WorldWideScience

Sample records for airborne thermal magnetic

  1. Evaluation of airborne thermal, magnetic, and electromagnetic characterization technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of Buried Structures (IBS) or Aerial Surveillance Project was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development to demonstrate airborne methods for locating and identifying buried waste and ordnance at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Two technologies were demonstrated: (a) a thermal infrared imaging system built by Martin Marietta Missile Systems and (b) a magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical surveying system operated by EBASCO Environmental. The thermal system detects small differences in ground temperature caused by uneven heating and cooling of the ground by the sun. Waste materials on the ground can be detected when the temperature of the waste is different than the background temperature. The geophysical system uses conventional magnetic and EM sensors. These sensors detect disturbances caused by magnetic or conductive waste and naturally occurring magnetic or conductive features of subsurface soils and rock. Both systems are deployed by helicopter. Data were collected at four INEL sites. Tests at the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area (NODA) were made to evaluate capabilities for detecting ordnance on the ground surface. Tests at the Cold Simulated Waste Demonstration Pit were made to evaluate capabilities for detecting buried waste at a controlled site, where the location and depth of buried materials are known. Tests at the Subsurface Disposal Area and Stationary Low-Power Reactor-1 burial area were made to evaluate capabilities for characterizing hazardous waste at sites that are typical of DOE buried waste sites nationwide

  2. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  3. Airborne Magnetic Trackline and Survey Data (Vector and Scalar Observations)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly National Geophysical Data Center) receive airborne magnetic survey data from US and non-US...

  4. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, deviation in detection ability analysis is observed. In this study, a novel detection range model is proposed on the basis of classic detection range models of airborne magnetometers. In this model, probability distribution is applied, and the magnetic properties of targets and the environment noise properties of a moving submarine are considered. The detection range model is also constructed by considering the distribution of the moving submarine during detection. A cell-averaging greatest-of-constant false alarm rate test method is also used to calculate the detection range of the model at a desired false alarm rate. The detection range model is then used to establish typical submarine search probabilistic models. Results show that the model can be used to evaluate not only the effects of ambient magnetic noise but also the moving and geomagnetic features of the target and airborne detection platform. The model can also be utilized to display the actual operating range of sensor systems.

  5. Roof heat loss detection using airborne thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Bauer, C.; Sulzer, W.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Austrian and European attempt to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, thermal rehabilitation and the improvement of the energy efficiency of buildings became an important topic in research as well as in building construction and refurbishment. Today, in-situ thermal infrared measurements are routinely used to determine energy loss through the building envelope. However, in-situ thermal surveys are expensive and time consuming, and in many cases the detection of the amount and location of waste heat leaving building through roofs is not possible with ground-based observations. For some years now, a new generation of high-resolution thermal infrared sensors makes it possible to survey heat-loss through roofs at a high level of detail and accuracy. However, to date, comparable studies have mainly been conducted on buildings with uniform roof covering and provided two-dimensional, qualitative information. This pilot study aims to survey the heat-loss through roofs of the buildings of the University of Graz (Austria) campus by using high-resolution airborne thermal infrared imagery (TABI 1800 - Thermal Airborne Broadband imager). TABI-1800 acquires data in a spectral range from 3.7 - 4.8 micron, a thermal resolution of 0.05 °C and a spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The remote sensing data is calibrated to different roof coverings (e.g. clay shingle, asphalt shingle, tin roof, glass) and combined with a roof surface model to determine the amount of waste heat leaving the building and to identify hot spots. The additional integration of information about the conditions underneath the roofs into the study allows a more detailed analysis of the upward heat flux and is a significant improvement of existing methods. The resulting data set provides useful information to the university facility service for infrastructure maintenance, especially in terms of attic and roof insulation improvements. Beyond that, the project is supposed to raise public

  6. Thermal Infrared Spectral Imager for Airborne Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-01-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is under development which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution for lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of apparent emissivity for various known standard minerals (such as quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  7. Air-borne noise of thermal module and system for notebook personal computers:experimental study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Thermal performance is the most important issue to be considered when a thermal module is designed for a notebook personal computer (PC).Because the fan causes air-borne noise and affects the user's comfort,the acoustic characteristics of the module attract more attention.Experiments were conducted to study the noise sources,the noise characteristic and the main factors influencing the noise level.The difference between the air-borne noise of the thermal module and the whole computer system was analyzed and its propagating characteristics were derived.The influence of I/O ports on the air-borne noise was also studied experimentally.

  8. Field and Thermal Characteristics of Magnetizing Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes field modeling and thermal modeling for magnetizing fixture. As the detailed characteristics of magnetizing fixture can be obtained, the efficient design of magnetizer which produce desired magnet will be possible using our modeling. For field modeling finite-element analysis is used as part of the design and analysis process for magnetizing fixture. The thermal modeling method of magnetizing fixture resistor uses multi-lumped model with equivalent thermal resistance and thermal capacitance.

  9. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  10. Airborne Thematic Thermal InfraRed and Electro-Optical Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is an advanced Airborne Thematic Thermal InfraRed and Electro-Optical Imaging System (ATTIREOIS). ATTIREOIS sensor payload consists of two sets of...

  11. Magnetic Approaches to Measuring and Mitigating Airborne Particulate Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, B.

    2014-12-01

    Human exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) generates adverse human health impacts at all life stages from the embryonic to the terminal, including damage to respiratory and cardiovascular health, and neurodevelopment and cognitive function. Detailed understanding of the causal links between PM exposure and specific health impacts, and possible means to reduce PM exposure require knowledge of PM concentrations, compositions and sources at the fine-scale; i.e. beyond the current resolution of spatially-sparse conventional PM monitoring, non-unique elemental analyses, or poorly-validated PM modelling. Magnetically-ordered iron oxide minerals appear to be a ubiquitous component of urban PM. These minerals derive partly from the presence of iron impurities in fuels, which form, upon combustion, a non-volatile residue, often dominated by magnetite, within glassy, spherical condensates. Iron-rich, magnetic PM also arises from abrasion from vehicle components, including disk brakes, and road dust. The ubiquity and diversity of these magnetic PM phases, and the speed and sensitivity of magnetic analyses (down to trace concentrations), makes possible rapid, cost-effective magnetic characterization and quantification of PM, a field of study which has developed rapidly across the globe over the last 2 decades. Magnetic studies of actively-sampled PM, on filters, and passively-sampled PM, on tree leaves and other depositional surfaces, can be used to: monitor and map at high spatial resolution ambient PM concentrations; address the controversial issue of the efficacy of PM capture by vegetation; and add a new, discriminatory dimension to PM source apportionment.

  12. NASA Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong Ly; Montesano, Paul M.; Kenneth J. Ranson; Jeffrey G. Masek; Joel T. McCorkel; Douglas C. Morton; Elizabeth M. Middleton; Ross F. Nelson; Lawrence A. Corp; Cook, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, fo...

  13. Energy magnetization and the thermal Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tao; Niu, Qian; Shi, Junren

    2011-12-01

    We obtain a set of general formulas for determining magnetizations, including the usual electromagnetic magnetization as well as the gravitomagnetic energy magnetization. The magnetization corrections to the thermal transport coefficients are explicitly demonstrated. Our theory provides a systematic approach for properly evaluating the thermal transport coefficients of magnetic systems, eliminating the unphysical divergence from the direct application of the Kubo formula. For a noninteracting anomalous Hall system, the corrected thermal Hall conductivity obeys the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  14. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field Using Satellite and Airborne Magnetic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris;

    We present a technique for modelling the lithospheric magnetic field based on estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a first demonstration we present an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010. Three component vector field...... for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid with an increasing grid resolution towards the airborne survey area. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm that includes model....... Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. The method can also be applied in local, high resolution, investigations of the lithospheric magnetic field, for example where suitable aeromagnetic data is available...

  15. Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-04-27

    A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

  16. Numerical analysis of thermally actuated magnets for magnetization of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Quan; Yan Yu; Rawlings, Colin; Coombs, Tim, E-mail: ql229@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity Group, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street. Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    Superconductors, such as YBCO bulks, have extremely high potential magnetic flux densities, comparing to rare earth magnets. Therefore, the magnetization of superconductors has attracted broad attention and contribution from both academic research and industry. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to magnetize superconductors. Unusually, instead of using high magnetic fields and pulses, repeatedly magnetic waves with strength of as low as rare earth magnets are applied. These magnetic waves, generated by thermally controlling a Gadolinium (Gd) bulk with a rare earth magnet underneath, travel over the flat surface of a YBCO bulk and get trapped little by little. Thus, a very small magnetic field can be used to build up a very large magnetic field. In this paper, the modelling results of thermally actuated magnetic waves are presented showing how to transfer sequentially applied thermal pulses into magnetic waves. The experiment results of the magnetization of YBCO bulk are also presented to demonstrate how superconductors are progressively magnetized by small magnetic field

  17. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng Fang; Yimin Xuan; Qiang Li

    2009-01-01

    Considering the forces acting on the particles and the motion of the particles, this study uses a numerical simulation to investigate the three-dimensional microstructure of the magnetic fluids in the presence of an external magnetic field. A method is proposed for predicting the anisotropic thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids. By introducing an anisotropic structure parameter which characterizes the non-uniform distribution of particles suspended in the magnetic fluids, the traditional Maxwell formula is modified and extended to calculate anisotropic thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids. The results show that in the presence of an external magnetic field the magnetic nanoparticles form chainlike clusters along the direction of the external magnetic field, which leads to the fact that the thermal conduc-tivity of the magnetic fluid along the chain direction is bigger than that along other directions. The thermal conductivity of the magnetic fluids presents an anisotropic feature. With the increase of the magnetic field strength the chainlike clusters in the magnetic fluid appear to be more obvious, so that the anisotropic feature of heat conduction in the fluids becomes more evident.

  18. Airborne magnetic mapping of volcanic areas - state-of-the-art and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supper, Robert; Paoletti, Valeria; Okuma, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally airborne magnetics surveys in volcanology are used for mapping regional geological features, fault zones and to develop a magnetic model of the volcanic subsurface. Within an Austrian-Italian-Japanese cooperation, several volcanic areas including Mt. Vesuvius, Ischia, Campi Flegreii and Aeolian Islands in Italy and Socorro Island in Mexico were mapped by high-resolution magnetic mapping during the last 15 years. In this paper, general conclusions from this long-term cooperation project on airborne magnetics in volcanic areas will be summarised. Basically the results showed the results from airborne magnetics could be used for three major purposes: 1. Developing a rough model for the magnetisation below the volcano down to several kilometres by applying advanced magnetic inversion algorithms helped to define the possible depth of the current or past magma chamber. Due to the complexity of the subsurface of volcanic areas, inversion of data was much dependent on constraints coming from other geoscientific disciplines. 2. After applying certain steps of reduction (topographic correction, field transformation) and a combination of source selective filtering, important regional structural trends could be derived from the alignment of the residual magnetic anomalies. 3. On the other hand during recent years, research has also focused on repeated measurements of the magnetic field of volcanic areas (differential in respect of time = differential magnetic measurements - DMM) using airborne sensors. Long-term temporal magnetic field variations in active volcanic areas can be caused by a changing size of the magma chamber or a general rise in temperature. This is caused by the fact that magnetization disappears, when a magnetic material is warmed up over a certain temperature (Curie- temperature). In consequence the resulting total magnetic field changes. Therefore, determining areas showing changes in the magnetic field could help to select areas where a

  19. Thermal management of closed computer modules utilizing high density circuitry. [in Airborne Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, A. W.; Porter, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents data on a preliminary analysis of the thermal dynamic characteristics of the Airborne Information Management System (AIMS), which is a continuing design project at NASA Dryden. The analysis established the methods which will be applied to the actual AIMS boards as they become available. The paper also describes the AIMS liquid cooling system design and presents a thermodynamic computer model of the AIMS cooling system, together with an experimental validation of this model.

  20. Thermal versus vacuum magnetization in QED

    CERN Document Server

    Elmfors, P; Persson, D; Skagerstam, B S; Elmfors, Per; Liljenberg, Per; Persson, David; Skagerstam, Bo Sture

    1995-01-01

    The magnetized relativistic Fermi and Bose gases are studied at finite temperature and density.In the case of the Fermi gas, the contribution to the magnetization from the vacuum becomes dominant for high magnetic fields, when the thermal contribution saturates. In the case of the charged Bose gas, the (paramagnetic) vacuum--magnetization becomes dominant when the gas changes from a diamagnetic to a paramagnetic behaviour. We furthermore find that the scalar--QED effective coupling constant for a weak non--zero external magnetic field is a decreasing function of the temperature.

  1. Multispectral thermal airborne TASI-600 data to study the Pompeii (IT) archaeological area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Angelo; Pascucci, Simone; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Santini, Federico; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The management of archaeological areas refers to the conservation of the ruins/buildings and the eventual prospection of new areas having an archaeological potential. In this framework, airborne remote sensing is a well-developed geophysical tool for supporting the archaeological surveys of wide areas. The spectral regions applied in archaeological remote sensing spans from the VNIR to the TIR. In particular, the archaeological thermal imaging considers that materials absorb, emit, transmit, and reflect the thermal infrared radiation at different rate according to their composition, density and moisture content. Despite its potential, thermal imaging in archaeological applications are scarce. Among them, noteworthy are the ones related to the use of Landsat and ASTER [1] and airborne remote sensing [2, 3, 4 and 5]. In view of these potential in Cultural Heritage applications, the present study aims at analysing the usefulness of the high spatial resolution thermal imaging on the Pompeii archaeological park. To this purpose TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (32 channels from 8 to 11.5 nm with a spectral resolution of 100nm and a spatial resolution of 1m/pixel) was acquired on December the 7th, 2015. Airborne survey has been acquired to get useful information on the building materials (both ancient and of consolidation) characteristics and, whenever possible, to retrieve quick indicators on their conservation status. Thermal images will be, moreover, processed to have an insight of the critical environmental issues impacting the structures (e.g. moisture). The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the airborne deployments, the pre-processing of the multispectral thermal imagery and the retrieving of accurate land surface temperatures (LST). LST map will be analysed to describe the thermal pattern of the city of Pompeii and detect any thermal anomalies. As far as the ongoing TASI-600 sensors pre-processing, it will include: (a) radiometric

  2. Thermalization of magnetically trapped metastable helium

    CERN Document Server

    Browaeys, A; Sirjean, O; Poupard, J; Nowak, S; Boiron, D; Westbrook, C I; Aspect, Alain

    2001-01-01

    We have observed thermalization by elastic collisions of magnetically trapped metastable helium atoms. Our method directly samples the reconstruction of a thermal energy distribution after the application of an RF knife. The relaxation time of our sample towards equilibrium gives an elastic collision rate constant close to the unitarity limit.

  3. Thermal potentiation of chemotherapy by magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hyperthermia as an adjuvant for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, significant clinical challenges have been encountered, such as a broader spectrum of toxicity, lack of patient tolerance, temperature control and significant invasiveness. Hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles in high-frequency oscillating magnetic fields, commonly termed magnetic fluid hyperthermia, is a promising form of heat delivery in which thermal ener...

  4. Thermal diffusivity measurements in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the first observation of thermal diffusivity in magnetic field on superconducting oxides. The measurements are performed on sintered samples using a high resolution a.c. technique from 30 to 120 K in magnetic field up to 7 T. In magnetic field higher than 1 T the thermal diffusivity below the critical temperature decreases and the authors suggest this is due to the scattering between the phonons and the flux lines inside the grains. The cross section σ related to such a scattering is calculated; the authors obtain values from 1 to 7 x 10-7 cm when the temperature increases from 30 to 70 K

  5. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Allison

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites. Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context.

  6. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Robert S.; Johnston, Joshua M.; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  7. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Robert S; Johnston, Joshua M; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  8. Thermally activated magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Guang-Hong; Wang Yin-Gang; Qi Xian-Jin; Li Zi-Quan; Chen Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the magnetization reversal of the ferromagnetic layers in the lrMn/CoFe/AlOx/CoFe magnetic tunnel junction has been investigated using bulk magnetometry. The films exhibit very complex magnetization processes and reversal mechanism. Thermal activation phenomena such as the training effect, the asymmetry of reversal, the loop broadening and the decrease of exchange field while holding the film at negative saturation have been observed on the hysteresis loops of the pinned ferromagnetic layer while not on those of the free ferromagnetic layer. The thermal activation phenomena observed can be explained by the model of two energy barrier distributions with different time constants.

  9. Airborne full tensor magnetic gradiometry surveys in the Thuringian basin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queitsch, M.; Schiffler, M.; Goepel, A.; Stolz, R.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.; Kukowski, N.

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution we introduce a newly developed fully operational full tensor magnetic gradiometer (FTMG) instrument based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) and show example data acquired in 2012 within the framework of the INFLUINS (Integrated Fluid Dynamics in Sedimentary basins) project. This multidisciplinary project aims for a better understanding of movements and interaction between shallow and deep fluids in the Thuringian Basin in the center of Germany. In contrast to mapping total magnetic field intensity (TMI) in conventional airborne magnetic surveys for industrial exploration of mineral deposits and sedimentary basins, our instrument measures all components of the magnetic field gradient tensor using highly sensitive SQUID gradiometers. This significantly constrains the solutions of the inverse problem. Furthermore, information on the ratio between induced and remanent magnetization is obtained. Special care has been taken to reduce motion noise while acquiring data in airborne operation. Therefore, the sensors are mounted in a nonmagnetic and aerodynamically shaped bird made of fiberglas with a high drag tail which stabilizes the bird even at low velocities. The system is towed by a helicopter and kept at 30m above ground during data acquisition. Additionally, the system in the bird incorporates an inertial unit for geo-referencing and enhanced motion noise compensation, a radar altimeter for topographic correction and a GPS system for high precision positioning. Advanced data processing techniques using reference magnetometer and inertial unit data result in a very low system noise of less than 60 pT/m peak to peak in airborne operation. To show the performance of the system we present example results from survey areas within the Thuringian basin and along its bordering highlands. The mapped gradient tensor components show a high correlation to existing geologic maps. Furthermore, the measured gradient components indicate

  10. Maneuvering thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids by tunable magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaykumar; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of magnetic field dependent thermal conductivity of a transformer oil base magnetic fluid as a function of volume fractions. In the absence of magnetic field, thermal conductivity increases linearly with an increase in volume fraction, and magnitude of thermal conductivity thus obtained is lower than that predicted by Maxwell's theory. This reveals the presence of clusters/oligomers in the system. On application of magnetic field, it exhibits a non-monotonous increase in thermal conductivity. The results are interpreted using the concept of a two-step homogenization method (which is based on differential effective medium theory). The results show a transformation of particle cluster configuration from long chain like prolate shape to the aggregated drop-like structure with increasing concentration as well as a magnetic field. The aggregated drop-like structure for concentrated system is supported by optical microscopic images. This shape change of clusters reduces thermal conductivity enhancement. Moreover, this structure formation is observed as a dynamic phenomenon, and at 226 mT field, the length of the structure extends with time, becomes maximum, and then reduces. This change results in the increase or decrease of thermal conductivity.

  11. NASA Goddards LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Morton, Douglas C.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Ly, Vuong; Montesano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (approximately 1 m) on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT's data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov), which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA's Data and Information policy.

  12. NASA Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT Airborne Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuong Ly

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard’s LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (~1 m on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT’s data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov, which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA’s Data and Information policy.

  13. Drift reduction in strapdown airborne gravimetry using a simple thermal correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, David; Nielsen, J. Emil; Ayres-Sampaio, Diogo; Forsberg, René; Becker, Matthias; Bastos, Luísa

    2015-11-01

    Previous work has shown, that strapdown airborne gravimeters can have a comparable or even superior performance in the higher frequency domain (resolution of few kilometres), compared to classical stable-platform air gravimeters using springs, such as the LaCoste and Romberg (LCR) S-gravimeter. However, the longer wavelengths (tens of kilometres and more) usually suffer from drifts of the accelerometers of the strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU). In this paper, we analyse the drift characteristics of the QA2000 accelerometers, which are the most widely used navigation-grade IMU accelerometers. A large portion of these drifts is shown to come from thermal effects. A lab calibration procedure is used to derive a thermal correction, which is then applied to data from 18 out of 19 flights from an airborne gravity campaign carried out in Chile in October 2013. The IMU-derived gravity closure error can be reduced by 91 % on average, from 3.72 mGal/h to only 0.33 mGal/h (RMS), which is an excellent long-term performance for strapdown gravimetry. Also, the IMU results are compared to the LCR S-gravimeter, which is known to have an excellent long-term stability. Again, the thermal correction yields a significant reduction of errors, with IMU and LCR aerogravity results being consistent at the 2 mGal level.

  14. Design and modeling of spectral-thermal unmixing targets for airborne hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Phil

    2006-05-01

    Techniques to determine the proportions of constituent materials within a single pixel spectrum are well documented in the reflective (0.4-2.5μm) domain. The same capability is also desirable for the thermal (7-14μm) domain, but is complicated by the thermal contributions to the measured spectral radiance. Atmospheric compensation schemes for the thermal domain have been described along with methods for estimating the spectral emissivity from a spectral radiance measurement and hence the next stage to be tackled is the unmixing of thermal spectral signatures. In order to pursue this goal it is necessary to collect data of well-calibrated targets which will expose the limits of the available techniques and enable more robust methods to be designed. This paper describes the design of a set of ground targets for an airborne hyperspectral imager, which will test the effectiveness of available methods. The set of targets include panels to explore a number of difficult scenarios such as isothermal (different materials at identical temperature), isochromal (identical materials, but at differing temperatures), thermal adjacency and thermal point sources. Practical fabrication issues for heated targets and selection of appropriate materials are described. Mathematical modelling of the experiments has enabled prediction of at-sensor measured radiances which are used to assess the design parameters. Finally, a number of useful lessons learned during the fielding of these actual targets are presented to assist those planning future trials of thermal hyperspectral sensors.

  15. Performance evaluation of four directional emissivity analytical models with thermal SAIL model and airborne images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huazhong; Liu, Rongyuan; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Liu, Qiang; Nerry, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    Land surface emissivity is a crucial parameter in the surface status monitoring. This study aims at the evaluation of four directional emissivity models, including two bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models and two gap-frequency-based models. Results showed that the kernel-driven BRDF model could well represent directional emissivity with an error less than 0.002, and was consequently used to retrieve emissivity with an accuracy of about 0.012 from an airborne multi-angular thermal infrared data set. Furthermore, we updated the cavity effect factor relating to multiple scattering inside canopy, which improved the performance of the gap-frequency-based models.

  16. Multispectral thermal airborne TASI-600 data to study the Pompeii (IT) archaeological area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Angelo; Pascucci, Simone; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Santini, Federico; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The management of archaeological areas refers to the conservation of the ruins/buildings and the eventual prospection of new areas having an archaeological potential. In this framework, airborne remote sensing is a well-developed geophysical tool for supporting the archaeological surveys of wide areas. The spectral regions applied in archaeological remote sensing spans from the VNIR to the TIR. In particular, the archaeological thermal imaging considers that materials absorb, emit, transmit, and reflect the thermal infrared radiation at different rate according to their composition, density and moisture content. Despite its potential, thermal imaging in archaeological applications are scarce. Among them, noteworthy are the ones related to the use of Landsat and ASTER [1] and airborne remote sensing [2, 3, 4 and 5]. In view of these potential in Cultural Heritage applications, the present study aims at analysing the usefulness of the high spatial resolution thermal imaging on the Pompeii archaeological park. To this purpose TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (32 channels from 8 to 11.5 nm with a spectral resolution of 100nm and a spatial resolution of 1m/pixel) was acquired on December the 7th, 2015. Airborne survey has been acquired to get useful information on the building materials (both ancient and of consolidation) characteristics and, whenever possible, to retrieve quick indicators on their conservation status. Thermal images will be, moreover, processed to have an insight of the critical environmental issues impacting the structures (e.g. moisture). The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the airborne deployments, the pre-processing of the multispectral thermal imagery and the retrieving of accurate land surface temperatures (LST). LST map will be analysed to describe the thermal pattern of the city of Pompeii and detect any thermal anomalies. As far as the ongoing TASI-600 sensors pre-processing, it will include: (a) radiometric

  17. EMAG2: A 2-arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, S.; Barckhausen, U.; Berkenbosch, H.; Bournas, N.; Brozena, J.; Childers, V.; Dostaler, F.; Fairhead, J.D.; Finn, C.; von Frese, R.R.B; Gaina, C.; Golynsky, S.; Kucks, R.; Lu, Hai; Milligan, P.; Mogren, S.; Muller, R.D.; Olesen, O.; Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.; Schreckenberger, B.; Thebault, E.; Tontini, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne magnetic measurements. EMAG2 is a significant update of our previous candidate grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2 arc min, and the altitude has been reduced from 5 km to 4 km above the geoid. Additional grid and track line data have been included, both over land and the oceans. Wherever available, the original shipborne and airborne data were used instead of precompiled oceanic magnetic grids. Interpolation between sparse track lines in the oceans was improved by directional gridding and extrapolation, based on an oceanic crustal age model. The longest wavelengths (>330 km) were replaced with the latest CHAMP satellite magnetic field model MF6. EMAG2 is available at http://geomag.org/models/EMAG2 and for permanent archive at http://earthref.org/ cgi-bin/er.cgi?s=erda.cgi?n=970. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. INTERPRETATION OF AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETIC DATA IN THE 600 AREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUMMINS GD

    2010-11-11

    As part of the 200-PO-1 Phase I geophysical surveys, Fugro Airborne Surveys was contracted to collect airborne electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic surveys of the Hanford Site 600 Area. Two helicopter survey systems were used with the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} time domain portion flown between June 19th and June 20th, 2008, and the RESOLVE{reg_sign} frequency domain portion was flown from June 29th to July 1st, 2008. Magnetic data were acquired contemporaneously with the electromagnetic surveys using a total-field cesium vapor magnetometer. Approximately 925 line kilometers (km) were flown using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} II system and 412 line kilometers were flown using the RESOLVE{reg_sign} system. The HeliGEOTEM system has an effective penetration of roughly 250 meters into the ground and the RESOLVE system has an effective penetration of roughly 60 meters. Acquisition parameters and preliminary results are provided in SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site. Airborne data are interpreted in this report in an attempt to identify areas of likely preferential groundwater flow within the aquifer system based on the presence of paleochannels or fault zones. The premise for the interpretation is that coarser-grained intervals have filled in scour channels created by episodic catastrophic flood events during the late Pleistocene. The interpretation strategy used the magnetic field anomaly data and existing bedrock maps to identify likely fault or lineament zones. Combined analysis of the magnetic, 60-Hz noise monitor, and flight-altitude (radar) data were used to identify zones where EM response is more likely due to cultural interference and or bedrock structures. Cross-sectional and map view presentations of the EM data were used to identify more electrically resistive zones that likely correlate with coarser-grained intervals. The resulting interpretation identifies one major northwest-southeast trending

  19. Thermal Photons From Magnetized Bare Strange Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez, Enrique Moreno; Patiño, Leonardo; Ortega, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    A plasma made out of strange-quark matter (SQM) and electrons, has a rather high plasma frequency (>20 MeV). Thus, a compact star made of such material all the way up to its surface, i.e., a bare strange star, would be unable to radiate away its thermal emission. We use the MIT-bag model and assume that SQM is the ground state of nuclear matter at high density. We investigate whether the presence of a magnetic field will allow propagation of radiation at frequencies below the SQM plasma frequencies. Hence, we study the presence of gyrofrequencies in a SQM plasma permeated by a strong magnetic field (B > 10^{12} G). We find that small regions in the frequency spectrum allow radiation propagation due to the presence of the magnetic fields. It is likely that narrow bands of radiation would likely be observable from magnetized bare strange stars .

  20. Detection of salmonid thermal refugia from airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, S. J.; Bergeron, N.; Rousseau, M.

    2010-12-01

    During elevated summer temperatures, salmonid species seek out areas of cool, well-oxygenated river water to alleviate thermal stress. Collectively known as ‘thermal refugia’, these are of great significance to the ability of salmonids to survive increased water temperatures, and a better understanding of their spatial and temporal characteristics may aid mitigation strategies against the possible effects of climate change on rivers. However, thermal refugia are traditionally hard to detect, and their in-river abundance and spatial patterns are largely unknown. Although previous research has examined TIR imaging as a means to sense river temperatures, few have achieved a resolution amenable to the detection of small thermal anomalies typically used by salmonids, with the majority of literature focusing on the general application of thermal imaging to river temperature detection and analysis. From preliminary research, we note that riverine thermal anomalies (as viewed from TIR imagery) can comprise a number of different forms resulting from a diverse range of sources. Given that the structural, spatial and temporal dynamics of thermal refugia in gravel bed rivers are a presumably a function of the complex geomorphological processes within a catchment, the ability to discriminate multi-scale thermal refugia may aid our comprehension not only of the behaviour of salmonids during high temperature events, but also of the geomorphological phenomena that are fundamental in governing river temperature heterogeneity. Initial thermal infrared imagery acquired in August 2009 suggested that while it is possible to manually detect riverine temperature anomalies, the creation of a dedicated remote sensing platform capable of obtaining both TIR and RGB photography easily and with a resolution amenable to refugia detection would greatly aid our ability to discriminate true refugia from other thermal anomalies (false positives). To this end, we have developed a system able to

  1. Elemental analysis of airborne particulate by using thermal and epithermal neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal neutron activation analysis was used to determine Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Mn, Na, V, and Ti concentrations, whereas epithermal neutron activation analysis was used to determine Cu, I and Si concentrations. Counting by Compton suppression both in thermal neutron activation and epithermal neutron activation analysis showed the significantly different on detection limit of element compare with normal counting system. It revealed counting by Compton suppression gave better result. The enrichment factor of elements indicated that V and Mn were enriched in several fine particulate samples. Ca, Si and Na were not enriched, whereas Br, I and Cl were enriched in fine airborne particulate or in coarse one. It was found that Cl and Na did not have correlation, while Br and I showed the same enrichment the same enrichment trend and high correlation (0,9). It means that Br and I were from the same pollutant source. It could concluded that the thermal neutron and epithermal neutron activations analysis combined with counting by Compton suppression could enhance sensitivity of analysis of elemental air bone particulate that was very useful in air pollution study. Key words : activation analysis, thermal neutron, epithermal neutron, Compton

  2. SPS extraction kicker magnet thermal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Timmins, M

    2004-01-01

    As the SPS accelerator will be used for the CNGS project and as LHC injector, the proton beams passing through its extraction kickers will have a much higher intensity than in the past. The image currents generated by this beam may provoke a temperature increase in the magnet's ferrite core to temperatures above the Curie temperature, unless the heat produced is effectively removed. A further complication arises from the fact that a high voltage is applied to the ferrites. The solution adopted consists in transferring the heat via Aluminium Nitride insulators to a water cooling circuit. The heat transfer analysis and the calculated thermal distribution of the magnet are presented.

  3. EMAG2. A 2-arc-minute resolution Earth magnetic anomaly grid compiled from satellite, airborne and marine magnetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Airborne and marine magnetic data have been collected for more than half a century, providing extensive coverage of the Earth. Due to the changing main field from the Earth's core, and due to differences in quality and coverage, combining these data to a consistent global magnetic anomaly grid is challenging. A key ingredient is the long wavelength magnetic field observed by the low-orbiting CHAMP satellite. To produce a homogeneous grid, the marine and aeromagnetic trackline data are first line-leveled and then merged with the existing grids of continental-scale compilations by Least Squares Collocation. The method takes the anisotropy of the oceanic magnetic field into account. This leads to an improved representation of oceanic magnetic lineations and allows for the interpolation between adjacent tracks in sparsely surveyed regions, particularly in the southern oceans. In the final processing step the short-to- intermediate wavelengths of the near-surface grid are merged with the latest CHAMP satellite magnetic anomaly model MF6 (http://geomag.org/models/MF6.html). In analogy to NGDC's 2-arc-minute resolution ETOPO2 grid, the new magnetic anomaly grid is named EMAG2. The grid is available in digital form and as plug-ins for NASA World Wind, Google Earth and Google Maps at http://geomag.org.

  4. An improved procedure for detection and enumeration of walrus signatures in airborne thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Douglas M.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Speckman, Suzann G.; Benter, R. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, application of remote sensing to marine mammal surveys has been a promising area of investigation for wildlife managers and researchers. In April 2006, the United States and Russia conducted an aerial survey of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) using thermal infrared sensors to detect groups of animals resting on pack ice in the Bering Sea. The goal of this survey was to estimate the size of the Pacific walrus population. An initial analysis of the U.S. data using previously-established methods resulted in lower detectability of walrus groups in the imagery and higher variability in calibration models than was expected based on pilot studies. This paper describes an improved procedure for detection and enumeration of walrus groups in airborne thermal imagery. Thermal images were first subdivided into smaller 200 x 200 pixel "tiles." We calculated three statistics to represent characteristics of walrus signatures from the temperature histogram for each the. Tiles that exhibited one or more of these characteristics were examined further to determine if walrus signatures were present. We used cluster analysis on tiles that contained walrus signatures to determine which pixels belonged to each group. We then calculated a thermal index value for each walrus group in the imagery and used generalized linear models to estimate detection functions (the probability of a group having a positive index value) and calibration functions (the size of a group as a function of its index value) based on counts from matched digital aerial photographs. The new method described here improved our ability to detect walrus groups at both 2 m and 4 m spatial resolution. In addition, the resulting calibration models have lower variance than the original method. We anticipate that the use of this new procedure will greatly improve the quality of the population estimate derived from these data. This procedure may also have broader applicability to thermal infrared

  5. Identification of Thermally Driven Valley Wind From Ground Based and Airborne Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampanelli, G.; de Franceschi, M.; Zardi, D.

    A peculiar valley wind, the so called Ora del Garda, has been adopted as a test case of thermally driven wind. The latter occurs on fair weather days, when it starts blowing during the late morning along the northern shore of Garda Lake as a typical lake breeze and thence channels in the Sarca Valley and Lakes Valley nearby, until it finally reaches, through an elevated saddle, the River Adige Valley, where it appears as a strong gusty wind. A statistical analysis of time series recorded by a network of meteorological ground station located in the above valleys allowed detailed identifi- cation of peculiar features. Further understanding has been gained from specific field observations including both ground based and airborne measurements performed with a light airplane within and above the valley boundary layer. A geostatistical analy- sis (kriging) of data allowed evaluation of vertical profiles at various locations. Deviations from the averaged vertical profile due to horizontal temperature gradients within the valley atmosphere were also evaluated and the underlying statistical struc- ture estimated in terms of suitable variogram function of the monitored variables. Fi- nally the procedure allowed an estimate potential temperature anomalies throughout the valley volume and the identification of basic thermal structures within the convec- tive boundary layer.

  6. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS data.

  7. Airborne detection of magnetic anomalies associated with soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconnaissance airborne geophysical data acquired over the 35,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, show several magnetic anomalies over undisturbed areas mapped as Copper Ridge Dolomite (CRD). The anomalies of interest are most apparent in magnetic gradient maps where they exceed 0.06 nT/m and in some cases exceed 0.5 nT/m. Anomalies as large as 25nT are seen on maps. Some of the anomalies correlate with known or suspected karst, or with apparent conductivity anomalies calculated from electromagnetic data acquired contemporaneously with the magnetic data. Some of the anomalies have a strong correlation with topographic lows or closed depressions. Surface magnetic data have been acquired over some of these sites and have confirmed the existence of the anomalies. Ground inspections in the vicinity of several of the anomalies has not led to any discoveries of manmade surface materials of sufficient size to generate the observed anomalies. One would expect an anomaly of approximately 1 nT for a pickup truck from 200 ft altitude. Typical residual magnetic anomalies have magnitudes of 5--10 nT, and some are as large as 25nT. The absence of roads or other indications of culture (past or present) near the anomalies and the modeling of anomalies in data acquired with surface instruments indicate that man-made metallic objects are unlikely to be responsible for the anomaly. The authors show that observed anomalies in the CRD can reasonably be associated with thickening of the soil layer. The occurrence of the anomalies in areas where evidences of karstification are seen would follow because sediment deposition would occur in topographic lows. Linear groups of anomalies on the maps may be associated with fracture zones which were eroded more than adjacent rocks and were subsequently covered with a thicker blanket of sediment. This study indicates that airborne magnetic data may be of use in other sites where fracture zones or buried collapse structures are of interest

  8. Magnetic field induced augmented thermal conduction phenomenon in magneto nanocolloids

    OpenAIRE

    Katiyar, Ajay; Dhar, Purbarun; Nandi, Tandra; Das, Sarit K

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field induced drastically augmented thermal conductivity of magneto nanocolloids involving magnetic oxide nanoparticles, viz. Fe2O3, Fe3O4, Nickel oxide (NiO), Cobalt oxide (Co3O4), dispersed in different base fluids (heat transfer oil, kerosene, and ethylene glycol) have been reported. Experiments reveal the augmented thermal transport under the external applied magnetic field, with kerosene based MNCs showing at relatively low magnetic field intensities as compared to the heat tran...

  9. Colloidal Stability and Thermal Stability of Magnetic Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    I.M. Arefyev; T.A. Arefyeva; Yu.B. Kazakov

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal and thermal stabilities of magnetic fluids define the service life of magneto-liquid equipment. The results of the research into colloidal and thermal stabilities of original synthesized magnetic fluids based on kerosene, siloxane fluid and synthetic hydrocarbon oil are presented. The method of carrying agent substitution was used in the research into colloidal stability. The thermal tests were conducted in the research into thermal stability. The conclusions about the prospects of ...

  10. Airborne Thermal Remote Sensing for Estimation of Groundwater Discharge to a River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuankun; Liu, Jie; Hu, Yue; Wang, Heshun; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods for studying surface water and groundwater interactions have usually been limited to point measurements, such as geochemical sampling and seepage measurement. A new methodology is presented for quantifying groundwater discharge to a river, by using river surface temperature data obtained from airborne thermal infrared remote sensing technology. The Hot Spot Analysis toolkit in ArcGIS was used to calculate the percentage of groundwater discharge to a river relative to the total flow of the river. This methodology was evaluated in the midstream of the Heihe River in the arid and semiarid northwest China. The results show that the percentage of groundwater discharge relative to the total streamflow was as high as 28%, which is in good agreement with the results from previous geochemical studies. The data analysis methodology used in this study is based on the assumption that the river water is fully mixed except in the areas of extremely low flow velocity, which could lead to underestimation of the amount of groundwater discharge. Despite this limitation, this remote sensing-based approach provides an efficient means of quantifying the surface water and groundwater interactions on a regional scale.

  11. Land surface emissivity retrieval from airborne hyperspectral scanner thermal infrared data over urban surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C. X.; Qian, Y. G.; Wang, N.; Ma, L. L.; Jiang, X. G.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) is a key parameter for characterizing the land surface, and is vital for a wide variety of surface-atmosphere studies. This paper retrieved LSEs of land surfaces over the city of Madrid, Spain from airborne hyperspectral scanner (AHS) thermal infrared data using temperature emissivity separation (TES) method. Six different kinds of urban surfaces: asphalt, bare soil, granite, pavement, shrub and grass pavement, were selected to evaluate the performance of the TES method in urban areas. The results demonstrate that the TES method can be successfully applied to retrieve LSEs in urban area. The six urban surfaces have similar curve shape of emissivity spectra, with the lowest emissivity in band 73, and highest in band 78; the LSE for bare soil varies significantly with spectra, approximately from 0.90 in band 72 to 0.98 in band 78, whereas the LSE for grass has the smallest spectral variation, approximately from 0.965 in band 72 to 0.974 in band 78, and the shrub presents higher LSE than other surfaces in bands 72, 73, 75-77, but a little lower in bands 78 and 79. Furthermore, it is worth noting that band 73 is suitable for discriminating different urban surfaces because large LSE differences exist in this channel for different urban surfaces.

  12. Airborne Thermal Remote Sensing for Estimation of Groundwater Discharge to a River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuankun; Liu, Jie; Hu, Yue; Wang, Heshun; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods for studying surface water and groundwater interactions have usually been limited to point measurements, such as geochemical sampling and seepage measurement. A new methodology is presented for quantifying groundwater discharge to a river, by using river surface temperature data obtained from airborne thermal infrared remote sensing technology. The Hot Spot Analysis toolkit in ArcGIS was used to calculate the percentage of groundwater discharge to a river relative to the total flow of the river. This methodology was evaluated in the midstream of the Heihe River in the arid and semiarid northwest China. The results show that the percentage of groundwater discharge relative to the total streamflow was as high as 28%, which is in good agreement with the results from previous geochemical studies. The data analysis methodology used in this study is based on the assumption that the river water is fully mixed except in the areas of extremely low flow velocity, which could lead to underestimation of the amount of groundwater discharge. Despite this limitation, this remote sensing-based approach provides an efficient means of quantifying the surface water and groundwater interactions on a regional scale. PMID:26281027

  13. Semi-automated structural analysis of high resolution magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry airborne surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeglia, N.; Martelet, G.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Ledru, P.; Tourlière, B.

    2005-08-01

    A user-controlled procedure was implemented for the structural analysis of geophysical maps. Local edge segments are first extracted using a suitable edge detector function, then linked into straight discontinuities and, finally, organised in complex boundary lines best delineating geophysical features. Final boundary lines may be attributed by a geologist to lithological contacts and/or structural geological features. Tests of some edge detectors, (i) horizontal gradient magnitude (HGM), (ii) various orders of the analytic signal ( An), reduced to the pole or not, (iii) enhanced horizontal derivative (EHD), (iv) composite analytic signal (CAS), were performed on synthetic magnetic data (with and without noise). As a result of these comparisons, the horizontal gradient appears to remain the best operator for the analysis of magnetic data. Computation of gradients in the frequency domain, including filtering and upward continuation of noisy data, is well-suited to the extraction of magnetic gradients associated to deep sources, while space-domain smoothing and differentiation techniques is generally preferable in the case of shallow magnetic sources, or for gamma-ray spectrometry analysis. Algorithms for edge extraction, segment linking, and line following can be controlled by choosing adequate edge detector and processing parameters which allows adaptation to a desired scale of interpretation. Tests on synthetic and real case data demonstrate the adaptability of the procedure and its ability to produce basic layer for multi-data analysis. The method was applied to the interpretation of high-resolution airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data collected in northern Namibia. It allowed the delineation of dyke networks concealed by superficial weathering and demonstrated the presence of lithological variations in alluvial flows. The output from the structural analysis procedure are compatible with standard GIS softwares and enable the geologist to (i) compare

  14. Extracting Roof Parameters and Heat Bridges Over the City of Oldenburg from Hyperspectral, Thermal, and Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannehr, L.; Luhmann, Th.; Piechel, J.; Roelfs, T.; Schmidt, An.

    2011-09-01

    Remote sensing methods are used to obtain different kinds of information about the state of the environment. Within the cooperative research project HiReSens, funded by the German BMBF, a hyperspectral scanner, an airborne laser scanner, a thermal camera, and a RGB-camera are employed on a small aircraft to determine roof material parameters and heat bridges of house tops over the city Oldenburg, Lower Saxony. HiReSens aims to combine various geometrical highly resolved data in order to achieve relevant evidence about the state of the city buildings. Thermal data are used to obtain the energy distribution of single buildings. The use of hyperspectral data yields information about material consistence of roofs. From airborne laser scanning data (ALS) digital surface models are inferred. They build the basis to locate the best orientations for solar panels of the city buildings. The combination of the different data sets offers the opportunity to capitalize synergies between differently working systems. Central goals are the development of tools for the collection of heat bridges by means of thermal data, spectral collection of roofs parameters on basis of hyperspectral data as well as 3D-capture of buildings from airborne lasers scanner data. Collecting, analyzing and merging of the data are not trivial especially not when the resolution and accuracy is aimed in the domain of a few decimetre. The results achieved need to be regarded as preliminary. Further investigations are still required to prove the accuracy in detail.

  15. Temperature and emissivity separation and mineral mapping based on airborne TASI hyperspectral thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing; Yan, Bokun; Dong, Xinfeng; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Tian, Feng; Wang, Runsheng

    2015-08-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing (8-12 μm) (TIR) has great potential for geologic remote sensing studies. TIR has been successfully used for terrestrial and planetary geologic studies to map surface materials. However, the complexity of the physics and the lack of hyperspectral data make the studies under-investigated. A new generation of commercial hyperspectral infrared sensors, known as Thermal Airborne Spectrographic Imager (TASI), was used for image analysis and mineral mapping in this study. In this paper, a combined method integrating normalized emissivity method (NEM), ratio algorithm (RATIO) and maximum-minimum apparent emissivity difference (MMD), being applied in multispectral data, has been modified and used to determine whether this method is suitable for retrieving emissivity from TASI hyperspectral data. MODTRAN 4 has been used for the atmospheric correction. The retrieved emissivity spectra matched well with the field measured spectra except for bands 1, 2, and 32. Quartz, calcite, diopside/hedenbergite, hornblende and microcline have been mapped by the emissivity image. Mineral mapping results agree with the dominant minerals identified by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction and spectroscopic analyses of field samples. Both of the results indicated that the atmospheric correction method and the combined temperature-emissivitiy method are suitable for TASI image. Carbonate skarnization was first found in the study area by the spatial extent of diopside. Chemical analyses of the skarn samples determined that the Au content was 0.32-1.74 g/t, with an average Au content of 0.73 g/t. This information provides an important resource for prospecting for skarn type gold deposits. It is also suggested that TASI is suitable for prospect and deposit scale exploration.

  16. Tension zones of deep-seated rockslides revealed by thermal anomalies and airborne laser scan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroň, Ivo; Bečkovský, David; Gajdošík, Juraj; Opálka, Filip; Plan, Lukas; Winkler, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Open cracks, tension fractures and crevice caves are important diagnostic features of gravitationally deformed slopes. When the cracks on the upper part of the slope open to the ground surface, they transfer relatively warm and buoyant air from the underground in cold seasons and thus could be detected by the infrared thermography (IRT) as warmer anomalies. Here we present two IRT surveys of deep-seated rockslides in Austria and the Czech Republic. We used thermal imaging cameras Flir and Optris, manipulated manually from the ground surface and also from unmanned aerial vehicle and piloted ultralight-plane platforms. The surveys were conducted during cold days of winter 2014/2015 and early in the morning to avoid the negative effect of direct sunshine. The first study site is the Bad Fischau rockslide in the southern part of the Vienna Basin (Austria). It was firstly identified by the morphostructural analysis of 1-m digital terrain model from the airborne laser scan data. The rockslide is superimposed on, and closely related to the active marginal faults of the Vienna basin, which is a pull apart structure. There is the 80-m-deep Eisenstein Show Cave situated in the southern lateral margin of the rockslide. The cave was originally considered to be purely of hydrothermal (hypogene) karstification; however its specific morphology and position within the detachment zone of the rockslide suggests its relation to gravitational slope-failure. The IRT survey revealed the Eisenstein Cave at the ground surface and also several other open cracks and possible cleft caves along the margins, headscarp, and also within the body of the rockslide. The second surveyed site was the Kněhyně rockslide in the flysch belt of the Outer Western Carpathians in the eastern Czech Republic. This deep-seated translational rockslide formed about eight known pseudokarst crevice caves, which reach up to 57 m in depth. The IRT survey recognized several warm anomalies indicating very deep

  17. Effectiveness of airborne multispectral thermal data for karst groundwater resources recognition in coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Stefano; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Palombo, Angelo; Santini, Federico; Pascucci, Simone

    2013-04-01

    Currently the detection, use and management of groundwater in karst regions can be considered one of the most significant procedures for solving water scarcity problems during periods of low rainfall this because groundwater resources from karst aquifers play a key role in the water supply in karst areas worldwide [1]. In many countries of the Mediterranean area, where karst is widespread, groundwater resources are still underexploited, while surface waters are generally preferred [2]. Furthermore, carbonate aquifers constitute a crucial thermal water resource outside of volcanic areas, even if there is no detailed and reliable global assessment of thermal water resources. The composite hydrogeological characteristics of karst, particularly directions and zones of groundwater distribution, are not up till now adequately explained [3]. In view of the abovementioned reasons the present study aims at analyzing the detection capability of high spatial resolution thermal remote sensing of karst water resources in coastal areas in order to get useful information on the karst springs flow and on different characteristics of these environments. To this purpose MIVIS [4, 5] and TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (see sensors' characteristics in Table 1) acquired on two coastal areas of the Mediterranean area interested by karst activity, one located in Montenegro and one in Italy, were used. One study area is located in the Kotor Bay, a winding bay on the Adriatic Sea surrounded by high mountains in south-western Montenegro and characterized by many subaerial and submarine coastal springs related to deep karstic channels. The other study area is located in Santa Cesarea (Italy), encompassing coastal cold springs, the main local source of high quality water, and also a noticeable thermal groundwater outflow. The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the two airborne deployments on these areas. The preprocessing of the multispectral thermal imagery

  18. Colloidal Stability and Thermal Stability of Magnetic Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Arefyev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal and thermal stabilities of magnetic fluids define the service life of magneto-liquid equipment. The results of the research into colloidal and thermal stabilities of original synthesized magnetic fluids based on kerosene, siloxane fluid and synthetic hydrocarbon oil are presented. The method of carrying agent substitution was used in the research into colloidal stability. The thermal tests were conducted in the research into thermal stability. The conclusions about the prospects of synthesized magnetic fluids using in technical equipment are made on the basis of received experimental data.

  19. Influence of thermodynamic properties of a thermo-acoustic emitter on the efficiency of thermal airborne ultrasound generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschewski, M; Kreutzbruck, M; Prager, J

    2015-12-01

    In this work we experimentally verify the theoretical prediction of the recently published Energy Density Fluctuation Model (EDF-model) of thermo-acoustic sound generation. Particularly, we investigate experimentally the influence of thermal inertia of an electrically conductive film on the efficiency of thermal airborne ultrasound generation predicted by the EDF-model. Unlike widely used theories, the EDF-model predicts that the thermal inertia of the electrically conductive film is a frequency-dependent parameter. Its influence grows non-linearly with the increase of excitation frequency and reduces the efficiency of the ultrasound generation. Thus, this parameter is the major limiting factor for the efficient thermal airborne ultrasound generation in the MHz-range. To verify this theoretical prediction experimentally, five thermo-acoustic emitter samples consisting of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) coatings of different thicknesses (from 65 nm to 1.44 μm) on quartz glass substrates were tested for airborne ultrasound generation in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 800 kHz. For the measurement of thermally generated sound pressures a laser Doppler vibrometer combined with a 12 μm thin polyethylene foil was used as the sound pressure detector. All tested thermo-acoustic emitter samples showed a resonance-free frequency response in the entire tested frequency range. The thermal inertia of the heat producing film acts as a low-pass filter and reduces the generated sound pressure with the increasing excitation frequency and the ITO film thickness. The difference of generated sound pressure levels for samples with 65 nm and 1.44 μm thickness is in the order of about 6 dB at 50 kHz and of about 12 dB at 500 kHz. A comparison of sound pressure levels measured experimentally and those predicted by the EDF-model shows for all tested emitter samples a relative error of less than ±6%. Thus, experimental results confirm the prediction of the EDF-model and show that the model can

  20. Form factors in magnetic scattering of thermal neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ballou, Rafik

    2007-01-01

    This lecture addresses the concept of form factor in magnetic scattering of thermal neutrons, analyzing its meaning, discussing its measurement by polarized neutrons and detailing its computation for the ions by the spherical tensor operator formalism.

  1. Analysis of thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets using magnetic domain observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Takezawa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We used magnetic domain observation to statistically observe the thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures up to 150 °C. Simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred adjacent grains occurred at 90 °C because of the magnetic interaction among the grains beyond grain boundaries in the Dysprosium (Dy-free low-coercivity magnet. Conversely, simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred grains did not occur in the Dy-added high-coercivity magnets, and the demagnetizing ratio steadily increased with temperature. Furthermore, the addition of Dy induced high thermal stability by eliminating the simultaneous thermal demagnetization, which was caused by the magnetic interaction among the grains.

  2. Thermalization of magnetized electrons from black body radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an interesting mechanism whereby an electron in a strong magnetic field can have both the parallel and perpendicular motions come into thermal equilibrium with black body radiation. The mechanism does not include any collisions with other particles and can overcome the extreme slowing of thermalization of highly magnetized particles at low temperatures. The mechanism depends upon the magnetic field strength having a spatial variation. We provide results from two example cases. This mechanism could affect the temperatures that can be achieved in experiments devoted to trapping antihydrogen

  3. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between

  4. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  5. Thermally driven vertical displacement of IP quadrupole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IP (interaction point) quadrupole magnets of the TRISTAN MR (main ring), QCS and QC1, at every IP sit on the common support made of steel. When all magnets are cycled through injection, acceleration, flattop and deceleration, the environmental temperature in the tunnel changes periodically following the magnet cycle. The magnet support receives the temperature cycles and the quadrupole on it moves vertically due to the thermal expansion and shrinkage of the support. Its movement was measured with the laser interferometer during the physics experiment. This displacement gives an effect on the closed orbit distortions and requires the orbit correction when it becomes serious. (author)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution satellite and airborne thermal infrared imaging of precursory unrest and 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Rick L.; Vaughan, R. Greg; Patrick, Matthew R.; Coombs, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    A combination of satellite and airborne high-resolution visible and thermal infrared (TIR) image data detected and measured changes at Redoubt Volcano during the 2008–2009 unrest and eruption. The TIR sensors detected persistent elevated temperatures at summit ice-melt holes as seismicity and gas emissions increased in late 2008 to March 2009. A phreatic explosion on 15 March was followed by more than 19 magmatic explosive events from 23 March to 4 April that produced high-altitude ash clouds and large lahars. Two (or three) lava domes extruded and were destroyed between 23 March and 4 April. After 4 April, the eruption extruded a large lava dome that continued to grow until at least early July 2009.

  8. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  9. Solar wind thermally induced magnetic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R E; Moya, P S; Muñoz, V; Araneda, J A; F-Viñas, A; Valdivia, J A

    2014-06-20

    A kinetic description of Alfvén-cyclotron magnetic fluctuations for anisotropic electron-proton quasistable plasmas is studied. An analytical treatment, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, consistently shows that spontaneous fluctuations in plasmas with stable distributions significantly contribute to the observed magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind, as seen, for example, in [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)], even far below from the instability thresholds. Furthermore, these results, which do not require any adjustable parameters or wave excitations, are consistent with the results provided by hybrid simulations. It is expected that this analysis contributes to our understanding of the nature of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  10. Boosting magnetic reconnection by viscosity and thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number P r m > 1 ), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for P r m > 1 . The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently, boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  11. Boosting Magnetic Reconnection by Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Minoshima, Takashi; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection is investigated by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations including uniform resistivity, uniform viscosity, and anisotropic thermal conduction. When viscosity exceeds resistivity (the magnetic Prandtl number Prm > 1), the viscous dissipation dominates outflow dynamics and leads to the decrease in the plasma density inside a current sheet. The low-density current sheet supports the excitation of the vortex. The thickness of the vortex is broader than that of the current for Prm > 1. The broader vortex flow more efficiently carries the upstream magnetic flux toward the reconnection region, and consequently boosts the reconnection. The reconnection rate increases with viscosity provided that thermal conduction is fast enough to take away the thermal energy increased by the viscous dissipation (the fluid Prandtl number Pr < 1). The result suggests the need to control the Prandtl numbers for the reconnection against the conventional resistive model.

  12. Background Radiance Estimation for Gas Plume Quantification for Airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Idoughi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging in the long-wave infrared (LWIR is a mean that is proving its worth in the characterization of gaseous effluent. Indeed the spectral and spatial resolution of acquisition instruments is steadily decreasing, making the gases characterization increasingly easy in the LWIR domain. The majority of literature algorithms exploit the plume contribution to the radiance corresponding to the difference of radiance between the plume-present and plume-absent pixels. Nevertheless, the off-plume radiance is unobservable using a single image. In this paper, we propose a new method to retrieve trace gas concentration from airborne infrared hyperspectral data. More particularly the outlined method improves the existing background radiance estimation approach to deal with heterogeneous scenes corresponding to industrial scenes. It consists in performing a classification of the scene and then applying a principal components analysis based method to estimate the background radiance on each cluster stemming from the classification. In order to determine the contribution of the classification to the background radiance estimation, we compared the two approaches on synthetic data and Telops Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS Imaging Hyper-Cam LW airborne acquisition above ethylene release. We finally show ethylene retrieved concentration map and estimate flow rate of the ethylene release.

  13. Thermal evolution of neutron stars with decaying magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotochemical heating originates in the deviation from beta equilibrium due to spin-down compression, which is closely related to the dipole magnetic field. We numerically calculate the deviation from chemical equilibrium and thermal evolution of neutron stars with decaying magnetic fields. We find that the power-law long term decay of the magnetic field slightly affects the deviation from chemical equilibrium and surface temperature. However, the magnetic decay leads to older neutron stars that could have a different surface temperature with the same magnetic field strength. That is, older neutron stars with a low magnetic field (108 G) could have a lower temperature even with rotochemical heating in operation, which probably explains the lack of other observations on older millisecond pulsars with higher surface temperature, except millisecond pulsar J0437–4715. (paper)

  14. Identifying trout refuges in the Indian and Hudson Rivers in northern New York through airborne thermal infrared remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Anne G.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Calef, Fred J.; Freehafer, Douglas A.; Kremens, Robert L.

    2015-10-09

    The locations and sizes of potential cold-water refuges for trout were examined in 2005 along a 27-kilometer segment of the Indian and Hudson Rivers in northern New York to evaluate the extent of refuges, the effects of routine flow releases from an impoundment, and how these refuges and releases might influence trout survival in reaches that otherwise would be thermally stressed. This river segment supports small populations of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), brown trout (Salmo trutta), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and also receives regular releases of reservoir-surface waters to support rafting during the summer, when water temperatures in both the reservoir and the river frequently exceed thermal thresholds for trout survival. Airborne thermal infrared imaging was supplemented with continuous, in-stream temperature loggers to identify potential refuges that may be associated with tributary inflows or groundwater seeps and to define the extent to which the release flows decrease the size of existing refuges. In general, the release flows overwhelmed the refuge areas and greatly decreased the size and number of the areas. Mean water temperatures were unaffected by the releases, but small-scale heterogeneity was diminished. At a larger scale, water temperatures in the upper and lower segments of the reach were consistently warmer than in the middle segment, even during passage of release waters. The inability of remote thermal infrared images to consistently distinguish land from water (in shaded areas) and to detect groundwater seeps (away from the shallow edges of the stream) limited data analysis and the ability to identify potential thermal refuge areas.

  15. Thermal fluctuations and critical behavior in a magnetized, anisotropic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Mahajan, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Thermal fluctuations in a magnetized, anisotropic plasma are studied by applying standard methods, based on the Einstein rule, to the known thermodynamic potential of the system. It is found in particular that magnetic fluctuations become critical when the anisotropy p{sub ∥}−p{sub ⊥} changes sign. By examining the critical region, additional insight on the equations of state for near-critical anisotropic plasma is obtained.

  16. Thermal magnetic field noise: Electron optics and decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal magnetic field noise from magnetic and non-magnetic conductive parts close to the electron beam recently has been identified as a reason for decoherence in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here, we report about new experimental results from measurements for a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. For a simplified version of this setup and other situations we derive semi-analytical models in order to predict the strength, bandwidth and spatial correlation of the noise fields. The results of the simulations are finally compared to previous and new experimental data in a quantitative manner. - Highlights: • We report on magnetic field noise of a thermodynamic origin which can cause decoherence in the medium voltage electron microscope (S)TEM. • Previously published and new experimental results are compared to theoretical predictions. • Layered structures of non-magnetic and magnetic materials in electron-optical components are treated theoretically and covered by experiments. • Various ways to calculate the power spectral density of the magnetic noise based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem are used for the evaluation. • The calculated spatial coherence of magnetic noise in a beam tube is used for the comparison of theoretical predictions and experiments

  17. Thermal magnetic field noise: Electron optics and decoherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, Stephan, E-mail: uhlemann@ceos-gmbh.de; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max.

    2015-04-15

    Thermal magnetic field noise from magnetic and non-magnetic conductive parts close to the electron beam recently has been identified as a reason for decoherence in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here, we report about new experimental results from measurements for a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. For a simplified version of this setup and other situations we derive semi-analytical models in order to predict the strength, bandwidth and spatial correlation of the noise fields. The results of the simulations are finally compared to previous and new experimental data in a quantitative manner. - Highlights: • We report on magnetic field noise of a thermodynamic origin which can cause decoherence in the medium voltage electron microscope (S)TEM. • Previously published and new experimental results are compared to theoretical predictions. • Layered structures of non-magnetic and magnetic materials in electron-optical components are treated theoretically and covered by experiments. • Various ways to calculate the power spectral density of the magnetic noise based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem are used for the evaluation. • The calculated spatial coherence of magnetic noise in a beam tube is used for the comparison of theoretical predictions and experiments.

  18. Circuit, Thermal and Cost Characteristics of Impulse Magnetizing Circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development of circuit, thermal and cost model for a capacitor discharge impulse megnetizer and compares simulations to measurements from an actual system. We used a cost structure consisting of five major subsystems for cost modeling. Especially, we estimated the potential for cost reductions impulse magnetizer as a function of time using the learning curve.

  19. A new approach to interpretation of airborne magnetic and electromagnetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynin, P.; Zhdanov, M. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Nyquist, J.; Beard, L.; Doll, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The airborne geophysical survey carried out at the Oak Ridge Reservation has shown that AEM can be used in evaluating details of waste areas. However, detection of small objects requires a flight altitude of 10-15 m which is impossible due to natural obstacles present in the Oak Ridge area. In these types of cases, data processing in the downward continuation allows to improve the survey resolution and a normalized gradient provides an additional information about the depth of buried objects.

  20. Data products of NASA Goddard's LiDAR, hyperspectral, and thermal airborne imager (G-LiHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corp, Lawrence A.; Cook, Bruce D.; McCorkel, Joel; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2015-06-01

    Scientists in the Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center have undertaken a unique instrument fusion effort for an airborne package that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR, Hyperspectral, and Thermal components. G-LiHT is a compact, lightweight and portable system that can be used on a wide range of airborne platforms to support a number of NASA Earth Science research projects and space-based missions. G-LiHT permits simultaneous and complementary measurements of surface reflectance, vegetation structure, and temperature, which provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms for mapping plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass, carbon stocks, and plant growth. G-LiHT and its supporting database are designed to give scientists open access to the data that are needed to understand the relationship between ecosystem form and function and to stimulate the advancement of synergistic algorithms. This system will enhance our ability to design new missions and produce data products related to biodiversity and climate change. G-LiHT has been operational since 2011 and has been used to collect data for a number of NASA and USFS sponsored studies, including NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) and the American ICESat/GLAS Assessment of Carbon (AMIGA-Carb). These acquisitions target a broad diversity of forest communities and ecoregions across the United States and Mexico. Here, we will discuss the components of G-LiHT, their calibration and performance characteristics, operational implementation, and data processing workflows. We will also provide examples of higher level data products that are currently available.

  1. Field mapping for heat capacity mapping determinations: Ground support for airborne thermal surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal models independently derived by Watson, Outcalt, and Rosema were compared using similar input data and found to yield very different results. Each model has a varying degree of sensitivity to any specified parameter. Data collected at Pisgah Crater-Lavic Lake was re-examined to indicate serious discrepancy in results for thermal inertia from Jet Lab Propulsion Laboratory calculations, when made using the same orginal data sets.

  2. Crustal structure beneath the Paleozoic Parnaíba Basin revealed by airborne gravity and magnetic data, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castroa, David L.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.; Phillips, Jeffrey D. Phillips; Vidotti, Roberta M.; Bezerra, Francisco H.R.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2014-01-01

    The Parnaíba Basin is a large Paleozoic syneclise in northeastern Brazil underlain by Precambrian crystalline basement, which comprises a complex lithostructural and tectonic framework formed during the Neoproterozoic–Eopaleozoic Brasiliano–Pan African orogenic collage. A sag basin up to 3.5 km thick and 1000 km long formed after the collage. The lithologic composition, structure, and role in the basin evolution of the underlying basement are the focus of this study. Airborne gravity and magnetic data were modeled to reveal the general crustal structure underneath the Parnaíba Basin. Results indicate that gravity and magnetic signatures delineate the main boundaries and structural trends of three cratonic areas and surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts in the basement. Triangular-shaped basement inliers are geophysically defined in the central region of this continental-scale Neoproterozoic convergence zone. A 3-D gravity inversion constrained by seismological data reveals that basement inliers exhibit a 36–40.5 km deep crustal root, with borders defined by a high-density and thinner crust. Forward modeling of gravity and magnetic data indicates that lateral boundaries between crustal units are limited by Brasiliano shear zones, representing lithospheric sutures of the Amazonian and São Francisco Cratons, Tocantins Province and Parnaíba Block. In addition, coincident residual gravity, residual magnetic, and pseudo-gravity lows indicate two complex systems of Eopaleozoic rifts related to the initial phase of the sag deposition, which follow basement trends in several directions.

  3. Characteristics of thermally assisted magnetic recording in granular perpendicular media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of thermally assisted magnetic recording using granular perpendicular media with a single-pole-trimmed head has been investigated. A read/write experiment using a spin stand in which the media were heated by laser irradiation demonstrated that the track average amplitude strongly depends on both the position of the write head relative to the center of the laser spot in the down-track direction and on the laser power. Although the signal-to-noise ratio increased with the coercivity of the media, the increment was small; this is thought to be caused by an increase in the switching field distribution of the media with temperature. Our results suggest that the magnetic constant of the media must be optimized with respect to the temperature of writing in order for high-density thermally assisted magnetic recording to be realized

  4. Magnetic properties related to thermal treatment of pyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Detailed rock magnetic experiments were conducted on high-purity natural crystalline pyrite and its products of thermal treatments in both argon and air atmospheres. In argon atmosphere (reducing environment), the pyrite is altered by heating to magnetite and pyrrhotite; the latter is stable in argon atmosphere, and has coercive force and coercivity of remanence of ~20 and ~30 mT, respectively. Whereas in air, the pyrite is ultimately oxidized to hematite. First order reversal curve (FORC) diagram of the end product shows that the remanence coercivity of hematite is up to ~1400 mT. The corresponding thermal transformation process of pyrite in air can be simply summarized as pyrite→ pyrrhotite→magnetite→hematite. These results are helpful for understanding of sedimentary magnetism, secondary chemical remanence and meteorolite magnetic properties.

  5. Integration of airborne optical and thermal imagery for archaeological subsurface structures detection: the Arpi case study (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, C.; Cavalli, R. M.; Fasulli, L.; Palombo, A.; Pascucci, S.; Santini, F.; Pignatti, S.

    2009-04-01

    archaeological area (southern Italy). We identify, for the selected sites, three main land cover overlying the buried structures: (a) photosynthetic (i.e. green low vegetation), (b) non-photosynthetic vegetation (i.e. yellow, dry low vegetation), and (c) dry bare soil. Afterwards, we analyse the spectral regions showing an inherent potential for the archaeological detection as a function of the land cover characteristics. The classified land cover units have been used in a spectral mixture analysis to assess the land cover fractional abundance surfacing the buried structures (i.e. mark-background system). The classification and unmixing results for the CASI, MIVIS and ATM remote sensing data processing showed a good accordance both in the land cover units and in the subsurface structures identification. The integrated analysis of the unmixing results for the three sensors allowed us to establish that for the land cover characterized by green and dry vegetation (occurrence higher than 75%), the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral regions better enhance the buried man-made structures. In particular, if the structures are covered by more than 75% of vegetation the two most promising wavelengths for their detection are the chlorophyll peak at 0.56 m (Visible region) and the red edge region (0.67 to 0.72 m; NIR region). This result confirms that the variation induced by the subsurface structures (e.g., stone walls, tile concentrations, pavements near the surface, road networks) to the natural vegetation growth and/or colour (i.e., for different stress factors) is primarily detectable by the chlorophyll peak and the red edge region applied for the vegetation stress detection. Whereas, if dry soils cover the structures (occurrence higher than 75%), both the VNIR and thermal infrared (TIR) regions are suitable to detect the subsurface structures. This work demonstrates that airborne reflectances and emissivities data, even though at different spatial/spectral resolutions and

  6. Experimental studies on removal of airborne haloanisoles by non-thermal plasma air purifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Hallam, David; Bermúdez, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to test the performance of non-thermal plasma air purifiers on its removal effectiveness of two haloanisoles – 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-Tribromoanisole (TBA). TCA and TBA are the two major compounds found in wine cellars that can contaminate wine to ...

  7. Insights into the Structure and Surface Geology of Isla Socorro, Mexico, from Airborne Magnetic and Gamma-Ray Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, V.; Gruber, S.; Varley, N.; D'Antonio, M.; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The island of Socorro is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 650 km off the coast of Mexico. It is a rare example of an oceanic volcanic island whose above sea level volume is made up mostly of peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, with subordinate mafic rocks. Subaerial volcanism started several hundred thousand years ago and continues until recent times. We present an investigation of surface and subsurface geology of the island, based on the first detailed extensive geophysical survey on the island. Acquired airborne magnetic and gamma-ray data were compared to existing geological information and supplemented with field investigations and satellite imagery. Magnetic data show a wide minimum in the central part of the island, possibly connected to a high-temperature zone in the deeper central portion of the volcano, likely to be due to a still hot magma body. The data also depict two parallel edges possibly suggesting the existence of a nested caldera. Analysis on upward continued magnetic data by recent imaging techniques highlighted two deep sources located around 5 km b.s.l., interpreted as feeding structures that are now filled with crystalline rocks. Gamma-ray data have been interpreted through integration with the geological survey results. Several previously known volcanic deposits have been identified based on radioelement distribution, and others have been redefined based on field evidence. A new succession of volcanic members is proposed, to be verified through more detailed geological mapping, geochemical analyses of rock samples and radiometric dating.

  8. Thermal effects on the magnetization reversal process and its interpretation in perpendicular magnetic recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kumar; Acharya, B. Ramamurthy; Bertero, Gerardo

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the time-scale and temperature dependence of the magnetization reversal in perpendicular magnetic recording media. One of the under-reported phenomena associated with this reversal is the thermal dependence of the squareness of the magnetic hysteresis loop. Understanding this phenomenon is important because the coercive squareness parameter S∗ is often used to evaluate the strength of the magnetic exchange-coupling interactions between the grains. In this work, we demonstrate that S∗ is a dynamic quantity which depends on the thermal agitation of the magnetization, and it is imperative to take this dependence into account in interpreting magnetic and microstructural effects. Based on the Sharrock model for the dynamic coercivity, we built an expression for the time-scale and temperature dependence of S∗ in highly oriented perpendicular magnetic recording media. Fits of experimental data to the resulting expression were then used to extract the intrinsic squareness parameter Sint∗ which originates in the thermal-independent demagnetization and exchange-interaction effects. Sint∗ was estimated for two sets of perpendicular recording media samples. For the first set of media samples showing progressively smaller grain sizes, the values of S∗ measured at the normal magnetometry time-scales of milliseconds to seconds indicated progressively smaller values. In contrast, the values of the thermal-independent S∗ determined from applying the above model were progressively larger. This discrepancy can only be explained on the basis of progressively stronger intergranular exchange coupling, which is offset by strong thermal effects at small grain sizes. For the second set of media samples with increasingly larger segregant oxide content, progressively smaller values of both S∗ and thermal-independent Sint∗ were observed, thus verifying the strong intergranular segregation effects due to greater nonmagnetic grain boundary phase. The

  9. Magnetic field approaches in dc thermal plasma modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freton, P; Gonzalez, J J; Masquere, M [Laplace, UMR 5213 CNRS-UPS-INP, Universite Paul Sabatier, bat 3R2, 118 rte de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Reichert, Frank, E-mail: pierre.freton@laplace.univ-tlse.fr, E-mail: frank.reichert@siemens.com [Siemens AG, E T HP CB PLM R and D B PB, Nonnendammallee 104, 13629 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    The self-induced magnetic field has an important role in thermal plasma configurations generated by electric arcs as it generates velocity through Lorentz forces. In the models a good representation of the magnetic field is thus necessary. Several approaches exist to calculate the self-induced magnetic field such as the Maxwell-Ampere formulation, the vector potential approach combined with different kinds of boundary conditions or the Biot and Savart (B and S) formulation. The calculation of the self-induced magnetic field is alone a difficult problem and only few papers of the thermal plasma community speak on this subject. In this study different approaches with different boundary conditions are applied on two geometries to compare the methods and their limitations. The calculation time is also one of the criteria for the choice of the method and a compromise must be found between method precision and computation time. The study shows the importance of the current carrying path representation in the electrode on the deduced magnetic field. The best compromise consists of using the B and S formulation on the walls and/or edges of the calculation domain to determine the boundary conditions and to solve the vector potential in a 2D system. This approach provides results identical to those obtained using the B and S formulation over the entire domain but with a considerable decrease in calculation time.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of thermally actuated micromechanical resonators for airborne particle mass sensing: II. Device fabrication and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper, the second of two parts, presents extensive measurement and characterization results on fabricated thermally actuated single-crystal silicon MEMS resonators analyzed in part I. The resonators have been fabricated using a single mask process on SOI substrates. Resonant frequencies in a few hundreds of kHz to a few MHz and equivalent motional conductances as high as 102 mA V−1 have been measured for the fabricated resonators. The measurement results have been compared to the resonator characteristics predicted by the model developed in part I showing a good agreement between the two. Despite the relatively low frequencies, high quality factors (Q) of the order of a few thousand have been measured for the resonators under atmospheric pressure. The mass sensitivities of some of the resonators were characterized by embedding them in a custom-made test setup and deposition of artificially generated aerosol particles with known size and composition. The resulting measured mass sensitivities are of the order of tens to hundreds of Hz ng−1 and are in agreement with the expected values based on the resonator's physical dimensions. Finally, measurement of mass density of arbitrary airborne particles in the surrounding lab environment has been demonstrated

  11. Airborne Thermal Imagery to Detect the Seasonal Evolution of Crop Water Status in Peach, Nectarine and Saturn Peach Orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Bellvert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current scenario of worldwide limited water supplies, conserving water is a major concern in agricultural areas. Characterizing within-orchard spatial heterogeneity in water requirements would assist in improving irrigation water use efficiency and conserve water. The crop water stress index (CWSI has been successfully used as a crop water status indicator in several fruit tree species. In this study, the CWSI was developed in three Prunus persica L. cultivars at different phenological stages of the 2012 to 2014 growing seasons, using canopy temperature measurements of well-watered trees. The CWSI was then remotely estimated using high-resolution thermal imagery acquired from an airborne platform and related to leaf water potential (ѰL throughout the season. The feasibility of mapping within-orchard spatial variability of ѰL from thermal imagery was also explored. Results indicated that CWSI can be calculated using a common non-water-stressed baseline (NWSB, upper and lower limits for the entire growing season and for the three studied cultivars. Nevertheless, a phenological effect was detected in the CWSI vs. ѰL relationships. For a specific given CWSI value, ѰL was more negative as the crop developed. This different seasonal response followed the same trend for the three studied cultivars. The approach presented in this study demonstrated that CWSI is a feasible method to assess the spatial variability of tree water status in heterogeneous orchards, and to derive ѰL maps throughout a complete growing season. A sensitivity analysis of varying pixel size showed that a pixel size of 0.8 m or less was needed for precise ѰL mapping of peach and nectarine orchards with a tree crown area between 3.0 to 5.0 m2.

  12. Controllable magnetic thermal rectification in a SMM dimmer with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-Hua; Liu, Juan; Luo, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Using the quantum master equation, we studied the thermally driven magnonic spin current in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) dimer with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Due to the asymmetric DMI, one can observe the thermal rectifying effect in the case of the spatial symmetry coupling with the thermal reservoirs. The properties of the thermal rectification can be controlled by tuning the angle and intensity of the magnetic field. Specially, when the DM vector and magnetic field point at the specific angles, the thermal rectifying effect disappears. And this phenomenon does not depend on the intensities of DMI and magnetic field, the temperature bias and the magnetic anisotropies of the SMM.

  13. Electron thermal self-energy in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, D

    1995-01-01

    Using the general form of the static energy solutions to the Dirac equation with a magnetic field, we calculate a general self-energy matrix in the Furry-picture. In the limit of high temperatures, but even higher magnetic fields, a self-consistent dispersion relation is solved. In contrast to the high temperature limit, this merely results in a small mass shift. The electron anomalous magnetic moment is calculated. The contribution from thermal fermions is found to be different from the corresponding contribution using perturbation theory and plane-wave external states. In the low temperature limit the self-energy is shown to exhibit de Haas--van Alphen oscillations. In the limit of low temperatures and high densities, the self-energy becomes very large.

  14. Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal history of Mercury's interior is examined using the model of Stevenson et al. (1983), extended to include the effects of tidal heating in Mercury's solid inner core. The implications of Mercury's thermal history for the source of the planet's magnetic field are discussed. It is shown that the major results of this model are similar to the results obtained with the Stevenson et al. model, except for the addition of inner-core tidal dissipation. It is concluded that the extended model properly characterizes Mercury's internal structure and thermal history, and that the criteria for dynamo generation are not properly satisfied. Alternative explanations, including the possibility of a weak thermoelectric dynamo, are examined

  15. Effects of thermal cycling on magnetic properties of lunar analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, A. M.; Shive, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to determine whether stresses associated with thermal cycling cracks can affect the coercivity of remanence carried by iron in lunar samples. Initially, samples were cycled up to 100 times in a refrigerator over a period of about 30 min per cycle. In a second set of experiments, samples were dipped directly into liquid nitrogen up to 100 times at about 1 min per cycle. Comparison of AF demagnetization curves of weak field anhysteretic remanent magnetization before and after cycling revealed no systematic differences. Calculations based on a model of spherical iron grains within olivine or troilite indicate that it is unlikely that the iron will crack under thermal stress. Thus, thermal cycling does not appear to provide an explanation for increasing the stability of remanence in samples from the lunar surface.

  16. G-LiHT: Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal Airborne Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce; Corp, Lawrence; Nelson, Ross; Morton, Douglas; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Masek, Jeffrey; Middleton, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center have developed an ultra-portable, low-cost, multi-sensor remote sensing system for studying the form and function of terrestrial ecosystems. G-LiHT integrates two LIDARs, a 905 nanometer single beam profiler and 1550 nm scanner, with a narrowband (1.5 nanometers) VNIR imaging spectrometer and a broadband (8-14 micrometers) thermal imager. The small footprint (approximately 12 centimeters) LIDAR data and approximately 1 meter ground resolution imagery are advantageous for high resolution applications such as the delineation of canopy crowns, characterization of canopy gaps, and the identification of sparse, low-stature vegetation, which is difficult to detect from space-based instruments and large-footprint LiDAR. The hyperspectral and thermal imagery can be used to characterize species composition, variations in biophysical variables (e.g., photosynthetic pigments), surface temperature, and responses to environmental stressors (e.g., heat, moisture loss). Additionally, the combination of LIDAR optical, and thermal data from G-LiHT is being used to assess forest health by sensing differences in foliage density, photosynthetic pigments, and transpiration. Low operating costs (approximately $1 ha) have allowed us to evaluate seasonal differences in LiDAR, passive optical and thermal data, which provides insight into year-round observations from space. Canopy characteristics and tree allometry (e.g., crown height:width, canopy:ground reflectance) derived from G-LiHT data are being used to generate realistic scenes for radiative transfer models, which in turn are being used to improve instrument design and ensure continuity between LiDAR instruments. G-LiHT has been installed and tested in aircraft with fuselage viewports and in a custom wing-mounted pod that allows G-LiHT to be flown on any Cessna 206, a common aircraft in use throughout the world. G-LiHT is currently being used for forest biomass and growth estimation

  17. Magnetic and optical properties of airborne dust and settling rates at the Phoenix landing site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drube, Line; Leer, Kristoffer; Walter, Goetz;

    2010-01-01

    The Magnetic Properties Experiment (referred to as iSweep or Caltarget) onboard the Phoenix lander was executed in the arctic region of Mars during the mission's 152 sols lifetime. The iSweep experiment involved periodic multispectral imaging of a series of permanent ring magnets. It was designed...... on the precursor Sweep Magnet Experiment onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers near Mars' equator, and also this dust is found to be brighter than both surface soil near the lander and soil in the region surrounding the lander. As most other dust and soils on Mars, the Phoenix dust lacks strong spectral signatures...

  18. Comparison of Magnetic Anomalies of Lithospheric Origin Measured by Satellite and Airborne Magnetometers over Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, R. A.; Coles, R. L.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomaly data from the OGO 2, 4 and 6 (Pogo) satellites are compared with upward-continued aeromagnetic data between 50 deg -85 deg N latitude and 220 deg - 260 deg E longitude. Agreement is good both in anomaly location and in amplitude, giving confidence that it is possible to proceed with the derivation and interpretation of satellite anomaly maps in all parts of the globe. The data contain a magnetic high over the Alpha ridge suggesting continental composition and a magnetic low over the southern Canada basin and northern Canadian Arctic islands (Sverdrup basin). The low in the Sverdrup basin corresponds to a region of high heat flow, suggesting a shallow Curie isotherm. A ridge of high field, with two distinct peaks in amplitude, is found over the northern portion of the platform deposits and a relative high is located in the central portion of the Churchill province. No features are present to indicate a magnetic boundary between Slave and Bear provinces, but a trend change is evident between Slave and Churchill provinces. South of 60 deg latitude a broad magnetic low is located over very thick (40-50 km) crust, interpreted to be a region of low magnetization.

  19. Lanthanide phosphonates: Synthesis, thermal stability and magnetic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amghouz, Z., E-mail: amghouz.uo@uniovi.es [Departamentos de Quimica Fisica y Analitica y Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, J.R.; Garcia-Granda, S. [Departamentos de Quimica Fisica y Analitica y Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Clearfield, A. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States); Rodriguez Fernandez, J.; Pedro, I. de [CITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Blanco, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Report of the complete series of lanthanide 1,4-phenylbis(phosphonate). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis under conventional hydrothermal synthesis or microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cation size is the key factor for the structural and particles size variations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal behaviour is characterized by unusual very high thermal stability. - Abstract: Series of novel organic-inorganic hybrids materials based on trivalent lanthanides (Ln = Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) and 1,4-phenylbis(phosphonate) obtained under hydrothermal conditions either by oven heat or microwave irradiation. The anhydrous compounds containing La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho, are isostructural. However, the compounds based on Y, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu are hydrated and their structures have not yet been solved. The series of compounds are characterized by PXRD, TEM, SEM-EDX and thermal analyses (TG-MS and DSC). TEM study show a variable particles size with a minimum mean-particle size of ca. 30 nm. These compounds exhibit unusual very high thermal stability. The size of particles and the thermal stability are depending on lanthanide(III) cation features. All the investigated materials show paramagnetic behaviour. The magnetic susceptibility data follow a Curie-Weiss laws with paramagnetic effective moments in good agreement with those expected for Ln{sup 3+} free ions.

  20. Measurement of thermal properties of magnetic nanoparticles using infrared thermal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jae Young; Chang, Ki Soo; Kook, Myung Ho;

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are considered promising for biomedical applications such as hyperthermia treatment and disease diagnosis owing to their distinctive thermal properties. For these applications, it is essential to screen the temperature distribution in the targeted disease site. This...... study aimed to investigate and observe the thermal properties of a small amount of MNPs used as highly sensitive biomarkers for disease diagnosis by microthermography. Toward this end, we used polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms containing a small amount of MNPs (30 mg Fe-1). In phantoms, the increasing...

  1. Magnetization strucrure of thermal vent on island arc from vector magnetic anomlies using AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Sayanagi, K.

    2012-04-01

    The geomagnetic anomaly measured by a scalar magnetometer,such as a proton precession magnetometer cannot be defined its direction, then it does not satisfy the Laplace's equation. Therefore physical formula describing the relation between magnetic field and magnetization cannot be established.Because the difference between results obtained from scalar data and from vector data is very significant, we must use vector magnetic field data for magnetization analyses to get the more reliable and exact solutions. The development program of fundamental tools for exploration of deep seabed resources started with the financial support of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT) in 2008 and will end in 2012. In this project, we are developing magnetic exploration tools for seabed resources using AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and other deep-towed vehicles to measure not the scalar magnetic field but the vector magnetic field in order to estimate magnetization structure below the sea-floor exactly and precisely. We conducted AUV magnetic survey in 2010 at the thermal area called Hakurei deposit in the Bayonnaise submarine caldera at the southern end of Izu island arc, about 400km south of Tokyo. We analyzed the observed vector magnetic fields to get the vector magnetic anomaly Fields using the method of Isezaki(1984). We inverted these vector magnetic anomaly fields to magnetization structure. CONCLUSIONS 1.The scalar magnetic field TIA (Total Intensity Anomaly) has no physical formula describing the relation between M (Magnetization) and TIA because TIA does not satisfy the Laplace's equation. Then it is impossible to estimate M from TIA. 2.Anlyses of M using TIA have been done so far under assumption TIA=PTA (Projected Total Anomay on MF (Main Geomagnetic Field)), however, which caused the analysis error due to ɛT= TIA - PTA . 3.We succeeded to measure the vector magnetic anomaly fields using AUV despite the severe magnetic noises

  2. Analysis of the thermal structure of the "Ora del Garda" wind from airborne and surface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiti, L.; Zardi, D.; de Franceschi, M.

    2010-09-01

    Systems of daily-periodic valley winds typically develop in the Alps, driven by the interaction between the thermally forced motion of air masses and the complex orographic configuration. The occurrence of large lakes can mark these phenomena with local peculiarities. This study investigates a well known valley/lake breeze phenomenon, the so-called Ora del Garda. The latter is a diurnal wind originating in the late morning of sunny days on the northern shores of Lake Garda, channelling into the Sarca River Valley and the Lakes Valley nearby, and reaching, on days of greater intensity, the Adige River Valley, where it gets mixed with the local up-valley winds and produces a strong and gusty local flow. The Ora blows very regularly on sunny days under fair weather conditions, from late spring to early autumn, and marks local weather conditions in the area. In order to explore how the development of this wind affects the boundary layer processes in the valleys, and in particular temperature and humidity structures, three measurements campaigns were performed in 1998-1999, including flights of an instrumented light airplane. Each flight trajectory explored three or four sections along the valley at specific locations (namely over the lake coast, at half valley, at the end of the valley). By following spiralling paths on vertical planes oriented either along or cross valley, data allowing detailed pictures of atmospheric structure on these sections were collected. At the same time data from surface weather stations located both on the valley floor and on the sidewall slopes were collected and analysed. In particular measurements from radiometers allowed to monitor the evolution of the radiation forcing the valley wind. For each single section suitable analytical expressions for mean vertical temperature and humidity profiles were first inferred to determine the dominating vertical structure. Then the characteristic spatial scales of variability of local deviations from

  3. Optimal electron, phonon, and magnetic characteristics for low energy thermally induced magnetization switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atxitia, U., E-mail: Unai.Atxitia@uni-konstanz.de [Fachbereich Physik, Universität Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Zukunftskolleg, Universität Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Ostler, T. A., E-mail: t.ostler@exeter.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO105DD (United Kingdom); College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon EX4 4SB (United Kingdom); Chantrell, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO105DD (United Kingdom); Chubykalo-Fesenko, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-11-09

    Using large-scale computer simulations, we thoroughly study the minimum energy required to thermally induced magnetization switching (TIMS) after the application of a femtosecond heat pulse in transition metal-rare earth ferrimagnetic alloys. We find that for an energy efficient TIMS, a low ferrimagnetic net magnetization with a strong temperature dependence is the relevant factor for the magnetic system. For the lattice and electron systems, the key physics for efficient TIMS is a large electron-phonon relaxation time. Importantly, we show that as the cooling time of the heated electrons is increased, the minimum power required to produce TIMS can be reduced by an order of magnitude. Our results show the way to low power TIMS by appropriate engineering of magnetic heterostructures.

  4. Thermal fermionic dispersion relations in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Elmfors, P; Skagerstam, B S; Elmfors, Per; Persson, David; Skagerstam, Bo Sture

    1996-01-01

    The thermal self-energy of an electron in a static uniform magnetic field B is calculated to first order in the fine structure constant \\alpha and to all orders in eB. We use two methods, one based on the Furry picture and another based on Schwinger's proper-time method. As external states we consider relativistic Landau levels with special emphasis on the lowest Landau level. In the high-temperature limit we derive self-consistent dispersion relations for particle and hole excitations, showing the chiral asymmetry caused by the external field. For weak fields, earlier results on the ground- state energy and the anomalous magnetic moment are discussed and compared with the present analysis. In the strong-field limit the appearance of a field-independent imaginary part of the self-energy, related to Landau damping in the e^{+}e^{-} plasma, is pointed out.

  5. Magnetism and thermal evolution of the terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Spohn, T.; Schubert, G.

    1983-01-01

    The absence in the cases of Venus and Mars of the substantial intrinsic magnetic fields of the earth and Mercury is considered, in light of thermal history calculations which suggest that, while the cores of Mercury and the earth are continuing to freeze, the cores of Venus and Mars may still be completely liquid. It is noted that completely fluid cores, lacking intrinsic heat sources, are not likely to sustain thermal convection for the age of the solar system, but cool to a subadiabatic, conductive state that cannot maintain a dynamo because of the gravitational energy release and the chemically driven convection that accompany inner core growth. The models presented include realistic pressure- and composition-dependent freezing curves for the core, and material parameters are chosen so that correct present-day values of heat outflow, upper mantle temperature and viscosity, and inner core radius, are obtained for the earth.

  6. Magnetism and thermal evolution of the terrestrial planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absence in the cases of Venus and Mars of the substantial intrinsic magnetic fields of the earth and Mercury is considered, in light of thermal history calculations which suggest that, while the cores of Mercury and the earth are continuing to freeze, the cores of Venus and Mars may still be completely liquid. It is noted that completely fluid cores, lacking intrinsic heat sources, are not likely to sustain thermal convection for the age of the solar system, but cool to a subadiabatic, conductive state that cannot maintain a dynamo because of the gravitational energy release and the chemically driven convection that accompany inner core growth. The models presented include realistic pressure- and composition-dependent freezing curves for the core, and material parameters are chosen so that correct present-day values of heat outflow, upper mantle temperature and viscosity, and inner core radius, are obtained for the earth. 116 references

  7. Four component magnetized dusty plasma containing non-thermal electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multicomponent plasmas are of great attraction for research in dusty plasmas. In the present research paper, dusty plasma consisting of non-thermal electrons, Maxwellian ions, negatively and positively charged warm adiabatic dust particles, is considered. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation which describes the basic features of the electrostatic solitary structures is derived by use of reductive perturbation method and solved for solitary wave solution. The effect of externally applied magnetic field and non-thermal electrons is found to modify the properties of the dust acoustic solitary potential significantly. The implications of these results for some space and astrophysical dusty plasma systems especially in planetary ring and cometary tails, are briefly mentioned.

  8. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leliaert, J., E-mail: jonathan.leliaert@ugent.be [Department of Electrical Energy, Systems and Automation, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L. [Department of Electrical Energy, Systems and Automation, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Laurson, L. [COMP Centre of Excellence and Helsinki Institute of Physics, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Durin, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); ISI Foundation, Via Alassio 11/c, 10126 Torino (Italy)

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  9. Thermal convection in a nonlinear non-Newtonian magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroze, D.; Pleiner, H.

    2015-09-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on thermal convection of a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid. The viscoelastic properties are described by a general nonlinear viscoelastic model that contains as special cases the standard phenomenological constitutive equations for the stress tensor. In order to explore numerically the system we perform a truncated Galerkin expansion obtaining a generalized Lorenz system with ten modes. We find numerically that the system has stationary, periodic and chaotic regimes. We establish phase diagrams to identify the different dynamical regimes as a function of the Rayleigh number and the viscoelastic material parameters.

  10. Atom Interferometry in Space: Thermal Management and Magnetic Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Milke, Alexander; Gürlebeck, Norman; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the STE-QUEST mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 70 nm or 7x10E-5 % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor $10^5$. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interfe...

  11. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman, E-mail: norman.guerlebeck@zarm.uni-bremen.de; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schuldt, Thilo [DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10{sup −4} % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  12. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10−4 % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 105. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space

  13. Using airborne thermal infrared imagery and helicopter EM conductivity to locate mine pools and discharges in the Kettle Creek watershed, north-central Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, E. (Shaw Environmental, Monroeville, PA); Hammack, R.W.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Sams, J.I.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.

    2005-11-01

    The Kettle Creek watershed contains 50–100-year-old surface and underground coal mines that are a continuing source of acid mine drainage (AMD). To characterize the mining-altered hydrology of this watershed, an airborne reconnaissance was conducted in 2002 using airborne thermal infrared imagery (TIR) and helicopter-mounted electromagnetic (HEM) surveys. TIR uses the temperature differential between surface water and groundwater to locate areas where groundwater emerges at the surface. TIR anomalies located in the survey included seeps and springs, as well as mine discharges. In a follow-up ground investigation, hand-held GPS units were used to locate 103 of the TIR anomalies. Of the sites investigated, 26 correlated with known mine discharges, whereas 27 were previously unknown. Seven known mine discharges previously obscured from TIR imagery were documented. HEM surveys were used to delineate the groundwater table and also to locate mine pools, mine discharges, and groundwater recharge zones. These surveys located 12 source regions and flow paths for acidic, metal-containing (conductive) mine drainage; areas containing acid-generating mine spoil; and areas of groundwater recharge and discharge, as well as identifying potential mine discharges previously obscured from TIR imagery by nondeciduous vegetation. Follow-up ground-based electromagnetic surveys verified the results of the HEM survey. Our study suggests that airborne reconnaissance can make the remediation of large watersheds more efficient by focusing expensive ground surveys on small target areas.

  14. Effect of magnetic field on thermal conductivity and viscosity of a magnetic nanofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahsavar, Amin [Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Saghafian, Mohsen [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafii, M. B. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran(Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The present work examines experimentally the effect of magnetic field on the viscosity and thermal conductivity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The hybrid nanofluid was prepared by using ultrasonic dispersion method. Magnetic field was created by a pair of spaced apart magnet plates. The effect of temperature on the time variation of thermal conductivity under applied magnetic field was also investigated. According to the results of this study, viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the strength of magnetic field, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Additionally, it is found that the hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid at low shear rates while it exhibits Newtonian behavior at high shear rates. Furthermore, results show that when an external magnetic field is applied to the studied magnetic nanofluids, the thermal conductivity experiences a peak.

  15. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Russellville quadrangle, Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Russellville quadrangle in north central Arkansas overlies thick Paleozoic sediments of the Arkoma Basin. These Paleozoics dominate surface exposure except where covered by Quaternary alluvial materials. Examination of available literature shows no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. Eighty-eight groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and most appeared to be of cultural origin. Magnetic data show character that suggest structural and/or lithologic complexity, but imply relatively deep-seated sources

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles for thermal lysis and application in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumana; Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Veerla, Sarath Chandra; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation-therapy are conventional treatment procedure of cancer. Though radiation therapy is very common practice for cancer treatment, it has limitations including incomplete and non specific destruction. Heating characteristics of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) is modelled using molecular dynamics simulation setup. This model would give an understanding for the treatment of cancer cell through MNP associated radiation-therapy. In this paper, alternating magnetic field driven heat generation of MNP is studied using classical molecular dynamics. Temperature is measured as an ensemble average of velocity of the atoms. Temperature stabilization is achieved. Under this simulation setting with certain parameters, 45°C temperature was obtained in our simulations. Simulation data would be helpful for experimental analysis to treat cancerous cell in presence of MNP under exposure to radiofrequency. The in vitro thermal characteristics of magnetite nanoparticles using magnetic coil of various frequencies (5, 7.5, 10 and 15 kHz), the saturation temperature was found at 0.5 mg/mL concentration. At frequency 50 kHz the live/dead and MTT assay was performed on magnetite nanoparticles using MC3T3 cells for 10 min duration. Low radio frequency (RF) radiation induced localized heat into the metallic nanoparticles which is clearly understood using the molecular dynamics simulation setup. Heating of nanoparticle trigger the killing of the tumor cells, acts as a local therapy, as it generates less side effects in comparison to other treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  17. Fast magnetic peak switching for thermal ionization mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Common practice in thermal ionization mass spectrometry is to make repeated and rapid comparisons between isotopes of interest by switching the magnetic deflection field sequentially between the values required to deflect each isotope through the collector slit. After each step in the field value (peak switch) it is necessary to pause before logging data, in order to allow the system response to settle to the point where it does not affect the precision of the isotopic ratio determination. The dynamics of the field stabilization system are the principle contributors to this delay period. The system characteristics applicable to a field-controlled magnet system are analyzed in this paer. Possible areas where the step response may be improved by the application of modern control theory are outlined. It is shown that any field-stabilized magnet system can be optimized for step response by the synthesis of a discrete control system. Discrete digital control, i.e. a software implementation, allows system optimization without the necessity for hardware modification, which would be difficult, expensive and possibility in some cases impractical. (orig.)

  18. An Assessment of Polynomial Regression Techniques for the Relative Radiometric Normalization (RRN of High-Resolution Multi-Temporal Airborne Thermal Infrared (TIR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mustafizur Rahman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal Infrared (TIR remote sensing images of urban environments are increasingly available from airborne and satellite platforms. However, limited access to high-spatial resolution (H-res: ~1 m TIR satellite images requires the use of TIR airborne sensors for mapping large complex urban surfaces, especially at micro-scales. A critical limitation of such H-res mapping is the need to acquire a large scene composed of multiple flight lines and mosaic them together. This results in the same scene components (e.g., roads, buildings, green space and water exhibiting different temperatures in different flight lines. To mitigate these effects, linear relative radiometric normalization (RRN techniques are often applied. However, the Earth’s surface is composed of features whose thermal behaviour is characterized by complexity and non-linearity. Therefore, we hypothesize that non-linear RRN techniques should demonstrate increased radiometric agreement over similar linear techniques. To test this hypothesis, this paper evaluates four (linear and non-linear RRN techniques, including: (i histogram matching (HM; (ii pseudo-invariant feature-based polynomial regression (PIF_Poly; (iii no-change stratified random sample-based linear regression (NCSRS_Lin; and (iv no-change stratified random sample-based polynomial regression (NCSRS_Poly; two of which (ii and iv are newly proposed non-linear techniques. When applied over two adjacent flight lines (~70 km2 of TABI-1800 airborne data, visual and statistical results show that both new non-linear techniques improved radiometric agreement over the previously evaluated linear techniques, with the new fully-automated method, NCSRS-based polynomial regression, providing the highest improvement in radiometric agreement between the master and the slave images, at ~56%. This is ~5% higher than the best previously evaluated linear technique (NCSRS-based linear regression.

  19. Thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a HTS NMR magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Se Hwan; Hong, Yong Jun; Yeom, Han Kil; Ko, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The superconducting NMR magnets have used cryogen such as liquid helium for their cooling. The conduction cooling method using cryocoolers, however, makes the cryogenic cooling system for NMR magnets more compact and user-friendly than the cryogen cooling method. This paper describes the thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a 400 MHz HTS NMR magnet, focusing on the magnet assembly. The highly thermo-conductive cooling plates between HTS double pancake coils are used to transfer the heat generated in coils, namely Joule heating at lap splice joints, to thermal link blocks and finally the cryocooler. The conduction cooling structure of the HTS magnet assembly preliminarily designed is verified by thermal and structural analysis. The orthotropic thermal properties of the HTS coil, thermal contact resistance and radiation heat load are considered in the thermal analysis. The thermal analysis confirms the uniform temperature distribution for the present thermal design of the NMR magnet within 0.2 K. The mechanical stress and the displacement by the electromagnetic force and the thermal contraction are checked to verify structural stability. The structural analysis indicates that the mechanical stress on each component of the magnet is less than its material yield strength and the displacement is acceptable in comparison with the magnet dimension.

  20. Magnetovisual method for monitoring thermal demagnetization of permanent magnets used in magnetostrictive actuators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Kaleta; P. Wiewiórski

    2014-01-01

    The design and measuring potential of the latest generation of the magnetic scanner called Magscanner-Maglab System (MMS) was presented. It enabled the fast acquisition of 3D signals from magnetic sensors and their visualization as digitalized mag-netic images. This system was used for monitoring of a thermal demagnetization process of permanent magnets. The original method and measurement devices were capable for examination of magnetic, mechanical and thermal defects in cylindrical rods made of NdFeB and non-rare earth components. Effectiveness of the method and device was tested for the reference demagnetized magnet dedicated for magnetostrictive actuators.

  1. Thermal remote sensing from Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner data in the framework of the SPARC and SEN2FLEX projects: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The AHS (Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner instrument has 80 spectral bands covering the visible and near infrared (VNIR, short wave infrared (SWIR, mid infrared (MIR and thermal infrared (TIR spectral range. The instrument is operated by Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aerospacial (INTA, and it has been involved in several field campaigns since 2004.

    This paper presents an overview of the work performed with the AHS thermal imagery provided in the framework of the SPARC and SEN2FLEX campaigns, carried out respectively in 2004 and 2005 over an agricultural area in Spain. The data collected in both campaigns allowed for the first time the development and testing of algorithms for land surface temperature and emissivity retrieval as well as the estimation of evapotranspiration from AHS data. Errors were found to be around 1.5 K for land surface temperature and 1 mm/day for evapotranspiration.

  2. Thermal remote sensing from Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner data in the framework of the SPARC and SEN2FLEX projects: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Sobrino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The AHS (Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner instrument has 80 spectral bands covering the visible and near infrared (VNIR, short wave infrared (SWIR, mid infrared (MIR and thermal infrared (TIR spectral range. The instrument is operated by Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aerospacial (INTA, and it has been involved in several field campaigns since 2004.

    This paper presents an overview of the work performed with the AHS thermal imagery provided in the framework of the SPARC and SEN2FLEX campaigns, carried out respectively in 2004 and 2005 over an agricultural area in Spain. The data collected in both campaigns allowed for the first time the development and testing of algorithms for land surface temperature and emissivity retrieval as well as the estimation of evapotranspiration from AHS data. Errors were found to be around 1.5 K for land surface temperature and 1 mm/day for evapotranspiration.

  3. Developing a semi/automated protocol to post-process large volume, High-resolution airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery for urban waste heat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mir Mustafizur

    In collaboration with The City of Calgary 2011 Sustainability Direction and as part of the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) project, the focus of this research is to develop a semi/automated 'protocol' to post-process large volumes of high-resolution (H-res) airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to enable accurate urban waste heat mapping. HEAT is a free GeoWeb service, designed to help Calgary residents improve their home energy efficiency by visualizing the amount and location of waste heat leaving their homes and communities, as easily as clicking on their house in Google Maps. HEAT metrics are derived from 43 flight lines of TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) data acquired on May 13--14, 2012 at night (11:00 pm--5:00 am) over The City of Calgary, Alberta (˜825 km 2) at a 50 cm spatial resolution and 0.05°C thermal resolution. At present, the only way to generate a large area, high-spatial resolution TIR scene is to acquire separate airborne flight lines and mosaic them together. However, the ambient sensed temperature within, and between flight lines naturally changes during acquisition (due to varying atmospheric and local micro-climate conditions), resulting in mosaicked images with different temperatures for the same scene components (e.g. roads, buildings), and mosaic join-lines arbitrarily bisect many thousands of homes. In combination these effects result in reduced utility and classification accuracy including, poorly defined HEAT Metrics, inaccurate hotspot detection and raw imagery that are difficult to interpret. In an effort to minimize these effects, three new semi/automated post-processing algorithms (the protocol) are described, which are then used to generate a 43 flight line mosaic of TABI-1800 data from which accurate Calgary waste heat maps and HEAT metrics can be generated. These algorithms (presented as four peer-reviewed papers)---are: (a) Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN)---used to mitigate the microclimatic

  4. Geological interpretation of Eastern Cuba Laterites from an airborne magnetic and radioactive isotope survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, J.A; Blanco, J [Departamento de Geologia, Instituto Superior Minero Metalurgico de Moa, (Cuba); Perez-Flores, M.A [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2008-04-15

    In eastern Cuba area several geophysical techniques have been applied to distinguish the main geological characteristics of the laterites which are of economical importance for the extraction of iron, nickel and chrome. The geophysical measurements include an aeromagnetic survey and thorium (eTh), potassium (K) and uranium (eU) isotope measurements. The results of gamma spectrometer measurements make a distinction between laterite reservoirs. The application of the magnetic and isotope methods allowed the determination of the distribution and development of the laterite crust, as well as the determination of hydrothermal alterations affecting the laterites, which is very useful for mining exploration and exploitation. Such alterations indicate the presence of silicates, which have negative effects on the metallurgic process. It is known that laterite crust has a high content of eU and eTh. [Spanish] Se han utilizado varias tecnicas geofisicas en la region oriental de Cuba para distinguir las principales caracteristicas geologicas de las lateritas, que poseen importancia economica para la extraccion de hierro, niquel y cobalto. Las mediciones geofisicas incluyen un estudio aeromagnetico y mediciones de isotopos de torio (eTh), potasio (K) y uranio (eU). Los resultados de las mediciones espectrometricas establecen diferencias entre los yacimientos de lateritas. De la aplicacion del metodo magnetico e isotopico se determino la distribucion y desarrollo de las cortezas lateriticas, asi como la ubicacion de alteraciones hidrotermales que afectan a las lateritas, lo cual es muy util durante la exploracion y explotacion minera. Esas alteraciones indican la presencia de silicatos, que tienen un efecto negativo en el proceso metalurgico. Se conoce que las cortezas lateriticas tienen altos contenidos de eU y eTh. De los contenidos de eU y eTh se infiere que las lateritas de la region de Moa se formaron antes que las de Mayari. De estas mediciones fue posible inferir el

  5. Thermal and magnetic properties of chitosan-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula I P; Machado, Diana; Laia, César; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-09-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer widely used for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue engineering. Chitosan can be used as coating for other types of materials such as iron oxide nanoparticles, improving its biocompatibility while extending its range of applications. In this work iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) produced by chemical precipitation and thermal decomposition and coated with chitosan with different molecular weights were studied. Basic characterization on bare and chitosan-Fe3O4 NPs was performed demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and superparamagnetic properties of the Fe3O4 NPs, and also the incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into chitosan nanoparticles increases the later hydrodynamic diameter without compromising its physical and chemical properties. The nano-composite was tested for magnetic hyperthermia by applying an alternating current magnetic field to the samples demonstrating that the heating ability of the Fe3O4 NPs was not significantly affected by chitosan.

  6. Chiral Charge Erasure via Thermal Fluctuations of Magnetic Helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We consider a relativistic plasma of fermions coupled to an Abelian gauge field and carrying a chiral charge asymmetry, which might arise in the early Universe through baryogenesis. It is known that on large length scales, $\\lambda \\gtrsim 1/(\\alpha \\mu_5)$, the chiral anomaly opens an instability toward the erasure of chiral charge and growth of magnetic helicity. Here the chemical potential $\\mu_{5}$ parametrizes the chiral asymmetry and $\\alpha$ is the fine-structure constant. We study the process of chiral charge erasure through the thermal fluctuations of magnetic helicity and contrast with the well-studied phenomenon of Chern-Simons number diffusion. Through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem we estimate the amplitude and time scale of helicity fluctuations on the length scale $\\lambda$, finding $\\delta \\mathcal{H} \\sim \\lambda T$ and $\\tau \\sim \\alpha \\lambda^3 T^2$ for a relativistic plasma at temperature $T$. We argue that the presence of a chiral asymmetry allows the helicity to grow diffusively fo...

  7. Thermal and magnetic properties of chitosan-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Paula I P; Machado, Diana; Laia, César; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-09-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer widely used for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue engineering. Chitosan can be used as coating for other types of materials such as iron oxide nanoparticles, improving its biocompatibility while extending its range of applications. In this work iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) produced by chemical precipitation and thermal decomposition and coated with chitosan with different molecular weights were studied. Basic characterization on bare and chitosan-Fe3O4 NPs was performed demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and superparamagnetic properties of the Fe3O4 NPs, and also the incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into chitosan nanoparticles increases the later hydrodynamic diameter without compromising its physical and chemical properties. The nano-composite was tested for magnetic hyperthermia by applying an alternating current magnetic field to the samples demonstrating that the heating ability of the Fe3O4 NPs was not significantly affected by chitosan. PMID:27261762

  8. Thermal entanglement in a mixed-spin Heisenberg XXZ model under a nonuniform external magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The thermal entanglement in (1/2,1) mixed-spin Heisenberg XXZ model is investigated under an external nonuniform magnetic field. In the uniform magnetic field system,the critical magnetic field Bc and critical temperature Tc are increased by increasing the anisotropic parameter k. The degree of magnetic field b plays an important role in improving the critical temperature and enlarging the region of entan-glement in the nonuniform magnetic field system.

  9. Magnetic and thermal properties of high Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonchoon.

    1990-09-21

    Measurements of the normal state magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, Bi{sub 1.8}Pb{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}, and Bi{sub 2{minus}x}Pb{sub x}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10+{delta}} (x = 0.2 and 0.25) were carried out. All {chi}(T) data show negative curvature below {approximately}2{Tc}. The data for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} are in excellent agreement with a new calculation of the superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism. From the analysis, we infer s-wave pairing and microscopic parameters are obtained. For {chi}(T) of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, part of the negative curvature is inferred to arise from the normal state background. We find a strong temperature dependent anisotropy {delta}{chi} {equivalent to} {chi}{sub c} {minus} {chi}{sub ab} and estimate the normal state spin contributions to {chi}(T). The heat capacity C(T) of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} is reported for 0.4 K < T < 400 K in zero and 70 kG magnetic fields. In addition to the feature associated with the onset of the superconductivity at {Tc}, two anomalies in C(T) were observed near 74 K and 330 K, with another possible anomaly near 102 K; the temperatures at which they occur correlate with anomalies in {chi}(T) and ultransonic measurements. The occurrence of the anomaly at {approx equal} 330 K is found to be sample-dependent. The influences of a magnetic field and the thermal and/or magnetic field treatment history dependence of a pellet sample on C(T), the entropy and the influence of superconducting fluctuations on C(T) near {Tc}, and the possible source of the observed intrinsic nonzero {gamma}(0) at low T are discussed.

  10. Thermally induced magnetization switching in Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001): selectable magnetic configurations by temperature and field control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Vidal, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Eddrief, Mahmoud; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Etgens, Victor H.; Popescu, Horia; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetization control by external magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents. Developing temperature-driven magnetization control has potential for achieving enhanced device functionalities. Recently, there has been much interest in thermally induced magnetisation switching (TIMS), where the temperature control of intrinsic material properties drives a deterministic switching without applying external fields. TIMS, mainly investigated in rare-earth–transition-metal ferrimagnets, has also been observed in epitaxial Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001), where it stems from a completely different physical mechanism. In Fe/MnAs temperature actually modifies the surface dipolar fields associated with the MnAs magnetic microstructure. This in turn determines the effective magnetic field acting on the Fe overlayer. In this way one can reverse the Fe magnetization direction by performing thermal cycles at ambient temperatures. Here we use element selective magnetization measurements to demonstrate that various magnetic configurations of the Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001) system are stabilized predictably by acting on the thermal cycle parameters and on the presence of a bias field. We show in particular that the maximum temperature reached during the cycle affects the final magnetic configuration. Our findings show that applications are possible for fast magnetization switching, where local temperature changes are induced by laser excitations. PMID:25631753

  11. Effects of terbium sulfide addition on magnetic properties, microstructure and thermal stability of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang-Bin, Li; Shuo, Liu; Xue-Jing, Cao; Bei-Bei, Zhou; Ling, Chen; A-Ru, Yan; Gao-Lin, Yan

    2016-07-01

    To increase coercivity and thermal stability of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets for high-temperature applications, a novel terbium sulfide powder is added into (Pr0.25Nd0.75)30.6Cu0.15FebalB1 (wt.%) basic magnets. The effects of the addition of terbium sulfide on magnetic properties, microstructure, and thermal stability of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets are investigated. The experimental results show that by adding 3 wt.% Tb2S3, the coercivity of the magnet is remarkably increased by about 54% without a considerable reduction in remanence and maximum energy product. By means of the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) technology, it is observed that Tb is mainly present in the outer region of 2:14:1 matrix grains and forms a well-developed Tb-shell phase, resulting in enhancement of H A, which accounts for the coercivity enhancement. Moreover, compared with Tb2S3-free magnets, the reversible temperature coefficients of remanence (α) and coercivity (β) and the irreversible flux loss of magnetic flow (h irr) values of Tb2S3-added magnets are improved, indicating that the thermal stability of the magnets is also effectively improved. Project supported by the Science Funds from the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant Nos. 2014DFB50130 and 2011CB612304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51172168 and 51072139).

  12. Effects of terbium sulfide addition on magnetic properties, microstructure and thermal stability of sintered Nd Fe B magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李向斌; 刘硕; 曹学静; 周贝贝; 陈岭; 闫阿儒; 严高林

    2016-01-01

    To increase coercivity and thermal stability of sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets for high-temperature applications, a novel terbium sulfide powder is added into (Pr0.25Nd0.75)30.6Cu0.15FebalB1 (wt.%) basic magnets. The effects of the addition of terbium sulfide on magnetic properties, microstructure, and thermal stability of sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets are investigated. The experimental results show that by adding 3 wt.% Tb2S3, the coercivity of the magnet is remarkably increased by about 54%without a considerable reduction in remanence and maximum energy product. By means of the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) technology, it is observed that Tb is mainly present in the outer region of 2:14:1 matrix grains and forms a well-developed Tb-shell phase, resulting in enhancement of HA, which accounts for the coercivity enhancement. Moreover, compared with Tb2S3-free magnets, the reversible temperature coefficients of remanence (α) and coercivity (β) and the irreversible flux loss of magnetic flow (hirr) values of Tb2S3-added magnets are improved, indicating that the thermal stability of the magnets is also effectively improved.

  13. Mechanical and Thermal Characteristics of Insulation Materials for the KSTAR Magnet System at Cryogenic Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wooho; Lim, Bungsu; Kim, Myungkyu; Park, Hyunki; Kim, Keeman; Chu, Yong; Lee, Sangil

    2004-06-01

    The KSTAR(Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) superconducting magnet is electrically insulated by the composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber (2.5 kV/mm) and Kapton (8 kV/mm). The insulation composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber is prepared using a VPI (Vacuum Pressure Impregnation) process. The superconducting magnet is under mechanical stress caused by the large temperature difference between the operation temperature of the magnet and room temperature. The large electro-magnetic force during the operation of the magnet is also exerted on the magnet. Therefore, the characteristics of the insulation material at cryogenic temperatures are very important and the tensile stress and thermal expansion coefficient for the insulation materials of the KSTAR superconducting magnet are measured. This paper presents results on mechanical properties of the insulation material for KSTAR magnets, such as density, ultimate tensile stress and thermal contraction between room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy.

  15. Thermally driven transverse transports and magnetic dynamics on a topological surface capped with a ferromagnet strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Shi-Han; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically study thermally driven transport of the Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator capped with a ferromagnet strip. The generation and manipulation of anomalous Hall and Nernst effects are analyzed, in which the in-plane magnetization of the ferromagnet film is found to take a decisive role. This scenario is distinct from that modulated by Berry phase where the in-plane magnetization is independent. We further discuss the thermal spin-transfer torque as a backaction of the thermoelectric transports on the magnetization and calculate the dynamics of the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects self-consistently. It is found that the magnitude of the long-time steady Hall and Nernst conductance is determined by competition between the magnetic anisotropy and current-induced effective anisotropy. These results open up a possibility of magnetically controlling the transverse thermoelectric transports or thermally manipulating the magnet switching.

  16. Measure Analysis on Magnetic Effect of Airborne Products%航空机载产品磁影响测量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛洪涛

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the technical requirements and the measuring method of magnetic influence measuring standard for the airborne products. And it deeply analyzes the principle of magnetic effect measurement, clarifies the confusing certainty principles for magnetic effect'limit value in the standard, and detailedly explains the method for magnetometer to measure magnetic effect. It shows that only converting the deflection angle limit into the magnetic field intensity limit, can the operation for digital magnetometer be convenient.%介绍了航空机载产品磁影响测量标准的技术要求和测量方法,深入剖析了磁影响测量的原理,澄清了标准中容易混淆的磁影响限值的确定原则,详细解释了磁强计测量磁影响的方法,经过实践检验,这种磁强计测量航空机载产品磁影响的方法准确可靠。

  17. The Experimental Analysis on the Thermal and Electrical Characteristics of Impregnating Materials for Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, a development of Coated Conductor (CC) that is a called the second generation superconductor tape is opened out. Therefore a commercialization of superconducting power equipments will be realized presently. To realize a commercialization, it is necessary to develop a stable superconducting magnet. A superconducting magnet has to keep thermal stability as well as electrical stability. In this paper, thermal conductivity of impregnating materials, epoxy compounds, was measured at 65K, 77K, 100K and 200K. Dielectric Strength of superconducting magnet modeled electrode system with impregnating materials was also analyzed. Stycast[reg] blue/catalyst 23LV is good materials to apply to the superconducting magnets

  18. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.; Pancaldi, M.; Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Curtis, J.; King, W. P.; Papp, A.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W.; Vavassori, P.; Riedo, E.; Bertacco, R.

    2016-06-01

    The search for novel tools to control magnetism at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of new paradigms in optics, electronics and spintronics. So far, the fabrication of magnetic nanostructures has been achieved mainly through irreversible structural or chemical modifications. Here, we propose a new concept for creating reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns by crafting, at the nanoscale, the magnetic anisotropy landscape of a ferromagnetic layer exchange-coupled to an antiferromagnetic layer. By performing localized field cooling with the hot tip of a scanning probe microscope, magnetic structures, with arbitrarily oriented magnetization and tunable unidirectional anisotropy, are reversibly patterned without modifying the film chemistry and topography. This opens unforeseen possibilities for the development of novel metamaterials with finely tuned magnetic properties, such as reconfigurable magneto-plasmonic and magnonic crystals. In this context, we experimentally demonstrate spatially controlled spin wave excitation and propagation in magnetic structures patterned with the proposed method.

  19. Physical, Thermal, Magnetic and Mechanical Properties of ARAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Y. B.; Lee, D. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, C. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon, (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The mechanical properties of total ninety-eight model alloys designed for application to HCCR TBM in the ITER were evaluated. The addition of small amounts of Zr was found to have positive effects on creep and impact resistance, based on which Zr-containing reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel, ARAA, has been developed. A 5-ton scale ARAA was produced via VIM and ESR methods and its basic properties required for fusion reactor applications were evaluated. It is found that the physical, thermal, magnetic and mechanical properties of ARAA are comparable to those of Eurofer 97. Reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel is considered a primary candidate for the structural material in a fusion reactor, owing to its good swelling resistance and compatibility with various coolants. Several types of RAFM steels showing good performance have been developed, which include the European Eurofer 97 and the Japanese F82H. For these alloys, an extensive materials database is available. The structural materials for the blanket system is expected to be subjected to high heat-load and operate under high-energy (14 MeV) and high-fluence fusion neutron irradiation. The operational range of temperature for a blanket is limited by the high-temperature creep and low-temperature irradiation embrittlement of the structural material. RAFM steels developed thus far are known to be operable at 350-550 .deg. C. To expand the temperature window and thereby allow for various design options, it is important to develop alloys that are able to withstand high temperature and high-energy neutron irradiation.

  20. Magnetization reversal and negative volume thermal expansion in Fe doped Ca2RuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, T. F.; Yuan, S. J.; Ye, F.; Chi, S.; Terzic, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, Z.; Liu, X.; Parkin, S.; Mao, W. L.; Cao, G.

    We report structural, magnetic, transport and thermal properties of single-crystal Ca2Ru1-xFexO4 (0 pressure, magnetic field and temperature. The central findings of this work are a pronounced magnetization reversal and a negative thermal expansion that are induced by Fe doping. Our results including neutron diffraction data suggest that the magnetization reversal is primarily a result of different temperature dependences of two antiparallel, competing Ru and Fe sublattices and that the negative thermal expansion is achieved via magnetic and metal-insulator transitions. We will present and discuss our results with comparison drawn with relevant systems. This work was supported by the NSF via Grant No. DMR-1265162.

  1. Nonreciprocal phase shift caused by magnetic-thermal coupling of a polarization maintaining fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengwei; Zhao, Yuxiang; Fu, Wenlan; Zhou, Wenqing; Liu, Cheng; Shu, Xiaowu; Che, Shuangliang

    2014-03-15

    A theory for nonreciprocal phase shift caused by cross coupling generated in a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) under the combined action of magnetic and temperature fields is proposed. The magnetic-thermal coupling in the FOG originates from the interaction of the magnetic field, fiber twist, birefringence caused by thermal stress, and the intrinsic and bending birefringence of the fiber. The cross coupling changes with temperature. When the PM fiber has a diameter of 250 μm, beat length of 3 mm, length of 500 m, twist rate of 1  rad/m, and optical source wavelength of 1310 nm, the maximum degree of magnetic-thermal coupling generated by a 1 mT radial magnetic field within the temperature range of -20°C  to 60°C is -5.47%.

  2. Evapotranspiration from Airborne Simulators as a Proxy Datasets for NASA's ECOSTRESS mission - A new Thermal Infrared Instrument on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S. J.; Olioso, A.; Sanchez, J. M.; Drewry, D.; Running, S. W.; Fisher, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Surface evapotranspiration (ET) represents the loss of water from the Earth's surface both by soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration processes. ET is a key climate variable linking the water, carbon, and energy cycles, and is very sensitive to changes in atmospheric forcing and soil water content. The response of ET to water and heat stress directly affects the surface energy balance and temperature which can be measured by thermal infrared remote sensing observations. The NASA ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) will be deployed in 2019 to address critical questions on plant-water dynamics, ecosystem productivity and future ecosystem changes with climate through an optimal combination of thermal infrared measurements in 5 spectral bands between 8-12 µm with pixel sizes of 38×57 m and an average revisit of 5 days over the contiguous United States at varying times of day. Two instruments capable of providing proxy datasets are the MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) airborne simulator and Hyperspectral Thermal Emissions Spectrometer (HyTES). This study is focused on estimating evapotranspiration using shortwave and thermal infrared remote sensing observations from these instruments. The thermal infrared data from MASTER/HyTES is used as a proxy dataset for ECOSTRESS to demonstrate the capability of the future spaceborne system to derive ET and water stress information from thermal based retrievals of land surface temperature. MASTER and HyTES data collected from 2004 to present over the Western United States at different seasons are used to test and evaluate different ET algorithms using ground-based measurements. Selected algorithms are 1) explicitly based on surface energy budget calculation or 2) based on the Penman-Monteith equation and use information on land surface temperature to estimate the surface resistance to convective fluxes. We use ground data from the Fluxnet and Ameriflux networks, and from permanent validation

  3. Modifying the growth morphology of aluminum crystals by magnetic mirror in a thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of magnetic fields on growth morphology of aluminum crystals was studied in a fluidized bed thermal plasma reactor assisted by magnetic mirrors. Aluminum crystals were precipitated in the reactor using aluminum powder or aluminum-graphite mixture as precursors. The absent of magnetic field was also studied for comparison. Products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Results indicated that, regardless the precursor used, it was observed the presence of aluminum nanowires when the external magnetic mirror was applied, suggesting that magnetic fields are able to modify growth morphology at nanoscale

  4. Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Woetzel, Mathias; Rhensius, J.;

    2010-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions in Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanowires at room temperature. We show that this purely thermal motion is well described by an Arrhenius law, allowing for a description...... magnetization gradients present....

  5. Thermal stability, thermal expansion and grain-growth in exchange-coupled Fe-Pt-Ag-B bulk nanocomposite magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicula, R., E-mail: radu.nicula@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Advanced Materials Processing, Feuerwerkerstr. 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Crisan, O.; Crisan, A.D.; Mercioniu, I. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Stir, M. [University of Berne, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freiestrasse 3, CH-3012 Berne (Switzerland); Vasiliu, F. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Formation of the L10 FePt hard-magnetic phase (>90%) directly in the as-cast state. • Specific alternating hard/soft nanostructure is stable to 600 °C without grain growth. • Anisotropic and non-linear thermal expansion effects. • The FePtAgB alloy behaves like a single magnetic phase (full exchange coupling). - Abstract: Rare-earth free (RE-free) exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets are intensively studied nowadays due to their potential use in applications demanding stable high-temperature operation and corrosion resistance. In this respect, the FePt alloy system is one of the most actively addressed potential permanent magnet solutions. In FePt alloys, promising magnetic features arise from the co-existence of hard magnetic L1{sub 0} FePt and soft magnetic L1{sub 2} Fe{sub 3}Pt phases emerged from the same metastable precursor. The present work deals with an in-situ temperature-resolved synchrotron radiation study of the thermal stability, thermal expansion and microstructure evolution in exchange-coupled FePtAgB alloys. The as-cast microstructural state as well as the optimized magnetic behavior are given as reference and correlated to the observed microstructural evolution with temperature. The melt-spun Fe{sub 48}Pt{sub 28}Ag{sub 6}B{sub 18} alloy ribbons were examined in situ by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction from ambient temperature up to 600 °C. The FePt-Fe{sub 3}Pt exchange-coupled microstructure achieved by rapid solidification is not significantly altered during the high temperature exposure. The thermal expansion of the FePt L1{sub 0} unit cell has been found to be strongly anisotropic, being essentially an in-plane expansion which may be seen as an anisotropic invar effect. For the FePt L1{sub 0} phase, a significant deviation from linear thermal expansion is observed at the Curie temperature T{sub C} = 477 °C. This non-linear behavior above T{sub C} is tentatively linked to a diffusion/segregation mechanism of Ag

  6. Relation between Charpy impact properties and magnetism in thermally aged Fe-Cu model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrates the possibility of applying magnetic methods to pressure vessel surveillance for irradiation embrittlement at nuclear power plants. Charpy impact test and magnetic hesteresis measurement were preformed on thermally aged Fe-1.0wt%Cu model alloys with and without pre-deformation. DBTT increased with increasing aging time. However, magnetic hysteresis parameters showed nonmonotonical changes. The phenomena are discussed in terms of Cu precipitation behavior and dislocation structure. (author)

  7. Thermally-Activated Magnetic Reversal Induced by a Spin-Polarized Current

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, E. B.; Albert, F. J.; Saneky, J. C.; Bonet, E.; Buhrman, R. A.; Ralph, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the statistical properties of magnetic reversal in nanomagnets driven by a spin-polarized current. Like reversal induced by a magnetic field, spin-transfer-driven reversal near room temperature exhibits the properties of thermally-activated escape over an effective barrier. However, the spin-transfer effect produces qualitatively different behaviors than an applied magnetic field. We discuss an effective current vs. field phase diagram. If the current and field are tuned so t...

  8. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  9. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic separation using cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet was applied for the purification of condenser water. Iron oxides in condenser water were effectively removed by superconducting magnetic separation. The effect of magnetic field strength and filter size was determined. Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly α-Fe2O3 (hematite) and γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  10. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, D.W., E-mail: dwha@keri.re.kr [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 642-120 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J.M.; Baik, S.K.; Lee, Y.J. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 642-120 (Korea, Republic of); Han, K.S. [Korea South-East Power Co., Goseong 638-932 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, R.K.; Sohn, M.H.; Seong, K.C. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 642-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic separation using cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet was applied for the purification of condenser water. Iron oxides in condenser water were effectively removed by superconducting magnetic separation. The effect of magnetic field strength and filter size was determined. Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  11. Electromagnetic, stress and thermal analysis of the Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China, the design of a superconducting magnet project as a test facility of the Nb3Sn coil or NbTi coil for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) has been carried out not only to estimate the relevant conductor performance but also to implement a background magnetic field for CFETR CS insert and toroidal field (TF) insert coils. The superconducting magnet is composed of two parts: the inner part with Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and the outer part with NbTi CICC. Both parts are connected in series and powered by a single DC power supply. The superconducting magnet can be cooled with supercritical helium at inlet temperature of 4.5 K. The total inductance and stored energy of the superconducting magnet are about 0.278 H and 436.6 MJ at an operating current of 56 kA respectively. An active quench protection circuit was adopted to transfer the stored magnetic energy of the superconducting ...

  12. Microwaves in Airborne Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of microwave spectrum is widespread due to its convenience. Therefore, enormous amount of information is available in the free space channel. Obviously, mining this channel for surveillance is quite common. Airborne surveillance offers significant advantages in military operations. This paper talks of the usage of microwaves in airborne surveillance systems, in general, and in the Indian airborne early warning and control (AEW&C System, in particular. It brings out the multiple sub-systems onboard the aircraft comprising the AEW&C system and their spectral coverage. Co-location of several systems has its own problems and resolving them in terms of geometric location, frequency band and time of operation are covered. AEW&C, being an airborne system, has several other requirements  including minimal weight, volume and power considerations, lightning protection, streamlining, structural integrity, thermal management, vibration tolerance, corrosion prevention, erosion resistance, static charge discharge capability, bird strike resilience, etc. The methods adopted to cater to all these requirements in the microwave systems that are used in the AEW&C system are discussed. Paper ultimately speaks of the microwave systems that are designed and developed for the Indian AEW&C system to surmount these unusual constraints.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(2, pp.138-144, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4255

  13. Measurement of FePt thermal properties relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Alex; Treves, David; Le, Thanh; Zong, Fenghua; Ajan, Antony; Acharya, Ramamurthy

    2014-05-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is the likely successor of the conventional perpendicular magnetic recording. Due to its high anisotropy, graded L10 ordered FePt is widely used as a HAMR recording layer. Electrically insulating MgO under-layer is essential for growing FePt in HAMR media. Experimentally, we observe very low thermal conductivity of FePt and significant thermal boundary resistance between FePt and MgO, whose magnitudes affect the HAMR thermal gradient. Realistic granular FePt media has >30% segregation, and, experimentally, we observe that FePt thermal properties are affected by segregation. We utilized time domain thermo-reflectance (TDTR) technique for studying FePt thermal conductivity and boundary resistance in realistic HAMR media stack. 1D finite element heat transport model was used for fitting experimental TDTR data and extracting thermal conductivities and related thermal boundary resistances. We found best fit thermal conductivity value for non-segregated FePt is as low as 13 W/mK. When reasonable amount of segregation (30%) is added, thermal conductivity reduces from 13 W/mK to 6 W/mK, and thermal boundary resistance to MgO reduces from 3.5 × 10-9 m2K/W to 0.7 × 10-9 m2K/W.

  14. Effect of Magnetic Field on Thermal Instability of Oldroydian Viscoelastic Rotating Fluid in Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, R. C.; Rana, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of a vertical magnetic field on thermal instability of an Oldroydian visco-elastic rotating fluid in a porous medium. By applying the normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation governing the effects of rotation, magnetic field and medium permeability is derived and solved analytically and numerically. For the case of stationary convection, the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that rotation has a stabilizing effect while the magnetic field and medium permeability have a stabilizing/destabilizing effect under certain conditions on thermal instability of the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid in a porous medium. The oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of rotation, the magnetic field and gravity field. It is also observed that the `principle of exchange of stability' is invalid in the presence of rotation and the magnetic field.

  15. Thermal chiral vortical and magnetic waves: new excitation modes in chiral fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    In certain circumstances, chiral (parity-violating) medium can be described hydrodynamically as a chiral fluid with microscopic quantum anomalies. Possible examples of such systems include strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, liquid helium 3He-A, neutron stars and the Early Universe. We study first-order hydrodynamics of a chiral fluid on a vortex background and in a external magnetic field. We show that there are two previously undiscovered modes describing heat waves propagating along the vortex and magnetic field. We call them the Thermal Chiral Vortical Wave and Thermal Chiral Magnetic Wave. We also identify known gapless excitations of density, the chiral vortical and chiral magnetic waves. We demonstrate that the velocity of the chiral vortical wave is zero, when the full hydrodynamic framework is applied, and hence the excitation reduces to a charge diffusion mode or is completely absent. We also correct the dispersion relation for the chiral magnetic wave.

  16. Finite temperature quark-gluon vertex with a magnetic field in the Hard Thermal Loop approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Loewe, M; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena; Zamora, R

    2014-01-01

    We compute the thermo-magnetic correction to the quark-gluon vertex in the presence of a weak magnetic field within the Hard Thermal Loop approximation. The vertex satisfies a QED-like Ward identity with the quark self-energy. The only vertex components that get modified are the longitudinal ones. The calculation provides a first principles result for the quark anomalous magnetic moment at high temperature in a weak magnetic field. We extract the effective thermo-magnetic quark-gluon coupling and show that this decreases as a function of the field strength. The result supports the idea that the properties of the effective quark-gluon coupling in the presence of a magnetic field are an important ingredient to understand the inverse magnetic catalysis phenomenon.

  17. Thermal stress dependence of magnetic hysteretic processes in core–shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, Ioan, E-mail: ioan.dumitru@uaic.ro; Astefanoaei, Iordana; Stancu, Alexandru

    2013-11-20

    The control of thermal stresses in the core–shell structures is an important task in order to understand their temperature dependent magnetization processes. This paper is dedicated to a theoretical and micromagnetic study of the thermal stresses on the hysteretic processes in core–shell nanoparticles. The analytical model can predict the thermal and elastic behavior of the core–shell nanoparticle supposed to a forced cooling process. The temperature and thermal stresses values obtained by direct computation from the analytical model were used to evaluate the magneto-elastic energy of the core–shell system. A micromagnetic model was used to compute the equilibrium positions of the particle magnetization as function of the applied field. The model allows an evaluation of the increase of the particle coercive field and of the blocking temperature as an effect of the thermal stress.

  18. Influence of thermal annealing and magnetic field on first order magnetic transition in Pd substituted FeRh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Lakhani, Archana; Rawat, R; Chaddah, P, E-mail: archnalakhani@csr.ernet.i [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research University Campus, Khandwa Road Indore-452001, M.P (India)

    2010-01-01

    Influence of successive thermal annealing and magnetic field on First order antiferro (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) transition in the Pd substituted FeRh has been studied. With successive thermal annealing CsCl type bcc phase increases at the expense of fct (pseudo fcc) phase. Resistivity measurements do not show any transition in as-cast sample in contrast to annealed samples. AFM to FM transition temperature (T{sub N}) is found to decrease with higher annealing temperature. With the application of magnetic field, T{sub N} shift to lower temperature. These measurements show anomalous thermomagnetic irreversibility besides showing giant magnetoresistance across magnetic field induced first order AFM to FM transition.

  19. The Spokane fault, Washington, Imaged with High-Resolution Airborne Magnetic Data—Implications for the 2001 Spokane Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Weaver, C. S.; Stephenson, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    A newly acquired, high-resolution aeromagnetic survey provides insights into the near-surface lithology and tectonic structure throughout the greater Spokane area of northeastern Washington and northwestern Idaho. The region has a diverse array of magnetic lithologies, ranging from highly magnetic flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) to weakly magnetic Mesozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks. Faults within these magnetic lithologies produce linear magnetic anomalies that permit mapping of geologic structures over tens of kilometers. A high-amplitude, linear magnetic anomaly overlies the NW- striking Cheney fracture zone 37 km southwest of Spokane and is interpreted as a basaltic dike swarm intruded during the extensional event that opened the fractures, possibly feeder dikes for overlying CRBG flows. A sub-parallel anomaly near the town of Cheney reflects another dike swarm, likely formed during the same extensional event. The Latah fault is seen as a discontinuous alignment of magnetic anomalies extending north-northwestward from south of Spokane to the northern edge of the magnetic survey, a distance of 44 km. An arcuate, north-striking magnetic lineament ~20 km northeast of Spokane may mark the Newport fault, the detachment that promoted exhumation of the Priest River metamorphic complex. A subtle northeast-striking magnetic lineament passes through downtown Spokane and may indicate the trace of the Spokane fault, suspected of producing more than 105 small (M≤4), shallow earthquakes within Spokane city limits in 2001, accompanied by 15 mm of vertical uplift. This magnetic lineament extends 22 km and, to the northwest, merges with the lineament interpreted as the Newport fault. The Spokane fault may represent a reactivated section of the Newport fault that otherwise is not known to be active today. New LiDAR data from the Spokane area does not show distinct fault scarps associated with these magnetic anomalies, but a more comprehensive

  20. Heat transfer and thermal fluid calculation of superconducting quadrupole magnet in BEPC II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pair of interaction region superconducting quadrupole (SCQ) magnets in Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPC II) are key facilities cooled by liquid helium in the constrained cooling channels. The heat loads to the SCQ magnet and temperature contour of the magnet cryostat are calculated. Based on the calculation, the method to decrease the heat load is presented. The results of thermal fluid modeling for the magnet cryostat are also provided. Two types of cooling schemes, the subcooled liquid helium and the supercritical helium flow, are numerically analyzed. (authors)

  1. Thermal Entanglement in Spin-Dimer V4+ with a Strong Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国锋; 梁九卿; 严启伟

    2003-01-01

    We study the entanglement in Heisenberg dimer single molecular magnets V4+ with a strong magnetic field by means of the measure of entanglement called "concurrence" and find that thermal entanglement exists for both the ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) cases. In the FM case, entanglement vanishes for anisotropic parameter λ = 0 while in the AFM case, entanglement exits in the whole region of anisotropic parameter 0≤λ≤1. Entanglement variations with anisotropic parameter λ, magnetic field B and temperature T are evaluated. We find a critical magnetic field at which the concurrence changes sharply from zero to maximum entanglement.

  2. The Use of the Airborne Thermal/Visible Land Application Sensor (ATLAS) to Determine the Thermal Response Numbers for Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Doug; Quattroch, Dale; Estes. Maury

    2007-01-01

    Although satellite data are very useful for analysis of the urban heat island effect at a coarse scale, they do not lend themselves to developing a better understanding of which surfaces across the city contribute or drive the development of the urban heat island effect. Analysis of thermal energy responses for specific or discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape (e.g., asphalt, building rooftops, vegetation) requires measurements at a very fine spatial scale (i.e., island effect, making cities more aesthetically pleasing and more habitable environments, and aid in overall cooling of the community. High spatial resolution thermal data are required to quantify how artificial surfaces within the city contribute to an increase in urban heating and the benefit of cool surfaces (e.g., surface coatings that reflect much of the incoming solar radiation as opposed to absorbing it thereby lowering urban temperatures). The TRN (thermal response number)(Luvall and Holbo 1989) is a technique using aircraft remotely sensed surface temperatures to quantify the thermal response of urban surfaces. The TRN was used to quantify the thermal response of various urban surface types ranging from completely vegetated surfaces to asphalt and concrete parking lots for several cities in the United States.

  3. Airborne multispectral and thermal remote sensing for detecting the onset of crop stress caused by multiple factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanbo; Thomson, Steven J.

    2010-10-01

    Remote sensing technology has been developed and applied to provide spatiotemporal information on crop stress for precision management. A series of multispectral images over a field planted cotton, corn and soybean were obtained by a Geospatial Systems MS4100 camera mounted on an Air Tractor 402B airplane equipped with Camera Link in a Magma converter box triggered by Terraverde Dragonfly® flight navigation and imaging control software. The field crops were intentionally stressed by applying glyphosate herbicide via aircraft and allowing it to drift near-field. Aerial multispectral images in the visible and near-infrared bands were manipulated to produce vegetation indices, which were used to quantify the onset of herbicide induced crop stress. The vegetation indices normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) showed the ability to monitor crop response to herbicide-induced injury by revealing stress at different phenological stages. Two other fields were managed with irrigated versus nonirrigated treatments, and those fields were imaged with both the multispectral system and an Electrophysics PV-320T thermal imaging camera on board an Air Tractor 402B aircraft. Thermal imagery indicated water stress due to deficits in soil moisture, and a proposed method of determining crop cover percentage using thermal imagery was compared with a multispectral imaging method. Development of an image fusion scheme may be necessary to provide synergy and improve overall water stress detection ability.

  4. Thermal Stability of Large Al-stabilized Superconducting Magnets Theoritical Analysis of CMS Solenoid.

    CERN Document Server

    Juster, F P

    1998-01-01

    The CMS detector magnet presently under design for the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an epoxy-impregnated structure, indirectly cooled by two-phase flow liquid helium. This magnet, based on aluminum-stabilized, mechanically reinforced conductor, is not cryostable : the heat generated by a thermal disturbance can be removed only by thermal diffusivity through the windings. In order to study the thermal stability of the magnet, we have developed numerical codes able to predict the thermal behaviour of an anisotropic and non-homogeneous medium against thermal perturbations due to friction or epoxy cracking. Our 3D finite element codes can calculate the propagation or the recovery of a normal zone in a superconducting magnet, taking into account the current diffusion effect, which strongly affects the heat generated by a transition in the case of large Al-stabilized conductors. Two different codes, CASTEM 2000 and HEATING are described in this paper. We present the results of the CMS Solenoid magnet sta...

  5. Thermo-mechanical analysis of the thermal shield for ITER magnet feeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We model the reasonable finite element model for feeder thermal shield. • We analyze the temperature distribution and pressure drop of the thermal shield. • Different materials for the thermal shield were analyzed. • Thermal stress analysis was performed and analysis result be applied to the detailed design. -- Abstract: The thermal shield for ITER magnet feeder plays the role of preventing thermal radiation from the warm components to the cool superconductor and supercritical helium system. Heat loads were calculated for thermal analysis, then finite element model was established by ANSYS code. Thermal analysis was performed in order to check the temperature distribution and pressure drop of the thermal shield under normal operation state. Different materials (steel or aluminum) for the thermal shield were also checked. Thermal stress analysis was performed based on the results of thermal analyses. Compared analysis results with design criteria, it is demonstrated that the results of the simulation are within allowable design requirements and the design scheme can be applied to the detailed design

  6. Thermo-mechanical analysis of the thermal shield for ITER magnet feeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Mingzhun, E-mail: leimz@ipp.ac.cn; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Songke; Wang, Zhongwei; Liu, Sumei; Lu, Kun; Cheng, Yong

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • We model the reasonable finite element model for feeder thermal shield. • We analyze the temperature distribution and pressure drop of the thermal shield. • Different materials for the thermal shield were analyzed. • Thermal stress analysis was performed and analysis result be applied to the detailed design. -- Abstract: The thermal shield for ITER magnet feeder plays the role of preventing thermal radiation from the warm components to the cool superconductor and supercritical helium system. Heat loads were calculated for thermal analysis, then finite element model was established by ANSYS code. Thermal analysis was performed in order to check the temperature distribution and pressure drop of the thermal shield under normal operation state. Different materials (steel or aluminum) for the thermal shield were also checked. Thermal stress analysis was performed based on the results of thermal analyses. Compared analysis results with design criteria, it is demonstrated that the results of the simulation are within allowable design requirements and the design scheme can be applied to the detailed design.

  7. High-coercivity, thermally stable and low unblocking temperature magnetic phase: Implications for Archeomagnetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G. A.; Gallet, Y.; Trindade, R. I.; Genevey, A.; Berquo, T. S.; Neumann, R.; Le Goff, M.

    2013-05-01

    The thermoremanent magnetization in baked clay archeological materials provide very useful information on the time evolution of the Earth's magnetic field over the past few millennia. In these materials, a thermally stable magnetic phase characterized by high coercivities (>400 mT) and low unblocking temperatures (~200 degrees Celsius) has recently been recognized in European bricks, tiles, kilns and hearth samples. Both the identification and the origin of this phase remain, however, poorly constrained. The very same high-coercivity, thermally stable, low unblocking temperature (HCSLT) magnetic phase has been identified in Brazilian bricks fragments dated of the past five centuries. We report here a large set of measurements on a selected collection of samples showing variable contributions of the HCSLT phase. These measurements include low-field magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature curves, hysteresis loops, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, thermal demagnetization of the three-axis IRM, first order reversal curves (FORC), low-temperature magnetization experiments (remanent magnetization curves and alternating current susceptibility), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show the coexistence of low-coercivity magnetic minerals (magnetite and titanomagnetite) and high-coercivity minerals (hematite, HCSLT phase and, in some cases, goethite). We note that the HCSLT magnetic phase is always found in association with hematite. We further observe that the Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectra, and the FORC diagrams are also very similar to results previously obtained from annealed clays in which nontronite or iron-rich montmorillonite was transformed into Al-substituted hematite by heating. The HCSLT magnetic phase is thus confidently identified as being hematite with Al substitution. Moreover, considering the abundance of montmorillonite in clay mining settings, we suggest that the widespread occurrence of HCSLT in

  8. Thermally actuated magnetization flux pump in single-grain YBCO bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Yu; Li Quan; Coombs, T A, E-mail: yy300@cam.ac.u, E-mail: ql229@cam.ac.u, E-mail: tac1000@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity Group, Electrical Engineering Department, Cambridge University, 9 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Recent progress in material processing has proved that high temperature superconductors (HTS) have a great potential to trap large magnetic fields at cryogenic temperatures. For example, HTS are widely used in MRI scanners and in magnetic bearings. However, using traditional ways to magnetize, the YBCO will always need the applied field to be as high as the expected field on the superconductor or much higher than it, leading to a much higher cost than that of using permanent magnets. In this paper, we find a method of YBCO magnetization in liquid nitrogen that only requires the applied field to be at the level of a permanent magnet. Moreover, rather than applying a pulsed high current field on the YBCO, we use a thermally actuated material (gadolinium) as an intermedia and create a travelling magnetic field through it by changing the partial temperature so that the partial permeability is changed to build up the magnetization of the YBCO gradually after multiple pumps. The gadolinium bulk is located between the YBCO and the permanent magnet and is heated and cooled repeatedly from the outer surface to generate a travelling thermal wave inwards. In the subsequent experiment, an obvious accumulation of the flux density is detected on the surface of the YBCO bulk.

  9. Thermally stable magnetic skyrmions in multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic racetracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xichao; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    A magnetic skyrmion is a topological magnetization structure with a nanometric size and a well-defined swirling spin distribution, which is anticipated to be an essential building block for novel skyrmion-based device applications. We study the motion of magnetic skyrmions in multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) racetracks as well as in conventional monolayer ferromagnetic (FM) racetracks at finite temperature. There is an odd-even effect of the constituent FM layer number on the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE). Namely, due to the suppression of the SkHE, the magnetic skyrmion has no transverse motion in multilayer SAF racetracks packed with even FM layers. It is shown that a moving magnetic skyrmion is stable even at room temperature (T =300 K) in a bilayer SAF racetrack but it is destructed at T =100 K in a monolayer FM racetrack. Our results indicate that the SAF structures are reliable and promising candidates for future applications in skyrmion electronics and skyrmion spintronics.

  10. Effect of alternate magnetic field on LY12 structure properties after thermal plastic forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈革新; 付宇明; 尹京; 肖宏

    2008-01-01

    The powerful alternate magnetic field treatment is an effective not-heat treatment, which improves the coriaceous performance of the material. In order to reveal the effect rule of the powerful alternate magnetic field on the structure capability after thermal plastic forming, the experimental methods were adopted to compare the microcosmic structure of the LY12 aluminium alloy test pieces before and after the powerful alternate magnetic field treatment. The mechanism of the structure refining was analyzed theoretically. According to the effect rule of the alternate magnetic field on critical grain growth work and the magnetic vibration-constriction mechanism, the structure dynamics factors were analyzed. The results show that, after a certain powerful alternate magnetic field treatment, the mechanical capability of the LY12 aluminium alloy after thermal plastic forming can be reinforced, the structure intertwist deriving from the thermal plastic forming becomes even and the branch crystal is also smashed, consequently refines the structure. The powerful alternate magnetic field treatment can be regarded as an effective method to improve metal structure performance after heat plastic forming.

  11. Seismology of the Sun : Inference of Thermal, Dynamic and Magnetic Field Structures of the Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Hiremath, K M

    2012-01-01

    Recent overwhelming evidences show that the sun strongly influences the Earth's climate and environment. Moreover existence of life on this Earth mainly depends upon the sun's energy. Hence, understanding of physics of the sun, especially the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of its interior, is very important. Recently, from the ground and space based observations, it is discovered that sun oscillates near 5 min periodicity in millions of modes. This discovery heralded a new era in solar physics and a separate branch called helioseismology or seismology of the sun has started. Before the advent of helioseismology, sun's thermal structure of the interior was understood from the evolutionary solution of stellar structure equations that mimicked the present age, mass and radius of the sun. Whereas solution of MHD equations yielded internal dynamics and magnetic field structure of the sun's interior. In this presentation, I review the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of the sun's inter...

  12. Helioseismic holography of simulated sunspots: magnetic and thermal contributions to travel times

    CERN Document Server

    Felipe, T; Crouch, A D; Birch, A C

    2016-01-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurfac...

  13. Thermal conductivity of magnetic insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamokostas, Georgios; Lapas, Panteleimon; Fiete, Gregory A.

    We study the influence of spin-orbit coupling on the thermal conductivity of various types of magnetic insulators. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling and orbital-degeneracy, the strong-coupling limit of Hubbard interactions at half filling can often be adequately described in terms of a pure spin Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form. However, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling the resulting exchange interaction can become highly anisotropic. The effect of the atomic spin-orbit coupling, taken into account through the effect of magnon-phonon interactions and the magnetic order and excitations, on the lattice thermal conductivity of various insulating magnetic systems is studied. We focus on the regime of low temperatures where the dominant source of scattering is two-magnon scattering to one-phonon processes. The thermal current is calculated within the Boltzmann transport theory. We are grateful for financial support from NSF Grant DMR-0955778.

  14. Magnetic field of Mercury and models of thermal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent planetary probes have performed in situ measurements of the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets. Consideration is given to the origin of these fields, with attention to the equilibrium-- condensation hypothesis for the formation of the solar system. In particular, it is shown that Mercury's present day magnetic field could have been acquired during or shortly after a cold accretion or that it could be due to a presently operating dynamo, resulting from a 'hot evolution'. Two parameters which would help to distinguish between these possibilities are the present-day surface heat flow and the moment of inertia

  15. Thermomagnetic writing into magnetophotonic microcavities controlling thermal diffusion for volumetric magnetic holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Goto, Taichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-01-11

    Holographic memory is expected to become a high-capacity data storage. Magnetic volumetric holograms are rewritable holograms that are recorded as magnetization directions through thermomagnetic recording. However, the effective depth of magnetic holograms is limited by thermal diffusion that causes merging of magnetic fringes. In this study, we propose the insertion of heat-sink layers (HSLs) for retaining well-defined magnetic fringes during volumetric writing. Magnetophotonic microcavity media were used for demonstrating the HSL effect, and the structural design principle was established in numerical calculations. The results indicate that deep and clear magnetic fringes and an improvement in the diffraction efficiency can be achieved by the insertion of HSLs. PMID:26832282

  16. Pseudo-thermal bar in poorly salted autumnal waters of the Gulf of Finland from satellite-airborne SAR/ASAR/ALSAR survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melentyev, Vladimir; Bobylev, Leonid; Tsepelev, Valery; Melentyev, Konstantin; Bednov, Petr

    2010-05-01

    The thermal bar (TB) was disclosed at the end of XIX century by F.A. Forel - world-famed founder of limnology, who studied different processes in Lake Leman from point of view ecology and hydrobiology. Forel supposed that TB arises in temperate large lakes for short period in spring in presence windless calm weather. Well-directed investigations of TB were recommenced in the beginning 1950-s at the Institute of Lake Research Russian Academy of Sciences by Dr A.I. Tikhomirov who had described also specific features of this phenomenon in fall. At the end of 1960-s we began examination thermal and ice regime of fresh and saltish inland water bodies with using remote sensing including multi-spectral airborne-satellite SLR/SAR/ASAR/ALSAR survey. And as result the possibility revealing TB parameters in fall season by low-frequency radar (ALSAR) installed onboard research aircraft was fixed documentally in the Lake Ladoga [Melentyev et. al., 2002]. According to [Tikhomirov, 1959] TB represents convergence zone around temperature of maximum density of fresh water + 4 °C (3, 98 °C, really). This narrow vertical "curtain" appears in littoral in spring owing to heating coastal waters, in fall - due to its cooling. TB divides large lakes and artificial reservoirs on two unequal thermic zones - heat-active (HAZ) and heat-inert (HIZ) that has different stratification of water temperature. Possible existence of TB in poorly salted sea waters was predicted by outstanding Russian oceanographer professor N. Zubov. Obviously firstly it was disclosed but without explanation the physics by [Bychkova, 1987]. Our own sub-satellite studies onboard nuclear icebreaker "Jamal" in western Arctic in fall 1996 allows reveal the TB on saltish waters in north-eastern "corner" of the Yenisei Gulf in mixing zone of marine and river waters. Long-lived converged zone that we call as pseudo-thermal bar (PTB) was marked by stationary banding narrow continuous rough strip that could be destroyed by

  17. Thermal and magnetic behavior of Angustifolia Kunth bamboo fibers covered with Fe3O4 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several Angustifolia Kunth bamboo fibers, which have been previously treated with an alkaline solution, were coated with magnetite particles. The coating of the fibers was achieved by an in-situ co-precipitation method with Fe2+ and Fe3+in NaOH or NH4OH. The fibers were evaluated by chemical analysis using atomic absorption (A.A.) technique, structural characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal stability with thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in nitrogen at temperature range between 23 °C and 800 °C and magnetic behavior using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) applying a magnetic field between -27 KOe and 27 KOe at room temperature. We found that the thermal stability and magnetization depend of the synthesis method used to cover the Angustifolia Kunth bamboo fibers. In addition, an improved magnetic response was observed when NaOH solution is used to generate the magnetite coating on the fiber surface.

  18. A search for inverse magnetic catalysis in thermal quark–meson models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, E.S. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mintz, B.W. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Schaffner-Bielich, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-04-04

    We explore the parameter space of the two-flavor thermal quark–meson model and its Polyakov loop-extended version under the influence of a constant external magnetic field B. We investigate the behavior of the pseudo critical temperature for chiral symmetry breaking taking into account the likely dependence of two parameters on the magnetic field: the Yukawa quark–meson coupling and the parameter T{sub 0} of the Polyakov loop potential. Under the constraints that magnetic catalysis is realized at zero temperature and the chiral transition at B=0 is a crossover, we find that the quark–meson model leads to thermal magnetic catalysis for the whole allowed parameter space, in contrast to the present picture stemming from lattice QCD.

  19. Fluid mechanical dispersion of airborne pollutants inside urban street canyons subjecting to multi-component ventilation and unstable thermal stratifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Shuo-Jun; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Di; Zhao, Fu-Yun; Wang, Han-Qing; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2016-09-15

    The pedestrian level pollutant transport in street canyons with multiple aspect ratios (H/W) is numerically investigated in the present work, regarding of various unstable thermal stratification scenarios and plain surrounding. Non-isothermal turbulent wind flow, temperature field and pollutant spread within and above the street canyons are solved by the realizable k-ε turbulence model along with the enhanced wall treatment. One-vortex flow regime is observed for shallow canyons with H/W=0.5, whereas multi-vortex flow regime is observed for deep canyons with H/W=2.0. Both one-vortex and multi-vortex regimes could be observed for the street canyons with H/W=1.0, where the secondary vortex could be initiated by the flow separation and intensified by unstable thermal stratification. Air exchange rate (AER) and pollutant retention time are adopted to respectively evaluate the street canyon ventilation and pollutant removal performance. A second-order polynomial functional relationship is established between AER and Richardson number (Ri). Similar functional relationship could be established between retention time and Ri, and it is only valid for canyons with one-vortex flow regime. In addition, retention time could be prolonged abruptly for canyons with multi-vortex flow regime. Very weak secondary vortex is presented at the ground level of deep canyons with mild stratification, where pollutants are highly accumulated. However, with the decrease of Ri, pollutant concentration adjacent to the ground reduces accordingly. Present research could be applied to guide the urban design and city planning for enhancing pedestrian environment. PMID:27262984

  20. Precooling of a superconducting magnet using a cryocooler and thermal switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, J; Yanai, M

    1979-11-01

    A simple precooling system for a superconducting magnet is developed using a Cryomech GB02 cryocooler and gas filled thermal switches. A superconducting magnet (NbTi wire, 7 T of maximum field, 5.6 kg of weight) is precooled to 16 K in about 70 h without any manual control. Heat transfer rate of each thermal switch (H2 or N2 gas filled at 1.3 MPa at room temperature) is about 3x10(-1) W/K during the ON state, and 5x10(-3) W/K during the OFF state.

  1. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-21

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. Magnetic and Thermal Analysis of Current Transformer in Normal and Abnormal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B.B. Sharifian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of Current Transformers (CTs magnetic and thermal properties are very complex due to the complexity of their construction, different properties of their materials and non-linearity of core B-H curve. Finite Element Methods (FEMs are very capable and reliable methods for these problems solution, such as Ansys software. In this study Ansys software is applied in analysis of an 800-400/5-5 CT. These analyses consist of 2D static normal, open circuit and short circuit condition of CT. Magnetic and thermal analysis are made and the results will be discussed.

  3. Magnetic and thermal properties of perovskite YFeO{sub 3} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Hui [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Xu Jiayue [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China)], E-mail: crystalxu@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wu Anhua; Zhao Jingtai; Shi Minli [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2009-02-15

    In this work, we reported the magnetic and thermal properties of perovskite YFeO{sub 3} crystal grown by the floating zone method. YFeO{sub 3} crystal is a canted antiferromagnet with a weak ferromagnetic behavior. The magnetization varied nonlinearly from 0.204 emu/g to 0.173 emu/g at the temperature range of 2-300 K. Its Neel temperature is around 644.5 K. The specific heat is about 0.56 J/(g K) at room temperature and reaches the maximum value of 0.77 J/(g K) at 644.5 K where the antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition occurs. Both the lattice and magnetic contributions to the heat capacity have been calculated. Thermal diffusivity and the thermal conductivity are as large as 3.53 mm{sup 2}/s and 11.27 W/(m K) at 298 K, respectively. Both of them show anomalies around the magnetic phase transition point. The average thermal expansion coefficients are -1.72 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} and 2.28 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} before and after Neel temperature, respectively. The high Neel temperature, high thermal conductivity and small expansion coefficient indicate that YFeO{sub 3} crystal is a promising candidate for laser-induced or optical device applications in broad temperature range and high power system.

  4. Performance of Nb3Sn quadrupole magnets under localized thermal load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Bossert, r.; Chlachidze, G.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes the results of design and analyses performed on 120-mm Nb{sub 3}Sn and NbTi quadrupole magnets with parameters relevant for the LHC IR upgrade. A realistic radiation heat load is evaluated in a wide luminosity range and translated into the magnet quench performance. The simulation results are supported by thermal measurements on a 90-mm Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole coil.

  5. Performance of Nb3Sn quadrupole magnets under localized thermal load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of design and analyses performed on 120-mm Nb3Sn and NbTi quadrupole magnets with parameters relevant for the LHC IR upgrade. A realistic radiation heat load is evaluated in a wide luminosity range and translated into the magnet quench performance. The simulation results are supported by thermal measurements on a 90-mm Nb3Sn quadrupole coil

  6. PERFORMANCE OF NB3SN QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS UNDER LOCALIZED THERMAL LOAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of design and analyses performed on 120-mm Nb3Sn and NbTi quadrupole magnets with parameters relevant for the LHC IR upgrade. A realistic radiation heat load is evaluated in a wide luminosity range and translated into the magnet quench performance. The simulation results are supported by thermal measurements on a 90-mm Nb3Sn quadrupole coil.

  7. Study of the connection between hysteresis and thermal relaxation in magnetic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Basso, Vittorio; Beatrice, Cinzia; Lobue, Martino; Tiberto, Paola; Bertotti, Giorgio

    1999-01-01

    The connection between hysteresis and thermal relaxation in magnetic materials is studied from both the experimental and the theoretical viewpoint. Hysteresis and viscosity effects are measured in Finemet-type nanocrystalline materials above the Curie temperature of the amorphous phase, where the system consists of ferromagnetic nanograins imbedded in a paramagnetic matrix. The hysteresis loop dependence on field rate, the magnetization time decay at different constant fields and the magnetiz...

  8. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity and Effusivity of Ferrite Based Nanofluids under Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ashok K.; Vijay S. Raykar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic field (H) on the thermal conductivity (λ) and effusivity (ε) of cobalt ferrite based nanofluids having different concentrations (ϕ). Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized using the microwave assisted method. At high volume fraction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in water (ϕ > 0), both thermal parameters have been found to be suppressed relative to ϕ and λ of water in the absence of H. However, it is seen that percentage values of the e...

  9. Realizing exactly solvable SU (N ) magnets with thermal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverland, Michael E.; Alagic, Gorjan; Martin, Michael J.; Koller, Andrew P.; Rey, Ana M.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2016-05-01

    We show that n thermal fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms in a flat-bottom trap allow one to robustly implement a spin model displaying two symmetries: the Sn symmetry that permutes atoms occupying different vibrational levels of the trap and the SU (N ) symmetry associated with N nuclear spin states. The symmetries make the model exactly solvable, which, in turn, enables the analytic study of dynamical processes such as spin diffusion in this SU (N ) system. We also show how to use this system to generate entangled states that allow for Heisenberg-limited metrology. This highly symmetric spin model should be experimentally realizable even when the vibrational levels are occupied according to a high-temperature thermal or an arbitrary nonthermal distribution.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of thermal oxidation of polyisoprene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M. A.; Hsu, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the microstructural changes occurring in cis- and trans-1,4-polyisoprenes during uncatalized thermal oxidation in the solid phase. The investigation made use of approaches based on proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. The oxidation of squalene and dihydromyrcene in the liquid phase was also studied. The studies provide the first NMR spectroscopic evidence for the presence of epoxy and peroxide, hydroperoxide, and alcohol groups within the oxidized polyisoprene chain.

  11. Progress in the Integrated Simulation of Thermal-Hydraulic Operation of the ITER Magnet System

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnasco, M; Bessette, D; Marinucci, C

    2010-01-01

    A new integrated computer code is being developed for the simulations of the overall behavior of the ITER magnet cryo-system. The existing THEA, FLOWER and POWER codes, assembled as modules of a computational environment (Super-Magnet) have been upgraded to perform global simulations of the cooling circuit for the ITER magnet system. The thermal coupling resulting from the generic geometric configurations has been implemented to realize quasi-three-dimensional simulations of the winding pack. In this paper we present details on the model.

  12. Tidal heating of Earth-like exoplanets around M stars: Thermal, magnetic, and orbital evolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Driscoll, P E; Barnes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the “tidal zone,” where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbita...

  13. Estimating the relationship between urban 3D morphology and land surface temperature using airborne LiDAR and Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Urban forests are known for mitigating the urban heat island effect and heat-related health issues by reducing air and surface temperature. Beyond the amount of the canopy area, however, little is known what kind of spatial patterns and structures of urban forests best contributes to reducing temperatures and mitigating the urban heat effects. Previous studies attempted to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and various indicators of vegetation abundance using remote sensed data but the majority of those studies relied on two dimensional area based metrics, such as tree canopy cover, impervious surface area, and Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, etc. This study investigates the relationship between the three-dimensional spatial structure of urban forests and urban surface temperature focusing on vertical variance. We use a Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor image (acquired on July 24, 2014) to estimate the land surface temperature of the City of Sacramento, CA. We extract the height and volume of urban features (both vegetation and non-vegetation) using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high spatial resolution aerial imagery. Using regression analysis, we apply empirical approach to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and different sets of variables, which describe spatial patterns and structures of various urban features including trees. Our analysis demonstrates that incorporating vertical variance parameters improve the accuracy of the model. The results of the study suggest urban tree planting is an effective and viable solution to mitigate urban heat by increasing the variance of urban surface as well as evaporative cooling effect.

  14. Thermal stability conditions of a weakly interacting Fermi gas in a weak magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fudian Men; Hui Liu; Houyu Zhu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the results derived from pseudopotential method and ensemble theory,thermal stability of a weakly interacting Fermi gas in a weak magnetic field is studied by using analytical method of thermodynamics.The exact analytical expressions of stability conditions at different temperatures are given,and the effects of interactions as well as magnetic field on the stability of the system are discussed.It is shown that there is an upper-limit magnetic field for the stability of the system at low temperatures,and there is an attractive dividing value at high temperatures.If attractive interaction is lower than the critical value,the stability of the system has no request for magnetic field,but if attractive interaction is higher than the dividing value,a lower-limit magnetic field exists for the stability of the system.

  15. Magnetic and Structural Properties of FePt-FeRh Exchange Spring Films for Thermally Assisted Magnetic Recording Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, J.-U. [San Jose Research Center; Maat, S. [San Jose Research Center; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Fullerton, E. E. [San Jose Research Center

    2004-01-01

    Recently a novel media structure for thermally assisted magnetic recording was proposed consisting of a layer of FePt exchange coupled to a FeRh layer. The FePt forms a high magnetocrystalline anisotropy, high coercivity ferromagnetic layer. The FeRh layer is antiferromagnetic at room temperature, but upon heating above a transition temperature becomes ferromagnetic with a large magnetic moment and low magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The coupled ferromagnetic FePt and FeRh layers form an exchange-spring system significantly lowering the coercive field of the composite system compared to a single layer of FePt. This feature opens intriguing possibilities for media applications for thermally assisted magnetic recording where the ferromagnetic phase of FeRh is exploited to help write the media while the low-temperature antiferromagnetic phase supports the long-term stability. Here temperature-dependent structural and magnetic measurements of undoped and doped FeRh single layer and FePt-FeRh bilayer films are presented and the promises and challenges of the exchange spring media structure are discussed.

  16. 航空重、磁异常相关性分析方法及其应用%CORRELATION ANALYTICAL METHOD AND ITS APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE GRAVITY AND MAGNETIC ANOMALIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕戌; 李文勇; 徐剑春

    2012-01-01

    以我国某海域为例,探讨了航空重、磁相关性分析方法及其应用.通过计算航空重、磁相关系数,结合研究区地质特征,将航空重、磁异常划分为三类:即同源异常、半同源异常和非同源异常,分别描述了这三类异常的重、磁特征,推断了异常源性质及地质特征,不仅减少了研究区地质解释的多解性,而且使解释成果更加符合客观实际.%Exemplified by the exploration in a certain sea area in China,the authors discussed the correlation analytical method and its application to airborne gravity and magnetic anomalies. Through computation of the correlation coefficient of airborne gravity and magnetic anomalies in combination with geological characteristics,the authors divided airborne gravity and magnetic anomalies into three types,namely homologous,half homologous and non-homologous anomalies,described these three kinds of anomalies and inferred the features of the source and geological characteristics. The results can not only reduce the multi-solution of geological interpretation but also make the interpretation more in accord with the reality.

  17. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Baik, S. K.; Lee, Y. J.; Han, K. S.; Ko, R. K.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly α-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) and γ-Fe 2O 3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  18. Helioseismic Holography of Simulated Sunspots: Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Travel Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe, T.; Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D.; Birch, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  19. Effects of Toroidal Magnetic Fields on the Thermal Instability of Thin Accretion Disks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sheng-Ming Zheng; Feng Yuan; Wei-Min Gu; Ju-Fu Lu

    2011-03-01

    The standard thin disk model predicts that when the accretion rate is moderately high, the disk is radiation–pressure-dominated and thermally unstable. However, observations indicate the opposite, namely the disk is quite stable. We present an explanation in this work by taking into account the role of the magnetic field which was ignored in the previous analysis.

  20. Thermal stability of Nb3Sn Rutherford cables for accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapper, de Willem Michiel

    2014-01-01

    In large scale superconducting applications, like bending magnets in particle colliders, thermal stability is an important issue. A relatively small perturbation of about 100 µJ in a single point can create a small normal zone in the superconductor, which will experience sever joule heating. If the

  1. Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of magnetic vortex structures in nonideal magnetite recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kovács, András.; Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Leslei; Conbhuí, Pádraig Ã.`; Frandsen, Cathrine; Supakulopas, Radchagrit; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal demagnetization of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, which govern the magnetic signal in many igneous rocks, is examined using off-axis electron holography. Visualization of a vortex structure held by an individual Fe3O4 particle (~250 nm in diameter) during in situ heating is achieved through the construction and examination of magnetic-induction maps. Stepwise demagnetization of the remanence-induced Fe3O4 particle upon heating to above the Curie temperature, performed in a similar fashion to bulk thermal demagnetization measurements, revealed that its vortex state remains stable under heating close to its unblocking temperature and is recovered upon cooling with the same or reversed vorticity. Hence, the PSD Fe3O4 particle exhibits thermomagnetic behavior comparable to a single-domain carrier, and thus, vortex states are considered reliable magnetic recorders for paleomagnetic investigations.

  2. Switching field dependence on heating pulse duration in thermally assisted magnetic random access memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papusoi, C. [Spintec, URA 2512 CEA/CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: cristian_papusoi@yahoo.com; Conraux, Y.; Prejbeanu, I.L. [Crocus Technology, 5 Robert Schumann, BP 1510, 38025 Grenoble (France); Sousa, R.; Dieny, B. [Spintec, URA 2512 CEA/CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-15

    The minimum applied field H{sub SW} required to reverse the magnetic moment of the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic storage layer of a thermally assisted magnetic random access memory (TA-MRAM) device during the application of a heating electric pulse is investigated as a function of pulse power P{sub HP} and duration {delta}. For the same power of the heating pulse P{sub HP} (or, equivalently, for the same temperature of the storage layer), H{sub SW} increases with decreasing heating time {delta}. This behavior is consistently interpreted by a thermally activated propagating domain-wall switching model, corroborated by a real-time study of switching. The increase of H{sub SW} with decreasing pulse width introduces a constraint for the minimum power consumption of a TA-MRAM where writing combines heating and magnetic field application.

  3. A thermally stable heating mechanism for the intracluster medium: turbulence, magnetic fields and plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, M W; Cowley, S C; Binney, J J; Sanders, J S

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of self-regulated heating and cooling in galaxy clusters and the implications for cluster magnetic fields and turbulence. Viscous heating of a weakly collisional magnetised plasma is regulated by the pressure anisotropy with respect to the local direction of the magnetic field. The intracluster medium is a high-beta plasma, where pressure anisotropies caused by the turbulent stresses and the consequent local changes in the magnetic field will trigger very fast microscale instabilities. We argue that the net effect of these instabilities will be to pin the pressure anisotropies at a marginal level, controlled by the plasma beta parameter. This gives rise to local heating rates that turn out to be comparable to the radiative cooling rates. Furthermore, we show that a balance between this heating and Bremsstrahlung cooling is thermally stable, unlike the often conjectured balance between cooling and thermal conduction. Given a sufficient (and probably self-regulating) supply of turbulent ...

  4. Utilization of the magnetogranulometric analysis to estimate the thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holotescu, S.; Stoian, F. D.; Marinica, O.; Kubicar, L.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the semi-empirical equation for the effective thermal conductivity of the Holotescu-Stoian model was applied to a set of four dilutions of a transformer oil based magnetic fluid with magnetite nanoparticles as magnetic phase, using the results obtained for the size distributions from the magnetogranulometry analysis, followed by a comparison with the measured values of the effective thermal conductivity obtained by the hot ball method. The link between the size distribution by number and by volume used in the magnetogranulometry analysis and the Holotescu-Stoian model adaptation to the lognormal distribution were presented. The comparison between the results given by the model and the corresponding experimental data showed that by using the approximated size distribution to calculate the effective thermal conductivity the analytical results much closer to the experimental ones are obtained, compared to those given by the Maxwell classical model.

  5. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms

  6. Thermal expansion anomaly and magnetic properties of Nd2AlFe11Mn5 compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Materials with negative thermal expansion have many important applications such as constituents of composite materials designed to .reduce their overall thermal expansion. The structural and magnetic properties of Nd2AlFe11Mn5 compound were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. The result shows that the Nd2AlFe11Mn5 compound crystallizes in a rhomhedral Th2Zn17-type structure. The Curie temperature Tc is about 150 K. The negative thermal expansion coefficient of Nd2AlFe11Mn5 compound is found by X-ray diffraction in temperature range of 122-203 K. There exists an anisotropic and strong positive spontaneous magnetostriction in Nd2AlFe11Mn5 compound. The magnetostriction deformations were discussed.

  7. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  8. Thermal Analysis of a Novel Cylindrical Transverse-Flux Permanent-Magnet Linear Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel staggered-teeth cylindrical transverse-flux permanent-magnet linear machine (TFPMLM, which aims to improve the power factor and force density. Due to the compact structure and high performance requirement, thermal problems should be seriously considered. The three-dimensional (3-D temperature field model is established. The determination of convection heat transfer coefficients is discussed. Equivalent thermal conductivities of stator core and winding are given to simplify the analysis. With the thermal effect of the adhesive coatings among permanent magnets (PMs and mover yoke taken into account, the temperature field distribution and variation rules of the TFPMLM are obtained using the finite volume method (FVM. The influences of slot filling factor and air flow velocity on the temperature field distribution are analyzed. It is found that the hottest spot of the TFPMLM appears in the middle of the end winding; and there is no risk of demagnetization for PMs.

  9. Thermal and damping behaviour of magnetic shape memory alloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, Susanne; Michaud, Véronique

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (MSMA) exhibit magnetic field and stress induced strains via energy dissipating twinning. Embedding single crystalline MSMA particles into a polymer matrix could thus produce composites with enhanced energy dissipation, suitable for damping applications. Composites of ferromagnetic, martensitic or austenitic Ni-Mn-Ga powders embedded in a standard epoxy matrix were produced by casting. The martensitic powder composites showed a crystal structure dependent damping behaviour that was more dissipative than that of austenitic powder or Cu-Ni reference powder composites and than that of the pure matrix. The loss ratio also increased with increasing strain amplitude and decreasing frequency, respectively. Furthermore, Ni-Mn-Ga powder composites exhibited an increased damping behaviour at the martensite/austenite transformation temperature of the Ni-Mn-Ga particles in addition to that at the glass transition temperature of the epoxy matrix, creating possible synergetic effects.

  10. Transient electromagnetic simulation and thermal analysis of the DC-biased AC quadrupole magnet for CSNS/RCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the large eddy currents at the ends of the quadrupole magnets for CSNS/RCS, the magnetic field properties and the heat generation are of great concern. In this paper, we take transient electromagnetic simulation and make use of the eddy current loss from the transient electromagnetic results to perform thermal analysis. Through analysis of the simulated results, the magnetic field dynamic properties of these magnets and a temperature rise are achieved. Finally, the accuracy of the thermal analysis is confirmed by a test of the prototype quadrupole magnet of the RCS. (authors)

  11. Transient electromagnetic simulation and thermal analysis of the DC-biased AC quadrupole magnet for CSNS/RCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xian-Jing; DENG Chang-Dong; KANG Wen

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large cddy currents at the ends of the quadrupole magnets for CSNS/RCS,the magnetic field properties and the heat generation are of great concern.In this paper,we take transient electromagnetic simulation and make use of the eddy current loss from the transient electromagnetic results to perform thermal analysis.Through analysis of the simulated results,the magnetic field dynamic properties of these magnets and a temperature rise are achieved.Finally,the accuracy of the thermal analysis is confirmed by a test of the prototype quadrupole magnet of the RCS.

  12. Magnetic Cellulose Nanocrystal Based Anisotropic Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films: Influence on Electrical, Magnetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Prodyut; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Vimal

    2016-07-20

    This paper reports a single-step co-precipitation method for the fabrication of magnetic cellulose nanocrystals (MGCNCs) with high iron oxide nanoparticle content (∼51 wt % loading) adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed that the hydroxyl groups on the surface of CNCs (derived from the bamboo pulp) acted as anchor points for the adsorption of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The fabricated MGCNCs have a high magnetic moment, which is utilized to orient the magnetoresponsive nanofillers in parallel or perpendicular orientations inside the polylactic acid (PLA) matrix. Magnetic-field-assisted directional alignment of MGCNCs led to the incorporation of anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties in the fabricated PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites. Thermomechanical studies showed significant improvement in the elastic modulus and glass-transition temperature for the magnetically oriented samples. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and XRD studies confirmed that the alignment of MGCNCs led to the improvement in the percentage crystallinity and, with the absence of the cold-crystallization phenomenon, finds a potential application in polymer processing in the presence of magnetic field. The tensile strength and percentage elongation for the parallel-oriented samples improved by ∼70 and 240%, respectively, and for perpendicular-oriented samples, by ∼58 and 172%, respectively, in comparison to the unoriented samples. Furthermore, its anisotropically induced electrical and magnetic properties are desirable for fabricating self-biased electronics products. We also demonstrate that the fabricated anisotropic PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites could be laminated into films with the incorporation of directionally tunable mechanical properties. Therefore, the current study provides a novel noninvasive approach of orienting nontoxic bioderived CNCs in the presence of low

  13. Magnetic Cellulose Nanocrystal Based Anisotropic Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films: Influence on Electrical, Magnetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Prodyut; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Vimal

    2016-07-20

    This paper reports a single-step co-precipitation method for the fabrication of magnetic cellulose nanocrystals (MGCNCs) with high iron oxide nanoparticle content (∼51 wt % loading) adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed that the hydroxyl groups on the surface of CNCs (derived from the bamboo pulp) acted as anchor points for the adsorption of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The fabricated MGCNCs have a high magnetic moment, which is utilized to orient the magnetoresponsive nanofillers in parallel or perpendicular orientations inside the polylactic acid (PLA) matrix. Magnetic-field-assisted directional alignment of MGCNCs led to the incorporation of anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties in the fabricated PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites. Thermomechanical studies showed significant improvement in the elastic modulus and glass-transition temperature for the magnetically oriented samples. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and XRD studies confirmed that the alignment of MGCNCs led to the improvement in the percentage crystallinity and, with the absence of the cold-crystallization phenomenon, finds a potential application in polymer processing in the presence of magnetic field. The tensile strength and percentage elongation for the parallel-oriented samples improved by ∼70 and 240%, respectively, and for perpendicular-oriented samples, by ∼58 and 172%, respectively, in comparison to the unoriented samples. Furthermore, its anisotropically induced electrical and magnetic properties are desirable for fabricating self-biased electronics products. We also demonstrate that the fabricated anisotropic PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites could be laminated into films with the incorporation of directionally tunable mechanical properties. Therefore, the current study provides a novel noninvasive approach of orienting nontoxic bioderived CNCs in the presence of low

  14. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Tupelo quadrangle, Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tupelo quadrangle covers a region immediately east of the Mississippi River flood plain in the northernmost Gulf Coastal Physiographic Province. Sediments of Teritary and Paleozoic basins shoal eastward. Tertiary exposures dominate the western half of the quadrangle. Cretaceous strata are exposed over most of the eastern half. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of eighty-six uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Few were considered significant, and most appear to relate to some cultural feature. Magnetic data appears, for the most part, to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region

  15. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Fort Smith quadrangle, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fort Smith quadrangle in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma overlies thick Paleozoic sediments of the Arkoma Basin. These Paleozoics dominate surface exposure except where covered by Quaternary Alluvial materials. Examination of available literature shows no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. Seventy-five groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and most appeared to be of cultural origin. Magnetic data show character that suggest structural and/or lithologic complexity, but imply relatively deep-seated sources

  16. Effects of thermal magnetic fluctuations on spin transport in Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ryan; Zholud, Andrei; Cao, Rongxing; Urazhdin, Sergei

    Despite extensive studies and applications of Pt as a spin Hall material in spintronic devices, its spin-dependent transport properties are still debated. We present a comprehensive experimental study of spin transport in Pt, utilizing measurements of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in nanoscale Permalloy (Py)-based spin valves with Pt inserted in the nonmagnetic spacer. The spin diffusion length and the interfacial spin flipping coefficients are extracted from the dependence of MR on the Pt thickness. For samples with Pt separated from Py by Cu spacers, the spin diffusion length is 6 nm at 7K, and decreases to 3 nm at room temperature. The interfacial spin flipping decreases with increasing temperature, resulting in nonmonotonic temperature dependence of MR in samples with thin Pt. In contrast, in samples with Pt in direct contact with Py, we do not observe such a nonmonotonic dependence, and the spin diffusion length is significantly larger than in samples with Pt surrounded by Cu spacers. Our results indicate a large effect of the giant paramagnetic fluctuations in the nearly ferromagnetic Pt. These fluctuations are suppressed due to the proximity magnetism when Pt is in contact with Py, resulting in enhanced spin diffusion length and reduced spin flipping at the Pt interfaces. These observations indicate the need for a critical revision of spin transport and spin Hall-related properties of Pt-based structures. Supported by NSF ECCS-1305586.

  17. Research Update: Utilizing magnetization dynamics in solid-state thermal energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boona, Stephen R.; Watzman, Sarah J.; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2016-10-01

    We review the spin-Seebeck and magnon-electron drag effects in the context of solid-state energy conversion. These phenomena are driven by advective magnon-electron interactions. Heat flow through magnetic materials generates magnetization dynamics, which can strongly affect free electrons within or adjacent to the magnetic material, thereby producing magnetization-dependent (e.g., remnant) electric fields. The relative strength of spin-dependent interactions means that magnon-driven effects can generate significantly larger thermoelectric power factors as compared to classical thermoelectric phenomena. This is a surprising situation in which spin-based effects are larger than purely charge-based effects, potentially enabling new approaches to thermal energy conversion.

  18. Thermal photon production from gluon fusion induced by magnetic fields in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, C A; Hernandez, L A

    2016-01-01

    We compute the production of thermal photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by gluon fusion in the presence of an intense magnetic field, and during the early stages of the reaction. This photon yield is an excess over calculations that do not consider magnetic field effects. We add this excess to recent hydrodynamic calculations that are close to describing the experimental transverse momentum distribution in RHIC and LHC. We then show that with reasonable values for the temperature, magnetic field strength, and strong coupling constant, our results provide a very good description of such excess. These results support the idea that the origin of at least some of the photon excess observed in heavy-ion experiments may arise from magnetic field induced processes.

  19. Thermal Entanglement and Critical Behavior of Magnetic Properties on a Triangulated Kagomé Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ananikian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium magnetic and entanglement properties in a spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg model on a triangulated Kagomé lattice are analyzed by means of the effective field for the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality. The calculation is reduced to decoupled individual (clusters trimers due to the separable character of the Ising-type exchange interactions between the Heisenberg trimers. The concurrence in terms of the three qubit isotropic Heisenberg model in the effective Ising field in the absence of a magnetic field is non-zero. The magnetic and entanglement properties exhibit common (plateau, peak features driven by a magnetic field and (antiferromagnetic exchange interaction. The (quantum entangled and non-entangled phases can be exploited as a useful tool for signalling the quantum phase transitions and crossovers at finite temperatures. The critical temperature of order-disorder coincides with the threshold temperature of thermal entanglement.

  20. Thermal equilibrium of non-neutral plasma in dipole magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, N.; Kasaoka, N.; Yoshida, Z. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Self-organization of a long-lived structure is one of the remarkable characteristics of macroscopic systems governed by long-range interactions. In a homogeneous magnetic field, a non-neutral plasma creates a “thermal equilibrium,” which is a Boltzmann distribution on a rigidly rotating frame. Here, we study how a non-neutral plasma self-organizes in inhomogeneous magnetic field; as a typical system, we consider a dipole magnetic field. In this generalized setting, the plasma exhibits its fundamental mechanism that determines the relaxed state. The scale hierarchy of adiabatic invariants is the determinant; the Boltzmann distribution under the topological constraint by the robust adiabatic invariants (hence, the homogeneous distribution with respect to the fragile invariant) is the relevant relaxed state, which turns out to be a rigidly rotating clump of particles (just same as in a homogeneous magnetic field), while the density is no longer homogeneous.

  1. Estimation of electronic and structural influence on the thermal magnetic properties of clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, P.-A.; Hendriksen, P.V.

    1994-01-01

    Using an effective Heisenberg model for clusters the spin-wave spectrum is calculated by direct diagonalization. The inclusion of a nonuniform magnetization profile at zero temperature, nonuniform exchange interactions as a result of structural relaxations, longer-range interactions, and of magne......Using an effective Heisenberg model for clusters the spin-wave spectrum is calculated by direct diagonalization. The inclusion of a nonuniform magnetization profile at zero temperature, nonuniform exchange interactions as a result of structural relaxations, longer-range interactions......, and of magnetic surface anisotropy have been studied. Very small effects are found on the thermal magnetic properties relative to those predicted for the simple nearest-neighbor Heisenberg model by Hendriksen, Linderoth, and Lindgard [J. Phys. C 31, 5675 (1993); Phys. Rev. B 48, 7259 (1993)]....

  2. Experimental investigation on thermal conductivity of MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Fe and Co) magnetic nanofluids under influence of magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Amir, E-mail: amir.karimi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 1439955961 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afghahi, S. Salman S. [Department of Engineering, Imam Hossein University, Tehran, Iran P.O. Box: 15816-18711 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariatmadar, Hamed; Ashjaee, Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 1439955961 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-20

    Highlights: • A comparative study is conducted to examine thermal conductivity of different MNFs. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles show higher saturation magnetization than that of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. • New empirical correlations are proposed to predict thermal conductivity of MNFs. - Abstract: In present study, the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids (MNFs) containing MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Fe and Co) nanoparticles suspended in deionized water are investigated in the absence and the presence of uniform magnetic field. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are synthesized using the co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscopy and vibration sample magnetometer are used to characterize the structure, size and magnetic properties of nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity of MNFs are measured at different volume fractions between 0% and 4.8% and the magnetic field intensity range of 0–500 G. The experimental results show that the thermal conductivity of MNFs increases with increase in volume fraction and magnetic field intensity before reaching its saturation point. Finally, new correlations are presented based on the experimental results to predict thermal conductivity of MNFs in both the absence and the presence of magnetic field.

  3. Experimental investigation on thermal conductivity of MFe2O4 (M = Fe and Co) magnetic nanofluids under influence of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A comparative study is conducted to examine thermal conductivity of different MNFs. • Fe3O4 nanoparticles show higher saturation magnetization than that of CoFe2O4. • New empirical correlations are proposed to predict thermal conductivity of MNFs. - Abstract: In present study, the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanofluids (MNFs) containing MFe2O4 (M = Fe and Co) nanoparticles suspended in deionized water are investigated in the absence and the presence of uniform magnetic field. Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles are synthesized using the co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscopy and vibration sample magnetometer are used to characterize the structure, size and magnetic properties of nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity of MNFs are measured at different volume fractions between 0% and 4.8% and the magnetic field intensity range of 0–500 G. The experimental results show that the thermal conductivity of MNFs increases with increase in volume fraction and magnetic field intensity before reaching its saturation point. Finally, new correlations are presented based on the experimental results to predict thermal conductivity of MNFs in both the absence and the presence of magnetic field

  4. Multi-physics analysis of permanent magnet tubular linear motors under severe volumetric and thermal constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李方; 叶佩青; 张辉

    2016-01-01

    Permanent magnet tubular linear motors (TLMs) arranged in multiple rows and multiple columns used for a radiotherapy machine were studied. Due to severe volumetric and thermal constraints, the TLMs were at high risk of overheating. To predict the performance of the TLMs accurately, a multi-physics analysis approach was proposed. Specifically, it considered the coupling effects amongst the electromagnetic and the thermal models of the TLMs, as well as the fluid model of the surrounding air. To reduce computation cost, both the electromagnetic and the thermal models were based on lumped-parameter methods. Only a minimum set of numerical computation (computational fluid dynamics, CFD) was performed to model the complex fluid behavior. With the proposed approach, both steady state and transient state temperature distributions, thermal rating and permissible load can be predicted. The validity of this approach is verified through the experiment.

  5. Effect of magnetized phonons on electrical and thermal conductivity of neutron star crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiko, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study electrical and thermal conductivities of degenerate electrons emitting and absorbing phonons in a strongly magnetized crystalline neutron star crust. We take into account modification of the phonon spectrum of a Coulomb solid of ions caused by a strong magnetic field. Boltzmann transport equation is solved using a generalized variational method. The ensuing 3D integrals over the transferred momenta are evaluated by two different numerical techniques, the Monte Carlo method and a regular integration over the first Brillouin zone. The results of the two numerical approaches are shown to be in a good agreement. An appreciable growth of electrical and thermal resistivities is reported at quantum and intermediate temperatures T ≲ 0.1Tp (Tp is the ion plasma temperature) in a wide range of chemical compositions and mass densities of matter even for moderately magnetized crystals ωB ˜ ωp (ωB and ωp are the ion cyclotron and plasma frequencies). This effect is due to an appearance of a soft (ω ∝ k2) phonon mode in the magnetized ion Coulomb crystal, which turns out to be easier to excite than acoustic phonons characteristic of the field-free case. These results are important for modelling magneto-thermal evolution of neutron stars.

  6. Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Helioseismic Travel times in Simulated Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Douglas; Felipe, Tobias; Birch, Aaron; Crouch, Ashley D.

    2016-05-01

    The interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge, since waves propagating through sunspots are potentially affected by both mode conversion and changes in the thermal structure of the spots. We carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through a variety of models which alternately isolate either the thermal or magnetic structure of the sunspot or include both of these. We find that helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. Using insight from ray theory, we find that travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level of the measurements) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it suggests a path towards inversions for sunspot structure. This research has been funded by the Spanish MINECO through grant AYA2014-55078-P, by the NASA Heliophysics Division through NNX14AD42G and NNH12CF23C, and the NSF Solar Terrestrial program through AGS-1127327.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF THERMAL EVOLUTION IN THE MAGNETIC PROTECTION OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Bustamante, Sebastian; Cuartas, Pablo A. [Instituto de Fisica-FCEN, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, Medellin (Colombia); Hoyos, Jaime H., E-mail: jzuluaga@fisica.udea.edu.co, E-mail: sbustama@pegasus.udea.edu.co, E-mail: p.cuartas@fisica.udea.edu.co, E-mail: jhhoyos@udem.edu.co [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad de Medellin, Carrera 87 No. 30-65, Medellin (Colombia)

    2013-06-10

    Magnetic protection of potentially habitable planets plays a central role in determining their actual habitability and/or the chances of detecting atmospheric biosignatures. Here we develop a thermal evolution model of potentially habitable Earth-like planets and super-Earths (SEs). Using up-to-date dynamo-scaling laws, we predict the properties of core dynamo magnetic fields and study the influence of thermal evolution on their properties. The level of magnetic protection of tidally locked and unlocked planets is estimated by combining simplified models of the planetary magnetosphere and a phenomenological description of the stellar wind. Thermal evolution introduces a strong dependence of magnetic protection on planetary mass and rotation rate. Tidally locked terrestrial planets with an Earth-like composition would have early dayside magnetopause distances between 1.5 and 4.0 R{sub p} , larger than previously estimated. Unlocked planets with periods of rotation {approx}1 day are protected by magnetospheres extending between 3 and 8 R{sub p} . Our results are robust in comparison with variations in planetary bulk composition and uncertainties in other critical model parameters. For illustration purposes, the thermal evolution and magnetic protection of the potentially habitable SEs GL 581d, GJ 667Cc, and HD 40307g were also studied. Assuming an Earth-like composition, we found that the dynamos of these planets are already extinct or close to being shut down. While GL 581d is the best protected, the protection of HD 40307g cannot be reliably estimated. GJ 667Cc, even under optimistic conditions, seems to be severely exposed to the stellar wind, and, under the conditions of our model, has probably suffered massive atmospheric losses.

  8. Rock magnetic finger-printing of soil from a coal-fired thermal power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gune, Minal; Harshavardhana, B G; Balakrishna, K; Udayashankar, H N; Shankar, R; Manjunatha, B R

    2016-05-01

    We present seasonal rock magnetic data for 48 surficial soil samples collected seasonally around a coal-fired thermal power plant on the southwest coast of India to demonstrate how fly ash from the power plant is transported both spatially and seasonally. Sampling was carried out during pre-monsoon (March), early-monsoon (June), monsoon (September) and post-monsoon (December) seasons. Low- and high-frequency magnetic susceptibility (χlf and χhf), frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (χfd), χfd %, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), "hard" IRM (HIRM), saturation IRM (SIRM) and inter-parametric ratios were determined for the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used on limited number of samples. NOAA HYSPLIT MODEL backward trajectory analysis and principal component analysis were carried out on the data. Fly ash samples exhibit an average HIRM value (400.07 × 10(-5) Am(2) kg(-1)) that is comparable to that of soil samples. The pre- and post-monsoon samples show a consistent reduction in the concentration of magnetically "hard" minerals with increasing distance from the power plant. These data suggest that fly ash has indeed been transported from the power plant to the sampling locations. Hence, HIRM may perhaps be used as a proxy for tracking fly ash from coal-fired thermal power plants. Seasonal data show that the distribution of fly ash to the surrounding areas is minimum during monsoons. They also point to the dominance of SP magnetite in early-monsoon season, whereas magnetic depletion is documented in the monsoon season. This seasonal difference is attributable to both pedogenesis and anthropogenic activity i.e. operation of the thermal power plant. PMID:27056477

  9. Rock magnetic finger-printing of soil from a coal-fired thermal power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gune, Minal; Harshavardhana, B G; Balakrishna, K; Udayashankar, H N; Shankar, R; Manjunatha, B R

    2016-05-01

    We present seasonal rock magnetic data for 48 surficial soil samples collected seasonally around a coal-fired thermal power plant on the southwest coast of India to demonstrate how fly ash from the power plant is transported both spatially and seasonally. Sampling was carried out during pre-monsoon (March), early-monsoon (June), monsoon (September) and post-monsoon (December) seasons. Low- and high-frequency magnetic susceptibility (χlf and χhf), frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (χfd), χfd %, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), "hard" IRM (HIRM), saturation IRM (SIRM) and inter-parametric ratios were determined for the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used on limited number of samples. NOAA HYSPLIT MODEL backward trajectory analysis and principal component analysis were carried out on the data. Fly ash samples exhibit an average HIRM value (400.07 × 10(-5) Am(2) kg(-1)) that is comparable to that of soil samples. The pre- and post-monsoon samples show a consistent reduction in the concentration of magnetically "hard" minerals with increasing distance from the power plant. These data suggest that fly ash has indeed been transported from the power plant to the sampling locations. Hence, HIRM may perhaps be used as a proxy for tracking fly ash from coal-fired thermal power plants. Seasonal data show that the distribution of fly ash to the surrounding areas is minimum during monsoons. They also point to the dominance of SP magnetite in early-monsoon season, whereas magnetic depletion is documented in the monsoon season. This seasonal difference is attributable to both pedogenesis and anthropogenic activity i.e. operation of the thermal power plant.

  10. Damping Dependence of Reversal Magnetic Field on Co-based Nano-Ferromagnetic with Thermal Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ananda Herianto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hard disk development has used HAMR technology that applies heat to perpendicular media until near Curie temperature, then cools it down to room temperature. The use of HAMR technology is significantly influence by Gilbert damping constants. Damping affects the magnetization reversal and coercivity field. Simulation is used to evaluate magnetization reversal by completing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert explicit equation. A strong ferromagnetic cobalt based material with size 50×50×20 nm3 is used which parameters are anisotropy materials 3.51×106 erg/cm3, magnetic saturation 5697.5 G, exchange constant 1×10-7 erg/cm, and various Gilbert damping from 0.09 to 0.5. To observe the thermal effect, two schemes are used which are Reduced Barrier Writing and Curie Point Writing. As a result, materials with high damping is able to reverse the magnetizations faster and reduce the energy barrier. Moreover, it can lower the minimum field to start the magnetizations reversal, threshold field, and probability rate. The heating near Curie temperature has succeeded in reducing the reversal field to 1/10 compared to writing process in absence of thermal field.

  11. Utilization of the magnetogranulometric analysis to estimate the thermal conductivity of magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holotescu, S., E-mail: sorin.holotescu@mec.upt.r [Politehnica University of Timisoara, 1 Mihai Viteazu Bv., Timisoara 300222 (Romania); Stoian, F.D.; Marinica, O. [Politehnica University of Timisoara, 1 Mihai Viteazu Bv., Timisoara 300222 (Romania); Kubicar, L. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2011-05-15

    In this study, the semi-empirical equation for the effective thermal conductivity of the Holotescu-Stoian model was applied to a set of four dilutions of a transformer oil based magnetic fluid with magnetite nanoparticles as magnetic phase, using the results obtained for the size distributions from the magnetogranulometry analysis, followed by a comparison with the measured values of the effective thermal conductivity obtained by the hot ball method. The link between the size distribution by number and by volume used in the magnetogranulometry analysis and the Holotescu-Stoian model adaptation to the lognormal distribution were presented. The comparison between the results given by the model and the corresponding experimental data showed that by using the approximated size distribution to calculate the effective thermal conductivity the analytical results much closer to the experimental ones are obtained, compared to those given by the Maxwell classical model. - Research Highlights: Utilization of the approximate particle size distribution obtained by magnetogranulometric analysis to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of a ferrofluid. Presentation of the relationship between the magnetogranulometric method based on the lognormal particle size distribution by volume (Chantrell) and the method based on the lognormal distribution by number (Rasa), highlighting that they give different results. Presentation of a generalized form of the model for evaluating the effective thermal conductivity that includes the particles size distribution.

  12. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Helena quadrangle of Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Helena quadrangle covers a region largely within the Mississippi River flood plain in the extreme northern Gulf Coastal Province. Tertiary sediments in this area are relatively thick, and overlie a Paleozoic basin gradually shoaling to the northeast. The Oachita Tectonic Zone strikes southeasterly through the center of the quadrangle. The exposed sequence is almost entirely Quaternary sediments of the flood plain area. Older Cenozoic deposits crop out in upland areas on the west side of the river valley. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Sixty uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and all appeared to occur as the result of cultural and/or weather effects. Magnetic data appear to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region

  13. Airborne Sensor Thermal Management Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-03

    The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft. The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft.

  14. Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of magnetic vortex structures in nonideal magnetite recorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kovács, András;

    2016-01-01

    The thermal demagnetization of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, which govern the magnetic signal in many igneous rocks, is examined using off-axis electron holography. Visualization of a vortex structure held by an individual Fe3O4 particle (~250nm in diameter) during in situ...... remains stable under heating close to its unblocking temperature and is recovered upon cooling with the same or reversed vorticity. Hence, the PSD Fe3O4 particle exhibits thermomagnetic behavior comparable to a single-domain carrier, and thus, vortex states are considered reliable magnetic recorders...

  15. A Conduction-Cooled Superconducting Magnet System-Design, Fabrication and Thermal Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Holbøll, Joachim; Wang, Qiuliang;

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high-vacuumed c......-vacuumed cryostat. A two-stage GM cryocooler with a cooling power of 1.5 W at 4.2 K in the second stage is used to cool the system from room temperature to 4.2 K. In this paper, the detailed design, fabrication, thermal analysis and tests of the system are presented....

  16. 飞机航向对航空磁探仪搜潜概率影响的仿真%Simulation Study on Effect of Aero Flight Orientation on Searching Submarine Probability of Airborne Magnetic Anomaly Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲晓慧; 陈建勇; 单志超

    2014-01-01

    The submarine is looked upon as a magnetic dipole possessing three axis magnetic moment in this paper and the factor of its course is considered. The expression of magnetic field based on submarine as the center of orthogonal reference frame is educed and mathematics model of airborne Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) searching submarine is established. The effect of aero flight orientation on searching submarine probability of airborne MAD is simulated by using of Monte Carlo method. The simulation result shows that aeroplane should fly from south to north or contrarily when MAD is used to searching submarine.%将潜艇作为一个具有三轴磁矩的磁偶极子,并考虑其航向因素,根据理论分析得出了以潜艇为中心的直角坐标系下的磁场表达式,在此基础上建立了航空磁探仪搜潜的数学模型。利用蒙特卡洛法仿真了飞机航向对磁探仪搜潜概率的影响。仿真结果表明利用磁探仪搜潜时飞机应尽量南北飞行。

  17. Magnetic field and thermal radiation effects on steady hydromagnetic Couette flow through a porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigozie Israel-Cookey

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates effects of thermal radiation and magnetic field on hydromagnetic Couette flow of a highly viscous fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity at constant pressure through a porous channel. The influence of the channel permeability is also assessed. The relevant governing partial differential equations have been transformed to non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations by virtue of the steady nature of the flow and are solved numerically using a marching finite difference scheme to give approximate solutions for the velocity and temperature profiles. We highlight the effects of Nahme numbers, magnetic field, radiation and permeability parameters on both profiles. The results obtained are used to give graphical illustrations of the distribution of the flow variables and are discussed.

  18. New 2D Thermal Model Applied to an LHC Inner Triplet Quadrupole Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Bielert, ER; Ten Kate, HHJ; Verweij, AP

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed numerical model is presented that enables to compute two-dimensional heat transfer and temperature distributions over the cross-section of superconducting accelerator magnets. The entire thermal path from strand-in-cable to heat sink, including helium channels is considered. Superfluid helium properties are combined with temperature- and field-dependent non-linear solid material properties. Interfacial interactions are also taken into account. The model is applied to the cross-section of an inner triplet quadrupole magnet featuring a new concept for the ground insulation. Beam loss profiles are implemented as main heat source. It is concluded that operational margins can be considerably increased by opening additional thermal paths, improving the cooling conditions.

  19. In-plane magnetic field effect on switching voltage and thermal stability in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezes, C.; Rojas Rozas, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Alzate, J. G.; Cai, X.; Katine, J. A.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Khalili Amiri, P.; Wang, K. L.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of in-plane magnetic field on switching voltage (Vsw) and thermal stability factor (Δ) are investigated in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). Dwell time measurements are used to determine the voltage dependence of the energy barrier height for various in-plane magnetic fields (Hin), and gain insight into the Hin dependent energy landscape. We find that both Vsw and Δ decrease with increasing Hin, with a dominant linear dependence. The results are reproduced by calculations based on a macrospin model while accounting for the modified magnetization configuration in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  20. Thermal Transition of Ribonuclease A Observed Using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫永彬; 罗雪春; 周海梦; 张日清

    2001-01-01

    The thermal transition of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) was investigated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Significant resonance overlap in the large native protein limits accurate assignments in the 1H NMR spectrum. This study proposes extending the investigation of large proteins by dynamic analysis. Comparison of the traditional method and the correlation coefficient method suggests successful application of spectrum image analysis in dynamic protein studies by NMR.

  1. Effects of thermal annealing on structural and magnetic properties of thin Pt/Cr/Co multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Center for Advanced Material Processing, Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713 209 (India); Oskar Liedke, Maciej [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Gupta, A. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.i [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2010-11-15

    Thermal stability of thin Pt/Cr/Co multilayers and the subsequent changes in their structural, magnetic, and magneto-optical properties are reported. We observe CoCrPt ternary alloy phase formation due to annealing at temperatures about 773 K, which is accompanied by enhancement in the coercivity value. In addition, 360{sup o} domain wall superimposed on a monodomain like background has been observed in the pristine multilayer, which changes into a multidomain upon annealing at 873 K.

  2. Thermal effect on magnetic parameters of high-coercivity cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagas, E. F., E-mail: efchagas@fisica.ufmt.br; Ponce, A. S.; Prado, R. J.; Silva, G. M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900 Cuiabá-MT (Brazil); Bettini, J. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, 13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150 Urca. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-07-21

    We prepared very high-coercivity cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by a combustion method and using short-time high-energy mechanical milling to increase strain and the structural defects density. The coercivity (H{sub C}) of the milled sample reached 3.75 kOe—a value almost five times higher than that obtained for the non-milled material (0.76 kOe). To investigate the effect of the temperature on the magnetic behavior of the milled sample, we performed a thermal treatment on the milled sample at 300, 400, and 600 °C for 30 and 180 min. We analyzed the changes in the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles due to the thermal treatment using the hysteresis curves, Williamson-Hall analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal treatment at 600 °C causes decreases in the microstructural strain and density of structural defects resulting in a significant decrease in H{sub C}. Furthermore, this thermal treatment increases the size of the nanoparticles and, as a consequence, there is a substantial increase in the saturation magnetization (M{sub S}). The H{sub C} of the samples treated at 600 °C for 30 and 180 min were 2.24 and 1.93 kOe, respectively, and the M{sub S} of these same samples increased from 57 emu/g to 66 and 70 emu/g, respectively. The H{sub C} and the M{sub S} are less affected by the thermal treatment at 300 and 400 °C.

  3. Accumulation and thermalization of cold atoms in a finite-depth magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chicireanu, R; Gorceix, O; Keller, J C; Laburthe-Tolra, B; Marechal, E; Porto, J V; Pouderous, A; Vernac, L

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically study the continuous accumulation of cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) into a finite depth trap, consisting in a magnetic quadrupole trap dressed by a radiofrequency (RF) field. Chromium atoms (52 isotope) in a MOT are continuously optically pumped by the MOT lasers to metastable dark states. In presence of a RF field, the temperature of the metastable atoms that remain magnetically trapped can be as low as 25 microK, with a density of 10^17 atoms.m-3, resulting in an increase of the phase-space density, still limited to 7.10^-6 by inelastic collisions. To investigate the thermalization issues in the truncated trap, we measure the free evaporation rate in the RF-truncated magnetic trap, and deduce the average elastic cross section for atoms in the 5D4 metastable states, equal to 7.0 10^-16m2.

  4. Generation of a symmetric magnetic field by thermal convection in a plane rotating layer

    CERN Document Server

    Zheligovsky, V

    2010-01-01

    We investigate numerically magnetic field generation by thermal convection with square periodicity cells in a rotating horizontal layer of electrically-conducting fluid with stress-free electrically perfectly conducting boundaries for Rayleigh numbers in the interval 5100\\le R\\le 5800. Dynamos of three kinds, apparently not encountered before, are presented: 1) Steady and time-periodic regimes, where the flow and magnetic field are symmetric about a vertical axis. In regimes with this symmetry, the global alpha-effect is insignificant, and the complex structure of the system of amplitude equations controlling weakly nonlinear stability of the system to perturbations with large spatial and temporal scales suggests that the perturbations are likely to exhibit uncommon complex patterns of behaviour, to be studied in the future work. 2) Periodic in time regimes, where magnetic field is always concentrated in the interior of the convective layer, in contrast to the behaviour first observed by St Pierre (1993) and ...

  5. Thermal Analysis on Radial Flux Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman Syaeful A Syaeful A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The main source of heat in the permanent magnet generator (PMG is the total losses which f come from winding losses, core losses and rotational losses. Total heat arising from such these losses must be properly distributed and maintained so as not to exceed the maximum allowable temperature to prevent damage to insulation on the winding and demagnetization on the permanent magnet machines. In this research, we consider thermal analysis which is occurred on the radial flux PMG by using finite element method to determine the extent to which the heat generated can be properly distributed. The simulation results show that there are no points of heat concentration or hot spot. The simulation maximum temperatures of the permanent magnet and the winding are 39.1oC and 72.5oC respectively while the experimental maximum temperature of the winding is 62oC.

  6. Methotrexate conjugated magnetic nanoparticle for targeted drug delivery and thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jagriti; Bhargava, Parag; Bahadur, D.

    2014-05-01

    A simple soft chemical approach is used for the preparation of citrate functionalized iron oxide (Fe3O4) aqueous colloidal magnetic nanoparticles (CA-MNPs) of average size ˜10 nm. The CA-MNPs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with strong field dependent magnetic responsivity. The CA-MNPs can be conjugated with Methotrexate (MTX) drug through amide bonds between the carboxylic group on the surface of MNPs and amine group of MTX. The surface functionalization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with citric acid and conjugation of MTX drug is evident from FTIR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurement, and elemental and thermal analyses. From the drug release study, it has been observed that this bonding of MTX conjugated MNPs (MTX-MNPs) is cleaved by the intracellular enzymes in lysosome, and MTX is delivered largely inside target cancerous cells at lower pH, thereby reducing toxicity to normal cells. Also, it has been observed that the intercellular uptake of MTX-MNPs is higher compared to CA-MNPs. In addition, the aqueous colloidal stability, optimal magnetization, and good specific absorption rate (under external AC magnetic field) of CA-MNPs act as effective heating source for thermal therapy. Cytotoxicity study of MTX-MNPs shows the reduction of cellular viability for human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Further, a synergistic effect of MTX-MNPs shows a more effective tumor cell death due to the combined effect of thermo-chemotherapy.

  7. Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect of Magnetic Thin Films for Ultrafast Thermal Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Yang; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Delin; Lattery, Dustin M; Li, Mo; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-07-01

    Thermomagnetic and magneto-optical effects are two fundamental but unique phenomena existing in magnetic materials. In this work, we demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) as an advanced thermal characterization technique by studying the original factors of the MOKE signal from four magnetic transducers, including TbFe, GdFeCo, Co/Pd, and CoFe/Pt. A figure of merit is proposed to evaluate the performance of the transducer layers, corresponding to the degree of the signal-to-noise ratio in TR-MOKE measurements. We observe improved figure of merit for rare-earth transition-metal-based TbFe and GdFeCo transducers and attribute this improvement to their relatively larger temperature-dependent magnetization and the Kerr rotation angle at the saturated magnetization state. Furthermore, an optimal thickness of TbFe is found to be ∼18.5 nm to give the best performance. Our findings will facilitate the nanoscale thermal characterization and the device design where the thermo-magneto-optical coupling plays an important role. PMID:27269127

  8. Model atmospheres and radiation of magnetic neutron stars: Anisotropic thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Ventura, J.; Zavlin, V. E.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropy of the thermal radiation emitted by a surface element of a neutron star atmosphere (e.g., by a polar cap of a radio pulsar). Angular dependences of the partial fluxes at various photon energies, and spectra at various angles are obtained for different values of the effective temperature T(sub eff) and magnetic field strength B, and for different directions of the magnetic field. It is shown that the local radiation of the magnetized neutron star atmospheres is highly anisotropic, with the maximum flux emitted in the magnetic field direction. At high B the angular dependences in the soft X-ray range have two maxima, a high narrow peak along B and a lower and broader maximum at intermediate angles. The radiation is strongly polarized, the modulation of the degree of polarization due to the rotation of the neurtron star may be much higher than that for the radiative flux. The results obtained are compared with recent ROSAT observations of the thermal-like radiation from the radio pulsars PSR 1929+10 and PSR J0437-4715.

  9. THERMAL EQUILIBRIA OF OPTICALLY THIN, MAGNETICALLY SUPPORTED, TWO-TEMPERATURE, BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtained thermal equilibrium solutions for optically thin, two-temperature black hole accretion disks incorporating magnetic fields. The main objective of this study is to explain the bright/hard state observed during the bright/slow transition of galactic black hole candidates. We assume that the energy transfer from ions to electrons occurs via Coulomb collisions. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, and inverse Compton scattering are considered as the radiative cooling processes. In order to complete the set of basic equations, we specify the magnetic flux advection rate instead of β = pgas/pmag. We find magnetically supported (low-β), thermally stable solutions. In these solutions, the total amount of the heating via the dissipation of turbulent magnetic fields goes into electrons and balances the radiative cooling. The low-β solutions extend to high mass accretion rates (∼>α2M-dotEdd) and the electron temperature is moderately cool (Te ∼ 108-109.5 K). High luminosities (∼>0.1LEdd) and moderately high energy cutoffs in the X-ray spectrum (∼50-200 keV) observed in the bright/hard state can be explained by the low-β solutions.

  10. Calculation of the Thermal Footprint of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, I; Evans, T; Moyer, R; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Kasilov, S; Lasnier, C; Porter, G; Runov, A; Schaffer, M; Schneider, R; Watkins, J

    2007-09-14

    The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on heat transport in DIII-D H-mode plasmas has been calculated by combining the TRIP3D field-line tracing code with the E3D two-fluid transport code. Simulations show that the divertor heat flux distribution becomes non-axisymmetric because heat flux is efficiently guided to the divertor along the three-dimensional invariant manifolds of the magnetic field. Calculations demonstrate that heat flux is spread over a wider area of the divertor target, thereby reducing the peak heat flux delivered during steady-state operation. Filtered optical cameras have observed non-axisymmetric particle fluxes at the strike-point and Langmuir probes have observed non-axisymmetric floating potentials. On the other hand, the predicted magnitude of stochastic thermal transport is too large to match the pedestal plasma profiles measured by Thomson scattering and charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The Braginskii thermal conductivity overestimates the expected heat transport in the pedestal because the mean free path is longer than estimates of the parallel thermal correlation length, and collisionless transport models are probably required for accurate description. However, even the collisionless estimates for electron thermal transport are too large by one to two orders of magnitude. Thus, it is likely that another mechanism such as rotational screening of resonant perturbations limits the stochastic region and reduces transport inside of the pedestal.

  11. Controlled synthesis and size-dependent thermal conductivity of Fe3O4 magnetic nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baodui; Wang, Baogang; Wei, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaobo; Lou, Wenjing

    2012-01-21

    The effect of nanoparticle size (4~44 nm) on the thermal conductivities of heat transfer oils has been systematically examined using iron oxide nanoparticles. Such Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple one-pot pyrolysis method. The size (16~44 nm), shape and assembly patterns of monodisperse Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were modulated by only controlling the amount of Fe(acac)(3). After the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4) NPs were dispersed in heat transfer oils, the prepared magnetic nanofluids exhibit higher thermal conductivity than heat transfer oils, and the enhanced values increase with a decrease in particle size. In addition, the viscosities of all nanofliuids are remarkably lower than that of the base fluid, which has been found for the first time in the nanofluid field. The promising features offer potential application in thermal energy engineering. PMID:22086086

  12. The thermal instability in a sheared magnetic field - Filament condensation with anisotropic heat conduction. [solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The condensation-mode growth rate of the thermal instability in an empirically motivated sheared field is shown to depend upon the existence of perpendicular thermal conduction. This typically very small effect (perpendicular conductivity/parallel conductivity less than about 10 to the -10th for the solar corona) increases the spatial-derivative order of the compressible temperature-perturbation equation, and thereby eliminates the singularities which appear when perpendicular conductivity = 0. The resulting growth rate is less than 1.5 times the controlling constant-density radiation rate, and has a clear maximum at a cross-field length of order 100 times and a width of about 0.1 the magnetic shear scale for solar conditions. The profiles of the observable temperature and density perturbations are independent of the thermal conductivity, and thus agree with those found previously. An analytic solution to the short-wavelength incompressible case is also given.

  13. A study of thermal, dielectric and magnetic properties of strontium malonate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Varghese, E-mail: varma57@gmail.com [Department of Physics, St. Aloysius' College, Edathua 689 573 (India); Jacob, Sabu [Department of Physics, St. Aloysius' College, Edathua 689 573 (India); Mahadevan, C.K. [Physics Research Centre, S.T. Hindu College, Nagercoil 629 002 (India); Abraham, K.E. [Department of Physics, S.B. College, Changanacherry 686 101 (India)

    2012-01-15

    Crystals of strontium malonate (SrC{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were grown in silica gel by the single diffusion technique. The thermo gravimetric (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies were carried out to investigate the thermal stability of the crystal. The dielectric behavior of the title compound crystal was investigated by measuring the dielectric parameters - dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity as a function of four frequencies - 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 100 kHz and 1 MHz at temperatures ranging from 50 to 170 Degree-Sign C. Results indicate that the title compound is thermally stable up to about 409 Degree-Sign C and is a promising low {epsilon}{sub r}-value dielectric material. The magnetic behavior of the crystal was also explored using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  14. A study of thermal, dielectric and magnetic properties of strontium malonate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Varghese; Jacob, Sabu; Mahadevan, C. K.; Abraham, K. E.

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of strontium malonate (SrC 3H 2O 4) were grown in silica gel by the single diffusion technique. The thermo gravimetric (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies were carried out to investigate the thermal stability of the crystal. The dielectric behavior of the title compound crystal was investigated by measuring the dielectric parameters - dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity as a function of four frequencies -1 kHz, 10 kHz, 100 kHz and 1 MHz at temperatures ranging from 50 to 170 °C. Results indicate that the title compound is thermally stable up to about 409 °C and is a promising low εr-value dielectric material. The magnetic behavior of the crystal was also explored using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  15. Effects of thermal annealing on the magnetic interactions in nanogranular Fe-Ag thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.; Fdez-Gubieda, M.L.; Svalov, A. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Campus de Leioa, 48940 Leioa (Spain); Meneghini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' , Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, 00146 Roma (Italy); Orue, I. [SGIker, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Campus de Leioa, 48940 Leioa (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub x}Ag{sub 100-x} granular thin films with competing interactions (25 {<=} x{<=} 35). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing up to 200 Degree-Sign C mainly modifies the interface of Fe nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing reduces RKKY interactions in Fe{sub 25}Ag{sub 75}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing favors exchange interactions and ferromagnetic order in Fe{sub 35}Ag{sub 65}. - Abstract: In this paper we have studied, by analysing the evolution of the magnetic behaviour during thermal treatment, the role of the interparticle magnetic interactions in Fe{sub x}Ag{sub 100-x} granular thin films prepared by sputtering deposition technique. Two compositions have been selected: x = 25 and 35, below and around the magnetic percolation of the system, respectively, according to our previous works. The structure of these thin films has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. To analyse the magnetic behaviour, DC magnetic measurements have been carried out after progressively annealing the samples at different temperatures (0 {<=} T{sub ann} {<=} 200 Degree-Sign C). These measurements have revealed that, upon thermal treatment, the frustrated state at low temperatures (T < 80 K) for the x = 25 sample tends to disappear, probably due to the weakening of RKKY interactions after the segregation of soluted Fe atoms in the Ag matrix. However, dipolar interactions are not affected by the annealing. On the contrary, at x = 35, around the magnetic percolation, the annealing gives rise to an increasingly ordered interface, thereby enhancing the transfer of the direct exchange interactions.

  16. The JAC airborne EM system : AEM-05

    OpenAIRE

    Levaniemi, H.; Beamish, D; Hautaniemi, H.; Kurimo, M.; Suppala, I.; Vironmaki, J.; Cuss, R.J.; Lahti, M; Tartaras, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system operated by the Joint Airborne geoscience Capability (JAC), a partnership between the Finnish and British Geological Surveys. The system is a component of a 3-in-1, fixed-wing facility acquiring magnetic gradiometer and full spectrum radiometric data alongside the wing-tip, frequency-domain AEM measurements. The AEM system has recently (2005) been upgraded from 2 to 4 frequencies and now provides a bandwidth from 900 Hz to 25 kHz....

  17. Hall effect on thermal stability of ferromagnetic fluid in porous medium in the presence of horizontal magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Amrish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the theoretical investigation of the effect of Hall currents on the thermal stability of a ferromagnetic fluid heated from below in porous medium. For a fluid layer between two free boundaries, an exact solution is obtained using a linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis. A dispersion relation governing the effects of medium permeability, a uniform horizontal magnetic field, magnetization and Hall currents is derived. For the case of stationary convection, it is found that the magnetic field and magnetization have a stabilizing effect on the system, as such their effect is to postpone the onset of thermal instability whereas Hall currents are found to hasten the onset of thermal instability. The medium permeability hastens the onset of convection under certain conditions. The principle of exchange of stabilities is not valid for the problem under consideration whereas in the absence of Hall currents (hence magnetic field, it is valid under certain conditions.

  18. Magnetic Thermal Ablation Using Ferrofluids: Influence of Administration Mode on Biological Effect in Different Porcine Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of magnetic thermal ablation in different porcine tissues using either a singular injection or a continuous infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In the first setting samples of three ferrofluids containing different amounts of iron (1:171, 2:192, and 3:214 mg/ml) were singularly interstitially injected into specimens of porcine liver, kidney, and muscle (n = 5). Then the specimens were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (2.86 kA/m, 190 kHz) generated by a circular coil for 5 min. In the second experimental setup ferrofluid samples were continuously interstitially infused into the tissue specimens during the exposure to the magnetic field. To measure the temperature increase two fiber-optic temperature probes with a fixed distance of 0.5 cm were inserted into the specimens along the puncture tract of the injection needle and the temperature was measured every 15 s. Finally, the specimens were dissected, the diameters of the created thermal lesions were measured, and the volumes were calculated and compared. Compared to continuous infusion, a single injection of ferrofluids resulted in smaller coagulation volumes in all tissues. Significant differences regarding coagulation volume were found in kidney and muscle specimens. The continuous infusion technique led to more elliptically shaped coagulation volumes due to larger diameters along the puncture tract. Our data show the feasibility of magnetic thermal ablation using either a single interstitial injection or continuous infusion for therapy of lesions in muscle, kidney, and liver. Continuous infusion of ferrofluids results in larger zones of necrosis compared to a single injection technique.

  19. Nanoscale thermal, acoustic, and magnetic dynamics probed with soft x-ray light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Mark E.

    This thesis discusses the application of coherent, ultrafast beams of soft x-ray light from high-order harmonic generation (HHG) to study thermal, acoustic, and magnetic processes in nanostructures. This short-wavelength light is a uniquely powerful probe of surface dynamics since it has both a very short wavelength and duration. First, this thesis reports the first observation and quantitative measurements of the transition from diffusive to ballistic thermal transport for the case of heat flow away from a heated nanostructure into a bulk substrate. This measurement provides insight into the fundamentals of thermal energy transport away from nanoscale hot spots, and demonstrates a fundamental limit to the energy dissipation capability of nanostructures. Further, we propose a straightforward correction to the Fourier law for heat diffusion, necessary for thermal management in nanoelectronics, nano-enabled energy systems, nanomanufacturing, and nanomedicine. Second, this work discusses dynamic measurements of ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW) and the first SAW dispersion measurement in a nanostructured system. These results are directly applicable to adhesion and thickness diagnostics of very thin films. Finally, this thesis reports the first use of light from HHG to study magnetic orientation. Using the transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect and soft x-ray light near the M-absorption edges of Fe, Co, and Ni, magnetic asymmetries up to 8% are observed from thin Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films. This signal is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that observed using optical methods, showing great promise for dynamic imaging of domain flipping at the 100 nm level.

  20. 导电导磁层状介质上的固定翼航空瞬变电磁响应%The Fixed-wing Airborne Transient Electromagnetic response of a magnetic conductive layered medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃庆炎; 王绪本; 毛立峰

    2011-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic theory, the forward formulae is obtained for Fixed-wing Airborne Transient Electromagnetic(ATEM) method in a magnetic conductive layered earth which contains dielectric parameters, conductivity and permeability parameters. The computer program for computing the ATEM response is worked out and the forward computing is completed for the theoretical models. According to the results of forward computing, we analyzed how the dielectric constant, resistivity, susceptibility and flight height influence the electromagnetic response. The results show that (1) Under the same condition, the lower the resistivity of the layered earth the greater the early time airborne electromagnetic response; (2) The dielectric parameters affect only the early time electromagnetic response and can be ignored at the late time; (3) The larger the permeability the greater the airborne electromagnetic response, so for the high permeability media, we can not ignore the influence of magnetic; (4) The higher the flight, the weaker the airborne electromagnetic response; The change in flight height will caused the distortion of airborne electromagnetic response, the lower flight height will cause the larger distortion than the higher flight height; For the good conductivity medium or the good permeability medium, the change in flight height will cause the larger relative error in the received signal.%基于电磁理论,导出了含介电参数、电导率参数和磁导率参数的导电导磁层状大地条件下的固定翼航空瞬变电磁响应的计算公式.编制了计算机程序,并对理论模型进行正演计算,根据计算结果分析了模型的介电常数、电阻率和磁导率参数、飞行高度参数对响应的影响.理论模型的计算结果显示当其它条件相同时,介质电阻率越小或磁导率越大,则航空电磁响应也越大;而介质的介电参数变化仅影响早期的电磁响应,晚期的响应可以忽略介电因素的

  1. Tidal Heating of Earth-like Exoplanets around M Stars: Thermal, Magnetic, and Orbital Evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the “tidal zone,” where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a viscoelastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within 0.07 AU circularize before 10 Gyr, independent of initial eccentricity. Once circular, these planets cool monotonically and maintain dynamos similar to that of Earth. Planets forced into eccentric orbits can experience a super-cooling of the core and rapid core solidification, inhibiting dynamo action for planets in the habitable zone. We find that tidal heating is insignificant in the habitable zone around 0.45 (or larger) solar-mass stars because tidal dissipation is a stronger function of orbital distance than stellar mass, and the habitable zone is farther from larger stars. Suppression of the planetary magnetic field exposes the atmosphere to stellar wind erosion and the surface to harmful radiation. In addition to weak magnetic fields, massive melt eruption rates and prolonged magma oceans may render eccentric planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars inhospitable for life. Key Words

  2. Thermal Performance of the Supporting System for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, M; Parma, Vittorio; Vandoni, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    The LHC collider will be composed of approximately 1700 main ring superconducting magnets cooled to 1.9 K in pressurised superfluid helium and supported within their cryostats on low heat in-leak column-type supports. The precise positioning of the heavy magnets and the stringent thermal budgets imposed by the machine cryogenic system, require a sound thermo-mechanical design of the support system. Each support is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in glass-fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with its top part interfaced to the magnet at 1.9 K and its bottom part mounted onto the cryostat vacuum vessel at 293 K. In order to reduce the conduction heat in-leak at 1.9 K, each support mounts two heat intercepts at intermediate locations on the column, both actively cooled by cryogenic lines carrying helium gas at 4.5-10 K and 50-65 K. The need to assess the thermal performance of the supports has lead to setting up a dedicated test set-up for precision heat load measurements on prototype supports. This pa...

  3. Effect of magnetized phonons on electrical and thermal conductivity of neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Baiko, D A

    2016-01-01

    We study electrical and thermal conductivities of degenerate electrons emitting and absorbing phonons in a strongly magnetized crystalline neutron star crust. We take into account modification of the phonon spectrum of a Coulomb solid of ions caused by a strong magnetic field. Boltzmann transport equation is solved using a generalized variational method. The ensuing three-dimensional integrals over the transferred momenta are evaluated by two different numerical techniques, the Monte-Carlo method and a regular integration over the first Brillouin zone. The results of the two numerical approaches are shown to be in a good agreement. An appreciable growth of electrical and thermal resistivities is reported at quantum and intermediate temperatures $T \\lesssim 0.1 T_{\\rm p}$ ($T_{\\rm p}$ is the ion plasma temperature) in a wide range of chemical compositions and mass densities of matter even for moderately magnetized crystals $\\omega_{\\rm B} \\sim \\omega_{\\rm p}$ ($\\omega_{\\rm B}$ and $\\omega_{\\rm p}$ are the ion ...

  4. Thermal phase transition in artificial spin ice systems induces the formation and migration of monopole-like magnetic excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Artificial spin ice systems exhibit monopole-like magnetic excitations. We develop here a theoretical study of the thermal phase transition of an artificial spin ice system, and we elucidate the role of the monopole excitations in the transition temperature. The dynamics of the spin ice is described by an efficient model based on cellular automata, which considers both thermal effects and dipolar interactions. We have established the critical temperature of the phase transition as function of the magnetic moment and the energy barrier of reversion. In addition, we predict that thermal gradients in the system induce the motion of elementary excitations, which could permit to manipulate monopole-like states.

  5. Airborne EM applied to environmental geoscience in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, D

    2002-01-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) has been highlighting the need for modern, multi-sensor airborne geophysical data in the UK. Here David Beamish, geophysicist with the BGS, describes the first trial airborne electromagnetic data acquired and its relevance to environmental geoscience. The lack of modern, multi-sensor (magnetic, radiometric and electromagnetic) data represents one of the most serious gaps in the geoscience knowledge base of the UK, and a national, high resolution airborne su...

  6. Magnetism and thermal induced characteristics of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chun-Shiang; Hsi, Chi-Shiung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Fang-Chi, E-mail: fangchi@nuu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Moo-Chin [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetics, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yung-Sheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 803, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    Magnetic properties of Li{sub 2}O-MnO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} (LMCPS) glasses doped with various amounts of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated. There is a dramatic change in the magnetic property of pristine LMCPS after the addition of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and crystallized at 850 Degree-Sign C for 4 h. Both the electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that the glass ceramic with 4 at% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the coexistence of superparamagnetism and ferromagnetism at room temperature. When the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content was higher than 8 at%, the LMCPS glasses showed ferromagnetism behavior. The complex magnetic behavior is due to the distribution of (Li, Mn)ferrite particle sizes driven by the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The thermal induced hysteresis loss of the crystallized LMCPS glass ceramics was characterized under an alternating magnetic field. The energy dissipations of the crystallized LMCPS glass ceramics were determined by the concentration and Mn/Fe ratios of Li(Mn, Fe)ferrite phase formed in the glass ceramics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in LMCPS glass ceramic promotes the growth of (Li, Mn)ferrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} determines the size of (Li,Mn)ferrite particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Room temperature superparamagnetism was obtained at 4 at% of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In addition, Li(Mn, Fe)ferrite phase contributes to the magnetic energy loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The largest energy loss is the trade-off between the ferrite content and Mn/Fe ratio.

  7. Electrochemical properties of a thermally expanded magnetic graphene composite with a conductive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mahmoud M M; Imae, Toyoko

    2016-04-21

    A magnetic graphene composite derived from stage-1 FeCl3-graphite intercalation compounds was thermally treated for up to 75 min at 400 °C or for 2 min at high temperatures up to 900 °C. These heat-treatments of the magnetic graphene composite gave rise to the cubical expansion of graphene with the enlargement of inter-graphene distances. The specific capacitance of the magnetic graphene composite increased upon heating and reached 42 F g(-1) at a scan rate of 5 mV s(-1) in 1.0 M NaCl, after being treated for 2 min at 900 °C. This value corresponds to 840% increase in the capacitance activity superior to that (5 F g(-1)) of the pristine magnetic graphene composite before heat-treatment. This capacitance enhancement can play a significant role in the increase of the surface area that reached 17.2 m(2) g(-1) during the non-defective inter-graphene exfoliation. Moreover, the magnetic graphene composite heated at 900 °C was hybridized with polyaniline by in situ polymerization of aniline to reach a specific capacitance of 253 F g(-1) at 5 mV s(-1). The current procedure of heat-treatment and hybridization with a conductive polymer can be an effective method for attaining a well-expanded magnetic graphene composite possessing an enhanced electrochemical activity with a relatively high energy density (141 W h kg(-1) in 1.0 M NaCl) and an excellent stability (99% after 9000 cycles of 20 A g(-1)). PMID:27030519

  8. Magnetism and thermal induced characteristics of Fe2O3 content bioceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic properties of Li2O–MnO2–CaO–P2O5–SiO2 (LMCPS) glasses doped with various amounts of Fe2O3 were investigated. There is a dramatic change in the magnetic property of pristine LMCPS after the addition of Fe2O3 and crystallized at 850 °C for 4 h. Both the electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that the glass ceramic with 4 at% Fe2O3 exhibited the coexistence of superparamagnetism and ferromagnetism at room temperature. When the Fe2O3 content was higher than 8 at%, the LMCPS glasses showed ferromagnetism behavior. The complex magnetic behavior is due to the distribution of (Li, Mn)ferrite particle sizes driven by the Fe2O3 content. The thermal induced hysteresis loss of the crystallized LMCPS glass ceramics was characterized under an alternating magnetic field. The energy dissipations of the crystallized LMCPS glass ceramics were determined by the concentration and Mn/Fe ratios of Li(Mn, Fe)ferrite phase formed in the glass ceramics. - Highlights: ► Presence of Fe2O3 in LMCPS glass ceramic promotes the growth of (Li, Mn)ferrite. ► The amount of Fe2O3 determines the size of (Li,Mn)ferrite particles. ► Room temperature superparamagnetism was obtained at 4 at% of Fe2O3 addition. ► In addition, Li(Mn, Fe)ferrite phase contributes to the magnetic energy loss. ► The largest energy loss is the trade-off between the ferrite content and Mn/Fe ratio.

  9. On the quantum magnetic oscillations of electrical and thermal conductivities of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Reis, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Oscillating thermodynamic quantities of diamagnetic materials, specially graphene, have been attracting attention of the scientific community due to the possibility to experimentally map the Fermi surface of the material. These have been the case of the de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas effects, found on the magnetization and electrical conductivity, respectively. In this direction, managing the thermodynamic oscillations is of practical purpose, since from the reconstructed Fermi surface it is possible to access, for instance, the electronic density. The present work theoretically explores the quantum oscillations of electrical and thermal conductivities of a monolayer graphene under a crossed magnetic and electric fields. We found that the longitudinal electric field can increase the amplitude of the oscillations and this result is of practical and broad interest for both, experimental and device physics.

  10. Electrical, thermal, catalytic and magnetic properties of nano-structured materials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuwei

    Nanotechnology is a subject that studies the fabrication, properties, and applications of materials on the nanometer-scale. Top-down and bottom-up approaches are commonly used in nano-structure fabrication. The top-down approach is used to fabricate nano-structures from bulk materials by lithography, etching, and polishing etc. It is commonly used in mechanical, electronic, and photonic devices. Bottom-up approaches fabricate nano-structures from atoms or molecules by chemical synthesis, self-assembly, and deposition, such as sol-gel processing, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), focused ion beam (FIB) milling/deposition, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and electro-deposition etc. Nano-structures can have several different dimensionalities, including zero-dimensional nano-structures, such as fullerenes, nano-particles, quantum dots, nano-sized clusters; one-dimensional nano-structures, such as carbon nanotubes, metallic and semiconducting nanowires; two-dimensional nano-structures, such as graphene, super lattice, thin films; and three-dimensional nano-structures, such as photonic structures, anodic aluminum oxide, and molecular sieves. These nano-structured materials exhibit unique electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the quantum mechanical regime. Various techniques can be used to study these properties, such as scanning probe microscopy (SPM), scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), micro Raman spectroscopy, etc. These unique properties have important applications in modern technologies, such as random access memories, display, solar energy conversion, chemical sensing, and bio-medical devices. This thesis includes four main topics in the broad area of nanoscience: magnetic properties of ferro-magnetic cobalt nanowires, plasmonic properties of metallic nano-particles, photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes, and electro-thermal-optical properties of carbon nanotubes. These materials and their

  11. Design of an axial flux PM motor using magnetic and thermal equivalent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Romain-Bernard; Glises, Raynal; Espanet, Christophe; Saint Ellier, Emeline; Dubas, Frédéric; Chamagne, Didier

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new generation of electric motors (7.5-15 kW) for automotive powertrains. The target is a full electric direct drive vehicle, for the particular application to heavy quadricycles. An original axial flux PM structure is proposed due to the simplicity of its manufacturing. However it leads to a 3D structure, difficult to study. The paper deals with analytical models that can be used to achieve the analysis and the sizing of the motor. The electromagnetic behavior is modeled using a simple magnetic equivalent network and the thermal behavior is analyzed with a thermal network. Finally, the analytical results are compared to those experimentally obtained and it proves the interest of the proposed structure: the construction is simple and the performances are satisfying.

  12. Clinical utility of magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) for realtime guidance of deep hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, P. R.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Maccarini, P. F.; Wyatt, Cory; Arunachalam, K.; Arabe, O.; Stakhursky, V.; Soher, B.; MacFall, J. R.; Li, Z.; Joines, William T.; Rangarao, S.; Cheng, K. S.; Das, S. K.; Martins, Carlos D.; Charles, Cecil; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Wong, T.; Jones, E.; Vujaskovic, Z.

    2009-02-01

    A critical need has emerged for volumetric thermometry to visualize 3D temperature distributions in real time during deep hyperthermia treatments used as an adjuvant to radiation or chemotherapy for cancer. For the current effort, magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) is used to measure 2D temperature rise distributions in four cross sections of large extremity soft tissue sarcomas during hyperthermia treatments. Novel hardware and software techniques are described which improve the signal to noise ratio of MR images, minimize motion artifact from circulating coupling fluids, and provide accurate high resolution volumetric thermal dosimetry. For the first 10 extremity sarcoma patients, the mean difference between MRTI region of interest and adjacent interstitial point measurements during the period of steady state temperature was 0.85°C. With 1min temporal resolution of measurements in four image planes, this noninvasive MRTI approach has demonstrated its utility for accurate monitoring and realtime steering of heat into tumors at depth in the body.

  13. Drift Mode Growth Rate and Associated Ion Thermal Transport in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-Ke; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Drift mode linear growth rate and quasi-linear ion thermal transport in the reversed magnetic shear plasma are investigated by using the two-fluid theory, previously developed by Weiland and the Chalmers group [J. Nucl.Fusion, 29 (1989) 1810; ibid. 30 (1990) 983]. The theory is here extended to include both the radial electrical field shear (dEr/dr) and the electron fluid velocity (Ve) in the sheared coordinate system. Here, Ve describes the coupling between the safety factor q and the Er × B velocity V E. Their influences on the growth rate and associated ion thermal transport are obtained numerically. In addition, the ion heat pinch in the reversed shear plasma is observed. Qualitatively, the present conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Load frequency stabilization of four area hydro thermal system using Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ruby meena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Automatic generation control in electric power system design is a major concern nowadays due to its rising size, varying structure, integration of renewable-energy sources and distributed generators to meet the growing demand. In this paper, automatic generation control of an interconnected four area hydro thermal system examined. Each area equipped with reheat turbine for thermal system and hydro turbine with electric governor for hydro system. Load frequency stabilization gained by including Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system (SMES in all areas. A comparative analysis made between Proportional and Integral (PI controller with Fuzzy Logic controller with and without including SMES in the four area power system. The designed Fuzzy Logic Controller can generate best dynamic performance for step load perturbations given in all areas. The system simulation realized by using MATLAB software.

  15. Channeled PIXE and magnetic measurements in Co implanted and thermally annealed ZnO single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Z., E-mail: wernerz@ipj.gov.pl [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 7 Sołtana Street, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Ratajczak, R. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 7 Sołtana Street, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Gosk, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, 69 Hoża Street, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 75 Koszykowa Street, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Barlak, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 7 Sołtana Street, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Twardowski, A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, 69 Hoża Street, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Pochrybniak, C. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 7 Sołtana Street, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Zhao, Q. [KU Leuven, Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, Celestijnenlaan 200d – box 2418, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Exceptionally high magnetic moment has been found in ZnO single crystals implanted with 120 keV Co ions to a fluence of 0.6 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} and 1.2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. • Paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases present after implantation transform into a paramagnetic phase following 800 °C annealing. • The magnetism is attributed to implantation-induced defects. - Abstract: Single crystals of ZnO were implanted with 0.6 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} and 1.2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} of Co ions produced by MEVVA type implanter. Channeled Rutherford backscattering (cRBS) measurements reveal incomplete amorphisation. Thermal annealing at 800 °C in argon leads to a reduction of point-type defects. The channeled particle-induced X-ray emission (cPIXE) measurements show partial substitutionality of Co ions directly following implantation with further growth of substitutional occupation after annealing. Magnetic measurements reveal the presence of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic phases after implantation. The value of magnetization can be interpreted as due to defects rather than Co content. The ferromagnetic phase disappears after annealing and the paramagnetic phase grows in intensity.

  16. Preparation and magnetic properties of nickel nanorods by thermal decomposition reducing methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yu; ZHANG Jian-cheng; SHEN Yue; JIANG Shu-tao; LIU Guo-yong; WANG Lin-jun

    2006-01-01

    The single-crystalline nickel nanorods with narrow size distribution and better magnetic properties were synthesized by thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide nanorods precursor powders,which were produced by soft template method using nickel oxalic acid as raw material. The influences of hydrothermal reaction temperature and time on morphology of the products were investigated. The structure,morphology and magnetic properties of the products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The as-prepared nickel nanorods are uniform with a diameter of 10-15 nm and length 70-120 nm. The results of magnetic measurements show that the specific saturation magnetization(ós) and coercivity values(Hc) of the nickel nanorods are 50.649 A·m2/kg and 190.0×(103/4π)A/m,respectively. Finally,a possible mechanism for the formation of nickel nanorods was discussed briefly.

  17. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaru, S., E-mail: shingo.tamaru@aist.go.jp; Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  18. Computational Dynamics of Arterial Blood Flow in the Presence of Magnetic Field and Thermal Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chinyoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We conduct a numerical study to determine the influence of magnetic field and thermal radiation on both velocity and temperature distributions in a single blood vessel. The model here assumes that blood is a Newtonian incompressible conducting fluid with radially varying viscosity due to hematocrit variation. The transient equations of momentum and energy transport governing the flow in an axisymmetric configuration are solved numerically using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Results are presented graphically and discussed both qualitatively and quantitatively from the physiological point of view. The results of this work may enhance current understanding of the factors that determine the effects of hyperthermia treatment on tumor tissues.

  19. The thermal and magnetic stress analyses of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid- B0 coil

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Z; Daël, A; Mayri, C; Pes, C; Reytier, M

    2002-01-01

    The B0 coil is a test-model of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid (BT) coils. It has been installed in the test station at CERN. One important item of the B0 test is the strain/stress measurements. In order to determine the expected stress values at the strain gage locations on the coil casing and the tie rods, detailed thermal and magnetic stress analyses of the B0 coil have been carried out. The analysis results are prepared for a later one-to-one comparison with the measurement results. (6 refs).

  20. A diagram for the representation of thermal, mechanical, and magnetic interaction in diamagnetic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloos, Gerhard [Technical Bureau for Optics and Electromechanics, Fellbach (Germany)

    1999-12-07

    A diagram is derived that visualizes the interplay of macroscopic thermal, mechanical, and magnetic effects in a diamagnetic crystal. The derivation is based on a Taylor expansion of a thermodynamic potential and on a theorem on the transformation behaviour of property tensors under time inversion. The interaction diagram provides a quick answer to the experimenter on the question of which linear and quadratic physical effects are possible in the given physical situation and how the measurement of an effect under study might be influenced by cross-effects. (author)

  1. Fabrication of nanoceramic hin-wall tubes by magnetic pulsed compaction and thermal sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gasproof thin-wall tubes of fine-grained ceramics based on zirconia and gadolinia have been produced by magnetic pulsed compaction and thermal sintering. Data on their structures and electric characteristics are presented. The tubes with a diameter of ~ 15 mm, wall thickness of ~ 0.7 mm, and length up to 80 mm are characterized by an uniform porous-free structure with a mean grain size in the range of 100 - 300 nm. The obtained ceramics possess high electrolytic properties.

  2. Magnetic and Thermal Analysis of Current Transformer in Normal and Abnormal Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    M. B.B. Sharifian; M. Farrokhifar; R. Esmaeilzadeh; K. B. Ali-Abasi; A. Ghahramani; E Amini

    2008-01-01

    Calculation of Current Transformers (CTs) magnetic and thermal properties are very complex due to the complexity of their construction, different properties of their materials and non-linearity of core B-H curve. Finite Element Methods (FEMs) are very capable and reliable methods for these problems solution, such as Ansys software. In this study Ansys software is applied in analysis of an 800-400/5-5 CT. These analyses consist of 2D static normal, open circuit and short circuit condition of C...

  3. Tidal heating of Earth-like exoplanets around M stars: Thermal, magnetic, and orbital evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Driscoll, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the "tidal zone". We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a visco-elastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within $0.07$ AU circularize before 10 G...

  4. Application of differential thermal analysis to investigation of magnetic field effect on solidification of Al-Cu hypereutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chuanjun; Yang Hui [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Ren Zhongming, E-mail: zmren@staff.shu.edu.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Ren Weili; Wu Yuqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2010-08-27

    Investigation of solidification in the Al-25 at.%Cu hypereutectic alloy in magnetic fields has been carried out by differential thermal analysis (DTA). The DTA results indicated that the nucleation temperatures of primary Al{sub 2}Cu phases and Al-Al{sub 2}Cu eutectics were lowered and the rates of crystal growth including primary phases and eutectics were reduced although the melting of the alloy was almost not affected in magnetic fields of 6 T and 12 T in comparison with those without a magnetic field. The suppression of nucleation and growth of primary phases and eutectics might be mainly attributed to reduction of diffusion rates of atoms in a magnetic field on the condition of suppression of convections. Primary Al{sub 2}Cu phases oriented along a magnetic field compared with disorder ones without a magnetic field, which was caused by the magnetic anisotropy.

  5. Magnetic structure, magnetoelastic coupling, and thermal properties of EuCrO3 nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, M.; Razavi, F. S.; Yamani, Z.; Flacau, R.; Reuvekamp, P. G.; Schulz, A.; Kremer, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    We carried out detailed studies of the magnetic structure, magnetoelastic coupling, and thermal properties of EuCrO3 nanopowders from room temperature to liquid helium temperature. Our neutron powder diffraction and x-ray powder diffraction measurements provide precise atomic positions of all atoms in the cell, especially for the light oxygen atoms. The low-temperature neutron powder diffraction data revealed extra Bragg peaks of magnetic origin, which can be attributed to a Gx antiferromagnetic structure with an ordered moment of ˜2.4 μB consistent with the 3 d3 electronic configuration of the Cr3 + cations. Apart from previously reported antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic transitions in EuCrO3 at low temperatures, we also observed an anomaly at about 100 K. This anomaly was observed in the temperature dependence of the sample's, lattice parameters, thermal expansion, Raman spectroscopy, permittivity, and conductance measurements. This anomaly is attributed to the magnetoelastic distortion in the EuCrO3 crystal.

  6. Analytical study of induced magnetic and thermal stress in superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VECC is in a process of developing an ISOL type of Rare Isotope Beam Facility. After RFQ and Drift Tube Linacs, superconducting QWRs will be employed to accelerate the beam up to 7 MeV/u energy. At present design work has been just initiated for the development of first cryomodule consisting of 4 numbers of superconducting QWR. A superconducting solenoid is planned to put in the middle of the 4 numbers of QWRs for the transverse focusing of the beam. After carrying out preliminary electromagnetic design of the solenoid for producing 9T magnetic field, mechanical design has also been started. Design of the bucking coil has also been carried out for the solenoid so that stray filed at a distance of 200 mm from the centre is less than 30 mT otherwise niobium made cavities of the QWR would have been quenched at underrated electric field gradient. Analytical stress analysis has been carried out to evaluate the stress induced due to magnetic pressure and thermal contraction. Analysis is still in progress to evaluate the necessity of requirement of banding to be carried out with material having higher thermal expansion coefficient so that contact of the extreme layer of the cable has been ensured. Alternative to the provision of availing banding, analysis is underway to take care of the situation by pre-stressing the cable itself during the winding of the coil. (author)

  7. Coupled granular/continuous medium for thermally stable perpendicular magnetic recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied coupled granular/continuous (CGC) perpendicular media consisting of a continuous multilayer structure and a granular layer. The addition of Co/Pt multilayers decreased the nucleation field from 200 to -1800 Oe and increased the squareness from 0.9 to 1.0. The moment decay at room temperature was significantly reduced from -4.8% to -0.05% per decade. At elevated temperatures, strong exchange coupling between a granular layer and a continuous layer is needed for thermal stability. The exchange-coupled continuous layer reduces thermal demagnetization as it effectively increases the grain size, tightens the grain distribution, and prevents the reversal of individual grains. Magnetic Force Microscope image showed a larger magnetic cluster size for the CGC structure. Compared to the CoCr18Pt12 medium, the CGC medium had 2.3 dB higher output. However, the noise for the CGC medium increased with the recording density, while the noise for the CoCr18Pt12 medium remained constant from 4 to 15 kfc/mm. Further optimization and noise reduction are still required for future high density recording

  8. 3D thermal analysis of a permanent magnet motor with cooling fans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng TAN; Xue-guan SONG; Bing JI; Zheng LIU; Ji-en MA; Wen-ping CAO

    2015-01-01

    Overheating of permanent magnet (PM) machines has become a major technical challenge as it gives rise to magnet demagnetization, degradation of insulation materials, and loss of motor efficiency. This paper proposes a state-of-the-art cooling system for an axial flux permanent magnet (AFPM) machine with the focus on its structural optimization. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with thermal consideration has been shown to be an efficient approach in the literature and is thus employed in this work. Meanwhile, a simplified numerical approach to the AFPM machine with complex configuration in 3D consisting of conduction, forced convection, and conjugate heat transfer is taken as a case study. Different simplification meth-ods (including configuration and working conditions) and two optimized fans for forced convection cooling are designed and installed on the AFPM machine and compared to a natural convection cooling system. The results show that the proposed ap-proach is effective for analyzing the thermal performance of a complex AFPM machine and strikes a balance between reasona-ble simplification, accuracy, and computational resource.%目的:提出一种适合永磁电机的冷却系统设计方案,降低电机本体温度。  创新点:提出一种适合永磁电机热分析的CFD仿真模型。  方法:采用计算流体动力学方法对包含冷却风扇的永磁电机进行空间三维热力学分析和优化设计。  结论:本文提出并优化后的冷却风扇可有效降低永磁电机的最高和平均温度。

  9. FTIR, magnetic, mass spectral, XRD and thermal studies of metal chelates of tenoxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, M. A.; El-Dien, F. A. Nour; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Gamel, Nadia E. A.

    2007-09-01

    Metal chelates of anti-inflammatory drug, tenoxicam (Ten), are synthesized and characterized using elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic, mass spectra, thermal analyses (TGA and DTA) and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The chelates are found to have the general formulae [M(H 2L) 2(H 2O) x] (A) 2· yH 2O (where H 2L = neutral Ten, A = Cl in case of Ni(II) and Co(II) or AcO in case of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, x = 0-2 and y = 0-2.5) and [M(H 2L) 3](A) z· yH 2O (A = SO 4 in case of Fe(II) ion ( z = 1) or Cl in case of Fe(III) ( z = 3) and y = 0-4). IR spectra reveal that Ten behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ions through the pyridyl- N and carbonyl- O of the amide moiety. The solid reflectance spectra and magnetic moment measurements reveal that these chelates have tetrahedral, square planar and octahedral geometrical structures. Mass spectra are also used to confirm the proposed formulae and the possible fragments resulted from fragmentation of Ten and its Zn(II) and Cu(II) chelates are suggested. The thermal behaviour of the chelates (TG/DTG, DTA) are discussed in detailed manner and revealed that water molecules of crystallization together with anions are removed in the first and second steps while the Ten molecules are removed in the subsequent steps. Different thermodynamic parameters are evaluated and the relative thermal stabilities of the complexes are discussed. X-ray powder diffraction patterns are used to indicate the polymorphic form of Ten and if the complexes have molecular similarity with respect to type of coordination.

  10. Thermal Design of an Nb3Sn High Field Accelerator Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the European project EuCARD, a Nb3Sn high field accelerator magnet is under design to serve as a test bed for future high field magnets and to upgrade the vertical CERN cable test facility, Fresca. The Fresca 2 block coil type magnet will be operated at 1.9 K or 4.2 K and is designed to produce about 13 T. A 2D numerical thermal model was developed to determinate the temperature margin of the coil in working conditions and the appropriate cool-down scenario. The temperature margin, which is DTmarge=5.8 K at 1.9 K and DTmarge=3.5 K at 4.2 K, was investigated in steady state condition with the AC losses due to field ramp rate as input heat generation. Several cool-down scenarios were examined in order to minimize the temperature difference and therefore reducing the mechanical constraints within the structure. The paper presents the numerical model, the assumptions taken for the calculations and several results of the simulation for the cool-down and temperature distributions due to seve...

  11. Magnetic field effect on laminar heat transfer in a pipe for thermal entry region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malekzadeh, Asadolah; Heydarinasab, Amir; Jahangiri, Mohammad [Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of a transverse magnetic field on the local heat transfer of an electrically-conducting laminar fluid flow with high Prandtl number through a pipe was studied experimentally. Experiments indicated an increase in the local Nusselt number. The coupled set of the equations of motion and the energy equation including the viscous and Joule dissipation terms becomes non-linear and is solved numerically using a finite difference scheme. Favorable comparisons with experimental results confirm the correctness of the numerical results. It is found that the influence of magnetic field can be diminished by reducing the angle between the flow direction and the direction of magnetic field. The wall temperature reduces as the value of Hartmann number increases and the reduction rate of the wall temperature decreases as the value of Hartmann number exceeds a certain value. The average Nusselt number asymptotically approaches its limit as the Hartmann number becomes larger. Also, curve fitting can be employed to derive an equation for the average Nusselt number as a function of the Hartmann number. This equation is similar to the Sieder-Tate equation. It is observed that increasing the Hartmann number has no considerable effect on the thermal boundary layer thickness but decreases the temperature of fluid layers inside the boundary layer.

  12. Hardening of Thermal Photons Through Inverse Compton Scattering in Strong Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new spectrum function is obtained by use of the Compton scattering cross section in the laboratory frame derived earlier. This spectrum function, besides some modifications in the coefficients of the resonant term, contains also a non-resonant term which is inversely proportional to the square of the magnetic field. Based on this spectrum function, the hardening of thermal photons through inverse Compton scattering by relativistic electron beams on the surface of a strongly magnetized neutron star is investigated. Two new features are found. First, there is a maximum scattered photon energy for a given resonant scattering, beyond which resonance disappears. This maximum depends on the electron energy and the magnetic field, but is independent of the incident photon energy. Second, beyond each resonant scattering, there is a high-energy tail, resulting from non-resonant scattering. It is also found that all the tails have a common upper limit which is the highest scattered photon energy for the given incident photon and electron energies. These two new features are absent in the Monte Carlo simulations and therefore, may have physical implications for γγ-ray emissions.

  13. Structural, Optical, and Magnetic Characterization of Spinel Zinc Chromite Nanocrystallines Synthesised by Thermal Treatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahudeen A. Gene

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the structural and magnetic characterization of spinel zinc chromite (ZnCr2O4 nanocrystallines synthesized by thermal treatment method. The samples were calcined at different temperatures in the range of 773 to 973 K. Polyvinylpyrrolidone was used to control the agglomeration of the nanoparticles. The average particle size of the synthesized nanocrystals was determined by powder X-ray diffraction which shows that the crystallite size increases from 19 nm at 773 K to 24 nm at 973 K and the result was in good agreement with the transmission electron microscopy images. The elemental composition of the samples was determined by energy dispersed X-ray spectroscopy which confirmed the presence of Zn, Cr, and O in the final products. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy also confirmed the presence of metal oxide bands for all the samples calcined at different temperature. The band gap energy was calculated from UV-vis reflectance spectra using the Kubelka-Munk function and the band gap energy of the samples was found to decrease from 4.03 eV at 773 K to 3.89 eV at 973 K. The magnetic properties were also demonstrated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, the presence of unpaired electrons was confirmed, and the resonant magnetic field and the g-factor of the calcined samples were also studied.

  14. Magnetic, transport, thermal properties and orbital state for spinel MnTi2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanjie; Yang, Zhaorong; Zhang, Yuheng

    2012-07-01

    We systematically investigated the various properties of MnTi2O4. The compounds are found to be conducted by small polarons with different activation energies across the temperature T1 and deviate from the Curie-Weiss law for the magnetic susceptibility at T1. Also at T1 do the specific heat undergo a crossover. As indicated by the X-ray diffraction peaks, the series of phenomena near the characteristic temperature T1 are attributed to the happening of the micro-structural distortion, and the distortion implies the short-range orbital ordering state below T1. This short-range oribtal ordering state is supported by the little upturn of the thermal conductance at T1. As the temperature decreases, the systems enter a long-ranged collinear ferrimagnetic state at a lower temperature TN. Moreover, the compounds decreases in thermal-electric power with the decrease of temperature and undergoes a p-type to n-type transition at the temperature Tpn. Through the quantitative theoretical analysis, both the decrease of the thermal power and the p-type to n-type transition are cooperatively induced by spin-orbit (SO) coupling and the Jahn-Teller (JT) effect.

  15. Thermal analysis of the APT power coupler and similarities to superconducting magnet current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waynert, J.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.

    1998-12-31

    A detailed thermal analysis has been performed of the 210 kW, 700 MHz RF power coupler (PC) which transfers microwave energy from high power klystrons to the superconducting (SC) resonant cavities for the acceleration of protons. The work is part of the design for Accelerator Production of Tritium funded by the US Department of Energy. The PC is a co-axial design with the RF power transmitted in the annular region between two concentric cylinders. The PC provides a thermal connection from room temperature to superconducting niobium operating at 2.15 K. Heat transfer mechanisms considered are conduction, infra-red radiation, RF joule heating in normal and superconducting materials, and, forced and natural convection cooling. The objective of the thermal analysis is to minimize the required refrigeration power subject to manufacturability and reliability concerns. The problem is reminiscent of the optimization of superconducting magnet leads. The similarities and differences in the results between SC leads and PCs are discussed as well as the critical parameters in the PC optimization.

  16. The imprint of the crustal magnetic field on the thermal spectra and pulse profiles of isolated neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, Rosalba; Pons, Jose' A; Rea, Nanda

    2013-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars (NSs) show a bewildering variety of astrophysical manifestations, presumably shaped by the magnetic field strength and topology at birth. Here, using state-of-the art calculations of the coupled magnetic and thermal evolution of NSs, we compute the thermal spectra and pulse profiles expected for a variety of initial magnetic field configurations. In particular, we contrast models with purely poloidal magnetic fields to models dominated by a strong internal toroidal component. We find that, while the former displays double peaked profiles and very low pulsed fractions, in the latter, the anisotropy in the surface temperature produced by the toroidal field often results in a single pulse profile, with pulsed fractions that can exceed the 50-60% level even for perfectly isotropic local emission. We further use our theoretical results to generate simulated "observed" spectra, and show that blackbody (BB) fits result in inferred radii that can be significantly smaller than the actual NS radi...

  17. Development of superconducting high gradient magnetic separation system for scale removal from feed-water in thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibatani, Saori; Nakanishi, Motohiro; Mizuno, Nobumi [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2016-03-15

    A Superconducting High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) system is proposed for treatment of feed-water in thermal power plant. This is a method to remove the iron scale from feed-water utilizing magnetic force. One of the issues for practical use of HGMS system is to extend continuous operation period. In this study, we designed the magnetic filters by particle trajectory simulation and HGMS experiments in order to solve this problem. As a result, the quantity of magnetite captured by each filter was equalized and filter blockage was prevented. A design method of the magnetic filter was proposed which is suitable for the long-term continuous scale removal in the feed-water system of the thermal power plant.

  18. Magnetic and thermal behaviour of the amorphous ferromagnet Fe79B16Si5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin waves in the amorphous ferromagnet Fe79B16Si5 are studied by Moessbauer effect spectroscopy. The magnetic hyperfine field (MHF) is measured at the Fe sites of such a ferromagnet, which exhibits a temperature dependence of the form, H(T)/H(0) = (1 - BT/sup 3/2/ - CT/sup 5/2/), indicative of spin wave excitations in amorphous ferromagnets. The T/sup 3/2/ behaviour and the distribution of the exchange interactions are studied in detail as a function of the MHF. The spin wave excitations constant B/sub 3/2/ = BT/sub C//sup 3/2/ = 0.3 +- 0.05 and C/sub 5/2/ = CT/sub C//sup 5/2/ = 0.3 +- 0.05,Are obtained by fitting the experimental data, and where T/sub C/ = 670 K. The results sh=ow that the contribution of C/sub 5/2/ is extremely effective above 124 K, while the ratio C/sub 5/2//C/sub 3/2/ = 1.0 indicates that the present magnetic interaction is of long range order character. On the other hand, fluctuations of the exchange interaction constant are found to decrease with increasing temperature. Some information regarding the directions of the magnetic moments are obtained during the study of the magnetic anisotropy course. The values of the Einstein and Debye temperatures as measured from the thermal shift results are theta/sub E/ = 250 K and theta/sub D/ = 350 K,And from the Moessbauer factor measurements theta/sub E/ = 165 K and theta/sub D/ = 285 K. (autho=r)

  19. Moose (Alces alces) reacts to high summer temperatures by utilizing thermal shelters in boreal forests - an analysis based on airborne laser scanning of the canopy structure at moose locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Markus; Matala, Juho; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Maltamo, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Packalen, Petteri

    2014-04-01

    The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm temperatures. Previous studies have documented changes in habitat use by moose due to high temperatures. In many of these studies, the used areas have been classified according to how much thermal cover they were assumed to offer based on satellite/aerial imagery data. Here, we identified the vegetation structure in the areas used by moose under different thermal conditions. For this purpose, we used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data extracted from the locations of GPS-collared moose. This provided us with detailed information about the relationships between moose and the structure of forests it uses in different thermal conditions and we were therefore able to determine and differentiate between the canopy structures at locations occupied by moose during different thermal conditions. We also discovered a threshold beyond which moose behaviour began to change significantly: as day temperatures began to reach 20 °C and higher, the search for areas with higher and denser canopies during daytime became evident. The difference was clear when compared to habitat use at lower temperatures, and was so strong that it provides supporting evidence to previous studies, suggesting that moose are able to modify their behaviour to cope with high temperatures, but also that the species is likely to be affected by warming climate.

  20. Thermal annealing and magnetic anisotropy of NiFe thin films on n{sup +}-Si for spintronic device applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Q.H. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China (China); Gansu Key Laboratory of Sensor and Sensor Technology, Institute of Sensor Technology, Gansu Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Huang, R. [Department of Physics, Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China (China); Wang, L.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wu, Z.G., E-mail: zgwu@lzu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, C., E-mail: lich@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China (China); Luo, Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zuo, S.Y. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, J. [Department of Physics, Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China (China); Peng, D.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Han, G.L. [Gansu Key Laboratory of Sensor and Sensor Technology, Institute of Sensor Technology, Gansu Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan, P.X. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-11-15

    To ensure that the magnetic metal electrodes can meet the requirements of the spin injection, NiFe films prepared both on HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer and n{sup +}-Si directly by sputtering deposition, and treated by conventional furnace annealing and/or high vacuum magnetic field annealing were investigated. It was found that thermal annealing at 250 °C improved the crystalline quality and reduced surface roughness of the NiFe films, thus enhancing its saturation magnetization intensity. The 100 nm thick NiFe films had too large coercive force and saturation magnetization intensity in vertical direction to meet the requirements of Hanle curve detection. While, 30 nm thick NiFe films showed paramagnetic hysteresis loops in vertical direction, and the magnetization intensity of the sample after annealing at 250 °C for 30 min was less than 2% to the parallel when the external magnetic field was given between ±10 Oe. This was preferred to Hanle curve detection. The thin HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer between metal and Si partially suppressed the diffusion of Ni in NiFe into Si substrate and formation of NiSi, greatly enhancing the saturation magnetization intensity of the Al/NiFe/HfO{sub 2}/Si sample by thermal annealing. Those results suggest that Al/NiFe/HfO{sub 2}/Si structure, from the point view of magnetic electrodes, would be suitable for spin injection and detection applications. - Highlights: • The saturation magnetization intensity of NiFe thin-film was enhanced by thermal annealing. • A paramagnetic hysteresis loop of NiFe thin-film was observed in vertical direction. • The thin HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer between NiFe and Si partially suppressed the diffusion of Ni into Si.

  1. Microwaves in Airborne Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher, S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of microwave spectrum is widespread due to its convenience. Therefore, enormous amount of information is available in the free space channel. Obviously, mining this channel for surveillance is quite common. Airborne surveillance offers significant advantages in military operations. This paper talks of the usage of microwaves in airborne surveillance systems, in general, and in the Indian airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) System, in particular. It brings out the multiple s...

  2. Preparation and thermal stability of nickel nanowires via self-assembly process under magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hu Wang; Ming Li; Xiaoyu Li; Kenan Xie; Li Liao

    2015-09-01

    Nickel nanowires were synthesized via a template-free method in an aqueous solution system combined with chemical reduction and magnetic field. The suitable concentration of Ni ions and reaction time were controlled in order to obtain nickel wires with uniform sizes. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the Ni nanowires with large aspect ratio up to 200 had uniform size and morphology, about 200 nm. Especially, it is noteworthy that the samples were stable in air when the temperature was lower than 318°C. The study would provide a facile method to prepare nickel nanowires with homogeneous diameter and high thermal stability, which could be used in catalysing CO2 hydrogenation.

  3. Magnetic, Thermal and Dynamical Evolution of AN M3.2 Two-Ribbon Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados, Manuel; Kuckein, Christoph; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres

    On 2013, 17th May, a two-ribbon M3.2 flare took place in the solar atmosphere on the active region AR 11748. The flare evolution was observed at the German VTT of the Observatorio del Teide using the instrument TIP-II, with spectropolarimetric measurements of the photosphere (Si I at 1082.7 nm) and the chromosphere (Helium triplet at 1083 nm). Simultaneous spectroscopic data of the chromospheric spectral line of Ca II at 854.2 nm and filtergrams at Halpha were also obtained. The flare evolution as observed from the ground can be compared with the changes observed by AIA@SDO at different ultraviolet wavelengths. The ground observations covered several hours, including the pre-flare, impulsive, gradual and post-flare phases. We present maps of the magnetic field, thermal and dynamical properties of the region during its evolution from pre- to post-flare phase.

  4. MHD stagnation point flow toward a linearly-stretching thermally-insulated sheet with induced magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    El-Mistikawy, Tarek M A

    2016-01-01

    The equations governing the magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow toward a non-conducting, thermally insulated, nonporous, linearly stretching sheet are cast in a self similar form. Consistent boundary conditions on the velocity, magnetic field and temperature are invoked. The flow problem involves three parameters- the magnetic Prandtl number, the magnetic interaction number, and the ratio of the stretching rate to the strength of the stagnation point flow. The energy equation includes viscous dissipation and Joule heating, and introduces the Prandtl number as a fourth parameter. Numerical solutions are obtained and sample results are presented.

  5. Magnetic properties of high-T(sub c) superconductors: Rigid levitation, flux pinning, thermal depinning, and fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The levitation of high-T(sub c) superconductors is quite conspicuous: Above magnets of low symmetry a disk of these ceramics floats motionless, without vibration or rotation; it has a continuous range of stable positions and orientations as if it were stuck in sand. Some specimens may even be suspended above or below the same magnet. This fascinating stability, inherent to no other type of levitation, is caused by the pinning of magnetic flux lines by inhomogeneities inside these extreme type-2 superconductors. The talk deals with pinning of magnetic flux in these materials, with flux flow, flux creep, thermally activated depinning, and the thermal fluctuation of the vortex positions in the flux line lattice (often called flux lattice melting). Also discussed are the fluctuations of the (nearly periodic) magnetic field inside these superconductors which are caused by random pinning sites and by the finite temperature. These fluctuations broaden the van-Hove singularities observed in the density of the magnetic field by nuclear magnetic resonance and by muon spin rotation.

  6. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L., E-mail: vlmathe@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  7. The divergence of neighboring magnetic field lines and fast-particle diffusion in strong magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, with application to thermal conduction in galaxy clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Maron, Jason L.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate field-line separation in strong MHD turbulence using direct numerical simulations. We find that in the static-magnetic-field approximation the thermal conductivity in galaxy clusters is reduced by a factor of about 50 relative to the Spitzer thermal conductivity of a non-magnetized plasma. This value is too small for heat conduction to balance radiative cooling in clusters.

  8. MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

  9. Recyclable Photo-Thermal Nano-Aggregates of Magnetic Nanoparticle Conjugated Gold Nanorods for Effective Pathogenic Bacteria Lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Kim, Sanghyo; Lee, Su Seong; Yi, Dong Kee

    2016-01-01

    We describe the nucleophilic hybridization technique for fabricating magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) around gold nanorod (AuNR) for desired photo-thermal lysis on pathogenic bacteria. From the electromagnetic energy conversion into heat to the surrounding medium, a significant and quicker temperature rise was noted after light absorption on nanohybrids, at a controlled laser light output and optimum nanoparticle concentration. We observed a similar photo-thermal pattern for more than three times for the same material up on repeated magnetic separation. Regardless of the cell wall nature, superior pathogenic cell lysis has been observed for the bacteria suspensions of individual and mixed samples of Salmonella typhi (S.typhi) and Bacillus subtilis (B.subtilis) by the photo-heated nanoparticles. The synthesis of short gold nanorod, conjugation with magnetic nanoparticle and its subsequent laser exposure provides a rapid and reiterated photo-thermal effect with enhanced magnetic separation for efficient bactericidal application in water samples. Resultant novel properties of the nano-aggregates makes them a candidate to be used for a rapid, effective, and re-iterated photo-thermal agent against a wide variety of pathogens to attain microbe free water.

  10. Effect of magnetic and thermal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves are one of the most important personal protective equipments but they are possible to tear off and contaminate food or pharmaceutical and healthcare products during manufacturing and packaging process. High tendency of torn glove remaining in food or products due to white or light flesh-coloured glove is not easy to be detected by naked eyes. In this paper, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) selected as additive for NBR to improve its detectability by mean of magnetic properties. IONs synthesized via precipitation method and compounded with NBR latex before casting on petri dish. The properties of IONs were investigated by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Raman Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile NBR/IONs composites were studied by Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It observed that, synthesized IONs shows of 25.28 nm crystallite with 25.86 nm semipherical (changed as) shape. Meanwhile, Magnetite and maghemite phase are found in range of 670 cm−1 and 700 cm−1 respectively, which it contributes magnetization saturation of 73.96 emu/g at 10,000 G by VSM. Thermal stability and magnetic properties were increased with incorporating IONs into NBR latex up to 20 phr. NBR/IONs 5 phr has the optimum thermal stability, lowest glass transition temperature (−14.83 °C) and acceptable range of magnetization saturation (3.83 emu/g at 10,000 G) to form NBR gloves with magnetic detectability. - Highlights: • We synthesized IONs with high magnetization saturation (Ms). • High Ms of IONs were incorporated into NBR latex in order to induce magnetic properties in the NBR composite. • Introduction of IONs into NBR latex would improve thermal properties. • The produced NBR/IONs 5 phr composite exceeded the minimum magnetic moment sensor of the detector. • They have high potential for the

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of TiZrNi thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering and thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyemin; Choi, Soo-bin; Lee, Ik-jae; Yu, Chung-jong; Kim, Jae-yong

    2010-11-01

    Distinctive thin layers of TiZr and Ni were deposited by using a magnetron sputtering method and a thermal annealing was applied to discover metallic films of quasicrystals. After a heat treatment in vacuum, 70 nm thick deposited layers were well mixed with nominal compositions of 49.7, 29.3 and 21.0 for Ti, Zr and Ni, respectively, which is very close with the one forming a quasicrystalline phase. The magnetization values were significantly decreased from 0.286 to 0.142 emu/mm3 at 2000 Oe, after annealing, while a shape of magnetic hysteresis was maintained. It is believed that a different magnetic behavior after thermal annealing is due to the homogeneous mixing of atomic elements and possible existence of a metastable phase.

  12. Suppression of parallel transport in turbulent magnetized plasmas and its impact on non-thermal and thermal aspects of solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Nicolas H; Emslie, A Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The transport of the energy contained in electrons, both thermal and suprathermal, in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of the flare phenomenon, from the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission to global energetics. Motivated by recent {\\em RHESSI} observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we here consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We...

  13. Effects of the magnetic field over the nanometric growth morphology on the material synthesis in a liquid spray thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible that the magnetic field affect the growth morphology of the materials at nanometric scale while there are synthesized. In this work is developed a thermal plasma reactor in fluidized bed assisted by magnetic mirror for material synthesis using a liquid spray. An aluminum solution is carrier in the plasma reactor with a without magnetic external magnetic field applied. We found from the characterization of material synthesized that: Aluminum nanowire and alumina nanofiber are generated when the external magnetic mirror is applied to the thermal plasma reactor.

  14. PEG/CaFe2O4 nanocomposite: Structural, morphological, magnetic and thermal analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Lavanya; Verma, Narendra K.

    2013-10-01

    The coating of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) on calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4) nanoparticles has been reported in the present study. The X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the formation of orthorhombic structure of bare CaFe2O4 nanoparticles, which was also retained after the PEG coating, along with additional characteristic peaks of PEG at 19° and 23°. The rings of CaFe2O4 nanoparticles were identified by the selected area electron diffraction pattern. The characteristic bands of PEG as observed in its Fourier transform infrared spectrum were also present in PEG coated CaFe2O4 nanoparticles, hence confirming its presence. In the thermal gravimetric studies, the complete thermal decomposition of PEG occurred in a one step process, but in case of PEG coated CaFe2O4 nanoparticles, the decomposition took place at a higher temperature owing to the formation of covalent bonds of PEG with CaFe2O4 nanoparticles. The presence of PEG on CaFe2O4 nanoparticles, spherical formation of PEG coated CaFe2O4 nanoparticles and reduced agglomeration in the CaFe2O4 nanoparticles were revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope studies, respectively. In vibrating sample magnetometer analysis, both bare as well as coated CaFe2O4 nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior. However, a drop in the magnetic saturation value was observed from 36.76 emu/g for CaFe2O4 nanoparticles to 6.74 emu/g for PEG coated CaFe2O4 nanoparticles, due to the formation of magnetically dead layer of PEG. In ZFC and FC analyses, superparamagnetic behavior with blocking temperature for bare and coated nanoparticles has been observed at ∼40 K and ∼60 K, respectively. The increase in the blocking temperature is attributed to the increase in the particle size after PEG coating.

  15. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-01

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  16. Influence of thermal debinding on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys for metal injection molding (MIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Pavón, A.; Jiménez-Morales, A.; Santos, T. G.; Quintino, L.; Torralba, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) may be used to produce soft magnetic materials with optimal mechanical and magnetic properties. Unlike other techniques, MIM enables the production of complex and small Fe-Si alloy parts with silicon contents greater than 3% by weight. In MIM process development, it is critical to design a proper debinding cycle not only to ensure complete removal of the binder system but also to obtain improved properties in the final part. This work is a preliminary study on the production of Fe-3.8Si soft magnetic parts by MIM using pre-alloyed powders and a non-industrialized binder. Two different heating rates during thermal debinding were used to study their effect on the final properties of the part. The final properties of the sintered parts are related to thermal debinding. It has been demonstrated that the heating rate during thermal debinding has a strong influence on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys.

  17. Thermal simulation of magnetization reversals for size-distributed assemblies of core-shell exchange biased nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richy, J.; Jay, J.-Ph.; Pogossian, S. P.; Ben Youssef, J.; Sheppard, C. J.; Prinsloo, A. R. E.; Spenato, D.; Dekadjevi, D. T.

    2016-08-01

    A temperature dependent coherent magnetization reversal model is proposed for size-distributed assemblies of ferromagnetic nanoparticles and ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (AF) core-shell nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are assumed to be of uniaxial anisotropy and all aligned along their easy axis. The thermal dependence is included by considering thermal fluctuations, implemented via the Néel-Arrhenius theory. Thermal and angular dependence of magnetization reversal loops, coercive field, and exchange-bias field are obtained, showing that ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic size-distributed exchange-coupled nanoparticles exhibit temperature-dependent asymmetric magnetization reversal. Also, non-monotonic evolutions of exchange-bias and coercive fields with temperature are demonstrated. The angular dependence of coercive field with temperature exhibits a complex behavior, with the presence of an apex, whose position and amplitude are strongly temperature-dependent. The angular dependence of exchange bias with temperature exhibits complex behaviors, which depends on the AF anisotropy and exchange coupling. The resulting angular behavior demonstrates the key role of the size distribution and temperature in the magnetic response of nanoparticles.

  18. Thermally activated switching at long time scales in exchange-coupled magnetic grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almudallal, Ahmad M.; Mercer, J. I.; Whitehead, J. P.; Plumer, M. L.; van Ek, J.; Fal, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    Rate coefficients of the Arrhenius-Néel form are calculated for thermally activated magnetic moment reversal for dual layer exchange-coupled composite (ECC) media based on the Langer formalism and are applied to study the sweep rate dependence of M H hysteresis loops as a function of the exchange coupling I between the layers. The individual grains are modeled as two exchange-coupled Stoner-Wohlfarth particles from which the minimum energy paths connecting the minimum energy states are calculated using a variant of the string method and the energy barriers and attempt frequencies calculated as a function of the applied field. The resultant rate equations describing the evolution of an ensemble of noninteracting ECC grains are then integrated numerically in an applied field with constant sweep rate R =-d H /d t and the magnetization calculated as a function of the applied field H . M H hysteresis loops are presented for a range of values I for sweep rates 105Oe /s ≤R ≤1010Oe /s and a figure of merit that quantifies the advantages of ECC media is proposed. M H hysteresis loops are also calculated based on the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations for 108Oe /s ≤R ≤1010Oe /s and are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained from the direct integration of rate equations. The results are also used to examine the accuracy of certain approximate models that reduce the complexity associated with the Langer-based formalism and which provide some useful insight into the reversal process and its dependence on the coupling strength and sweep rate. Of particular interest is the clustering of minimum energy states that are separated by relatively low-energy barriers into "metastates." It is shown that while approximating the reversal process in terms of "metastates" results in little loss of accuracy, it can reduce the run time of a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of the magnetic decay of an ensemble of dual layer ECC media by 2 -3 orders of magnitude

  19. Hot accretion disks with pairs: Effects of magnetic field and thermal cyclocsynchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1994-01-01

    We show the effects of thermal cyclosynchrotron radiation and magnetic viscosity on the structure of hot, two-temperature accretion disks. Magnetic field, B, is assumed to be randomly oriented and the ratio of magnetic pressure to either gas pressure, alpha = P(sub mag)/P(sub gas), or the sum of the gas and radiation pressures, alpha = (P(sub mag)/P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)), is fixed. We find those effects do not change the qualitative properties of the disks, i.e., there are still two critical accretion rates related to production of e(sup +/-) pairs, (M dot)((sup U)(sub cr)) and (M dot)((sup L)(sub cr)), that affect the number of local and global disk solutions, as recently found by Bjoernsson and Svensson for the case with B = 0. However, a critical value of the alpha-viscosity parameter above which those critical accretion rates disappear becomes smaller than alpha(sub cr) = 1 found in the case of B = 0, for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)). If P(sub mag) = alpha P(sub gas), on the other hand, alpha(sub cr) is still about unity. Moreover, when Comptonized cyclosynchrotron radiation dominates Comptonized bremsstrahlung, radiation from the disk obeys a power law with the energy spectral index of approximately 0.5, in a qualitative agreement with X-ray observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and Galactic black hole candidates. We also extend the hot disk solutions for P(sub mag) = alpha(P(sub gas) + P(sub rad)) to the effectively optically thick region, where they merge with the standard cold disk solutions. We find that the mapping method by Bjoernsson and Svensson gives a good approximation to the disk structure in the hot region and show where it breaks in the transition region. Finally, we find a region in the disk parameter space with no solutions due to the inability of Coulomb heating to supply enough energy to electrons.

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  1. Magnetic field control of near-field radiative heat transfer and the realization of highly tunable hyperbolic thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada-Villa, E.; Fernández-Hurtado, V.; García-Vidal, F. J.; García-Martín, A.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical study of the magnetic field dependence of the near-field radiative heat transfer (NFRHT) between two parallel plates. We show that when the plates are made of doped semiconductors, the near-field thermal radiation can be severely affected by the application of a static magnetic field. We find that irrespective of its direction, the presence of a magnetic field reduces the radiative heat conductance, and dramatic reductions up to 700% can be found with fields of about 6 T at room temperature. We show that this striking behavior is due to the fact that the magnetic field radically changes the nature of the NFRHT. The field not only affects the electromagnetic surface waves (both plasmons and phonon polaritons) that normally dominate the near-field radiation in doped semiconductors, but it also induces hyperbolic modes that progressively dominate the heat transfer as the field increases. In particular, we show that when the field is perpendicular to the plates, the semiconductors become ideal hyperbolic near-field emitters. More importantly, by changing the magnetic field, the system can be continuously tuned from a situation where the surface waves dominate the heat transfer to a situation where hyperbolic modes completely govern the near-field thermal radiation. We show that this high tunability can be achieved with accessible magnetic fields and very common materials like n -doped InSb or Si. Our study paves the way for an active control of NFRHT and it opens the possibility to study unique hyperbolic thermal emitters without the need to resort to complicated metamaterials.

  2. Airborne wind energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, Uwe; Schmehl, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This reference offers an overview of the field of airborne wind energy. As the first book of its kind, it provides a consistent compilation of the fundamental theories, a compendium of current research and development activities as well as economic and regulatory aspects. In five parts, the book demonstrates the relevance of Airborne Wind Energy and the role that this emerging field of technology can play for the transition towards a renewable energy economy. Part I on 'Fundamentals' contains seven general chapters explaining the principles of airborne wind energy and its different variants, o

  3. Magnetically softened iron oxide (MSIO) nanofluid and its application to thermally-induced heat shock proteins for ocular neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Seongtae; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Jeun, Minhong; Jang, Jung-Tak; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Kwan; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Hey Min; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-09-01

    Magnetically softened iron oxide (MSIO) nanofluid, PEGylated (Mn0.5Zn0.5)Fe2O4, was successfully developed for local induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) 72 in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) for ocular neuroprotection. The MSIO nanofluid showed significantly enhanced alternating current (AC) magnetic heat induction characteristics including exceptionally high SLP (Specific Loss Power, > 2000 W/g). This phenomenon was resulted from the dramatically improved AC magnetic softness of MSIO caused by the magnetically tailored Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) distributions in Fe3O4. In addition, the MSIO nanofluid with ultra-thin surface coating layer thickness and high monodispersity allowed for a higher cellular uptake up to a 52.5% with RGCs and enhancing "relaxation power" for higher AC heating capability. The RGCs cultured with MSIO nanofluid successfully induced HSPs 72 by magnetic nanofluid hyperthermia (MNFH). Moreover, it was interestingly observed that systematic control of "AC magnetically-induced heating up rate" reaching to a constant heating temperature of HSPs 72 induction allowed to achieve maximized induction efficiency at the slowest AC heating up rate during MNFH. In addition to in-vitro experimental verification, the studies of MSIO infusion behavior using animal models and a newly designed magnetic coil system demonstrated that the MSIO has promising biotechnical feasibility for thermally-induced HSPs agents in future glaucoma clinics. PMID:27294536

  4. Analysis of airborne pesticides from different chemical classes adsorbed on Radiello® Tenax® passive tubes by thermal-desorption-GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeppel, Caroline; Fabritius, Marie; Nief, Marie; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Briand, Olivier; Tuduri, Ludovic; Millet, Maurice

    2015-02-01

    An analytical methodology using automatic thermal desorption (ATD) and GC/MS was developed for the determination of 28 pesticides of different chemical classes (dichlobenil, carbofuran, trifluralin, clopyralid, carbaryl, flazasulfuron, mecoprop-P, dicamba, 2,4-MCPA, dichlorprop, 2,4-D, triclopyr, cyprodinil, bromoxynil, fluroxypyr, oxadiazon, myclobutanil, buprofezin, picloram, trinexapac-p-ethyl, ioxynil, diflufenican, tebuconazole, bifenthrin, isoxaben, alphacypermethrin, fenoxaprop and tau-fluvalinate) commonly used in nonagricultural areas in atmospheric samples. This methodology was developed to evaluate the indoor and outdoor atmospheric contamination by nonagricultural pesticides. Pesticides were sampled passive sampling tubes containing Tenax® adsorbent. Since most of these pesticides are polar (clopyralid, mecoprop-P, dicamba, 2,4-MCPA, dichlorprop, 2,4-D, triclopyr, bromoxynil, fluroxypyr, picloram, trinexapac-p-ethyl and ioxynil), a derivatisation step is required. For this purpose, a silylation step using N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MtBSTFA) was added before thermal desorption. This agent was chosen since it delivers very specific ions on electronic impact (m/z = M-57). This method was established with special consideration for optimal thermal desorption conditions (desorption temperature, desorb flow and duration; trap heating duration and flow; outlet split), linear ranges, limits of quantification and detection which varied from 0.005 to 10 ng and from 0.001 to 2.5 ng, respectively, for an uncertainty varied from 8 to 30 %. The method was applied in situ to the analysis of passive tubes exposed during herbicide application to an industrial site in east of France. PMID:25205153

  5. Tunnel magnetoresistance in thermally robust Mo/CoFeB/MgO tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Fang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on tunnel magnetoresistance and electric-field effect in the Mo buffered and capped CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A large tunnel magnetoresistance of 120% is achieved. Furthermore, this structure shows greatly improved thermal stability and stronger electric-field-induced modulation effect in comparison with the Ta/CoFeB/MgO-based MTJs. These results suggest that the Mo-based MTJs are more desirable for next generation spintronic devices.

  6. New option for solving the climatic problems with non-thermal laser driven boron fusion and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the broad stream of sustainable developments on fusion energy, new aspects are developed now by applying ultra-short, ultra-powerful laser pulses in a plasma-block ignition scheme by avoiding the well known difficulties of thermal-pressure instabilities and losses through using electro-dynamic non-thermal energy conversion. A further advantage is given by the new 10 kilo-Tesla magnetic fields for fusion of uncompressed proton-boron fuel which avoids problems of dangerous nuclea...

  7. Feeble magnetic fields generated by thermal charge fluctuations in extended metallic conductors: Implications for electric-dipole moment experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple formulation for calculating the magnetic field external to an extended nonpermeable conducting body due to thermal current fluctuations within the body is developed, and is applied to a recent experimental search for the atomic electric-dipole moment (EDM) of 199Hg. It is shown that the thermal fluctuation field is only slightly smaller in magnitude than other noise sources in that experiment. The formulation is extended to permeable bodies, and the implications for general EDM experiments are discussed. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. New option for solving the climatic problems with non-thermal laser driven boron fusion and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the broad stream of sustainable developments on fusion energy, new aspects are developed now by applying ultra-short, ultra-powerful laser pulses in a plasma-block ignition scheme by avoiding the well known difficulties of thermal-pressure instabilities and losses through using electro-dynamic non-thermal energy conversion. A further advantage is given by the new 10 kilo-Tesla magnetic fields for fusion of uncompressed proton-boron fuel which avoids problems of dangerous nuclear radiation.

  9. Synthesis and structural, magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of several transition metal oxides and aresnides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Supriyo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Oxide compounds containing the transition metal vanadium (V) have attracted a lot of attention in the field of condensed matter physics owing to their exhibition of interesting properties including metal-insulator transitons, structural transitions, ferromagnetic and an- tiferromagnetic orderings, and heavy fermion behavior. Binary vanadium oxides VnO2n-1 where 2 ≤ n ≤ 9 have triclinic structures and exhibit metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic transitions.[1–6] The only exception is V7O13 which remains metallic down to 4 K.[7] The ternary vanadium oxide LiV2O4 has the normal spinel structure, is metallic, does not un- dergo magnetic ordering and exhibits heavy fermion behavior below 10 K.[8] CaV2O4 has an orthorhombic structure[9, 10] with the vanadium spins forming zigzag chains and has been suggested to be a model system to study the gapless chiral phase.[11, 12] These provide great motivation for further investigation of some known vanadium compounds as well as to ex- plore new vanadium compounds in search of new physics. This thesis consists, in part, of experimental studies involving sample preparation and magnetic, transport, thermal, and x- ray measurements on some strongly correlated eletron systems containing the transition metal vanadium. The compounds studied are LiV2O4, YV4O8, and YbV4O8. The recent discovery of superconductivity in RFeAsO1-xFx (R = La, Ce, Pr, Gd, Tb, Dy, Sm, and Nd), and AFe2As2 (A = Ba, Sr, Ca, and Eu) doped with K, Na, or Cs at the A site with relatively high Tc has sparked tremendous activities in the condensed matter physics community and a renewed interest in the area of superconductivity as occurred following the discovery of the layered cuprate high Tc superconductors in 1986. To discover more supercon- ductors

  10. Magnetic response of gelatin ferrogels across the sol-gel transition: the influence of high energy crosslinking on thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisotzki, Emilia I; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Kratz, Harald; Mayr, Stefan G

    2016-05-01

    As emerging responsive materials, ferrogels have demonstrated significant potential for applications in areas of engineering to regenerative medicine. Promising techniques to study the behavior of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in such matrices include magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) and magnetorelaxometry (MRX). This work investigated the magnetic response of gelatin-based ferrogels with increasing temperatures, before and after high energy crosslinking. The particle response was characterized by the nonlinear magnetization using MPS and quasistatic magnetization measurements as well as MRX to discriminate between Néel and Brownian relaxation mechanisms. The effective magnetic response of MNPs in gelatin was suppressed, indicating that the magnetization of the ferrogels was strongly influenced by competing dipole-dipole interactions. Significant changes in the magnetic behavior were observed across the gelatin sol-gel transition, as influenced by the matrix viscosity. These relaxation processes were modeled by Fourier transformation of the Langevin function, combined with a Debye term for the nonlinear magnetic response, for single core MNPs embedded in matrices of changing viscosities. Using high energy electron irradiation as a crosslinking method, modified ferrogels exhibited thermal stability on a range of timescales. However, MRX relaxation times revealed a slight softening around the gelatin sol-gel transition felt by the smallest particles, demonstrating a high sensitivity to observe local changes in the viscoelasticity. Overall, MPS and MRX functioned as non-contact methods to observe changes in the nanorheology around the native sol-gel transition and in crosslinked ferrogels, as well as provided an understanding of how MNPs were integrated into and influenced by the surrounding matrix. PMID:27029437

  11. Unconventional effects in the magnetization and magnetoconductivity of iron based superconductors near Tc as probed by thermal fluctuation spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Álvarez, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study unconventional effects on the magnetization and Magnetoconductivity of iron-based superconductors, FeSCs, mainly family '122'. This was done through the so-called superconducting fluctuation spectroscopy above the superconducting critical temperature, Tc. This technique has been used in a considerable number of work to characterize the properties of superconductors (see for example). Moreover, the nature of the thermal fluctuations is determined,...

  12. Modeling the Magnetic and Thermal Structure of Active Regions: 1st Year 1st Semi-Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2003-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first six months of the first year of NASA SR&T contract "Modeling the Magnetic and Thermal Structure of Active Regions", NASW-03008, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period January 14, 2003 to July 13, 2003. Under this contract SAIC has conducted research into theoretical modeling of the properties of active regions using the MHD model.

  13. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Effect of magnetic and thermal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Hun Tiar; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd, E-mail: sharifahbee@um.edu.my; Boondamnoen, O.; Tai, Mun Foong

    2015-12-01

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves are one of the most important personal protective equipments but they are possible to tear off and contaminate food or pharmaceutical and healthcare products during manufacturing and packaging process. High tendency of torn glove remaining in food or products due to white or light flesh-coloured glove is not easy to be detected by naked eyes. In this paper, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) selected as additive for NBR to improve its detectability by mean of magnetic properties. IONs synthesized via precipitation method and compounded with NBR latex before casting on petri dish. The properties of IONs were investigated by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Raman Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile NBR/IONs composites were studied by Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It observed that, synthesized IONs shows of 25.28 nm crystallite with 25.86 nm semipherical (changed as) shape. Meanwhile, Magnetite and maghemite phase are found in range of 670 cm{sup −1} and 700 cm{sup −1} respectively, which it contributes magnetization saturation of 73.96 emu/g at 10,000 G by VSM. Thermal stability and magnetic properties were increased with incorporating IONs into NBR latex up to 20 phr. NBR/IONs 5 phr has the optimum thermal stability, lowest glass transition temperature (−14.83 °C) and acceptable range of magnetization saturation (3.83 emu/g at 10,000 G) to form NBR gloves with magnetic detectability. - Highlights: • We synthesized IONs with high magnetization saturation (M{sub s}). • High M{sub s} of IONs were incorporated into NBR latex in order to induce magnetic properties in the NBR composite. • Introduction of IONs into NBR latex would improve thermal properties. • The produced NBR/IONs 5 phr composite exceeded the minimum magnetic moment sensor of the detector. • They have high

  15. Temperature monitoring along the Rhine River based on airborne thermal infrared remote sensing: qualitative results compared to satellite data and validation with in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Katharina; Baschek, Björn

    2014-10-01

    Water temperature is an important parameter of water quality and influences other physical and chemical parameters. It also directly influences the survival and growth of animal and plant species in river ecosystems. In situ measurements do not allow for a total spatial coverage of water bodies and rivers that is necessary for monitoring and research at the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Germany. Hence, the ability of different remote sensing products to identify and investigate water inflows and water temperatures in Federal waterways is evaluated within the research project 'Remote sensing of water surface temperature'. The research area for a case study is the Upper and Middle Rhine River from the barrage in Iffezheim to Koblenz. Satellite products (e. g. Landsat and ASTER imagery) can only be used for rivers at least twice as wide as the spatial resolution of the satellite images. They can help to identify different water bodies only at tributaries with larger inflow volume (Main and Mosel) or larger temperature differences between the inflow (e. g. from power plants working with high capacity) and the river water. To identify and investigate also smaller water inflows and temperature differences, thermal data with better ground and thermal resolution is required. An aerial survey of the research area was conducted in late October 2013. Data of the surface was acquired with two camera systems, a digital camera with R, G, B, and Near-IR channels, and a thermal imaging camera measuring the brightness temperature in the 8-12 m wavelength region (TIR). The resolution of the TIR camera allowed for a ground resolution of 4 m, covering the whole width of the main stream and larger branches. The RGB and NIR data allowed to eliminate land surface temperatures from the analysis and to identify clouds and shadows present during the data acquisition. By degrading the spatial resolution and adding sensor noise, artificial Landsat ETM+ and TIRS datasets were created

  16. Magnetic fields, non-thermal radiation and particle acceleration in colliding winds of WR-O stars

    CERN Document Server

    Falceta-Goncalves, D

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal emission has been detected in WR-stars for many years at long wavelengths spectral range, in general attributed to synchrotron emission. Two key ingredients are needed to explain such emissions, namely magnetic fields and relativistic particles. Particles can be accelerated to relativistic speeds by Fermi processes at strong shocks. Therefore, strong synchrotron emission is usually attributed to WR binarity. The magnetic field may also be amplified at shocks, however the actual picture of the magnetic field geometry, intensity, and its role on the acceleration of particles at WR binary systems is still unclear. In this work we discuss the recent developments in MHD modelling of wind-wind collision regions by means of numerical simulations, and the coupled particle acceleration processes related.

  17. Thermal stability of the induced magnetic anisotropy and structure of the nanocrystalline alloy FeCuNbSiB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic anisotropy induced in the ribbons of the Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 alloy in the course of stress annealing combined with the nanocrystallising one was investigated. Crystalline phases formed during the above treatments were studied by the Moessbauer method. Analysis of the Moessbauer results showed that the content of the Fe-Si phases depends neither on the exposure time nor on the value of the induced magnetic anisotropy constant. At the same time, in the regions containing, along with Fe, Nb and B the process of redistributing the elements proceeds with time, and the deeper the process, the higher the thermal stability of the induced magnetic anisotropy

  18. Thermal and magnetic behavior of Angustifolia Kunth bamboo fibers covered with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, S. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Arias, N.P. [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica y Computacion, Facultad de Ingenieria y Arquitectura, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Giraldo, O., E-mail: ohggiraldo@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Materiales Nanoestructurados y Funcionales, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia); Rosales-Rivera, A.; Moscoso, O. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo y Materiales Avanzados, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-08-15

    Several Angustifolia Kunth bamboo fibers, which have been previously treated with an alkaline solution, were coated with magnetite particles. The coating of the fibers was achieved by an in-situ co-precipitation method with Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}in NaOH or NH{sub 4}OH. The fibers were evaluated by chemical analysis using atomic absorption (A.A.) technique, structural characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal stability with thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in nitrogen at temperature range between 23 Degree-Sign C and 800 Degree-Sign C and magnetic behavior using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) applying a magnetic field between -27 KOe and 27 KOe at room temperature. We found that the thermal stability and magnetization depend of the synthesis method used to cover the Angustifolia Kunth bamboo fibers. In addition, an improved magnetic response was observed when NaOH solution is used to generate the magnetite coating on the fiber surface.

  19. Experimental validation of the thermal performance of the 1.9 K magnet cryostats during the commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Maglioni, C; Poncet, A

    2009-01-01

    The LHC machine, at present in the commissioning phase at CERN, is composed of eight 1.9 K superconducting magnet sectors independently operated. Assembled in 8 continuous segments of approximately 2.7 km length each, the HeII cryostats for the 1232 dipoles magnets and 438 Short Straight Sections (housing the quadrupole magnets) were designed to fulfil tight heat load budgets for an affordable large-scale project. The commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sectors is under way since January 2007 and 5 sectors have now been operated at their nominal temperatures of 1.9 K. An experimental assessment of the thermal performance of the final machine is therefore possible, allowing comparison with design estimates. After a brief description of the layout of the LHC cryostats, and their associated cryogenic and vacuum sectorisations, calorimetric measurements of the heat loads to the 1.9 K magnets and to the cryostat thermal shielding are presented and discussed.

  20. Thermal, radioactive and magnetic properties of the lavas of the Mt Melbourne Volcanic Field (Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio Armadillo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of measurements of physical properties carried out on mafic lavas from the Mt Melbourne
    Volcanic Field, useful for interpretation of geophysical surveys designed to shed light on the structure of the
    crust. The thermal conductivity is comparable to that of glass and shows a clear negative dependence on porosity.
    The volume heat capacity and the thermal diffusivity are less variable. The concentration of the thermally
    important natural radioactive isotopes was determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Lavas denoted a rather low
    heat-production rate, and the largest concentration of heat-producing elements (potassium, uranium, thorium
    was found in the trachyte samples. The magnetic susceptibility is more variable than the other physical properties
    and, among the several iron-titanium oxides, it appears primarily controlled by the ulvöspinel-magnetite solid
    solution series.

  1. The effect of non-thermal electrons on obliquely propagating electron acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyavir; Bharuthram, Ramashwar

    2016-07-01

    Small amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves are studied in a magnetized plasma consisting of hot electrons following Cairn's type non-thermal distribution function and fluid cool electrons, cool ions and an electron beam. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation is derived to describe the nonlinear evolution of electron acoustic waves. It is observed that the presence of non-thermal electrons plays an important role in determining the existence region of solitary wave structures. Theoretical results of this work is used to model the electrostatic solitary structures observed by Viking satellite. Detailed investigation of physical parameters such as non-thermality of hot electrons, beam electron velocity and temperature, obliquity on the existence regime of solitons will be discussed.

  2. Silica/potassium ferrite nanocomposite: Structural, morphological, magnetic, thermal and in vitro cytotoxicity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Lavanya, E-mail: lavanshya@yahoo.co.in; Verma, N.K.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: • Silica coating on potassium ferrite nanoparticles is reported. • Their structural, morphological, thermal behaviour is studied and compared. • Both bare and coated nanoparticles are superparamagnetic and biocompatible. -- Abstract: The coating of silica on potassium ferrite (KFeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles has been reported in the present study. The X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the formation of orthorhombic structure of bare potassium ferrite nanoparticles, which was also retained after the silica coating, along with a broad band near 2θ ∼ 20–25° pertaining to the presence of amorphous silica. The size of bare and coated potassium ferrite nanoparticles was found to be 4–8 nm and 10–22 nm, respectively, as observed from transmission electron microscope. The presence of silica was also revealed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrum and high resolution transmission electron microscope. In vibrating sample magnetometer analysis, both bare as well as coated potassium ferrite nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behaviour with magnetic saturation values, 49.01 and 21.17 emu/g, respectively. Dose-dependent cellular toxicity was observed in the in vitro MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, a tetrazole) – assay study on Jurkat cells, where both bare as well as silica coated nanoparticles exhibited non-toxicity below 250 μg/ml. An augmentation of cell viability was observed in case of silica coated potassium ferrite nanoparticles. The nanosize, superparamagnetic behaviour and enhanced cell viability make silica coated potassium ferrite nanoparticles a potential claimant for biomedical applications.

  3. DNA as a molecular local thermal probe for the analysis of magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jorge T; Moros, María; Del Pino, Pablo; Rivera, Sara; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M

    2013-10-25

    Too hot to handle: The surroundings of magnetic nanoparticles can be heated by applying a magnetic field. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles were functionalized with single-stranded DNA molecules and further hybridized with DNA modified with different fluorophores. By correlating the denaturation profiles of the DNA with the local temperature, temperature gradients for the vicinity of the excited nanoparticles were determined.

  4. On Discrimination of Thermal Versus Mechanical Effects of Shock on Rock Magnetic Properties of Spherically Shocked up to ˜10–140 GPa Basalt and Diabase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L.; Tikoo, S. M.; Kars, M.; Egli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new experimental method of discrimination in shock-recovery experiments between thermal and mechanical effects of shock on rock magnetic properties of spherically shocked (Ti) magnetite-bearing basalt and diabase.

  5. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on the Non-thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2016-06-01

    The transport of the energy contained in electrons, both thermal and suprathermal, in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of the flare phenomenon, from the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission to global energetics. Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we here consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on the flare coronal temperature that can be attained, on the post-impulsive-phase cooling of heated coronal plasma, and on the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the possible ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy associated with accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  6. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, C. R.; Borasi, G.; Payne, A.

    2016-01-01

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one.

  7. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, C R; Borasi, G; Payne, A

    2016-01-21

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one. PMID:26741344

  8. Effect of magnetic and thermal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) latex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hun Tiar; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Boondamnoen, O.; Tai, Mun Foong

    2015-12-01

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) gloves are one of the most important personal protective equipments but they are possible to tear off and contaminate food or pharmaceutical and healthcare products during manufacturing and packaging process. High tendency of torn glove remaining in food or products due to white or light flesh-coloured glove is not easy to be detected by naked eyes. In this paper, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) selected as additive for NBR to improve its detectability by mean of magnetic properties. IONs synthesized via precipitation method and compounded with NBR latex before casting on petri dish. The properties of IONs were investigated by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Raman Spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile NBR/IONs composites were studied by Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). It observed that, synthesized IONs shows of 25.28 nm crystallite with 25.86 nm semipherical (changed as) shape. Meanwhile, Magnetite and maghemite phase are found in range of 670 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 respectively, which it contributes magnetization saturation of 73.96 emu/g at 10,000 G by VSM. Thermal stability and magnetic properties were increased with incorporating IONs into NBR latex up to 20 phr. NBR/IONs 5 phr has the optimum thermal stability, lowest glass transition temperature (-14.83 °C) and acceptable range of magnetization saturation (3.83 emu/g at 10,000 G) to form NBR gloves with magnetic detectability.

  9. Airborne Magnetic and Electromagnetic Data map Rock Alteration and Water Content at Mount Adams, Mount Baker and Mount Rainier, Washington: Implications for Lahar Hazards and Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C. A.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Horton, R.; Breit, G.; John, D.

    2007-12-01

    High resolution helicopter-borne magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) data flown over the rugged, ice-covered, highly magnetic and mostly resistive volcanoes of Mount Rainier, Mount Adams and Mount Baker, along with rock property measurements, reveal the distribution of alteration, water and hydrothermal fluids that are essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards and understanding hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the magnetization and resistivity of volcanic rock resulting in clear recognition of altered rock by helicopter magnetic and EM measurements. Magnetic and EM data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses of hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region, in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit, and in much of the central cone of Mount Baker. We identify the Sunset Amphitheater region and steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams as likely sources for future debris flows. In addition, the EM data identified water-saturated rocks in the upper 100-200 m of the three volcanoes. The water-saturated zone could extend deeper, but is beyond the detection limits of the EM data. Water in hydrothermal fluids reacts with the volcanic rock to produce clay minerals. The formation of clay minerals and presence of free water reduces the effective stress, thereby increasing the potential for slope failure, and acts, with entrained melting ice, as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. Therefore, knowing the distribution of water is also important for hazard assessments. Finally, modeling requires extremely low

  10. Loading experiment and thermal analysis for conduction cooled magnet of SMES system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WU; Huiling WANG; Jiangbo XIE; Yan ZHAO; Yuejin TANG; Jindong LI; Jing SHI

    2009-01-01

    China's first 35kJ high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system with an experiment equipment was depicted. The dynamic heat analysis of the magnet of the SMES was conducted through the current load test on the directly cooled conduction magnet. The research results were as follows:when the converter charges and discharges the magnet for energy storage, the hysteresis loss is the main part of power loss, and contributes significantly to temperature rise;reducing the current frequency at the side of direct current is conducive to restraining temperature rise. The optimizing factors of the cool-guide structure were analyzed based on the heat stability theory, and it was found that the heat transfer of its key part (at the top of the magnet) must be strengthened to reduce the axial temperature difference of the magnet.

  11. A thermally stable heating mechanism for the intracluster medium: turbulence, magnetic fields and plasma instabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kunz, M. W.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Binney, J. J.; Sanders, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of self-regulated heating and cooling in galaxy clusters and the implications for cluster magnetic fields and turbulence. Viscous heating of a weakly collisional magnetised plasma is regulated by the pressure anisotropy with respect to the local direction of the magnetic field. The intracluster medium is a high-beta plasma, where pressure anisotropies caused by the turbulent stresses and the consequent local changes in the magnetic field will trigger very fast microsca...

  12. Study of thermal stability of permanent magnets by the method of Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method permitting identification of residual magnetization factor α, as applied to permanent magnets from barium ferrite BaFe12O19, is described. Formulas for indentification of factor α based on analysis of the Moessbauer spectra of 57Fe nuclei obtained in the temperature range of 120-300 K, where magnets from barium ferrite manifest special instability, are provided. The value of factor α obtained based on the Moessbauer spectra is 2 ·10-3 deg -1, which coincides with the value obtained based on magnetic measurements

  13. Modeling an unmitigated thermal quench event in a large field magnet in a DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superconducting magnet systems of future fusion reactors, such as a Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO), will produce magnetic field energies in the 10 s of GJ range. The release of this energy during a fault condition could produce arcs that can damage the magnets of these systems. The public safety consequences of such events must be explored for a DEMO reactor because the magnets are located near the DEMO's primary radioactive confinement barrier, the reactor's vacuum vessel (VV). Great care will be taken in the design of DEMO's magnet systems to detect and provide a rapid field energy dump to avoid any accidents conditions. During an event when a fault condition proceeds undetected, the potential of producing melting of the magnet exists. If molten material from the magnet impinges on the walls of the VV, these walls could fail, resulting in a pathway for release of radioactive material from the VV. A model is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) called MAGARC to investigate the consequences of this accident in a large toroidal field (TF) coil. Recent improvements to this model are described in this paper, along with predictions for a DEMO relevant event in a toroidal field magnet

  14. The influence of the solid thermal conductivity on active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    for a range of thermal conductivities, operating frequencies, a long and short regenerator, and finally a regenerator with a low and a high number of transfer units (NTU) regenerator. In this way the performance is mapped out and the impact of the thermal conductivity of the solid is probed. Modeling shows...

  15. Magnetic, transport, and thermal properties of ferromagnetic EuB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic measurements on Al-flux grown EuB6 crystals show that this material orders ferromagnetically with a transition temperature T/sub c/=13.7 K. The effective moment derived from paramagnetic susceptibility measurements gives μ/sub eff/=7.76 μ/sub B/, and the saturation magnetization extrapolated to 0 K is within 10% of the theoretical value of 7 μ/sub B/ expected for Eu+2. The magnetic order, however, cannot be that of a simple colinear ferromagnet because the magnetic specific heat in zero applied magnetic field shows a broad maximum centered about 9 K rather than the expected lambda-like anomaly at 13.7 K. Finally, transport measurements suggest that EuB6 is an intrinsic semimental

  16. Effect of thermal treatment on coercivity of SmCo/sub 5/ sintered magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permanent magnet materials composed of transition and rare earth metals exhibit high energy products. Samarium cobalt magnets are developed and research is done to have high coercivity. Chemistry is varied from 34 to 36 weight percent of samarium in Sm/sub 1/Co/sub 5/ compound. Effect of chemistry and sintering treatment temperatures on final properties has been studied. Magnets are manufactured by powder metallurgical technique involving isostatic pressing and sintering in C. Then the magnets are inert atmosphere at temperatures range of 1140-1170 deg. C. It subject to post sintering aging treatment in temperature range of 800-900 deg. C is observed that coercivity of Sm/sub 1/Co/sub 5/ magnet varies with aging temperature and can be improved by post sintering aging treatment. (author)

  17. Influence of stoichiometry on phase constitution, thermal behavior and magnetic properties of Ba-hexaferrite particles prepared via SHS route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barium hexaferrite magnetic particles were synthesized via self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) route by thermal initiation of compact mixed powders of iron, iron oxide and barium nitrate using various Fe(total)/Ba molar ratios of 9-12. As-SHS treated and post synthesis specimens were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, VSM, DTA/TGA and SEM. DTA/TGA studies revealed that the formation temperature of barium hexaferrite decreased by increasing of Fe/Ba molar ratio. VSM measurement also indicated that saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercivity (Hc) of the annealed specimens increased by increasing of Fe/Ba molar ratio. XRD results confirmed by those obtained from DTA/TGA and VSM, indicated that the Fe/Ba molar ratio of 12 is favorable for the formation of single-phase barium hexaferrite

  18. Approximate energy states and thermal properties of a particle with position-dependent mass in external magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Eshghi, Mahdi; Ikhdair, Sameer M

    2016-01-01

    We solve the Schr\\"odinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse and Coulomb potentials and exposed to external magnetic and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields. The non-relativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions. We also study the thermal quantities of such a system. Further, the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism. We give plots for energy as a function of various physical parameters. The behavior of the internal energy, specific heat and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown.

  19. Attainable entanglement of unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the chemical shift

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Y; Ohba, I; Yoshida, N; Mikami, Shuji; Ohba, Ichiro; Ota, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2006-01-01

    Recently, Yu, Brown, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 71}, 032341 (2005)] investigated the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Their research gave an insight into the role of the entanglement in a liquid-state NMR quantum computer. Moreover, they attempted to reveal the role of mixed-state entanglement in quantum computing. However, they assumed that the Zeeman energy of each nuclear spin which corresponds to a qubit takes a common value for all; there is no chemical shift. In this paper, we research a model with the chemical shifts and analytically derive the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled, by the positive partial transposition (PPT) criterion with respect to any bipartition. We examine the effect of the chemical shifts on the boundary between the separability and the nonseparability, and find it is negligible.

  20. Investigation of thermal, mechanical and magnetic behaviors of the Cu-11%Al alloy with Ag and Mn additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.A.G., E-mail: galdino.ricardo@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Paganotti, A.; Gama, S. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Adorno, A.T.; Carvalho, T.M.; Santos, C.M.A. [Instituto de Quimica - UNESP, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The investigation of thermal, mechanical and magnetic behaviors of the Cu-11%Al, Cu-11%Al-3%Ag, Cu-11%Al-10%Mn and Cu-11%Al-10%Mn-3%Ag alloys was made using microhardness measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy and magnetic moment change with applied field measurement. The results indicated that the Mn addition changes the phase stability range, the microhardness values and makes undetectable the eutectoid reaction in annealed Cu-11%Al and Cu-11%Al-3%Ag alloys while the presence of Ag does not modify the phase transformation sequence neither microhardness values of the annealed Cu-11%Al and Cu-11%Al-10%Mn alloys, but it increases the magnetic moment of this latter at about 2.7 times and decreases the rates of eutectoid and peritectoid reactions of the former. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure of Cu-Al alloy is modified in the Ag presence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ({alpha} + {gamma}) phase is stabilized down to room temperature when Ag is added to Cu-Al alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-rich phase modifies the magnetic characteristics of Cu-Al-Mn alloy.

  1. Effect of replacing RE and TM on magnetic properties and thermal stability of some Al–Ni-based amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uporov, S.A., E-mail: segga@bk.ru [Institute of Metallurgy UB RAS, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Uporova, N.S. [Ural State Pedagogical University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Bykov, V.A.; Kulikova, T.V.; Pryanichnikov, S.V. [Institute of Metallurgy UB RAS, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► X-ray diffraction analysis of the quenched Al–Ni-based alloys revealed a clear prepeak. ► The amorphous alloys demonstrate the superparamagnetic behavior. ► The variation of the RE and TM caused the radical changes of thermal properties. -- Abstract: Amorphous ribbons Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 8}Ho{sub 6}, Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 8}Gd{sub 6} and Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 6}Co{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}Y{sub 2} were prepared by quenching from 1580–1600 K using spinning technique at a wheel speed of 32 m/s. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the quenched alloys revealed a clear prepeak located below the main amorphous peak. The specimens crystallize in three stages but glass transition temperature was not found. The crystalinity was calculated by both XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods for all samples. Magnetic properties of ribbons were investigated in wide ranges of temperature (T = 4–900 K) and magnetic field (up to 30 kOe) by Faraday method and vibration sample magnetometry (VSM). The amorphous alloys investigated have no magnetic ordering at low temperatures down to T = 4 K but demonstrate the superparamagnetic behavior. The magnetic properties are discussed in the frames of conception of existence the superparamagnetic clusters with ferrimagnetic ordering.

  2. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  3. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on Non-Thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on several items of interest to the modeling of flares, including: the peak flare coronal temperature that can be attained, the post-impulsive-phase cooling time of heated coronal plasma, and the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy content of accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  4. Calculation of thermal conductivity coefficients of electrons in magnetized dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2016-01-01

    The solution of Boltzmann equation for plasma in magnetic field, with arbitrarily degenerate electrons and non-degenerate nuclei, is obtained by Chapman-Enskog method. Functions, generalizing Sonin polynomials are used for obtaining an approximate solution. Fully ionized plasma is considered. The tensor of the heat conductivity coefficients in non-quantized magnetic field is calculated. For non-degenerate and strongly degenerate plasma the asymptotic analytic formulas are obtained, which are compared with results of previous authors. The Lorentz approximation, with neglecting of electron-electron encounters, is asymptotically exact for strongly degenerate plasma. For non-degenerate plasma the solution at 3-function approximation for Lorentz gas deviate from the exact solution for about 2.2\\%, at zero magnetic field. We obtain the solution for the heat conductivity tensor for the case of non-degenerate electrons, in presence of a magnetic field, in three polynomial approximation with account of electron-electr...

  5. Magnetic thermal hysteresis due to paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic transition in Fe-24.4Mn-5.9Si-5.1Cr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic thermal hysteresis (MTH associated with a paramagnetic (PM-antiferromagnetic (AFM phase transition was found in an Fe-24.4Mn-5.9Si-5.1Cr shape-memory alloy. Aside from the magnetic field (H, the driving rate (v can also tune the critical temperature of the magnetic transition and cause an increase in MTH. The magnetic phase diagram obtained is discussed. The equation for MTH was deduced based on the Landau model for a PM-AFM transition that includes H and v dependence, which gives a reasonable account of the experimental results.

  6. Influence of Thermal Treatment on Magnetic Properties of Steel Sheet Material Utilised in Cable Routing System

    OpenAIRE

    Elemir Usak

    2013-01-01

    The influence of relax annealing aimed at removal of the residual stresses (so-called stress-relief annealing) on various magnetic parameters, such as the relative magnetic amplitude permeability, coercivity, remanent flux density, etc. is discussed. Samples of steel cable tray material which is a part of commercially available cable routing system were investigated in order to find information about the properties important from the point of view of EMC requirements in extremely demanding in...

  7. Influence of thermal treatment on magnetic properties of steel sheet material utilised in cable routing system

    OpenAIRE

    Ušák, Elemír

    2013-01-01

    The influence of relax annealing aimed at removal of the residual stresses (so-called stress-relief annealing) on various magnetic parameters, such as the relative magnetic amplitude permeability, coercivity, remanent flux density, etc. is discussed. Samples of steel cable tray material which is a part of commercially available cable routing system were investigated in order to find information about the properties important from the point of view of EMC requirements in extremely demanding in...

  8. Evaluation of thermal recovery of neutron-irradiated SA508-3 steel using magnetic property measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vickers microhardness and magnetic properties have been used to investigate irradiation effects and thermal recovery characteristics of neutron-irradiated SA508-3 reactor pressure vessel steel specimens irradiated to a neutron fluence of 5.5 x 1017 n cm-2 (E > 1 MeV) at 70oC. Two recovery stages were identified from the hardness results during isochronal annealing and the mechanism responsible for the two stages was explained using the results of Barkhausen noise on the basis of the interaction between radiation-induced defects and the magnetic domain wall. The neutron irradiation caused the coercivity to decrease, whereas the maximum induction increased. Barkhausen noise parameters associated with the domain-wall motion were decreased by neutron irradiation and recovered with subsequent heat treatments. From the sensitive changes in the Barkhausen noise upon annealing heat treatment, it is suggested that the Barkhausen noise measurements may be used as a useful tool for monitoring the early stage of the thermal recovery behaviour of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels. (Author)

  9. Influence of Small Cr Addition on Thermal Stability and Magnetic Properties of Fe-Co-Zr-Nb-B Glassy Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Fe62Co8-xCrxZr6Nb4B2o (x=0-4 at. Pct) metallic glasses show high thermal stability with a maximum supercooled liquid region of about 84.8 K. The addition of 2 at. pet Cr causes the extension of the supercooled liquid region remarkably, leading to the enhancement of thermal stability and glass-forming ability. The crystallization of the Fe-based glassy alloys takes place through a single exothermic reaction, accompanying the precipitation of more than three kinds of crystallized phases such as a-Fe, Fe2Zr and ZrB2- The long-range atomic rearrangements required for the precipitation of the multiple crystalline phases seem to play an important role in the appearance of the large supercooled liquid region through the retardation of the crystallization reactions. The Fe-based alloys exhibit soft ferromagnetic properties. The saturation magnetization decreases with increasing Cr content while the saturated magnetostriction increases as a function of Cr content. There is no distinct change in the saturation magnetization and coercive force with annealing temperature below the crystallization temperature. The devitrification gives rise to a considerable enhancement in both σs and Hc.

  10. Thermal evolution of nanocrystalline co-sputtered Ni–Zr alloy films: Structural, magnetic and MD simulation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati, E-mail: debarati@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rao, T.V. Chandrasekhar; Bhushan, K.G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ali, Kawsar [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Debnath, A. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Arya, A. [Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bhattacharya, S. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Monophasic and homogeneous Ni{sub 10}Zr{sub 7} nanocrystalline alloy films were successfully grown at room temperature by co-sputtering in an indigenously developed three-gun DC/RF magnetron sputtering unit. The films could be produced with long-range crystallographic and chemical order in the alloy, thus overcoming the widely acknowledged inherent proclivity of the glass forming Ni–Zr couple towards amorphization. Crystallinity of these alloys is a desirable feature with regard to improved efficacy in applications such as hydrogen storage, catalytic activity and nuclear reactor engineering, to name a few. Thermal stability of this crystalline phase, being vital for transition to viable applications, was investigated through systematic annealing of the alloy films at 473 K, 673 K and 923 K for various durations. While the films were stable at 473 K, the effect of annealing at 673 K was to create segregation into nanocrystalline Ni (superparamagnetic) and amorphous Ni + Zr (non-magnetic) phases. Detailed analyses of the physical and magnetic structures before and after annealing were performed through several techniques effectual in analyzing stratified configurations and the findings were all consistent with each other. Polarized neutron and X-ray reflectometry, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to gauge phase separation at nanometer length scales. SQUID based magnetometry was used to investigate macroscopic magnetic properties. Simulated annealing performed on this system using molecular dynamic calculations corroborated well with the experimental results. This study provides a thorough understanding of the creation and thermal evolution of a crystalline Ni–Zr alloy. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline Ni{sub 10}Zr{sub 7} alloy thin films deposited successfully by co-sputtering. • Creation of a crystalline alloy in a binary system with a tendency to amorphize.

  11. Structural and magnetic effects on thermal emittance of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} from the first principles calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiang-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-ferrous Metals, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Tang, Fu-Ling, E-mail: tfl03@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-ferrous Metals, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Xue, Hong-Tao; Lu, Wen-Jiang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Non-ferrous Metals, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Feng, Yu-Dong [Science and Technology on Surface Engineering Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation functional was used in the first-principles method to calculate thermal emittance of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO). The effects of structure and magnetism on thermal emittance of LSMO were systematically investigated by the complex dielectric function. It is found that the LSMO with orthorhombic structure has a higher thermal emittance than that with rhombohedral structure at the same temperature. When the magnetism varying with temperature of LSMO is put into consideration, the magnetic different make a significant change on thermal emittance and the variation of thermal emittance of La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}MnO{sub 3} is the biggest among x=0, 0.2, 0.25, 0.5. It is found that thermal emittance have a low value at the low temperature and have a high value at the high temperature, due to the unique feature of variable thermal emittance based on metal-insulator transition, which makes LSMO attractive as potential thermal control materials. - Highlights: • The emittance of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) varies with different magnetism state. • Orthorhombic LSMO has larger emittance than rhombohedral LSMO at same temperature. • If the magnetism varying with temperature of LSMO is considered, the variation of emittance of La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}MnO{sub 3} is the biggest among x=0, 0.2, 0.25 and 0.5.

  12. Magneto-Thermal Stability in LARP Nb3Sn TQS Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Caspi, S; Dietderich, D; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Rossi, L; Sabbi, G L; Takala, E

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Program (LARP), three US laboratories BNL, FNAL and LBNL are developing Nb3Sn quadrupole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. At present CERN is supporting this activity by testing some of the LARP 1 m long 90 mm aperture magnets. Recently two magnets using a shell based key and bladder technology (TQS) have been tested at CERN. These magnets (TQS02c, TQS03a) share the same mechanical structure and use a 27 strand Rutherford cable based one on the 0.7 mm RRP® strand produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST). The main difference between the two magnets is the strand sub-element layout (54/61 in TQS02c versus 108/127 in TQS03a) and the strand critical current. The TQS03a wire has a significantly lower critical current, a larger amount of copper stabilizer, and a larger number of superconducting sub-elements with respect to the TQS02c strand. The tests show that TQS02c was stable between 4.3 K and 2.7 K while it was limited by the s...

  13. Constraints on magnetic field strength in the remnant SN 1006 from its non-thermal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, O.; Kuzyo, T.; Bocchino, F.

    2012-01-01

    Images of SN 1006 have a number of important properties. For instance, the bright limbs coincide spatially in various bands, they have different brightnesses, and the contrast of brightness varies from radio to gamma rays. The reasons for such properties and the role of the magnetic field strength are discussed. Simple, almost model-independent methods and analytical approximations for the derivation of the strength of the magnetic field from the comparison of radio, X-ray and TeV images of the supernova remnant are presented. The methods require the TeV image to be well resolved and accurate, at least to the level of the radio and X-ray maps, so that reasonable constraints can be placed on the magnetic field. If we apply the methods to the present HESS data, they limit the strength of the magnetic field in the limbs of SN 1006 to values lower than a few hundred micro-gauss. If applied to the Fermi-LAT band, the model predicts the same position and same ratio of the surface brightness for GeV photons as for the radio band. We conclude that future TeV and GeV high-resolution data may prove to be very informative about the magnetic field of SN 1006.

  14. Thermal evolution of magnetic-excitation spectrum of PrB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazukov, V. N.; Alekseev, P. A.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Philippov, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic dynamic response of a PrB6 single crystal has been studied using inelastic neutron scattering in a temperature range of 10-120 K, which is above the temperatures of the phase transitions to the magnetic-ordered state. The study is aimed at revealing peculiarities of the state with a low magnetic moment in a temperature range of 7 K < T ≤ 20 K, which was identified in a number of magnetometric experiments. In addition to a quasielastic signal, a weak-dispersion excitation with an energy of ~1 meV has been detected, which exists at temperatures below 24 K. The results have been analyzed from the viewpoint of the formation of a spatially nonuniform state based on domains with short-range magnetic correlations at temperatures of 10-20 K. Judging by the dispersion of excitations, the character of the correlation is similar to that observed in a state with long-range magnetic order which arises at lower temperatures.

  15. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and thermal bistability in a magnetic two-dimensional hole system

    CERN Document Server

    Wurstbauer, Ursula; Weiss, Dieter; Dietl, Tomasz; Wegscheider, Werner; 10.1038/nphys1782

    2011-01-01

    Colossal negative magnetoresistance and the associated field-induced insulator-to-metal transition, the most characteristic features of magnetic semiconductors, are observed in n-type rare earth oxides and chalcogenides, p-type manganites, n-type and p-type diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) as well as in quantum wells of n-type DMS. Here, we report on magnetostransport studies of Mn modulation-doped InAs quantum wells, which reveal a magnetic field driven and bias voltage dependent insulator-to-metal transition with abrupt and hysteretic changes of resistance over several orders of magnitude. These phenomena coexist with the quantised Hall effect in high magnetic fields. We show that the exchange coupling between a hole and the parent Mn acceptor produces a magnetic anisotropy barrier that shifts the spin relaxation time of the bound hole to a 100 s range in compressively strained quantum wells. This bistability of the individual Mn acceptors explains the hysteretic behaviour while opening prospects for i...

  16. Thermal magnetic resonance: physics considerations and electromagnetic field simulations up to 23.5 Tesla (1GHz)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and most aggressive malign brain tumor. The 5-year survival rate after tumor resection and adjuvant chemoradiation is only 10 %, with almost all recurrences occurring in the initially treated site. Attempts to improve local control using a higher radiation dose were not successful so that alternative additive treatments are urgently needed. Given the strong rationale for hyperthermia as part of a multimodal treatment for patients with glioblastoma, non-invasive radio frequency (RF) hyperthermia might significantly improve treatment results. A non-invasive applicator was constructed utilizing the magnetic resonance (MR) spin excitation frequency for controlled RF hyperthermia and MR imaging in an integrated system, which we refer to as thermal MR. Applicator designs at RF frequencies 300 MHz, 500 MHz and 1GHz were investigated and examined for absolute applicable thermal dose and temperature hotspot size. Electromagnetic field (EMF) and temperature simulations were performed in human voxel models. RF heating experiments were conducted at 300 MHz and 500 MHz to characterize the applicator performance and validate the simulations. The feasibility of thermal MR was demonstrated at 7.0 T. The temperature could be increased by ~11 °C in 3 min in the center of a head sized phantom. Modification of the RF phases allowed steering of a temperature hotspot to a deliberately selected location. RF heating was monitored using the integrated system for MR thermometry and high spatial resolution MRI. EMF and thermal simulations demonstrated that local RF hyperthermia using the integrated system is feasible to reach a maximum temperature in the center of the human brain of 46.8 °C after 3 min of RF heating while surface temperatures stayed below 41 °C. Using higher RF frequencies reduces the size of the temperature hotspot significantly. The opportunities and capabilities of thermal magnetic resonance for RF hyperthermia interventions

  17. Excitation of plasma waves by unstable photoelectron and thermal electron populations on closed magnetic field lines in the Martian ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Borisov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that anisotropic electron pitch angle distributions in the closed magnetic field regions of the Martian ionosphere gives rise to excitation of plasma instabilities. We discuss two types of instabilities that are excited by two different populations of electrons. First, the generation of Langmuir waves by photoelectrons with energies of the order of 10eV is investigated. It is predicted that the measured anisotropy of their pitch angle distribution at the heights z≈400km causes excitation of waves with frequencies f~30kHz and wavelengths λ~30m. Near the terminators the instability of the electrostatic waves with frequencies of the order of or less than the electron gyrofrequency exited by thermal electrons is predicted. The typical frequencies of these waves depend on the local magnitude of the magnetic field and can achieve values f~3-5kHz above strong crustal magnetic fields.

  18. Thermally stable voltage-controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Mo|CoFeB|MgO structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang, E-mail: xiang.li@ucla.edu; Yu, Guoqiang; Wong, Kin; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Akyol, Mustafa; Wang, Kang L., E-mail: wang@seas.ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Wu, Hao; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ong, P. V.; Kioussis, Nicholas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, California 91330 (United States); Hu, Qi; Ebrahimi, Farbod [Inston Inc., Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Khalili Amiri, Pedram, E-mail: pedramk@ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Inston Inc., Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We study voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) and other magnetic properties in annealed Mo|CoFeB|MgO layered structures. The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is observed to increase with annealing over the studied temperature range, and a VCMA coefficient of about 40 fJ/V-m is sustained after annealing at temperatures as high as 430 °C. Ab initio electronic structure calculations of interfacial PMA as a function of strain further show that strain relaxation may lead to the increase of interfacial PMA at higher annealing temperatures. Measurements also show that there is no significant VCMA and interfacial PMA dependence on the CoFeB thickness over the studied range, which illustrates the interfacial origin of the anisotropy and its voltage dependence, i.e., the VCMA effect. The high thermal annealing stability of Mo|CoFeB|MgO structures makes them compatible with advanced CMOS back-end-of-line processes, and will be important for integration of magnetoelectric random access memory into on-chip embedded applications.

  19. Influence of a complex magnetic field application in rats upon thermal nociceptive thresholds: the importance of polarity and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L J; Koren, S A; Persinger, M A

    2004-10-01

    The application of a weak (1 microTesla) complex magnetic field pattern with a relevant electrophysiological signature produced an analgesic response in rats to thermal stimuli when the pattern was presented once every 4 sec for 30 min through iron-core solenoids. In one experiment, the burst-firing pattern was presented once every 4 s for 30 min and restricted to the positive polarity, negative polarity or a bipolar equivalent. The strongest analgesia occurred when the burst-firing pattern was presented with positive polarity or as the typical bipolar signal. Administrations of the burst-firing pattern once per week for four consecutive weeks produced analgesia that was clearly evident during the first, third, and fourth weeks but not during the second week of treatment. A telephone sensor coil (that can be readily obtained from local electronic shops) was then used instead of the solenoids along with an audio (.wav) file to generate the magnetic field; the analgesia was still apparent. However, when the magnetic pattern was generated from a compact disc source the analgesia was not evoked. The current results suggest that these fields can be generated through simple commercial devices controlled by available computer software.

  20. Thermally stable voltage-controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Mo|CoFeB|MgO structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) and other magnetic properties in annealed Mo|CoFeB|MgO layered structures. The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is observed to increase with annealing over the studied temperature range, and a VCMA coefficient of about 40 fJ/V-m is sustained after annealing at temperatures as high as 430 °C. Ab initio electronic structure calculations of interfacial PMA as a function of strain further show that strain relaxation may lead to the increase of interfacial PMA at higher annealing temperatures. Measurements also show that there is no significant VCMA and interfacial PMA dependence on the CoFeB thickness over the studied range, which illustrates the interfacial origin of the anisotropy and its voltage dependence, i.e., the VCMA effect. The high thermal annealing stability of Mo|CoFeB|MgO structures makes them compatible with advanced CMOS back-end-of-line processes, and will be important for integration of magnetoelectric random access memory into on-chip embedded applications

  1. MLS airborne antenna research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  2. Linear Stability Analysis of Thermal Convection in an Infinitely Long Vertical Rectangular Enclosure in the Presence of a Uniform Horizontal Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kitaura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stability of thermal convection in an infinitely long vertical channel in the presence of a uniform horizontal magnetic field applied in the direction parallel to the hot and cold walls was numerically studied. First, in order to confirm accuracy of the present numerical code, the one-dimensional computations without the effect of magnetic field were computed and they agreed with a previous study quantitatively for various values of the Prandtl number. Then, linear stability analysis for the thermal convection flow in a square horizontal cross section under the magnetic field was carried out for the case of Pr = 0.025. The thermal convection flow was once destabilized at certain low Hartmann numbers, and it was stabilized at high Hartmann numbers.

  3. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles.

  4. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  5. Nanocrystalline alloy Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9. Its structure and magnetic properties. II. Thermal stability of the induced magnetic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specimens of alloy Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 produced as amorphous ribbons by quenching from the melt to a rotating wheel are used to study thermal stability of a constant of magnetic anisotropy Ku, induced in the process of thermomechanical or thermomagnetic treatments. The conditions of magnetic anisotropy induction (holding time and the intensity of external action) for obtaining expected thermal stability of Ku, are elucidated. Transmission electron microscopical studies show some distinctions in the alloy microstructure after different treatments. A comparison of results of magnetic and structural investigations, carried out by Moessbauer method, permits the assumption that the phases containing niobium and boron along with iron are responsible for thermal stability of Ku

  6. Tripartite entanglement of {Cu3} single molecular magnet with magnetic field in thermal equilibrium%{Cu3}单分子磁体在热平衡和磁场作用下的三体纠缠∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑一丹; 周斌

    2016-01-01

    Quantum entanglement is one of the most fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. Because of the nonlocality, quantum entanglement is widely used in quantum computation and quantum information. Considering the fact that thermal fluctuation suppresses quantum effects, the concept of thermal entanglement is introduced to refer to the idea that the effect of temperature should be viewed as external control in the preparation of entangled state. It has been found that nanoscale single molecular magnet has a novel quantum effect at low temperature. Furthermore, single-molecular magnet is viewed as a promising candidate for realizing encoding and manipulation of quantum information. Na9[Cu3Na3(H2O)9(α-AsW9O33)2]·26H2O (denoted as {Cu3} for convenience) is one of the typical representatives of nanoscale single molecular magnets. In this paper, we will theoretically analyze the properties of tripartite entanglement in {Cu3} with an external magnetic field in thermal equilibrium. The tripartite negativity is used to characterize the tripartite entanglement. The tripartite negativity of {Cu3} single molecular magnet is calculated numerically by using the equivalent spin model and experimental fitting parameters. We consider the magnetic fields along the vertical and the parallel directions of triangular spin ring, respectively, and the case with a tilted magnetic field is also discussed in this paper. It is shown that the magnitude and direction of magnetic field, and temperature have importance effects on the tripartite negativity of the system. It is found that the larger extra strong magnetic field will inhibit the generation of the quantum state of tripartite entanglement at higher temperature. In addition, compared with the magnetic field along the parallel direction of triangular spin ring and the tilted magnetic field, the magnetic field along the vertical direction of triangular spin ring obtains larger values of tripartite negativity under the same temperature

  7. Efficiency of Removing Sulfur Dioxide in the Air by Non-Thermal Plasma Along with the Application of the Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The non-thermal plasma created by high voltage pulsed power supply can be used to remove sulfur dioxide in the air, but how to increase the removing efficiency is not clear. It is novel to apply the magnetic field in removing SO2 as discussed in this paper. The mechanisms of removing sulfur dioxide by non-thermal plasma along with the application of the magnetic field are analyzed, and the related factors affecting the removal efficiency, such as the magnitude of pulsed voltage, the polarity of the pulse, the layout of the discharge electrode, especially the magnetic field are experimentally investigated. It can be concluded that the purification efficiency is improved significantly by applying the magnetic field.

  8. Electrical, thermal and magnetic studies on Bi-substituted LSMO manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daivajna, Mamatha D. [Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India); Rao, Ashok, E-mail: ashokanu_rao@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India); Okram, G.S. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Indore 452017 (India)

    2015-08-15

    In the present investigation detailed electrical, magnetic and thermoelectric measurements on Bi-doped L{sub 0.6−x}Bi{sub x}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} (0≤x≤0.3) manganites have been done. All the samples are single phased. The metal-insulator transition temperatures (T{sub MI}) as well as the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) are both found to decrease with Bi-content. Magneto-resistance (MR) data shows that MR (%) increases with Bi-content thereby showing it can be used in magnetic memory based devices. Resistivity data shows that small polaron hopping (SPH) model is valid in high temperature regime. Low temperature resistivity data depicts that electron–electron scattering is mainly responsible for the conduction mechanism. High temperature thermoelectric power (TEP) data reaffirms the validity of SPH model. - Highlights: • The Bi-doped compounds follow small polaron hopping model in high temperature range. • Electrical resistivity data shows evidences about existence of magnetic polarons. • MR and TCR increase with Bi-content. • Potential bolometer and magnetic sensing materials.

  9. Thermal stability and the magnetic properties of hybrid vanadium oxide-tetradecylamine nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleta, M. E.; López, C. A.; Granada, M.; Troiani, H. E.; Sánchez, R. D.; Malta, M.; Torresi, R. M.

    2012-09-01

    Vanadium oxide nanotubes (NTs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method followed by a long-term hydrothermal treatment. The obtained nanotubes have a multiwall structure, and 70% of vanadium ions are in the V4+ state. This percentage was derived by evaluating three components of the magnetic susceptibility; namely, (i) the paramagnetic Curie-Weiss behavior, (ii) antiferromagnetic dimers, and (iii) magnetic trimers. The as-made NTs were annealed in situ in the cavity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The line shape changes irreversibly at 390 K, and the EPR susceptibility presents an anomaly at 425 K. These changes are interpreted as a partial oxidation of the V4+ ions and consequently a decrease in the concentration of the magnetic species. The quantification of the V4+ ions of the annealed NTs reveals a diminution to 39% of V4+, a weakening of the Curie-Weiss and antiferromagnetic dimers contributions, and the suppression of magnetic trimers. Vibrational studies confirm the decrease of V4+ amount.

  10. A magnetic resonance study of 3d transition metals and thermal donors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a study of 3d-transition metal impurities in silicon (titanium and iron in particular) and a study of oxygen-related heat-treatment centers in silicon, both carried out mainly by magnetic resonances techniques like EPR and ENDOR. 119 refs.; 31 figs.; 14 tabs

  11. An integrated study of thermal treatment effects on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Zn-ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antic, Bratislav; Perovic, Marija; Kremenovic, Aleksandar; Blanusa, Jovan; Spasojevic, Vojislav; Vulic, Predrag; Bessais, Lotfi; Bozin, Emil S

    2013-02-27

    The evolution of the magnetic state, crystal structure and microstructure parameters of nanocrystalline zinc-ferrite, tuned by thermal annealing of ∼4 nm nanoparticles, was systematically studied by complementary characterization methods. Structural analysis of neutron and synchrotron x-ray radiation data revealed a mixed cation distribution in the nanoparticle samples, with the degree of inversion systematically decreasing from 0.25 in an as-prepared nanocrystalline sample to a non-inverted spinel structure with a normal cation distribution in the bulk counterpart. The results of DC magnetization and Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments indicated a superparamagnetic relaxation in ∼4 nm nanoparticles, albeit with different freezing temperatures T(f) of 27.5 K and 46 K, respectively. The quadrupole splitting parameter decreases with the annealing temperature due to cation redistribution between the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure and the associated defects. DC magnetization measurements indicated the existence of significant interparticle interactions among nanoparticles ('superspins'). Additional confirmation for the presence of interparticle interactions was found from the fit of the T(f)(H) dependence to the AT line, from which a value of the anisotropy constant of K(eff) = 5.6 × 10(5) erg cm(-3) was deduced. Further evidence for strong interparticle interactions was found from AC susceptibility measurements, where the frequency dependence of the freezing temperature T(f)(f) was satisfactory described by both Vogel-Fulcher and dynamic scaling theory, both applicable for interacting systems. The parameters obtained from these fits suggest collective freezing of magnetic moments at T(f). PMID:23343510

  12. An integrated study of thermal treatment effects on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Zn-ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antic, Bratislav [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia); Perovic, Marija [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia); Kremenovic, Aleksandar [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia); Blanusa, Jovan [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia); Spasojevic, Vojislav [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia); Vulic, Predrag [Univ. of Belgrade (Serbia); Bessais, Lotfi [Univ. of Paris (France); Bozin, Emil S [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The evolution of the magnetic state, crystal structure and microstructure parameters of nanocrystalline zinc–ferrite, tuned by thermal annealing of ~4 nm nanoparticles, was systematically studied by complementary characterization methods. Structural analysis of neutron and synchrotron x-ray radiation data revealed a mixed cation distribution in the nanoparticle samples, with the degree of inversion systematically decreasing from 0.25 in an as-prepared nanocrystalline sample to a non-inverted spinel structure with a normal cation distribution in the bulk counterpart. The results of DC magnetization and Mossbauer spectroscopy experiments indicated a superparamagnetic relaxation in ~4 nm nanoparticles, albeit with different freezing temperatures Tf of 27.5 K and 46 K, respectively. The quadrupole splitting parameter decreases with the annealing temperature due to cation redistribution between the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure and the associated defects. DC magnetization measurements indicated the existence of significant interparticle interactions among nanoparticles (‘superspins’). Additional confirmation for the presence of interparticle interactions was found from the fit of the Tf(H) dependence to the AT line, from which a value of the anisotropy constant of Keff = 5.6 × 105 erg cm-3 was deduced. Further evidence for strong interparticle interactions was found from AC susceptibility measurements, where the frequency dependence of the freezing temperature Tf(ƒ) was satisfactory described by both Vogel–Fulcher and dynamic scaling theory, both applicable for interacting systems. The parameters obtained from these fits suggest collective freezing of magnetic moments at Tf .

  13. Synchronization of electrically coupled stochastic magnetic oscillators induced by thermal and electrical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, A.; Locatelli, N.; Grollier, J.; Querlioz, D.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic tunnel junctions are nanostructures that auto-oscillate stochastically under the effect of thermal noise. Recent works showed that despite their stochasticity, such junctions possess a capability to synchronize to subthreshold voltage drives, in a way that can be enhanced or controlled by adding noise. In this work, we investigate a system composed of two electrically coupled junctions, connected in series to a periodic voltage source. We make use of numerical simulations and of an analytical model to demonstrate that both junctions can be phase locked to the drive, in phase or in antiphase. This synchronization phenomenon can be controlled by both thermal and electrical noises, although the two types of noises induce qualitatively different behaviors. Namely, thermal noise can stabilize a regime where one junction is phase locked to the drive voltage while the other is blocked in one state; on the contrary, electrical noise causes the junctions to have highly correlated behaviors and thus cannot induce the latter. These results open the way for the design of superparamagnetic tunnel junctions that can perform computation through synchronization, and which harvest the largest part of their energy consumption from thermal noise.

  14. Design study of magnetic environments for XYZ polarization analysis using 3He for the new thermal time of flight spectrometer TOPAS

    CERN Document Server

    Salhi, Zahir; Ioffe, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a finite element calculation of the magnetic field (MagNet software) taken with the newly proposed PASTIS Coil, which uses a wide-angle banana shaped 3He Neuton Spin Filter cell (NSF) to cover a large range of scattering angle. The goal of this insert is to enable XYZ polarization analysis to be installed on the future thermal time-of flight spectrometer TOPAS.

  15. Thermal conductivity and viscosity of hybrid nanfluids prepared with magnetic nanodiamond-cobalt oxide (ND-Co3O4) nanocomposite

    OpenAIRE

    L. Syam Sundar; G.O. Irurueta; Venkata Ramana, E.; Singh, Manoj K.; A.C.M. Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of magnetic nanodiamond-cobalt oxide (ND-Co3O4) nanocomposite material; preparation of nanofluids and estimation of thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and viscosity has been explained experimentally in this paper. The nanocomposite material has been synthesized by using in-situ growth technique and chemical coprecipitation between cobalt chloride and sodium borohydrate. The various techniques such as XRD, TEM, XPS and VSM have been used to confirm the ND and Co3O4 phase...

  16. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  17. Structural, thermal, magnetic and optical characterization of undoped nanocrystalline ZnS prepared by solid state reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faita, F.L., E-mail: flffisica@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Ersching, K. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Catarinense – Campus Camboriú, 88340-000 Camboriú, SC (Brazil); Poffo, C.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077000 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Benetti, L.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Trichês, D.M.; Souza, S.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077000 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Viegas, A.D.C.; Lima, J.C. de [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline zinc blende and wurtzite ZnS phases produced by mechanical alloying. • Sulfur and/or zinc vacancies in the ZnS as-milled. • Magnetic and semiconductor behavior for the as-milled ZnS-10h. • Irreversible demagnetization and Curie temperature above room temperature. • Structural stability after annealing and aged of the ZnS-10h sample. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline zinc blende and wurtzite ZnS phases with sulfur and/or zinc vacancies were obtained from a mechanically alloyed Zn{sub 50}S{sub 50} powder mixture. Structural, thermal, magnetic, optical and photoacoustic studies were carried out using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, vibrating sample magnetometer, UV–Vis absorption, photoluminescence and photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The cubic zinc blende (ZnS{sup ZB}) and hexagonal wurtzite (ZnS{sup WZ}) phases were nucleated in 3 h of milling and remained until 10 h when the milling process was stopped. The coexistence of these two phases was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction measurements attested the structural stability of the sample milled for 10 h and aged for eighteen months and of the sample milled 10 h and annealed at 300 °C and 600 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed the unreacted sulfur in molecular form (rings and/or chains). Magnetic behavior was observed for as-milled sample and Curie temperature was estimated at 430 °C. Moreover, an irreversible behavior of magnetic properties was observed and correlated with changes on the structural vacancies densities. The UV–Vis absorption spectra and McLean analysis showed an optical band gap around 3.4 eV and 3.9 for ZnS{sup ZB} and ZnS{sup WZ} phases, respectively. The sample milled for 10 h showed low blue photoemission intensity centered at 470 nm and thermal diffusivity around 0.02 cm{sup 2}/s.

  18. Electrical, Thermal, and Magnetic Characterization of Natural Tetrahedrites-Tennantites of Different Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinsky, P.; Vaney, J.-B.; Candolfi, C.; Dauscher, A.; Lenoir, B.; Hejtmánek, J.

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring sulfosalt minerals of the tetrahedrite-tennantite series ((Cu,Fe,Zn,Ag,Hg)12(Sb,As)4S13) are studied because of their potential use as basic components in the manufacture of thermoelectric devices for moderate-temperature applications. In the work reported herein, the chemical, crystallographic, thermoelectric, and magnetic properties of four specimens from different ores from Europe and America were exhaustively characterized. Our study revealed that these natural tetrahedrites usually behave as low-to-moderately doped p-type semiconductors with low mobility. Their carrier charge transport is thus located at the edge between hopping and itinerant mechanisms. The magnetic study, probing the behavior of the constituent iron species, revealed that an insignificant part of the iron occurs as ferromagnetic impurities. The dominant iron species is Fe2+ ions with antiferromagnetic interactions. The maximum value of ZT observed was 0.13 at 700 K; this value is impaired, primarily, by high electrical resistivity.

  19. Synchronization of electrically coupled stochastic magnetic oscillators induced by thermal and electrical noise

    OpenAIRE

    Mizrahi, A.; Locatelli, N.; Grollier, J.; Querlioz, D.

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic tunnel junctions are nanostructures that auto-oscillate stochastically under the effect of thermal noise. Recent works showed that despite their stochasticity, such junctions possess a capability to synchronize to subthreshold voltage drives, in a way that can be enhanced or controlled by adding noise. In this work, we investigate a system composed of two electrically coupled junctions, connected in series to a periodic voltage source. We make use of numerical simulations an...

  20. Thermal Quantum Discord in Pure Dzyaloshinskii—Moriya Model with Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Chuang; Li, Xiao-Man; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effects of the directions of Dzyaloshinskii—Moriya (DM) interaction vector and magnetic field on the quantum discord in the pure DM model. For different directions of DM vector, we find that there are different optimal parameter components of magnetic field. Moreover, we find that the optimal parameter components rules are the same for the Hamiltonian H1 and H2. According to the rules, for a certain axial DM vector, we can get the maximal quantum discord by adjusting the direction of the external magnetic field, which is feasible under the current experimental technology. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11204061, 11374085, 11104057, and 11204002, the Anhui Provincial Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. 1408085MA16, the Anhui Provincial Candidates for Academic and Technical Leaders Foundation under Grant No. 2015H052, the discipline top-notch talents Foundation and the Excellent Young Talents Support Plan of Anhui Provincial Universities. Ming Yang is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11274010, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education under Grant No. 20113401110002, the 211 Project of Anhui University, and the Personnel Department of Anhui Province

  1. Thermal Marangoni instability and magnetic pressure for a thin ferrofluid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennenberg, Marcel; Slavtchev, Slavtcho; Weyssow, Boris

    2009-04-01

    We study the linear coupling between the Marangoni and Cowley-Rosensweig instabilities for a thin layer of ferrofluid subjected to a temperature gradient and a magnetic field. Both are perpendicular to the reference horizontal boundaries, one of which is a rigid plate, while the other is a free surface remaining flat as long as the magnetic field is smaller than the critical value of the onset of the static isothermal Cowley-Rosensweig instability. Our study considers at first a ferrofluid layer resting on the rigid border. In the stationary case, when heating is directed from the rigid side, a magnetic field, smaller than the Cowley-Rosensweig critical one, can induce a new pattern: the critical Marangoni number is much lower than in the nonmagnetic undeformable case, for a dimensionless wavenumber of O(square root Bo) less than 1.992, its Newtonian classical value. When heating from the gaseous phase, an oscillatory marginal case exists theoretically, but for unphysical conditions. We consider also the case when the ferrofluid is hanging down from the rigid side. Only the wavelength critical value of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that separates a stable region from an unstable one changes. PMID:19426330

  2. Study of Heat Transfer with Nonlinear Thermal Radiation on Sinusoidal Motion of Magnetic Solid Particles in a Dusty Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M. M.; Zeeshan, A.; Ellahi, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, heat transfer with nonlinear thermal radiation on sinusoidal motion of magnetic solid particles in a dust Jeffrey fluid has been studied. The effects of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hall current are also taken under consideration. The governing equation of motion and energy equation are modelled with help of Ohms law for fluid and dust phases. The solutions of the resulting ordinary coupled partial differential equations are solved analytically. The impact of all the physical parameters of interest such as Hartmann number, slip parameter, Hall parameter, radiation parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and particle volume fraction are demonstrated mathematically and graphically. Trapping mechanism is also discussed in detail by drawing contour lines. The present analysis affirms many interesting behaviours, which permit further study on solid particles motion with heat and mass transfer.

  3. Study of Heat Transfer with Nonlinear Thermal Radiation on Sinusoidal Motion of Magnetic Solid Particles in a Dusty Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatti M. M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, heat transfer with nonlinear thermal radiation on sinusoidal motion of magnetic solid particles in a dust Jeffrey fluid has been studied. The effects of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD and hall current are also taken under consideration. The governing equation of motion and energy equation are modelled with help of Ohms law for fluid and dust phases. The solutions of the resulting ordinary coupled partial differential equations are solved analytically. The impact of all the physical parameters of interest such as Hartmann number, slip parameter, Hall parameter, radiation parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and particle volume fraction are demonstrated mathematically and graphically. Trapping mechanism is also discussed in detail by drawing contour lines. The present analysis affirms many interesting behaviours, which permit further study on solid particles motion with heat and mass transfer.

  4. Synthesis, Crystal Structures, Thermal Analysis and Magnetic Property of Mono- and Bi-nuclear 1,1-Cyclobutanedicarboxylate Copper Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Ming-Xing; DAI, Hui; SHAO, Min; SHI, Lei; LIN, Kun-Hua; CHENG, Zhi-Xuan; WENG, Lin-Hong

    2006-01-01

    Two new copper complexes, [Cu(cbdc)(phen)(H2O)]·2H2O (1) and [Cu2(cbdc)(phen)2(H2O)2](ClO4)2·H2O (2)(cbdc= 1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylate and phen= 1,10-phenanthroline), were synthesized by reaction of cbdc with Cu(ClO4)2 and phen in ethanol aqueous solution. Complex 1 crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/c and a=0.9428(4) nm, b= 1.2183(5) nm, c= 1.6265(7) nm, β= 102.418(5)°, V= 1.8246(13) nm3, Z=4, R=3D supramolecular structure where Cu(Ⅱ) ion is five-coordinated and has square-pyramidal coordination geometry.Its thermal decomposition procedure detail was studied by thermal analysis TG-DSC. Complex 2 belongs to monoclinic system with space group P2(1)/c and a=0.8897(3) nm, b= 1.9130(8) nm, c= 1.9936(8) nm, β=99.04(2)°,V=3.351(2) nm3, Z=4, R=0.0540, wR2=0.1102. The structure of 2 is a discrete binucleus, where Cu(1) is four-coordinated by phen and cbdc in a square-planar geometry while Cu(2) is five-coordinated by phen, one O of cbdc and two H2O, which can be best described as distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry. Cu(1) and Cu(2) are linked by carboxylic group of cbdc in a bidentate bridging fashion. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities of 2 in 2-300 K showed that its magnetic behavior obeyed Curie law.

  5. Thermal softening of metallic shaped-charge jets formed by the collapse of shaped-charge liners in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibility of increasing the ultimate stretching and penetration capability of metallic shaped-charge jets in the presence of an axial magnetic field in the shaped-charge liner due to heating and thermal softening of the jet material as a result of a sharp increase in the magnetic-field induction in the jet formation region upon liner collapse. This process is studied by numerical simulation in a quasi-two-dimensional formulation taking into account the inertial stretching of the conductive rigid-plastic rod in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field in it.

  6. Airborne field strength monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bredemeyer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000 by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz, the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA accelerated method of moments (MoM using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  7. Instability growth for magnetized liner inertial fusion seeded by electro-thermal, electro-choric, and material strength effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecover, J. D.; Chittenden, J. P. [The Centre for Inertial Fusion Studies, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    A critical limitation of magnetically imploded systems such as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability which primarily disrupts the outer surface of the liner. MagLIF-relevant experiments have showed large amplitude multi-mode MRT instability growth growing from surface roughness [McBride et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 135004 (2012)], which is only reproduced by 3D simulations using our MHD code Gorgon when an artificially azimuthally correlated initialisation is added. We have shown that the missing azimuthal correlation could be provided by a combination of the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an “electro-choric” instability (ECI); describing, respectively, the tendency of current to correlate azimuthally early in time due to temperature dependent Ohmic heating; and an amplification of the ETI driven by density dependent resistivity around vapourisation. We developed and implemented a material strength model in Gorgon to improve simulation of the solid phase of liner implosions which, when applied to simulations exhibiting the ETI and ECI, gave a significant increase in wavelength and amplitude. Full circumference simulations of the MRT instability provided a significant improvement on previous randomly initialised results and approached agreement with experiment.

  8. Investigation of the Cooling and Thermal-Measuring System of a Compound-Structure Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingang Bai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine (CS-PMSM is a power-split device which can enable the internal combustion engine (ICE to operate at optimum efficiency during all driving conditions by controlling its torque and speed. However, the CS-PMSM has more serious temperature rise and heat dissipation problems than conventional permanent-magnet (PM machines, especially when the CS-PMSM is running at low speed and under full load conditions. As the thermal resistance of double-layer air gaps is quite big, the hot spot proves to be in the inner winding rotor. To ensure the safe operation of the CS-PMSM, the use of forced-air and water cooling in the inner winding rotor are investigated. The study shows that the water cooling can provide a better cooling effect, but require a complicated mechanical structure. Considering the complexity of the high efficiency cooling system, a real-time temperature monitoring method is proposed and a temperature measuring system which can accurately measure the real-time temperature of multiple key points in the machine is developed to promptly adjust the operating and cooling conditions based on the measured temperature results. Finally, the temperature rise experiment of the CS-PMSM prototype is done and the simulation results are partly validated by the experimental data.

  9. Issues relating to airborne applications of HTS SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, C P; Binks, R A; Lam, S H K; Du, J; Tilbrook, D L; Mitchell, E E; MacFarlane, J C; Lee, J B; Turner, R; Downey, M; Maddever, A

    2002-01-01

    Airborne application of HTS SQUIDs is the most difficult environment for their successful deployment. In order to operate with the sensitivity required for a particular application, there are many issues to be addressed such as the need for very wide dynamic range electronics, motion noise elimination, immunity to large changing magnetic fields and cultural noise sources. This paper reviews what is necessary to achieve an airborne system giving examples in geophysical mineral exploration. It will consider issues relating to device design and fabrication, electronics, dewar design, suspension system requirements and noise elimination methods.

  10. Operations of the thermal control system for Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer electronics following the beta angle of the International Space Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) has been running and measuring cosmic rays on the International Space Station (ISS) since May 19, 2011. The thermal control system (TCS) plays an important role in keeping all components and equipment working in an operational temperature range. Since the AMS started working on the ISS, AMS thermal engineers have been monitoring the on-orbit status of the TCS. During normal operation, the local temperature of AMS components regularly varies along with the β angle of the ISS. Based on the collected temperature data, the general characteristics of local temperature variations of TCS for AMS Electronics following the β of the ISS are discussed with the statistics of the orbit-averaged temperature and the orbit standard deviation of temperature. Furthermore some temperature anomalies at specific β are also studied. - Highlights: • The variation of the main radiators temperature is statistically analyzed. • The hot case and cold case for the main radiators are found in normal operations. • The solar illumination falling on the inner sheet of RAM radiator leads to temperature jump. • The temperature anomalies on the WAKE radiator show a uniform trend except WR3 sensor. • The regularity of the temperature variation is described with fitted equations

  11. Investigation of Electromagnetic, Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of a Five-Phase Dual-Rotor Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates of a kind of five-phase dual-rotor permanent-magnet synchronous motor (DRPMSM, which contains dual rotors and a single stator. This kind of motor has the potential advantages of high power density, high reliability and high efficiency, which make it more appropriate for using in electric vehicles (EVs. In order to evaluate the most suitable power level for this kind of structure, the electromagnetic, the thermal and the mechanical characteristics are investigated in this paper. The length to diameter ratio of motors is researched to obtain the highest power density and then the optimum ratio is obtained. Based on the optimum ratio, the thermal characteristics are researched under natural condition and forced-air cooling condition with different wind speeds. In addition, the mechanical characteristics are analyzed under no-load and different loads conditions, respectively. All of the results are analyzed by two-dimension (2-D and three-dimension (3-D finite element method (FEM simulation, which provide a good reference to select suitable power level for this kind of motor structure. Finally, a DRPMSM prototype is manufactured and tested. The experimental results effectively verify the FEM results.

  12. A magnetic iron(III) switch with controlled and adjustable thermal response for solution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Claudio; Morgan, Grace G; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Spin crossover requires cooperative behavior of the metal centers in order to become useful for devices. While cooperativity is barely predictable in solids, we show here that solution processing and the covalent introduction of molecular recognition sites allows the spin crossover of iron(III) sal(2)trien complexes to be rationally tuned. A simple correlation between the number of molecular recognition sites and the spin crossover temperature enabled the fabrication of materials that are magnetically bistable at room temperature. The predictable behavior relies on combining function (spin switching) and structure (supramolecular assembly) through covalent interactions in a single molecular building block.

  13. The Effect of Blood Flow on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non Thermal Irreversible Electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hjouj; Jacob Lavee; David Last; David Guez; Dianne Daniels; Shirley Sharabi; Boris Rubinsky; Yael Mardor

    2013-01-01

    To generate an understanding of the physiological significance of MR images of Non-Thermal Irreversible Electroporation (NTIRE) we compared the following MR imaging sequences: T1W, T2W, PD, GE, and T2 SPAIR acquired after NTIRE treatment in a rodent liver model. The parameters that were studied included the presence or absence of a Gd-based contrast agent, and in vivo and ex-vivo NTIRE treatments in the same liver. NTIRE is a new minimally invasive tissue ablation modality in which pulsed ele...

  14. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL MODES OF MAGNETIC-ELECTRIC GRINDING ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF GAS-THERMAL SPRAYED NI–CR–B–SI-COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Spiridonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of technological modes of magnetic-electric grinding on structural changes in a surface layer of gas-thermal sprayed coatings is investigated in the paper. The paper presents optimum modes of  coating roughing and finishing processes.

  15. Thermal stability at 1.9 K and 4.3 K of Nb3Sn cables for quadrupole magnets for the LHC upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapper, de W.M.; Dhalle, M.M.J.; Bordini, B.; Ballarino, A.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the planned luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider, new quadrupole and dipole magnets are being designed and tested. Cabled conductors have been tested in the FRESCA test station to aid this effort. Part of this work is to characterize the thermal stability of the Nb3Sn cond

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  17. Convection during Thermally Unstable Solidification of Pb-Sn in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.; Tewari, S. N.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    1996-01-01

    Convection and macrosegregation in directionally solidified hypoeutectic Pb-38 wt pct Sn and hypereutectic Pb-64.5 wt pct Sn have been examined during upward and downward growth. Temperature fluctuations are observed along the length of the melt column during downward growth. With increasing Rayleigh number, these fluctuations change from none, to cyclic, to time periodic having multiple harmonics, and finally to random. At the higher convective driving force of 350 K temperature inversion, the transverse magnetic field decreased convective levels, strong random temperature fluctuations (flows) becoming smaller and periodic. The maximum field of 0.45 T was unable to completely eliminate convection. For the lower convective driving force of 150 K temperature inversion, the 0.05 T magnetic field decreased flows, and at 0.15 T, the field caused a dramatic decrease in the characteristic frequency of the temperature fluctuations, indicating a change in the nature of the flow, the waveform of the temperature fluctuations changing from sinusoidal to a pulsed wave. Temperature fluctuations and time delays between thermocouples were used to estimate flow velocities. Irrespective of the convection in the bulk melt (ahead of the mushy zone), longitudinal macrosegregation occurs only if the interdendritic melt mixes with the bulk melt.

  18. Airborne monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete system for tracking, mapping, and performing a composition analysis of a radioactive plume and contaminated area was developed at the NRCN. The system includes two major units : An airborne unit for monitoring and a ground station for analyzing. The airborne unit is mounted on a helicopter and includes file following. Four radiation sensor, two 2'' x 2'' Nal (Tl) sensors horizontally separated by lead shield for mapping and spectroscopy, and two Geiger Mueller (GM) tubes as part of the safety system. A multichannel analyzer card is used for spectroscopy. A navigation system, based on GPS and a barometric altitude meter, is used to locate the plume or ground data. The telemetry system, consisting of a transceiver and a modem, transfers all the data in real time to the ground station. An industrial PC (Field Works) runs a dedicated C++ Windows application to manage the acquired data. An independent microprocessor based backup system includes a recorder, display, and key pad. The ground station is based on an industrial PC, a telemetry system, a color printer and a modem to communicate with automatic meteorology stations in the relevant area. A special software controls the ground station. Measurement results are analyzed in the ground station to estimate plume parameters including motion, location, size, velocity, and perform risk assessment. (authors)

  19. Soft magnetic properties and thermal stability of bulk Fe{sub 83}B{sub 17} alloy prepared by undercooling and Cu-mold casting methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changlin, E-mail: ycl@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Huili; Sheng, Gang; Liu, Feng

    2015-06-15

    The thermal stability and soft magnetic properties of bulk Fe{sub 83}B{sub 17} rods with nano-lamellar eutectic structures and metastable Fe{sub 3}B phases were investigated by annealing at 973–1273 K for 1.5 h. Samples with a diameter of 3 mm were prepared by undercooling solidification combined with Cu-mold casting. The decomposition of Fe{sub 3}B and the transformation of nano-lamellar eutectic structures were finished after annealing at 1173 K for 1.5 h. Increasing annealing temperature showed that the soft magnetic properties of the sample were kept relatively stable. The saturation magnetization and retentivity were decreased only slightly, while the coercivity was decreased significantly. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of the nano-lamellar eutectic structure was obtained. • Thermal stability of the metastable Fe{sub 3}B phase was obtained. • The soft magnetic properties of the sample remain stability by annealing. • Nano-lamellar eutectic structures enhance the soft magnetic properties.

  20. Calibration Matters: Advances in Strapdown Airborne Gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D.

    2015-12-01

    Using a commercial navigation-grade strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) for airborne gravimetry can be advantageous in terms of cost, handling, and space consumption compared to the classical stable-platform spring gravimeters. Up to now, however, large sensor errors made it impossible to reach the mGal-level using such type IMUs as they are not designed or optimized for this kind of application. Apart from a proper error-modeling in the filtering process, specific calibration methods that are tailored to the application of aerogravity may help to bridge this gap and to improve their performance. Based on simulations, a quantitative analysis is presented on how much IMU sensor errors, as biases, scale factors, cross couplings, and thermal drifts distort the determination of gravity and the deflection of the vertical (DOV). Several lab and in-field calibration methods are briefly discussed, and calibration results are shown for an iMAR RQH unit. In particular, a thermal lab calibration of its QA2000 accelerometers greatly improved the long-term drift behavior. Latest results from four recent airborne gravimetry campaigns confirm the effectiveness of the calibrations applied, with cross-over accuracies reaching 1.0 mGal (0.6 mGal after cross-over adjustment) and DOV accuracies reaching 1.1 arc seconds after cross-over adjustment.

  1. Cyclotron line signatures of thermal and magnetic mountains from accreting neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Priymak, Maxim; Lasky, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cyclotron resonance scattering features (CRSFs) in the X-ray spectrum of an accreting neutron star are modified differently by accretion mounds sustained by magnetic and thermocompositional gradients. It is shown that one can discriminate, in principle, between mounds of different physical origins by studying how the line energy, width, and depth of a CRSF depend on the orientation of the neutron star, accreted mass, surface temperature distribution, and equation of state. CRSF signatures including gravitational light bending are computed for both phase-resolved and phase-averaged spectra on the basis of self-consistent Grad-Shafranov mound equilibria satisfying a global flux-freezing constraint. The prospects of multimessenger X-ray and gravitational-wave observations with future instruments are canvassed briefly.

  2. Beam Halo on the LHC TCDQ Diluter System and Thermal Load on the Downstream Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Presland, A; Redaelli, S; Robert-Démolaize, G; Sarchiapone, L; Weiler, T; Weterings, W

    2006-01-01

    The moveable single-jawed graphite TCDQ diluter must be positioned very close to the circulating LHC beam in order to prevent damage to downstream components in the event of an unsynchronised beam abort. A two-jawed graphite TCS.IR6 collimator forms part of the TCDQ system. The requirement to place the jaws close to the beam means that the system can intercept a substantial beam halo load. Initial investigations indicated a worryingly high heat load on the Q4 coils. This paper presents the updated load cases, shielding and simulation geometry, and the results of simulations of the energy deposition in the TCDQ system and in the downstream superconducting Q4 magnet. The implications for the operation of the LHC are discussed.

  3. Structural support of a yin-yang magnet for a tandem mirror reactor with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a comprehensive summary covering work performed by Grumman Aerospace Corporation, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, on the TMP yin-yang coils. The yin-yang coil pair used for our analysis has a major arc radius of 2.7 m and a minor arc radius of 1.18 m, compared with 2.5 m and 0.75 m for the MFTF. The maximum field on the present conductor is 9.05 Tesla. This magnetic field is created by, and interacts with, a conductor current which produces a 360 million Newton total force, tending to separate the parallel lobes of the major arcs

  4. The Effect of Blood Flow on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non Thermal Irreversible Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjouj, Mohammad; Lavee, Jacob; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Sharabi, Shirley; Rubinsky, Boris; Mardor, Yael

    2013-10-01

    To generate an understanding of the physiological significance of MR images of Non-Thermal Irreversible Electroporation (NTIRE) we compared the following MR imaging sequences: T1W, T2W, PD, GE, and T2 SPAIR acquired after NTIRE treatment in a rodent liver model. The parameters that were studied included the presence or absence of a Gd-based contrast agent, and in vivo and ex-vivo NTIRE treatments in the same liver. NTIRE is a new minimally invasive tissue ablation modality in which pulsed electric fields cause molecularly selective cell death while, the extracellular matrix and large blood vessels remain patent. This attribute of NTIRE is of major clinical importance as it allows treatment of undesirable tissues near critical blood vessels. The presented study results suggest that MR images acquired following NTIRE treatment are all directly related to the unique pattern of blood flow after NTIRE treatment and are not produced in the absence of blood flow.

  5. Airborne lidar detection of subsurface oceanic scattering layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Krabill, William B.; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Gilbert, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    The airborne lidar detection and cross-sectional mapping of submerged oceanic scattering layers are reported. The field experiment was conducted in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of Assateague Island, VA. NASA's Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was operated in the bathymetric mode to acquire on-wavelength 532-nm depth-resolved backscatter signals from shelf/slope waters. Unwanted laser pulse reflection from the air-water interface was minimized by spatial filtering and off-nadir operation. The presence of thermal stratification over the shelf was verified by the deployment of airborne expendable bathythermographs. Optical beam transmission measurements acquired from a surface truthing vessel indicated the presence of a layer of turbid water near the sea floor over the inner portion of the shelf.

  6. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  7. Structure, thermal and magnetic properties of Fe43Co14Ni14B20Si5Nb4 bulk metallic glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nowosielski

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents structure characteristics, thermal stability and soft magnetic properties analysis of Fe-based bulk metallic glass in as-cast state and after crystallization process.Design/methodology/approach: The studies were performed on Fe43Co14Ni14B20Si5Nb4 metallic glass in a form of plates and rods. The amorphous structure of tested samples was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM methods. The thermal stability of the glassy samples was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The soft magnetic properties examination of tested material contained initial magnetic permeability and magnetic permeability relaxation measurements.Findings: The XRD and TEM investigations revealed that the studied as-cast plates and rods were amorphous. Broad diffraction halo could be observed for all tested samples, indicating the formation of a glassy phase with the diameters up to 3 mm for rods. The fracture surface of rod samples appears to consist of two different zones which might correspond with different amorphous structures of studied materials. The thermal stability parameters of rod with diameter of 3 mm, such as glass transition temperature, onset crystallization temperature and supercooled liquid area were measured by DSC to be 797 K, 854 K, 57 K, respectively. The heat treatment process of rod samples involved in crystallization of α-Fe phase and formation of iron borides at temperature above 873 K.Practical implications: The appropriate increase of annealing temperature significantly improved soft magnetic properties of examined alloy by increasing the initial magnetic permeability and decreasing the magnetic permeability relaxation.Originality/value: The success of fabrication of studied Fe-based bulk metallic glass in a form of plates and rods is important for the future progress in research and practical application of those glassy materials.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  11. Prediction and removal of rotation noise in airborne EM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Terence 12Macnae, James

    2014-03-01

    We aim to eliminate or reduce significant impediments to conductive target detection and conductive cover penetration in airborne electromagnetic (AEM) systems. Existing limitations come from the very high noise encountered at low base frequencies, caused by rotations of vector magnetic field sensors in the Earth's magnetic field. We use the output of tri-axial rotation-rate sensors to predict and subtract the rotation noise from rigidly coupled ARMIT magnetic field sensors. The approach is successful in reducing rotation noise by one to two orders of magnitude at low frequencies.

  12. Weak Nonlinear Thermal Instability Under Vertical Magnetic Field, Temperature Modulation And Heat Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a weak nonlinear stability problem of magneto-convection in an electrically conducting Newtonian liquid, confined between two horizontal surfaces, under a constant vertical magnetic field, and subjected to an imposed time-periodic boundary temperature (ITBT along with internal heating effects. In the case of (ITBT, the temperature gradient between the walls of the fluid layer consists of a steady part and a time-dependent oscillatory part. The temperature of both walls is modulated in this case. The disturbance is expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of convection, which is assumed to be small. It is found that the response of the convective system to the internal Rayleigh number is destabilizing. Using Ginzburg-Landau equation, the effect of modulations on heat transport is analyzed. Effect of various parameters on the heat transport is also discussed. Further, it is found that the heat transport can be controlled by suitably adjusting the external parameters of the system.

  13. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  14. Compositae dermatitis from airborne parthenolide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, E.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    suspected of causing airborne contact allergy, and its most important allergen is the sesquiterpene lactone (SQL) parthenolide (PHL). OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to (i) assess the allergenicity of feverfew-derived monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and their oxidized products in feverfew......-allergic patients and (ii) re-assess the role of PHL and other SQLs in airborne contact allergy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Feverfew-allergic patients were patch tested with extracts and fractions containing volatile monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as well as extracts of airborne particles from flowering feverfew plants...

  15. Thermal-shock- and fatigue-resistant coatings for magnetically confined fusion environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candidate coating systems of materials of low atomic number Z under development for fusion reactor applications were exposed to a maximum of 1000 cycles of electron beam pulse heating at 2 kW cm-2 for 1.5 s. The coating/substrate systems that were investigated include chemically vapor-deposited TiB2/graphite, chemically vapor-deposited TiC/graphite, chemically vapor-deposited B/graphite, plasma-sprayed TiB2/Cu, clad V/Cu, clad Ti/Cu and clad plus borided VB2/V/Cu. All the thin coatings obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) survived the testing as did the plasma-sprayed TiB2/Cu. coatings of CVD TiB2 and CVD TiC on Poco graphite showed fatigue cracking which may have propagated into the graphite substrates. Some of the clad materials showed failure due to coating melt and deformation and separation due to thermal ratcheting. (Auth.)

  16. A computer tool for the fusion and visualization of thermal and magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichinho, Gerson Linck; Gariba, Munir Antonio; Sanches, Ionildo José; Gamba, Humberto Remigio; Cruz, Felipe Pardal Franco; Nohama, Percy

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of temperature variation along the surface of the body, provided by digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI), is becoming a valuable auxiliary tool for the early detection of many diseases in medicine. However, DITI is essentially a 2-D technique and its image does not provide useful anatomical information associated with it. However, multimodal image registration and fusion may overcome this difficulty and provide additional information for diagnosis purposes. In this paper, a new method of registering and merging 2-D DITI and 3-D MRI is presented. Registration of the images acquired from the two modalities is necessary as they are acquired with different image systems. Firstly, the body volume of interest is scanned by a MRI system and a set of 2-D DITI of it, at orthogonal angles, is acquired. Next, it is necessary to register these two different sets of images. This is done by creating 2-D MRI projections from the reconstructed 3-D MRI volume and registering it with the DITI. Once registered, the DITI is then projected over the 3-D MRI. The program developed to assess the proposed method to combine MRI and DITI resulted in a new tool for fusing two different image modalities, and it can help medical doctors.

  17. Detection of violations in thermal cycle of electric arc welding of heat resistant steel 12Kh1MF using magnetic properties of a heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies on the magnetic characteristics of the 12Kh1M1F heat resistant steel are carried out in the zones of melting and thermal effect by different modes of the electric are welding and the new approach to calculating and forecasting the longevity of service of the steam pipe welded joints is proposed on the basis of the magnetic structuroscopy. The local step-by-step (with the 1-2 mm interval) measurement of the metal residual magnetization after magnetization through the point pole method is accomplished in the welded joint area after the removal of the weld reinforcement. The evaluating of the welding modes violations and the joint longevity forecast are given in the basis of the maximum and minimum measurement results or their distribution along the measurement line

  18. Unraveling the roles of thermal annealing and off-time duration in magnetic properties of pulsed electrodeposited NiCu nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji jamali, Z.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Montazer, A. H.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic alloy nanowires (ANWs) have long been studied owing to both their fundamental aspects and possible applications in magnetic storage media and magnetoresistance devices. Here, we report on the roles of thermal annealing and duration of off-time between pulses (toff) in crystalline characteristics and magnetic properties of arrays of pulsed electrodeposited NiCu ANWs (35 nm in diameter and a length of 1.2 μm), embedded in porous anodic alumina template. Increasing toff enabled us to increase the Cu content thereby fabricating NiCu ANWs with different crystallinity and alloy compositions. Although major hysteresis curve measurements showed no considerable change in magnetic properties before and after annealing, the first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis provided new insights into the roles of thermal annealing and toff. In other words, FORC diagrams indicated the presence of low and high coercive field regions in annealed Ni-rich ANWs, coinciding with the increase in toff in as-deposited ANWs. The former has a small coercivity with strong demagnetizing magnetostatic interactions from neighboring NWs and may correspond to a soft magnetic phase. The latter has a greater coercivity with weak interactions, corresponding to a hard magnetic phase. On the other hand, for as-deposited and annealed Cu-rich NiCu ANWs, a mixed phase of the soft and hard segments could be found. Furthermore, a transition from the interacting Ni-rich to non-interacting Cu-rich ANWs took place with a magnetic field applied parallel to the NW axis. Thus, these arrays of ANWs with tunable magnetic phases and interactions may have potential applications in the nanoscale devices.

  19. Surfactant-thermal syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of Mn-Ge-sulfides/selenides

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Guodong

    2014-10-06

    Although either surfactants or amines have been investigated to direct the crystal growth of metal chalcogenides, the synergic effect of organic amines and surfactants to control the crystal growth has not been explored. In this report, several organic bases (hydrazine monohydrate, ethylenediamine (en), 1,2-propanediamine (1,2-dap), and 1,3-propanediamine (1,3-dap)) have been employed as structure-directing agents (SDAs) to prepare four novel chalcogenides (Mn3Ge2S7(NH3)4 (1), [Mn(en)2(H2O)][Mn(en)2MnGe3Se9] (2), (1,2-dapH)2{[Mn(1,2-dap)2]Ge2Se7} (3), and (1,3-dapH)(puH)MnGeSe4(4) (pu = propyleneurea) under surfactant media (PEG-400). These as-prepared new crystalline materials provide diverse metal coordination geometries, including MnS3N tetrahedra, MnGe2Se7 trimer, and MnGe3Se10 T2 cluster. Compounds 1-3 have been fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder XRD, UV-vis spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Moreover, magnetic measurements for compound 1 showed an obvious antiferromagnetic transition at ∼9 K. Our research not only enriches the structural chemistry of the transitional-metal/14/16 chalcogenides but also allows us to better understand the synergic effect of organic amines and surfactants on the crystallization of metal chalcogenides.

  20. Mapping permafrost with airborne electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsley, B. J.; Ball, L. B.; Bloss, B. R.; Kass, A.; Pastick, N.; Smith, B. D.; Voss, C. I.; Walsh, D. O.; Walvoord, M. A.; Wylie, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost is a key characteristic of cold region landscapes, yet detailed assessments of how the subsurface distribution of permafrost impacts the environment, hydrologic systems, and infrastructure are lacking. Data acquired from several airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys in Alaska provide significant new insight into the spatial extent of permafrost over larger areas (hundreds to thousands of square kilometers) than can be mapped using ground-based geophysical methods or through drilling. We compare several AEM datasets from different areas of interior Alaska, and explore the capacity of these data to infer geologic structure, permafrost extent, and related hydrologic processes. We also assess the impact of fires on permafrost by comparing data from different burn years within similar geological environments. Ultimately, interpretations rely on understanding the relationship between electrical resistivity measured by AEM surveys and the physical properties of interest such as geology, permafrost, and unfrozen water content in the subsurface. These relationships are often ambiguous and non-unique, so additional information is useful for reducing uncertainty. Shallow (upper ~1m) permafrost and soil characteristics identified from remotely sensed imagery and field observations help to constrain and aerially extend near-surface AEM interpretations, where correlations between the AEM and remote sensing data are identified using empirical multivariate analyses. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) measurements quantify the contribution of unfrozen water at depth to the AEM-derived electrical resistivity models at several locations within one survey area. AEM surveys fill a critical data gap in the subsurface characterization of permafrost environments and will be valuable in future mapping and monitoring programs in cold regions.

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  5. Influence of mechanical milling and thermal annealing on electrical and magnetic properties of nanostructured Ni–Zn and cobalt ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Narayanasamy; N Sivakumar

    2008-06-01

    The present article reports some of the interesting and important electrical and magnetic properties of nanostructured spinel ferrites such as Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and CoFe2O4. In the case of Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4, d.c. electrical conductivity increases upon milling, and it is attributed to oxygen vacancies created by high energy mechanical milling. The real part of dielectric constant (') for the milled sample is found to be about an order of magnitude smaller than that of the bulk nickel zinc ferrite. The increase in Néel temperature from 538 K in the bulk state to 611 K on the reduction of grain size upon milling has been explained based on the change in the cation distribution. The dielectric constant is smaller by an order of magnitude and the dielectric loss is three orders of magnitude smaller for the milled sample compared to that of the bulk. In the case of cobalt ferrite, the observed decrease in conductivity, when the grain size is increased from 8–92 nm upon thermal annealing is clearly due to the predominant effect of migration of some of the Fe3+ ions from octahedral to tetrahedral sites, as is evident from in-field Mössbauer and EXAFS measurements. The dielectric loss (tan ) is an order of magnitude smaller for the nano sized particles compared to that of the bulk counterpart.

  6. An analogy between the thermal equilibration of a gas mixture and transverse relaxation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Packwood, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    We study a gas containing two components, a small component P and a large component Q. P is selectively heated to a high temperature and then returns to equilibrium via collisions with Q. This thermal equilibration process is analysed in a new way. We divide the kinetic energy space of the molecules of P into two regions F and D, and show that the molecules of P randomly switch (`oscillate') between the two states as time proceeds due to collisions with the molecules of Q. Initially, the molecules of P are all in the state D, however because each molecule in P collides with the molecules of Q at different times, the oscillations occur out of step with each other. There is a net destructive interference between the oscillations, and so they are not observed when monitoring the average kinetic energy of the molecules of P as a function of time. We will explain the similarities and differences between this observation and transverse relaxation processes that occur in magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This study e...

  7. Suzaku Discovery of Non-thermal X-ray Emission from the Rotating Magnetized White Dwarf, AE Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Terada, Yukikatsu; Ishida, Manabu; Mukai, Koji; Dotani, Tadayas u; Okada, Shunsaku; Nakamura, Ryoko; Naik, Sachindra; Bamba, Aya; Makishima, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    The fast rotating magnetized white dwarf, AE Aquarii, was observed with Suzaku, in October 2005 and October 2006 with exposures of 53.1 and 42.4 ks, respectively. In addition to clear spin modulation in the 0.5--10 keV band of the XIS data at the barycentric period of 33.0769 \\pm 0.0001 s, the 10--30 keV HXD data in the second half of the 2005 observation also showed statistically significant periodic signals at a consistent period. On that occasion, the spin-folded HXD light curve exhibited two sharp spikes separated by about 0.2 cycles in phase, in contrast to approximately sinusoidal profiles observed in energies below about 4 keV. The folded 4--10 keV XIS light curves are understood as a superposition of those two types of pulse profiles. The phase averaged 1.5--10 keV spectra can be reproduced by two thermal components with temperatures of $2.90_{-0.16}^{+0.20}$ keV and $0.53_{-0.13}^{+0.14}$ keV, but the 12-25 keV HXD data show a significant excess above the extrapolated model. This excess can be explai...

  8. Performance of a Bounce-Averaged Global Model of Super-Thermal Electron Transport in the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Tim

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our recent research on the application of a multiprocessor Cray T916 supercomputer in modeling super-thermal electron transport in the earth's magnetic field. In general, this mathematical model requires numerical solution of a system of partial differential equations. The code we use for this model is moderately vectorized. By using Amdahl's Law for vector processors, it can be verified that the code is about 60% vectorized on a Cray computer. Speedup factors on the order of 2.5 were obtained compared to the unvectorized code. In the following sections, we discuss the methodology of improving the code. In addition to our goal of optimizing the code for solution on the Cray computer, we had the goal of scalability in mind. Scalability combines the concepts of portabilty with near-linear speedup. Specifically, a scalable program is one whose performance is portable across many different architectures with differing numbers of processors for many different problem sizes. Though we have access to a Cray at this time, the goal was to also have code which would run well on a variety of architectures.

  9. Optical and magnetic properties of monophasic cadmium ferrite (CdFe2O4) nanostructure prepared by thermal treatment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports optical and magnetic properties of CdFe2O4 nanostructure which was prepared by a simple thermal treatment method. Calcination was conducted at temperatures between 673 and 773 K, and final products had different crystallite sizes ranging from 47 to 138 nm. The influence of calcination temperature on the degree of crystallinity, microstructure, and phase composition was investigated by different characterization techniques, i.e., X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. The compositions of the samples were determined by Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA). The effect of calcination temperature on band gap energy was studied by UV–vis absorption spectra. The formed nanostructures exhibited ferromagnetic behaviors with unpaired electrons spins, which was confirmed by using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Metal nitrates were added into an aqueous solution of PVA and the mixed solution was heated at 373 K. • The effect of calcination temperature on morphology of cadmium ferrite nanostructures was characterized. • Elemental composition, phase composition and others properties were investigated

  10. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  11. A thermal entangled quantum refrigerator based on a two-qubit Heisenberg model with Dzyaloshinskii—Moriya interaction in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on an isotropic two spin-1/2 qubits Heisenberg model with the Dzyaloshinskii—Moriya interaction in an external magnetic field, we have constructed an entangled quantum refrigerator. Expressions for the basic thermodynamic quantities, i.e., the heat exchanged, the net work input, and the coefficient of performance, are derived. Some intriguing features and their qualitative explanations in zero and non zero magnetic fields are given. The influence of the thermal entanglement on the refrigerator is investigated. The results obtained here have general significance and will be helpful to understand the performance of an entangled quantum refrigerator. (general)

  12. Thermal expansion and the Grueneisen parameter near the magnetic instability in Ce sub 1 sub - sub x La sub x Ru sub 2 Si sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kambe, S; Lejay, P; Haen, P; Visser, A D

    1997-01-01

    The low-temperature thermal expansion of the heavy-fermion system with the formula Ce sub 1 sub - sub x La sub x Ru sub 2 Si sub 2 (x=0 and x=0.05) close to the magnetic instability is analysed in terms of the renormalization group and self-consistent renormalized spin-fluctuation models. The Grueneisen parameter calculated using the renormalized Fermi temperature is compared with the effective one which is determined from thermal expansion measurements and previously obtained specific heat data. (author)

  13. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  15. The Braginskii model of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. I. Effects of self-generated magnetic fields and thermal conduction in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Modica, Frank; Zhiglo, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) There exists a substantial disagreement between computer simulation results and high-energy density laboratory experiments of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability Kuranz et al. (2010). We adopt the Braginskii formulation for transport in hot, dense plasma, implement and verify the additional physics modules, and conduct a computational study of a single-mode RTI in two dimensions with various combinations of the newly implemented modules. We find that magnetic fields reach levels on the order of 11 MG in the absence of thermal conduction. We observe denting of the RT spike tip and generation of additional higher order modes as a result of these fields. Contrary to interpretation presented in earlier work Nishiguchi (2002), the additional mode is not generated due to modified anisotropic heat transport effects but due to dynamical effect of self-generated magnetic fields. The main effects of thermal conduction are a reduction of the RT instability growth rate (by about 20% for conditions considered here)...

  16. Magnetic and electrical characterization of nickel-rich NiFe thin films synthesized by atomic layer deposition and subsequent thermal reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, A. P.; Zierold, R.; Gooth, J.; Dendooven, J.; Detavernier, C.; Escrig, J.; Nielsch, K.

    2016-08-01

    Nickel-rich NiFe thin films (Ni92Fe8, Ni89Fe11 and Ni83Fe17) were prepared by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) with a subsequent thermal reduction process. In order to obtain Ni x Fe1-x O y films, one ALD supercycle was performed according to the following sequence: m NiCp2/O3, with m = 1, 2 or 3, followed by one FeCp2/O3 cycle. The supercycle was repeated n times. The thermal reduction process in hydrogen atmosphere was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction studies as a function of temperature. The metallic nickel iron alloy thin films were investigated and characterized with respect to crystallinity, morphology, resistivity, and magnetism. As proof-of-concept magnetic properties of an array of Ni83Fe17, close to the perfect Permalloy stoichiometry, nanotubes and an isolated tube were investigated.

  17. South African Airborne Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Airborne operations entail the delivery of ground troops and their equipment by air to their area of operations. They can also include the subsequent support of these troops and their equipment by air. Historically, and by definition, this would encompass delivery by fixed-wing powered aircraft, by glider, by parachute or by helicopter. Almost any troops can be delivered by most of these means. However, the technical expertise and physical as well as psychological demands required by parachuting have resulted in specialist troops being selected and trained for this role. Some of the material advantages of using parachute troops, or paratroops, are: the enormous strategic reach provided by the long-distance transport aircraft used to convey them; the considerable payload which these aircraft are capable of carrying; the speed with which the parachute force can deploy; and the fact that no infrastructure such as airfields are required for their arrival. Perhaps most attractively to cash-strapped governments, the light equipment scales of parachute units’ makes them economical to establish and maintain. There are also less tangible advantages: the soldiers selected are invariably volunteers with a willingness or even desire to tackle challenges; their selection and training produces tough, confident and aggressive troops, psychologically geared to face superior odds and to function independently from other units; and their initiative and self-reliance combined with a high level of physical fitness makes them suitable for a number of different and demanding roles.

  18. Quantum Thermal Effect of Dirac Particles in a Non-uniformly Rectilinearly Accelerating Black Hole with Electronic Charge, Magnetic Charge and Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, S Q

    2001-01-01

    The Hawking radiation of Dirac particles in an arbitrarily rectilinearly accelerating Kinnersley black hole with electro-magnetic charge and cosmological constant is investigated by using method of the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. Both the location and the temperature of the event horizon depend on the time and the polar angle. The Hawking thermal radiation spectrum of Dirac particles is also derived. PACS numbers: 04.70.Dy, 97.60.Lf

  19. Airborne thermography for condition monitoring of a public baths building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Mats; Hellman, Erik; Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    2001-03-01

    Airborne and ground-based thermography surveys have been performed in order to detect moisture and energy related problems in the construction of a public swimming bath building. This paper describes the information potential and the advantages and limitations using a standard IR-camera and traditional inspection methods to gather information for retrofit priorities. The damage conditions indicated in the thermal images are confirmed by field inspections and photographic documentation.

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  3. A lock-in-based method to examine the thermal signatures of magnetic nanoparticles in the liquid, solid and aggregated states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, C. A.; Lattuada, M.; Burnand, D.; Crippa, F.; Martinez-Garcia, J. C.; Hirt, A. M.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Bonmarin, M.; Petri-Fink, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new methodology based on lock-in thermography to study and quantify the heating power of magnetic nanoparticles. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to a modulated alternating magnetic field were used as model materials to demonstrate the potency of the system. Both quantitative and qualitative information on their respective heating power was extracted at high thermal resolutions under increasingly complex conditions, including nanoparticles in the liquid, solid and aggregated states. Compared to conventional techniques, this approach offers a fast, sensitive and non-intrusive alternative to investigate multiple and dilute specimens simultaneously, which is essential for optimizing and accelerating screening procedures and comparative studies.We propose a new methodology based on lock-in thermography to study and quantify the heating power of magnetic nanoparticles. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to a modulated alternating magnetic field were used as model materials to demonstrate the potency of the system. Both quantitative and qualitative information on their respective heating power was extracted at high thermal resolutions under increasingly complex conditions, including nanoparticles in the liquid, solid and aggregated states. Compared to conventional techniques, this approach offers a fast, sensitive and non-intrusive alternative to investigate multiple and dilute specimens simultaneously, which is essential for optimizing and accelerating screening procedures and comparative studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02066f

  4. Thermal Performance Analysis of Submersible Screw Pump Permanent Magnet Motor%潜油螺杆泵永磁电机的热性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄苏融; 黄晓进; 张琪

    2015-01-01

    Submersible screw pump permanent magnet motor works in the deep complex oil well. The thermal performance of the submersible screw pump permanent magnet motor was analyzed by establishing thermal network model. The temperature results of thermal network model and fluid-structure coupling method was compared. The good agreement between the two temperature results verified the effectiveness and correctness of the thermal network model.%潜油螺杆泵永磁电机长期运行在井下数千米,环境复杂. 结合潜油螺杆泵永磁电机样机设计的热性能分析,建立潜油螺杆泵永磁电机的热网络模型,开展电机热性能分析评估. 同时,热网络计算结果与流固耦合仿真结果比较吻合,验证了潜油螺杆泵永磁电机热网络模型的有效性和实用性.

  5. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe–Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  6. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS. PMID:27385480

  7. Improvement of Thermal Stability of Nd-Tb-Fe-Co-B Sintered Magnets by Additions of Pr, Ho, Al, and Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lukin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the influence of Pr, Al, Cu, B and Ho which were introduced into the Co-containing sintered magnets of Nd-Dy-Tb-Fe-Co-B type on the magnetic parameters (α, Hci, Br, BHmax⁡. The effect of heat treatment parameters on magnetic properties was also studied. It was revealed that the essential alloying of NdFeB magnets by such elements as Dy, Tb, Ho, Co as well as by boron-forming elements, for example, by titanium, may lead to reducing of F-phase quantity, and, as a consequence, to decreasing of magnetic parameters. It was also shown that additional doping of such alloys by Pr, B, Al and Cu leads to a significant increase of the quantity of F-phase in magnets as well as solubility of the Dy, Tb, Ho and Co in it. This promotes the increase of magnetic parameters. It was possible to attain the following properties for the magnets (Nd0,15Pr0,35Tb0,25Ho0,2515(Fe0,71Co0,29bal ⋅ Al0,9Cu0,1B8,5 (at. % after optimal thermal treatment {1175 K (3,6–7,2 ks with slow (12–16 ks cooling to 675 K and subsequently remaining at T=775 K for 3,6 ks—hardening}: Br=0,88 T, Hci=1760 kA/m, BHmax⁡=144 kJ/m3, α<|0,01|%/K in the temperature interval 223–323 K.

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  10. SGA-WZ: A New Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaidong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Inertial navigation systems and gravimeters are now routinely used to map the regional gravitational quantities from an aircraft with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. However, airborne gravimeter of this kind is limited by the inaccuracy of the inertial sensor performance, the integrated navigation technique and the kinematic acceleration determination. As the GPS technique developed, the vehicle acceleration determination is no longer the limiting factor in airborne gravity due to the cancellation of the common mode acceleration in differential mode. A new airborne gravimeter taking full advantage of the inertial navigation system is described with improved mechanical design, high precision time synchronization, better thermal control and optimized sensor modeling. Apart from the general usage, the Global Positioning System (GPS after differentiation is integrated to the inertial navigation system which provides not only more precise altitude information along with the navigation aiding, but also an effective way to calculate the vehicle acceleration. Design description and test results on the performance of the gyroscopes and accelerations will be emphasized. Analysis and discussion of the airborne field test results are also given.

  11. Non-invasive 3d magnetic resonance thermal mapping: determination of the lesion size during laser-therapy in ex vivo tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments in open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnets have made possible the use of reproducible thermosensitive sequences to determine temperature distribution inside biological tissue. This study aimed to compare MR thermal mapping during laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) with macroscopically observed thermal lesions in order to estimate the 3D size of the coagulative necrosis. Laser irradiation was performed ex vivo with a 980-nm laser in pig liver in an open low-magnetic field (0.2 T) scanner. Laser light was transmitted through a 1,040/600 μm (outer/core diameter) bare-tipped silica fiber. Laser energy was applied in a pulsed mode (10 s laser-on, 10 s laser-off) for 12 min, power 6 W, energy 2,160 J. Gradient-echo images acquired during laser irradiation were used for real-time temperature mapping by the MR-T1 method. The method was then validated by a comparison between calculated 60 C isotherm and macroscopic lesion size. Temperature accuracy was 2.2 C, temporal resolution was 20 s. and spatial resolution was 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm3 (0.8% of the mean volume of coagulative necrosis). The mean lesion volume was 1830 mm3 ± 189 (standard error), σ (standard deviation) = 499 and range (min = 1281; max = 2591) mm3. Volumes calculated from MRI isotherms were correlated (correlation coefficient r 2 = 0.70) significantly (P = 0.08) to lesion size determined from macroscopic measurements. Using fast gradient-echo sequence, laser monitoring is achieved efficiently with fast temperature mapping. T1-weighted images appear promising in monitoring lesion size evolution in future low magnetic field in vivo studies. (orig.)

  12. Effects of sintering process on the structural, magnetic and thermal properties of Ni0.92Ca0.08Fe2O4 nanoferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles of Ni0.92Ca0.08Fe2O4 ferrite was prepared by the citrate precursor method. The effect of sintering temperature and sintering time on the structural, magnetic, and thermal properties of the prepared samples were investigated by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and photoacoustic (PA) technique, respectively. The grain size of the sintered samples estimated from the XRD and the TEM results inform that the increase in the particle size is more announced by increasing the sintering temperature than increasing the sintering time. The unexpected decrease of the saturation magnetization of the sintered samples is ascribed to the dominant effect of the cation distribution which is affected by the sintering process. The cation distribution of the present samples was obtained from the analysis of the magnetization measurements and XRD data. The increase of measured density and the decrease of porosity of the sintered samples as a result of the grain growth have the obvious effect of increasing their thermal diffusivity. - Highlights: • Nanoferrite of Ni0.92Ca0.08Fe2O4 has been prepared by citrate precursor method. • Effect of sintering temperature and time on various properties of the sintered samples is studied. • The XRD patterns reveal that the sintered samples at higher than 400 °C have single phase structure. • Abnormal effect of both sintering temperature and time on saturation magnetization is explained. • The increase of thermal diffusivity with increasing sintering temperature and time is discussed

  13. Study of domain structure and magnetization reversal after thermal treatments in Fe{sub 40}Co{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Kosice (Slovakia); Varga, R., E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Kosice (Slovakia); Badini-Confalonieri, G.A.; Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    We have studied the effect of thermal treatment on the magnetic domain structure and magnetic reversal process of amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe{sub 40}Co{sub 38}Mo{sub 4}B{sub 18} microwires. The domain structure and the magnetization reversal of amorphous FeCoMoB microwires reflect the complex stress distribution introduced by the glass coating. Hence, the thickness of radial domain structure decreases with temperature and the temperature dependence of the switching field presents a discontinuous behavior. After nanocrystallization, the domain structure of FeCoMoB microwire is almost constant within the temperature range 10-400 K and the switching field decreases almost linearly with temperature mostly because of the decrease of saturation magnetization. - Highlights: > Nanocrystalline FeCoMoB microwires are characterized by the high Curie temperature. > Nanocrystalline FeCoMoB microwires remains bistable even in nanocrystalline state. > Nanocrystalline FeCoMoB microwires are characterized by high magnetic stability in a wide temperature range.

  14. Influence of cooling rate in planar thermally assisted magnetic random access memory: Improved writeability due to spin-transfer-torque influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavent, A. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 38000 Grenoble (France); Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Creuzet, C.; Alvarez-Hérault, J. [Crocus Technology, 38000 Grenoble (France); Vila, L. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Sousa, R. C.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-14

    This paper investigates the effect of a controlled cooling rate on magnetic field reversal assisted by spin transfer torque (STT) in thermally assisted magnetic random access memory. By using a gradual linear decrease of the voltage at the end of the write pulse, the STT decays more slowly or at least at the same rate as the temperature. This condition is necessary to make sure that the storage layer magnetization remains in the desired written direction during cooling of the cell. The influence of the write current pulse decay rate was investigated on two exchange biased synthetic ferrimagnet (SyF) electrodes. For a NiFe based electrode, a significant improvement in writing reproducibility was observed using a gradual linear voltage transition. The write error rate decreases by a factor of 10 when increasing the write pulse fall-time from ∼3 ns to 70 ns. For comparison, a second CoFe/NiFe based electrode was also reversed by magnetic field assisted by STT. In this case, no difference between sharp and linear write pulse fall shape was observed. We attribute this observation to the higher thermal stability of the CoFe/NiFe electrode during cooling. In real-time measurements of the magnetization reversal, it was found that Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling in the SyF electrode vanishes for the highest pulse voltages that were used due to the high temperature reached during write. As a result, during the cooling phase, the final state is reached through a spin-flop transition of the SyF storage layer.

  15. Structure, thermal and magnetic properties of (Fe72B20Si4Nb4100-xYx (x=0.3 metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Babilas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The work presents structure characterization, thermal and soft magnetic properties analysis of selected Fe-based metallic glasses in as-cast state and after crystallization process.Design/methodology/approach: The studies were performed on Fe72B20Si4Nb4 and Fe70B19Si4Nb4Y3 metallic glasses in form of ribbon. The amorphous structure of tested samples was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM methods. The crystallization behaviour of the studied alloys was examined by differential thermal analysis (DTA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The soft magnetic properties examination of tested materials contained initial magnetic permeability and magnetic permeability relaxation measurements.Findings: The XRD and TEM investigations confirmed that the studied alloys Fe72B20Si4Nb4 and Fe70B19Si4Nb4Y3 were amorphous in as-cast state. The liquidus temperature assumed as the end temperature of the melting isotherm on the DTA reached a value of 1550 K and 1560 K for Fe72B20Si4Nb4 and Fe70B19Si4Nb4Y3 alloy, adequately. The analysis of crystallization process indicated that onset and peak crystallization temperature increased with increasing of heating rate at DSC measurements. The samples of Fe72B20Si4Nb4 alloy presented two stage crystallization process. The initial magnetic permeability of examined samples increased together with the increase of annealing temperature and reached a distinct maximum at 773 K for Fe72B20Si4Nb4 and at 723 K for Fe70B19Si4Nb4Y3 alloy.Practical implications: The increasing of annealing temperature significantly improved soft magnetic properties of examined alloys by increase the initial magnetic permeability.Originality/value: The applied investigation methods are suitable to determine the changes of structure and selected properties between studied alloys, especially in aspect of the soft magnetic properties improvement after annealing process.

  16. Influence of aging time of oleate precursor on the magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Polo-Corrales, Liliana [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Chavez, Ermides; Cabarcas-Bolivar, Jari [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Uwakweh, Oswald N.C. [Department of General Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: crinaldi@uprm.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are of interest because of their room temperature coercivity and high magnetic anisotropy constant, which make them attractive in applications such as sensors based on the Brownian relaxation mechanism and probes to determine the mechanical properties of complex fluids at the nanoscale. These nanoparticles can be synthesized with a narrow size distribution by the thermal decomposition of an iron-cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point solvent. We studied the influence of aging time of the iron-cobalt oleate precursor on the structure, chemical composition, size, and magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and thermal behavior of the iron-cobalt oleate was studied during the aging process. Infrared spectra indicated a shift in the coordination state of the oleate and iron/cobalt ions from bidentate to bridging coordination. Aging seemed to influence the thermal decomposition of the iron-cobalt oleate as determined from thermogravimmetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, where shifts in the temperatures corresponding to decomposition events and a narrowing of the endotherms associated with these events were observed. Aging promoted formation of the spinel crystal structure, as determined from X-ray diffraction, and influenced the nanoparticle magnetic properties, resulting in an increase in blocking temperature and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Mossbauer spectra also indicated changes in the magnetic properties resulting from aging of the precursor oleate. Although all samples exhibited some degree of Brownian relaxation, as determined from complex susceptibility measurements in a liquid medium, aging of the iron-cobalt oleate precursor resulted in crossing of the in-phase {chi} Prime and out-of-phase {chi} Double-Prime components of the complex susceptibility at the frequency of the Brownian magnetic relaxation peak, as expected for

  17. Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductance Measurements of a Superconducting-Normal Mixed State by Detection of Single 3 eV Photons in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S.-J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of the detected signal pulses in a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) in response to absorption of one or more 3 eV photons. We designed and used this MPT sensor for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this device, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons, and responsivity is enhanced by a Meissner transition in which the magnetic flux penetrating the sensor changes rapidly to minimize free energy in a mixed superconducting normal state. We have previously reported on use of our MPT to study a thermal phonon energy loss to the substrate when absorbing x-rays. We now describe results of extracting heat capacity C and thermal conductance G values from pulse height and decay time of MPT pulses generated by 3 eV photons. The variation in C and G at temperatures near the Meissner transition temperature (set by an internal magnetic bias field) allow us to probe the behavior in superconducting normal mixed state of the condensation energy and the electron cooling power resulting from quasi-particle recombination and phonon emission. The information gained on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  18. Thermal stability and magnetic properties of Fe-Co-M-Zr-Nb-Ge-B (M ¼ Mo, Cr) bulk metallic glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Xu; Qunjiao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Fe62Co8-xMxZr6Nb4Ge1B19 (M=Mo, Cr) bulk metallic glasses were synthesized in the diameter range up to 2 mm by copper mold casting, which exhibit high thermal stability and large glass-forming ability. The super-cooled liquid region diminishes by the dissolution of Mo. The addition of 2 at%Cr leads to the broading of the liquid region remarkably, resulting in the improvement of thermal stability. The crystallization takes place through a single exothermic reaction, accompanying the precipitation of more than three kinds of crystallized phases such asα-Fe, Fe2Zr and ZrB2. The Fe-based alloys show soft ferromagnetic properties. The saturation magnetization (ss) decreases with increasing Mo or Cr content while the saturated magnetostriction increases with raising Mo or Cr content. There is no evident change in the ss and coercive force (Hc) with annealing temperature below the crystallization temperature, which suggests a more relaxed atomic configuration the glasses have. The crystallization causes a substantial enhancement in both ss and Hc. Each soft magnetic property of the glasses containing Cr with higher thermal stability is superior to that of the alloys containing Mo.

  19. Thermal stability and magnetic properties of Fe–Co–M–Zr–Nb–Ge–B (M=Mo, Cr bulk metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fe62Co8−xMxZr6Nb4Ge1B19 (M=Mo, Cr bulk metallic glasses were synthesized in the diameter range up to 2 mm by copper mold casting, which exhibit high thermal stability and large glass-forming ability. The super-cooled liquid region diminishes by the dissolution of Mo. The addition of 2 at% Cr leads to the broading of the liquid region remarkably, resulting in the improvement of thermal stability. The crystallization takes place through a single exothermic reaction, accompanying the precipitation of more than three kinds of crystallized phases such as α-Fe, Fe2Zr and ZrB2. The Fe-based alloys show soft ferromagnetic properties. The saturation magnetization (σs decreases with increasing Mo or Cr content while the saturated magnetostriction increases with raising Mo or Cr content. There is no evident change in the σs and coercive force (Hc with annealing temperature below the crystallization temperature, which suggests a more relaxed atomic configuration the glasses have. The crystallization causes a substantial enhancement in both σs and Hc. Each soft magnetic property of the glasses containing Cr with higher thermal stability is superior to that of the alloys containing Mo.

  20. Remote sensing, airborne radiometric survey and aeromagnetic survey data processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking remote sensing data, airborne radiometric data and aero magnetic survey data as an example, the authors elaborate about basic thinking of remote sensing data processing methods, spectral feature analysis and adopted processing methods, also explore the remote sensing data combining with the processing of airborne radiometric survey and aero magnetic survey data, and analyze geological significance of processed image. It is not only useful for geological environment research and uranium prospecting in the study area, but also reference to applications in another area. (authors)

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  2. Comparison of airborne and spaceborne TIR data for studying volcanic geothermal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Bergfeld, D.; Evans, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping and quantifying the surface expression of geothermal heat flux in volcanic geothermal areas is important for establishing baseline thermal activity to better detect and understand any future changes that may be related to hydrothermal or volcanic processes, or human activities. Volcanic geothermal areas are often too large and inaccessible for only field-based thermal monitoring, so thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing tools are also used. High resolution (sub-meter) airborne TIR imagery can be used for detailed, quantitative analyses of small, subtle geothermal features. Airborne data acquisitions have the advantage of being able to be acquired under ideal conditions (e.g., predawn, cloud-free), but the disadvantage of high costs - thus precluding high-frequency monitoring. Satellite-based TIR data from the Landsat 8 platform are freely available and can be acquired regularly for change detection, but are acquired with coarser spatial resolution (e.g., 100-m pixels), and thus are not as sensitive to subtle thermal characteristics. Two geothermal areas with clear, nighttime TIR data from nearly concurrent (within days) airborne and spaceborne instruments were investigated: Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park, WY; and the Casa Diablo geothermal field, near Mammoth Lakes, CA. At Norris Geyser Basin, the area covered by high-resolution airborne TIR imagery is almost entirely geothermally heated ground, with hundreds of fumaroles, hot springs, and thermal drainages - although some non-geothermal background is exposed. With the coarser resolution Landsat 8 data, there are thermal variations within the smaller area covered by the airborne data, but the entire area appears to be thermally anomalous with respect to the non-geothermal background outside the basin. In the geothermal field around the Casa Diablo geothermal site, there are numerous, small areas of geothermal heating that are clearly distinguishable above the background by the high

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  6. Overview of the magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Goetz, W.; Bertelsen, P.;

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers have accumulated airborne dust on different types of permanent magnets. Images of these magnets document the dynamics of dust capture and removal over time. The strongly magnetic subset of airborne dust appears dark brown to black in Panoramic Camera (Pancam) images...

  7. Effect of a Temperature Mode of Radiation-thermal Sintering the Structure and Magnetic Properties of Mn-Zn-ferrites

    OpenAIRE

    V.G. Kostishyn; A.S. Komlev; M.V. Korobeynikov; A.A. Bryazgin; V.I. Shvedunov; A.V. Timofeev; M.A. Mikhailenko

    2015-01-01

    2000NM Mn-Zn-ferrites have been produced by radiation-thermal sintering (RTS). We have studied the effect of RTS on the electromagnetic properties of ferrites. X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate general aspects of phase transformations during the radiation-thermal sintering of green compacts.

  8. Effect of a Temperature Mode of Radiation-thermal Sintering the Structure and Magnetic Properties of Mn-Zn-ferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Kostishyn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 2000NM Mn-Zn-ferrites have been produced by radiation-thermal sintering (RTS. We have studied the effect of RTS on the electromagnetic properties of ferrites. X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate general aspects of phase transformations during the radiation-thermal sintering of green compacts.

  9. Coupled-analysis of current transport performance and thermal behaviour of conduction-cooled Bi-2223/Ag double-pancake coil for magnetic sail spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We model current transport and thermal performances of conduction-cooled HTS coil. • We investigate the effect of the longitudinal inhomogeneity of the HTS tape. • The analysis can precisely estimate performances of the conduction-cooled coil. • The longitudinal inhomogeneity of the HTS tape deteriorates coil performances. • Quench currents of the HTS coil are not consistent with the critical currents. -- Abstract: This paper investigated the quantitative current transport performance and thermal behaviour of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, and the effect of the critical current inhomogeneity along the longitudinal direction of HTS tapes on the coil performances. We fabricated a double-pancake coil using a Bi-2223/Ag tape with a length of 200 m as a scale-down model for a magnetic sail spacecraft. We measured the current transport property and temperature rises during current applications of the HTS coil in a conduction-cooled system, and analytically reproduced the results on the basis of the percolation depinning model and three-dimensional heat balance equation. The percolation depinning model can describe the electric field versus current density of HTS tapes as a function of temperature and magnetic field vector, and we also introduced the longitudinal distribution of the local critical current of the HTS tape into this model. As a result, we can estimate the critical currents of the HTS coil within 10% error for a wide range of the operational temperatures from 45 to 80 K, and temperature rises on the coil during current applications. These results showed that our analysis and conduction-cooled system were successfully realized. The analysis also suggested that the critical current inhomogeneity along the length of the HTS tape deteriorated the current transport performance and thermal stability of the HTS coil. The present study contributes to the characterization of HTS coils and design of a coil system for the

  10. Routing architecture and security for airborne networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongmei; Xie, Peng; Li, Jason; Xu, Roger; Levy, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Airborne networks are envisioned to provide interconnectivity for terrestial and space networks by interconnecting highly mobile airborne platforms. A number of military applications are expected to be used by the operator, and all these applications require proper routing security support to establish correct route between communicating platforms in a timely manner. As airborne networks somewhat different from traditional wired and wireless networks (e.g., Internet, LAN, WLAN, MANET, etc), security aspects valid in these networks are not fully applicable to airborne networks. Designing an efficient security scheme to protect airborne networks is confronted with new requirements. In this paper, we first identify a candidate routing architecture, which works as an underlying structure for our proposed security scheme. And then we investigate the vulnerabilities and attack models against routing protocols in airborne networks. Based on these studies, we propose an integrated security solution to address routing security issues in airborne networks.

  11. Formation of high electrical-resistivity thin surface layer on carbonyl-iron powder (CIP and thermal stability of nanocrystalline structure and vortex magnetic structure of CIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugimura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the carbonyl-iron powder (CIP used in the metal composite bulk magnetic core for high-efficient/light-weight SiC/GaN power device MHz switching dc-dc converter, where the fine CIP with a mean diameter of 1.1 μm is used to suppress the MHz band eddy current inside the CIP body. When applying the CIP to composite core together with the resin matrix, high electrical resistivity layer must be formed on the CIP-surface in order to suppress the overlapped eddy current between adjacent CIPs. In this study, tens nm thick silica (SiO2 was successfully deposited on the CIP-surface by using hydrolysis of TEOS (Si(OC2H54. Also tens nm thick oxidized layer of the CIP-surface was successfully formed by using CIP annealing in dry air. The SiC/GaN power device can operate at ambient temperature over 200 degree-C, and the composite magnetic core is required to operate at such ambient temperature. The as-made CIP had small coercivity below 800 A/m (10 Oe due to its nanocrystalline-structure and had a single vortex magnetic structure. From the experimental results, both nanocrystalline and single vortex magnetic structure were maintained after heat-exposure of 250 degree-C, and the powder coercivity after same heat-exposure was nearly same as that of the as-made CIP. Therefore, the CIP with thermally stable nanocrystalline-structure and vortex magnetic state was considered to be heat-resistant magnetic powder used in the iron-based composite core for SiC/GaN power electronics.

  12. Formation of high electrical-resistivity thin surface layer on carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) and thermal stability of nanocrystalline structure and vortex magnetic structure of CIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, K.; Miyajima, Y.; Sonehara, M.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, F.; Zettsu, N.; Teshima, K.; Mizusaki, H.

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) used in the metal composite bulk magnetic core for high-efficient/light-weight SiC/GaN power device MHz switching dc-dc converter, where the fine CIP with a mean diameter of 1.1 μm is used to suppress the MHz band eddy current inside the CIP body. When applying the CIP to composite core together with the resin matrix, high electrical resistivity layer must be formed on the CIP-surface in order to suppress the overlapped eddy current between adjacent CIPs. In this study, tens nm thick silica (SiO2) was successfully deposited on the CIP-surface by using hydrolysis of TEOS (Si(OC2H5)4). Also tens nm thick oxidized layer of the CIP-surface was successfully formed by using CIP annealing in dry air. The SiC/GaN power device can operate at ambient temperature over 200 degree-C, and the composite magnetic core is required to operate at such ambient temperature. The as-made CIP had small coercivity below 800 A/m (10 Oe) due to its nanocrystalline-structure and had a single vortex magnetic structure. From the experimental results, both nanocrystalline and single vortex magnetic structure were maintained after heat-exposure of 250 degree-C, and the powder coercivity after same heat-exposure was nearly same as that of the as-made CIP. Therefore, the CIP with thermally stable nanocrystalline-structure and vortex magnetic state was considered to be heat-resistant magnetic powder used in the iron-based composite core for SiC/GaN power electronics.

  13. Thin film flow and heat transfer over an unsteady stretching sheet with thermal radiation, internal heating in presence of external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Metri, Prashant G; Abel, M Subhash

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical analysis of thin film flow and heat transfer to a laminar liquid film from a horizontal stretching sheet. The flow of thin liquid film and subsequent heat transfer from the stretching surface is investigated with the aid of similarity transformations. Similarity transformations are used to convert unsteady boundary layer equations to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations. The resulting non-linear differential equations are solved numerically using Runge-kutta-Fehlberg and Newton-Raphson schemes. A relationship between film thickness $\\beta$ and the unsteadiness parameter $S$ is found, the effect of unsteadiness parameter $S$, and the Prandtl number $Pr$, Magnetic field parameter $Mn$, Radiation parameter $Nr$ and viscous dissipation parameter $Ec$ and heat source parameter $\\gamma$ on the temperature distributions are presented and discussed in detail. Present analysis shows that the combined effect of magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat source and ...

  14. Perpendicularly magnetized (001)-textured D022 MnGa films grown on an (Mg0.2Ti0.8)O buffer with thermally oxidized Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the growth of (001)-textured polycrystalline D022 MnGa films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) on thermally oxidized Si substrates using an (Mg0.2Ti0.8)O (MTO) buffer layer. The ordered D022 MnGa film grown at the optimum substrate temperature of 530 °C on the MTO buffer layer shows PMA with magnetization of 80 kA/m, PMA energy density of 0.28 MJ/m3, and coercivity of 2.3 T. The scanning transmission electron microscope analysis confirms the formation of a highly (001)-textured structure and the elementally sharp interfaces between the MTO layer and the MnGa layer. The achieved D022 MnGa PMA films on an amorphous substrate will provide the possible pathway of integration of a Mn-based PMA film into Si-based substrates

  15. Correlation between Pd metal thickness and thermally stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy features in [Co/Pd]n multilayers at annealing temperatures up to 500 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang Guk An

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We examine highly stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA features of [Co/Pd]10 multilayers (MLs versus Pd thickness at various ex-situ annealing temperatures. Thermally stable PMA characteristics were observed up to 500 °C, confirming the suitability of these systems for industrial applications at this temperature. Experimental observations suggest that the choice of equivalent Co and Pd layer thicknesses in a ML configuration ensures thermally stable PMA features, even at higher annealing temperatures. X-ray diffraction patterns and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images were obtained to determine thickness, post-annealing PMA behavior, and to explore the structural features that govern these findings.

  16. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  17. Evidence for monoclinic crystal structure and negative thermal expansion below magnetic transition temperature in Pb(Fe_1/2Nb_1/2)O_3

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Satendra Pal; Pandey, Dhananjai; Yoon, Songhak; Baik, Sunggi; Shin, Namsoo

    2007-01-01

    The existing controversy about the room temperature structure of multiferroic Pb(Fe_1/2Nb_1/2)O_3 is settled using synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction data. Results of Rietveld refinements in the temperature range 300 to 12K reveal that the structure remains monoclinic in the Cm space group down to 12K, but the lattice parameters show anomalies at the magnetic transition temperature (T_N) due to spin lattice coupling. The lattice volume exhibits negative thermal expansion behaviour, with Alp...

  18. Propagation of arbitrary amplitude dust-ion acoustic waves in the collisional magnetized dusty plasma in the presence of non-thermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, M.; Zahed, H.; Pestehe, S. J.; Sobhanian, S.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential method, the oblique propagation of dust-ion acoustic solitary waves is studied in a magnetized dusty plasma. By considering non-thermal distribution of electrons, the related pseudo-potential is obtained using the Poisson equation. The behavior of the wave is investigated for some ranges of parameters. It is demonstrated that the increase in ion density, lz, β, and also δ1 can lead to the increases in the width and amplitude of the pseudo-potential, while any increase of a2, the coefficient that describes the first nonlinear term in the G ( ϕ ) , increases the amplitude of the V ( ϕ ) .

  19. Kinetics of thermally induced first-order magnetic transition in La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13} itinerant electron metamagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, A., E-mail: afujita@material.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yako, H. [Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Kinetics of the thermally induced first-order phase transition between the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases is proved in La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13}. ► Growth rate of the ferromagnetic region is represented by the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami model with the Avrami exponent of ∼2.2. ► The influence of the local elastic energy is relatively small in comparison with the magnetostructural transition and release of the latent heat dominates the kinetics in the magnetic transition of La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13}. -- Abstract: A nucleation-growth phenomenon has been investigated in the thermally induced first-order transition between the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states of La(Fe{sub 0.88}Si{sub 0.12}){sub 13} itinerant-electron metamagnetic (IEM) compound by measuring the AC susceptibility. Temperature dependence of the transition rate upon cooling exhibits a Johnson–Mehl–Avrami type variation and the Avrami exponent is determined to be 2.2. The thermal variation of the transition rate is scaled by the cooling rate, indicating that generation and dissipation of the latent heat are important for the kinetics of the growth process of the thermally induced transition.

  20. Thermal conductivity and dielectric properties of a TiO2-based electrical insulator for use with high temperature superconductor-based magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmael, S. A.; Slomski, M.; Luo, H.; White, M.; Hunt, A.; Mandzy, N.; Muth, J. F.; Nesbit, R.; Paskova, T.; Straka, W.; Schwartz, J.

    2014-09-01

    Quench protection is a remaining challenge impeding the implementation of high temperature superconductor (HTS)-based magnet applications. This is due primarily to the slow normal zone propagation velocity (NZPV) observed in Bi2Sr2CaCu2OX (Bi2212) and (RE)Ba2Cu3O7 - x (REBCO) systems. Recent computational and experimental findings reveal significant improvements in turn-to-turn NZPV, resulting in a magnet that is more stable and easier to protect through three-dimensional normal zone growth (Phillips M 2009; Ishmael S et al 2013 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 23 7201311). These improvements are achieved by replacing conventional insulation materials, such as Kapton and mullite braid, with a thin, thermally conducting, electrically-insulating ceramic oxide coating. This paper reports on the temperature-dependent thermal properties, electrical breakdown limits and microstructural characteristics of a titanium oxide (TiO2) insulation and a doped-TiO2-based proprietary insulation (doped-TiO2) shown previously to enhance quench behavior (Ishmael S et al 2013 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 23 7201311). Breakdown voltages at 77 K ranging from ˜1.5 kV to over 5 kV are reported. At 4.2 K, the TiO2 increases the thermal conductivity of polyimide by about a factor of 10. With the addition of a dopant, thermal conductivity is increased by an additional 13%, and a high temperature heat treatment increases it by nearly an additional 100%. Similar increases are observed at 77 K and room temperature. These results are understood in the context of the various microstructures observed.