties, is still not well understood. We study the size-dependent properties of the ligand shell on the surface of NCs, by embedding surface bound dyes as a probe within the ligand shell. The reorientation times for these dyes show a linear dependence on the NC surface curvature indicating size-dependent change in viscosity, which is related to a change in the density of the ligand layer because of the geometry of the surface, a unique feature of NCs. Understanding the properties of the ligand shell will allow rational design of the surface to achieve the desired properties, providing an additional important knob for tuning their functionality.

  20. Evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of composite polymers by considering the filler size distribution law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorin HOLOTESCU; Floriana D.STOIAN

    2009-01-01

    We present an empirical model for the effective thermal conductivity(ETC)of a polymer composite that includes dependency on the filler size distribution-chosen as the Rosin-Rammler distribution.The ETC is determined based on certain hypotheses that connect the behavior of a real composite matefial A.to that of a model composite material B,filled with mono-dimensional filler.The application of these hypotheses to the Maxwell model for ETC is presented.The validation of the new model and its characteristic equation was carried out using experimental data from the reference.The comparison showed that by using the size distribution law a very good fit between the equation of the new model(the size distribution model for the ETC)and the reference experimental results is obtained,even for high volume fractions,up to about 50%.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF TYPES AND MODELS OF AIRCRAFT USING ASC-ANALYSIS OF THEIR SILHOUETTES (CONTOURS (GENERALIZATION, ABSTRACTION, CLASSIFICATION AND IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsenko Y. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the application of automated system-cognitive analysis (ASC-analysis, its mathematical model which is system theory of information and its software tool, which is intellectual system called "Eidos" for solving problems related to identification of types and models of aircraft by their silhouettes on the ground, to be more precise, their external contours: 1 digitization of scanned images of aircraft and creation of their mathematical models; 2 formation of mathematical models of specific aircraft with the use of the information theory; 3 modeling of the generalized images of various aircraft types and models and their graphic visualization; 4 comparing an image of a particular plane with generalized images of various aircraft types and models, and quantifying the degree of similarities and differences between them, i.e., the identification of the type and model of airplane by its silhouette (contour on the ground; 5 quantification of the similarities and differences of the generalized images of the planes with each other, i.e., clusterconstructive analysis of generalized images of various aircraft types and models. The article gives a new approach to digitizing images of aircraft, based on the use of the polar coordinate system, the center of gravity of the image and its external contour. Before digitizing images, we may use their transformation, standardizing the position of the images, their sizes (resolution, distance and the angle of rotation (angle in three dimensions. Therefore, the results of digitization and ASC-analysis of the images can be invariant (independent relative to their position, dimensions and turns. The shape of the contour of a particular aircraft is considered as a noise information on the type and model of aircraft, including information about the true shape of the aircraft type and its model (clean signal and noise, which distort the real shape, due to noise influences, both of the means of

  2. M(H) dependence and size distribution of SPIONs measured by atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Simone; Grujic, Zoran D; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Weis, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the quasistatic recording of the magnetic excitation function M(H) of superparamagnetic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (SPION) suspensions by an atomic magnetometer allows a precise determination of the sample's iron mass content mFe and the particle size distribution.

  3. Colony Size of Phaeocystis Antarctica (Prymnesiophyceae) as Influenced by Zooplankton Grazers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica is a dominant phytoplankton species in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, and exists as solitary cells and mucilaginous colonies that differ by several orders of magnitude in size. Recent studies with P. globosa suggested that colony formation and enl...

  4. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.leopold@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2014-12-15

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  5. Computer Simulation of Packing of Particles with Size Distributions Produced by Fragmentation Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Martin, Miguel Angel; Muñoz Ortega, Francisco Javier; Reyes Castro, Miguel E.; Taguas Coejo, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Fragmentation schemes inspired by theoretical results and conjectures of Kolmogorov are applied to produce particle size distributions of different natures, depending on fragmentation parameters. A two-dimensional computer simulation method of packing is applied to the resulting distributions and the void fraction is evaluated. The relationship between the void fraction and characteristic parameters of the fragmentation process is studied.

  6. Interdisciplinary Construction and Implementation of a Human sized Humanoid Robot by master students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Svendsen, Mads Sølver

    2009-01-01

    With limited funding it seemed a very good idea to encourage master students to design and construct their own human size biped robot.  Because this task is huge and very interdisciplinary different expertises were covered by students from different departments who in turn took over results from ...

  7. Ceramography and segmentation of polycristalline ceramics: application to grain size analysis by automatic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, X.; Coster, M.; Chermant, J.L.; Chermant, L. [LERMAT, ISMRA, Caen (France); Chartier, T. [SPCTS, ENSCI, Limoges (France)

    2002-07-01

    The knowledge of the mean grain size of ceramics is a very important problem to solve in the ceramic industry. Some specific methods of segmentation are presented to analyse, by an automatic way, the granulometry and morphological parameters of ceramic materials. Example presented concerns cerine materials. Such investigations lead to important information on the sintering process. (orig.)

  8. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl4 by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles

  9. Model-based synthesis of aircraft noise to quantify human perception of sound quality and annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, D.; Janssens, K.; Van der Auweraer, H.; Sas, P.; Desmet, W.

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a method to synthesize aircraft noise as perceived on the ground. The developed method gives designers the opportunity to make a quick and economic evaluation concerning sound quality of different design alternatives or improvements on existing aircraft. By presenting several synthesized sounds to a jury, it is possible to evaluate the quality of different aircraft sounds and to construct a sound that can serve as a target for future aircraft designs. The combination of using a sound synthesis method that can perform changes to a recorded aircraft sound together with executing jury tests allows to quantify the human perception of aircraft noise.

  10. Small Autonomous Aircraft Servo Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Small air vehicles offer challenging power, weight, and volume constraints when considering implementation of system health monitoring technologies. In order to develop a testbed for monitoring the health and integrity of control surface servos and linkages, the Autonomous Aircraft Servo Health Monitoring system has been designed for small Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms to detect problematic behavior from servos and the air craft structures they control, This system will serve to verify the structural integrity of an aircraft's servos and linkages and thereby, through early detection of a problematic situation, minimize the chances of an aircraft accident. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's rotary-winged UAV has an Airborne Power management unit that is responsible for regulating, distributing, and monitoring the power supplied to the UAV's avionics. The current sensing technology utilized by the Airborne Power Management system is also the basis for the Servo Health system. The Servo Health system measures the current draw of the servos while the servos are in Motion in order to quantify the servo health. During a preflight check, deviations from a known baseline behavior can be logged and their causes found upon closer inspection of the aircraft. The erratic behavior nay include binding as a result of dirt buildup or backlash caused by looseness in the mechanical linkages. Moreover, the Servo Health system will allow elusive problems to be identified and preventative measures taken to avoid unnecessary hazardous conditions in small autonomous aircraft.

  11. Improving Aircraft Design Robustness with Scenario Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Strohmayer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to other industries, the aerospace sector is characterized by long product cycles in a very complex environment. The aircraft manufacturer has to base his product strategy on a long-term view of risks and opportunities in the transport industry but he cannot predict the development of relevant factors in this market environment with any certainty. In this situation, scenario methods offer a pragmatic way to limit the uncertainties and to work them up methodically, in order to derive recommendations for cost-intensive strategic decisions like for example the go-ahead for a new aircraft concept. By including scenario methods in the aircraft design cycle, the ‘design robustness’ can be improved, i.e. the design is not optimised for a prognosticated operating environment, but can cope with various possible future developments. The paper will explain the three fundamental aspects in applying scenario planning to the aircraft design process: requirement definition, design evaluation and technology identification. For each aspect, methods will be shown, which connect the rather qualitative results of a scenario process with aircraft design, which typically demands a qualitative input.

  12. Design of a spanloader cargo aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    With a growing demand for fast international freight service, the slow-moving cargo ships currently in use will soon find a substantial portion of their clients looking elsewhere. One candidate for filling this expected gap in the freight market is a span-loading aircraft (or 'flying wing') capable of long-range operation with extremely large payloads. This report summarizes the design features of an aircraft capable of fulfilling a long-haul, high-capacity cargo mission. The spanloader seeks to gain advantage over conventional aircraft by eliminating the aircraft fuselage and thus reducing empty weight. The primary disadvantage of this configuration is that the cargo-containing wing tends to be thick, thus posing a challenge to the airfoil designer. It also suffers from stability and control problems not encountered by conventional aircraft. The result is an interesting, challenging exercise in unconventional design. The report that follows is a student written synopsis of an effort judged to be the best of eight designs developed during the year 1988-1989.

  13. Comparison of Grain Size in Plain Carbon Hot-Rolled Sheets Manufactured by CSP and Conventional Rolling Processing%Comparison of Grain Size in Plain Carbon Hot-Rolled Sheets Manufactured by CSP and Conventional Rolling Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xue-song; ZHU Guo-hui; MAO Wei-min

    2012-01-01

    Average grain size and grain size distribution in as hot-rolled SPHC, SPHD, and SPHE sheets manufac- tured by compact strip production (CSP) processing and traditional continuous casting and rolling (CCR) processing respectively were investigated by quantitative metallographic method. The results show that the average grain size and distribution width of grain size in sheets manufactured by CSP processing was obviously larger than that by CCR processing. It was analyzed that multi-phase transformation and high reduction ratio in CCR processing resulted in refining grain size, which would be dominant reason for controlling grain size. In plain carbon steels such as SPHC, SPHD and SPHE, the effect of fine precipitation in CSP on behavior of deformation and recrystallization of austenite during roiling, and consequent refinement of grain size seem not to be as important as the effect of reheating and roughing in CCR processing. Homogenizing in reheating and refining grain size in roughing in CCR processing would refine final grain size and also make grain size homogenized, Very coarse grain size would result in mixed grain size, large distribution width of grain size due to interaction of static and dynamic recrystallization in CSP processing

  14. Size Characterization of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticles by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navin, Jason K.; Grass, Michael E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Marsh, Anderson L.

    2009-08-15

    In this work, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been utilized to characterize colloidal platinum nanoparticles synthesized in the 1-4 nm size range. The nanoparticles were prepared via a solution-based method in which the size could be controlled by varying reaction conditions, such as the alcohol used as the reductant. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone), or PVP, (MW = 29,000 g/mol) was employed as a capping agent to stabilize the synthesized nanoparticles in solution. A model for determining the size of the metallic nanoparticle core from MALDI-TOF mass spectra has been developed and verified through correlation with particle sizes from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. In this model it was assumed that 1.85 nm nanoparticles are capped by one PVP chain, which was verified through experiments performed with capped and uncapped nanoparticles. Larger nanoparticles are capped by either two (2.60 and 2.94 nm) or three (3.69 nm) PVP chains. These findings clearly indicate the usefulness of MALDI-TOF MS as a technique for fully characterizing nanoscale materials in order to elucidate structure-property relationships.

  15. Nanoscale size effect on surface spin canting in iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by the microemulsion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniformly sized and crystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with spinel structure and mean diameters of about 3, 6 and 9 nm were synthesized in high yield using the microemulsion route at room temperature. The nanoparticles (NPs) were stabilized in situ by organic surfactant molecules which acted both as a stabilizer of the microemulsion system and as a capping layer of the NP surface. NP size control was attained by careful adjustment of the preparation conditions. The structure, morphology and NP size distribution were investigated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A particular effort was devoted in this work to study the effect of size and capping of these NPs on their magnetic structure by in-field Mössbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K. The mean canting angle (relative to the applied field direction) of the Fe spins was observed to increase with decreasing NP size due to the enhanced surface-to-volume ratio. Comparing bare and capped NPs of the same diameter, we verified that the spin canting was not affected by the organic capping. This implied almost identical magnetic orientations of bare and capped NPs. Simultaneously, the capping material was capable of preventing agglomeration effects which can occur in case of direct particle contact. Using a core/shell model, we showed that spin canting originated from the surface shell of the NPs. Furthermore, the Mössbauer spectral parameters provided evidence for the existence of a high fraction of Fe3O4 (magnetite) in the IONP. (paper)

  16. Charging of Individual Micron-Size Interstellar/Planetary Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper, we discuss experimental results on dust charging by electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly by low energy electron impact. Available theoretical models based on the Sternglass equation (Sternglass, 1954) are applicable for neutral, planar, and bulk surfaces only. However, charging properties of individual micron-size dust grains are expected to be different from the values measured on bulk materials. Our recent experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC) indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (e.g. Abbas et al, 2010). Here we discuss the complex nature of SEE charging properties of individual micron-size lunar dust grains and silica microspheres.

  17. Nano-sized Li4Ti5O12 anode material with excellent performance prepared by solid state reaction: The effect of precursor size and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nano-sized Li4Ti5O12 has been prepared through solid state reaction by using axiolitic TiO2 as precursor. • The prepared nano-sized Li4Ti5O12 anode material shows excellent electrochemical performance. • The utilization of precursor with special morphology and size is one of the useful ways to prepare more active electrode materials. - Abstract: Spinel nano-sized Li4Ti5O12 anode material of secondary lithium-ion battery has been successfully prepared by solid state reaction using axiolitic TiO2 assembled by 10–20 nm nanoparticles and Li2CO3 as precursors. The synthesis condition, grain size effect and corresponding electrochemical performance of the special Li4Ti5O12 have been studied in comparison with those of the normal Li4Ti5O12 originated from commercial TiO2. We also propose the mechanism that using the nano-scaled TiO2 with special structure and unexcess Li2CO3 as precursors can synthesize pure phase nano-sized Li4Ti5O12 at 800 °C through solid state reaction. The prepared nano-sized Li4Ti5O12 anode material for Li-ion batteries shows excellent capacity performance with rate capacity of 174.2, 164.0, 157.4, 146.4 and 129.6 mA h g−1 at 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 C, respectively, and capacity retention of 95.1% after 100 cycles at 1 C. In addition, the specific capacity fade for the cell with the different Li4Ti5O12 active materials resulted from the increase of internal resistance after 100 cycles is compared

  18. Static aeroelastic analysis for generic configuration aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu; Chargin, Mladen K.

    1987-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis capability that can calculate flexible air loads for generic configuration aircraft was developed. It was made possible by integrating a finite element structural analysis code (MSC/NASTRAN) and a panel code of aerodynamic analysis based on linear potential flow theory. The framework already built in MSC/NASTRAN was used and the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix is computed externally and inserted in the NASTRAN by means of a DMAP program. It was shown that deformation and flexible airloads of an oblique wing aircraft can be calculated reliably by this code both in subsonic and supersonic speeds. Preliminary results indicating importance of flexibility in calculating air loads for this type of aircraft are presented.

  19. Computer-aided methods for analysis and synthesis of supersonic cruise aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Computer-aided methods are reviewed which are being developed by Langley Research Center in-house work and by related grants and contracts. Synthesis methods to size structural members to meet strength and stiffness (flutter) requirements are emphasized and described. Because of the strong interaction among the aerodynamic loads, structural stiffness, and member sizes of supersonic cruise aircraft structures, these methods are combined into systems of computer programs to perform design studies. The approaches used in organizing these systems to provide efficiency, flexibility of use in an iterative process, and ease of system modification are discussed.

  20. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  1. Mixing Ventilation System in a Single-Aisle Aircraft Cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Zhang, Chen; Wojcik, Kamil;

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, air is supplied to the aircraft cabin either by individual nozzles or by supply slots. The air is expected to be fully mixed in the cabin, and the system is considered to be a mixing ventilation system. This paper will provide measurements on the mixing flow in an aircraft cabin...

  2. 78 FR 35110 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... airplane exhaust system. This AD was prompted by reports of exhaust system failures upstream of aircraft... comment. Discuss Exhaust System Misalignment, Its Effect on Exhaust System Failures, and Pertinent Company... Condition This AD was prompted by the forced landings of aircraft due to exhaust system failures...

  3. Formation of bimetallic nanoalloys by Au coating of size-selected Cu clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimetallic clusters display new characteristics that could not be obtained by varying either the size of pure metallic systems or the composition of bulk bimetals alone. Coating of pre-deposited clusters by vapour deposition is a typical synthesis process of bimetallic clusters. Here, we have demonstrated that hierarchical, gold cluster-decorated copper clusters as well as both heterogeneous and homogeneous Cu–Au bimetallic clusters (4.6 to 10.7 nm) can be prepared by coating pre-deposited, size-selected Cu5000 (4.6 ± 0.2 nm) with Au evaporation at various temperatures. These bimetallic clusters were analyzed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and associated electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results indicate that the growth of bimetallic clusters is controlled by a competition between nucleation and diffusion of the coating Au atoms.

  4. Aerodynamics/ACEE: Aircraft energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of a 10 year program managed by NASA which seeks to make possible the most efficient use of energy for aircraft propulsion and lift as well as provide a technology that can be used by U.S. manufacturers of air transports and engines. Supercritical wings, winglets, vortex drag reduction, high lift, active control, laminar flow control, and aerodynamics by computer are among the topics discussed. Wind tunnel models in flight verification of advanced technology, and the design, construction and testing of various aircraft structures are also described.

  5. Conceptual Design and Structural Optimization of NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Gern, Frank H.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously achieving the fuel consumption and noise reduction goals set forth by NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project requires innovative and unconventional aircraft concepts. In response, advanced hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft concepts have been proposed and analyzed as a means of meeting these objectives. For the current study, several HWB concepts were analyzed using the Hybrid wing body Conceptual Design and structural optimization (HCDstruct) analysis code. HCDstruct is a medium-fidelity finite element based conceptual design and structural optimization tool developed to fill the critical analysis gap existing between lower order structural sizing approaches and detailed, often finite element based sizing methods for HWB aircraft concepts. Whereas prior versions of the tool used a half-model approach in building the representative finite element model, a full wing-tip-to-wing-tip modeling capability was recently added to HCDstruct, which alleviated the symmetry constraints at the model centerline in place of a free-flying model and allowed for more realistic center body, aft body, and wing loading and trim response. The latest version of HCDstruct was applied to two ERA reference cases, including the Boeing Open Rotor Engine Integration On an HWB (OREIO) concept and the Boeing ERA-0009H1 concept, and results agreed favorably with detailed Boeing design data and related Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) analyses. Following these benchmark cases, HCDstruct was used to size NASA's ERA HWB concepts and to perform a related scaling study.

  6. 氨法制取纳米氧化锌的粒径控制研究%Particle size control of nano - sized zinc oxide by ammonia process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡建国; 蔡睿敏

    2009-01-01

    为有效控制氨法制取纳米氧化锌的粒径,在蒸氨前将浸出原液用一定量的纯净水稀释,可增加初期沉淀生成的晶核数,使沉淀粒径更加均匀和细化,同时发现蒸氨残液不可以作为浸出原液的稀释剂回用.蒸氨的加热方式对纳米氧化锌的粒径也有影响,选择蒸汽直接加热,当溶液含锌质量浓度小于0.3 g/L时,所制取的纳米氧化锌粒径满足GB/T 19589-2004纳米氧化锌的要求 .%In order to effectively control the particle size of nano - sized zinc oxide prepared by ammonia process,leaching stock solution was diluted with a certain amount of purified water before ammonia distillation process,which could increase the quantity of crystal nucleus generated by initial precipitation and make particle size of precipitate more uniform and refined.Meanwhile,it was found that distilled ammonia residual liquid could not be served as diluent of leaching stock solution for recycling.Also,heating method of ammonia distillation will affect the particle size of nano - sized zinc oxide.Particle size of prepared nano - sized zinc oxide can satisfy the requirements of GB/T 19589-2004,when direct steam heating was selected and mass concentration of zinc in the solution was less than 0.3 g/L.

  7. Molecular behavior of DNA in a cell-sized compartment coated by lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tsutomu; Fujimoto, Rie; Shimobayashi, Shunsuke F.; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of long DNA molecules in a cell-sized confined space was investigated. We prepared water-in-oil droplets covered by phospholipids, which mimic the inner space of a cell, following the encapsulation of DNA molecules with unfolded coil and folded globule conformations. Microscopic observation revealed that the adsorption of coiled DNA onto the membrane surface depended on the size of the vesicular space. Globular DNA showed a cell-size-dependent unfolding transition after adsorption on the membrane. Furthermore, when DNA interacted with a two-phase membrane surface, DNA selectively adsorbed on the membrane phase, such as an ordered or disordered phase, depending on its conformation. We discuss the mechanism of these trends by considering the free energy of DNA together with a polyamine in the solution. The free energy of our model was consistent with the present experimental data. The cooperative interaction of DNA and polyamines with a membrane surface leads to the size-dependent behavior of molecular systems in a small space. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the physical mechanism of molecular events and reactions inside a cell.

  8. Fluorescence quenching of fluoroquinolones by gold nanoparticles with different sizes and its analytical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amjadi, Mohammad, E-mail: amjadi@tabrizu.ac.ir; Farzampour, Leila

    2014-01-15

    The interaction of some fluoroquinolones including norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin and ofloxacin with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different sizes (8, 20 and 75 nm) was studied. In the studied systems, fluoroquinolones are noncovalently adsorbed onto the surface of AuNPs, which results in severe quenching of fluoroquinolones fluorescence possibly as a result of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Stern–Volmer quenching constants were obtained and found to increase with an increase in the size of AuNPs. Moreover, the interactions between some thiols and fluoroquinolone-adsorbed AuNPs were investigated to explore the analytical applicability of the systems. It was found that upon the addition of thiols to fluoroquinolone-AuNPs systems the fluorescence of fluoroquinolones switches to “turn-on” due to the strong binding of thiols to AuNPs and removal of quinolines from NP surface. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence enhancement showed a linear relationship with the concentration of thiols, indicating the analytical usefulness of the system. -- Highlights: • Interaction of fluoroquinolones with AuNPs of different sizes was investigated. • The fluorescence of fluoroquinolones is efficiently quenched by AuNPs. • The fluorescence quenching efficiency increases by increasing NP size. • Fluoroquinolone-AuNPs systems can be used as sensitive turn-on sensors for thiols. • Danofloxacin-20-nm AuNPs system exhibits the highest sensitivity for thiols.

  9. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence in amorphous silicon carbide films by adjusting Ag island film sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag island films with different sizes are deposited on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) films, and the influences of Ag island films on the optical properties of the α-SiC:H films are investigated. Atomic force microscope images show that Ag nanoislands are formed after Ag coating, and the size of the Ag islands increases with increasing Ag deposition time. The extinction spectra indicate that two resonance absorption peaks which correspond to out-of-plane and in-plane surface plasmon modes of the Ag island films are obtained, and the resonance peak shifts toward longer wavelength with increasing Ag island size. The photoluminescence (PL) enhancement or quenching depends on the size of Ag islands, and PL enhancement by 1.6 times on the main PL band is obtained when the sputtering time is 10 min. Analyses show that the influence of surface plasmons on the PL of α-SiC:H is determined by the competition between the scattering and absorption of Ag islands, and PL enhancement is obtained when scattering is the main interaction between the Ag islands and incident light. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  10. Stabilization of microgrid with intermittent renewable energy sources by SMES with optimal coil size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saejia, M., E-mail: samongkol@gmail.com [School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ngamroo, I. [School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2011-11-15

    A controller design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is proposed. The structure of a power controller is the practical proportional-integral (PI). The PI parameters and coil size are tuned by a particle swarm optimization. The proposed method is able to effectively alleviate power fluctuations. It is well known that the superconducting coil is the vital part of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit. This paper deals with the power controller design of a SMES unit with an optimal coil size for stabilization of an isolated microgrid. The study microgrid consists of renewable energy sources with intermittent power outputs i.e., wind and photovoltaic. Since power generations from such renewable sources are unpredictable and variable, these result in power fluctuations in a microgrid. To stabilize power fluctuations, a SMES unit with a fast control of active and reactive power can be applied. The structure of a power controller is the practical proportional-integral (PI). Based on the minimization of the variance of power fluctuations from renewable sources as well as the initial stored energy of SMES, the optimal PI parameters and coil size are automatically and simultaneously tuned by a particle swarm optimization. Simulation studies show that the proposed SMES controller with an optimal coil size is able to effectively alleviate power fluctuations under various power patterns from intermittent renewable sources.

  11. Molecular behavior of DNA in a cell-sized compartment coated by lipids

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, T; Shimobayashi, S F; Ichikawa, M; Takagi, M

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of long DNA molecules in a cell-sized confined space was investigated. We prepared water-in-oil droplets covered by phospholipids, which mimic the inner space of a cell, following the encapsulation of DNA molecules with unfolded coil and folded globule conformations. Microscopic observation revealed that the adsorption of coiled DNA onto the membrane surface depended on the size of the vesicular space. Globular DNA showed a cell-size-dependent unfolding transition after adsorption on the membrane. Furthermore, when DNA interacted with a two-phase membrane surface, DNA selectively adsorbed on the membrane phase, such as an ordered or disordered phase, depending on its conformation. We discuss the mechanism of these trends by considering the free energy of DNA together with a polyamine in the solution. The free energy of our model was consistent with the present experimental data. The cooperative interaction of DNA and polyamines with a membrane surface leads to the size-dependent behavior of molec...

  12. Separation of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by plates constructed of conventional and composite materials with applications for prediction of interior noise paths in propeller driven aircraft. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The anticipated application of advanced turboprop propulsion systems and use of composite materials in primary structure is expected to increase the interior noise of future aircraft to unacceptability high levels. The absence of technically and economically feasible noise source-path diagnostic tools has been a primer obstacle in the development of efficient noise control treatments for propeller driven aircraft. A new diagnostic method which permits the separation and prediction of the fully coherent airborne and structureborne components of the sound radiated by plates or thin shells has been developed. Analytical and experimental studies of the proposed method were performed on plates constructed of both conventional and composite materials. The results of the study indicate that the proposed method can be applied to a variety of aircraft materials, could be used in flight, and has fewer encumbrances than the other diagnostic tools currently available. The study has also revealed that the noise radiation of vibrating plates in the low frequency regime due to combined airborne and structureborne inputs possesses a strong synergistic nature. The large influence of the interaction between the airborne and structureborne terms has been hitherto ignored by researchers of aircraft interior noise problems.

  13. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs. Methods A standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two...... different sizes. One buffet featured standard sized plates that served as control (standard size as provided by the caterer, 27cm). A second buffet featured smaller sized plates (24cm) that served as the intervention. After the lunch concluded (30 minutes), all leftover food was collected in designated...... trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk. Results Those eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8%. Conclusions Our field experiment tests...

  14. Impacts of alternative fuels in aviation on microphysical aerosol properties and predicted ice nuclei concentration at aircraft cruise altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, B.; D'Ascoli, E.; Sauer, D. N.; Kim, J.; Scheibe, M.; Schlager, H.; Moore, R.; Anderson, B. E.; Ullrich, R.; Mohler, O.; Hoose, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decades air traffic has been substantially growing affecting air quality and climate. According to the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), in the next few years world passenger and freight traffic is expected to increase annually by 6-7% and 4-5%, respectively. One possibility to reduce aviation impacts on the atmosphere and climate might be the replacement of fossil fuels by alternative fuels. However, so far the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions from aircraft engines and their ability to form contrails remain uncertain. To study the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions and the formation of contrails, the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) field experiment was conducted in California. In May 2014, the DLR Falcon 20 and the NASA HU-25 jet aircraft were instrumented with an extended aerosol and trace gas payload probing different types of fuels including JP-8 and JP-8 blended with HEFA (Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids) while the NASA DC8 aircraft acted as the source aircraft for ACCESS-2. Emission measurements were taken in the DC8 exhaust plumes at aircraft cruise level between 9-12 km altitude and at distances between 50 m and 20 km behind the DC8 engines. Here, we will present results from the ACCESS-2 aerosol measurements which show a 30-60% reduction of the non-volatile (mainly black carbon) particle number concentration in the aircraft exhaust for the HEFA-blend compared to conventional JP-8 fuel. Size-resolved particle emission indices show the largest reductions for larger particle sizes suggesting that the HEFA blend contains fewer and smaller black carbon particles. We will combine the airborne measurements with a parameterization of deposition nucleation developed during a number of ice nucleation experiments at the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe and discuss the impact of alternative fuels on the abundance of potential ice nuclei at cruise conditions.

  15. Tailoring the size and distribution of Ag nanoparticles in silica glass by defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yitao, E-mail: yangyt@impcas.ac.cn [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Chonghong; Song, Yin; Gou, Jie; Zhang, Liqing [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Hengqing; Liu, Juan; Xian, Yongqiang [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma, Yizhun [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The composites embedded with metallic nanoparticles show large nonlinear optical susceptibility and strong surface plasmon resonance absorption, which enable potential application in opto-electronics. Ion implantation has been proven to be a powerful technique of synthesis of metallic nanoparticles due to its versatility and compatibility. However, the synthesis of nanoparticles by ion implantation inevitably leads to a broad size distribution due to Ostwald ripening process. The broad size distribution has a negative effect on improving the figure of merits for nonlinear optics. In this paper, we tried to introduce defects in silica glass to act as pre-nucleation centers to mediate the size and distribution of Ag nanoparticles. In experiment, the silica glass samples were pre-irradiated by 200 keV Ar ions to fluences of 0.8, 2.0 and 5.0 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, and then 200 keV Ag ions were implanted into the pre-irradiated samples to fluence of 2.0 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. UV–VIS results show that the absorbance intensity of Ag SPR peak initially increases and then decreases with pre-irradiation fluence, which implies the change in size and density of Ag nanoparticles in samples. TEM results verify that Ag nanoparticles in the sample pre-irradiated to the fluence of 0.8 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} grow bigger and distribute in a relatively narrow region comparing with that without pre-irradiation. With further increase of pre-irradiation fluence, the size of Ag nanoparticles shows a depth dependent distribution. A boundary can be clear seen at the depth of 110 nm, larger Ag nanoparticles disperse in region shallower than 110 nm, and smaller Ag nanoparticles disperse in the region deeper than 110 nm. The average size of Ag nanoparticles initially increases and then decreases with pre-irradiation fluence. Therefore, the introduction of defects by pre-irradiation could be an effective way to tailor the size and distribution of metallic nanoparticles in

  16. Investigation of the relationship between aircraft noise and community annoyance in China

    OpenAIRE

    Di Guoqing; Liu Xiaoyi; Shi Xiang; Li Zhengguang; Lin Qili

    2012-01-01

    A survey of community annoyance induced by aircraft noise exposure was carried out around Hangzhou Xiaoshan International Airport. To investigate the relationship curves between aircraft noise and the percentage of "highly annoyed" persons in China and also to get annoyance threshold of aircraft noise in China. Noise annoyance induced by aircraft noise exposure was assessed by 764 local residents around the airport using the International Commission on Biological Effect of Noise (ICBEN) scale...

  17. Commercial aircraft noise modeling Effects of air traffic and airport infrastructure changes

    OpenAIRE

    Khardi, S.; Konovalova, E.; LADEGAILLERIE, Y; HAMADICHE, M

    2010-01-01

    International air traffic is growing rapidly and environmental concerns induced by excessive aircraft noise become a major objective of airport authorities and aircraft manufacturers despite of the reduction of the aircraft noise levels by 20 dB during the last thirty years. The large numbers of people living in communities near airports, affected by aircraft noise, have been complaining. This paper gives detailed operations data of Lyon Saint-Exupéry International Airport (France) and provid...

  18. Optimization of size controlled poly (lactide-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles using quality by design concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabha R. V. Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality by design (QbD is a risk management and science-based approach laid down by the ICH as well as other Regulatory agencies to enhance pharmaceutical development throughout a product′s lifecycle. Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA is the material of choice for development of depot particulate formulations due to its biodegradable nature and is also considered as the ′green′ eco-friendly material due its biocompatibility and non-toxic properties. Further, PLGA based formulations are approved by regulatory agencies and currently in clinical practice. The aim of the current investigation involves formulation, optimization and in vitro characterization of size controlled PLGA based nanoparticles by employing modified nanoprecipitation technique. An initial risk-assessment analysis was conducted with different formulation and process variables along with their impact on critical quality attributes of the formulation which were identified as particle size and percentage process yield. The Ishikawa diagram was employed to determine the potential risk factors and subsequently optimized by statistical experimental design concept. Box-Behnken design was utilized to optimize nanoparticles and further characterizing the optimized nanoparticulate formulation in vitro. From the present study, it can be concluded that PLGA based nanoparticles with controlled particle size and process yield can be obtained by inculcating the concept of QbD in the product development.

  19. Particle Size and Pore Structure Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles Prepared by Confined Arc Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingru Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the protecting inert gas, silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared by confined arc plasma method. The particle size, microstructure, and morphology of the particles by this process were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction (SAED. The N2 absorption-desorption isotherms of the samples were measured by using the static volumetric absorption analyzer, the pore structure of the sample was calculated by Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH academic model, and the specific surface area was calculated from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET adsorption equation. The experiment results indicate that the crystal structure of the samples is face-centered cubic (FCC structure the same as the bulk materials, the particle size distribution ranging from 5 to 65 nm, with an average particle size about 26 nm obtained by TEM and confirmed by XRD and BET results. The specific surface area is 23.81 m2/g, pore volumes are 0.09 cm3/g, and average pore diameter is 18.7 nm.

  20. An evaluation of the performance of chemistry transport models by comparison with research aircraft observations. Part 1: Concepts and overall model performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brunner

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous evaluation of five global Chemistry-Transport and two Chemistry-Climate Models operated by several different groups in Europe was performed by comparing the models with trace gas observations from a number of research aircraft measurement campaigns. Whenever possible the models were run over the four-year period 1995–1998 and at each simulation time step the instantaneous tracer fields were interpolated to all coinciding observation points. This approach allows for a very close comparison with observations and fully accounts for the specific meteorological conditions during the measurement flights, which is important considering the often limited availability and representativity of such trace gas measurements. A new extensive database including all major research aircraft and commercial airliner measurements between 1995 and 1998 as well as ozone soundings was established specifically to support this type of direct comparison. Quantitative methods were applied to judge model performance including the calculation of average concentration biases and the visualization of correlations and RMS errors in the form of so-called Taylor diagrams. We present the general concepts applied, the structure and content of the database, and an overall analysis of model skills over four distinct regions. These regions were selected to represent various degrees and types of pollution and to cover large geographical domains with sufficient availability of observations. Comparison of model results with the observations revealed specific problems for each individual model. This study suggests what further improvements are needed and can serve as a benchmark for re-evaluations of such improvements. In general all models show deficiencies with respect to both mean concentrations and vertical gradients of the important trace gases ozone, CO and NOx at the tropopause. Too strong two-way mixing across the tropopause is suggested to be the main