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Sample records for airborne fallout mapping

  1. Airborne fallout mapping of {sup 137}Cs Finnish defence forces team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, M.; Heininen, T. [Finnish Defence Forces Research Centre, Lakiala (Finland); Pulakka, M. [Finnish Air Force Depot, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The main task of the team was to create a fallout map of {sup 137}Cs in a specified area in Padasjoki Auttoinen village. The team used an MI-8 helicopter of the Finnish Air Force. The team had an HPGe system (relative efficiency 70%) to measure nuclide specific ground contamination level. For navigation the team took advantage of the DGPS service provided by Finnish Broadcasting company utilizing the RDS-channel to get position accuracy within 2 meters. The correction signal is reachable nationwide on the FM transmitter network. The system produced a distribution map for {sup 40}K and fallout maps for {sup 134,137}Cs using a Micro Station Program with TerraModeler application. The maximum measured {sup 137}Cs ground contamination exceeded 130-140 kBqm{sup -2}. (au).

  2. Airborne fallout mapping of {sup 137}Cs - STUK/HUT team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkinen, M.; Aarnio, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Honkamaa, T.; Tiilikainen, H. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The task of the team was to create a fallout map of {sup 137}Cs on a specified area in Padasjoki Auttoinen village. The team used AB-420 helicopter of the Finnish Frontier Guard. The team had two measuring systems: HPGe system (relative efficiency 18%) and NaI system (5`x5`). Both systems produced similar maps. The average {sup 137}Cs fallout within the area (lakes and ponds included) was 88 kBq m{sup -2,} the maximum value being 161 kBq m{sup -2}. In an emergency the HPGe is superior to NaI because of its better energy resolution, giving possibility to obtain nuclide-specific results. (au).

  3. Carborne fallout mapping - STUK/HUT team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer 1995 altogether 8,625 spectrometric and 3,108 dose-rate measurements were performed in Padasjoki Auttoinen village using carborne measuring devices. As a result 137Cs fallout and dose-rate maps were produced. The highest measured values in the test area II were 160 kBq m-2 for fallout and 0.22 μSv h-1 for dose-rate. One hot spot was found beside the test area (dose rate 0.31 μSv h-1). On the cultivated areas the measured count rates in 137Cs-window are three to four times lower than in the forest areas in average, indicating an altered depth profile of caesium. (au)

  4. Carborne fallout mapping - STUK/HUT team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honkamaa, T.; Tiilikainen, H. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Aarnio, P.; Nikkinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    During the summer 1995 altogether 8,625 spectrometric and 3,108 dose-rate measurements were performed in Padasjoki Auttoinen village using carborne measuring devices. As a result {sup 137}Cs fallout and dose-rate maps were produced. The highest measured values in the test area II were 160 kBq m{sup -2} for fallout and 0.22 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} for dose-rate. One hot spot was found beside the test area (dose rate 0.31 {mu}Sv h{sup -1}). On the cultivated areas the measured count rates in {sup 137}Cs-window are three to four times lower than in the forest areas in average, indicating an altered depth profile of caesium. (au).

  5. On temporal variation of Ceasium isotopes activities in airborne and fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly variations of Cs-137 and Cs-134 activities in airborne and fallout collected in Dalat from 1986 to 1991 are presented. The variations exhibit distinct maxima in December-January, when dry fallout was predominant. The observed peaks are explained by the intrusion of cold air masses with higher radioactivity from temperate latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. Very high dry fallout velocity (about 10 cm/s) determined from the airborne and fallout activities clearly demonstrates one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front vertical air motion is descending.(Authors) (1 Fig. 2 Tables)

  6. Mapping of caesium fallout from the Chernobyl accident in the Jotunheimen area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranwal, Vikas C.; Ofstad, Frode; Roenning, Jan S.; Watson, Robin J.

    2011-07-01

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident, several areas in Norway received radioactive fallout. One of these areas is the eastern part of Jotunheimen in central Norway. Immediately after the accident in 1986, the Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) performed airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy in central Norway. At that time, it was not possible to calculate reliable radionuclide concentrations, and the data were presented as total counts per second. Several man-made radionuclides were present in the initial fallout, but due to short half-lives, most of these have now disintegrated into stable isotopes. 137Cs, with a half-life of 11.000 days ({approx} 30 years) is still present in the environment in significant quantities, leading to high radioactivity levels in meat from reindeer and sheep. To obtain a detailed map of the caesium fallout concentration in Jotunheimen, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) survey was carried out, focussing on reindeer grazing areas. This project was a cooperation between Reindeer Husbandry Administration, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Geological Survey of Norway. (auth)

  7. Airborne measurements of fission product fall-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1993 the Danish Emergency Management Agency will install an airborne γ-ray detector system for area survey of contamination with radioactive nuclides - primarily fission products that may be released during a heavy accident at a nuclear power plant or from accidents during transport of radioactive material. The equipment is based on 16 liter NaI(TI) crystals and multichannel analysers from Exploranium (Canada). A preliminary investigation of the possibilities for detection of low and high level contamination - and the problems that may be expected during use of the equipment, and during interpretation of the measured data, is described. Several days after reactor shut-down some of the nuclides can be identified directly from the measured spectrum, and contamination levels may be determined within a factor two. After several weeks, most fission products have decayed. Concentrations and exposure rates can be determined with increasing accuracy as time passes. Approximate calibration of the equipment for measurements of surface contamination and natural radioactivity can be performed in the laboratory. Further checks of equipment should include accurate measurements of the spectrum resolution. Detectors should be checked individually, and all together. Further control of dead time and pulse pile-up should be performed. Energy calibration, electronics performance and data equipment should be tested against results from the original calibration. (AB)

  8. Mapping permafrost with airborne electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsley, B. J.; Ball, L. B.; Bloss, B. R.; Kass, A.; Pastick, N.; Smith, B. D.; Voss, C. I.; Walsh, D. O.; Walvoord, M. A.; Wylie, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost is a key characteristic of cold region landscapes, yet detailed assessments of how the subsurface distribution of permafrost impacts the environment, hydrologic systems, and infrastructure are lacking. Data acquired from several airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys in Alaska provide significant new insight into the spatial extent of permafrost over larger areas (hundreds to thousands of square kilometers) than can be mapped using ground-based geophysical methods or through drilling. We compare several AEM datasets from different areas of interior Alaska, and explore the capacity of these data to infer geologic structure, permafrost extent, and related hydrologic processes. We also assess the impact of fires on permafrost by comparing data from different burn years within similar geological environments. Ultimately, interpretations rely on understanding the relationship between electrical resistivity measured by AEM surveys and the physical properties of interest such as geology, permafrost, and unfrozen water content in the subsurface. These relationships are often ambiguous and non-unique, so additional information is useful for reducing uncertainty. Shallow (upper ~1m) permafrost and soil characteristics identified from remotely sensed imagery and field observations help to constrain and aerially extend near-surface AEM interpretations, where correlations between the AEM and remote sensing data are identified using empirical multivariate analyses. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) measurements quantify the contribution of unfrozen water at depth to the AEM-derived electrical resistivity models at several locations within one survey area. AEM surveys fill a critical data gap in the subsurface characterization of permafrost environments and will be valuable in future mapping and monitoring programs in cold regions.

  9. Distribution and characterization of fall-out and airborne activity from 10 to 160 miles from Ground Zero, Spring 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baurmash, L.; Neel, J.W.; Vance, W.K. III; Mork, H.M.; Larson, K.H.

    1958-09-01

    Fall-out patterns of four tower shots were delineated by survey-instrument methods to distances of approximately 160 miles from Ground Zero. Surface-contamination levels in terms of ..mu..c/ft/sup 2/ and fall-out particle-size distributions were determined by soil-sample analyses. Airborne radioactivity concentrations determined by air samplers of different types and supports agreed within a factor of 4; aerosol radioactivity median diameters of < 5 ..mu.. were determined by cascade impactors. The solubilities of fall-out and airborne radioactivity in 0.1N HCl ranged from 20 to 30 and 65 to 85%, respectively. More than 90% of the fall-out from two shots was magnetic. Beta-decay slopes ranged from T/sup -0/ /sup 80/ to T/sup -1/ /sup 59/, and field gamma-decay slops ranged from T/sup -1/ /sup 07/ to T/sup -2/ /sup 10/. Principal beta-energy peaks of 0.6 and 2.0 MeV were observed.

  10. Airborne Wide Area Imager for Wildfire Mapping and Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An advanced airborne imaging system for fire detection/mapping is proposed. The goal of the project is to improve control and management of wildfires in order to...

  11. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  12. MAPPING GRAIN SORGHUM YEILD VARIABILITY USING AIRBORNE DIGITAL VIDEOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapping crop yield variability is one important aspect of precision agriculture. This study was designed to assess airborne digital videography as a tool for mapping grain sorghum yields for precision farming. Color-infrared (CIR) imagery was acquired with a three- camera digital video imaging sys...

  13. Airborne system for mapping and tracking extended gamma ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An airborne system was developed for mapping and tracking extended sources of airborne or terrestrially distributed γ-ray emitters. The system records 300 channel γ-ray spectral data every three seconds on magnetic tape. Computer programs have been written to isolate the contribution from the particular radionuclide of interest. Aircraft position as sensed by a microwave ranging system is recorded every second on magnetic tape. Measurements of airborne stack releases of 41A concentrations versus time or aircraft position agree well with computer code predictions

  14. Construction of radioelement and dose rate baseline maps by combining ground and airborne radiometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For emergency situations like nuclear accidents, lost isotopic sources, debris of reactor-powered satellites etc. well-documented baseline information is indispensable. Maps of cosmic, terrestrial natural and artificial radiation can be constructed by assembling different datasets such as ground and airborne gamma spectrometry, direct dose rate measurements, and soil/rock samples. The in situ measurements were calibrated using the soil samples taken at/around the field measurement sites, the airborne measurements by a combination of in situ, and soil/rock sample data. The radioelement concentrations (Bq/kg) were in turn converted to dose-rate (nSv/h). First, the cosmic radiation map was constructed from a digital terrain model, averaging topographic heights within cells of 2 km X 2 km size. For the terrestrial radiation a total of 1615 ground data points were available, in addition to the airborne data. The artificial radiation map (Chernobyl and earlier fallout) has the smallest data base (184 data points from airborne and ground measurements). The dose rate map was constructed by summing up the above-mentioned contributions. It relies on a data base which corresponds to a density of about 1 point per 25 km2. The cosmic radiation map shows elevated dose rates in the high parts of the Swiss Alps. The cosmic dose rate ranges from 40 to 190 nSv/h, depending on altitude. The terrestrial dose rate maps show general agreement with lithology: elevated dose rates (100 to 200 nSv/h) characterize the Central Massifs of the Alps where crystalline rocks give a maximum of 370 nSv/h, whereas the sedimentary northern Alpine Foreland (Jura, Molasse basin) shows consistently lower dose rates (40-100 nSv/h). The artificial radiation map has its maximum value in the southern part of Switzerland (90 nSv/h). The map of total dose rate exhibits values from 55 to 570 nSv/h. These values are considerably higher than reported in the Radiation Atlas (''Natural Sources of Ionising Radiation

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION AIRBORNE SHALLOW WATER MAPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbacher, F.; M. Pfennigbauer; M. Aufleger; Ullrich, A

    2012-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperati...

  16. High Resolution Airborne Shallow Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, F.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Aufleger, M.; Ullrich, A.

    2012-07-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive (EU-WFD), authorities face the problem of repeatedly performing area-wide surveying of all kinds of inland waters. Especially for mid-sized or small rivers this is a considerable challenge imposing insurmountable logistical efforts and costs. It is therefore investigated if large-scale surveying of a river system on an operational basis is feasible by employing airborne hydrographic laser scanning. In cooperation with the Bavarian Water Authority (WWA Weilheim) a pilot project was initiated by the Unit of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of Innsbruck and RIEGL Laser Measurement Systems exploiting the possibilities of a new LIDAR measurement system with high spatial resolution and high measurement rate to capture about 70 km of riverbed and foreland for the river Loisach in Bavaria/Germany and the estuary and parts of the shoreline (about 40km in length) of lake Ammersee. The entire area surveyed was referenced to classic terrestrial cross-section surveys with the aim to derive products for the monitoring and managing needs of the inland water bodies forced by the EU-WFD. The survey was performed in July 2011 by helicopter and airplane and took 3 days in total. In addition, high resolution areal images were taken to provide an optical reference, offering a wide range of possibilities on further research, monitoring, and managing responsibilities. The operating altitude was about 500 m to maintain eye-safety, even for the aided eye, the airspeed was about 55 kts for the helicopter and 75 kts for the aircraft. The helicopter was used in the alpine regions while the fixed wing aircraft was used in the plains and the urban area, using appropriate scan rates to receive evenly distributed point clouds. The resulting point density ranged from 10 to 25 points per square meter. By carefully selecting days with optimum water quality, satisfactory penetration down to the river bed was achieved

  17. Airborne Measurement in the Ash Plume from Mount Sakurajima: Analysis of Gravitational Effects on Dispersion and Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Eliasson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash concentrations in the plume from Sakurajima volcano in Japan are observed from airplanes equipped with optical particle counters and GPS tracking devices. The volcano emits several puffs a day. The puffs are also recorded by the Sakurajima Volcanological Observatory. High concentrations are observed in the puffs and fallout driven by vertical air current, called streak fallout. Puffs dispersion is analyzed by the classical diffusion-advection method and a new gravitational dispersion method. The fluid mechanic of the gravitational dispersion, streak fallout, and classical diffusion-advection theory is described in three separate appendices together with methods to find the time gravitational dispersion constant and the diffusion coefficient from satellite photos. The diffusion-advection equation may be used to scale volcanic eruptions so the same eruption plumes can be scaled to constant flux and wind conditions or two eruptions can be scaled to each other. The dispersion analyses show that dispersion of volcanic plumes does not follow either theories completely. It is most likely diffusion in the interface of the plume and the ambient air, together with gravitational flattening of the plumes core. This means larger boundary concentration gradients and smaller diffusion coefficients than state of the art methods can predict.

  18. Tropical forest carbon assessment: integrating satellite and airborne mapping approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale carbon mapping is needed to support the UNFCCC program to reduce deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). Managers of forested land can potentially increase their carbon credits via detailed monitoring of forest cover, loss and gain (hectares), and periodic estimates of changes in forest carbon density (tons ha-1). Satellites provide an opportunity to monitor changes in forest carbon caused by deforestation and degradation, but only after initial carbon densities have been assessed. New airborne approaches, especially light detection and ranging (LiDAR), provide a means to estimate forest carbon density over large areas, which greatly assists in the development of practical baselines. Here I present an integrated satellite-airborne mapping approach that supports high-resolution carbon stock assessment and monitoring in tropical forest regions. The approach yields a spatially resolved, regional state-of-the-forest carbon baseline, followed by high-resolution monitoring of forest cover and disturbance to estimate carbon emissions. Rapid advances and decreasing costs in the satellite and airborne mapping sectors are already making high-resolution carbon stock and emissions assessments viable anywhere in the world.

  19. Tropical forest carbon assessment: integrating satellite and airborne mapping approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, Gregory P, E-mail: gpa@stanford.ed [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Large-scale carbon mapping is needed to support the UNFCCC program to reduce deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). Managers of forested land can potentially increase their carbon credits via detailed monitoring of forest cover, loss and gain (hectares), and periodic estimates of changes in forest carbon density (tons ha{sup -1}). Satellites provide an opportunity to monitor changes in forest carbon caused by deforestation and degradation, but only after initial carbon densities have been assessed. New airborne approaches, especially light detection and ranging (LiDAR), provide a means to estimate forest carbon density over large areas, which greatly assists in the development of practical baselines. Here I present an integrated satellite-airborne mapping approach that supports high-resolution carbon stock assessment and monitoring in tropical forest regions. The approach yields a spatially resolved, regional state-of-the-forest carbon baseline, followed by high-resolution monitoring of forest cover and disturbance to estimate carbon emissions. Rapid advances and decreasing costs in the satellite and airborne mapping sectors are already making high-resolution carbon stock and emissions assessments viable anywhere in the world.

  20. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  1. Airborne LIDAR: high resolution shallow water bathymetric mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Glennie, C. L.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The primary goals of the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) include collecting research quality airborne LIDAR observations for projects funded by NSF through proposal/peer review, and improving airborne LIDAR technology/products to enable new applications. To extend NCALM capabilities to shallow water bathymetric mapping, as inexpensively and quickly as possible, we contracted for the development of a new sensor head compatible with the electronics rack of our near infrared (NIR) sensor, but operates at a wavelength of 0.532 micrometers. The new sensor head utilizes the same laser pump diodes, control electronics, waveform digitizer (currently 8 bit, with a 12 bit unit under development), and high capacity data storage units as the NIR sensor, but the optics are designed and coated for the green light produced by the frequency doubled NdYAG laser. The green sensor has a sufficient field of view to receive returns from the surface of a body of water, and allowing for refraction, from the underlying terrain. The laser operates at selected pulse rates up to 70 kHz, and has a nominal pulse width of approximately 5 nanoseconds. Laboratory and initial engineering field tests indicate that the system can detect bottom returns in 10 meters or greater depths of water with 0.1 loss of signal per meter of water and a bottom reflectivity of 0.1, and that it should be possible, with proper processing of the digitized waveform data, to resolve surface and bottom returns in water as shallow as 10 to 15 cm. Operating from an altitude of 400 meters hundred meters, ground-speed of 80 meters per second, scan angle of 15 degrees, and a pulse rate of 70 kHz, yields a single-pass point density of about 5 points per m2, which will yield bathymetric maps of shallow lakes, streams and coastal waters with previously unavailable spatial resolutions.

  2. Radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of the fireball following a nuclear or thermonuclear explosion, and its ascent and cooling are described. Local and global fallout are discussed, and the differing behaviour of fallout from the troposphere and stratosphere explained. The monthly and accumulated fallout of sr90 and its distribution in the Northern and Southern hemispheres is used as an illustration. The accumulation of fallout and its distribution and concentration by food chains is also discussed, using Sr 90, Cs 137 and I 131 as examples. (JIW)

  3. LSNR Airborne LIDAR Mapping System Design and Early Results (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K.; Carter, W. E.; Slatton, K. C.

    2009-12-01

    Low signal-to-noise ratio (LSNR) detection techniques allow for implementation of airborne light detection and range (LIDAR) instrumentation aboard platforms with prohibitive power, size, and weight restrictions. The University of Florida has developed the Coastal Area Tactical-mapping System (CATS), a prototype LSNR LIDAR system capable of single photon laser ranging. CATS is designed to operate in a fixed-wing aircraft flying 600 m above ground level, producing 532 nm, 480 ps, 3 μJ output pulses at 8 kHz. To achieve continuous coverage of the terrain with 20 cm spatial resolution in a single pass, a 10x10 array of laser beamlets is scanned. A Risley prism scanner (two rotating V-coated optical wedges) allows the array of laser beamlets to be deflected in a variety of patterns, including conical, spiral, and lines at selected angles to the direction of flight. Backscattered laser photons are imaged onto a 100 channel (10x10 segmented-anode) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a micro-channel plate (MCP) amplifier. Each channel of the PMT is connected to a multi-stop 2 GHz event timer. Here we report on tests in which ranges for known targets were accumulated for repeated laser shots and statistical analyses were applied to evaluate range accuracy, minimum separation distance, bathymetric mapping depth, and atmospheric scattering. Ground-based field test results have yielded 10 cm range accuracy and sub-meter feature identification at variable scan settings. These experiments also show that a secondary surface can be detected at a distance of 15 cm from the first. Range errors in secondary surface identification for six separate trials were within 7.5 cm, or within the timing resolution limit of the system. Operating at multi-photon sensitivity may have value for situations in which high ambient noise precludes single-photon sensitivity. Low reflectivity targets submerged in highly turbid waters can cause detection issues. CATS offers the capability to adjust the

  4. Medium altitude airborne Geiger-mode mapping LIDAR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, William E.; Steele, Bradley; Nelson, Graham; Truscott, Antony; Itzler, Mark; Entwistle, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 15 years the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and private industry have been developing airborne LiDAR systems based on arrays of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) detectors capable of detecting a single photon. The extreme sensitivity of GmAPD detectors allows operation of LiDAR sensors at unprecedented altitudes and area collection rates in excess of 1,000 km2/hr. Up until now the primary emphasis of this technology has been limited to defense applications despite the significant benefits of applying this technology to non-military uses such as mapping, monitoring critical infrastructure and disaster relief. This paper briefly describes the operation of GmAPDs, design and operation of a Geiger-mode LiDAR, a comparison of Geiger-mode and traditional linear mode LiDARs, and a description of the first commercial Geiger-mode LiDAR system, the IntelliEarth™ Geospatial Solutions Geiger-mode LiDAR sensor.

  5. Mangrove species mapping in Kuala Sepetang Mangrove Forest, Perak using high resolution airborne data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, B. C.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove vegetation is widely employed and studied as it is a unique ecosystem which is able to provide plenty of goods and applications to our country. In this paper, high resolution airborne image data obtained the flight mission on Kuala Sepetang Mangrove Forest Reserve, Perak, Malaysia will be used for mangrove species mapping. Supervised classification using the retrieved surface reflectance will be performed to classify the airborne data using Geomatica 2013 software package. The ground truth data will be used to validate the classification accuracy. High correlation of R2=0.873 was achieved in this study indicate that high resolution airborne data is reliable and suitable used for mangrove species mapping.

  6. Radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential radiation doses from several scenarios involving nuclear attack on an unsheltered United States population are calculated for local, intermediate time scale and long-term fallout. Dose estimates are made for both a normal atmosphere and an atmosphere perturbed by smoke produced by massive fires. A separate section discusses the additional doses from nuclear fuel facilities, were they to be targeted in an attack. Finally, in an appendix the direct effects of fallout on humans are considered. These include effects of sheltering and biological repair of damage from chronic doses. 21 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs

  7. Airborne Wide Area Imager for Wildfire Mapping and Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An autonomous airborne imaging system for earth science research, disaster response, and fire detection is proposed. The primary goal is to improve information to...

  8. Airborne geophysical mapping of environmental features - examples from Northern Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Michael; Appleton, James; Beamish, David; Cuss, Robert; Van Dam, Christiaan; Jones, David; Lahti, Mari; Miles, Jon; Rawlins, Barry; Scheib, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Northern Ireland completed a low-level regional airborne geophysical survey of Northern Ireland during 2005-6 as part of the Tellus Project. The survey was flown by the Joint Airborne Geoscience Capability, a partnership of the British Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Finland. The aircraft, a De Havilland Twin Otter, was equipped with two magnetometer sensors, a four-frequency electromagnetic system and a 256-channel gamma-ray spectrometer. The traverse-...

  9. The Impact on Geological and Hydrogeological Mapping Results of Moving from Ground to Airborne TEM

    OpenAIRE

    Sapia, V.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Viezzoli, A.; Aarhus Geophysics Aps; Jørgensen, F.; Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland; Oldenborger, G. A.; Geological Survey of Canada; Marchetti, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia

    2014-01-01

    In the past three decades, airborne electromagnetic (AEM) systems have been used for many groundwater exploration purposes. This contribution of airborne geophysics for both groundwater resource mapping and water quality evaluations and management has increased dramatically over the past ten years, proving how these systems are appropriate for large-scale and efficient groundwater surveying. One of the major reasons for its popularity is the time and cost efficiency in producin...

  10. Airborne Lidar: Advances in Discrete Return Technology for 3D Vegetation Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Ussyshkin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional discrete return airborne lidar systems, used in the commercial sector for efficient generation of high quality spatial data, have been considered for the past decade to be an ideal choice for various mapping applications. Unlike two-dimensional aerial imagery, the elevation component of airborne lidar data provides the ability to represent vertical structure details with very high precision, which is an advantage for many lidar applications focusing on the analysis of elevated features such as 3D vegetation mapping. However, the use of conventional airborne discrete return lidar systems for some of these applications has often been limited, mostly due to relatively coarse vertical resolution and insufficient number of multiple measurements in vertical domain. For this reason, full waveform airborne sensors providing more detailed representation of target vertical structure have often been considered as a preferable choice in some areas of 3D vegetation mapping application, such as forestry research. This paper presents an overview of the specific features of airborne lidar technology concerning 3D mapping applications, particularly vegetation mapping. Certain key performance characteristics of lidar sensors important for the quality of vegetation mapping are discussed and illustrated by the advanced capabilities of the ALTM-Orion, a new discrete return sensor manufactured by Optech Incorporated. It is demonstrated that advanced discrete return sensors with enhanced 3D mapping capabilities can produce data of enhanced quality, which can represent complex structures of vegetation targets at the level of details equivalent in some aspects to the content of full waveform data. It is also shown that recent advances in conventional airborne lidar technology bear the potential to create a new application niche, where high quality dense point clouds, enhanced by fully recorded intensity for multiple returns, may provide sufficient

  11. Arctic cushion plants as fallout 'monitors'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal distribution of fallout 137Cs was determined for arctic cushion plants Dryas integrifolia, Silene acaulis and the bryophytes Rhacomitrium lanuginosum and Polytrichum juniperinum collected at various latitudes in Canadian Arctic. The results indicate that these plants have functioned as biological monitors of radioactive fallout and it is suggested that analysis of the internal distribution of 137Cs could serve as a model for other airborne contaminants. (author)

  12. RESUME95 Nordic field test of mobile equipment for nuclear fall-out monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, C.; Bresson, J.; Chiffot, T.; Guillot, L. [Centre d`Etudes de Valduc, Direction des Applications Militaires, Commissaiat a L`Energie Atomique, Tille (France)

    1997-12-31

    Nordic Safety Research (NKS) organised in August 1995 a field test of various techniques and instrumentation for monitoring radioactive fall-out. In an emergency situation, after a major release of radioactive material, many different measuring systems are going to be used, ranging from small hand hold intensitometer to complex spectrometer systems. In this test the following type of equipment were tested: Airborne spectrometers; Carborne spectrometers and dose rate meters; In situ spectrometers and intensitometers. Helinuc team was equipped of an airborne system and of a germanium device for in situ measurements. Different tasks were specified for each team: Mapping caesium fall-out and natural activity over two areas of 18 and 5 km{sup 2}; Research of hidden sources. For measurements and data processing the respect of time allowed was strictly controlled for testing the ability of each team. (au).

  13. RESUME95 Nordic field test of mobile equipment for nuclear fall-out monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordic Safety Research (NKS) organised in August 1995 a field test of various techniques and instrumentation for monitoring radioactive fall-out. In an emergency situation, after a major release of radioactive material, many different measuring systems are going to be used, ranging from small hand hold intensitometer to complex spectrometer systems. In this test the following type of equipment were tested: Airborne spectrometers; Carborne spectrometers and dose rate meters; In situ spectrometers and intensitometers. Helinuc team was equipped of an airborne system and of a germanium device for in situ measurements. Different tasks were specified for each team: Mapping caesium fall-out and natural activity over two areas of 18 and 5 km2; Research of hidden sources. For measurements and data processing the respect of time allowed was strictly controlled for testing the ability of each team. (au)

  14. Mapping of the DOME-C area in Antarctica by an airborne L-band radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    A 350 × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature close to the yearly mean temperature — well suited for calibration checks for...

  15. Airborne L-band radiometer mapping of the dome-C area in Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2015-01-01

    A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration...

  16. A New Method for Processing Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometry Data for Mapping Low Level Contaminations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim;

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for processing airborne gamma ray spectrometry data has been developed. It is based on the noise adjusted singular value decomposition method introduced by Hovgaard in 1997. The new technique opens for mapping of very low contamination levels. It is tested with data from Latvia...

  17. Statewide Mapping of Aboveground Biomass by Integrating Airborne Lidar Data and National Forestry Inventory Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; McRoberts, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The freely available airborne lidar data at the sub-national level in the United States provide unprecedented opportunities for mapping large-area yet accurate information about vegetation structure, biomass, and carbon. However, the challenge of processing massive lidar data and extracting useful information is huge. This study is to conduct a statewide mapping study of aboveground biomass (AGB) by integrating airborne lidar data and FIA (Forest Inventory and Analysis) plot data for the whole state of Minnesota. We will share our experience and lessons in issues including 1) automatic generation of Digital Terrain Model from point cloud, 2) classification of vegetation returns, 3) calculation of AGB from FIA plots using different allometric models, 4) statistical modeling of AGB by integrating with FIA plots, and 5) assessing the uncertainty of mapped AGB.

  18. Satellite imagery and airborne geophysics for geologic mapping of the Edembo area, Eastern Hoggar (Algerian Sahara)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamri, Takfarinas; Djemaï, Safouane; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Zoheir, Basem; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Ouzegane, Khadidja; Amara, Massinissa

    2016-03-01

    Satellite imagery combined with airborne geophysical data and field observations were employed for new geologic mapping of the Edembo area in the Eastern Hoggar (Tuareg Shield, Sahara). Multi-spectral band fusion, filtering, and transformation techniques, i.e., band combination, band-rationing and principal component analysis of ETM+ and ASTER data are used for better spectral discrimination of the different rocks units. A thematic map assessed by field data and available geologic information is compiled by supervised classification of satellite data with high overall accuracy (>90%). The automated extraction technique efficiently aided the detection of the structural lineaments, i.e., faults, shear zones, and joints. Airborne magnetic and Gamma-ray spectrometry data showed the pervasiveness of the large structures beneath the Paleozoic sedimentary cover and aeolian sands. The aeroradiometric K-range is used for discrimination of the high-K granitoids of Djanet from the peralumineous granites of Edembo, and to verify the Silurian sediments with their high K-bearing minerals. The new geological map is considered to be a high resolution improvement on all pre-existing maps of this hardly accessible area in the Tuareg Shield. Integration of the airborne geophysical and space-borne imagery data can hence provide a rapid means of geologically mapping areas hitherto poorly known or difficult to access.

  19. Mapping and modeling airborne urban phenanthrene distribution using vegetation biomonitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noth, Elizabeth M.; Katharine Hammond, S.; Biging, Gregory S.; Tager, Ira B.

    2013-10-01

    To capture the spatial distribution of phenanthrene in an urban setting we used vegetation biomonitoring with Jeffrey pine trees (Pinus jeffreyi). The major challenge in characterizing spatial variation in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations within a metropolitan area has been sampling at a fine enough resolution to observe the underlying spatial pattern. However, field and chamber studies show that the primary pathway through which PAHs enter plants is from air into leaves, making vegetation biomonitoring a feasible way to examine the spatial distribution of these compounds. Previous research has shown that phenanthrene has adverse health effects and that it is one of the most abundant PAHs in urban air. We collected 99 pine needle samples from 91 locations in Fresno in the morning on a winter day, and analyzed them for PAHs in the inner needle. All 99 pine needle samples had detectable levels of phenanthrene, with mean concentration of 41.0 ng g-1, median 36.9 ng g-1, and standard deviation of 28.5 ng g-1 fresh weight. The ratio of the 90th:10th percentile concentrations by location was 3.3. The phenanthrene distribution had a statistically significant Moran's I of 0.035, indicating a high degree of spatial clustering. We implemented land use regression to fit a model to our data. Our model was able to explain a moderate amount of the variability in the data (R2 = 0.56), likely reflecting the major sources of phenanthrene in Fresno. The spatial distribution of modeled airborne phenanthrene shows the influences of highways, railroads, and industrial and commercial zones.

  20. WIDE-AREA MAPPING OF FOREST WITH NATIONAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING AND FIELD INVENTORY DATASETS

    OpenAIRE

    Monnet, J.-M.; C. Ginzler; Clivaz, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) remote sensing data are now available for entire countries such as Switzerland. Methods for the estimation of forest parameters from ALS have been intensively investigated in the past years. However, the implementation of a forest mapping workflow based on available data at a regional level still remains challenging. A case study was implemented in the Canton of Valais (Switzerland). The national ALS dataset and field data of the Swiss National Forest Inventory w...

  1. Airborne laser swath mapping of the Denton Hills, Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica: Applications for structural and glacial geomorphic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Terry; Csathó, Beata

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution digital elevation data acquired by airborne laser scanning (ALS) for the Denton Hills, along the coastal foothills of the Royal Society Range, Transantarctic Mountains, are examined for applications to bedrock and glacial geomorphic mapping. Digital elevation models (DEMs), displayed as shaded-relief images and slope maps, portray geomorphic landscape features in unprecedented detail across the region. Structures of both ductile and brittle origin, ranging in age from the Paleozoic to the Quaternary, can be mapped from the DEMs. Glacial features, providing a record of the limits of grounded ice, of lake paleoshorelines, and of proglacial lake-ice conveyor deposits, are also prominent on the DEMs. The ALS-derived topographic data have great potential for a range of mapping applications in regions of ice-free terrain in Antarctica

  2. Comparative levels of radioactive air pollutants from industry and fallout. A progress report of radioecological investigations of airborne radioactivity in the Utah environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported of measurements carried on during the year 1971 and the first two months of 1972 on the radioactivity from natural as compared to artificial radiation sources in the environment in Utah. During this time, a major portion of our work was devoted to analyses of the data and preparation of a report related to the Baneberry venting event and the accumulation of data on fallout from the January 7, 1972 Chinese nuclear explosion. Calibration procedures were developed for air samplers for the establishment of the numbers of pCi/m3 in air. The responses of the air monitors in relationship to the ventilation index, seasonal effect, and the industrial complexity of the area were analyzed. Continuous measurements were made of the levels of radioactive materials in soils and vegetation and the results of these studies are presented mainly in tabular form. Comparisons have been made of the levels of radioactive materials in soils on the basis of square mile levels and the distribution of the radioactive materials in the soil profiles. Measurements of farm crops, including the major sources from which dairy products would be produced, have been made, and some comparisons by year and location have been made. Studies of secondary aerosols have been made using the dust accumulated on farm implements as the indicator of the kinds of secondary aerosols to which farmers and outdoorsmen might be exposed. These results would also be indicative of the kinds of dusts produced when high winds resuspend soil deposited radionuclides

  3. Mapping Understory Trees Using Airborne Discrete-Return LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, I.; Hovi, A.; Morsdorf, F.

    2011-09-01

    Understory trees in multi-layer stands are often ignored in forest inventories. Information about them would benefit silviculture, wood procurement and biodiversity management. Cost-efficient inventory methods for the assessment of the presence, density, species- and size-distributions are called for. LiDAR remote sensing is a promising addition to field work. Unlike in passive image data, in which the signals from multiple layers mix, the 3D position of each hot-spot reflection is known in LiDAR data. The overstory however prevents from obtaining a wall-to-wall sample of understory, and measurements are subject to transmission losses. Discriminating between the crowns of dominant and suppressed trees can also be challenging. We examined the potential of LiDAR for the mapping of the understory trees in Scots pine stands (62°N, 24°E), using carefully georeferenced reference data and several LiDAR data sets. We present results that highlight differences in echo-triggering between sensors that affect the near-ground height data. A conceptual model for the transmission losses in the overstory was created and formulated into simple compensation models that reduced the intensity variation in second- and third return data. The task is highly ill-posed in discrete-return LiDAR data, and our models employed the geometry of the overstory as well as the intensity of previous returns. We showed that even first-return data in the understory is subject to losses in the overstory that did not trigger an echo. Even with compensation of the losses, the intensity data was deemed of low value in species discrimination. Area-based LiDAR height metrics that were derived from the data belonging to the crown volume of the understory showed reasonable correlation with the density and mean height of the understory trees. Assessment of the species seems out of reach in discrete-return LiDAR data, which is a drastic drawback.

  4. Airborne magnetic mapping of volcanic areas - state-of-the-art and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supper, Robert; Paoletti, Valeria; Okuma, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally airborne magnetics surveys in volcanology are used for mapping regional geological features, fault zones and to develop a magnetic model of the volcanic subsurface. Within an Austrian-Italian-Japanese cooperation, several volcanic areas including Mt. Vesuvius, Ischia, Campi Flegreii and Aeolian Islands in Italy and Socorro Island in Mexico were mapped by high-resolution magnetic mapping during the last 15 years. In this paper, general conclusions from this long-term cooperation project on airborne magnetics in volcanic areas will be summarised. Basically the results showed the results from airborne magnetics could be used for three major purposes: 1. Developing a rough model for the magnetisation below the volcano down to several kilometres by applying advanced magnetic inversion algorithms helped to define the possible depth of the current or past magma chamber. Due to the complexity of the subsurface of volcanic areas, inversion of data was much dependent on constraints coming from other geoscientific disciplines. 2. After applying certain steps of reduction (topographic correction, field transformation) and a combination of source selective filtering, important regional structural trends could be derived from the alignment of the residual magnetic anomalies. 3. On the other hand during recent years, research has also focused on repeated measurements of the magnetic field of volcanic areas (differential in respect of time = differential magnetic measurements - DMM) using airborne sensors. Long-term temporal magnetic field variations in active volcanic areas can be caused by a changing size of the magma chamber or a general rise in temperature. This is caused by the fact that magnetization disappears, when a magnetic material is warmed up over a certain temperature (Curie- temperature). In consequence the resulting total magnetic field changes. Therefore, determining areas showing changes in the magnetic field could help to select areas where a

  5. Positional Accuracy of Airborne Integrated Global Positioning and Inertial Navigation Systems for Mapping in Glen Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Richard D.; Hothem, Larry D.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution airborne and satellite image sensor systems integrated with onboard data collection based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation systems (INS) may offer a quick and cost-effective way to gather accurate topographic map information without ground control or aerial triangulation. The Applanix Corporation?s Position and Orientation Solutions for Direct Georeferencing of aerial photography was used in this project to examine the positional accuracy of integrated GPS/INS for terrain mapping in Glen Canyon, Arizona. The research application in this study yielded important information on the usefulness and limits of airborne integrated GPS/INS data-capture systems for mapping.

  6. Towards Automatic Single-Sensor Mapping by Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahokas, E.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Matikainen, L.; Karila, K.; Litkey, P.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of the Optech Titan multispectral airborne laser scanner in the fields of mapping and forestry. Investigation was targeted to six land cover classes. Multispectral laser scanner data can be used to distinguish land cover classes of the ground surface, including the roads and separate road surface classes. For forest inventory using point cloud metrics and intensity features combined, total accuracy of 93.5% was achieved for classification of three main boreal tree species (pine, spruce and birch).When using intensity features - without point height metrics - a classification accuracy of 91% was achieved for these three tree species. It was also shown that deciduous trees can be further classified into more species. We propose that intensity-related features and waveform-type features are combined with point height metrics for forest attribute derivation in area-based prediction, which is an operatively applied forest inventory process in Scandinavia. It is expected that multispectral airborne laser scanning can provide highly valuable data for city and forest mapping and is a highly relevant data asset for national and local mapping agencies in the near future.

  7. Flight investigation of helicopter IFR approaches to oil rigs using airborne weather and mapping radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J. S.; Hegarty, D. M.; Phillips, J. D.; Sturgeon, W. R.; Hunting, A. W.; Pate, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne weather and mapping radar is a near-term, economical method of providing 'self-contained' navigation information for approaches to offshore oil rigs and its use has been rapidly expanding in recent years. A joint NASA/FAA flight test investigation of helicopter IFR approaches to offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico was initiated in June 1978 and conducted under contract to Air Logistics. Approximately 120 approaches were flown in a Bell 212 helicopter by 15 operational pilots during the months of August and September 1978. The purpose of the tests was to collect data to (1) support development of advanced radar flight director concepts by NASA and (2) aid the establishment of Terminal Instrument Procedures (TERPS) criteria by the FAA. The flight test objectives were to develop airborne radar approach procedures, measure tracking errors, determine accpetable weather minimums, and determine pilot acceptability. Data obtained will contribute significantly to improved helicopter airborne radar approach capability and to the support of exploration, development, and utilization of the Nation's offshore oil supplies.

  8. Mapping Coral Reef Benthos, Substrates, and Bathymetry, Using Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Leiper

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used a reef-up approach to map coral reef benthos, substrates and bathymetry, with high spatial resolution hyperspectral image data. It investigated a physics-based inversion method for mapping coral reef benthos and substrates using readily available software: Hydrolight and ENVI. Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI data were acquired over Heron Reef in July 2002. The spectral reflectance of coral reef benthos and substrate types were measured in-situ, and using the HydroLight 4.2 radiative transfer model a spectral reflectance library of subsurface reflectance was simulated using water column depths from 0.5–10.0 m at 0.5 m intervals. Using the Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm, sediment, benthic micro-algae, algal turf, crustose coralline algae, macro-algae, and live coral were mapped with an overall accuracy of 65% to a depth of around 8.0 m; in waters deeper than 8.0 m the match between the classified image and field validation data was poor. Qualitative validation of the maps showed accurate mapping of areas dominated by sediment, benthic micro-algae, algal turf, live coral, and macro-algae. A bathymetric map was produced for water column depths 0.5–10.0 m, at 0.5 m intervals, and showed high correspondence with in-situ sonar data (R2 value of 0.93.

  9. Area-Based Mapping of Defoliation of Scots Pine Stands Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu Hyyppä

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The mapping of changes in the distribution of insect-caused forest damage remains an important forest monitoring application and challenge. Efficient and accurate methods are required for mapping and monitoring changes in insect defoliation to inform forest management and reporting activities. In this research, we develop and evaluate a LiDAR-driven (Light Detection And Ranging approach for mapping defoliation caused by the Common pine sawfly (Diprion pini L.. Our method requires plot-level training data and airborne scanning LiDAR data. The approach is predicated on a forest canopy mask created by detecting forest canopy cover using LiDAR. The LiDAR returns that are reflected from the canopy (that is, returns > half of maximum plot tree height are used in the prediction of the defoliation. Predictions of defoliation are made at plot-level, which enables a direct integration of the method to operational forest management planning while also providing additional value-added from inventory-focused LiDAR datasets. In addition to the method development, we evaluated the prediction accuracy and investigated the required pulse density for operational LiDAR-based mapping of defoliation. Our method proved to be suitable for the mapping of defoliated stands, resulting in an overall mapping accuracy of 84.3% and a Cohen’s kappa coefficient of 0.68.

  10. Bedrock mapping of buried valley networks using seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenborger, G. A.; Logan, C. E.; Hinton, M. J.; Pugin, A. J.-M.; Sapia, V.; Sharpe, D. R.; Russell, H. A. J.

    2016-05-01

    In glaciated terrain, buried valleys often host aquifers that are significant groundwater resources. However, given the range of scales, spatial complexity and depth of burial, buried valleys often remain undetected or insufficiently mapped. Accurate and thorough mapping of bedrock topography is a crucial step in detecting and delineating buried valleys and understanding formative valley processes. We develop a bedrock mapping procedure supported by the combination of seismic reflection data and helicopter time-domain electromagnetic data with water well records for the Spiritwood buried valley aquifer system in Manitoba, Canada. The limited spatial density of water well bedrock observations precludes complete depiction of the buried valley bedrock topography and renders the water well records alone inadequate for accurate hydrogeological model building. Instead, we leverage the complementary strengths of seismic reflection and airborne electromagnetic data for accurate local detection of the sediment-bedrock interface and for spatially extensive coverage, respectively. Seismic reflection data are used to define buried valley morphology in cross-section beneath survey lines distributed over a regional area. A 3D model of electrical conductivity is derived from inversion of the airborne electromagnetic data and used to extrapolate buried valley morphology over the entire survey area. A spatially variable assignment of the electrical conductivity at the bedrock surface is applied to different features of the buried valley morphology identified in the seismic cross-sections. Electrical conductivity is then used to guide construction of buried valley shapes between seismic sections. The 3D locus of points defining each morphological valley feature is constructed using a path optimization routine that utilizes deviation from the assigned electrical conductivities as the cost function. Our resulting map represents a bedrock surface of unprecedented detail with more

  11. A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Mascaro, Joseph; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Vaudry, Romuald; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Hall, Jefferson S; van Breugel, Michiel

    2012-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is fast turning the corner from demonstration technology to a key tool for assessing carbon stocks in tropical forests. With its ability to penetrate tropical forest canopies and detect three-dimensional forest structure, LiDAR may prove to be a major component of international strategies to measure and account for carbon emissions from and uptake by tropical forests. To date, however, basic ecological information such as height-diameter allometry and stand-level wood density have not been mechanistically incorporated into methods for mapping forest carbon at regional and global scales. A better incorporation of these structural patterns in forests may reduce the considerable time needed to calibrate airborne data with ground-based forest inventory plots, which presently necessitate exhaustive measurements of tree diameters and heights, as well as tree identifications for wood density estimation. Here, we develop a new approach that can facilitate rapid LiDAR calibration with minimal field data. Throughout four tropical regions (Panama, Peru, Madagascar, and Hawaii), we were able to predict aboveground carbon density estimated in field inventory plots using a single universal LiDAR model (r ( 2 ) = 0.80, RMSE = 27.6 Mg C ha(-1)). This model is comparable in predictive power to locally calibrated models, but relies on limited inputs of basal area and wood density information for a given region, rather than on traditional plot inventories. With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy. PMID:22033763

  12. Airborne Hyperspectral Survey of Afghanistan 2007: Flight Line Planning and HyMap Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, K. Eric

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data were acquired over Afghanistan with the HyMap imaging spectrometer (Cocks and others, 1998) operating on the WB-57 high altitude NASA research aircraft (http://jsc-aircraft-ops.jsc.nasa.gov/wb57/index.html). These data were acquired during the interval of August 22, 2007 to October 2, 2007, as part of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) project 'Oil and Gas Resources Assessment of the Katawaz and Helmand Basins'. A total of 218 flight lines of hyperspectral remote sensing data were collected over the country. This report describes the planning of the airborne survey and the flight lines that were flown. Included with this report are digital files of the nadir tracks of the flight lines, including a map of the labeled flight lines and corresponding vector shape files for geographic information systems (GIS).

  13. Mapping of traditional settlements by unmanned airborne vehicles towards architectural restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Skoutelis, Nikolaos; Tripolitsiotis, Achilleas; Tsatsarounos, Stelios; Tsitonaki, Anna; Zervos, Panagiotis

    2015-06-01

    Conservation and restoration of traditional settlements are amongst the actions that international directives proclaim in order to protect our cultural heritage. Towards this end, a mandatory base step in all archaeological and historical practices includes the surveying and mapping of the study area. Often, new, unexplored or abandoned settlements are considered, where dense vegetation, damaged structures and ruins, incorporation of newer structures and renovation characteristics make the precise surveying procedure a labor intensive and time consuming procedure. Unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) have been effectively incorporated into several cultural heritage projects mainly for mapping archeological sites. However, the majority of relevant publications lack of quantitative evaluation of their results and when such a validation is provided it is rather a procedural error estimation readily available from the software used, without independent ground truth verification. In this study, a low-cost custom-built hexacopter prototype was employed to deliver accurate mapping of the traditional settlement of Kamariotis in east Crete, Greece. The case of Kamariotis settlement included highly dense urban structures with continuous building forms, curved walls and missing terraces, while wild vegetation made classic geodetic surveying unfeasible. The resulting maps were qualitatively compared against the ones derived using Google Earth and the Greek Cadastral Orthophoto Viewing platforms to evaluate their applicability for architectural mapping. Moreover, the overall precision of the photogrammetric procedure was compared against geodetic surveying.

  14. How the fallout from Chernobyl was detected and measured in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial observations of the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden and Norway are described. Characterization and mapping of the fallout are given. Improving of reactor accident consequence modelling is treated

  15. Volumetric evolution of Surtsey, Iceland, from topographic maps and scanning airborne laser altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J.B.; Williams, R.S.; Frawley, J.J.; Krabill, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    The volumetric evolution of Surtsey has been estimated on the basis of digital elevation models derived from NASA scanning airborne laser altimeter surveys (20 July 1998), as well as digitized 1:5,000-scale topographic maps produced by the National Land Survey of Iceland and by Norrman. Subaerial volumes have been computed from co-registered digital elevation models (DEM's) from 6 July 1968, 11 July 1975, 16 July 1993, and 20 July 1998 (scanning airborne laser altimetry), as well as true surface area (above mean sea level). Our analysis suggests that the subaerial volume of Surtsey has been reduced from nearly 0.100 km3 on 6 July 1968 to 0.075 km3 on 20 July 1998. Linear regression analysis of the temporal evolution of Surtsey's subaerial volume indicates that most of its subaerial surface will be at or below mean sea-level by approximately 2100. This assumes a conservative estimate of continuation of the current pace of marine erosion and mass-wasting on the island, including the indurated core of the conduits of the Surtur I and Surtur II eruptive vents. If the conduits are relatively resistant to marine erosion they will become sea stacks after the rest of the island has become a submarine shoal, and some portions of the island could survive for centuries. The 20 July 1998 scanning laser altimeter surveys further indicate rapid enlargement of erosional canyons in the northeastern portion of the partial tephra ring associated with Surtur I. Continued airborne and eventually spaceborne topographic surveys of Surtsey are planned to refine the inter-annual change of its subaerial volume.

  16. Processing of airborne lidar bathymetry data for detailed sea floor mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulldahl, H. Michael

    2014-10-01

    Airborne bathymetric lidar has proven to be a valuable sensor for rapid and accurate sounding of shallow water areas. With advanced processing of the lidar data, detailed mapping of the sea floor with various objects and vegetation is possible. This mapping capability has a wide range of applications including detection of mine-like objects, mapping marine natural resources, and fish spawning areas, as well as supporting the fulfillment of national and international environmental monitoring directives. Although data sets collected by subsea systems give a high degree of credibility they can benefit from a combination with lidar for surveying and monitoring larger areas. With lidar-based sea floor maps containing information of substrate and attached vegetation, the field investigations become more efficient. Field data collection can be directed into selected areas and even focused to identification of specific targets detected in the lidar map. The purpose of this work is to describe the performance for detection and classification of sea floor objects and vegetation, for the lidar seeing through the water column. With both experimental and simulated data we examine the lidar signal characteristics depending on bottom depth, substrate type, and vegetation. The experimental evaluation is based on lidar data from field documented sites, where field data were taken from underwater video recordings. To be able to accurately extract the information from the received lidar signal, it is necessary to account for the air-water interface and the water medium. The information content is hidden in the lidar depth data, also referred to as point data, and also in the shape of the received lidar waveform. The returned lidar signal is affected by environmental factors such as bottom depth and water turbidity, as well as lidar system factors such as laser beam footprint size and sounding density.

  17. Individual Species Crown Mapping in Taman Rimba Ilmu, University Malaya Using Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaruzaman Jusoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Accurate, current and cost-effective individual standing tree data are required by forest management communities for use in forest inventory over large areas. Currently, most of the forest mapping process is done directly on the ground using many technique such as the bearing-distance and also the other technique that use the computer software as a support, such as Tree MapperTM. Instead of ground data collection and where there are difficulties in reaching the individual trees, hyper spectral remote sensing technology is the best option to map the tree positions. Approach: A novel approach to generating an individual tree crown mapping estimated for a lowland dipterocarp forest of Taman Rimba Ilmu, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur using an airborne hyperspatial (1 m2 ground resolution imager was presented. Results: A total of 297 individual tree crowns comprising of 83 Xylopia sp., 79 Ixonanthes sp., 56 Hevea sp., 15 Streblus elongates, 14 Pellacalyx sp., 12 Endospermum diadenum, 11 Macaranga gigantea, 10 Cratoxylum sp., 10 Cannarium sp. and 7 Ixonanthes icosandra were identified and delineated as individual polygons in a study area plot of 2 ha. Conclusion/Recommendations: It was found out that individual tree crowns in University Malaya can be detected and counted with reasonable field measured to image derived mapping accuracy of 98.65%. This study implied that acceptable individual tree crown classification maps and algometric equations relating diameter at breast height (dbh or crown area to biomass can be used to generate timber volume estimates with established crown-diameter-volume correlations.

  18. Mapping Urban Tree Canopy Cover Using Fused Airborne LIDAR and Satellite Imagery Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmehr, Ebadat G.; Amati, Marco; Fraser, Clive S.

    2016-06-01

    Urban green spaces, particularly urban trees, play a key role in enhancing the liveability of cities. The availability of accurate and up-to-date maps of tree canopy cover is important for sustainable development of urban green spaces. LiDAR point clouds are widely used for the mapping of buildings and trees, and several LiDAR point cloud classification techniques have been proposed for automatic mapping. However, the effectiveness of point cloud classification techniques for automated tree extraction from LiDAR data can be impacted to the point of failure by the complexity of tree canopy shapes in urban areas. Multispectral imagery, which provides complementary information to LiDAR data, can improve point cloud classification quality. This paper proposes a reliable method for the extraction of tree canopy cover from fused LiDAR point cloud and multispectral satellite imagery data. The proposed method initially associates each LiDAR point with spectral information from the co-registered satellite imagery data. It calculates the normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) value for each LiDAR point and corrects tree points which have been misclassified as buildings. Then, region growing of tree points, taking the NDVI value into account, is applied. Finally, the LiDAR points classified as tree points are utilised to generate a canopy cover map. The performance of the proposed tree canopy cover mapping method is experimentally evaluated on a data set of airborne LiDAR and WorldView 2 imagery covering a suburb in Melbourne, Australia.

  19. Temperature and emissivity separation and mineral mapping based on airborne TASI hyperspectral thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing; Yan, Bokun; Dong, Xinfeng; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Tian, Feng; Wang, Runsheng

    2015-08-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing (8-12 μm) (TIR) has great potential for geologic remote sensing studies. TIR has been successfully used for terrestrial and planetary geologic studies to map surface materials. However, the complexity of the physics and the lack of hyperspectral data make the studies under-investigated. A new generation of commercial hyperspectral infrared sensors, known as Thermal Airborne Spectrographic Imager (TASI), was used for image analysis and mineral mapping in this study. In this paper, a combined method integrating normalized emissivity method (NEM), ratio algorithm (RATIO) and maximum-minimum apparent emissivity difference (MMD), being applied in multispectral data, has been modified and used to determine whether this method is suitable for retrieving emissivity from TASI hyperspectral data. MODTRAN 4 has been used for the atmospheric correction. The retrieved emissivity spectra matched well with the field measured spectra except for bands 1, 2, and 32. Quartz, calcite, diopside/hedenbergite, hornblende and microcline have been mapped by the emissivity image. Mineral mapping results agree with the dominant minerals identified by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction and spectroscopic analyses of field samples. Both of the results indicated that the atmospheric correction method and the combined temperature-emissivitiy method are suitable for TASI image. Carbonate skarnization was first found in the study area by the spatial extent of diopside. Chemical analyses of the skarn samples determined that the Au content was 0.32-1.74 g/t, with an average Au content of 0.73 g/t. This information provides an important resource for prospecting for skarn type gold deposits. It is also suggested that TASI is suitable for prospect and deposit scale exploration.

  20. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, J.D., E-mail: jda@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Miles, J.C.H. [Health Protection Agency (HPA) - Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Young, M. [Geological Survey of Northern Ireland, Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, Colby House, Stranmillis Court, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5BJ, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air. - Research Highlights: {yields} A new radon map for Northern Ireland is derived from indoor radon and geology data. {yields} Linear regression used to map radon potential (RP) from airborne and soil data. {yields} Gamma-ray spectrometry estimated U is the most significant independent variable. {yields} RP maps based on separate models for distinct geological terrains are most effective. {yields} Under-prediction of RP may be caused by loss of radon from surface rocks and soils.

  1. Wide-Area Mapping of Forest with National Airborne Laser Scanning and Field Inventory Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, J.-M.; Ginzler, C.; Clivaz, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) remote sensing data are now available for entire countries such as Switzerland. Methods for the estimation of forest parameters from ALS have been intensively investigated in the past years. However, the implementation of a forest mapping workflow based on available data at a regional level still remains challenging. A case study was implemented in the Canton of Valais (Switzerland). The national ALS dataset and field data of the Swiss National Forest Inventory were used to calibrate estimation models for mean and maximum height, basal area, stem density, mean diameter and stem volume. When stratification was performed based on ALS acquisition settings and geographical criteria, satisfactory prediction models were obtained for volume (R2 = 0.61 with a root mean square error of 47 %) and basal area (respectively 0.51 and 45 %) while height variables had an error lower than 19%. This case study shows that the use of nationwide ALS and field datasets for forest resources mapping is cost efficient, but additional investigations are required to handle the limitations of the input data and optimize the accuracy.

  2. Implementation of Waveform Digitization In A Small Footprint, Airborne Lidar Topographic Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, R.; Crawford, M. M.; Liadsky, J.

    2004-12-01

    Accurate mapping is critical for applications ranging from geodesy, geomorphology, and forestry to urban planning and natural hazards monitoring. While airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) has had a revolutionary impact on three-dimensional imaging of the earth's surface, there is great potential for developing new capability by replacing the laser range and backscatter intensity information recorded by conventional lidar systems with full waveform digitization. The University of Texas at Austin (UT) owns and operates an Optech ALTM 1225, a small footprint lidar system. In response to an initiative from UT, Optech has developed a module which samples the analog waveform of a laser pulse and converts these samples into digital measurements. The waveform digitizer specifications include a 1-nanosecond sampling interval, 440 samples per return laser waveform (approximately 65 meters of vertical extent), and waveform digitization at the 25kHz laser pulse repetition rate. The digitizer also records the initial T0 pulse that starts the timing cycle. The digitizer unit is an independent module supported by a Pentium-4 computer, two hard drives, and a high-speed data recording system. The digitizer is integrated into the ALTM system so that both full waveform and the conventional first and last returns are recorded for each transmitted laser pulse. This unique capability allows for conventional lidar data to be directly compared to the full waveform. We present examples of full waveform lidar mapping over different environments and discuss future applications.

  3. The design and the development of a hyperspectral and multispectral airborne mapping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsevski, Pece V.; Gessler, Paul E.

    Flexible and cost-effective tools for rapid image acquisition and natural resource mapping are needed by land managers. This paper describes the hardware and software architecture of a low-cost system that can be deployed on a light aircraft for rapid data acquisition. The Hyperspectral and Multispectral Cameras for Airborne Mapping (HAMCAM) was designed and developed in the Geospatial Laboratory for Environmental Dynamics at the University of Idaho as a student-learning tool, and to enhance the existing curriculum currently offered. The system integrates a hyperspectral sensor with four multispectral cameras, an Inertial Navigation System (INS), a Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS)-capable Global Positioning System (GPS), a data acquisition computer, and custom software for running the sensors in a variety of different modes. The outputs include very high resolution imagery obtained in four adjustable visible and near-infrared bands from the multispectral imager. The hyperspectral sensor acquires 240 spectral bands along 2.7 nm intervals within the 445-900 nm range. The INS provides aircraft pitch, roll and yaw information for rapid geo-registration of the imagery. This paper will discuss the challenges associated with the development of the system and the integration of components and software for implementation of this system for natural resource management applications. In addition, sample imagery acquired by the sensor will be presented.

  4. Evaluating Sentinel-2 for Lakeshore Habitat Mapping Based on Airborne Hyperspectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Stratoulias

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of lakeshore ecosystems requires fine-scale information to account for the high biodiversity typically encountered in the land-water ecotone. Sentinel-2 is a satellite with high spatial and spectral resolution and improved revisiting frequency and is expected to have significant potential for habitat mapping and classification of complex lakeshore ecosystems. In this context, investigations of the capabilities of Sentinel-2 in regard to the spatial and spectral dimensions are needed to assess its potential and the quality of the expected output. This study presents the first simulation of the high spatial resolution (i.e., 10 m and 20 m bands of Sentinel-2 for lakeshore mapping, based on the satellite’s Spectral Response Function and hyperspectral airborne data collected over Lake Balaton, Hungary in August 2010. A comparison of supervised classifications of the simulated products is presented and the information loss from spectral aggregation and spatial upscaling in the context of lakeshore vegetation classification is discussed. We conclude that Sentinel-2 imagery has a strong potential for monitoring fine-scale habitats, such as reed beds.

  5. Canopy Gap Mapping from Airborne Laser Scanning: An Assessment of the Positional and Geometrical Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Bonnet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Canopy gaps are small-scale openings in forest canopies which offer suitable micro-climatic conditions for tree regeneration. Field mapping of gaps is complex and time-consuming. Several studies have used Canopy Height Models (CHM derived from airborne laser scanning (ALS to delineate gaps but limited accuracy assessment has been carried out, especially regarding the gap geometry. In this study, we investigate three mapping methods based on raster layers produced from ALS leaf-off and leaf-on datasets: thresholding, per-pixel and per-object supervised classifications with Random Forest. In addition to the CHM, other metrics related to the canopy porosity are tested. The gap detection is good, with a global accuracy up to 82% and consumer’s accuracy often exceeding 90%. The Geometric Accuracy (GAc was analyzed with the gap area, main orientation, gap shape-complexity index and a quantitative assessment index of the matching with reference gaps polygons. The GAc assessment shows difficulties in identifying a method which properly delineates gaps. The performance of CHM-based thresholding was exceeded by that of other methods, especially thresholding of canopy porosity rasters and the per-pixel supervised classification. Beyond assessing the methods performance, we argue the critical need for future ALS-based gap studies to consider the geometric accuracy of results.

  6. Mapping Forest Species Composition Using Imaging Spectrometry and Airborne Laser Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabzadeh, H.; Morsdorf, F.; Leiterer, R.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mapping of forest species composition is an important aspect of monitoring and management planning related to ecosystem functions and services associated with water refinement, carbon sequestration, biodiversity, and wildlife habitats. Although different vegetation species often have unique spectral signatures, mapping based on spectral reflectance properties alone is often an ill-posed problem, since the spectral signature is as well influenced by age, canopy gaps, shadows and background characteristics. Thus, reducing the unknown variation by knowing the structural parameters of different species should improve determination procedures. In this study we combine imaging spectrometry (IS) and airborne laser scanning (ALS) data of a mixed needle and broadleaf forest to differentiate tree species more accurately as single-instrument data could do. Since forest inventory data in dense forests involve uncertainties, we tried to refine them by using individual tree crowns (ITC) position and shape, which derived from ALS data. Comparison of the extracted spectra from original field data and the modified one shows how ALS-derived shape and position of ITCs can improve separablity of the different species. The spatially explicit information layers containing both the spectral and structural components from the IS and ALS datasets were then combined by using a non-parametric support vector machine (SVM) classifier.

  7. The use of airborne electromagnetic for efficient mapping of salt water intrusion and outflow to the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Kirkegaard, Casper; Ribeiro, Joana;

    2010-01-01

    not only the salt-fresh water boundary in the coastal zone, but also the mixing of fresh-salt-water on the seaside. Even freshwater layers under several meters of brackish water can be mapped. Sufficient depth of investigation is obtained by time domain methods as they have a significant higher......Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) is an efficient tool for mapping groundwater resources in sedimentary environments. AEM delivers a very high data coverage and results in high-resolution electrical images of the subsurface. In particular the time domain methods (TEM) are well suited for mapping o0f...

  8. Mapping the Risk of Forest Wind Damage Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, N.; Vastaranta, M.; Honkavaara, E.; Wulder, M. A.; White, J. C.; Litkey, P.; Holopainen, M.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Wind damage is known for causing threats to sustainable forest management and yield value in boreal forests. Information about wind damage risk can aid forest managers in understanding and possibly mitigating damage impacts. The objective of this research was to better understand and quantify drivers of wind damage, and to map the probability of wind damage. To accomplish this, we used open-access airborne scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. The probability of wind-induced forest damage (PDAM) in southern Finland (61°N, 23°E) was modelled for a 173 km2 study area of mainly managed boreal forests (dominated by Norway spruce and Scots pine) and agricultural fields. Wind damage occurred in the study area in December 2011. LiDAR data were acquired prior to the damage in 2008. High spatial resolution aerial imagery, acquired after the damage event (January, 2012) provided a source of model calibration via expert interpretation. A systematic grid (16 m x 16 m) was established and 430 sample grid cells were identified systematically and classified as damaged or undamaged based on visual interpretation using the aerial images. Potential drivers associated with PDAM were examined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Risk model predictors were extracted from the LiDAR-derived surface models. Geographic information systems (GIS) supported spatial mapping and identification of areas of high PDAM across the study area. The risk model based on LiDAR data provided good agreement with detected risk areas (73 % with kappa-value 0,47). The strongest predictors in the risk model were mean canopy height and mean elevation. Our results indicate that open-access LiDAR data sets can be used to map the probability of wind damage risk without field data, providing valuable information for forest management planning.

  9. Application of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry to geological mapping, mineral exploration and land-use planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data are used to support regional and details bedrock and surficial geological mapping, mineral exploration for a variety of mineral deposit types, environmental radiation monitoring and land-use planning. Recent case histories developed by the Geological Survey of Canada describe the use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry to map composite igneous intrusions and mixed igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary terranes, with varying proportions of glacial overburden, soil moisture, surface wetness and vegetation cover. Other case histories show that potassium alteration associated with volcanic-hosted massive sulphide, polymetallic, magmatic-hydrothermal vein, and porphyry mineralization can be distinguished, relative to normal lithological radioelement signatures, by characteristic eTh/K ratio lows. These examples show that effective interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data must include all airborne variables and incorporate ground spectrometry, superficial and bedrock geochemistry and petrology. This information compliments magnetic, electromagnetic, geological and conventional geochemical data often collected during regional geoscience and mineral exploration programs. (author)

  10. A complex geo-scientific strategy for landslide hazard mitigation ─ from airborne mapping to ground monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaritz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available After a large landslide event in Sibratsgfäll/Austria several exploration methods were evaluated on their applicability to investigate and monitor landslide areas. The resulting optimised strategy consists of the combined application of airborne electromagnetics, ground geoelectrical measurements and geoelectrical monitoring combined with hydrological and geological mapping and geotechnical modelling. Interdisciplinary communication and discussion was the primary key to assess this complicated hazard situation.

  11. Semi-automatic mapping of cultural heritage from airborne laser scanning using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due Trier, Øivind; Salberg, Arnt-Børre; Holger Pilø, Lars; Tonning, Christer; Marius Johansen, Hans; Aarsten, Dagrun

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes to use deep learning to improve semi-automatic mapping of cultural heritage from airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. Automatic detection methods, based on traditional pattern recognition, have been applied in a number of cultural heritage mapping projects in Norway for the past five years. Automatic detection of pits and heaps have been combined with visual interpretation of the ALS data for the mapping of deer hunting systems, iron production sites, grave mounds and charcoal kilns. However, the performance of the automatic detection methods varies substantially between ALS datasets. For the mapping of deer hunting systems on flat gravel and sand sediment deposits, the automatic detection results were almost perfect. However, some false detections appeared in the terrain outside of the sediment deposits. These could be explained by other pit-like landscape features, like parts of river courses, spaces between boulders, and modern terrain modifications. However, these were easy to spot during visual interpretation, and the number of missed individual pitfall traps was still low. For the mapping of grave mounds, the automatic method produced a large number of false detections, reducing the usefulness of the semi-automatic approach. The mound structure is a very common natural terrain feature, and the grave mounds are less distinct in shape than the pitfall traps. Still, applying automatic mound detection on an entire municipality did lead to a new discovery of an Iron Age grave field with more than 15 individual mounds. Automatic mound detection also proved to be useful for a detailed re-mapping of Norway's largest Iron Age grave yard, which contains almost 1000 individual graves. Combined pit and mound detection has been applied to the mapping of more than 1000 charcoal kilns that were used by an iron work 350-200 years ago. The majority of charcoal kilns were indirectly detected as either pits on the circumference, a central mound, or both

  12. Analysis of airborne LiDAR as a basis for digital soil mapping in Alpine areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringer, K.; Tusch, M.; Geitner, C.; Meißl, G.; Rutzinger, M.

    2009-04-01

    Especially in mountainous regions like the Alps the formation of soil is highly influenced by relief characteristics. Among all factors included in Jenny's (1941) model for soil development, relief is the one most commonly used in approaches to create digital soil maps and to derive soil properties from secondary data sources (McBratney et al. 2003). Elevation data, first order (slope, aspect) and second order derivates (plan, profile and cross-sectional curvature) as well as complex morphometric parameters (various landform classifications, e.g., Wood 1996) and compound indices (e.g., topographic wetness indices, vertical distance to drainage network, insolation) can be calculated from digital elevation models (DEM). However, while being an important source of information for digital soil mapping on small map scales, "conventional" DEMs are of limited use for the design of large scale conceptual soil maps for small areas due to rather coarse raster resolutions with cell sizes ranging from 20 to 100 meters. Slight variations in elevation and small landform features might not be discernible even though they might have a significant effect to soil formation, e.g., regarding the influence of groundwater in alluvial soils or the extent of alluvial fans. Nowadays, Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) provides highly accurate data for the elaboration of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTM) even in forested areas. In the project LASBO (Laserscanning in der Bodenkartierung) the applicability of digital terrain models derived from LiDAR for the identification of soil-relevant geomorphometric parameter is investigated. Various algorithms which were initially designed for coarser raster data are applied on high-resolution DTMs. Test areas for LASBO are located in the region of Bruneck (Italy) and near the municipality of Kramsach in the Inn Valley (Austria). The freely available DTM for Bruneck has a raster resolution of 2.5 meters while in Kramsach a DTM with

  13. Using High-Resolution Airborne LiDAR-Data for Landslide Mapping in the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, N.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing frequency of natural disasters like floods and landslides, the active remote sensing technique LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), has become a topic of great interest to the Federal State Government of Styria, Federal Republic of Austria. In a perennial project from 2008 to 2012 high-resolution 3D Airborne LiDAR Data of the Province of Styria, an area about 16.000km2 in south-eastern Austria were collected. These data were processed to create Digital Terrain Models (DTM) and Digital Surface Models (DSM) at 1m resolution with a vertical accuracy of 15 [cm] and a positional accuracy of 40 [cm]. High resolution DTMs can be used in different geo-related applications like geomorphological mapping or natural hazard mapping. DTMs show because of its high accuracy various natural and anthropogenic terrain features such as erosion scarps, alluvial fans, landslides, old creeks, topographic edges and karstforms, as well as walking paths and roads and in addition to that LiDAR data allows the detection and outlining of these different geomorphological and anthropogenic features with the help of ArcGIS 10 geoprocessing and analysing techniques, mathematical, statistical and image processing methods and the open source scripting language Python. As a result complex workflows and new geoprocessing tools can be implemented in an ArcGIS 10 workspace and are provided as easy to use toolbox contents. The landslide phenomena take in centre stage of the research work of the author. Thereby the main focus is targeted on sliding movements out of soils and bedrock. Factors like gravity take effect on slope stability directly and cause complex mass movements with a downslope directed, gliding movement of bed- and/or loose-rock as well as soil material. In this paper the author presents the result of her master thesis, an automatic ArcGIS 10 landslide mapping tool using high-resolution LiDAR data in the rock masses of the Eastern Alps (Province of Styria, Austria

  14. Mapping of macro and micro nutrients of mixed pastures using airborne AisaFENIX hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Yule, I. J.

    2016-07-01

    On-farm assessment of mixed pasture nutrient concentrations is important for animal production and pasture management. Hyperspectral imaging is recognized as a potential tool to quantify the nutrient content of vegetation. However, it is a great challenge to estimate macro and micro nutrients in heterogeneous mixed pastures. In this study, canopy reflectance data was measured by using a high resolution airborne visible-to-shortwave infrared (Vis-SWIR) imaging spectrometer measuring in the wavelength region 380-2500 nm to predict nutrient concentrations, nitrogen (N) phosphorus (P), potassium (K), sulfur (S), zinc (Zn), sodium (Na), manganese (Mn) copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) in heterogeneous mixed pastures across a sheep and beef farm in hill country, within New Zealand. Prediction models were developed using four different methods which are included partial least squares regression (PLSR), kernel PLSR, support vector regression (SVR), random forest regression (RFR) algorithms and their performance compared using the test data. The results from the study revealed that RFR produced highest accuracy (0.55 ⩽ R2CV ⩽ 0.78; 6.68% ⩽ nRMSECV ⩽ 26.47%) compared to all other algorithms for the majority of nutrients (N, P, K, Zn, Na, Cu and Mg) described, and the remaining nutrients (S and Mn) were predicted with high accuracy (0.68 ⩽ R2CV ⩽ 0.86; 13.00% ⩽ nRMSECV ⩽ 14.64%) using SVR. The best training models were used to extrapolate over the whole farm with the purpose of predicting those pasture nutrients and expressed through pixel based spatial maps. These spatially registered nutrient maps demonstrate the range and geographical location of often large differences in pasture nutrient values which are normally not measured and therefore not included in decision making when considering more effective ways to utilized pasture.

  15. Use of airborne multispectral scanner data to map alteration related to roll-front uranium migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer-enhanced airborne multispectral scanner (MSS) images have been used to detect and map red oxidized alteration related to roll-front uranium migration in the southern Powder River basin, Wyoming. Information in the 0.4- to 1.1-μm spectral region was used to produce a color ratio composite image, upon which the red-altered areas can be differentiated. The red-altered and incipiently altered sandstones result from the migration of a roll-front (or geochemical cell) through the sandstone in the direction of the hydrologic gradient. Most uranium deposits in the Powder River basin occur at the boundary between this oxidized sandstone and reduced sandstone. Therefore, the ability to detect and map this alteration reliably can provide important information about the potential for uranium mineralization down gradient from the altered areas, at the surface in an area of interest. Spectral reflectance studies indicate that a shift in the absorption band edge from 0.52 μm (for goethitic sandstone) to 0.58 μm (for hematitic sandstone) and an intensification of an absorption band at 0.85 μm (for hematitic sandstone) are the bases for identifying the red-altered sandstone as green anomalous areas on the color ratio composite image. Some of the incipiently altered sandstone also appears green, whereas unaltered material and white-altered sandstone appear as blue to cyan colors. Therefore, the composite image is useful in discriminating hematitic sandstone from goethitic sandstone. At high densities (>65%), vegetation masks the sandstones on the color ratio composite image. Artemisia tridentata (sage) and Stipa comata (grass) are the species that have the greatest individual effect on the image

  16. Preliminary geoid mapping results by Fugro's improved Micro-g LaCoste turnkey airborne gravity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, D.; Kingdon, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Micro-g LaCoste Turnkey Airborne Gravity System (TAGS) with Fugro's improved gravity processing and geoid modeling software package for regional gravity field mapping and geoid determination. Three test areas with different topographic characteristics under the Gravity for the Redefinition of the AmericanVertical Datum (GRAV-D) project of theUSNOAA National Geodetic Surveys (NGS) were used for case studies and determine the available accuracy of the system. The preliminary results of all these test cases show that the system with Fugro's improved gravity and geoid processing software package is able to achieve a comparable geoid mapping result to traditional terrestrial methods.

  17. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; Koenig, Kristina; Groom, Geoff; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about the magnitude of localised flooding of riverine areas is crucial for appropriate land management and administration at regional and local levels. However, detection and delineation of localised flooding with remote sensing techniques are often hampered on floodplains by the presence of herbaceous vegetation. To address this problem, this study presents the application of full-waveform airborne laser scanning (ALS) data for detection of floodwater extent. In general, water surfaces are characterised by low values of backscattered energy due to water absorption of the infrared laser shots, but the exact strength of the recorded laser pulse depends on the area covered by the targets located within a laser pulse footprint area. To account for this we analysed the physical quantity of radiometrically calibrated ALS data, the backscattering coefficient, in relation to water and vegetation coverage within a single laser footprint. The results showed that the backscatter was negatively correlated to water coverage, and that of the three distinguished classes of water coverage (low, medium, and high) only the class with the largest extent of water cover (>70%) had relatively distinct characteristics that can be used for classification of water surfaces. Following the laser footprint analysis, three classifiers, namely AdaBoost with Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, were utilised to classify laser points into flooded and non-flooded classes and to derive the map of flooding extent. The performance of the classifiers is highly dependent on the set of laser points features used. Best performance was achieved by combining radiometric and geometric laser point features. The accuracy of flooding maps based solely on radiometric features resulted in overall accuracies of up to 70% and was limited due to the overlap of the backscattering coefficient values between water and other land cover classes. Our point-based classification methods assure a high

  18. Performance metrics for state-of-the-art airborne magnetic and electromagnetic systems for mapping and detection of unexploded ordnance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, William E.; Bell, David T.; Gamey, T. Jeffrey; Beard, Les P.; Sheehan, Jacob R.; Norton, Jeannemarie

    2010-04-01

    Over the past decade, notable progress has been made in the performance of airborne geophysical systems for mapping and detection of unexploded ordnance in terrestrial and shallow marine environments. For magnetometer systems, the most significant improvements include development of denser magnetometer arrays and vertical gradiometer configurations. In prototype analyses and recent Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) assessments using new production systems the greatest sensitivity has been achieved with a vertical gradiometer configuration, despite model-based survey design results which suggest that dense total-field arrays would be superior. As effective as magnetometer systems have proven to be at many sites, they are inadequate at sites where basalts and other ferrous geologic formations or soils produce anomalies that approach or exceed those of target ordnance items. Additionally, magnetometer systems are ineffective where detection of non-ferrous ordnance items is of primary concern. Recent completion of the Battelle TEM-8 airborne time-domain electromagnetic system represents the culmination of nearly nine years of assessment and development of airborne electromagnetic systems for UXO mapping and detection. A recent ESTCP demonstration of this system in New Mexico showed that it was able to detect 99% of blind-seeded ordnance items, 81mm and larger, and that it could be used to map in detail a bombing target on a basalt flow where previous airborne magnetometer surveys had failed. The probability of detection for the TEM-8 in the blind-seeded study area was better than that reported for a dense-array total-field magnetometer demonstration of the same blind-seeded site, and the TEM-8 system successfully detected these items with less than half as many anomaly picks as the dense-array total-field magnetometer system.

  19. Probabilistic change mapping from airborne LiDAR for post-disaster damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalobeanu, A.; Runyon, S. C.; Kruse, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    When both pre- and post-event LiDAR point clouds are available, change detection can be performed to identify areas that were most affected by a disaster event, and to obtain a map of quantitative changes in terms of height differences. In the case of earthquakes in built-up areas for instance, first responders can use a LiDAR change map to help prioritize search and recovery efforts. The main challenge consists of producing reliable change maps, robust to collection conditions, free of processing artifacts (due for instance to triangulation or gridding), and taking into account the various sources of uncertainty. Indeed, datasets acquired within a few years interval are often of different point density (sometimes an order of magnitude higher for recent data), different acquisition geometries, and very likely suffer from georeferencing errors and geometric discrepancies. All these differences might not be important for producing maps from each dataset separately, but they are crucial when performing change detection. We have developed a novel technique for the estimation of uncertainty maps from the LiDAR point clouds, using Bayesian inference, treating all variables as random. The main principle is to grid all points on a common grid before attempting any comparison, as working directly with point clouds is cumbersome and time consuming. A non-parametric approach based on local linear regression was implemented, assuming a locally linear model for the surface. This enabled us to derive error bars on gridded elevations, and then elevation differences. In this way, a map of statistically significant changes could be computed - whereas a deterministic approach would not allow testing of the significance of differences between the two datasets. This approach allowed us to take into account not only the observation noise (due to ranging, position and attitude errors) but also the intrinsic roughness of the observed surfaces occurring when scanning vegetation. As only

  20. Radioecology of fallout cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title subject is discussed mainly on findings of radiocesium (rCs) from 3 aspects of the radionuclide fallout and its spread thereafter, the primary and secondary contamination of the food chain leading to man, and the concept of decontamination by isolation of radionuclides. Japanese ecosystem has undergone the wide and complicated contamination with global fallouts mainly by nuclear tests in the atmosphere (1950-1970), Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents (1986 and 2011, respectively). rCs in the fallouts, having the long half time, is heterogeneously spread in the forest, farmland, rivers and lakes, seaweeds, animals, soils and water. In Fukushima, rCs contamination is conceivably over its transiently elevated early phase from fallout, sea/river water and land soil to plant including vegetables and fruit trees and animals like fishes, livestock and wild ones. Ecological half life of rCs derived from Chernobyl fallout in England is reportedly 1-4 years during the first five years, and thereafter, 6-30 years due to its environmental circulation within the ecosystem. For ambient dose of rCs, water and soil can be a shield of its gamma ray in the ecosystem. It is essential to understand the dynamics of rCs in the ecosystem for environmental restoration from the contamination in order to maintain the safe and reassured human life through dietary/active living. The present method of decontamination in the ecosystem essentially stands on the transfer of radionuclides, but should do on their isolation, of which approach must be searched for. (T.T.)

  1. Probabilistic topographic maps from raw, full-waveform airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalobeanu, A.; Gonçalves, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The main goal of the AutoProbaDTM project is to derive new methodologies to measure the topography and terrain characteristics using the latest full-waveform airborne LiDAR technology. It includes algorithmic development, implementation, and validation over a large test area. In the long run, we wish to develop techniques that are scalable and applicable to future satellite missions such as LIST (NASA Decadal Survey), to help perform efficient and accurate large-scale mapping. One of the biggest challenges is to develop fast ways to process huge volumes of raw data without compromising the accuracy and the physical consistency of the result. Over the past decades, significant progress has been made in digital elevation model (DEM) extraction and user interaction has been much reduced, however most algorithms are still supervised. Topographic surveys currently play a central role in sensor calibration and full automation is still an unsolved problem. Moreover, very few existing methods are currently able to propose a quantitative error map with the reconstructed DEM. Traditional validation and quality control only allow to check the discrepancy between the product and a set of reference points, lacking the ability to predict the actual uncertainty related to elevations at chosen locations. We plan to provide fast and automated techniques to derive topographic maps and to compute error maps as well, based on a probabilistic approach to modeling terrains and data acquisition, solving inverse problems and handling uncertainty. Bayesian inference provides a rigorous framework for model reconstruction and error propagation, treating all quantities as random, and combining sources of information optimally. In the future, the uncertainty maps shall help scientists put error bars on quantities derived from the models. In June 2011, 200 km2 of data were acquired (100 GB of binary files, half a billion waveforms) in central Portugal, over an area of geomorphological and

  2. Mapping Natura 2000 Habitat Conservation Status in a Pannonic Salt Steppe with Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Zlinszky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Natura 2000 Habitat Conservation Status is currently evaluated based on fieldwork. However, this is proving to be unfeasible over large areas. The use of remote sensing is increasingly encouraged but covering the full range of ecological variables by such datasets and ensuring compatibility with the traditional assessment methodology has not been achieved yet. We aimed to test Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS as a source for mapping all variables required by the local official conservation status assessment scheme and to develop an automated method that calculates Natura 2000 conservation status at 0.5 m raster resolution for 24 km2 of Pannonic Salt Steppe habitat (code 1530. We used multi-temporal (summer and winter ALS point clouds with full-waveform recording and a density of 10 pt/m2. Some required variables were derived from ALS product rasters; others involved vegetation classification layers calculated by machine learning and fuzzy categorization. Thresholds separating favorable and unfavorable values of each variable required by the national assessment scheme were manually calibrated from 10 plots where field-based assessment was carried out. Rasters representing positive and negative scores for each input variable were integrated in a ruleset that exactly follows the Hungarian Natura 2000 assessment scheme for grasslands. Accuracy of each parameter and the final conservation status score and category was evaluated by 10 independent assessment plots. We conclude that ALS is a suitable data source for Natura 2000 assessments in grasslands, and that the national grassland assessment scheme can successfully be used as a GIS processing model for conservation status, ensuring that the output is directly comparable with traditional field based assessments.

  3. Mapping Forest Cover and Forest Cover Change with Airborne S-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Ningthoujam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of forest cover, forest carbon stocks and carbon emissions from deforestation and degradation are increasingly important components of sustainable resource management, for combating biodiversity loss and in climate mitigation policies. Satellite remote sensing provides the only means for mapping global forest cover regularly. However, forest classification with optical data is limited by its insensitivity to three-dimensional canopy structure and cloud cover obscuring many forest regions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR sensors are increasingly being used to mitigate these problems, mainly in the L-, C- and X-band domains of the electromagnetic spectrum. S-band has not been systematically studied for this purpose. In anticipation of the British built NovaSAR-S satellite mission, this study evaluates the benefits of polarimetric S-band SAR for forest characterisation. The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS-I radiative transfer model is utilised to understand the scattering mechanisms in forest canopies at S-band. The MIMICS-I model reveals strong S-band backscatter sensitivity to the forest canopy in comparison to soil characteristics across all polarisations and incidence angles. Airborne S-band SAR imagery over the temperate mixed forest of Savernake Forest in southern England is analysed for its information content. Based on the modelling results, S-band HH- and VV-polarisation radar backscatter and the Radar Forest Degradation Index (RFDI are used in a forest/non-forest Maximum Likelihood classification at a spatial resolution of 6 m (70% overall accuracy, κ = 0.41 and 20 m (63% overall accuracy, κ = 0.27. The conclusion is that S-band SAR such as from NovaSAR-S is likely to be suitable for monitoring forest cover and its changes.

  4. Weekly LiDAR snow depth mapping for operational snow hydrology - the NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; McGurk, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Operational hydrologic simulation and forecasting in snowmelt-dominated watersheds currently relies on indices of snow accumulation and melt from measurements at a small number of point locations or geographically-limited manual surveys. These data sources cannot adequately characterize the spatial distribution of snow depth/water equivalent, which is the primary determinant of snowpack volume and runoff rates. The NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory's airborne laser scanning system maps snow depth at high spatial and temporal resolutions, providing an unprecedented snowpack monitoring capability and enabling a new operational paradigm. In the Spring of 2013, the ASO mapped snow depth in the Tuolumne River Basin in California's Yosemite National Park on a nominally weekly basis, and provided fast-turnaround spatial snow depth and water equivalent maps to the operators of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the water supply for 2.5 million people on the San Francisco peninsula. These products enabled more accurate runoff simulation and optimal reservoir management in a year of very low snow accumulation. We present the initial results from this new application of multi-temporal LiDAR mapping in operational snow hydrology.

  5. Airborne Multispectral LIDAR Data for Land-Cover Classification and Land/water Mapping Using Different Spectral Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, S.; Shaker, A.; El-Rabbany, A.; LaRocque, P. E.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data is widely used in remote sensing applications, such as topographic and landwater mapping. Recently, airborne multispectral LiDAR sensors, which acquire data at different wavelengths, are available, thus allows recording a diversity of intensity values from different land features. In this study, three normalized difference feature indexes (NDFI), for vegetation, water, and built-up area mapping, were evaluated. The NDFIs namely, NDFIG-NIR, NDFIG-MIR, and NDFINIR-MIR were calculated using data collected at three wavelengths; green: 532 nm, near-infrared (NIR): 1064 nm, and mid-infrared (MIR): 1550 nm by the world's first airborne multispectral LiDAR sensor "Optech Titan". The Jenks natural breaks optimization method was used to determine the threshold values for each NDFI, in order to cluster the 3D point data into two classes (water and land or vegetation and built-up area). Two sites at Scarborough, Ontario, Canada were tested to evaluate the performance of the NDFIs for land-water, vegetation, and built-up area mapping. The use of the three NDFIs succeeded to discriminate vegetation from built-up areas with an overall accuracy of 92.51%. Based on the classification results, it is suggested to use NDFIG-MIR and NDFINIR-MIR for vegetation and built-up areas extraction, respectively. The clustering results show that the direct use of NDFIs for land-water mapping has low performance. Therefore, the clustered classes, based on the NDFIs, are constrained by the recorded number of returns from different wavelengths, thus the overall accuracy is improved to 96.98%.

  6. Mapping, Assessment and Analysis of Large-Scale Landslides Based on Airborne LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    In the context of the integrated risk management of the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control (WLV) large-scale landslides - per definition only areas larger than 10 ha - were mapped in a study area in the South of Innsbruck/Tyrol. The large-scale landslides to be identified are mostly very slow and deep-seated including complex processes like mountain slope deformations ("Talzuschübe"). The mapping method for the first time developed in this study is based on hillshades of high-resolution airborne LIDAR data which recently has been made nearly nationwide available for Austria. These data have the advantage faced with other remote-sensing data like orthophotos that dense and high vegetation and other distracting objects on the ground are eliminated. This guarantees everywhere a high visibility of the terrain surface which is very helpful for the detection of landslides. These aspects allowed developing a new systematic approach for the identification and rough classification of large-scale landslides according to their activity. Using an iterative comparison of first results with other existing methods and field observations the methodology was developed as objective as possible. For this reason these landslides are divided in four distinct segments showing typical characteristics like double ridges or a surface of rupture. According to the characteristics and to the importance of these four segments all detected landslides are then assigned to one of the four classes of activity: "active", "likely active", "inactive" or "possibly inactive". Using this method, large-scale landslides were identified in 26 % of the entire study area. The major part of these landslides (65 %) is supposed to be "inactive" and only 0.5 % are classified as "active". In addition some analyses in the context of natural hazard research were carried out to interpret the quantitative occurrence and spatial distribution of the mapped landslides. Glacial overdeepening in valleys

  7. Merging LANDSAT TM and airborne SAR for generating maps of Louisiana's coastal zone to facilitate oil spill cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollution from oil spills is an ever present risk in coastal areas. The risk increases as oil and gas exploration, extraction and transportation expands with demands for energy by a growing population and increasing standards of living. Up-to-date maps of the areas at risk will help facilitate oil spill cleanup and reduce environmental damage. In the study described here, recently acquired LANDSAT TM and airborne X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) were used to evaluate techniques to generate accurate and up-to-date image-based maps suitable for use by field personnel in preparation for, during and following an oil spill. Selection of the study area, selection of the LANDSAT TM data and bands, the importance of SAR data, image processing and merging techniques, selection procedures for the best image-based maps, evaluation of the merged images, and problems encountered during the study were discussed

  8. Defining and Verifying Research Grade Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, C. C.

    2004-12-01

    The first and primary goal of the National Science Foundation (NSF) supported Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), operated jointly by the University of Florida and the University of California, Berkeley, is to make "research grade" ALSM data widely available at affordable cost to the national scientific community. Cost aside, researchers need to know what NCALM considers research grade data and how the quality of the data is verified, to be able to determine the likelihood that the data they receive will meet their project specific requirements. Given the current state of the technology it is reasonable to expect a well planned and executed survey to produce surface elevations with uncertainties less than 10 centimeters and horizontal uncertainties of a few decimeters. Various components of the total error are generally associated with the aircraft trajectory, aircraft orientation, or laser vectors. Aircraft trajectory error is dependent largely on the Global Positioning System (GPS) observations, aircraft orientation on Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) observations, and laser vectors on the scanning and ranging instrumentation. In addition to the issue of the precision or accuracy of the coordinates of the surface points, consideration must also be given to the point-to-point spacing and voids in the coverage. The major sources of error produce distinct artifacts in the data set. For example, aircraft trajectory errors tend to change slowly as the satellite constellation geometry varies, producing slopes within swaths and offsets between swaths. Roll, pitch and yaw biases in the IMU observations tend to persist through whole flights, and created distinctive artifacts in the swath overlap areas. Errors in the zero-point and scale of the laser scanner cause the edges of swaths to turn up or down. Range walk errors cause offsets between bright and dark surfaces, causing paint stripes to float above the dark surfaces of roads. The three keys to producing

  9. Airborne geophysical mapping as an innovative methodology for landslide investigation: evaluation of results from the Gschliefgraben landslide, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Supper

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In September 2009, a complex airborne geophysical survey was performed in the large landslide affected area of the Gschliefgraben valley, Upper Austria, in order to evaluate the usability of this method for landslide detection and mapping. An evaluation of the results, including different remote sensing and ground based methods, proved that airborne geophysics, especially the airborne electromagnetic method, has a high potential for landslide investigation. This is due to its sensitivity to fluid and clay content and porosity, which are parameters showing characteristic values in landslide prone structures. Resistivity distributions in different depth levels as well as depth-slices along selected profiles are presented and compared with ground geoelectrical profiles for the test area of Gschliefgraben. Further interesting results can be derived from the radiometric survey, whereas the naturally occurring radioisotopes 40K and 232Th, as well as the man-made nuclide 137Cs have been considered. While the content of potassium and thorium in the shallow subsurface layer is expressively related to the lithological composition, the distribution of caesium is mainly determined by mass wasting processes.

  10. The use of airborne radiometric and exploration survey data and techniques in radon risk mapping in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of Swedish maps for the purpose of showing radon risk at different locations was initiated in Sweden in 1979. The Swedish Radon Commission, working in co-operation with the National Radiation Protection Institute and the Board for Urban Planning and Building, commissioned the Geological Survey of Sweden to produce maps of all areas in which the gamma radiation from the ground surface or in the ground were known to exceed 30 μR/h and of areas at risk of exceeding that level. The bases for the maps were existing geological and geophysical maps and other data. In 1981, we learned that the 30 μR/h level was a crude measure of the risk of radon in dwellings. Actually, there are buildings with high indoor radon levels built on nearly every type of ground, except on soils and bedrock with very low uranium content. A new type of map, Radon Risk Map, was developed. These maps show areas of high radon risk, normal risk and low risk. High risk areas are those where radon concentration in soil air is known to or can be expected to exceed 50,000 Bq/m3. Radon risk maps covering 65% of Sweden have now been produced. According to the Swedish Building Code, a radon investigation of a building site must be made before construction starts. To a large extent, the Radon Risk Maps are compiled from data based on gamma ray spectrometric airborne surveys and information obtained from uranium exploration surveys. In field investigations for radon risk mapping and detailed site investigations, gamma measurements, gamma ray spectrometric and radon measurements are used. The measurements are made using technology and instruments once developed for uranium exploration. (author). 10 refs, 13 figs, 4 tabs

  11. Forest biomass estimation by the use of airborne laser scanning data and in situ FieldMap measurements in a spruce forest stand

    OpenAIRE

    Petrila, Marius; Apostol, Bogdan; Lorenţ, Adrian; Gancz, Vladimir; Silaghi, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyze the possibility of stand biomass evaluation based on biometric measurements from airborne laser scanning data in a spruce forest test area. Data fusion of airborne laser scanning, and aerial orthoimagery (0.5 m spatial resolution), as well as the use of FieldMap equipment in the measurement of reference data in sampling plots makes it possible to estimate different stand parameters. An important stage of height evaluation in the spruce test a...

  12. Regional Scale Rain-Forest Height Mapping Using Regression-Kriging of Spaceborne and Airborne LiDAR Data: Application on French Guiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Fayad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available LiDAR data has been successfully used to estimate forest parameters such as canopy heights and biomass. Major limitation of LiDAR systems (airborne and spaceborne arises from their limited spatial coverage. In this study, we present a technique for canopy height mapping using airborne and spaceborne LiDAR data (from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS. First, canopy heights extracted from both airborne and spaceborne LiDAR were extrapolated from available environmental data. The estimated canopy height maps using Random Forest (RF regression from airborne or GLAS calibration datasets showed similar precisions (~6 m. To improve the precision of canopy height estimates, regression-kriging was used. Results indicated an improvement in terms of root mean square error (RMSE, from 6.5 to 4.2 m using the GLAS dataset, and from 5.8 to 1.8 m using the airborne LiDAR dataset. Finally, in order to investigate the impact of the spatial sampling of future LiDAR missions on canopy height estimates precision, six subsets were derived from the initial airborne LiDAR dataset. Results indicated that using the regression-kriging approach a precision of 1.8 m on the canopy height map was achievable with a flight line spacing of 5 km. This precision decreased to 4.8 m for flight line spacing of 50 km.

  13. Part I. Radioactivity in fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily and monthly variations were studied of radioactive fallout. Daily fallout was sampled in Bratislava and at Jaslovske Bohunice while monthly fallout was sampled in Bratislava, Jaslovske Bohunice, Trnava, Piestany. The study covered the years 1961 to 1964. Since 1964 samples were only taken in Bratislava. As against Jaslovske Bohunice, samples taken in Bratislava showed high pollution levels. It was found that maximum fallout occurred after the first resumption of nuclear tests, ie., in 1963. The values of 20.89 nCi/m2 for 90Sr and 28.24 nCi/m2 for 137Cs were found. A drop in the amount of fallout was observed after 1964. Radioactivity increased again following nuclear tests. The overall cumulative values of fallout deposit in Bratislava were found to be 51.99 nCi/m2 for 90Sr and 73.10 nCi/m2 for 137Cs. (J.P.)

  14. Employing airborne multispectral digital imagery to map Brazilian pepper infestation in south Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in south Texas to determine the feasibility of using airborne multispectral digital imagery for differentiating the invasive plant Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) from other cover types. Imagery obtained in the visible, near infrared, and mid infrared regions of th...

  15. Airborne lidar mapping of vertical ozone distributions in support of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandated attainment of the ozone standard established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Improved photochemical models validated by experimental data are needed to develop strategies for reducing near surface ozone concentrations downwind of urban and industrial centers. For more than 10 years, lidar has been used on large aircraft to provide unique information on ozone distributions in the atmosphere. However, compact airborne lidar systems are needed for operation on small aircraft of the type typically used on regional air quality investigations to collect data with which to develop and validate air quality models. Data presented in this paper will consist of a comparison between airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and airborne in-situ ozone measurements. Also discussed are future plans to improve the airborne ultraviolet-DIAL for ozone and other gas observations and addition of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) emission spectrometer to investigate the effects of other gas species on vertical ozone distribution

  16. Mapping of Ice in the Odden by Satellite and Airborne Remote Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Hansen, K.Q.; Valeur, H.;

    1999-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the ice conditions in the Odden area of the Greenland Sea was carried out using data from active and passive microwave sensors, supplemented by airborne data. The study focuses on the 1992-1993 winter season, the only winter during the period 1993-1995 in which an Odden fea...

  17. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor: a medium-altitude, digitisation-only, airborne laser altimeter for mapping vegetation and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Rabine, David L.; Hofton, Michelle A.

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne, scanning laser altimeter, designed and developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). LVIS operates at altitudes up to 10 km above ground, and is capable of producing a data swath up to 1000 m wide nominally with 25-m wide footprints. The entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitised, allowing unambiguous determination of range and return pulse structure. Combined with aircraft position and attitude knowledge, this instrument produces topographic maps with dm accuracy and vertical height and structure measurements of vegetation. The laser transmitter is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG oscillator producing 1064 nm, 10 ns, 5 mJ pulses at repetition rates up to 500 Hz. LVIS has recently demonstrated its ability to determine topography (including sub-canopy) and vegetation height and structure on flight missions to various forested regions in the US and Central America. The LVIS system is the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission (a NASA Earth remote sensing satellite due for launch in year 2000), providing simulated data sets and a platform for instrument proof-of-concept studies. The topography maps and return waveforms produced by LVIS provide Earth scientists with a unique data set allowing studies of topography, hydrology, and vegetation with unmatched accuracy and coverage.

  18. Mapping tree health using airborne full-waveform laser scans and hyperspectral imagery: a case study for floodplain eucalypt forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendryk, I.; Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.

    2014-12-01

    Barmah-Millewa Forest (BMF), the largest River Red Gum forest in the world, located in south-eastern Australia is suffering from severe dieback, thus diminishing its ecological and economical value. Previous research showed that dieback is a good predictor of the forest health and stressed the need for BMF health mapping and change monitoring. In this respect, airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging offer extensive spatial and spectral coverage of measurements and represent an ideal tool for forest health mapping at individual tree scale. The aim of this project is to quantify the health of individual, structurally complex floodplain eucalypt trees by integrating airborne hyperspectral imagery, full-waveform laser scans and field measurements. An aerial survey, conducted in May 2014, was designed to provide a representative sample of BMF tree health. The positioning of 17 flight lines aimed to capture the heterogeneity of the forest health and flood frequency. Preliminary analysis of the aerial remote sensing data with regards to chlorophyll concentrations, dieback levels and canopy densities allowed us to target our field campaign (conducted in June 2014). Field measurements included accurate position measurements, LAI, visual assessment, spectral measurement and mensuration of individual trees in 30 m2 plots. For detection of individual tree trunks from airborne laser scans we used a novel approach based on Euclidean distance clustering, taking advantage of the intensity and pulse width difference between woody and leaf tree compartments. The detected trunks were used to seed a minimum cut algorithm for tree crown delineation. In situ measurements confirmed the high structural diversity of the forest and allowed the calibration of the tree detection algorithm. An overall accuracy of the tree detection of 54% and 67% was achieved for trees with circumference over 40 cm and over 100 cm respectively. As a further step, 3D point clusters representing

  19. Airborne radiometric data - A tool for reconnaissance geological mapping using a GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A clustering technique is applied to radioelement data, and the resulting cluster map is compared with a digitized geological map within a GIS software package. The cross tabulation clearly identifies those geological units that have a distinctive radioelement response. By reclassifying the map overlay and imposing a color coding scheme that enhances bedrock geology classes, the relationship between the bedrock geology and radioelement response is enhanced. The degree of correlation between the two cartographic images is site dependent, rather than global. Areas where the two maps differ indicate zones of possible interest for field verification of published field maps for the purposes of mineral exploration. 13 refs

  20. Hyperspectral laboratory and airborne measurements as tools for local mapping of swelling soils in Orléans area (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Gilles; Dufrechou, Gregory; Hohmann, Audrey

    2013-04-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Based on spatial distribution of infrastructure damages and existing geological maps, the Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM, the French Geological Survey) published in 2010 a 1:50 000 swelling hazard map of France. This map indexes the territory to low, intermediate, or high swell susceptibility, but does not display smallest and isolated clays lithologies. At local scale, identification of clay minerals and characterization of swell potential of soils using conventional soil analysis (DRX, chemical, and geotechnical analysis) are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. Shortwave infrared (SWIR: 1100-2500 nm) spectral domains are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands that provide an underused tool for estimate the swell potential of soils. Reflectance spectroscopy, using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer, permits a rapid and less expensive measurement of soil reflectance spectra in the field and laboratory. In order to produce high precision map of expansive soils, the BRGM aims to optimize laboratory reflectance spectroscopy for mapping swelling soils. Geotechnical use of laboratory reflectance spectroscopy for local characterization of swell potential of soils could be assessable from an economical point of view. A new high resolution airborne hyperspectral survey (covering ca. 280 km², 380 channels ranging from 400 to 2500 nm) located at the W of Orléans (Loiret, France) will also be combined with field and laboratory measurements to detect and map swelling soils.

  1. Long-range volcanic ash transport and fallout during the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam J.; Villarosa, Gustavo; Rose, William I.; Delmelle, Pierre; Prata, Alfred J.; Viramonte, José G.

    2012-01-01

    The May 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile, provided a rare opportunity to measure the long-range transport of volcanic emissions and characteristics of a widely-dispersed terrestrial ash deposit. Airborne ash mass, quantified using thermal infrared satellite remote sensing, ranged between 0.2 and 0.4 Tg during the period 3-7 May 2008. A high level of spatiotemporal correspondence was observed between cloud trajectories and changes in surface reflectivity, which was inferred to indicate ash deposition. The evolution of the deposit was mapped for the first time using satellite-based observations of surface reflectivity. The distal (>80 km) ash deposit was poorly sorted and fine grained, and mean particle size varied very little beyond a distance >300 km. There were three particle size subpopulations in fallout at distances >300 km which mirror those identified in fallout from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, known to have a high propensity for aggregation. Discrete temporal sampling and characterisation of fallout demonstrated contributions from specific eruptive phases. Samples collected at the time of deposition were compared to bulk samples collected months after deposition and provided some evidence for winnowing. Experimentally-derived ash leachates had near-neutral pH values and charge balance which indicates minimal quantities of adsorbed acids. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed surface enrichments in Ca, Na and Fe and the presence of coatings of mixed Ca-, Na- and Fe-rich salts on ash particles prior to deposition. Low S:Cl ratios in leachates indicate that the eruption had a low S content, and high Cl:F ratios imply gas-ash interaction within a Cl-rich environment. We estimate that ash fallout had potential to scavenge ∼42% of total S released into the atmosphere prior to deposition. XPS analyses also revealed ash particle surfaces were strongly enriched in Fe (in contrast to the results from bulk leachate

  2. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammack, R. W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States). Geosciences Div.

    2006-12-28

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the

  3. Discriminating Irrigated and Rainfed Maize with Diurnal Fluorescence and Canopy Temperature Airborne Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Rossini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the potential of airborne remote sensing images to detect water stress in maize. Visible and near infrared CASI (Itres Research Ltd., Calgary, AL, Canada and thermal AHS-160 (Sensytech Inc., Beverly, MA, USA data were acquired at three different times during the day on a maize field (Zea mays L. grown with three different irrigation treatments. An intensive field campaign was also conducted concurrently with image acquisition to measure leaf ecophysiological parameters and the leaf area index. The analysis of the field data showed that maize plants were experiencing moderate to severe water stress in rainfed plots and a weaker stress condition in the plots with a water deficit imposed between stem elongation and flowering. Vegetation indices including the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI computed from the CASI images, sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (F760 and canopy temperature (Tc showed different performances in describing the water stress during the day. During the morning overpass, NDVI was the index with the highest discriminant power due to the sensitivity of NDVI to maize canopy structure, affected by the water irrigation treatment. As the day progressed, processes related to heat dissipation through plant transpiration became more and more important and at midday Tc showed the best performances. Furthermore, Tc retrieved from the midday image was the only index able to distinguish all the three classes of water status. Finally, during the afternoon, PRI and F760 showed the best performances. These results demonstrate the feasibility to detect water stress using thermal and optical airborne data, pointing out the importance of careful planning of the airborne surveys as a function of the specific aims of the study.

  4. Radon potential mapping of the Tralee-Castleisland and Cavan areas (Ireland) based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Doyle, E; Fenton, D; Organo, C

    2011-06-01

    The probability of homes in Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is estimated on the basis of known in-house radon measurements averaged over 10 km × 10 km grid squares. The scope for using airborne gamma-ray spectrometer data for the Tralee-Castleisland area of county Kerry and county Cavan to predict the radon potential (RP) in two distinct areas of Ireland is evaluated in this study. Airborne data are compared statistically with in-house radon measurements in conjunction with geological and ground permeability data to establish linear regression models and produce radon potential maps. The best agreement between the percentage of dwellings exceeding the reference level (RL) for radon concentrations in Ireland (% > RL), estimated from indoor radon data, and modelled RP in the Tralee-Castleisland area is produced using models based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry equivalent uranium (eU) and ground permeability data. Good agreement was obtained between the % > RL from indoor radon data and RP estimated from eU data in the Cavan area using terrain specific models. In both areas, RP maps derived from eU data are spatially more detailed than the published 10 km grid map. The results show the potential for using airborne radiometric data for producing RP maps. PMID:21617292

  5. Radon potential mapping of the Tralee-Castleisland and Cavan areas (Ireland) based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, J D [British Geological Survey (BGS), Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Doyle, E [Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI), Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Fenton, D; Organo, C, E-mail: jda@bgs.ac.uk [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII), 3 Clonskeagh Square, Dublin 14 (Ireland)

    2011-06-01

    The probability of homes in Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is estimated on the basis of known in-house radon measurements averaged over 10 km x 10 km grid squares. The scope for using airborne gamma-ray spectrometer data for the Tralee-Castleisland area of county Kerry and county Cavan to predict the radon potential (RP) in two distinct areas of Ireland is evaluated in this study. Airborne data are compared statistically with in-house radon measurements in conjunction with geological and ground permeability data to establish linear regression models and produce radon potential maps. The best agreement between the percentage of dwellings exceeding the reference level (RL) for radon concentrations in Ireland (% > RL), estimated from indoor radon data, and modelled RP in the Tralee-Castleisland area is produced using models based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry equivalent uranium (eU) and ground permeability data. Good agreement was obtained between the % > RL from indoor radon data and RP estimated from eU data in the Cavan area using terrain specific models. In both areas, RP maps derived from eU data are spatially more detailed than the published 10 km grid map. The results show the potential for using airborne radiometric data for producing RP maps.

  6. MAPPING URBAN TREE CANOPY COVER USING FUSED AIRBORNE LIDAR AND SATELLITE IMAGERY DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Parmehr, Ebadat G.; Amati, Marco; Fraser, Clive S.

    2016-01-01

    Urban green spaces, particularly urban trees, play a key role in enhancing the liveability of cities. The availability of accurate and up-to-date maps of tree canopy cover is important for sustainable development of urban green spaces. LiDAR point clouds are widely used for the mapping of buildings and trees, and several LiDAR point cloud classification techniques have been proposed for automatic mapping. However, the effectiveness of point cloud classification techniques for automated tree e...

  7. Area-Based Mapping of Defoliation of Scots Pine Stands Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR

    OpenAIRE

    Hannu Hyyppä; Michael A. Wulder; Juha Hyyppä; Ville Kankare; Markus Holopainen; Mikko Vastaranta; Päivi Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa; Tuula Kantola

    2013-01-01

    The mapping of changes in the distribution of insect-caused forest damage remains an important forest monitoring application and challenge. Efficient and accurate methods are required for mapping and monitoring changes in insect defoliation to inform forest management and reporting activities. In this research, we develop and evaluate a LiDAR-driven (Light Detection And Ranging) approach for mapping defoliation caused by the Common pine sawfly (Diprion pini L.). Our method requires plot-level...

  8. The real hazards of nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses an article by Carl Sagan entitled ''On minimizing the consequences of nuclear war'' [Nature 317 485 Oct 1985], in the light of the authors' own work on global fallout. Consequences of local fallout, human impact of local fallout, and global fallout calculations using computer models, are all described. (U.K.)

  9. Airborne geoid determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Bastos, L.; Gidskehaug, A.; Meyer, U.; Timmen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Airborne geoid mapping techniques may provide the opportunity to improve the geoid over vast areas of the Earth, such as polar areas, tropical jungles and mountainous areas, and provide an accurate "seam-less" geoid model across most coastal regions. Determination of the geoid by airborne methods...... relies on the development of airborne gravimetry, which in turn is dependent on developments in kinematic GPS. Routine accuracy of airborne gravimetry are now at the 2 mGal level, which may translate into 5-10 cm geoid accuracy on regional scales. The error behaviour of airborne gravimetry is well...

  10. VNIR-SWIR-TIR hyperspectral airborne campaign for soil and sediment mapping in semi-arid south african environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Robert; Chabrillat, Sabine; Eisele, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Airborne hyperspectral remote sensing techniques has been proven to offer efficient procedures for soil and sediment mineralogical mapping in arid areas on larger scales. Optical methods based on traditional remote sensing windows using the solar reflective spectral wavelength range from the visible-near infrared (VNIR: 0.4-1.1 μm) to the short-wave infrared region (SWIR: 1.1-2.5 μm) allow mapping of common soil properties such as iron oxides, textural characteristics and organic carbon. However, soil mapping in semi-arid environments using VNIR-SWIR is currently limited due to specific spectral characteristics. Challenges appear in such environments due to the common presence of sandy soils (coarse textured) which grain size distribution is driven by the dominant mineral, quartz (SiO2), and which lacks any distinctive Si-O bond related spectral features within the VNIR-SWIR. Furthermore, another challenge is represented by the common presence of other specific spectral features due to different salts (gypsum, halite) or coatings of different forms (cyanobacteria, iron-oxides and/or -oxyhydroxides) for which few studies exists or that oft prevent detection of any other potential spectral feature of e.g. soil organics. In this context, more methodological developments are needed to overcome current limitations of hyperspectral remote sensing for arid areas, and to extent its scope using the thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength region within the atmospheric window between 8 and 14 μm (longwave infrared). In 2015 an extensive VNIR-SWIR-TIR airborne hyperspectral dataset consisting of HySpex-VNIR, HySpex-SWIR (NEO) and Hyper-Cam (TELOPS) data has been acquired in various Namibian and South African landscapes part of the Dimap/GFZ campaign in the frame of the BMBF-SPACES Geoarchive project. Research goals are 1) to demonstrate the capabilities to extract information from such a dataset and 2) to demonstrate the potential of advanced hyperspectral remote sensing

  11. The hunt for sliding planes in a phyllitic rock slide in Western Norway using airborne electromagnetic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspmo Pfaffhuber, Andreas; Grimstad, Eystein; Domaas, Ulrik; Auken, Esben; Halkjær, Max

    2010-05-01

    The inner Aurland fjord and the adjacent Flåm valley (Western Norway) are subject to a potential rock slide comprised of creeping rock- and debris masses. From repeated GPS measurements we understand that rock and debris movements are constrained by precipitation and snow melt. Based on this assumption the local municipality and regional hydroelectricity company are evaluating the option to drain the unstable area with a more than 10 km long drainage tunnel to a nearby hydropower reservoir. We conducted an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) mapping survey to find indications for the sliding planes and to assess the tunnel corridor for potential tunneling hazard areas. Unstable rock areas some 1.000 meters above seawater have been mapped as massive phyllite intercepted by numerous tension cracks opening up to several meters. Field observations also point out that significant amounts of surface water in streams on the mountain plateau disappear in some of these cracks and surface again several hundred meters down the slope. Potentially sliding planes provide the water pathways and the changes in water pressure can cause instability. As the phyllite will weather to fine grained clay the water saturated sliding planes should be an ideal target for AEM as they are very conductive (1-10 Ohm*m) in comparison to the resistive undisturbed phyllite or nearby gneiss (> 1.000 Ohm*m). From our first AEM data interpretation we find widespread areas with high conductivity, which are most likely caused by either water saturated, fine grained sliding planes or fault zones at the phyllite / gneiss interface. At this point, financing for drilling is pending to transform the geophysical maps to a firm geological model. Based on the AEM results, we are formulating a joint research program involving detailed hydrological investigations, monitoring of formation water pressure, movements, meteorology, more detailed structural mapping and geophysical ground follow up of the airborne data. We

  12. Mapping Changes in a Recovering Mine Site with Hyperspectral Airborne HyMap Imagery (Sotiel, SW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Buzzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral high spatial resolution HyMap data are used to map mine waste from massive sulfide ore deposits, mostly abandoned, on the Iberian Pyrite Belt (southwest Spain. Mine dams, mill tailings and mine dumps in variable states of pyrite oxidation are recognizable. The interpretation of hyperspectral remote sensing requires specific algorithms able to manage high dimensional data compared to multispectral data. The routine of image processing methods used to extract information from hyperspectral data to map geological features is explained, as well as the sequence of algorithms used to produce maps of the mine sites. The mineralogical identification capability of algorithms to produce maps based on archive spectral libraries is discussed. Trends of mineral growth differ spectrally over time according to the geological setting and the recovery state of the mine site. Subtle mineralogical changes are enhanced using the spectral response as indicators of pyrite oxidation intensity of the mine waste piles and pyrite mud tailings. The changes in the surface of the mill tailings deserve a detailed description, as the surfaces are inaccessible to direct observation. Such mineralogical changes respond faithfully to industrial activities or the influence of climate when undisturbed by human influence.

  13. Mapping Weathering and Alteration Minerals in the Comstock and Geiger Grade Areas using Visible to Thermal Infrared Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Greg R.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    To support research into both precious metal exploration and environmental site characterization a combination of high spatial/spectral resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data were acquired to remotely map hydrothermal alteration minerals around the Geiger Grade and Comstock alteration regions, and map the mineral by-products of weathered mine dumps in Virginia City. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopy. The resulting mineral maps show the spatial distribution of several important alteration minerals around each study area including alunite, quartz, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. In the Comstock region the mineral maps show acid-sulfate alteration, widespread propylitic alteration and extensive faulting that offsets the acid-sulfate areas, in contrast to the larger, dominantly acid-sulfate alteration exposed along Geiger Grade. Also, different mineral zones within the intense acid-sulfate areas were mapped. In the Virginia City historic mining district the important weathering minerals mapped include hematite, goethite, jarosite and hydrous sulfate minerals (hexahydrite, alunogen and gypsum) located on mine dumps. Sulfate minerals indicate acidic water forming in the mine dump environment. While there is not an immediate threat to the community, there are clearly sources of

  14. Ecosystem services - from assessements of estimations to quantitative, validated, high-resolution, continental-scale mapping via airborne LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlinszky, András; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    "Ecosystem services" defined vaguely as "nature's benefits to people" are a trending concept in ecology and conservation. Quantifying and mapping these services is a longtime demand of both ecosystems science and environmental policy. The current state of the art is to use existing maps of land cover, and assign certain average ecosystem service values to their unit areas. This approach has some major weaknesses: the concept of "ecosystem services", the input land cover maps and the value indicators. Such assessments often aim at valueing services in terms of human currency as a basis for decision-making, although this approach remains contested. Land cover maps used for ecosystem service assessments (typically the CORINE land cover product) are generated from continental-scale satellite imagery, with resolution in the range of hundreds of meters. In some rare cases, airborne sensors are used, with higher resolution but less covered area. Typically, general land cover classes are used instead of categories defined specifically for the purpose of ecosystem service assessment. The value indicators are developed for and tested on small study sites, but widely applied and adapted to other sites far away (a process called benefit transfer) where local information may not be available. Upscaling is always problematic since such measurements investigate areas much smaller than the output map unit. Nevertheless, remote sensing is still expected to play a major role in conceptualization and assessment of ecosystem services. We propose that an improvement of several orders of magnitude in resolution and accuracy is possible through the application of airborne LIDAR, a measurement technique now routinely used for collection of countrywide three-dimensional datasets with typically sub-meter resolution. However, this requires a clear definition of the concept of ecosystem services and the variables in focus: remote sensing can measure variables closely related to "ecosystem

  15. Airborne mapping of chemical plumes in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Paul E.; Thomas, Mark J.; Kroutil, Robert T.; Combs, Roger; Cummings, Alan S.; Miller, Dave; Curry, Tim; Shen, Sylvia S.

    2006-05-01

    Infrared airborne spectral measurements were collected over the Gulf Coast area during the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. These measurements allowed surveillance for potentially hazardous chemical vapor releases from industrial facilities caused by storm damage. Data was collected with a mid-longwave infrared multispectral imager and a hyperspectral Fourier transform infrared spectrometer operating in a low altitude aircraft. Signal processing allowed detection and identification of targeted spectral signatures in the presence of interferents, atmospheric contributions, and thermal clutter. Results confirmed the presence of a number of chemical vapors. All detection results were immediately passed along to emergency first responders on the ground. The chemical identification, location, and vapor species concentration information were used by the emergency response ground teams for identification of critical plume releases and subsequent mitigation.

  16. Airborne LIDAR mapping of SF6 concentration distributions for transport and diffusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Airborne Lidar Agent Remote Monitor (ALARM) uses two downward-pointing, high-energy (1 J), line-tunable CO2 lasers operating in the 9- to 11-μm wavelength region. By tuning one laser to a wavelength of maximum absorption and the other laser to a wavelength of minimum absorption of a gas species, column-content (vertically integrated) gas concentrations can be made from terrain lidar returns, and altitude-resolved concentations can be made from atmospheric aerosol lidar returns. The tracer gas SF6 has a strong absorption band within the tuning range of the ALARM system. A field demonstration of the ALARM capabilities for measurement of SF6 was designed and conducted with geometries and conditions similar to those that might occur in the event of an accidental radioactive gas release

  17. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  18. Flood hazard mapping by integrating airborne laser scanning data, high resolution images and large scale maps: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    P. Fernandez; G. Gonçalves; Gomes Pereira, L.; M. Moreira

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and management of flood risks framework impose the mapping of flood hazard in potential flood risks areas. Floods in urban environments may happen due to rainfall extreme events and be exacerbated by saturated or impervious surfaces. Flood risk is greater in urban areas. (...)

  19. Mapping forest species composition using imaging spectrometry and airborne laser scanner data

    OpenAIRE

    Torabzadeh, Hossein; Morsdorf, Felix; Leiterer, Reik; Schaepman, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mapping of forest species composition is an important aspect of monitoring and management planning related to ecosystem functions and services associated with water refinement, carbon sequestration, biodiversity, and wildlife habitats. Although different vegetation species often have unique spectral signatures, mapping based on spectral reflectance properties alone is often an ill-posed problem, since the spectral signature is as well influenced by age, canopy gaps, shadows and backg...

  20. MAPPING FOREST SPECIES COMPOSITION USING IMAGING SPECTROMETRY AND AIRBORNE LASER SCANNER DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Torabzadeh, H.; Morsdorf, F; Leiterer, R.; Schaepman, M E

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mapping of forest species composition is an important aspect of monitoring and management planning related to ecosystem functions and services associated with water refinement, carbon sequestration, biodiversity, and wildlife habitats. Although different vegetation species often have unique spectral signatures, mapping based on spectral reflectance properties alone is often an ill-posed problem, since the spectral signature is as well influenced by age, canopy gaps, shadows ...

  1. Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) for Enhanced Riparian Water Use Estimates, Basin Sediment Budgets, and Terrain Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Farid, A.; Miller, S. N.; Semmens, D.; Williams, D. J.; Moran, S.; Unkrich, C. L.

    2003-12-01

    The uses of Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) or LIDAR for earth science applications beyond topographic mapping are rapidly expanding. The USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center, in collaboration with the Geosensing Systems Engineering Group at the Univ. of Florida and a wide range of other investigators, designed and conducted a multi-purpose ALSM mission over southeastern Arizona. Research goals include: 1) differentiate young and old riparian cottonwood trees to improve riparian water use estimates; 2) assess the ability of LIDAR to define channel bank steepness and thus cross-channel trafficability; 3) assess the ability of LIDAR to define relatively small, isolated depressions where higher soil moisture may persist; and, 4) quantify changes in channel morphology and sediment movement between pre- and post-monsoon flights. The first flight mission was successfully completed in early June and a post-monsoon mission is scheduled for October. Research goals, mission planning, and initial results will be further developed in this presentation. Acknowledgements: The Upper San Pedro Partnership, DOD-Legacy Program, EPA-Landscape Ecology Branch, U.S. Army-TEC, and the Bureau of Land Management are gratefully acknowledged for supporting this effort. The second author is supported by SAHRA (Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas) under the STC Program of the National Science Foundation, Agreement No. EAR-9876800.

  2. FireMapper 2.0: a multispectral uncooled infrared imaging system for airborne wildfire mapping and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James W.; Riggan, Philip J.; Griffin, Stephanie A.; Grush, Ronald C.; Grush, William H.; Pena, James

    2003-11-01

    FireMapper®2.0 is a second-generation airborne system developed specifically for wildfire mapping and remote sensing. Its design is based on lessons learned from two years of flight-testing of a research FireMapper® system by the Pacific uthwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service. The new, operational design features greater coverage and improved performance with a rugged sensor that is less than one third the size and weight of the original research sensor. The sensor obtains thermal infrared images in two narrow spectral bands and one wide spectral band with the use of a single uncooled microbolometer detector array. The dynamic range of the sensor is designed to accurately measure scene temperatures from normal backgrounds, for remote sensing and disaster management applications, up to flaming fronts without saturating. All three channels are extremely linear and are calibrated in-flight with a highly accurate absolute calibration system. Airborne testing of the research system has led to improved displays and simplified operator interfaces. These features facilitate the operational use of the FireMapper®2.0 system on both fixed wing aircraft and helicopters with minimal operator inputs. The operating system features custom software to display and zoom in on the images in realtime as they are obtained. Selected images can also be saved and recalled for detailed study. All images are tagged with GPS date, time, latitude, longitude, altitude, and heading and can be recorded on a portable USB hard drive upon operator command. The operating system can also be used to replay previously recorded image sequences. The FireMapper® 2.0 was designed and fabricated by Space Instruments, Inc. as part of a Research Joint Venture with the USDA Forest Service.

  3. Mapping Forest Height in Alaska Using GLAS, Landsat Composites, and Airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Peterson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation structure, including forest canopy height, is an important input variable to fire behavior modeling systems for simulating wildfire behavior. As such, forest canopy height is one of a nationwide suite of products generated by the LANDFIRE program. In the past, LANDFIRE has relied on a combination of field observations and Landsat imagery to develop existing vegetation structure products. The paucity of field data in the remote Alaskan forests has led to a very simple forest canopy height classification for the original LANDFIRE forest height map. To better meet the needs of data users and refine the map legend, LANDFIRE incorporated ICESat Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS data into the updating process when developing the LANDFIRE 2010 product. The high latitude of this region enabled dense coverage of discrete GLAS samples, from which forest height was calculated. Different methods for deriving height from the GLAS waveform data were applied, including an attempt to correct for slope. These methods were then evaluated and integrated into the final map according to predefined criteria. The resulting map of forest canopy height includes more height classes than the original map, thereby better depicting the heterogeneity of the landscape, and provides seamless data for fire behavior analysts and other users of LANDFIRE data.

  4. Application of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in soil/regolith mapping and applied geomorphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray spectrometric surveys are an important source of information for soil, regolith and geomorphological studies, as demonstrated by the interpretation of airborne surveys in Western Australia, central New South Wales and north Queensland. Gamma-rays emitted from the ground surface relate to the primary mineralogy and geochemistry of the bedrock, and the secondary weathered materials. Weathering modifies the distribution and concentration of radioelements from the original bedrock source. Once the radioelement response of bedrock and weathered materials is understood, the gamma-ray data can provide information on geomorphic processes and soil/regolith properties, including their mineralogy, texture, chemistry and style of weathering. This information can contribute significantly to an understanding of the weathering and geomorphic history of a region and, therefore, has the potential to be used in developing more effective land-management strategies and refining geochemical models in support of mineral exploration. Gamma-ray imagery is enhanced when combined with Landsat TM bands and digital elevation models (DEM). This synergy enables geochemical information derived from the gamma-ray data to be interpreted within a geomorphic framework. Draping gamma-ray images over DEMs as 3D landscape perspective views aids interpretation and allows the interpreter to visualise complex relationships between the gamma-ray response and landform features. 44 refs.,1 tab., 11 figs

  5. Black-backed woodpecker habitat suitability mapping using conifer snag basal area estimated from airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Planes, Á.; Garcia, M.; Siegel, R.; Koltunov, A.; Ramirez, C.; Ustin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Occupancy and habitat suitability models for snag-dependent wildlife species are commonly defined as a function of snag basal area. Although critical for predicting or assessing habitat suitability, spatially distributed estimates of snag basal area are not generally available across landscapes at spatial scales relevant for conservation planning. This study evaluates the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) to 1) identify individual conifer snags and map their basal area across a recently burned forest, and 2) map habitat suitability for a wildlife species known to be dependent on snag basal area, specifically the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus). This study focuses on the Rim Fire, a megafire that took place in 2013 in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, creating large patches of medium- and high-severity burned forest. We use forest inventory plots, single-tree ALS-derived metrics and Gaussian processes classification and regression to identify conifer snags and estimate their stem diameter and basal area. Then, we use the results to map habitat suitability for the black-backed woodpecker using thresholds for conifer basal area from a previously published habitat suitability model. Local maxima detection and watershed segmentation algorithms resulted in 75% detection of trees with stem diameter larger than 30 cm. Snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 91.8 % and conifer snags are identified with an overall accuracy of 84.8 %. Finally, Gaussian process regression reliably estimated stem diameter (R2 = 0.8) using height and crown area. This work provides a fast and efficient methodology to characterize the extent of a burned forest at the tree level and a critical tool for early wildlife assessment in post-fire forest management and biodiversity conservation.

  6. Mapping beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest structure with airborne hyperspectral imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, M.A.; Skidmore, A.K.; Sobhan, I.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating forest structural attributes using multispectral remote sensing is challenging because of the saturation of multispectral indices at high canopy cover. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of hyperspectral data in estimating and mapping forest structural parameters includ

  7. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Radoslaw; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina;

    2016-01-01

    characteristics that can be used for classification of water surfaces. Following the laser footprint analysis, three classifiers, namely AdaBoost with Decision Tree, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, were utilised to classify laser points into flooded and non-flooded classes and to derive the map of flooding extent...

  8. Using Airborne and Satellite Imagery to Distinguish and Map Black Mangrove

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports the results of studies evaluating color-infrared (CIR) aerial photography, CIR aerial true digital imagery, and high resolution QuickBird multispectral satellite imagery for distinguishing and mapping black mangrove [Avicennia germinans (L.) L.] populations along the lower Texas g...

  9. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  10. Airborne radiometric survey data and a DTM as covariates for regional scale mapping of soil organic carbon across Northern Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A potential covariate for mapping of SOC (soil organic carbon) is airborne gammaradiometric data. These are measurements of emission of gamma rays due to decay of radionuclides in the top 50 cm of the soil, including potassium (gamma-K). We might expect spatial correlation between gamma-K and SOC content for two reasons. First, the well-established spatial correlation between gamma-ray attenuation and soil moisture extends to SOC because the latter accumulates in soils which are wet for much of the year. Second, for soils with a wide range of SOC contents over the same parent material, the mineral content (and gamma emission) will be smaller when diluted by larger organic matter contents. We used data from the recent TELLUS survey of Northern Ireland including airborne radiometry and ground-based soil carbon measurements (n=6862; loss-on-ignition) to investigate the potential for improved regional-scale (13,360 square km) estimation of SOC. We split the data at random into prediction (n=3000) and validation subsets. We fitted linear mixed models of the spatial variation of SOC to the prediction data and then used the empirical best linear unbiased predictor to predict the SOC concentration at the validation sites. We incorporated gamma-K and altitude (50 m resolution DTM) as fixed effects in these linear mixed models in order to test the effectiveness of these covariates for prediction, in terms of the root mean squared errors (RMSEs) of the predictions at the validation sites.We also tested how these RMSEs varied with n (the number of SOC observations in the prediction set). Exploratory analysis revealed that the frequency distribution of SOC was bi-modal. We attempted to analyze the two peaks of this distribution separately by applying a three-fold (organic, organo-mineral and mineral) classification to the samples (1:50,000 soil maps). Our tests confirmed that splitting the samples in this manner does improve the accuracy of the SOC predictions in the

  11. Mapping tree health using airborne laser scans and hyperspectral imagery: a case study for a floodplain eucalypt forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendryk, Iurii; Tulbure, Mirela; Broich, Mark; McGrath, Andrew; Alexandrov, Sergey; Keith, David

    2016-04-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) and hyperspectral imaging (HSI) are two complementary remote sensing technologies that provide comprehensive structural and spectral characteristics of forests over large areas. In this study we developed two algorithms: one for individual tree delineation utilizing ALS and the other utilizing ALS and HSI to characterize health of delineated trees in a structurally complex floodplain eucalypt forest. We conducted experiments in the largest eucalypt, river red gum forest in the world, located in the south-east of Australia that experienced severe dieback over the past six decades. For detection of individual trees from ALS we developed a novel bottom-up approach based on Euclidean distance clustering to detect tree trunks and random walks segmentation to further delineate tree crowns. Overall, our algorithm was able to detect 67% of tree trunks with diameter larger than 13 cm. We assessed the accuracy of tree delineations in terms of crown height and width, with correct delineation of 68% of tree crowns. The increase in ALS point density from ~12 to ~24 points/m2 resulted in tree trunk detection and crown delineation increase of 11% and 13%, respectively. Trees with incorrectly delineated crowns were generally attributed to areas with high tree density along water courses. The accurate delineation of trees allowed us to classify the health of this forest using machine learning and field-measured tree crown dieback and transparency ratios, which were good predictors of tree health in this forest. ALS and HSI derived indices were used as predictor variables to train and test object-oriented random forest classifier. Returned pulse width, intensity and density related ALS indices were the most important predictors in the tree health classifications. At the forest level in terms of tree crown dieback, 77% of trees were classified as healthy, 14% as declining and 9% as dying or dead with 81% mapping accuracy. Similarly, in terms of tree

  12. Automated UAV-based mapping for airborne reconnaissance and video exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Se, Stephen; Firoozfam, Pezhman; Goldstein, Norman; Wu, Linda; Dutkiewicz, Melanie; Pace, Paul; Naud, J. L. Pierre

    2009-05-01

    Airborne surveillance and reconnaissance are essential for successful military missions. Such capabilities are critical for force protection, situational awareness, mission planning, damage assessment and others. UAVs gather huge amount of video data but it is extremely labour-intensive for operators to analyse hours and hours of received data. At MDA, we have developed a suite of tools towards automated video exploitation including calibration, visualization, change detection and 3D reconstruction. The on-going work is to improve the robustness of these tools and automate the process as much as possible. Our calibration tool extracts and matches tie-points in the video frames incrementally to recover the camera calibration and poses, which are then refined by bundle adjustment. Our visualization tool stabilizes the video, expands its field-of-view and creates a geo-referenced mosaic from the video frames. It is important to identify anomalies in a scene, which may include detecting any improvised explosive devices (IED). However, it is tedious and difficult to compare video clips to look for differences manually. Our change detection tool allows the user to load two video clips taken from two passes at different times and flags any changes between them. 3D models are useful for situational awareness, as it is easier to understand the scene by visualizing it in 3D. Our 3D reconstruction tool creates calibrated photo-realistic 3D models from video clips taken from different viewpoints, using both semi-automated and automated approaches. The resulting 3D models also allow distance measurements and line-of- sight analysis.

  13. Airborne mapping of radioactive contamination. Results from a test in Finland, RESUME95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, S.; Smethurst, M.A. [Geological Survey of Norway (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The Geological Survey of Norway participated in the exercise RESUME95 (Rapid Environmental Surveying Using Mobile Equipment 95) in Finland, during August 1995. The purpose of the exercise was to 1) test preparedness in the Nordic countries for accidents involving the release and dispersal of radioactive material, 2) compare results from the different teams participating in the exercise, 3) establish routines for the exchange of data and 4) investigate the possibility of international assistance in the event of nuclear accidents. The Geological Survey of Norway carried out a survey over three test areas (area I, II and III). All three areas were contaminated with man made radionuclides in the days following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. The Cesium-137 contamination level was reported to be about 50 kBq/m{sup 2} in area I, and this area was used for calibration. In area II mapping of Cesium-137 ground concentration was carried out. Detection of hidden artificial radiation sources were the main purpose in area III. This report describes the exercise - RESUME95, field operations, calibration, mapping of Cesium-137 ground concentration and detection of hidden point sources. Results are presented as colour maps. (au).

  14. Generation of Land Cover Maps through the Fusion of Aerial Images and Airborne LiDAR Data in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite images and aerial images with high spatial resolution have improved visual interpretation capabilities. The use of high-resolution images has rapidly grown and has been extended to various fields, such as military surveillance, disaster monitoring, and cartography. However, many problems were encountered in which one object has a variety of spectral properties and different objects have similar spectral characteristics in terms of land cover. The problems are quite noticeable, especially for building objects in urban environments. In the land cover classification process, these issues directly decrease the classification accuracy by causing misclassification of single objects as well as between objects. This study proposes a method of increasing the accuracy of land cover classification by addressing the problem of misclassifying building objects through the output-level fusion of aerial images and airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data. The new method consists of the following three steps: (1 generation of the segmented image via a process that performs adaptive dynamic range linear stretching and modified seeded region growth algorithms; (2 extraction of building information from airborne LiDAR data using a planar filter and binary supervised classification; and (3 generation of a land cover map using the output-level fusion of two results and object-based classification. The new method was tested at four experimental sites with the Min-Max method and the SSI-nDSM method followed by a visual assessment and a quantitative accuracy assessment through comparison with reference data. In the accuracy assessment, the new method exhibits various advantages, including reduced noise and more precise classification results. Additionally, the new method improved the overall accuracy by more than 5% over the comparative evaluation methods. The high and low patterns between the overall and building accuracies were similar. Thus, the new

  15. Demonstration of radar reflector detection and ground clutter suppression using airborne weather and mapping radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. J.; Bull, J. S.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A navigation system which utilizes minimum ground-based equipment is especially advantageous to helicopters, which can make off-airport landings. Research has been conducted in the use of weather and mapping radar to detect large radar reflectors overland for navigation purposes. As initial studies have not been successful, investigations were conducted regarding a new concept for the detection of ground-based radar reflectors and eliminating ground clutter, using a device called an echo processor (EP). A description is presented of the problems associated with detecting radar reflectors overland, taking into account the EP concept and the results of ground- and flight-test investigations. The echo processor concept was successfully demonstrated in detecting radar reflectors overland in a high-clutter environment. A radar reflector target size of 55 dBsm was found to be adequate for detection in an urban environment.

  16. Forage: a sensitive indicator of airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of using Ge(Li) γ-ray spectroscopy to measure radioactivity concentration of forage in the vicinity of the Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant, Houston County, AL., over a 31/2 yr period. The report period includes 2 yr of pre-operational and 11/2 yr of operational sampling. Although the objective of forage sampling was the measurement of manmade airborne fallout radioactivity, several natural radioisotopes were also found to be present. A summary of natural radioactivity data for all samples measured during the period from August 1975 to December 1978 is given. Approximately 10 days after each of four Chinese atmospheric nuclear tests conducted during the sampling period fresh fission product fallout was measured on the forage. The information from these nuclear tests shows forage sampling to be a convenient and sensitive monitoring tool for airborne fallout radioactivity. (author)

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the Trinity Fallout Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial gamma survey was conducted during May and June of 1992 to define the Trinity fallout field, which lies primarily in the White Sands Missile Range in the state of New Mexico. The field was mapped almost entirely from the gamma ray emissions of cesium-137 (137Cs), a fission product. The field, as measured, extends from Trinity ground zero, over the Oscura Mountains, across the Chupadera Mesa, and thence past Cedarvale, New Mexico, a distance of more than 100 kilometers. An estimate of 137Cs activity inventory is 100 Ci in an area covering 1,400 square kilometers. Another isotope, europium-152, is significant at ground zero. A 137Cs concentration contour plot overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey map indicates the location and intensity of the fallout field. A contour map of terrestrial exposure rate is presented in a similar fashion

  18. Nuclear fall-out shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An underground nuclear fall-out shelter has a plastics shell which, apart from service and access openings, is waterproof and provided, if desired, with a concrete roof. The shelter has an access opening, an air system, lighting, water storage, sanitation and sewage facilities. (author)

  19. New Trends in Fallout Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The objective of the national fallout shelter program is to provide shelter space for all Americans by--(1) locating, marking, and stocking suitable public shelter areas in existing buildings, and (2) having new structures designed and built to maximize protection. This nation's architects and engineers are now knowledgeable in radiation shielding…

  20. Airborne Laser Altimetry Mapping of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Application to Mass Balance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalati, W.; Krabill, W.; Frederick, E.; Manizade, S.; Martin, C.; Sonntag, J.; Swift, R.; Thomas, R.; Wright, W.; Yungel, J.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 and '99, the Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) program completed resurveys of lines occupied 5 years earlier revealing elevation changes of the Greenland ice sheet and identifying areas of significant thinning, thickening and balance. In planning these surveys, consideration had to be given to the spatial constraints associated with aircraft operation, the spatial nature of ice sheet behavior, and limited resources, as well as temporal issues, such as seasonal and interannual variability in the context of measurement accuracy. This paper examines the extent to which the sampling and survey strategy is valid for drawing conclusions on the current state of balance of the Greenland ice sheet. The surveys covered the entire ice sheet with an average distance of 21.4 km between each location on the ice sheet and the nearest flight line. For most of the ice sheet, the elevation changes show relatively little spatial variability, and their magnitudes are significantly smaller than the observed elevation change signal. As a result, we conclude that the density of the sampling and the accuracy of the measurements are sufficient to draw meaningful conclusions on the state of balance of the entire ice sheet over the five-year survey period. Outlet glaciers, however, show far more spatial and temporal variability, and each of the major ones is likely to require individual surveys in order to determine its balance.

  1. Development of an airborne MMW FM-CW radar for mapping river ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankielum, Norbert E.; Ferrick, Michael G.; Weyrick, Patricia B.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of a river's freezeup ice cover stability and its breakup rely on detailed knowledge of the cover's thickness and the variability of that thickness. A high-resolution, millimeter wave (26.5- to 40-GHz) Frequency Modulated-Continuous Wave radar with real-time data acquisition and digital signal processing and display capability was deployed from a low-flying (3-10 m) helicopter to continuously acquire, process and display data during an ice thickness profiling survey of a 24-km study reach. A nominal sheet ice thickness of 50 cm, occasional areas of new ice sheet as thin as 5 cm, open leads, and massive ice accumulations on the order of 5 m thick were encountered. Radar profiling data agreed with ground truth from borehole measurements of the sheet ice, and provided a more detailed view of the ice conditions than that obtained from a low altitude video survey. The radar system provided rapid, safe and accurate data acquisition, allowing detailed mapping of the ice conditions throughout the reach.

  2. Web-Enabled Optoelectronic Particle-Fallout Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberger, Lewis P.

    2008-01-01

    A Web-enabled optoelectronic particle- fallout monitor has been developed as a prototype of future such instruments that (l) would be installed in multiple locations for which assurance of cleanliness is required and (2) could be interrogated and controlled in nearly real time by multiple remote users. Like prior particle-fallout monitors, this instrument provides a measure of particles that accumulate on a surface as an indication of the quantity of airborne particulate contaminants. The design of this instrument reflects requirements to: Reduce the cost and complexity of its optoelectronic sensory subsystem relative to those of prior optoelectronic particle fallout monitors while maintaining or improving capabilities; Use existing network and office computers for distributed display and control; Derive electric power for the instrument from a computer network, a wall outlet, or a battery; Provide for Web-based retrieval and analysis of measurement data and of a file containing such ancillary data as a log of command attempts at remote units; and Use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for maximum performance and minimal network overhead.

  3. High resolution mapping of the tropospheric NO2 distribution in three Belgian cities based on airborne APEX remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Frederik; Merlaud, Alexis; Fayt, Caroline; Danckaert, Thomas; Iordache, Daniel; Meuleman, Koen; Deutsch, Felix; Adriaenssens, Sandy; Fierens, Frans; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    An approach is presented to retrieve tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) and to map the NO2 two dimensional distribution at high resolution, based on Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX) observations. APEX, developed by a Swiss-Belgian consortium on behalf of ESA (European Space Agency), is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with a high spatial (approximately 3 m at 5000 m ASL), spectral (413 to 2421 nm in 533 narrow, contiguous spectral bands) and radiometric (14-bit) resolution. VCDs are derived, following a similar approach as described in the pioneering work of Popp et al. (2012), based on (1) spectral calibration and spatial binning of the observed radiance spectra in order to improve the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, (2) Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of the pre-processed spectra in the visible wavelength region, with a reference spectrum containing low NO2 absorption, in order to quantify the abundance of NO2 along the light path, based on its molecular absorption structures and (3) radiative transfer modeling for air mass factor calculation in order to convert slant to vertical columns. This study will be done in the framework of the BUMBA (Belgian Urban NO2 Monitoring Based on APEX hyperspectral data) project. Dedicated flights with APEX mounted in a Dornier DO-228 airplane, operated by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), are planned to be performed in Spring 2015 above the three largest and most heavily polluted Belgian cities, i.e. Brussels, Antwerp and Liège. The retrieved VCDs will be validated by comparison with correlative ground-based and car-based DOAS observations. Main objectives are (1) to assess the operational capabilities of APEX to map the NO2 field over an urban area at high spatial and spectral resolution in a relatively short time and cost-effective way, and to characterise all aspects of the retrieval approach; (2) to use the APEX NO2 measurements

  4. Now You See It… Now You Don’t: Understanding Airborne Mapping LiDAR Collection and Data Product Generation for Archaeological Research in Mesoamerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Fernandez-Diaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide a description of airborne mapping LiDAR, also known as airborne laser scanning (ALS, technology and its workflow from mission planning to final data product generation, with a specific emphasis on archaeological research. ALS observations are highly customizable, and can be tailored to meet specific research needs. Thus it is important for an archaeologist to fully understand the options available during planning, collection and data product generation before commissioning an ALS survey, to ensure the intended research questions can be answered with the resultant data products. Also this knowledge is of great use for the researcher trying to understand the quality and limitations of existing datasets collected for other purposes. Throughout the paper we use examples from archeological ALS projects to illustrate the key concepts of importance for the archaeology researcher.

  5. Characterization of airborne uranium from test firing of XM774 ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, to characterize the airborne depleted uranium (DU) resulting from the test firings of 105-mm, APFSDS-T XM774 ammunition. The goal was to obtain data pertinent to evaluations of human inhalation exposure to the airborne DU. Data was desired concerning the following: (1) size distribution of airborne DU; (2) quantity of airborne DU; (3) dispersion of airborne DU from the target vicinity; (4) amount of DU deposited on the ground; (5) solubility of airborne DU compounds in lung fluid; and (6) oxide forms of airborne and fallout DU. The experiments involved extensive air sampling for total airborne DU particulates and respirable DU particles both above the targets and at distances downwind. Fallout and fragments were collected around the target area. High-speed movies of the smoke generated from the impact of the penetrators were taken to estimate the cloud volumes. Results of the experiments are presented

  6. Fukushima fallout at Milano, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Manenti, Simone; Gini, Luigi; Groppi, Flavia

    2012-12-01

    The radionuclides (131)I, (137)Cs and (134)Cs were observed in the Milano region (45°) of Italy early after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan. Increased atmospheric radioactivity was observed on an air filter taken on 30 March 2011, while the maximum activity of 467 μBq m(-3) for (131)I was recorded at April 3-4, 2011. The first evidence of Fukushima fallout was confirmed with (131)I and (137)Cs measured in precipitation at two sampling sites at Milano on 28 March, 2011, with the concentrations of (131)I and (137)Cs in the rainwater equal to 0.89 Bq L(-1) and 0.12 Bq L(-1), respectively. A sample of dry deposition that was collected 9 days after the first rainfall event of 27-28 March, 2011 showed that the dry deposition was more effective in the case of (137)Cs than it was for (131)I, probably because iodine was mainly in gaseous form whereas caesium was rapidly bound to aerosols and thus highly subject to dry deposition. The relatively high observed values of (137)Cs in grass, soil and fresh goat and cow milk samples were probably from Chernobyl fallout and global fallout from past nuclear tests rather than from the Fukushima accident. Finally, a dose assessment for the region of investigation showed clearly that the detected activities in all environmental samples were very far below levels of concern. PMID:22300481

  7. The InSAeS4 Airborne X-Band Interferometric SAR System: A First Assessment on Its Imaging and Topographic Mapping Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Perna; Carmen Esposito; Tiago Amaral; Paolo Berardino; Giuseppe Jackson; João Moreira; Antonio Pauciullo; Eurico Vaz Junior; Christian Wimmer; Riccardo Lanari

    2016-01-01

    We present in this work a first assessment of the imaging and topographic mapping capabilities of the InSAeS4 system, which is a single-pass interferometric airborne X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In particular, we first provide a brief description of the InSAeS4 sensor. Then, we discuss the results of our analysis on the SAR and interferometric SAR products relevant to the first flight-test campaign. More specifically, we have exploited as reference the GPS measurements relevant to n...

  8. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  9. Evaluation of a Light-weight Lidar and a Photogrammetric System for Unmanned Airborne Mapping Applications : [Bewertung eines Lidar-systems mit geringem Gewicht und eines photogrammetrischen Systems für Anwendungen auf einem UAV

    OpenAIRE

    Conte, Gianpaolo; Rudol, Piotr; Doherty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two light-weight and low-cost airborne mapping systems. One is based on a lidar technology and the other on a video camera. The airborne lidar system consists of a high-precision global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) inertial measurement unit, a magnetic compass and a low-cost lidar scanner. The vision system is based on a consumer grade video camera. A commercial photogrammetric software package is used ...

  10. Erosional losses of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium from fallout after atmospheric explosion of nuclear weapons in the 1950's and 1960s is being redistributed over the landscape by soil erosion and carried on sediment by streams to oceans. Erosion rates computed with the Universal Soil Loss Equation for more than 200,000 sample points on nonfederal land across the US were used to estimate plutonium removal rates by soil erosion. On the average, only about 4% of the eroded sediment reaches the outlet of a major river. The remaining sediment is deposited en route, and because deposition is a selective process, the sediment is enriched in fine particles having the highest concentration of plutonium because of the element's strong association with clay and silt-sized sediment. Estimated enrichment ratios, sediment delivery ratios, and erosion rates were used to estimate annual delivery of fallout plutonium. These estimates ranged from 0.002% of the initial fallout plutonium inventory for the Savannah River basin to 0.01% for the Columbia River basin, to 0.02% for the Hudson and Rio Grande River basins, to 0.08% for the Mississippi River basin. If the deposition of plutonium had been uniformly 1 mCi/km2, the estimated plutonium activity on suspended sediment would range from about 7 fCi/g of sediment of the Savannah River basin, to 9 fCi/g for the Mississippi River basin, to 12 fCi/g for the Hudson River basin, to 14 fCi/g for the Columbia and Rio Grande River basins. 45 references, 2 figures, 17 tables

  11. Fallout forecasting: 1945-1962

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed hazards of fallout from the detonations of nuclear devices in the atmosphere have always been the concern of those involved in the Test Program. Even before the Trinity Shot (TR-2) of July 16, 1945, many very competent, intelligent scientists and others from all fields of expertise tried their hand at the prediction problems. This resume and collection of parts from reports, memoranda, references, etc., endeavor to chronologically outline prediction methods used operationally in the field during Test Operations of nuclear devices fired into the atmosphere

  12. Fallout forecasting: 1945-1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.R. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The delayed hazards of fallout from the detonations of nuclear devices in the atmosphere have always been the concern of those involved in the Test Program. Even before the Trinity Shot (TR-2) of July 16, 1945, many very competent, intelligent scientists and others from all fields of expertise tried their hand at the prediction problems. This resume and collection of parts from reports, memoranda, references, etc., endeavor to chronologically outline prediction methods used operationally in the field during Test Operations of nuclear devices fired into the atmosphere.

  13. Worldwide fallout of plutonium from nuclear weapons tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of 238Pu and /sup 239,240/Pu fallout from nuclear weapons tests and the SNAP-9A navigational satellite burnup are presented for the years through 1980. Data abstracted from the literature were taken from the stratosphere, atmosphere, and from deposition and surface soil. Over 7300 data entries are included in the 23 tables. The tables are sorted by medium (stratosphere, atmosphere, and deposition near the surface and soil, nuclide, hemisphere, and longitude going from west to east, and are arranged in chronological order. Latitudes are also provided. Fallout levels in SI units (becquerels), calculated from the original readings, and the references from which the original data were taken are given in the report. The appendix is a map showing the various sites from which data were obtained

  14. Alteration mineral mapping and metallogenic prediction using CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data in Mingshujing area of Gansu Province, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Zhao, Yingjun; Qin, Kai; Tian, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is a frontier of remote sensing. Due to its advantage of integrated image with spectrum, it can realize objects identification, superior to objects classification of multispectral remote sensing. Taken the Mingshujing area in Gansu Province of China as an example, this study extracted the alteration minerals and thus to do metallogenic prediction using CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data. The Mingshujing area, located in Liuyuan region of Gansu Province, is dominated by middle Variscan granites and Indosinian granites, with well developed EW- and NE-trending faults. In July 2012, our project team obtained the CASI/SASI hyperspectral data of Liuyuan region by aerial flight. The CASI hyperspectral data have 32 bands and the SASI hyperspectral data have 88 bands, with spectral resolution of 15nm for both. The hyperspectral raw data were first preprocessed, including radiometric correction and geometric correction. We then conducted atmospheric correction using empirical line method based on synchronously measured ground spectra to obtain hyperspectral reflectance data. Spectral dimension of hyperspectral data was reduced by the minimum noise fraction transformation method, and then purity pixels were selected. After these steps, image endmember spectra were obtained. We used the endmember spectrum election method based on expert knowledge to analyze the image endmember spectra. Then, the mixture tuned matched filter (MTMF) mapping method was used to extract mineral information, including limonite, Al-rich sericite, Al-poor sericite and chlorite. Finally, the distribution of minerals in the Mingshujing area was mapped. According to the distribution of limonite and Al-rich sericite mapped by CASI/SASI hyperspectral data, we delineated five gold prospecting areas, and further conducted field verification in these areas. It is shown that there are significant gold mineralized anomalies in surface in the Baixianishan and Xitan prospecting

  15. Mapping Savanna Tree Species at Ecosystem Scales Using Support Vector Machine Classification and BRDF Correction on Airborne Hyperspectral and LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Asner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mapping the spatial distribution of plant species in savannas provides insight into the roles of competition, fire, herbivory, soils and climate in maintaining the biodiversity of these ecosystems. This study focuses on the challenges facing large-scale species mapping using a fusion of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR and hyperspectral imagery. Here we build upon previous work on airborne species detection by using a two-stage support vector machine (SVM classifier to first predict species from hyperspectral data at the pixel scale. Tree crowns are segmented from the lidar imagery such that crown-level information, such as maximum tree height, can then be combined with the pixel-level species probabilities to predict the species of each tree. An overall prediction accuracy of 76% was achieved for 15 species. We also show that bidirectional reflectance distribution (BRDF effects caused by anisotropic scattering properties of savanna vegetation can result in flight line artifacts evident in species probability maps, yet these can be largely mitigated by applying a semi-empirical BRDF model to the hyperspectral data. We find that confronting these three challenges—reflectance anisotropy, integration of pixel- and crown-level data, and crown delineation over large areas—enables species mapping at ecosystem scales for monitoring biodiversity and ecosystem function.

  16. Implementation of a near-real time cross-border web-mapping platform on airborne particulate matter (PM) concentration with open-source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knörchen, Achim; Ketzler, Gunnar; Schneider, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Although Europe has been growing together for the past decades, cross-border information platforms on environmental issues are still scarce. With regard to the establishment of a web-mapping tool on airborne particulate matter (PM) concentration for the Euregio Meuse-Rhine located in the border region of Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands, this article describes the research on methodical and technical backgrounds implementing such a platform. An open-source solution was selected for presenting the data in a Web GIS (OpenLayers/GeoExt; both JavaScript-based), applying other free tools for data handling (Python), data management (PostgreSQL), geo-statistical modelling (Octave), geoprocessing (GRASS GIS/GDAL) and web mapping (MapServer). The multilingual, made-to-order online platform provides access to near-real time data on PM concentration as well as additional background information. In an open data section, commented configuration files for the Web GIS client are being made available for download. Furthermore, all geodata generated by the project is being published under public domain and can be retrieved in various formats or integrated into Desktop GIS as Web Map Services (WMS).

  17. From HYSOMA to ENSOMAP - A new open source tool for quantitative soil properties mapping based on hyperspectral imagery from airborne to spaceborne applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrillat, Sabine; Guillaso, Stephane; Rabe, Andreas; Foerster, Saskia; Guanter, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Soil spectroscopy from the visible-near infrared to the short wave infrared has been shown to be a proven method for the quantitative prediction of key soil surface properties in the laboratory, field, and up to airborne studies for exposed soils in appropriate surface conditions. With the upcoming launch of the next generation of spaceborne hyperspectral sensors within the next 3 to 5 years (EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, SHALOM), a great potential for the global mapping and monitoring of soil properties is appearing. This potential can be achieved only if adequate software tools are available, as shown by the increasing demand for the availability/accessibility of hyperspectral soil products from the geoscience community that have neither the capacity nor the expertise to deliver these soil products. In this context, recently many international efforts were tuned toward the development of robust and easy-to-access soil algorithms to allow non-remote sensing experts to obtain geoscience information based on non-expensive software packages where repeatability of the results is an important prerequisite. In particular, several algorithms for geological and mineral mapping were recently released such as the U.S. Geological Survey Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements (PRISM) software, or the GFZ EnMAP Geological Mapper. For quantitative soil mapping and monitoring, the HYSOMA (Hyperspectral Soil Mapper) software interface was developed at GFZ under the EUFAR (www.eufar.net) and the EnMAP (www.enmap.org) programs. HYSOMA was specifically oriented toward digital soil mapping applications and has been distributed since 2012 for free as IDL plug-ins under the IDL-virtual machine at www.gfz-potsdam.de/hysoma under a close source license. The HYSOMA interface focuses on fully automatic generation of semi-quantitative soil maps such as soil moisture, soil organic matter, iron oxide, clay content, and carbonate content. With more than 100 users around the world

  18. A fall-out shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong structure of precast concrete for use as, for example, a fallout shelter, strong-room or electricity sub-station is described. The major portion is generally tubular in construction and rectangular in cross-section. The tube may be formed in one piece or with two directed channel elements. Pairs of U legs abut either along the sides or along the top and bottom. End slabs close the compartment. An entrance shaft is formed by an upstanding channel element with upper and lower end slabs; alternatively the entrance shaft may be horizontal. Doors or hatches are provided. The whole structure may be buried. This invention provides a structure capable of withstanding considerable overpressure and of offering good resistance to radiation and is cheap and simple to manufacture. (U.K.)

  19. Airborne and ground-based transient electromagnetic mapping of groundwater salinity in the Machile–Zambezi Basin, southwestern Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongo, Mkhuzo; Vest Christiansen, Anders; Tembo, Alice;

    2015-01-01

    The geological and morphological evolution of the Kalahari Basin of Southern Africa has given rise to a complex hydrogeological regime that is affected by water quality issues. Among these concerns is the occurrence of saline groundwater. Airborne and ground-based electromagnetic surveying is an...... Africa. The saline lacustrine sediments infilling the Machile Graben are responsible for the low formation resistivity (below 13 Ωm) and high salinity (above 7000 µS/cm) observed in the groundwater and are probably related to the complex evolutionary history of Palaeo-Lake Makgadikgadi....

  20. Airborne gamma spectrometry - towards integration of European operational capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A nuclear threat can take several forms. The fallout from nuclear weapons or from an accident in a nuclear power reactor may contaminate a large area (>>100,000 km2) whereas the dispersion of single sources, either accidentally or deliberately (dirty bomb), contaminates a much smaller area, perhaps only a few thousand square kilometres or less. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) plays an important role in providing detailed information an the dispersion of radioactive materials. AGS using a fixed-wing or a rotary-wing aircraft is at its best in fallout mapping and in searching for orphan sources. Plume tracking could be a third application but is very complex, and there is a risk of vehicle contamination, which would deteriorate mission capability in the later phases of an accident. Because of obvious advantages, unmanned aerial vehicles could be used to monitor the release rate at the site of an accident and perhaps the plume itself. The aim of the present paper is to discuss ways to utilize existing European airborne monitoring capabilities for multilateral assistance in an accident and to give some thoughts to how an integrated system could be developed to take into account various national measuring strategies. In a large-scale accident, it is to be expected that the European countries use their radiological resources to map their own territory. It is realistic to think of assistance by transferring equipment and staff to another country only in accident scenarios where a country or countries with essential AGS capability would not have been affected by the fallout. Various AGS survey results can be fused only if a common platform for data exchange is available. Formats and protocols have been developed for special cases (ECCOMAGS, Nuclear Fission Safety, 4th and 5th Framework Programmes) but there are no universal solutions applicable to different situations and Instruments. The hardware and software among the European AGS teams are tailor

  1. Atmospheric fallout of sodium combustion aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five sodium combustion product release tests were conducted in the open atmosphere at INEL, Idaho. About 100 kg of sodium was burned in 5 min at 30 m elevation in two of the tests. Fallout distribution and combustion product species determinations were made. The principal fallout occurred near the release point and decreased exponentially as the plume moved downwind. The tests indicated that little fallout of combustion product aerosols occurred beyond a few hundred meters from the source under the given meteorological conditions. 2 refs

  2. Extending airborne electromagnetic surveys for regional active layer and permafrost mapping with remote sensing and ancillary data, Yukon Flats ecoregion, central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Minsley, Burke J.; Ji, Lei; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Rose, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning regression tree models were used to extrapolate airborne electromagnetic resistivity data collected along flight lines in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, central Alaska, for regional mapping of permafrost. This method of extrapolation (r = 0.86) used subsurface resistivity, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) at-sensor reflectance, thermal, TM-derived spectral indices, digital elevation models and other relevant spatial data to estimate near-surface (0–2.6-m depth) resistivity at 30-m resolution. A piecewise regression model (r = 0.82) and a presence/absence decision tree classification (accuracy of 87%) were used to estimate active-layer thickness (ALT) (permafrost occurrence from field data, modelled near-surface (0–2.6 m) resistivity, and other relevant remote sensing and map data. At site scale, the predicted ALTs were similar to those previously observed for different vegetation types. At the landscape scale, the predicted ALTs tended to be thinner on higher-elevation loess deposits than on low-lying alluvial and sand sheet deposits of the Yukon Flats. The ALT and permafrost maps provide a baseline for future permafrost monitoring, serve as inputs for modelling hydrological and carbon cycles at local to regional scales, and offer insight into the ALT response to fire and thaw processes.

  3. Spectral Unmixing of Forest Crown Components at Close Range, Airborne and Simulated Sentinel-2 and EnMAP Spectral Imaging Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Clasen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Forest biochemical and biophysical variables and their spatial and temporal distribution are essential inputs to process-orientated ecosystem models. To provide this information, imaging spectroscopy appears to be a promising tool. In this context, the present study investigates the potential of spectral unmixing to derive sub-pixel crown component fractions in a temperate deciduous forest ecosystem. However, the high proportion of foliage in this complex vegetation structure leads to the problem of saturation effects, when applying broadband vegetation indices. This study illustrates that multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA can contribute to overcoming this challenge. Reference fractional abundances, as well as spectral measurements of the canopy components, could be precisely determined from a crane measurement platform situated in a deciduous forest in North-East Germany. In contrast to most other studies, which only use leaf and soil endmembers, this experimental setup allowed for the inclusion of a bark endmember for the unmixing of components within the canopy. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of additional endmembers markedly improves the accuracy. A mean absolute error of 7.9% could be achieved for the fractional occurrence of the leaf endmember and 5.9% for the bark endmember. In order to evaluate the results of this field-based study for airborne and satellite-based remote sensing applications, a transfer to Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA and simulated Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP and Sentinel-2 imagery was carried out. All sensors were capable of unmixing crown components with a mean absolute error ranging between 3% and 21%.

  4. Utilization of airborne gamma ray spectrometric data for geological mapping, radioactive mineral exploration and environmental monitoring of southeastern Aswan city, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. S.; Elkhodary, Shadia T.

    2013-12-01

    The present work utilizes airborne gamma ray spectrometric data in a trial to refine surface geology of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, detect any radioactive mineralization and monitor environment at southeastern Aswan city, South Eastern Desert, Egypt. This area is mainly covered with igneous rocks (younger granites, older granites, metasediments, metavolcanics, metagabbro, Tertiary basalt and ring complex), metamorphic rocks as well as sedimentary rocks (Um Barmil Formation, Timsah Formation, Abu Aggag Formation and wadi sediments). Airborne gamma ray spectrometry can be very helpful in mapping surface geology. This provides estimates of the apparent surface concentrations of the most common naturally occurring radioactive elements, such as potassium (K), equivalent uranium (eU) and equivalent thorium (eTh). This is based on the assumption that, the absolute and relative concentrations of these radioelements vary measurably and significantly with lithology. The composite image technique is used to display simultaneously three parameters of the three radioelement concentrations and their three binary ratios on one image. The technique offers much in terms of lithological discrimination, based on colour differences and showed efficiency in defining areas, where different lithofacies occur within areas mapped as one continuous lithology. The integration between surface geological information and geophysical data led to detailing the surface geology and the contacts between different rock units. Significant locations or favourable areas for uranium exploration are defined, where the measurements exceed (X + 2S), taking X as the arithmetic mean of eU, eU/eTh and eU/K measurements and S as the standard deviation corresponding to each variables. The study area shows the presence of four relatively high uraniferous zones. These zones cannot be ignored and need further ground follow-up. In addition, the trend analysis based on the three radioelement maps and

  5. Airborne Laser Scanner Mapping as a Monitoring Method for Forest Ecosystem Dynamics of Mts. Shirakami, Northeastern Japan, World Heritage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, H.; Saito, M.; Sato, H.; Nakashizuka, T.; Mimura, K.; Mori, K.; Otsubo, M.; Suhama, T.; Mitani, A.

    2005-12-01

    Shiramakami Mts. situated in the mountains of northeastern Japan is registered as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, because the area includes the last remaining virgin stand of Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata)forest, the typical Japanese climax temperate forest. The registered area consists of 10,139ha core zone plus 6800 ha buffer zone and covers about one third of the Shirakami mountains which are a heavily dissected range with summits rising to just over 1200 m. In the Shirakami-sanchi World Heritage site, it is important to develop suitable monitoring method for conservation and management. UNESCO requires to report site condition and how we investigate. For this purpose various investigations have been conducted to clarify the nature of forest by collecting basic field data on climate, topography and biology. But it is not fully carried out to grasp the forest ecosystem in the whole area because of inaccessibility to the site with steep topography and long winter. Since the primeval beech forest ecosystem is prerequisite factors for registration of Mts. Shirakami as World Heritage, it is primarily important to monitor the change in structure and composition of the beech forests in the area. In this sense, the forest 3D structure (tree height, canopy density, canopy regeneration) and its dynamics are useful information to investigate. However, it requires large amount of labors to know in a large area for long-term. Thus, we need to develop an effective monitoring method, which can observe the forest ecosystem in an efficient way. This research project has been taken with two objectives (i) to clarify the forest ecosystem dynamics for conserving forest ecosystem, (ii) to develop a monitoring method in large scale of forest ecosystem by using airborne sensor systems. In FY2003 and 2004, the measurements by airborne laser scanner and hyper-spectral sensor were done around Mt. Kushiisi south slope monitoring site. Also, ground observations on structure and

  6. Radioactive fallout and neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejat Akar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Possible link between radioactivity and the occurrence of neural tube defects is a long lasting debate since the Chernobyl nuclear fallout in 1986. A recent report on the incidence of neural defects in the west coast of USA, following Fukushima disaster, brought another evidence for effect of radioactive fallout on the occurrence of NTD’s. Here a literature review was performed focusing on this special subject.

  7. Mapping the terrestrial air-absorbed gamma dose rate based on the data of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in southern cities of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental radioactivity survey by Airborne Gamma-ray Spectrometry (AGS) on a large scale was undertaken in Zhuhai Zone (ZZ) and Shenzhen Zone (SZ), which include major cities in southern China, covering areas of 3800 km2 and 4660 km2, respectively. The estimated dose rates by AGS have been compared with observed results by ionization chamber and portable dosemeter. Maps of the terrestrial dose rate at 1m above ground level have been calculated based on the data of AGS. The mean dose rates are 84.37 ± 51.69 and 82.10 ± 32.98 nGy/h in ZZ and SZ, and the maximum rates are 343.11 and 368.36 nGy/h, respectively. Dose rates in some places are above 180 nGy/h; the areas covered where 149 km2 in ZZ and 43 km2 in SZ. The dominant geological conditions that evidently contribute to the radioactive anomalies are outcrops of Middle and Late Jurassic and Cretaceous biotitic-granite. The growth of industrialization and urbanization has dramatically altered radiation background. Stone mining results in the increase of radiation levels with maximum dose rates approaching 368.36 nGy/h in an open pit. The investigation results provide valuable background data and give a good example for mapping nationwide natural radiation terrestrial dose rates in China by AGS. (author)

  8. Vegetation and topography mapping with an airborne laser altimeter using a high-efficiency laser and a scannable field-of-view telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, J.B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Coyle, D. B.

    1996-11-01

    A medium altitude airborne laser altimeter system has been designed and developed at NASA`s Goddard Space Flight Center to map surface height distributions (SHDs) across wide, nadir-centered, swaths. Instrument performance, data product quality, and the satellite-like footprint sizes are maintained using novel laser output and receiver field of view (FOV) scanning techniques. The laser transmitter was custom designed and built at GSFC to achieve 10% wallplug efficiency in a compact, rugged package. The laser output pulse is 2 nsec full width half max (FWHM) at a repetition rate of 500 Hz and with 6 mJ of output power evenly split into 1.064 nm and 0.532 nm wavelengths. A multiple-pass pump scheme along with variable conductance heatpipes (VCHPs) combine to increase the laser efficiency. The telescope was custom designed to have a throughput of > 85%, 20 cm aperture, 6{degrees} potential FOV, 0.5 {degrees} instantaneous FOV that is rapidly positioned anywhere in the potential FOV within 2 msec, permitting wide-swath scanning as well as real-time nadir control of the scan swath. The return echoes are recorded using a 500 MHz, 8-bit waveform digitizer. Possible applications range from simple topographic mapping to 3-dimensional vegetation structure determination. Tree heights, canopy architecture, and surface roughness can easily be extracted from the return echo. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Geodetic Imaging Lidar: Applications for high-accuracy, large area mapping with NASA's upcoming high-altitude waveform-based airborne laser altimetry Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Hofton, M. A.; Citrin, E.; Luthcke, S. B.; Misakonis, A.; Wake, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform laser altimetry has demonstrated its ability to capture highly-accurate surface topography and vertical structure (e.g. vegetation height and structure) even in the most challenging conditions. NASA's high-altitude airborne laser altimeter, LVIS (the Land Vegetation, and Ice Sensor) has produced high-accuracy surface maps over a wide variety of science targets for the last 2 decades. Recently NASA has funded the transition of LVIS into a full-time NASA airborne Facility instrument to increase the amount and quality of the data and to decrease the end-user costs, to expand the utilization and application of this unique sensor capability. Based heavily on the existing LVIS sensor design, the Facility LVIS instrument includes numerous improvements for reliability, resolution, real-time performance monitoring and science products, decreased operational costs, and improved data turnaround time and consistency. The development of this Facility instrument is proceeding well and it is scheduled to begin operations testing in mid-2016. A comprehensive description of the LVIS Facility capability will be presented along with several mission scenarios and science applications examples. The sensor improvements included increased spatial resolution (footprints as small as 5 m), increased range precision (sub-cm single shot range precision), expanded dynamic range, improved detector sensitivity, operational autonomy, real-time flight line tracking, and overall increased reliability and sensor calibration stability. The science customer mission planning and data product interface will be discussed. Science applications of the LVIS Facility include: cryosphere, territorial ecology carbon cycle, hydrology, solid earth and natural hazards, and biodiversity.

  10. A system for airborne SAR interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang; Skou, Niels; Granholm, Johan;

    1996-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) systems have already demonstrated that elevation maps can be generated rapidly with single pass airborne across-track interferometry systems (XTT), and satellite repeat track interferometry (RTT) techniques have been used to map both elevation and......) the status of the airborne interferometry activities at DCRS, including the present system configuration, recent results, and some scientific applications of the system....

  11. Collaborative Cyber-infrastructures for the Management of the UNESCO-IGCP Research Project "Forecast of tephra fallout"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Cordoba, G.

    2009-04-01

    Tephra fallout following explosive volcanic eruptions produces several hazardous effects on inhabitants, infrastructure, and property and represents a serious threat for communities located around active volcanoes. In order to mitigate the effects on the surrounding areas, scientists and civil decision-making authorities need reliable short-term forecasts during episodes of eruptive crisis and long-term probabilistic maps to plan territorial policies and land use. Modelling, together with field studies and volcano monitoring, constitutes an indispensable tool to achieve these objectives. The UNESCO-IGCP research project proposal "Forecast of tephra fallout" has the aim to produce a series of tools capable to elaborate both short-term forecasts and long-term hazard assessments using the cutting-edge models for tephra transport and sedimentation. A special project website will be designed to supply a set of models, procedures and expertise to several Latino-American Institutes based in countries seriously threatened by this geo-hazard (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Nicaragua). This will proportionate to the final users a tool to elaborate short-term forecasts of tephra deposition on the ground, and determine airborne ash concentrations (a quantity of special relevance for aerial navigation safety) during eruptions and emergencies. The project web-site will have a public section and a password-protected area to exchange information and data among participants and, eventually, to allow remote execution of high-resolution mesoscale meteorological forecasts at the BSC facilities. The public website section will be updated periodically and will include sections describing the project objectives and achievements as well as the hazard maps for the investigated volcanoes, and will be linked to other relevant websites such as IAVCEI, IGCP, IUGS and UNESCO homepages. A part of the public section of the website will be devoted to disseminate achieved

  12. Migration studies of 137Cs from nuclear weapons fallout and the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertical migration of 137Cs originating from nuclear weapons fallout (NWF) and the Chernobyl accident has been studied at 27 reference sites in western Sweden. An attempt to describe the present depth distribution with an alternative solution of the Convection-Dispersion Equation (CDE) with a pulse-like fallout as initial condition was made. The actual depth profiles in the soil samples were fit to a sum of the CDE for both NWF and Chernobyl debris. The magnitudes of the fallouts were estimated from precipitation calculations and GIS-mapping, leaving two free parameters (convection velocity and effective dispersion constant) for performing the fit of the depth profiles. In some cases using only two parameters is not sufficient to achieve an accurate representation for the depth profile, indicating an over- or underestimate of the magnitude of the fallout. In these cases the magnitude of the fallout is also varied. The fitted depth profiles were used to correct in situ measurements from the same locations for the actual depth distribution, showing good agreement with the accumulated activities in soil samples

  13. Biodiversity Mapping via Natura 2000 Conservation Status and Ebv Assessment Using Airborne Laser Scanning in Alkali Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlinszky, A.; Deák, B.; Kania, A.; Schroiff, A.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Biodiversity is an ecological concept, which essentially involves a complex sum of several indicators. One widely accepted such set of indicators is prescribed for habitat conservation status assessment within Natura 2000, a continental-scale conservation programme of the European Union. Essential Biodiversity Variables are a set of indicators designed to be relevant for biodiversity and suitable for global-scale operational monitoring. Here we revisit a study of Natura 2000 conservation status mapping via airbone LIDAR that develops individual remote sensing-derived proxies for every parameter required by the Natura 2000 manual, from the perspective of developing regional-scale Essential Biodiversity Variables. Based on leaf-on and leaf-off point clouds (10 pt/m2) collected in an alkali grassland area, a set of data products were calculated at 0.5 ×0.5 m resolution. These represent various aspects of radiometric and geometric texture. A Random Forest machine learning classifier was developed to create fuzzy vegetation maps of classes of interest based on these data products. In the next step, either classification results or LIDAR data products were selected as proxies for individual Natura 2000 conservation status variables, and fine-tuned based on field references. These proxies showed adequate performance and were summarized to deliver Natura 2000 conservation status with 80% overall accuracy compared to field references. This study draws attention to the potential of LIDAR for regional-scale Essential Biodiversity variables, and also holds implications for global-scale mapping. These are (i) the use of sensor data products together with habitat-level classification, (ii) the utility of seasonal data, including for non-seasonal variables such as grassland canopy structure, and (iii) the potential of fuzzy mapping-derived class probabilities as proxies for species presence and absence.

  14. The InSAeS4 Airborne X-Band Interferometric SAR System: A First Assessment on Its Imaging and Topographic Mapping Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Perna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present in this work a first assessment of the imaging and topographic mapping capabilities of the InSAeS4 system, which is a single-pass interferometric airborne X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR. In particular, we first provide a brief description of the InSAeS4 sensor. Then, we discuss the results of our analysis on the SAR and interferometric SAR products relevant to the first flight-test campaign. More specifically, we have exploited as reference the GPS measurements relevant to nine Corner Reflectors (CRs deployed over the illuminated area during the campaign and a laser scanner Digital Elevation Model (DEM. From the analysis carried out on the CRs we achieved a mean geometric resolution, for the SAR products, of about 0.14 m in azimuth and 0.49 m in range, a positioning misalignment with standard deviation of 0.07 m in range and 0.08 m in azimuth, and a height error with standard deviation of 0.51 m. From the comparison with the laser scanner DEM we estimated a height error with standard deviation of 1.57 m.

  15. Mapping asbestos-cement roofing with the use of APEX hyperspectral airborne imagery: Karpacz area, Poland – a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Krówczyńska Małgorzata; Wilk Ewa; Pabjanek Piotr; Zagajewski Bogdan; Meuleman Koen

    2016-01-01

    Asbestos and asbestos containing products are harmful to human health, and therefore its use has been legally forbidden in the EU. Since there is no adequate data on the amount of asbestos-cement roofing in Poland, the objective of this study was to map asbestos-cement roofing with the use of hyperspectral APEX data (288 bands at the spatial resolution of 2.7 m) in the Karpacz area (southwest Poland). A field survey constituted the basis for training and verification polygons in the classific...

  16. Evaluation of Surface Energy Balance models for mapping evapotranspiration using very high resolution airborne remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, George

    Agriculture is the largest (90%) consumer of all fresh water in the world. The consumptive use of water by vegetation represented by the process evapotranspiration (ET) has a vital role in the dynamics of water, carbon and energy fluxes of the biosphere. Consequently, mapping ET is essential for making water a sustainable resource and also for monitoring ecosystem response to water stress and changing climate. Over the past three decades, numerous thermal remote sensing based ET mapping algorithms were developed and these have brought a significant theoretical and technical advancement in the spatial modeling of ET. Though these algorithms provided a robust, economical, and efficient tool for ET estimations at field and regional scales, yet the uncertainties in flux estimations were large, making evaluation a difficult task. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and improve the performance of widely used remote sensing based energy balance models, namely: the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Data used in this study was collected as part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional field campaign BEAREX (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) that was conducted during 2007 and 2008 summer cropping seasons at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas. Seventeen high resolution remote sensing images taken from multispectral sensors onboard aircraft and field measurements of the agro-meteorological variables from the campaign were used for model evaluation and improvement. Overall relative error measured in terms of mean absolute percent difference (MAPD) for instantaneous ET (mm h -1) were 22.7%, 23.2%, and 12.6% for SEBAL, METRIC, and SEBS, respectively. SEBAL and METRIC performances for irrigated fields representing higher ET

  17. Ionizing radiation, cancer induction and radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred years of observations of ionizing radiation have led to a number of major discoveries, including [1] ionizing radiation induces gene mutations in animals at a rate linearly proportional to dose, [2] certain cancers are induced by relatively high doses at a rate that is linearly proportional to the dose, [3] exposure of the fetus to very low doses of x-rays has been associated with an increased risk of cancer developing during childhood, and [4] many cancers result from somatic mutations in genes that control the normal growth and differentiation of cells. Cancers induced by ionizing radiation are likely therefore to result from somatic mutations, as first predicted by H. J. Muller in 1927. Large scale man-made releases of radioactive fallout have occurred and pose a cancer hazard. A special case is the risk of thyroid cancer to infants who ingest the radioiodines in such fallout. Ongoing epidemiological studies of persons exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl accident in 1986 may eventually help to quantify risks associated with very low radiation doses and low dose rates. Governments and societies will need to be better prepared to cope with any future releases of radioactive fallout. (author)

  18. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK)

  19. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.D. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Abelin, T.; Egger, M. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland)) (and others)

    1994-11-12

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK).

  20. Pituitary tumors following fallout radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two pituitary tumors were diagnosed in a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in 1954. Endocrinologic findings in the exposed population, are reported and the possible relation of the tumors to radiation exposure and thyroid disease is discussed

  1. Fallout in Sweden from Chernobyl Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fallout from Chernobyl as recorded by the Swedish network of 25 fixed gamma monitoring stations during the three days 27th, 28th and 29th of April 1986. The measurements are made 2.5 metres above the ground. (author)

  2. Temporary/portable nuclear fallout shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and invention of a temporary/portable fallout shelter has been described in context of schematic and representative embodiments. Tent structures are described which include disposable, exterior, semi-transparent plastic and/or fabric shield membranes covering a tent composed of stretched, tightly woven, rip-resistant fabric panels supported by tensile rods/wands. 16 figs

  3. Radioecological sensitivity. Danish fallout data revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danish fallout data covering four decades are interpreted in terms of radioecological sensitivity. The radioecological sensitivity is the time-integrated radionuclide concentration in an environmental sample from a unit ground deposition (e.g. Bq y kg-1 per Gq m-2). The fallout data comprise observed levels of the radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr in precipitation, grass, milk, beef and diet. The data are analysed with different types of radioecological models: traditional UNSCEAR models and more recent dynamic models. The traditional models provide empirical relationships between the annual fallout from precipitation and the annual average levels in grass, milk, beef and diet. The relationships may be derived from spreadsheet calculations. ECOSYS and FARMLAND represent more recent radioecological models, which are available as software for personal computers. These models are more mechanistic and require information on a range of topics, e.g. mode of deposition, nuclide dependent and nuclide independent parameters. The more recent models do not reproduce the fallout data better than the traditional models. But the general features of the more recent models make them suited for prediction of radiological consequences of routine and accidental releases in areas where limited radioecological data are available. The work is part of the NKS/BOK-2.1 project on Important Nordic Food Chains aiming at characterising radioecological sensitivity and variability across the Nordic countries. (au)

  4. Mapping asbestos-cement roofing with the use of APEX hyperspectral airborne imagery: Karpacz area, Poland – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krówczyńska Małgorzata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Asbestos and asbestos containing products are harmful to human health, and therefore its use has been legally forbidden in the EU. Since there is no adequate data on the amount of asbestos-cement roofing in Poland, the objective of this study was to map asbestos-cement roofing with the use of hyperspectral APEX data (288 bands at the spatial resolution of 2.7 m in the Karpacz area (southwest Poland. A field survey constituted the basis for training and verification polygons in the classification process. A SAM classification method was performed with the following classification results: 62% producer’s accuracy, 73% user’s accuracy and an overall accuracy of 95%. The asbestos-cement roofing for buildings may be discriminated with a high classification accuracy with the use of hyperspectral imagery. The vast majority of the classified buildings were characterised by their small area (i.e. residential type buildings, which reduced the overall accuracy of the classification.

  5. Perspectives of 2D and 3D mapping of atmospheric pollutants over urban areas by means of airborne DOAS spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ravegnani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available tants, offering numerous advantages over conventional networks of in situ analysers. We propose some innovative solutions in the field of DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy remote systems, utilizing diffuse solar light as the radiation source. We examine the numerous potentialities of minor gas slant column calculations, applying the «off-axis» methodology for collecting the diffuse solar radiation. One of these particular approaches, using measurements along horizontal paths, has already been tested with the spectrometer installed on board the Geophysica aircraft during stratospheric flights up to altitudes of 20 km. The theoretical basis of these new measurement techniques using DOAS remote sensing systems are delineated to assess whether low altitude flights can provide 2D and 3D pollution tomography over metropolitan areas. The 2D or 3D trace gas total column mapping could be used to investigate: i transport and dispersion phenomena of air pollution, ii photochemical process rates, iii gas plume tomography, iv minor gas vertical profiles into the Planetary Boundary Layer and v minor gas flux divergence over a large area.

  6. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, L; Bernard, C

    2007-01-01

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 ((137)Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a (137)Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of (137)Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This (137)Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R(2)=0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of (137)Cs. The spatial redistribution of (137)Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 10(7)Bq of (137)Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution. PMID:17673340

  7. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 (137Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a 137Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of 137Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This 137Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R2 = 0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of 137Cs. The spatial redistribution of 137Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 107 Bq of 137Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution

  8. FALLOUT RADIATION: EFFECTS ON THE SKIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R. A.; Cronkite, E. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1963-02-06

    Until recently it has been generally assumed that injury to the skin from ionizing radiation was not a serious hazard associated with the detonation of nuclear dcvices. However, in 1954 the importance of this hazard became apparent when widespread lesions of the skin developed in a large group of people accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in the Marshall Islands following the experimental detonation of a large nuclear device. The accident in the Marshall Islands affords an example of large numbers of lesions of the skin in human beings from the fallout. Studies have been documented and will be referred to frequently in this chapter. The possibility of such accidents must be considered seriously in view of the increasingly widespread use of radioisotopes.

  9. Modeling Fallout of Anthropogenic I-129

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englund, Edvard; Aldahan, Als; Possnert, Göran; Haltia-Hovi, Eeva; Hou, Xiaolin; Renberg, Ingmar; Saarinen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    Despite the relatively well-recognized emission rates of the anthropogenic 1291, there is little knowledge about the temporal fallout patterns and magnitude of fluxes since the start of the atomic era at the early 1940s. We here present measurements of annual 1291 concentrations in sediment...... atmosphere is derived for pertinent sea areas (English Channel, Irish Sea, and North Sea), which is estimated at 0.04 to 0.21 y(-1)....

  10. The fate of airborne lead pollution in boreal forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Klaminder, Jonatan

    2005-01-01

    Lead has a more than three-millennia-long pollution history in Europe. Metal production, burning of coal and use of leaded petrol resulted in a significant pollution of the atmosphere. As a consequence of atmospheric fallout, the Swedish boreal forest is strongly contaminated by airborne lead pollution. High levels of lead in the soil and soil pore water are of concern because the soil fauna, plants and aquatic biota may respond negatively to this toxic element. The fate of the accumulated po...

  11. Radioactive fallout in Norway in 1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholastic achievement of Norwegian children born in 1965 has been analysed in relation to date of birth and school address, in order to examine a possible effect of radioactive fallout during their fetal period. The Western regions of the country had an order of magnitude higher fallout contamination than the Eastern region. There was in the Western region a pronounced seasonal variation in e.g. 137Cs content of milk. The results indicate a deficiency in scholastic achievement in the West cohort corresponding to the coincidence of the most sensitive fetal period (8-15 weeks post conception) with the 1964 late summer increase in 137Cs content of milk. The dose from fallout is several orders of magnitude too low to explain the observed deficiency quantitatively in consonance with the Hiroshima-Nagasaki findings. It is suggested that the explaination may be found be way of a repair induction lag hypothesis, related to the microdosimetric conditions at background dose rate level. (author)

  12. Ingestion intake of fallout Pu in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingestion intakes of fallout Pu throughout Japan in the 1959-1962 and 1978-1980 periods were measured by analyzing composite samples of each foodstuff or duplicate composite food samples consumed by five persons for a period of 1 d. Cumulative ingestion intake in Tokyo for the period from 1954-1980 was estimated by regression analysis. The cumulative ingestion intake, calculated by simple regression analysis between the natural log of the intake and that of annual fallout deposition of Pu, was estimated to be 450 pCi. Calculated by a multiple regression analysis, including the natural log of annual fallout deposition rates for a previous year as an additional independent variable, it was estimated to be 600 pCi. Considering in combination an ingestion intake, the value of which is calculated by the multiple regression analysis; an absorption ratio from the gastrointestinal tract of 0.001 (a recently reported value for low-level soluble Pu independent of chemical form); and the metabolic model in ICRP Publication 30, it is possible to estimate that the contribution of ingestion intake to liver and bone burden would be approximately 30%

  13. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  14. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  15. Glaciers in South Tyrol 1850 - 2006: application of Airborne Laser Scanner data, orthophotos and historical maps for the acquisition of recent and the reconstruction of past glacier extents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the densely populated high mountain areas of the Alps, glaciers are an important part of the cultural and natural landscape. During the warm summer months they are among the most important freshwater resources for economy sectors such as agriculture or industry, an important component for the tourism industry and of great significance for the production of energy from hydropower. However, they also constitute a potential cause of natural hazards. Due to their direct linkage to temperature and precipitation, glaciers are characterized as one of the best natural climate indicators. For that reason, mountain glaciers have become a key symbol for the ongoing discussion about climate, climate changes and the resulting consequences because their reactions can easily be observed and visualized. The main objective of this doctoral thesis is to contribute to a better understanding of the regional South Tyrolean glacier development through a reconstruction and analysis of the glacier changes that have occurred since the climax of the Little Ice Age at around 1850. Glacier inventories, fieldwork and GIS-assisted reconstructions of historical and calculation of recent glacier topographies are used to depict, analyze and visualize the changes of the South Tyrolean glaciers between the maximum extent of approximately 1850 and the inventories of 1997 and 2006. In a comparison of recent, highly accurate glacier topographies mapped with ALS-methods (Airborne Laser Scanner) with a reconstruction of the Little Ice Age maximum South Tyrolean glaciers were detected to have lost 183.2 km2 or 66% of their glacier cover in approximately the last 150 years. This comparison also showed a loss in glacier volume of 9 km3 between 1850 and 2006, which corresponds to a mean ice thickness change of -49 m. These drastic losses in the glacier covered area and volume, which are mainly visible on the glacier tongues of large valley glaciers like Langtauferer- and Suldenferner, clearly show changes

  16. Airborne geophysical survey of the catastrophic landslide at Stože, Log pod Mangrtom, as a test of an innovative approach for landslide mapping in steep alpine terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Baroň

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne geophysics is a promising method for investigating landslides. Here we present a case study of multisensor airborne geophysical survey at the catastrophic landslide Stože near Log pod Mangrtom in Slovenia, which was conducted in the framework of the European FP7th Project "SafeLand". Based on the survey itself and achieved results, we discuss applicability, limits, and benefits and costs of the method for investigating landslides in steep alpine terrains. Despite of several operational constraints, the airborne electromagnetic survey of the area well presented the lithological pattern and water saturation. The high resistivity regions mostly indicated drained slope scree and landslide mass, drained and loosened material of the moraine deposit in the tension zone of the landslide with present cracks and cavities. The minima of the resistivity pattern were attributed to the outcrop of marls rich in clay, to water-saturated moraine deposit above impermeable marls in the tension zone, and to water-saturated porous alluvial gravel and landslide scree along the Koritnica River. The magnetic survey proved to be inapplicable for such a small and rough area. The Potassium and Thorium maps, on the other hand, both well identified the regions of tension inside the landslide zone, outcrops of marls and dolomite, clay-rich colluvium, weathered zones along a regional tectonic fault, and alluvial deposits and deposits of debris flows, and the minima of the 137Cs clearly revealed the zones of material removal due to recent mass movements.

  17. Evaluation of the US Army fallout prediction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Army fallout prediction method was evaluated against an advanced fallout prediction model--SIMFIC (Simplified Fallout Interpretive Code). The danger zone areas of the US Army method were found to be significantly greater (up to a factor of 8) than the areas of corresponding radiation hazard as predicted by SIMFIC. Nonetheless, because the US Army's method predicts danger zone lengths that are commonly shorter than the corresponding hot line distances of SIMFIC, the US Army's method is not reliably conservative

  18. Airborne gamma ray measurements conducted during an international trial in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) contributed to the RESUME 95 exercise by developing the calibration site at Vesivehmaa, and by participating in the airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) part of the study. This report provides a full technical description of the AGS results from the SURRC team. The AGS tasks included fallout mapping of a 6x3 km area in central Finland with nominal 150 m line spacing, and a time constrained search for an undisclosed number of hidden radioactive sources. Measurements at the calibration site were also taken to provide a basis for traceable cross comparison between each teams' quantification procedures at a single, well characterised, location. A decision was taken to transport the SURRC AGS system by land and sea, and to utilise a Finnish Twin Star Helicopter chartered from Helijet OY from Rovaniemi and flown by a UK pilot. Prior to departure the SURRC spectrometer, comprising a 16 l. Nal detector and a 50% GMX detector, was checked, and NaI stripping ratios measured using pads, absorbers and active sheets. Installation and CAA approval details were forwarded to Finland, together with the CV of the proposed pilot, to obtain clearances for the operation. Maps of the study area were digitised to form geographical backdrops for the AGS results. The equipment was transported in a single Landrover, via Harwich, north Germany, and Helsinki; a journey taking 2 days and involving 3 overland stages and two ferries. The system was installed at tested in the Helijet aircraft immediately prior to the study. The SURRC team was the first to fly starting at 8.00 am on the day of study. Fallout mapping in Area II was accomplished within the allotted 2 hour period, and the source search conducted in Area III within the allotted hour. Immediately on landing the positions of 3 hidden sources were reported to the organisers, with paper copies of tabular data available within a few minutes of landing, and initial mapping taking

  19. Chernobyl fallout in southern and central Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the levels and distributions of radionuclides released in the Chernobyl accident, we sampled surface peat from 62 sites in Southern and Central Finland and measured 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 132Te, 140Ba, 103Ru, 90Sr, 141Ce, and 95Zr. The distribution of fallout activities was highly uneven, depending on movement of the contaminated air mass and rainfall distribution during the critical days. The highest values observed were 420 kBq m-2 of 131I and 70 kBq m-2 of 137Cs. The nuclide ratios showed wide and partly unexpected variations. The high-boiling-point, or nonvolatile, elements Ce and Zr were spread mostly on a 200-km-wide zone extending across Finland from southwest to northeast. The more volatile elements, I, Ce, and Te, showed quite a different, more widespread, fallout distribution, while an intermediate behavior was observed for Ba, Ru, and possibly Sr. These results can be explained by assuming that pulverized nuclear fuel material released in the reactor explosion on 26 April reached Finland via Poland and the Baltic Sea and traversed the country along the above-mentioned narrow zone, while volatile material, evaporated in the reactor fire from 26 April to 5 May, arrived in several waves and was consequently more widely and evenly spread. From their elemental melting and boiling points, Ru and Mo would appear to belong to the nonvolatile group and Sr to the volatile. Yet, their actual behaviors were opposite; Ru in particular was found in the nonvolatile as well as the volatile fallout, possibly because Ru activities were present in the fuel partly in the metallic state and partly as volatile oxides

  20. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities

  1. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  2. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  3. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  4. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities

  5. Evaluation of 7Be fallout spatial variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmogenic radionuclide beryllium-7 (Be) is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic particle reactions and is being used as a tracer for soil erosion and climatic processes research. After the production, 7Be bonds to aerosol particles in the atmosphere and is deposited on the soil surface with other radionuclide species by rainfall. Because of the high adsorption on soil particles and its short half-life of 53.2 days, this radionuclide follows of the erosion process and can be used as a tracer to evaluate the sediment transport that occurs during a single rain event or short period of rain events. A key assumption for the erosion evaluation through this radiotracer is the uniformity of the spatial distribution of the 7Be fallout. The 7Be method was elaborated recently and due to its few applications, some assumptions related to the method were not yet properly investigated yet, and the hypothesis of 7Be fallout uniformity needs to be evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 7Be fallout spatial distribution through the rain water 7Be activity analysis of the first five millimeters of single rain events. The rain water was sampled using twelve collectors distributed on an experimental area of about 300 m2 , located in the campus of Sao Paulo University, Piracicaba. The 7Be activities were measured using a 53% efficiency gamma-ray spectrometer from the Radioisotope laboratory of CENA. The 7Be activities in rain water varied from 0.26 to 1.81 Sq.L-1, with the highest values in summer and lowest in spring. In each one of the 5 single events, the spatial variability of 7Se activity in rain water was high, showing the high randomness of the fallout spatial distribution. A simulation using the 7Be spatial variability values obtained here and 7Se average reference inventories taken from the literature was performed determining the lowest detectable erosion rate estimated by 7Be model. The importance of taking a representative number of samples to determine the

  6. Effects of fallout radiation on crop production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vulnerability of selected food crops to radioactive fallout as affected by radiation dose, dose rate, kind of radiation, plant species, developmental stage, and postirradiation interval was studied. Data are presented on barley, wheat, soybeans, corn, potatoes, alfalfa, and rice. Results showed that morphological development influenced radiosensitivity of the plants in terms of seed or grain yield, and high radiation dose rates were more damaging to plants than low dose rates. Beta radiation was equivalent to γ radiation for specific indices of damage. Annual plants showed sublethal damage at maturity but damage in perennials sometimes did not appear for several years. (U.S.)

  7. UAVSAR: An Airborne Window on Earth Surface Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates that UAVSAR's precision autopilot and electronic steering have allowed for the reliable collection of airborne repeat pass radar interferometric data for deformation mapping. Deformation maps from temporal scales ranging from hours to months over a variety of signals of geophysical interest illustrate the utility of UAVSAR airborne repeat pass interferometry to these studies.

  8. The isotopic signature of fallout plutonium in the North Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium analyses of a dated coral record from the French Frigate Shoals in the central North Pacific indicate that there are two major sources of Pu in this basin: close-in (tropospheric) fallout from nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands in the 1950s and global (stratospheric) fallout which peaked in 1962. Furthermore, the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of fallout from the Pacific Proving Grounds is characteristically higher (0.24) than that of global fallout Pu (0.18-0.19). Seawater and sediment samples from the North Pacific exhibit a wide range of 240Pu/239Pu values (0.19-0.34), with a trend towards higher ratios in the subsurface waters and sediment. Deep water 240Pu/239Pu ratios are higher in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands relative to stations further from this close-in fallout source. These preliminary data suggest that fallout Pu from the Pacific Proving Grounds is more rapidly removed from the surface waters than is global fallout Pu. Plutonium geochemistry appears to be related to the physical/chemical form of Pu-bearing particles generated by different fallout sources. (author)

  9. Airborne monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete system for tracking, mapping, and performing a composition analysis of a radioactive plume and contaminated area was developed at the NRCN. The system includes two major units : An airborne unit for monitoring and a ground station for analyzing. The airborne unit is mounted on a helicopter and includes file following. Four radiation sensor, two 2'' x 2'' Nal (Tl) sensors horizontally separated by lead shield for mapping and spectroscopy, and two Geiger Mueller (GM) tubes as part of the safety system. A multichannel analyzer card is used for spectroscopy. A navigation system, based on GPS and a barometric altitude meter, is used to locate the plume or ground data. The telemetry system, consisting of a transceiver and a modem, transfers all the data in real time to the ground station. An industrial PC (Field Works) runs a dedicated C++ Windows application to manage the acquired data. An independent microprocessor based backup system includes a recorder, display, and key pad. The ground station is based on an industrial PC, a telemetry system, a color printer and a modem to communicate with automatic meteorology stations in the relevant area. A special software controls the ground station. Measurement results are analyzed in the ground station to estimate plume parameters including motion, location, size, velocity, and perform risk assessment. (authors)

  10. Airborne gamma ray measurements conducted during an international trial in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) contributed to the Resume 95 exercise by developing the calibration site at Vesivehmaa, and by participating in the airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) part of the study. This paper summarises the airborne survey results from the SURRC team. The AGS tasks included fallout mapping of a 6x3 km area in central Finland with nominal 150 m line spacing, and a time constrained search for an undisclosed number of hidden radioactive sources. Measurements at the calibration site were also taken to provide a basis for traceable cross comparison between each teams' quantification procedures at a single, well characterised, location. A full set of calibrated maps of Chernobyl deposition and natural radionuclides, together with overlays corresponding to topography, roads, rivers and lakes were finished during the survey and displayed at the end of the exercise. The main survey area (Area II) was found to have a mean 137Cs deposition of 64.4±24.4 kBq m-2, based on the calibration appropriate to the Vesivehmaa site. The major point sources in Area III were discovered, although the collimated 137Cs and 60Co sources were not. Retrospective analysis has shown that sources Cs3 and Cs4 were not significantly above local environmental levels in our data set; whereas the low activity 60Co source Co3 was detected. This confirms the improved sensitivity of AGS source searches to nuclides which are not already present as environmental contaminants. The collimated 192Ir was found both using scattered radiation and from full energy lines detected with a Ge detector. The 99mTc was located using a ratio of low energy integrals from the NaI spectra. (EG)

  11. Airborne gamma ray measurements conducted during an international trial in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Allyson, J.D.; McConville, P.; Murphy, S.; Smith, J. [Scottish Univ. Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) contributed to the Resume 95 exercise by developing the calibration site at Vesivehmaa, and by participating in the airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) part of the study. This paper summarises the airborne survey results from the SURRC team. The AGS tasks included fallout mapping of a 6x3 km area in central Finland with nominal 150 m line spacing, and a time constrained search for an undisclosed number of hidden radioactive sources. Measurements at the calibration site were also taken to provide a basis for traceable cross comparison between each teams` quantification procedures at a single, well characterised, location. A full set of calibrated maps of Chernobyl deposition and natural radionuclides, together with overlays corresponding to topography, roads, rivers and lakes were finished during the survey and displayed at the end of the exercise. The main survey area (Area II) was found to have a mean {sup 137}Cs deposition of 64.4{+-}24.4 kBq m{sup -2}, based on the calibration appropriate to the Vesivehmaa site. The major point sources in Area III were discovered, although the collimated {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co sources were not. Retrospective analysis has shown that sources Cs3 and Cs4 were not significantly above local environmental levels in our data set; whereas the low activity {sup 60}Co source Co3 was detected. This confirms the improved sensitivity of AGS source searches to nuclides which are not already present as environmental contaminants. The collimated {sup 192}Ir was found both using scattered radiation and from full energy lines detected with a Ge detector. The {sup 99m}Tc was located using a ratio of low energy integrals from the NaI spectra. (EG). 28 refs.

  12. Measurements of atmospheric fallout in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of studying the radioactive fallout present in Argentina from atmospheric nuclear explosions tests that have been conducted recently, an environmental monitoring program, outside the influence of nuclear facilities of Argentina, was undertaken during 1996 and 1997. The levels of Cs-137 and Sr-90 were analysed in samples of air, deposited material (rainwater), milk, an average meal of a standard man and food. During this period, a total of 630 radiochemical analysis were performed on 325 samples of the different matrices described. The concentration levels of the radionuclides analysed in the different environmental matrices are presented and are compared with the values obtained in the environmental monitoring program done during the period 1960-1981. (author)

  13. Nuclear fallout in the Irish terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the transport mechanisms of pollutants from weapons detonation sites and reactor installations are reviewed. Secondary contamination processes such as sea-to-land transfer are also examined and a comprehensive literature survey of research relating to fission and neutron activation products such as 90Sr, 134Cs, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am in the Global terrestrial environment is detailed. The deposition patterns of a wide range of fallout radionuclides throughout the terrestrial environment of Ireland have been examined in detail for the first time. Particular attention has been paid to the impact of (a) atmospheric nuclear weapons testing mainly carried out in the 1950s and 1960s and (b) the Chernobyl accident which occurred in April 1986. To this end a number of separate soil sampling programmes were carried out with the specific objectives of determining: (i) the geographical and vertical distribution of nuclear fallout in the Irish terrestrial environment, (ii) the contribution of Chernobyl deposition to the integrated total of selected nuclides, (iii) correlations, if any, with a number of environmental parameters, (iv) the possible existence of a radionuclide sea-to-land transfer effect along the north-east coast of Ireland and (v) the degree of spatial variability of radiometric measurements in a relatively localised and arbitrarily chosen area. The principal radionuclides studied included 134Cs, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am and 90Sr, and required the application of a range of high sensitivity radiochemical and radiometric techniques. (author)

  14. Impact of the Chernobyl fallout in the alpine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Austria the alpine regions received the highest fallout contamination, showing a very inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the surface deposition. About half of the national territory is within alpine regions, which are very different in times of underlying bedrock and soil characteristic. Since this is the controlling factor for the radionuclide uptake of the vegetation, it is crucial for the long-term effects of radioactive fallout. Different studies have been carried out in the Province of Salzburg (area: 7154 km2) over the past ten years, addressing a broad spectrum of issues, such as: measurement of the spatial distribution of the fallout, research in monitoring techniques comparison of theoretical calculations with actual in vivo-measurements of nuclide uptake by man for different population groups, and the investigation of biological effects. When considering the radioecological effects of the Chernobyl fallout a distinction has to be made between the short-term effects immediately following the fallout and the long-term effects. While the short term effects are controlled by the physical characteristics of the fallout, similar for the whole region, the long-term effects are more determined by the radioecological properties of the environments affected which are much more variable than the fallout-characteristics

  15. Regional scale rain-forest height mapping using regression-kriging of spaceborne and airborne LiDAR data: application on French Guiana

    OpenAIRE

    Fayad, I.; Baghdadi, N.; Bailly, J.S.; Barbier, N.; Gond, V.; Hérault, B; El Hajj, M.; Fabre, F.; Perrin, J.

    2016-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) remote sensing has been shown to be a good technique for the estimation of forest parameters such as canopy heights and above ground biomass. Whilst airborne LiDAR data are in general very dense but only available over small areas due to the cost of their acquisition, spaceborne LiDAR data acquired from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) have a coarser acquisition density associated with a global cover. It is therefore valuable to analyze the inte...

  16. Chernobyl -- the fallout and the farmer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident an increase in the levels of airborne radioactivity was first detected in Ireland during the period 2nd-4th May, 1986. Heavy rainfall resulted in significant ground deposition of this activity, and the environmental monitoring programme set up by the Nuclear Energy Board ( now the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland) has determined the distribution and level of radionuclides in the major food items consumed by the Irish population

  17. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests

  18. Trees as Filters of Radioactive Fallout from the Chernobyl Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Brownridge, James D

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a copy of an unpublished study of the filtering effect of red maple trees (acer rubrum) on fission product fallout near Binghamton, NY, USA following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The conclusions of this work may offer some insight into what is happening in the forests exposed to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident. This posting is in memory of Noel K. Yeh.

  19. Chernobyl fallout in small mammals captured in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out aimed at studying the contamination of small mammals (orders Rodentia and Insectivora) following the Chernobyl fallout. The animals were captured in three differently contaminated areas and, for control, in an area with negligible fallout. The results obtained show that the activity in the captured animals varied and depended on surface deposition. The differences between the species are investigated and the influence of feeding habits on the contamination levels are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. 131I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided

  1. Fallout Concentration Various Environmental Samples in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing of nuclear weapons have been carried out by the advanced countries, such as United States, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, France, China, India and Pakistan, since about 1945 until 1998. Nuclear weapons tests were conducted at various locations, on and above the earth's surface or underground or on and under the ocean's surface. Nuclear explosions caused the radionuclides of fission product, such as 131l, 89Sr, 90Sr, 134Cs, 137Cs, and 239Pu released to the atmospheric layer. In the atmospheric layer, the long-lived radionuclides, i.e, 90Sr dan 137Cs will be distributed into the environment as the fallout radionuclides, and deposited in the various environmental samples (soil, water, and biota). In general, at several locations in Indonesia the 90Sr and 137Cs in the various environmental samples still can be detected. The data of measurement results of 90Sr and 137Cs concentrations were generally lower than that from some countries in the northern hemisphere. (author)

  2. Radioactive fallout in air and rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of atmospheric dust and rainwater have been collected from the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Results are presented of analyses of these samples for various fission products and certain other radionuclides. The average concentrations of long-lived fission products in air and rain in the United Kingdom in 1977 were about double those in 1976 and about 2% of the maximum which was reached in 1963-64. A similar rise occurred between 1973 and 1974. Despite such fluctuations the general trend is of slowly decreasing concentrations. Plutonium concentrations in air at Chilton are discussed for the years 1954-1977 and generally follow the pattern of long-lived fission products. Barium-140 and iodine-131 indicative of a recent atmospheric test were detected in air and rain in the United Kingdom after the low yield Chinese explosion of 17 September 1977. Iodine-131 ceased to be detectable by mid-October and barium-140 by December 1977. In the southern hemisphere the mean concentration of caesium-137 in air in 1977 was about two-thirds that in 1976. An estimate is made of the worldwide deposit of caesium-137 and strontium-90 which, in 1976, was the lowest since measurements were started in 1955. The gamma and beta-ray dose rates from fallout at Chilton are estimated from the observed deposition. Measurements of short-lived fission products in air and rain are given in an Appendix. (author)

  3. Radioactive fallout in food and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 1 of this review is designed to provide an up-dated background to the subject in relation to FAO's interests and responsibilities in scientifically accurate but non-technical language. Part 2 is concerned more specifically with the problems of radioactive fallout over pasture and cultivated soils. Moreover, it is mainly concerned with problems of international significance under peacetime conditions and which are likely only to arise as a result of a major nuclear reactor accident, or, possibly, some unintended nuclear explosion. However, relatively local problems of soil contamination could arise as a result of other kinds of accident. In the report the natural occurrence of radionuclides, and radiation exposure as a fact of life in the human environment, are indicated. Exposure to ionizing radiation from natural and man-made sources are compared. The behaviour and significance of radionuclides in ecosystems are briefly illustrated. Land-based nuclear powr stations and nuclear-powered ships and submarines are identified as the major potential accident hazards to agriculture or fisheries under peacetime conditions. 216 refs, figs and tabs

  4. An airborne gamma ray survey of parts of SW Scotland in February 1993. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An airborne gamma ray survey was conducted for the Scottish Office Environment Department of coastal and inland parts of SW Scotland to define existing background levels, to locate features worthy of further attention, and to demonstrate the emergency response capabilities of radiometric methods. Coastal areas were surveyed with 500 m line spacing. Inland areas were specified to 2 km line spacing, however it was possible to achieve 1 km line spacing in the majority of the inland zone. The radiometric maps show clearly the distributions of each individual nuclide and indicate the contribution which individual localised features make to the overall gamma ray dose rate. Naturally occurring nuclides reflect the underlying geological and geomorphological contexts of the landscapes. The main granite intrusions, most notably at Cairnsmore of Fleet, the Loch Doon Granodiorite, Glencairn of Carsphairn, the Dalbeattie granite, and Criffel Pluton are readily visible in 40K, 214Bi and 208Tl maps, and control their local radiation environments. A number of areas of enhanced 214Bi, which may reflect radon potential, were noted. A transient radon associated 214Bi signal was observed on the west of the Wigtown peninsular during the survey. Examination of spectral data in the vicinity Dundrennan has confirmed that there is no evidence of widespread terrestrial contamination arising from the use of depleted uranium projectiles on the range. The 137Cs map indicates the environmental distribution of this nuclide in considerable detail. Levels of 137Cs range from approximately 2 kBq m-2, a level consistent with global weapons' testing fallout, from 2-40 kBq m-2 on terrestrial sites affected by deposition from the Chernobyl accident, and from 40 kBq m-2 to over 200 kBq m-2 on tide washed pastures which have accumulated marine sediments from the Irish sea. (author)

  5. After Chernobyl--how US physicians respond to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, a reactor unit at the Soviet Union's Chernobyl Power Station exploded, and substantial amounts of radioactive material were released. Fallout from this incident was deposited in the United States and elsewhere. Radioactive fallout is a major concern for obstetricians and pediatricians; their patients are the most vulnerable to the adverse effects of radiation. This study addresses the question: What are these physicians' perceptions and beliefs about fallout and its effects on their patients? A questionnaire was developed to measure these perceptions and beliefs. This instrument was mailed in November 1986 to all obstetricians and pediatricians listed in the telephone directory for western Massachusetts. A factor analysis of the physicians' responses yielded five factors: concern for patients, management of risk, effect of fallout, physicians' role in prevention, and guidance on advising patients. The physicians' responses to patients' inquiries were categorized as giving information, reassurance, and prescription. The authors recommend that the study be replicated with a more representative sample, that professional medical groups provide reliable information to members, and that physicians ask their professional organizations to address the issue of physician participation in the national planning process relevant to their concerns about radioactive fallout

  6. Indication of the radioactive fallout in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhomashi, N; Almasoud, Fahad I

    2016-02-01

    On March 2011, a severe damage has occurred to Fukushima Di-iachi nuclear reactor complex in Japan following the huge earthquake and the resulting Tsunami. Consequently, vast amounts of radioactive fallout were released into the atmosphere and contaminated the environment in Japan. Soon after the accident, traces of anthropogenic radionuclides were detected in environmental samples collected in many parts in the northern hemisphere even very far away from Japan creating a global concern. There is no information about radioactive contamination in the Arabian Peninsula caused by the Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident. The first evidence of Fukushima radioactive fallout in Riyadh (24° 43' N, 46° 38' E), Saudi Arabia has been confirmed in April 8, 2011. The airborne fission products (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were measured in air samples. The radionuclide concentrations were determined by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. Their activity concentrations were studied as a function of time over a period of 20 days at the end of which they had mostly fallen below our limit of detection. The maximum activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in air of, respectively, 323.7 ± 18.5, 17.2 ± 1.0 and 26.0 ± 1.8 μBq m(-3) were observed on April 10-11, 2011. The (131)I/(137)Cs and (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio values in air were presented and discussed. Finally, the effective doses to the public of Riyadh city from inhalation of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs due to contribution from Fukushima incident was found far below levels of concern. PMID:26650827

  7. Statistical analysis of fallout radionuclides transfer to paddy-field rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides released from nuclear facilities to atmosphere are transported through various pathways in biosphere and cause human exposure. Among these radionuclides transfer pathways, an ingestion of crops containing radionuclides is one of the dominant pathway for human exposure. For the safety assessment of nuclear facilities, it is important to understand the behavior of radionuclides in agricultural environment and to describe them in a mathematical model. In this paper, a statistical model is proposed for estimating the concentration of fallout radionuclides in paddy-field rice, the staple food for Japanese people. For describing behavior of fallout radionuclides in a paddy-field, a dynamic model and a statistical model have been proposed respectively. The model used in this study has been developed assuming that the amount of radionuclides transfer to brown rice (hulled rice) or polished rice through direct deposition of airborne radionuclides (the direct deposition pathway) and root uptake from a paddy soil (the root uptake pathway) are proportional to the deposition flux of radionuclides and concentration of radionuclides in paddy soil respectively. That is, the model has two independent variables; the deposition flux of radionuclides and the concentration of radionuclides in the paddy soil, and has single dependent variable; the concentration of radionuclides in brown rice or polished rice. The regression analysis is applied by using environmental monitoring data. Then the distribution of radionuclides between rice-bran (skin part of rice crop) and polished rice (core part) through both the direct deposition pathway and the root uptake pathway are evaluated by the model. (author)

  8. Radar, geologic, airborne gamma ray and Landsat TM digital data integration for geological mapping of the Estrela granite complex (Para State)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is focused on the geotectonic context of the Carajas Mineral Province, Amazon Craton, which represents the most important Brazilian Mineral Province and hosts iron, cooper, gold, manganese and nickel deposits. At the end of Archean age, during the techno-metamorphic evolution, moderated alkaline granitoids were generated, such as, Estrela Granite Complex (EGC). This work has used digital integration products with the purpose of study the granite suite, its host rock, and the surrounded area. The digital integrated data were gamma-ray and geological data with satellite images (SAR-SAREX e TM-Landsat). The geophysics data, originally in 32 bits and grid format, were interpolated and converted to 8 bits images. The geological data (facies map) was digitalized and converted to a raster format. The remote sensing images were geometrically corrected to guarantee an accuracy on the geological mapping. On the data processing phase, SAR images were digital integrated with gamma-ray data, TM-Landsat image and the raster facies map. The IHS transformation was used as the technique to integrate the multi-source data. On the photogeological interpretation, SAR data were extremely important to permit the extraction of the main tectonic lineaments which occur on the following directions: +/- N45W, +/- N70W, +/- NS, +/- N20E, +/- N45E e +/- N75E. This procedure was done both in analogic and automatic form, being the automatic process more useful to complement information in the extracting process. Among the digital products generated, SAR/GAMA products (uranium, thorium and total count) were the ones that give the most important contribution. The interpretation of the SAR/GAMA's products added to the field campaign have allowed to map the limits of units that occur in the region and four facies of the Estrela Granite Complex were detected. The origin of the granite suite might be related to a magmatic differentiation or to distinct intrusion pulses. The use of the

  9. Fallout Radioactivity in Some Egyptian Lakes Bottom Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the Egyptian environmental radioactivity monitoring program, the fallout radioactivity levels in Qarun, Bardawill and Ed ku lakes bottom sediments have been measured. The specific activities of 137Cs were measured using gamma ray spectrometer based on Hyper pure germanium detector. The specific activities of plutonium isotopes(238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Pu) were measured using alpha spectrometry based on surface battier detectors and liquid scintillation spectrometry after radiochemical separation. The activity ratios 239+240Pu/137Cs, 239+240Pu/241Pu, and 238Pu/ 239+240Pu were calculated. The results seemed to confirm that fallout radioactivity is mainly due to nuclear weapons testing fallout

  10. The glacier and land ice surface topography interferometer: An airborne proof-of-concept demonstration of high-precision Ka-band single-pass elevation mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Moller, D; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, GA; Fisher, CD; T. Michel; Zawadzki, M; E. Rignot

    2011-01-01

    As part of the NASA International Polar Year activities, a Ka-band cross-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) recently demonstrated high-precision elevation swath mapping capability. This proof-of-concept instrument was achieved by interfacing two Ka-band slotted-waveguide antennas in a cross-track geometry and Ka-band electronics with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's L-band uninhabited aerial vehicle SAR. Deployed on the NASA Gulfstream III, initial engineering flights in Marc...

  11. Transfer of fallout tritium from environment to human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large quntity of tritium will be used as a fuel of nuclear fusion in the future. It is, therefore, considered important to elucidate tritium behavior present in the environment and the process of tritium transfer from the environment to the human body. Fallout tritium is an applicable material in searching for the long term behavior of tritium in the environment. This paper focuses on the American, Italian, Japanese literature concerning fallout tritium in food and in the human body. The specific activity ratio of bound to free tritium poses an important problem. The mechanism of biological concentration must await further studies. (N.K.) 63 refs

  12. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release

  13. Radioactive fallout over South Africa during 1974-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUCOR is routinely monitoring air and rainwater for radioactive fallout from atmospheric sources. Air humidity is continuously collected and analysed for tritium. Milk samples are obtained from a number of places throughout the country. These samples are analysed to detect timeously any build-up of radionuclides in soil and plants. Only a few atmosperic nuclear tests have been conducted (by China) since the previous report period of 1965 to 1973. The fallout from these sources over South Africa is extremely small and it is mainly cosmogenic radioactivity, viz 3H and 7Be, that is detected

  14. Interception and retention of Chernobyl fallout by forage grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of perennial forage crops from experimental plots set up for field performance were utilized to assess fallout retention in the six weeks following the Chernobyl reactor accident. In the study, plant density and the concentration of Cs-137, Ru-106, and Sb-125 were determined in the four cultivars from 8th May to 17th June, 1986. The obtained results indicate that in the event of a nuclear reactor failure for a short deposition time of fallout particles on pasture during normal plant growth the activity of Cs, Ru, and Sb would decrease by 50% about 10 days following the end of radionuclide deposition. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. A fully-automated approach to land cover mapping with airborne LiDAR and high resolution multispectral imagery in a forested suburban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Jason R.; Volin, John C.; Civco, Daniel L.

    2015-06-01

    Information on land cover is essential for guiding land management decisions and supporting landscape-level ecological research. In recent years, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and high resolution aerial imagery have become more readily available in many areas. These data have great potential to enable the generation of land cover at a fine scale and across large areas by leveraging 3-dimensional structure and multispectral information. LiDAR and other high resolution datasets must be processed in relatively small subsets due to their large volumes; however, conventional classification techniques cannot be fully automated and thus are unlikely to be feasible options when processing large high-resolution datasets. In this paper, we propose a fully automated rule-based algorithm to develop a 1 m resolution land cover classification from LiDAR data and multispectral imagery. The algorithm we propose uses a series of pixel- and object-based rules to identify eight vegetated and non-vegetated land cover features (deciduous and coniferous tall vegetation, medium vegetation, low vegetation, water, riparian wetlands, buildings, low impervious cover). The rules leverage both structural and spectral properties including height, LiDAR return characteristics, brightness in visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Pixel-based properties were used initially to classify each land cover class while minimizing omission error; a series of object-based tests were then used to remove errors of commission. These tests used conservative thresholds, based on diverse test areas, to help avoid over-fitting the algorithm to the test areas. The accuracy assessment of the classification results included a stratified random sample of 3198 validation points distributed across 30 1 × 1 km tiles in eastern Connecticut, USA. The sample tiles were selected in a stratified random manner from locations representing the full range of

  16. Sediment core record of global fallout and Bikini close-in fallout Pu in Sagami Bay, Western Northwest Pacific margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2004-07-01

    The total 239-240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the sediments in Sagami Bay of the western Northwest Pacific margin were investigated using ICP-MS with a shield torch system. 239+240Pu inventories in the examined sediment cores were found to be much higher than those predicted from atmospheric global fallout (42 MBq/km2) at the same latitude. In addition, elevated 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios ranging from 0.22 to 0.28 were observed in the sediment samples. On the basis of the vertical profiles of 239+240Pu and characterized 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in a sediment core collected in the center of Sagami Bay, we identified two distinct sources of fallout Pu in the bay: the global stratospheric fallout with characteristic 240Pu/239Pu ratio of 0.18 and the transported close-in fallout derived from Bikini and Enewetak surface nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s. We propose that the Pu transportation was mainly due to oceanic processes (for example, through the North Equatorial Current and the Kuroshio Current). Using a two fallout end-member model, we find that the contribution of Bikini close-in fallout Pu ranged from 44 to 59% in Sagami Bay sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that Pu contamination, which originated from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s, has extended westwards as far as the Japanese coast. PMID:15296298

  17. Microwaves in Airborne Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher, S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of microwave spectrum is widespread due to its convenience. Therefore, enormous amount of information is available in the free space channel. Obviously, mining this channel for surveillance is quite common. Airborne surveillance offers significant advantages in military operations. This paper talks of the usage of microwaves in airborne surveillance systems, in general, and in the Indian airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) System, in particular. It brings out the multiple s...

  18. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.-A.; Mourlon, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  19. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  20. Behaviour of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides deposited on peat and urban surfaces in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the thesis the impact of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on Finland was studied in three aspects: (1) the areal distribution of Chernobyl fallout in Finland was determined by measuring peat samples, (2) the behaviour of fallout radionuclides was investigated in the combustion of peat in power plants, and (3) the removal rates of fallout radionuclides on urban surfaces were resolved

  1. On the integration of Airborne full-waveform laser scanning and optical imagery for Site Detection and Mapping: Monteserico study case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, R.; Guariglia, A.; Lacovara, B.; Lasaponara, R.; Masini, N.

    2009-04-01

    This paper analyses the capability of airborne LiDAR derived data in the recognition of archaeological marks. It also evaluates the benefits to integrate them with aerial photos and very high resolution satellite imagery. The selected test site is Monteserico, a medieval village located on a pastureland hill in the North East of Basilicata (Southern Italy). The site, attested by documentary sources beginning from the 12th century, was discovered by aerial survey in 1996 [1] and investigated in 2005 by using QuickBird imagery [2]. The only architectural evidence is a castle, built on the western top of the hill; whereas on the southern side, earthenware, pottery and crumbling building materials, related to the medieval settlement, could be observed. From a geological point of view, the stratigraphic sequence is composed of Subappennine Clays, Monte Marano sands and Irsina conglomerates. Sporadic herbaceous plants grow over the investigated area. For the purpose of this study, a full-waveform laser scanning with a 240.000 Hz frequency was used. The average point density value of dataset is about 30 points/m2. The final product is a 0.30 m Digital Surface Models (DSMs) accurately modelled. To derive the DSM the point cloud of the ALS was filtered and then classified by applying appropriate algorithms. In this way surface relief and archaeological features were surveyed with great detail. The DSM was compared with other remote sensing data source such as oblique and nadiral aerial photos and QuickBird imagery, acquired in different time. In this way it was possible to evaluate, compare each other and overlay the archaeological features recorded from each data source (aerial, satellite and lidar). Lidar data showed some interesting results. In particular, they allowed for identifying and recording differences in height on the ground produced by surface and shallow archaeological remains (the so-called shadow marks). Most of these features are visible also by the optical

  2. Forage: A sensitive indicator for airborne radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the radiological environmental monitoring program at the Joseph M. Parley Nuclear Plant to meet the requirements of NRC Regulations 10 CRF 50, Appendix I, routine sampling of forage was implemented. Indicator plots of forage (grass) were established at the plant site boundary in the two Meteorological sectors having the highest X/Q values for ground-level dispersion of airborne radioactivity. Likewise, a control plot was established in a sector having a significantly lower X/Q value at a distance of 18 miles. Procedures for maintenance of the grass plots, sampling of forage, and sample preparation for measurement of gamma radioactivity with a Ge (Li) detector were developed during the reported three year measurement period. Three atmospheric nuclear tests by the Peoples Republic of China in 1976 and 1977 has proven forage sampling to be convenient, sensitive, and in the judgement of the authors gives results which are superior to most other media sampled for airborne radioactivity. Typical measured levels of radioactivity from 150 to greater than 10,000 pCi/kg (dry weight) were obtained for the principal fission products in the Chinese bomb fallout, which included 95Zr-95Nb, 103Ru, 131I, 140Ba-140La, 141Ce, and 144Ce. On a unit weight basis the level of radioactivity measured was consistently higher for forage than for green leafy vegetables. This was attributed to the higher surface area for the forage. For comparison, plots of airborne concentrations for gross beta and particulate gamma emitters are shown during the time periods that include the Chinese nuclear tests. (author)

  3. Mercury, arsenic and selenium fall-out from an industrial complex studied by means of lichen transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinnes, E. (Inst. for Atomic Energy, Kjeller, Norway); Krog, H.

    1977-01-01

    Transplants of the lichen Hypogymnia physodes were subjected to neutron activation analysis in a study of air-borne pollution from an industrial complex in Sarpsborg, Norway. Compared with samples taken from the natural vegetation in the vicinity of the industrial complex, the transplant technique proved to be an efficient means of studying local mercury fall-out from industrial sources. The content of mercury in naturally occurring specimens of the same species was much lower than in the transplants. This may be due mainly to damage of the natural vegetation by SO/sub 2/ pollution. No significant increase in the concentration of arsenic or selenium was found in the natural vegetation or in the transplants in the neighborhood of the industrial complex, indicating that the release of these elements into the air from industrial works in Sarpsborg is low.

  4. Mercury, arsenic and selenium fall-out from an industrial complex studied by means of lichen transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transplants of the lichen Hypogymnia physodes were subjected to neutron activation analysis in a study of air-borne pollution from an industrial complex in Sarpsborg, Norway. Compared with samples taken from the natural vegetation in the vicinity of the industrial complex, the transplant technique proved to be an efficient means of studying local mercury fall-out from industrial sources. The content of mercury in naturally occuring specimens of the same species was much lower than in the transplants. This may be due mainly to damage of the natural vegetation by SO2 pollution. No significant increase in the concentration of arsenic or selenium was found in the natural vegetation or in the transplants in the neighbourhood of the industrail complex, indicating that the release of these elements into the air from industrial works in Sarpsborg is low. (author)

  5. Radioactive fall-out in Norway after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the fall-out from the atmosphere during the fifties and sixties, a system of local control of radioactive contamination of food was built up. (LORACON - LOcal RAdioactivity COntrol). The different Meat and Food Inspection Services were equipped with Geiger Mueller instruments. The system was in operation until late seventies. From 1977 there was no testing and calibration of the instruments. The development towards a reduction of the state of readiness was accelerated when the Norwegian Parliament decided that Norway should not establish any nuclear power plants (1979). Only the universities and special institutions as the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene and the Institute for Energy Technique were still able to analyse on radioactive isotopes. The confusion about how much radioactive fall-out from the Chernobyl reactor accident Norway received lasted for some weeks in Norway. Partially, this was due to the lack of instruments, but also many experts rejected the idea that an accident so far away might cause these amounts of fall-out consisted of Iodine and Cesium. The fall-out followed a very irregular pattern both nationally and locally with the mountain areas in Middle Norway most affected

  6. Radioactive fallout in the southern hemisphere from nuclear weapons tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallout in the southern hemisphere, and its origins in the national programs of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in both hemispheres, are reviewed. Of the 390 nuclear tests conducted in the atmosphere to date, 53 were carried out in the southern hemisphere and it is the second phase of these, between 1966 and 1974, that is seen to have been responsible for the main fallout of short-lived fission products in the southern hemisphere. In contrast to this, the programs of atmospheric nuclear testing in the northern hemisphere up to 1962 are shown to have been the main source of long-lived fission products in fallout in the southern hemisphere. The course followed by this contamination through the environment of the southern hemisphere is traced for the national programs of nuclear testing after 1962 taken separately (France, China) and for the earlier national programs taken together (U.S.S.R., U.S.A. and U.K.). The impact on populations in the southern hemisphere of fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests to date is assessed

  7. Predicted erosion and sediment delivery of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erosion estimates calculated with the Universal Soil Loss Equation as a part of USDA's 1977 National Resources Inventory were used to estimate delivery of fallout plutonium in several major river basins. Erosion will slowly remove the plutonium, but deposition will leave about 90 percent of the plutonium on the landscape for very long times

  8. Local fall-out and the animal food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local consequences of fresh fall-out, especially in the case of atmospheric nuclear explosions, are reviewed from the point of view of the internal contamination of the consumer of foodstuffs of animal origin. The edibility of foodstuffs derived from animals having grazed in the presence of fall-out is evaluated both from the wholesome and radio-toxicological points of view. The contamination level of these foodstuffs is calculated as a function of the ground fall-out, and of agronomical and ecological parameters for each radio-nuclide of the animal food chain. The internal exposure of the human consumer is calculated from this level as a function of the diet and of various parameters especially temporal. The equivalent dose to each critical organ, including the digestive tract is deduced from the burdens of each organ. From this a nutritional hygiene in the areas affected by fall-out is obtained, in relationship to the action levels fixed by the responsible authorities in exceptional circumstances. Criteria for these action levels are given as function of the food rations. (authors)

  9. First airborne transient em survey in antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Mikucki, J. J.; Sørensen, Kurt Ingvard K.I.;

    2012-01-01

    A first airborne transient electromagnetic survey was flown in Antarctica in December 2011 with the SkyTEM system. This transient airborne EM system has been optimized in Denmark for almost ten years and was specially designed for ground water mapping. The SkyTEM tool is ideal for mapping...... conductive targets, and the transient AEM method provides a better understanding of the saline ground water system for microbiology, paleoclimate studies, or geothermal potential. In this study we present preliminary results from our field survey which resulted in more than 1000 km of flight lines. The...... are presented here, the Taylor Valley demonstrating the promising capabilities of the geophysical method to map permafrost and the saline ground water systems....

  10. Dynamic Monitoring of Cleanroom Fallout Using an Air Particle Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Radford

    2011-01-01

    The particle fallout limitations and periodic allocations for the James Webb Space Telescope are very stringent. Standard prediction methods are complicated by non-linearity and monitoring methods that are insufficiently responsive. A method for dynamically predicting the particle fallout in a cleanroom using air particle counter data was determined by numerical correlation. This method provides a simple linear correlation to both time and air quality, which can be monitored in real time. The summation of effects provides the program better understanding of the cleanliness and assists in the planning of future activities. Definition of fallout rates within a cleanroom during assembly and integration of contamination-sensitive hardware, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, is essential for budgeting purposes. Balancing the activity levels for assembly and test with the particle accumulation rate is paramount. The current approach to predicting particle fallout in a cleanroom assumes a constant air quality based on the rated class of a cleanroom, with adjustments for projected work or exposure times. Actual cleanroom class can also depend on the number of personnel present and the type of activities. A linear correlation of air quality and normalized particle fallout was determined numerically. An air particle counter (standard cleanroom equipment) can be used to monitor the air quality on a real-time basis and determine the "class" of the cleanroom (per FED-STD-209 or ISO-14644). The correlation function provides an area coverage coefficient per class-hour of exposure. The prediction of particle accumulations provides scheduling inputs for activity levels and cleanroom class requirements.

  11. Airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its role as collector and disseminator of information on nuclear techniques has long had an interest in gamma ray spectrometer methods and has published a number of Technical Reports on various aspects of the subject. At an Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna in November 1986 to review appropriate activities the IAEA could take following the Chernobyl accident, it was recommended that preparation begin on a new Technical Report on airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying, taking into account the use of the technique for environmental monitoring as well as for nuclear emergency response requirements. Shortly thereafter the IAEA became the lead organization in the Radioelement Geochemical Mapping section of the International Geological Correlation Programme/United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Project on International Geochemical Mapping. These two factors led to the preparation of the present Technical Report. 18 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Yttrium and lanthanides in human lung fluids, probing the exposure to atmospheric fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Censi, P., E-mail: censi@unipa.it [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); En.Bio.Tech. - Via Aquileia, 35 90100 Palermo (Italy); Tamburo, E. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); Speziale, S. [Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam, 14473 (Germany); Zuddas, P. [Institut Genie de l' Environnement et Ecodeveloppement and Departement Sciences de la Terre, UMR 5125, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue R. Dubois, Bat GEODE 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Randazzo, L.A. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); En.Bio.Tech. - Via Aquileia, 35 90100 Palermo (Italy); Institut Genie de l' Environnement et Ecodeveloppement and Departement Sciences de la Terre, UMR 5125, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue R. Dubois, Bat GEODE 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Punturo, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita di Catania, Corso Italia, 55 - 95129 Catania (Italy); Cuttitta, A. [I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); Arico, P. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    Inhalation of airborne particles can produce crystallization of phosphatic microcrysts in intraaveolar areas of lungs, sometimes degenerating into pulmonary fibrosis. Results of this study indicate that these pathologies are induced by interactions between lung fluids and inhaled atmospheric dust in people exposed to volcanic dust ejected from Mount Etna in 2001. Here, the lung solid-liquid interaction is evaluated by the distribution of yttrium and lanthanides (YLn) in fluid bronchoalveolar lavages on selected individuals according the classical geochemical approaches. We found that shale-normalised patterns of yttrium and lanthanides have a 'V shaped' feature corresponding to the depletion of elements from Nd to Tb when compared to the variable enrichments of heavy lanthanides, Y, La and Ce. These features and concurrent thermodynamic simulations suggest that phosphate precipitation can occur in lungs due to interactions between volcanic particles and fluids. We propose that patterns of yttrium and lanthanides can represent a viable explanation of some pathology observed in patients after prolonged exposure to atmospheric fallout and are suitable to become a diagnostic parameter of chemical environmental stresses.

  13. Airborne wind energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, Uwe; Schmehl, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This reference offers an overview of the field of airborne wind energy. As the first book of its kind, it provides a consistent compilation of the fundamental theories, a compendium of current research and development activities as well as economic and regulatory aspects. In five parts, the book demonstrates the relevance of Airborne Wind Energy and the role that this emerging field of technology can play for the transition towards a renewable energy economy. Part I on 'Fundamentals' contains seven general chapters explaining the principles of airborne wind energy and its different variants, o

  14. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePhillips, M.P.

    1995-10-23

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239,240}Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release.

  15. Association of nuclear fallout with leukemia in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world population has been exposed to low levels of fission products from nuclear testing. Has this had any health effects? Six different epidemiological associations are demonstrated between leukemia and nuclear fallout in the general population. The strongest association is with acute and myeloid types of leukemia among children. They peaked at approximately 5.5 yr (among 5-9 yr olds) after the peaks in fallout. The entire United States population exhibited an increasing leukemia rate during and for several years after the open air nuclear testing and fell sharply thereafter. Regional differences in leukemia rates correspond to a composite exposure index that used 90Sr concentrations in food, cow's milk, and human bone. The calculated leukemia risk per rad for children was similar to that calculated for Japanese A-bomb children survivors

  16. Observations of the Chernobyl fallout in Tvaeren bay, baltic proper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident was detected in Tvaeren bay, Baltic sea proper. A second peak of Cs-137 in the water occurring one year after the fallout event indicated a supply of water from the highly contaminated Bothnian sea area. Bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) responded quickly to the variations in CS-137 content of the water. Bladder wrack seems to be a ten times more sensitive bioindicator for radioactive CS than the blue mussel. An apparent half-time of 29 and 21 days was observed for bladder wrack and blue mussel, respectively, at a mean temperature of 12 degree C and 7 per thousand S. A long-term increase in Cs-137 content was observed in bottom sediment and benthic infauna. (au)

  17. Childhood leukaemia, fallout and radiation doses near Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible explanations of the recently reported increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia around Dounreay are examined in the light of the changes in national leukaemia incidence that occurred during the period of exposure to fallout from international atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. It is concluded that the increase cannot be due to underestimation of the risk of leukaemia per unit dose of radiation, nor to an underestimate of the relative biological efficiency of high as compared with low LET radiation. Possible explanations of the increase include an underestimate of the red bone marrow doses due to the Dounreay discharges relative to those from fallout, a misconception of the site of origin of childhood leukaemia, epidemics of infectious disease and exposure to some other unidentified environmental agent. (author)

  18. Topographic Effects on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates from Radiocesium Fallout

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Land topography can affect air radiation dose rates by locating radiation sources closer to, or further, from detector locations when compared to perfectly flat terrain. Hills and slopes can also shield against the propagation of gamma rays. To understand the possible magnitude of topographic effects on air dose rates, this study presents calculations for ambient dose equivalent rates at a range of heights above the ground for varying land topographies. The geometries considered were angled ground at the intersection of two planar surfaces, which is a model for slopes neighboring flat land, and a simple conical geometry, representing settings from hilltops to valley bottoms. In each case the radiation source was radioactive cesium fallout, and the slope angle was varied systematically to determine the effect of topography on the air dose rate. Under the assumption of homogeneous fallout across the land surface, and for these geometries and detector locations, the dose rates at high altitudes are more strongly...

  19. Radioactive fallout nuclides in a peat-bog ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Province of Salzburg belongs to the regions with the highest contamination from the Chernobyl-fallout outside the former USSR. The peat-bog investigated in this study is situated in Koppl, east of Salzburg. A peat-bog is a special example of an ecosystem, which is generally not disturbed by human activities because it is under strict nature-conservation and whose soil structure is not affected by animal activities from moles and earthworms. Peat-bogs are characterized by acidic soils which are high in organic material and low in clay mineral content. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that especially in peat-bogs and especially in the Koppl-peat-bog very high amounts of radioactive fallout nuclides from the Chernobyl accident and from the bomb-testings could be found

  20. Committee's report on ruthenium fall-out incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of the fall-out incident of November 11 and 12, 1959, by responsible parties (Health Physics Division and Operations Division personnel) established beyond reasonable doubt that the incident had its origin in the expulsion of particles, heavily contaminated with ruthenium, which had been detached from the walls of the electric fan housing and ducts in the off-gas system associated with the brick stack. All available evidence indicates that the particles were loosened during maintenance work on the exhaust damper and the bearings of the electric fan and were carried up the stack in two bursts as particulate fall-out when this fan was put back into service. Radiographic and chemical analysis showed the activity to be almost entirely ruthenium (Ru106) and its daughter rhodium (Rh106) with very little, if any, strontium being present. This report summarizes the findings and sets forth the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee asked to investigate the incident

  1. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Lelieveld, J.; KUNKEL, D.; M. G. Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of ma...

  2. The development of radioactive glass surrogates for fallout debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of glass that emulates fallout is desired by the nuclear forensics community for training and measurement exercises. The composition of nuclear fallout is complex, with widely varying isotopic compositions (Fahey et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(47):20207-20212, 2010; Bellucci et al., Anal Chem 85:7588-7593, 2013; Wallace et al., J Radioanal Nucl Chem, 2013; Belloni et al., J Environ Radioact 102:852-862, 2011; Freiling, Science 139:1058-1059, 1963; Science 133:1991-1999, 1961; Bunney and Sam Government Report: Naval Ordinance Laboratory, White Oak, 1971). As the gaseous cloud traverses from hotter to cooler regions of the atmosphere, the processes of condensation and nucleation entrain environmental materials, vaporized nuclear materials and fission products. The elemental and isotopic composition of the fission products is altered due to chemical fractionation (i.e. the fission product composition that would be expected from fission of the original nuclear material is altered by differences in condensation rates of the elements); the fallout may be enriched or depleted in volatile or refractory fission products. This paper describes preliminary work to synthesize, irradiate and fractionate the fission product content of irradiated particulate glass using a thermal distillation 2 h after irradiation. The glass was synthesized using a solution-based polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate. (Izrael, Radioactive fallout after nuclear explosions and accidents, 2002) Uranium was incorporated into the glass particulate at trace concentrations during polymerization. The particulate was subjected to a short thermal neutron irradiation then heated to 1,273 K approximately 2 h after the end of irradiation. Fission products of 133,134,135I, 132,134Te, 135Xe, 138Cs and 91,92Sr were observed to be distilled from the particulate. The results of these preliminary studies are discussed. (author)

  3. Fallout 137Cs in soils from North Western Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallout levels of 137Cs in surface soil from North Western Libya have been measured using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of 137Cs in soil ranged from 975 to 1720 mBq x kg-1. The areal activity concentrations ranged from 1300 to 2250 mBq x m-2, and were highly correlated with annual precipitation. The effective dose from external exposure to 137Cs is found to be 3 nSv x y-1. (author)

  4. Uranium fallout from nuclear-powered satellites and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical measurements were carried out uranium isotopes in a total of 77 rain and snow samples collected at Fayetteville (360N, 940W), Arkansas, during the period between April 1983 and July 1985. The presence of excess 235U was detected in many of the rain samples and it was attributed to the fallout from the nuclear reactor on board the Soviet satellite Cosmos-1402, which fell over the South Atlantic Ocean on 7 February 1983 (Bakhtiar, 1985). Meanwhile, marked increases in the concentrations of naturally-occurring uranium and thorium isotopes were observed in rain samples collected during 1983 and these increases were attributed to the fallout from the 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano in Mexico. At the beginning of 1984, the 235U/238U ratio in rain water was rapidly decreasing and it appeared as if the effects of both the 1982 eruption of El Chichon and the 1983 fall of the nuclear-powered satellite Cosmos-1402 on the concentration of uranium isotopes in rain water would dissipate and the levels of uranium in rain would soon return to normal during the early part of 1985. Sharp increases in the 234U/238U ratios in rain were observed during the months of May and June 1085. These results most likely indicate the effects of delayed fallouts from the two events-the 1982 eruption of El Chichon and the 1983 fall of cosmos-1402

  5. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship

  6. Distribution of fallout cesium-137 in the Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed for simple analysis of 137Cs concentrations in water, sediments, and biota in the fractional picocurie per liter range. These measurements are important, since fallout 137Cs will be present in estuarine environments for a generation. The concentration of 137Cs in water is important to studies of distribution coefficients, or concentration factors between water and sediment or organisms. Fallout 137Cs is also a natural tracer, making possible experiments on a span of space and time that is impossible with intentionally added tracers. Thus, one can determine an approximate residence time for a body of brackish water with a few 137Cs concentration measurements, given the average depth and typical fallout deposition rate. This estimate is good enough for first estimates as to the capacity of the body of water for various pollutants. Measurements at several sites, and at all seasonal conditions, can be used to solve the mass and concentration balance equations that more rigorously describe the hydrography of the estuary. (U.S.)

  7. The airborne laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberson, Steven; Schall, Harold; Shattuck, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the current program status.

  8. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdall, M. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, OEsteraas (Norway)); Smethurst, M.A. (Univ. of Exeter and Avalonia Geophysics, Cornwall Campus, Penryn (United Kingdom)); Andersson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aage, H.K. (Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland))

    2011-10-15

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  9. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  10. Monitoring Fallout From Fukushima, Japan After Nuclear Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, on March 23rd, 2011, following the radioactivity releases after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131I in Heilongjiang province the northeast of China, were detected

  11. Airborne real-time mapping and monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Avbelj, Janja; Kurz, Franz

    2016-01-01

    In cases of large scale events and disasters public offices and organizations with security responsibilities as well as traffic authorities need accurate and reliable information for situation awareness. These pieces of information are used by the authorities to quickly meet decisions in order to safely and efficiently manage such events with the given resources. Particularly, information on the transportation system and traffic are of great importance, because the mobility of the public and ...

  12. Cesium-137 radioisotope, a fallout component in the study of soil erosion and sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary study on the possibility of using Cesium-137, a component of the fallout, to estimate soil erosion and sedimentation was carried out in a small watershed in Piracicaba, Sao Paulo. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (Germanium detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer) was used to detect Cs-137. The fallout standards of the profiles fallout and results of soil losses and gains for the transects are discussed based on these measurements. (author)

  13. Rainfall erosivity in catchments contaminated with fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Chartin, Caroline; Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Cerdan, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 resulted in the fallout of significant quantities of radiocesium over the Fukushima region. After reaching the soil surface, radiocesium is quickly bound to fine soil particles. Thereafter, rainfall and snowmelt run-off events transfer particle-bound radiocesium downstream. Characterizing the precipitation regime of the fallout-impacted region is thus important for understanding post-deposition radiocesium dynamics. Accordingly, 10 min (1995-2015) and daily precipitation data (1977-2015) from 42 meteorological stations within a 100 km radius of the FDNPP were analyzed. Monthly rainfall erosivity maps were developed to depict the spatial heterogeneity of rainfall erosivity for catchments entirely contained within this radius. The mean average precipitation in the region surrounding the FDNPP is 1420 mm yr-1 (SD 235) with a mean rainfall erosivity of 3696 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1 (SD 1327). Tropical cyclones contribute 22 % of the precipitation (422 mm yr-1) and 40 % of the rainfall erosivity (1462 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1 (SD 637)). The majority of precipitation (60 %) and rainfall erosivity (82 %) occurs between June and October. At a regional scale, rainfall erosivity increases from the north to the south during July and August, the most erosive months. For the remainder of the year, this gradient occurs mostly from northwest to southeast. Relief features strongly influence the spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity at a smaller scale, with the coastal plains and coastal mountain range having greater rainfall erosivity than the inland Abukuma River valley. Understanding these patterns, particularly their spatial and temporal (both inter- and intraannual) variation, is important for contextualizing soil and particle-bound radiocesium transfers in the Fukushima region. Moreover, understanding the impact of tropical cyclones will be important for managing sediment and sediment-bound contaminant

  14. A new generic sub-model for radionuclide fixation in large catchments from continuous and single-pulse fallouts, as used in a river model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new general sub-model for fixation in catchment areas to be used within the framework of a river model for substances such as radionuclides and metals from continuous and single-pulse fallouts. The model has been critically tested using data from 27 European river sites covering a very wide geographical area and contaminated by radiocesium and radiostrontium from the Chernobyl accident and from the nuclear weapons tests (NWT fallout). This modelling approach gives radionuclide concentrations in water (total, dissolved and particulate phases) at defined sites on a monthly basis. The overall river model is based on processes in the upstream river stretch and in the catchment area. The catchment area is differentiated into inflow (∼dry land) areas and outflow (∼wetland) areas. The model has a general structure, which can be used for all radionuclides or substances. It is simple to apply in practice since all driving variables may be readily accessed from maps and standard monitoring programs. The driving variables are: latitude, altitude, catchment area, mean annual precipitation and fallout. Note that for large catchments, this model does not require data on the characteristic soil type or the percentage of outflow areas (wet lands) in the catchment, as in most previous models, since in practice it is very difficult to obtain reliable data on characteristic soil type or percentage of outflow areas, especially in large and topographically complex catchments. Modelled values have been compared to empirical data from rivers sites covering a wide domain (catchment areas from 3000 to 3,000,000 km2, precipitation from 400 to 1700 mm/year; fallouts from 1600 to 280,000 Bq/m2; altitudes from 0 to 1000 m.a.s.l. and latitudes from 41 deg. to 72 deg. N). The river model with its sub-model for fixation predicts close to the uncertainty factors given by the empirical data, which have been shown to be about a factor of 1.6 for 137Cs and a factor of 2

  15. Application of radioactive fallout cesium-137 for measuring soil erosion and sediment accumulations rates and patterns: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive fallout 137Cs (cesium-137) deposited across the landscape from atmospheric nuclear tests is strongly absorbed on soil particles limiting its movement by chemical and biological processes. Most 137Cs movement in the environment is by physical processes; therefore, 137Cs is a unique tracer for studying erosion and sedimentation. Cesium-137 loss from a watershed has been shown to correlate strongly with soil loss calculated by the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) or measured from small runoff plates. By measuring spatial patterns of 137Cs in vertical and horizontal planes across the landscape, rates of soil loss or deposition can be measured for different parts of a watershed. Even within landscape units, redistribution of soil can be mapped and erosion or deposition rates for different parts of individual fields measured and mapped. Sediment accumulation rates can be measured by comparing the vertical distribution of 137Cs in sediments with the temporal deposition of fallout 137Cs from the atmosphere to locate sediment horizons. Using these dated sediment horizons, sediment accumulation rates can be measured. Interpretations about the location of these dated horizons must consider particle size of the sediments, reworking of deposited sediments, diffusional movement of 137Cs, and time rates of physical process in the sedimentation process. The 137Cs technique can be used to determine sediment accumulation rates in a wide variety of depositional environments including reservoirs, lakes, wetlands, coastal areas, and floodplains

  16. History of plutonium composition of fallout in the northeastern U.S. from contemporary measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analyses of lake sediments from the northeastern US provide depositional histories of 137Cs and 239+240Pu from both global fallout and fallout from the Nevada Test Site detonations in the 1950's. These results provide an independent verification and extension of the temporal trend of the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of global fallout to earlier times. This data supports the findings of other studies of fallout in the atmospheric and marine environment. (author) 26 refs.; 8 figs.; 9 refs

  17. When the dust settles: stable xenon isotope constraints on the formation of nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear weapons represent one of the most immediate threats of mass destruction. In the event that a procured or developed nuclear weapon is detonated in a populated metropolitan area, timely and accurate nuclear forensic analysis and fallout modeling would be needed to support attribution efforts and hazard assessments. Here we demonstrate that fissiogenic xenon isotopes retained in radioactive fallout generated by a nuclear explosion provide unique constraints on (1) the timescale of fallout formation, (2) chemical fractionation that occurs when fission products and nuclear fuel are incorporated into fallout, and (3) the speciation of fission products in the fireball. Our data suggest that, in near surface nuclear tests, the presence of a significant quantity of metal in a device assembly, combined with a short time allowed for mixing with the ambient atmosphere (seconds), may prevent complete oxidation of fission products prior to their incorporation into fallout. Xenon isotopes thus provide a window into the chemical composition of the fireball in the seconds that follow a nuclear explosion, thereby improving our understanding of the physical and thermo-chemical conditions under which fallout forms. - Highlights: • Radioactive fallout generated by nuclear explosions contains fissiogenic xenon isotopes. • Xe isotopes provide constraints on timescales of fallout formation and the speciation of fission products in the fireball. • Our data indicate that macroscopic fallout forms rapidly (<3 s). • Chemical fractionation trends suggest that fission products may not have been fully oxidized prior to incorporation

  18. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  19. Artificial tritium fall-out at the South Pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow samples were taken from a 5-m-deep pit located near the South Pole station in January 1975, and continuous deuterium, tritium and beta activity profiles have been obtained from them. These three measurements and the stratigraphic level observation allow a precise chronology of the pit from 1950 to 1975 to be deduced, providing a continuous record of artificial tritium fall-out in the southern hemisphere. This has been extended to 1978 using samples from a second pit taken in 1978. Taking advantage of the unusual 1957-58 stable isotope content in the snow, it has been demonstrated that an important part of the isotopic signal in the precipitation is retained in the snow in spite of the low accumulation rate (8.2g/cm2). The first artificial tritium, from the 1952 Ivy experiments, was detected during 1954. A two years delay between explosions and fall-out is well established, and enables the tritium fall-out to be related to the main nuclear tests from 1952 up to 1960. This delay appears longer for the large 1961-62 devices. For the French southern hemisphere experiments, it is about one year. A sharp tritium decrease is observed after a high 1973 peak, providing a new tritium reference level for future glaciological studies in Antarctica. The beta and tritium peaks occur during the Antarctic summer and the Antarctic winter respectively, showing different injection mechanisms. This winter input and the high tritium values registered at the South Pole indicate a preferential tritium transfer over the polar region. Two mechanisms, stratospheric-tropospheric exchange and direct stratospheric cloud precipitation, could account for this injection. (author)

  20. Field study of fallout radiocaesium in upland soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of Chernobyl fallout radiocaesium in undisturbed soils of the mountain areas of Friuli-Venezia Giulia region (NE Italy) has been monitored by two sampling surveys carried out in 1987 and 1988. Surface activities and depth profiles are presented and discussed with regard to different natural ecosystems. A simple residence time model is applied to describe downwards migration of radiocaesium. Residence half-time in the top 3-cm layer averages about 5 years both for fields and forests and decreases in underlying layers. It is suggested to use this parameter to investigate the influence of soil and site characteristics on radiocaesium migration. (author)

  1. Cesium fallout in Norway after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of country-wide measurements of 137Cs and 134 Cs in soil samples in Norway after the Chernobyl accident are reported. The results clearly demonstrates that municipalities in the central part of southern Norway, Troendelag and the southern part of Nordland, have been rather heavily contaminated. The total fallout of 137Cs and 134Cs from the Chernobyl accident in Norway is estimated to 2300 TBq and 1200 TBq, respectively. This is approximately 6% of the cesium activity released from the reactor

  2. Radioactive fallout in Norway from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident had considerable consequences for Norway. Except for the areas in the former USSR, around Chernobyl some areas in Norway received fallout which gave the highest contamination levels. The natural and semi natural ecosystems will produce food products with high activity levels of radiocesium for several decennium. Cost-effective countermeasures were implemented, and they reduced the doses considerable, especially for critical groups. Doses received over the next 50 years will probably cause cancer in 500 persons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Thermoluminescence studies of NTS-related fallout exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible health effects from fallout radiation resulting from atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the 1950's and 60's was refocused in 1979 by the report of apparent increases in childhood leukemias in regions downwind of the NTS. A program is discussed which established a dosimetry technique for the measurement of low doses of radiation in common building bricks. A considerable amount of technique development has been in progress throughout the course of the pilot study. Since its development, considerable progress has been made on increasing the accuracy and reliability of the technique

  4. Caesium fallout as a tracer of erosion-sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to set up a methodology of use of radioactive caesium fallout, to measure erosion and sedimentation in a sub-catchment and to establish the effects of geomorphological parameters, land uses and soil nature, on the losses caesium by physical process. The result obtained by this new and elegant approach, on a watershed of 4114 ha., studied before by classical and conventional techniques, gives a good evaluation of erosion, but also sedimentation rate, and permit to stand up, a model and sampling strategy, to extend the method to large catchment. 1 tab., 2 refs. (author)

  5. The use of airborne laser data to calibrate satellite radar altimetry data over ice sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon; Bamber, J.L.; Krabill, W.B.

    -precision airborne laser profiling data from the so-called Arctic Ice Mapping project as a tool to determine that bias and to calibrate the satellite altimetry. This is achieved by a simple statistical analysis of the airborne laser profiles, which defines the mean amplitude of the local surface undulations as a...

  6. MITAS: multisensor imaging technology for airborne surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John D.

    1991-08-01

    MITAS, a unique and low-cost solution to the problem of collecting and processing multisensor imaging data for airborne surveillance operations has been developed, MITAS results from integrating the established and proven real-time video processing, target tracking, and sensor management software of TAU with commercially available image exploitation and map processing software. The MITAS image analysis station (IAS) supports airborne day/night reconnaissance and surveillance missions involving low-altitude collection platforms employing a suite of sensors to perform reconnaissance functions against a variety of ground and sea targets. The system will detect, locate, and recognize threats likely to be encountered in support of counternarcotic operations and in low-intensity conflict areas. The IAS is capable of autonomous, near real-time target exploitation and has the appropriate communication links to remotely located IAS systems for more extended analysis of sensor data. The IAS supports the collection, fusion, and processing of three main imaging sensors: daylight imagery (DIS), forward looking infrared (FLIR), and infrared line scan (IRLS). The MITAS IAS provides support to all aspects of the airborne surveillance mission, including sensor control, real-time image enhancement, automatic target tracking, sensor fusion, freeze-frame capture, image exploitation, target data-base management, map processing, remote image transmission, and report generation.

  7. Evaluation of {sup 7}Be fallout spatial variability; Avaliacao da variabilidade espacial do fallout do {sup 7}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Victor Meriguetti

    2011-07-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclide beryllium-7 (Be) is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic particle reactions and is being used as a tracer for soil erosion and climatic processes research. After the production, {sup 7}Be bonds to aerosol particles in the atmosphere and is deposited on the soil surface with other radionuclide species by rainfall. Because of the high adsorption on soil particles and its short half-life of 53.2 days, this radionuclide follows of the erosion process and can be used as a tracer to evaluate the sediment transport that occurs during a single rain event or short period of rain events. A key assumption for the erosion evaluation through this radiotracer is the uniformity of the spatial distribution of the {sup 7}Be fallout. The {sup 7}Be method was elaborated recently and due to its few applications, some assumptions related to the method were not yet properly investigated yet, and the hypothesis of {sup 7}Be fallout uniformity needs to be evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the {sup 7}Be fallout spatial distribution through the rain water {sup 7}Be activity analysis of the first five millimeters of single rain events. The rain water was sampled using twelve collectors distributed on an experimental area of about 300 m2 , located in the campus of Sao Paulo University, Piracicaba. The {sup 7}Be activities were measured using a 53% efficiency gamma-ray spectrometer from the Radioisotope laboratory of CENA. The {sup 7}Be activities in rain water varied from 0.26 to 1.81 Sq.L{sup -}1, with the highest values in summer and lowest in spring. In each one of the 5 single events, the spatial variability of {sup 7}Se activity in rain water was high, showing the high randomness of the fallout spatial distribution. A simulation using the {sup 7}Be spatial variability values obtained here and {sup 7}Se average reference inventories taken from the literature was performed determining the lowest detectable erosion rate estimated by {sup 7}Be model

  8. Freshwater and Alpine ecosystem response to Chernobyl fallout in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental and agricultural research programmes were initiated in Norway in June 1986 following the Chernobyl accident. The main fallout in Norway occurred on 28 and 29 April and had an extremely patchy distribution between 60 and 66 deg. C N. In Lake Hoeysjoeen in the county of North Troendelag, high radioactivity was found in the sediment and in all levels of the food chains from vegetation to fish, including phytoplankton, zooplankton, bottom animals, brown trout and Arctic char. Food chains for both wild and domestic animals are studied in the Alpine areas of central Norway. High seasonal variation has been found in the radiocaesium load of reindeer. Such a variation is a result of the high radioactivity (up to more than 100 kBq/kg dry weight) in lichens, the only winter food for reindeer. Also there are indications of increased calf mortality and chromosomal aberrations in the blood cells of the reindeer in nutrient poor areas with heavy fallout. In mountain pastures where sheep and goats graze, a sharp increase in meat and goat milk radiocaesium occurred during the late pasture season in 1988. This was caused by the large number of mushrooms with high levels of radioactivity. Present research in Norway will have to be continued in order to develop further national and international co-operation among scientists and institutions with whom biologists had little or no contact previously. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs

  9. Individual human odor fallout as detected by trained canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyplelová, Petra; Vokálek, Václav; Pinc, Ludvík; Pacáková, Zuzana; Bartoš, Luděk; Santariová, Milena; Čapková, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that if odor fallout (the release of a human's odor onto an untouched object) in human subjects exists, then holding a hand above an absorbent will produce a detectable scent which will be subsequently matched in a detection test by trained canines. Scents were collected from seven males to sterile cotton absorbent squares. The left hand was used to get the control scent and the right hand served as the target scent. Each experimental subject was sitting; his left hand was laid down on a cotton square for 3 min. The right hand was held 5 cm above another cotton square for 3 min. The scent identification was done by two specially trained police German shepherds. These canines had routinely performed scent identification line-ups as part of criminal investigation procedures. Both canines performed 14 line-ups and correctly matched the collected scents of all test subjects. The results suggest the existence of human odor fallout, whereby a human scent trace is left by humans even if they do not touch an object. PMID:24378296

  10. Fallout, radiation doses near Dounreay, and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible explanations for the recently reported increased incidence of childhood leukaemia around Dounreay were examined in the light of changes in the national incidence of leukaemia that occurred during the period of exposure to fallout from international testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. It was concluded that the increase could not be accounted for by underestimate of the risk of leukaemia per unit dose of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, nor by underestimate of the relative biological efficiency of high compared with low linear energy transfer radiation. One possible explanation was underestimation of doses to the red bone marrow due to the discharges at Dounreay relative to dose from fallout, though investigation of ways in which this might have occurred did not suggest anything definite. Other explanations included a misconception of the site of origin of childhood leukaemia, outbreaks of an infectious disease and exposure to other, unidentified environmental agents. These findings weigh against the hypothesis that the recent increase in childhood leukaemia near Dounreay might be accounted for by radioactive discharges from nuclear plants, unless the doses to the stem cells from which childhood leukaemia originates have been grossly underestimated. (author)

  11. Organic association of the fallout radionuclides in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate organic association of fallout cesium, strontium and plutonium in the soil, soil samples influenced by fallout from nuclear weapon testings were treated with alkali (0.1 M-sodium hydroxide solution) to extract organic acids. After extraction, the resultant three fractions (sedimentary residue, humic and fulvic acid fractions) were subjected to the γ-ray spectrometric analysis for 137Cs, and radiochemical analysis for 90Sr and 239,240Pu. Alkali extraction experiments showed that a lot of 239,240Pu was extracted to organic acids from the soil samples, whereas most of 137Cs and 90Sr remained in residual fraction. Less than 10% of the total 137Cs and 90Sr was found in the organic fraction. The concentrations of 137Cs and 90Sr associated with humic fractions were higher than those with the corresponding fulvic fractions. It was found that more than 40% of the total 239,240Pu was associated with the organic fraction of soils. In contrast with 137Cs and 90Sr, 239,240Pu associated with fulvic fractions was much higher than in humic fractions

  12. Chernobyl fallout in a Swedish spruce forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the distribution of Chernobyl fallout in a Swedish forest was carried out and showed more than 95% of the 137Cs in the system to be of Chernobyl origin. The data show that approximately 87% of total fallout is found in soils, 6% in the bryophyte layer and 7% in standing biomass of trees. The mean deposition of 137Cs in the system (including soils, bryophytes, understorey vegetation, fungi, trees, moose and roe deer) was 54 kBq m-2. Fungi, understorey vegetation and ruminant populations collectively contained approximately 1% of total radiocaesium in the system. However, actual concentrations in these sample types were higher than in any other category, mostly exceeding the limit of 1500 Bq kg-1 for consumption of wild produce in Sweden. These categories represent the principal foodstuffs responsible for radiation transfer to man from the system and though negligible in total biomass there is potential for significant dose transfer to individuals who are regular consumers of wild forest produce

  13. Microwaves in Airborne Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of microwave spectrum is widespread due to its convenience. Therefore, enormous amount of information is available in the free space channel. Obviously, mining this channel for surveillance is quite common. Airborne surveillance offers significant advantages in military operations. This paper talks of the usage of microwaves in airborne surveillance systems, in general, and in the Indian airborne early warning and control (AEW&C System, in particular. It brings out the multiple sub-systems onboard the aircraft comprising the AEW&C system and their spectral coverage. Co-location of several systems has its own problems and resolving them in terms of geometric location, frequency band and time of operation are covered. AEW&C, being an airborne system, has several other requirements  including minimal weight, volume and power considerations, lightning protection, streamlining, structural integrity, thermal management, vibration tolerance, corrosion prevention, erosion resistance, static charge discharge capability, bird strike resilience, etc. The methods adopted to cater to all these requirements in the microwave systems that are used in the AEW&C system are discussed. Paper ultimately speaks of the microwave systems that are designed and developed for the Indian AEW&C system to surmount these unusual constraints.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(2, pp.138-144, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4255

  14. PREDICTIONS OF DISPERSION AND DEPOSITION OF FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR TESTING USING THE NOAA-HYSPLIT METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Brian E.; Beck, Harold L.; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) was evaluated as a research tool to simulate the dispersion and deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear tests. Model-based estimates of fallout can be valuable for use in the reconstruction of past exposures from nuclear testing, particularly, where little historical fallout monitoring data is available. The ability to make reliable predictions about fallout deposition could also have significant importanc...

  15. The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2001-11-20

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of {+-}25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The heart of this report is the step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM. NOTE: ''The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter'', was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory report in1979. Some of the materials originally suggested for suspending the leaves of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) are no longer available. Because of changes in the manufacturing process, other materials (e.g., sewing thread, unwaxed dental floss) may not have the insulating capability to work properly. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has not tested any of the suggestions provided in the preface of the report, but they have been used by other groups. When using these

  16. Airborne Gamma-Ray Survey in Latvia 1995/96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Based on Airborne Gamma-Ray Spectrometry measurements performed with the Danish AGS equipment in 1995 and 1996 maps of the natural radioactivity have been produdced for selected areas in Latvia. The calibration of the quipment have been improved by comparisons with soil sample measurements....

  17. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehni, T.

    1995-12-31

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF{sub 2} with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Cancer of the thyroid and 131I fallout in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1953 to 1962 Norway received relatively high levels of radioactive fallout. On the basis of extensive measurements in air, precipitation, food and humans, the dose to the thyroid due to 131I has been calculated. Cancer registration in Norway is practically completely efficient because of obligatory notification of the Cancer Registry by physicians, pathology laboratories, and the Central Bureau of Statistics of all cases or death certificates concerning cancer. Analysis of the Cancer Registry data from 1953 to 1980 concerning birth cohorts 1936 to 1961 indicates an overall increasing trend in thyroid cancer morbidity, most pronounced in female cohorts born 1930-50. The highest, most abrupt irregularities reveal a coincidence of high numbers with high 131I content in milk consumed during the years of prepuberty and puberty. Possible interpretations are discussed. (author)

  19. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF2 with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Transport of fallout radiocesium and plutonium in forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At five sites in a spruce stand and in a pine stand the vertical activity distributions were determined for sup239+240 Pu and sup137 Cs from the global fallout of weapon testing in the sixties as well as separately for Chernobyl-derived radiocesium. To evaluate the migration rates of these radionuclides in the various soil horinzons, a compartmental model was employed. The migration rates were smallest at the top of the mineral horizon, but increased again with increasing depth. In contrast, the mobility of Chernobyl-derived sup137 Cs is presently in all soil layers significantly higher, but decreases with time. The fixation of radiocesium by the clay particles of the soil is, therefore, a rather slow process

  1. Using fallout plutonium as a probe for erosion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, W T; Fifield, L K; Tims, S G; Fujioka, T; Mueller, N

    2011-10-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the potential of using fallout plutonium (Pu), which originated from atmospheric nuclear-weapons tests, as a tool to investigate recent erosional processes within the lower Cotter water-supply catchment in the Australian Capital Territory. This catchment, which was predominantly pine plantation, was severely affected by a major bush fire in 2003. Accelerator mass spectrometry has been used to measure Pu in soil samples collected from a number of sites across the catchment. The results indicate that less than 1cm of surface soil had been lost since the early 1960s over much of the catchment. Areas of more erodible soil have, however, lost 2-4cm of topsoil, and a loss of ∼6cm of soil was identified at one particular site. PMID:20638160

  2. Accumulation of plutonium from fallout in southern Finns and Lapps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The body burden of 239,240Pu and 238Pu from fallout in southern Finns and Lapps was determined by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry through analyses of autopsy tissue samples. Comparing the body burden against the inhalation and ingestion intake of plutonium of these population groups the fractional absorption factor for plutonium from the human gastrointestinal tract and lungs was estinated. In addition, the determined tissue values were compared with those computed with the aid of the ICRP lung model and plutonium content of surface air in the Helsinki area. The 239,240Pu concentrations per wet weight of tissue descended in the order liver>lymph nodes>bone>lung>testes>muscle. A dependence of plutonium content of tissues on the amount of air inhaled by the person during the fallout period and, thus, on the age of the person, was shown. The skeletal distribution of plutonium in man was roughly similar to that reported for animals. The ratio of 239,240Pu content in vertebrae to that in ribs was 1.4, on the average, and the rib/femur ratio 1.0. The average body burden of 239,240Pu in adult southern Finn and Lapp males was estimated to be 1.2 pCi (44.4 mBq), of which about 51 per cent was located in liver and 40 per cent in skeleton. The estimates for the ingestion and inhalation intake of 239,240Pu during the period 1945-78 were 36 and 18 pCi (1.3, 0.67 Bq) and 540 and 13 pCi (19.9, 0.48 Bq) for southern Finn and Lapp males, respectively. The estimated fractional absorption factor of plutonium in humn GI-tract was of the order (6-9)x10-4 and in lungs (7.5-8.5)x10-2. (author)

  3. Predicted erosion and sediment delivery of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium (Pu) from fallout after atmospheric explosion of nuclear weapons in the 1950s and 1960s is being redistributed over the landscape by soil erosion and carried on sediment by streams to oceans. Erosion rates computed with the Universal Soil Loss Equation for about 200,000 sample points on nonfederal land across the US were used to estimate Pu removal rates by soil erosion by water, Pu delivery in several major rivers, and concentration of Pu on the transported sediment. Estimates of average annual Pu delivery on sediment ranged from 0.002% of the initial fallout Pu inventory for the Savannah River basin to 0.08% for the Mississippi River basin. If the deposition of Pu had been uniformly 37 Bq/m2, the estimated Pu activity on suspended sediment ranged from about 0.26 Bq/kg of sediment for the Savannah River basin to 0.52 Bq/kg for the Columbia and Rio Grande river basins. After 1000 yr, about 9 to 48% of the initial Pu inventory will remain in US soils that are eroding. Much of the Pu on eroded sediment will travel only a short distance from its origin before its host sediment particles are deposited and permanently located, at least for a few hundred years. As much as 90% of the initially deposited Pu will remain, redistributed over the landscape by erosion and deposition. Although the delivery rate of Pu by rivers will not decrease greatly in the next 100 yr, a significant decrease will likely occur by 1000 yr

  4. Quantifying Holocene and Anthropocene erosion rates with cosmogenic and fallout nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-lived cosmogenic nuclides, such as in-situ produced 14C in quartz, and fallout nuclides, such as 137Cs and 239,240Pu, are particularly suited to determine Holocene and/or anthropogenic rates of soil erosion. While fallout 137Cs has been widely used to study erosion processes, the methodology and application of the in-situ produced 14C and 239,240Pu are still somewhat experimental. In the case of in-situ 14C it are experimental/methodological obstacles that stand in the way of wider application, in the case of fallout plutonium it is down to neglect. This experimental/neglected status is a pity, since in situ 14C has the potential to allow resolving Holocene from longer-term Earth-surface process rates, whereas fallout Pu can be used to overcome difficulties in 137Cs methodology arising from the Chernobyl fallout (particularly in Europe) and the relative short half-life of radionuclides of Cs. The presentation will (i) introduce the intrinsic methodological benefits of in-situ produced radiocarbon and fallout plutonium, (ii) report on developmental work at CologneAMS to establish routine use of these nuclides and (iii) present a showcase application for fallout plutonium. (author)

  5. Airborne forest fire research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  6. Particulate airborne impurities

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The cumulative effects of air pollutants are of principal concern in research on environmental protection in Sweden. Post-industrial society has imposed many limits on emitted air pollutants, yet the number of reports on the negative effects from them is increasing, largely due to human activity in the form of industrial emissions and increased traffic flows. Rising concerns over the health effects from airborne particulate matter (PM) stem from in vitro, in vivo, and cohort studies revealing...

  7. GRYPHON : Airborne lifestyle concept

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The result of the project, the Gryphon, is a helicopter concept designed for private use. The intention of the project has been to investigate how safe, personal airborne mobility could be an attractive transportation alternative in the future. As an aspirational concept the goal has been to inspire and show an exciting way to enjoy a modern, sustainable lifestyle close to nature without the need for conventional infrastructure.

  8. Content and depth profiles of fall-out 137Cs in Spanish soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the knowledge on the inventory of fallout radionuclides in Spain, a research project has been started, which aim is to know the content and depth profile of long lived radionuclides, mainly 137Cs and 90Sr, and to develop migration models for characteristic soils. For this purpose a 150 x 150 km mesh grid has been applied to the territory and in each one of the squares of the grid a sample has been collected. The set of sampling points have been selected to cover the vast majority of Spanish types of soil and such that a rainfall recording station with monthly records, at least since 1950, is near the sampling position. Sampling has been performed following international standards, and such that at each sampling point two samples 1.25m deep. Both sub-samples have been mixed to make up the sample to be analysed.. From the measurements, the correlation between mean annual rainfall and inventory has been studied, finding that a linear relationship exists between them. Using this relation and a dense set of mean annual rainfall data a map showing the distribution of 137Cs deposition has been obtained. (author)

  9. A new general mechanistic river model for radionuclides from single pulse fallouts which can be run by readily accessible driving variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new general, process-based river model for substances such as radionuclides from single pulse fallouts. The new model has been critically tested using data from 13 European rivers contaminated by radiocesium from the Chernobyl accident. This modelling approach gives radionuclide concentrations in water (total, dissolved and particulate phases; and also concentrations in sediments and fish, but the latter aspects are not discussed in this paper) at defined river sites. The model is based on processes in the upstream river stretch and in the upstream catchment area. The catchment area is differentiated into inflow (∼dry land) areas and outflow (∼wetland) areas. The model also accounts for time-dependent fixation of substances in the catchment. The catchment area sub-model is based on a previous catchment model, which has been tested with very good results for radiocesium, radiostrontium and Ca-concentrations (from liming operations). The new river model is simple to apply in practice since all driving variables may be readily accessed from maps and standard monitoring programs. The driving variables are: latitude, altitude, continentality, catchment area, mean annual precipitation, soil type (percentages or organic and sandy soils), fallout and month of fallout. Modelled values have been compared to independent empirical data from 10 rivers sites (91 data on radiocesium in water) covering a wide domain (catchment areas from 4000 to 180,000 km2, precipitation from 500 to 960 mm/yr and fallout from 1700 to 660,000 Bq/m2). The new model predicts very well - when modelled values are compared to empirical data, the slope is perfect (1.0) and the r 2-value is 0.90. This is good giving the fact that there are also uncertainties in the empirical data, which set a limit to the achieved predictive power, as expressed by the r 2-value

  10. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  11. Environmental geophysics mapping salinity and water resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dent, D.

    2007-01-01

    Salinity and fresh water are two sides of the same coin, most conveniently measured by electrical conductivity; they can now be mapped rapidly in three dimensions using airborne electromagnetics (AEM). Recent developments in the calibration of airborne data against in-field measurements and addition

  12. Airborne laser altimeter measurements of landscape topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of topography can provide a wealth of information on landscape properties for managing hydrologic and geologic systems and conserving natural and agricultural resources. This article discusses the application of an airborne laser altimeter to measure topography and other landscape surface properties. The airborne laser altimeter makes 4000 measurements per second with a vertical recording resolution of 5 cm. Data are collected digitally with a personal computer. A video camera, borehole sighted with the laser, records an image for locating flight lines. GPS data are used to locate flight line positions on the landscape. Laser data were used to measure vegetation canopy topography, height, cover, and distribution and to measure microtopography of the land surface and gullies with depths of 15–20 cm. Macrotopography of landscape profiles for segments up to 4 km were in agreement with available topographic maps but provided more detail. Larger gullies with and without vegetation, and stream channel cross sections and their associated floodplains have also been measured and reported in other publications. Landscape segments for any length could be measured for either micro- or macrotopography. Airborne laser altimeter measurements of landscape profiles can provide detailed information on landscape properties or specific needs that will allow better decisions on the design and location of structures (i.e., roads, pipe, and power lines) and for improving the management and conservation of natural and agricultural landscapes. (author)

  13. Heavy metals and trace elements in atmospheric fall-out: their relationship with topsoil and wheat element composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M A; Jasan, Raquel; Plá, Rita; Pignata, María L

    2012-04-30

    The objectives of this study were to determine the average concentrations and deposition rates of 28 elements in atmospheric bulk deposition and to elucidate associations among topsoil, bulk deposition and wheat element composition. The fluxes of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) deposition in Córdoba were higher than in other agro-ecosystems, which reflects both natural (geochemistry and topsoil removal) and anthropogenic sources. High lanthanide, uranium (U) and thorium (Th) concentrations revealed the impact of an open cast uranium mine. The highest enrichment factors (EF) were those of Cu, Pb, Zn and nickel (Ni), with calcium (Ca) being the most prominent in the surroundings of a cement plant. Industries and the transport of airborne urban pollutants were the main anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and antimony (Sb). The concentrations of metals in wheat grain were predicted using the topsoil and atmospheric fall-out composition with R(2)=0.90, with the latter being the best explanatory variable. The present study highlights the potential health hazards of wheat consumption (Environmental Protection Agency) by the assessment of heavy metals in bulk atmospheric deposition. PMID:22390956

  14. Chapter 4: Measurements of total beta-activity in the fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide information on fresh fission products in fallout reaching Australia from nuclear tests being conducted by France in Polynesia, measurements were made of total beta activity in daily fallout deposition of 25 Australian sampling stations covering a three month period from 25 July to 23 October 1973. The methods employed to measure the radioactivity of the samples are described and the data on total beta-activity, and the calculated external gamma radiation doses from fresh fallout are presented. (R.L.)

  15. Redistribution of fallout radionuclides in Enewetak Atoll lagoon sediments by callianassid bioturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands contain a large selection of fallout radionuclides as a result of 43 nuclear weapon tests conducted there between 1948 and 1958. The authors report elevated fallout radionuclide concentrations buried more deeply in the lagoon sediments and evidence of burrowing into the sediment by several species of callianassid ghost shrimp (Crustacea: Thalassinidea) which has displaced highly radioactive sediment. The burrowing activities of callianassids, which are ubiquitous on the lagoon floor, facilitate radionuclide redistribution and complicate the fallout radionuclide inventory of the lagoon. (author)

  16. Variations of caesium isotope concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly records of 137Cs and 134Cs concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-91 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominated. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperature northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from these data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending. (Author)

  17. Variations of Caesium Isotope Concentrations in Air and Fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly records of 137Cs and 134Cs concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-91 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominates. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperate northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from these data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending. (author)

  18. Variations of caesium isotope concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Zuy Hien; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Truong Y; Vuong Thu Bac; Nguyen Trong Ngo (Dalat Nuclear Research Inst. (Viet Nam))

    1994-01-01

    Monthly records of [sup 137]Cs and [sup 134]Cs concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-91 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominated. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperature northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from these data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending. (Author).

  19. Variations of caesium isotope concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly records of Cs-137 and Cs-134 concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-1991 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominated. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperate northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from this data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending

  20. Study of the fallout of artificial iron-55. Application to the evaluation of the fallout of natural iron of stratospheric origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this work is to study the iron-55 fallout to establish the world balance of this radioelement. The utilisation of this tracer enables the calculation of the input of natural iron of stratospheric origin to the Earth and the input through the atmosphere of natural iron to the oceans. We have shown that: iron-55 is essentially produced in nuclear explosions according to the 56Fe(n,2n)55Fe reaction; the iron-55 fallout obeys a 'stratospheric pattern' with a decay period between 9 and 11 months; by surface unit and at the same latitude, this fallout is 3.5 times more important on the Eastern part of the Northern Atlantic than over France. By comparison with the strontium-90 fallout, we established the world balance of the iron-55 fallout in the 1962-1965 period. This balance amounts to approximately 50 mega-curies for the iron-55 introduced into the atmosphere; 25.3 mega-curies of which fall down on the Earth during this period. We estimated at 6 x 106 tons per year the input of natural iron of stratospheric origin to the Earth and at 1.2 x 107 tons per year the input through the atmosphere of natural iron to the oceans. This latter figure represents 13 to 38 per cent of the amount of iron incorporated annually in the pelagic sediments. (author)

  1. 基于机载激光雷达的寒温带典型森林高度制图研究%Typical forest height mapping in cold temperate zone using airborne LiDAR data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Based on the airborne LiDAR point cloud data and 66 sample plots data from field inventory of Chaocha Forest Farm in Genhe City, Inner Mongolia, we set the cold temperate primary and secondary forests as research subjects. The model training accuracy and estimating accuracy of different forest height models were compared ( crown area weighted height model, arithmetic mean height model, LiDAR percentile height model) , which were generated by field-measured forest height ( Lorey's height, crown area weighted height, arithmetic mean height) , LiDAR crown area weighted height, LiDAR arithmetic mean height and LiDAR percentile height, respectively. LiDAR crown area weighted height and LiDAR arithmetic mean height were extracted by double tangent tree crown recognition algorithm, and LiDAR percentile height was extracted from LiDAR point cloud directly. Then we investigated the applicability of the double tangent tree crown recognition algorithm in the study area, revealed the difference between Lorey's height and crown area weighted height, and determined the optimal explanatory variables and selected the optimal forest height model. Afterwards, the optimal tree height model was used to calculate the spatial distribution of forest height in the study area, which would provide reference data for subsequent studies of biomass and carbon storage. The results showed that the training accuracy and estimating accuracy of the field crown area weighted forest height model were well consistent with Lorey's height, yet slightly lower than the results of Lorey's height. And 50% percentile height was well fitted with the field-measured height (R2 = 0.869, RMSE = 1.366 m for Lorey's height, and R2 = 0.839, RMSE = 1.392 m for crown area weighted height) . Estimating accuracy of each independently validated sample plot was all higher than 85%, with the average accuracy of 94.73% and the highest accuracy of 99.78%. The average estimating accuracy for mixed forests was 96.72%, higher

  2. Erosion/Disposition Data Derived from Fallout Radionuclides (FRNS) Using Geostatistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRN (Fallout Radionuclides) methodologies to assess erosion and sedimentation processes have been used worldwide for more than 40 years. However, some aspects of the methodology in particular data spatialisation and interpretation need further improvement. The aim of this work is to characterize the spatial distribution of FRN and to establish an isotope and sediment budget using FRN data and geostatistics. The spatial correlation of 137Cs, soil organic matter content (SOM) and soil erosion-sedimentation patterns was estimated in a 2.16 ha field (located in the southern part of the Boyer River watershed, in Eastern Canada) using geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS). The spatial variability of the parameters was characterized through a geostatistical approach which considers the randomized and structured nature of spatial variables and the spatial distribution of the samples. Semivariograms were produced to take into account the spatial structure present in the data. A strong spatial dependence was found for each tested parameter (0.87 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.95 and 0.7 ≤ Scale/Sill ≤ 0.96). SOM spatial redistribution was correlated to soil erosion and sedimentation as shown by the significant relationship (r2 = 0.63; p 137Cs and SOM. The spatial distribution of FRN was estimated by Ordinary Kriging (OK) to design contour maps. Using different interpolation methods and 'area weighted mean' of the 137Cs redistribution map, a radioisotope budget was established. Since 1954, around 2x107 Bq of 137Cs were exported from the studied field. The net sediment production was estimated at 16.6 t ha-1 a-1 with a sediment delivery ratio (SDR) of 99%. The paper demonstrates the efficient contribution of geostatistics in studies using environmental radionuclides to estimate soil redistribution rates and isotope and sediment budgets. This approach could be used for 210Pb or 7Be as well as 137Cs. (author)

  3. Transfer of 137Cs to milk and meat in Hungary from Chernobyl fallout with comparisons of worldwide fallout in the 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer coefficients for 137Cs from the Chernobyl accident were determined for milk (Fm) and meat (Ff) of cows and sheep in Hungary. Fm and Ff for both cows and sheep fed forage harvested within 1 mo of the accident were lower than results reported for worldwide fallout from weapons tests. Forage harvested 60 d or later after the accident produced an Fm similar to results from feeding soluble 134Cs. The results are interpreted to indicate three distinct categories of Fm about 2.0 X 10(-3), 4.0 X 10(-3) and 1.4 X 10(-2) d L-1, respectively, for Chernobyl fallout, worldwide fallout and soluble Cs isotopes or 137Cs contained in plants from soil uptake

  4. Influence of radioactive fallout on water supply and sewerage in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report reviews the practices and organization of water supply and sewerage in Finland and is related to their response to radioactive fallout situations. The contribution of drinking water to the internal radiation dose caused by radioactive fallout has earlier been small in Finland. However, in a wide-scale fallout situation, the decreasing of collective dose received from water may be justified, if the dose can be reduced at a reasonable cost, for instance by a temporary change of the raw water source. Efficient exchange of information between radiation protection and water supply experts is important for successful dose reduction measures. In Finland waterworks deliver tap water to 4.2 million people. Half of the water is ground water, and generally very well protected against fallout radioactivity. The other half is treated surface water. (6 figs., 5 tabs.)

  5. Determination of Volatility and Element Fractionation in Glassy Fallout Debris by SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Todd L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tenner, Travis Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bonamici, Chloe Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollington, Anthony Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of this report is to characterize glassy fallout debris using the Trinity Test and then characterize the U-isotopes of U3O8 reference materials that contain weaponized debris.

  6. Airborne radioactive contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current technologies for the detection of airborne radioactive contamination do not provide real-time capability. Most of these techniques are based on the capture of particulate matter in air onto filters which are then processed in the laboratory; thus, the turnaround time for detection of contamination can be many days. To address this shortcoming, an effort is underway to adapt LRAD (Long-Range-Alpha-Detection) technology for real-time monitoring of airborne releases of alpa-emitting radionuclides. Alpha decays in air create ionization that can be subsequently collected on electrodes, producing a current that is proportional to the amount of radioactive material present. Using external fans on a pipe containing LRAD detectors, controlled samples of ambient air can be continuously tested for the presence of radioactive contamination. Current prototypes include a two-chamber model. Sampled air is drawn through a particulate filter and then through the first chamber, which uses an electrostatic filter at its entrance to remove ambient ionization. At its exit, ionization that occurred due to the presence of radon is collected and recorded. The air then passes through a length of pipe to allow some decay of short-lived radon species. A second chamber identical to the first monitors the remaining activity. Further development is necessary on air samples without the use of particulate filtering, both to distinguish ionization that can pass through the initial electrostatic filter on otherwise inert particulate matter from that produced through the decay of radioactive material and to separate both of these from the radon contribution. The end product could provide a sensitive, cost-effective, real-time method of determining the presence of airborne radioactive contamination

  7. Airborne field strength monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bredemeyer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000 by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO. One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz, the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA accelerated method of moments (MoM using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  8. Thyroid Nodules as a Late Effect of Exposure to Fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple nodules of the thyroid gland have developed in a Marshallese population 10 to 14 years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout The exposure occurred in 1954 when an unpredicted shift in winds caused deposition of fallout on several Marshall Islands east of Bikini Sixty four people received 175 rads of gamma radiation which proved to be sub lethal but resulted in early nausea and vomiting and significant depression of blood elements Exposure of the skin resulted m beta bums and epilation and there was significant internal absorption of fission isotopes from contaminated food and water The most serious internal exposure was from radioiodines (131I 132I 133I 135I) It was estimated that in addition to the gamma radiation the adult thyroid gland received 160 rads from radioiodines and the young children because of their considerably smaller glands an estimated 700 1400 rads Recovery of blood elements to nearly normal and healing of skin lesions with regrowth of hair was complete by one year These findings have been fully documented The most important late radiation effect has been the development of thyroid abnormalities Since 1963 a total of 20 cases have thus far been detected 17 in children exposed at less than 10 years of age (90% of that group) and 3 in adults Thyroid surgery on 11 children and 3 adults revealed that all had benign adenomatous nodules except for a mixed papillary and follicular carcinoma in a 40 year-old woman The benign nodules were similar to those associated with iodine deficiency but such deficiency was not apparent m the Marshallese who live largely on seafood However most pathologists could not distinguish definite radiation effects in the nodules Growth and development retardation in some of the exposed children is now clearly related to thyroid deficiency Two boys with the greatest growth retardation developed pronounced hypothyroidism with atrophy of their thyroid glands Treatment of the exposed group with thyroid hormone

  9. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-01-01

    The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout l...

  10. Fall-out of pollutants from distant industrial areas in a rural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Louvain-la-Neuve, a semi-rural area, one frequently observes the fall-out of sulphur dioxide attributable to various industrial areas within Belgium. Two techniques are employed for finding the sources: meteorological studies of the trajectories of the polluted air masses; elemental analysis of aerosols collected at the time of dioxide fall-out. With the latter technique it is possible to characterize the emitting industries and thus to determine the origin of the detected sulphur dioxide. (author)

  11. PROJECTED LIFETIME CANCER RISKS FROM EXPOSURE TO REGIONAL RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS

    OpenAIRE

    Land, Charles E.; Bouville, Andre; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946–1958 at Bikini and Enewetak atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external radioactive components of fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of e...

  12. Fallout Deposition in the Marshall Islands from Bikini and Enewetak Nuclear Weapons Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Harold L.; Bouville, André; Moroz, Brian E.; Simon, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Deposition densities (Bq m-2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in nuclear weapons testing fallout from tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls (1946-1958) have been estimated on a test-specific basis for all the 31 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. A complete review of various historical and contemporary data, as well as meteorological analysis, was used to make judgments regarding which tests deposited fallout in the Marshall Islands an...

  13. Estimated inventory of plutonium and uranium radionuclides for vegetation in aged fallout areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented pertinent to the contamination of vegetation by plutonium and other radionuclides in aged fallout areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The standing biomass of vegetation estimated by nondestructive dimensional methods varied from about 200 to 600 g/m2 for the different fallout areas. Estimated inventories of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, and 235U in plants and their biological effects are discussed

  14. Compositae dermatitis from airborne parthenolide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, E; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compositae dermatitis confined to exposed skin has often been considered on clinical grounds to be airborne. Although anecdotal clinical and plant chemical reports suggest true airborne allergy, no proof has been procured. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) is a European Compositae plant...

  15. Laser Systems For Use With Airborne Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsky, Joseph

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes a family of airborne laser systems in use for terrain profiling, surveying, mapping, altimetry, collision avoidance and shipboard landing systems using fixed and rotary wing aircraft as the platforms. The laser altimeter has also been used in systems compatible with the Army T-16 and. T-22 carrier missiles (platform). Both pulsed gallium arsenide and Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped, yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser rangefinders have been used for these applications. All of these systems use ACCI's advanced measurement techniques that permit range accuracies of 8 cm, single shot, 1 cm averaged, to be achieved. Pulse rates up to 4 Khz are employed for airborne profiling. This high data density rate provides 1 data point every 2" along the aircraft flight line at aircraft speed of 500 knots. Scanning modes for some applications are employed. Systems have been integrated with all current inertial navigation systems (Litton, Ferranti and Honeywell), as well as a number of microwave positioning systems. Removal of aircraft motion from the laser range measurements by use of an accelerometer is described. Flight data from a number of program performed by U.S. and Canadian Federal Agencies, in addition to those of commercial surveying and mapping companies are described.

  16. Lineament mapping of vertical fractures of rock outcrops by remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarrese, Raffaella; Masciopinto, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of hydrological processes within the vadose zone is usually difficult, especially in the presence of compact rock subsoil. The possibility of recognizing the trend of the structural lineaments in fractured systems has important fallout in the understanding water infiltration processes, especially when the groundwater flow is strongly affected by the presence of faults and fractures that constitute the preferred ways of water fluxes. This study aims to detect fracture lineaments on fractured rock formations from CASI hyperspectral airborne VNIR images, with a size of 60 cm of the spatial resolution, and collected during November 2014. Lineaments detected with such high resolution have been compared with the fracture lineaments detected by a Landsat 8 image acquired at the same time of the CASI acquisition. The method has processed several remote sensed images at different spatial resolution, and it has produced the visualization of numerous lineament maps, as result of the vertical and sub-vertical fractures of the investigated area. The study has been applied to the fractured limestone outcrop of the Murgia region (Southern Italy). Here the rock formation hosts a deep groundwater, which supplies freshwater for drinking and irrigation purposes. The number of the fractures allowed a rough estimation of the vertical average hydraulic conductivity of the rock outcrop. This value was compared with field saturated rock hydraulic conductivity measurements derived from large ring infiltrometer tests carried out on the same rock outcrop.

  17. Airborne gamma spectrometry measurements in the context of the exercise ARM02; Aeroradiometrische Messungen im Rahmen der Uebung ARM02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucher, B.; Rybach, L. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Schwarz, G. [Swiss Nuclear Safety Authority, Villigen (Switzerland); Baerlocher, C. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    The international exercise under the European Union project ECCOMAGS (European Coordination and Calibration of Mobile and Airborne Gamma Spectrometry) stood in the centre of the yearly airborne gamma spectrometry measurement flights which were carried out in the time of 27 -31 May 2002. The exercise was held in Southwest Scotland in the region of Dumfries and Galloway. Unfortunately due to difficulties with flight approvals for military aircrafts data could be taken in the exercise area only on the flight back to Switzerland. Immediately after returning to Switzerland the regular measurements around the nuclear power plants Beznau (KKB) and Leibstadt (KKL), around the intermediate storage facilities for radioactive waste (ZWILAG) and around the research facility Paul Scherrer Institute were performed. The flights took place in the context of the exercise ARM02 and were lead by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NAZ). Unfortunately just a few measurements in the common intercalibration areas could be taken on the flight back from the international exercise. Nevertheless comparisons of the results with those of other European teams could be made. These comparisons proved the good calibration of our equipment. On the flight back measurements were also carried out at great altitude above the sea. This data allowed to determine very well the background of the aircraft and the cosmic stripping ratios. In the context of the regular measurements in the environs of the nuclear facilities in Switzerland the areas around the nuclear power plants Beznau and Leibstadt and around the nuclear research facility Paul Scherrer Institute were measured. The results were very similar to the results of earlier measurements in the last years. The nuclear power plant Beznau couldn't be recognised on the activity maps. But the nuclear power plant Leibstadt could be identified by its direct radiation which is specific for this type of reactor (BWR). At the site of the Paul

  18. Airborne lidar detection of subsurface oceanic scattering layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Krabill, William B.; Buntzen, Rodney R.; Gilbert, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    The airborne lidar detection and cross-sectional mapping of submerged oceanic scattering layers are reported. The field experiment was conducted in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of Assateague Island, VA. NASA's Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was operated in the bathymetric mode to acquire on-wavelength 532-nm depth-resolved backscatter signals from shelf/slope waters. Unwanted laser pulse reflection from the air-water interface was minimized by spatial filtering and off-nadir operation. The presence of thermal stratification over the shelf was verified by the deployment of airborne expendable bathythermographs. Optical beam transmission measurements acquired from a surface truthing vessel indicated the presence of a layer of turbid water near the sea floor over the inner portion of the shelf.

  19. Airborne laser sensors for oil spill remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of remote sensing technology as an effective tool in oil spill response measures was discussed. Environment Canada is currently developing airborne oil spill remote sensors, including the Scanning Laser Environmental Airborne Fluorosensor (SLEAF), and the Laser Ultrasonic Remote Sensing of Oil Thickness (LURSOT). Each remote sensor is designed to respond to specific roles in oil spill response. The SLEAF is designed to detect and map oil spills in complicated shoreline environments. The LURSOT will provide an absolute measurement of oil thickness from an airborne platform. The information provided is necessary to determine which countermeasures should be taken, such as dispersant application or in-situ burning. A new measuring technique has also been developed in which the thickness of oil spill on water can be accurately measured. 1 fig

  20. Nuclear weapons testing fallout: proving causation for exposure injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent Federal District Court opinion dealing with exposure of civilians to fallout from atomic bomb testing more than two decades ago provides guidance on how court action may in the future, address this problem. Close to 1200 negligence liability claims have been brought against the US government in the names of individuals who had resided near the Nevada Test Site and who subsequently developed cancer or leukemia. Because of the importance and complexity of the cases, the parties involved mutually agreed to the selection of 24 bellwether cases which then provided a legal and factural pattern against which other cases may be subsequently matched. The trial court's decision announced in Allen vs. United States, concluded that the government had a duty to adequately monitor, warn, and educate the population put at risk by the tests and that it had failed to fulfill its duty. However, it is only through case-by-case decision making, by courts reviewing all of the evidence in specific cases and tailoring results to best fit the specific facts, that equitable solutions can be applied in our optimal number of cases

  1. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  2. Dispersal and fallout simulations for urban consequences management (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wachtor, Adam J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patnik, Gopal [US NAVAL RESEARCH LAB.

    2010-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, biological, or radioactive releases from leaks, spills, fires, or blasts, may occur (intentionally or accidentally) in urban environments during warfare or as part of terrorist attacks on military bases or other facilities. The associated contaminant dispersion is complex and semi-chaotic. Urban predictive simulation capabilities can have direct impact in many threat-reduction areas of interest, including, urban sensor placement and threat analysis, contaminant transport (CT) effects on surrounding civilian population (dosages, evacuation, shelter-in-place), education and training of rescue teams and services. Detailed simulations for the various processes involved are in principle possible, but generally not fast. Predicting urban airflow accompanied by CT presents extremely challenging requirements. Crucial technical issues include, simulating turbulent fluid and particulate transport, initial and boundary condition modeling incorporating a consistent stratified urban boundary layer with realistic wind fluctuations, and post-processing of the simulation results for practical consequences management. Relevant fluid dynamic processes to be simulated include, detailed energetic and contaminant sources, complex building vortex shedding and flows in recirculation zones, and modeling of particle distributions, including particulate fallout, as well as deposition, re-suspension and evaporation. Other issues include, modeling building damage effects due to eventual blasts, addressing appropriate regional and atmospheric data reduction.

  3. KFM: a homemade yet accurate and dependable fallout meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of +-25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM are presented. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM

  4. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah

  5. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, S.G.; Land, C.E.; McKay, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah.

  6. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurgeirsson, M A; Arnalds, O; Palsson, S E; Howard, B J; Gudnason, K

    2005-01-01

    The retention of 137Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m(-2) and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r2=0.71). The majority of 137Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of 137Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (soils retained 74% of 137Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, 137Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. PMID:15571875

  7. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention of 137Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m-2 and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r2 = 0.71). The majority of 137Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of 137Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (137Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, 137Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils

  8. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurgeirsson, M.A. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Raudararstigur 10, IS-150 Reykjavik (Iceland)]. E-mail: ms@gr.is; Arnalds, O. [Agricultural Research Institute, Keldnaholt, IS-112 Reykjavik (Iceland); Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Raudararstigur 10, IS-150 Reykjavik (Iceland); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Gudnason, K. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Raudararstigur 10, IS-150 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2005-07-01

    The retention of {sup 137}Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m{sup -2} and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r{sup 2} = 0.71). The majority of {sup 137}Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of {sup 137}Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (<1%). Yet these soils retained 74% of {sup 137}Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, {sup 137}Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils.

  9. Airborne transmission of lyssaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, N; Phillpotts, R; Fooks, A R

    2006-06-01

    In 2002, a Scottish bat conservationist developed a rabies-like disease and subsequently died. This was caused by infection with European bat lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2), a virus closely related to Rabies virus (RABV). The source of this infection and the means of transmission have not yet been confirmed. In this study, the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, particularly RABV and the bat variant EBLV-2, might be transmitted via the airborne route was tested. Mice were challenged via direct introduction of lyssavirus into the nasal passages. Two hours after intranasal challenge with a mouse-adapted strain of RABV (Challenge Virus Standard), viral RNA was detectable in the tongue, lungs and stomach. All of the mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation developed disease signs by 7 days post-infection. Two out of five mice challenged by direct intranasal inoculation of EBLV-2 developed disease between 16 and 19 days post-infection. In addition, a simple apparatus was evaluated in which mice could be exposed experimentally to infectious doses of lyssavirus from an aerosol. Using this approach, mice challenged with RABV, but not those challenged with EBLV-2, were highly susceptible to infection by inhalation. These data support the hypothesis that lyssaviruses, and RABV in particular, can be spread by airborne transmission in a dose-dependent manner. This could present a particular hazard to personnel exposed to aerosols of infectious RABV following accidental release in a laboratory environment. PMID:16687600

  10. A first attempt to derive soil erosion rates from 137Cs airborne gamma measurements in two Alpine valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Bucher, Benno; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The application of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) as soil tracers is currently one of the most promising and effective approach for evaluating soil erosion magnitudes in mountainous grasslands. Conventional assessment or measurement methods are laborious and constrained by the topographic and climatic conditions of the Alps. The 137Cs (half-life = 30.2 years) is the most frequently used FRN to study soil redistribution. However the application of 137Cs in alpine grasslands is compromised by the high heterogeneity of the fallout due to the origin of 137Cs fallout in the Alps, which is linked to single rain events occurring just after the Chernobyl accident when most of the Alpine soils were still covered by snow. The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of the 137Cs distribution in two study areas in the Central Swiss Alps: the Ursern valley (Canton Uri), and the Piora valley (Canton Ticino). In June 2015, a helicopter equipped with a NaI gamma detector flew over the two study sites and screened the 137Cs activity of the top soil. The use of airborne gamma measurements is particularly efficient in case of higher 137Cs concentration in the soil. Due to their high altitude and high precipitation rates, the Swiss Alps are expected to be more contaminated by 137Cs fallout than other parts of Switzerland. The airborne gamma measurements have been related to several key parameters which characterize the areas, such as soil properties, slopes, expositions and land uses. The ground truthing of the airborne measurements (i.e. the 137Cs laboratory measurements of the soil samples collected at the same points) returned a good fit. The obtained results offer an overview of the 137Cs concentration in the study areas, which allowed us to identify suitable reference sites, and to analyse the relationship between the 137Cs distribution and the above cited parameters. The authors also derived a preliminary qualitative and a quantitative assessment of soil redistribution

  11. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Sleetmute quadrangle (Alaska). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the months of July, August, and September 1979 an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was carried out over ten 30 x 10 NTMS quadrangles of West-Central Alaska. The results obtained over Sleetmute map are discussed. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps. The histograms and the multiparameter profiles are presented with the anomaly maps and flight path map in a separate bound volume

  12. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Ophir quadrangle (Alaska). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During July, August, and September 1979, an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten 30 x 10 NTMS quadrangles of West-Central Alaska. The results obtained over the Ophir map area. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps; and computer printer maps. The histograms and the multiparameter profiles are presented with the anomaly maps and flight path map in a separate bound volume

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: McGrath Quadrangle (Alaska). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the months of July, August, and September 1979, an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten 30 x 10 NTMS quadrangle of West-Central Alaska. The results obtained over the McGrath map area are discussed. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps. The histograms and the multiparameter profiles are presented with the anomaly maps and flight path map in a separate volume

  14. Research on Block Adjustment of Airborne InSAR Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne InSAR system and InSAR data processing algorithm have been one of the hot topics in the international SAR field. Geometric constraint relation of images is set up through airborne InSAR block adjustment, adjustment parameters are adjusted and refined, and the three-dimensional(3D) ground coordinates of tie-points(TPs) are solved according to least squares theory. The number of the ground control points(GCPs) is reduced. The airborne InSAR block adjustment experiment was done using self-developed Airborne InSAR Block Adjustment Software System. The 76 airborne InSAR images which are 0.5 m resolution and cover an area of 472 square kilometers generated a block of 4 strips and 19 rows with approximately 30% overlap between adjacent strips. The study site is located in in Jiangyou Sichuan province and characterized by a hilly topography. The result meets DEM and DOM mapping accuracy requirements at scale of 1:10000

  15. Modeling for Airborne Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift

  16. Research and Application on the Large Scale Topographic Map Surveying Based on Airborne-LiDAR data-A Case Study at Mountain City%基于机载LiDAR数据测绘大比例尺地形图的研究与应用--以山地城市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘万华; 刘超祥; 原野

    2015-01-01

    Traditional large scale topographic mapping uses aerial photography,however,this method is limited to several external factors,for instance,the density of vegetation coverage,the photogrammetry projection error and the image shades,etc. Airborne-LiDAR uses Laser shots to fetch the information on earth. The Laser point holds three-dimension-al information and intensity of echo,this characteristic just makes up the short come of Traditional method. This article does research on large scale topographic mapping in mountain city using airborne-LiDAR data. In this case study,we found a normal production process and analyzed the accuracy of the results. The conclusion shows the result accuracy can be used for 1 : 2000 scale topographic mapping.%传统大范围的大比例尺地形图测制多采用航测的方法,但基于航摄影像匹配的航测方法本身存在着一定的局限性,机载LiDAR通过激光回波获取信息,激光具有一定的穿透性,在植被覆盖的区域也能获取一定数量的地面反射激光点;激光点云本身记录了三维坐标信息,各种物体顶部的激光点不存在投影差的问题,LiDAR数据的特点正好能弥补航摄影像的不足之处。本文通过研究基于机载LiDAR数据配合高分辨率数字正射影像在山地城市测制大比例尺地形图,探索出一套生产方法流程,以重庆测区为例,分析了该方法的可行性并对测图成果精度进行了系统性分析,结果表明,本试验中要素精度和DEM精度可以达到1:2000的测图要求。

  17. Merging airborne and carborne radiometric data for surveying the Deir Az-Zor area, Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To complete the radiometric map of Syria, and to estimate the natural background radiation levels for environmental monitoring, a carborne survey was undertaken over the Deir Az-Zor area. This area was not covered by a previous airborne survey, except for peripheral regions in the south and west. To complete the radiometric map, results of the carborne and airborne surveys had to be merged. This paper presents the merging procedure which was used after normalizing the two data sets to match each other. No anomalies suitable for radioelement exploration were found. However, the overall radiometric maps resulting from the present work were consistent with the maps of the areas covered by the airborne survey. (author)

  18. Fallout from Chernobyl and atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Chernobyl in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some results and experience gained so far in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident are discussed in the light of knowledge obtained from the studies of fallout from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Cesium-137, which was an important radionuclide in the bomb fallout, was still more important after Chernobyl. For most Swedes the external irradiation from deposited Cs-137 was the dominating source of irradiation. Studies of Chernobyl fallout have given new information in the fate of contamination in the forest environment, lakes, urban areas, on shielding factors for houses etc. The releases from Chernobyl gave relatively lower dietary doses than expected form the same amount of Cs-137, released through nuclear weapons testing. However lake fish, moose and forest products have shown to be of greater importance than earlier realized. The main reason for the lower dietary doses from Chernobyl was the seasonal distribution of the fallout with deposition just before the start of the growing season. The various actions taken also reduced the intake of Cs-137 and Cs-134. Otherwise, there are no radical differences in the behaviour of cesium in the environment after the bombs and after Chernobyl. Differences may exist, primarily during the first year, due to different fallout conditions, where also the physical-chemical form of the fallout might have been of some importance. The average Swede will have an effective dose commitment of around 1 mSv from Chernobyl, which is about the same as from the bomb fallout. The highest doses due to Chernobyl area received by people living in high deposition areas (>80 kBq/m2 of CS-137) and consuming larger amounts of game animals, lake fish and reindeer. (66 refs.)

  19. Evaluating airborne multispectral digital video to differentiate giant Salvinia from other features in northeast Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant salvinia is one of the world’s most noxious aquatic weeds. Researchers employed airborne digital video imagery and an unsupervised computer analysis to derive a map showing giant salvinia and other aquatic and terrestrial features within a study site located in northeast Texas. The map had a...

  20. Territory contamination with the radionuclides representing the fuel component of Chernobyl fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashparov, V A; Lundin, S M; Zvarych, S I; Yoshchenko, V I; Levchuk, S E; Khomutinin, Y V; Maloshtan, I M; Protsak, V P

    2003-12-30

    The data obtained through a series of experiments were used to specify the correlation of activities of the fuel component radionuclides of Chernobyl fallout and to create the maps of the 30-km Chernobyl zone terrestrial density of contamination with 154Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am (on 01.01.2000). In the year 2000, total inventories of the fuel component radionuclides in the upper 30-cm soil layer of the 30-km Chernobyl zone in Ukraine (outside the ChNPP industrial site, excluding the activity located in the radioactive waste storages and in the cooling pond) were estimated as: 90Sr--7.7 x 10(14) Bq; 137Cs--2.8 x 10(15) Bq; 154Eu--1.4 x 10(13) Bq; 238Pu--7.2 x 10(12) Bq; 239+240Pu--1.5 x 10(13) Bq; 241Am--1.8 x 10(13) Bq. These values correspond to 0.4-0.5% of their amounts in the ChNPP unit 4 at the moment of the accident. The current estimate is 3 times lower than the previous widely-cited estimates. Inventories of the fuel component radionuclides were also estimated in other objects within the 30-km zone and outside it. This allowed more accurate data to be obtained on the magnitude of a relative release of radionuclides in the fuel particles (FP) matrix during the Chernobyl accident outside the ChNPP industrial site. It amounts to 1.5+/-0.5% of these radionuclides in the reactor, which is 2 times lower than the previous estimates. Two-thirds of the radionuclides release in the FP was deposited on the territory of Ukraine. PMID:14630415

  1. Territory contamination with the radionuclides representing the fuel component of Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data obtained through a series of experiments were used to specify the correlation of activities of the fuel component radionuclides of Chernobyl fallout and to create the maps of the 30-km Chernobyl zone terrestrial density of contamination with 154Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am (on 01.01.2000). In the year 2000, total inventories of the fuel component radionuclides in the upper 30-cm soil layer of the 30-km Chernobyl zone in Ukraine (outside the ChNPP industrial site, excluding the activity located in the radioactive waste storages and in the cooling pond) were estimated as: 90Sr-7.7x1014 Bq; 137Cs-2.8x1015 Bq; 154Eu-1.4x1013 Bq; 238Pu-7.2x1012 Bq; 239+240Pu-1.5x1013 Bq; 241Am-1.8x1013 Bq. These values correspond to 0.4-0.5% of their amounts in the ChNPP unit 4 at the moment of the accident. The current estimate is 3 times lower than the previous widely-cited estimates. Inventories of the fuel component radionuclides were also estimated in other objects within the 30-km zone and outside it. This allowed more accurate data to be obtained on the magnitude of a relative release of radionuclides in the fuel particles (FP) matrix during the Chernobyl accident outside the ChNPP industrial site. It amounts to 1.5±0.5% of these radionuclides in the reactor, which is 2 times lower than the previous estimates. Two-thirds of the radionuclides release in the FP was deposited on the territory of Ukraine

  2. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  3. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurgeirsson, M.A.; Arnalds, O.; Palsson, S.E.; Gudnason, K. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Division of Environmental Monitoring and Emergency Preparedness, Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2004-07-01

    In 2000-2002 the retention of {sup 137}Cs in various types of andosols, which are the most abundant soils in Iceland, was investigated. This is the first comprehensive attempt to determine radiocaesium levels and retention characteristics of Icelandic soils. Soils were sampled at 29 sites located near meteorological stations covering variation in precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0- 5, 5-10, and 10-15 cm depths. Several physical and chemical parameters were measured, such as organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, pH and clay mineral content. The radiocaesium activity is quite variable and ranges between 300 and 4800 Bq/m{sup 2} and correlates closely to total annual precipitation (r{sup 2}=0.9). Most of the radiocaesium is retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil, or 83% on average. The greatest penetration was observed for organic Histo-sols, where 6% of the total {sup 137}Cs was found at 10-15 cm depth compared to less than 3% for Andosols types. The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with low clay content and contain little organic matter (<1%). Yet these soils retained 74% of {sup 137}Cs in the top 5 cm in our study. The results clearly indicate that radioactive fallout caesium is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferri-hydrite. Winter frost, snow melt, crack flow, and animal activity seem to have little effect on the {sup 137}Cs distribution at the present sampling sites. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the aerial activity and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. (author)

  4. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2000-2002 the retention of 137Cs in various types of andosols, which are the most abundant soils in Iceland, was investigated. This is the first comprehensive attempt to determine radiocaesium levels and retention characteristics of Icelandic soils. Soils were sampled at 29 sites located near meteorological stations covering variation in precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0- 5, 5-10, and 10-15 cm depths. Several physical and chemical parameters were measured, such as organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, pH and clay mineral content. The radiocaesium activity is quite variable and ranges between 300 and 4800 Bq/m2 and correlates closely to total annual precipitation (r2=0.9). Most of the radiocaesium is retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil, or 83% on average. The greatest penetration was observed for organic Histo-sols, where 6% of the total 137Cs was found at 10-15 cm depth compared to less than 3% for Andosols types. The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with low clay content and contain little organic matter (137Cs in the top 5 cm in our study. The results clearly indicate that radioactive fallout caesium is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferri-hydrite. Winter frost, snow melt, crack flow, and animal activity seem to have little effect on the 137Cs distribution at the present sampling sites. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the aerial activity and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. (author)

  5. Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Sean; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Dan; Law, Emily; Kay-Im, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE) is JPL's internal investment to improve the return on airborne missions. Improve development performance of the data system. Improve return on the captured science data. The investment is to develop a common science data system capability for airborne instruments that encompasses the end-to-end lifecycle covering planning, provisioning of data system capabilities, and support for scientific analysis in order to improve the quality, cost effectiveness, and capabilities to enable new scientific discovery and research in earth observation.

  6. Airborne radiometric: Data evaluation and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The airborne geophysical system of the BGR (German Geological Survey) consists of a helicopter equipped with an electromagnetic system with two transmittors and two receivers, a proton resonance magnetometer and a 16 L NaJ-crystal with four channel recording. All these data together with navigation data and flight altitude above ground are recorded each second on a nine track magnetic tape for further data evaluation. Different corrections have to be applied to the rough data such as: smoothing by means of a digital filter to reduce statistical noise, altitude correction, Compton-correction, and drift correction (cross-profile evaluation). Then the corrected measuring data are combined with the navigation data in order to be able to produce iso-line maps. The final results are presented as: line plots for U, Th, and K (and EM-data and magnetometer data); actual flight line plots; iso-line maps for U, Th, and K; iso-line maps for conductivity; depth of conducting layer; and magnetometry maps. The procedures of correction and evaluation of the above mentioned data as well as the calibration of the NaJ-detector in terms of ppm U, Th, and %K are dicussed in the paper. (author)

  7. Trial airborne environmental and geological survey: an initial appraisal of relevance to land-use

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, D.; Cuss, R.J.; Jones, D. G.; Peart, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A series of four trial airborne environmental and geological surveys was flown by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) in collaboration with the British Geological Survey (BGS) in June 1999; the trials were co-sponsored by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions and the Environment Agency. The main objective of these surveys was to test the efficiency of the GTK airborne electromagnetic system in the mapping of potential pollution problems in the UK environment. Gamma s...

  8. Trial airborne environmental and geological survey of target areas in the English Midlands

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, D.; Cuss, R.J.; Jones, D.G.; Peart, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A series of four trial airborne environmental and geological surveys was flown by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) in collaboration with the British Geological Survey (BGS) in June 1999; the trials were co-sponsored by the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions and the Environment Agency. The main objective of these surveys was to test the efficiency of the GTK airborne electromagnetic (EM) system in the mapping of potential pollution problems in the UK environment. Ga...

  9. High-resolution NO₂ remote sensing from the Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Popp, C; Brunner, D.; Damm, A.; Van Roozendael, M.; Fayt, C.; Buchmann, B

    2012-01-01

    We present and evaluate the retrieval of high spatial resolution maps of NO2 vertical column densities (VCD) from the Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer. APEX is a novel instrument providing airborne measurements of unique spectral and spatial resolution and coverage as well as high signal stability. In this study, we use spectrometer data acquired over Zurich, Switzerland, in the morning and late afternoon during a flight campaign on a cloud-free summer d...

  10. High-resolution NO₂ remote sensing from the Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Popp, C; Brunner, Dominik; DAMM Alexander; M. Van Roozendael; C. Fayt; B. Buchmann

    2012-01-01

    We present and evaluate the retrieval of high spatial resolution maps of NO₂ vertical column densities (VCD) from the Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX) imaging spectrometer. APEX is a novel instrument providing airborne measurements of unique spectral and spatial resolution and coverage as well as high signal stability. In this study, we use spectrometer data acquired over Zurich, Switzerland, in the morning and late afternoon during a flight campaign on a cloud-free summer day in June 2010. N...

  11. A century old record of lead-210 fallout on the Greenland ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic measurements of the stable oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) and artificial radioactivity (total β) on a 77 m ice core the DYE 3 location in S.E. Greenland provided precise age indices to study the fallout of lead-210 during the last century. The results obtained on the Dye 3 core and those of similar studies conducted on two other ice cores from the Greenland locations, Camp Century and North Central, are discussed in relation to the average fallout of 210Pb and the probable contributions made by natural and artificial sources in the atmosphere. The results indicate that: (i) the fallout of 210Pb observed over a period of 100 years has not remained constant, an assumption usually made in geochronological studies; (ii) the fallout of 210Pb over the period 1886-1930 is observed to be higher at least by a factor of two than that observed in the period 1930-1975; (iii) the higher 210Pb fallout observed over the period 1886-1930 coincides with high volcanic activity in this period; (iv) there is no evidence for significant production of 210Pb due to testing of nuclear weapons in the three decades: 1950s to 1970s. (author) 28 refs

  12. Elements of response on the mapping of Chernobylsk accident fallout in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison of estimations got with the help of the rain-deposit relationship with results of consolidated measurements, got on well controlled and referred samples is globally positive. These differences, in addition match with the uncertainties that have been previously estimated in the rain-deposit model. (N.C.)

  13. A MATLAB GEODETIC SOFTWARE FOR PROCESSING AIRBORNE LIDAR BATHYMETRY DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Pepe, M.; Prezioso, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to build three-dimensional models through technologies based on satellite navigation systems GNSS and the continuous development of new sensors, as Airborne Laser Scanning Hydrography (ALH), data acquisition methods and 3D multi-resolution representations, have contributed significantly to the digital 3D documentation, mapping, preservation and representation of landscapes and heritage as well as to the growth of research in this fields. However, GNSS systems led to the use...

  14. Overview and comparative analysis of digital airborne photogrammetric surveying systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tamše, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    In the thesis, three the most important digital airborne photogrammetric systems are described, as well as their comparative analysis and the application of this technology in Slovenia are presented. Digital technology is being constantly developed and use of aerial images is being increased. Traditionally, aerial images were mostly used for digital topographic mapping, nowadays their use is focused on producing digital orthophoto, which is being used in different areas. First, main character...

  15. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  16. Changes in the levels of radioactive fall-out and the resulting radiation doses to man in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period covered by the Council's 1956 report, that is, up to the spring of 1956, the radioactive debris falling in the United Kingdom had arisen from a large number of small nuclear explosions, chiefly in Nevada, and from a few large nuclear explosions mainly in the Pacific, especially in March, 1954. It was recognized that the doses of radiation to persons from the deposition of debris arising from the smaller nuclear explosions would be far outweighed by those from the larger explosions. The material reaching the U.K. from the latter at that time was found to have an apparent age (determined from the ratio of strontium 89 to strontium 90 which ranged from 7 to 14 months. In these circumstances the dose contributed by the isotopes of relatively short life (say, two months or less) was much less important than the dose from the long-lived isotopes such as caesium 137 and strontium 90. From the autumn of 1956 the pattern of testing changed. A high proportion of the explosions carried out were of megaton size and took place in higher latitudes in the northern hemisphere. As a result the short-lived isotopes became relatively more important and, with the heavy testing of nuclear devices in the Arctic in October, 1958, the contribution of radioactive fall-out to the background dose-rate in air in the open rose in the spring of 1959 so that, for a period of a month or two, it amounted to some 30 per cent of the natural background. This rise in dose-rate can be attributed to two main causes, namely, the increase in the rate of testing and the shorter time during which the fission products from the tests in the autumn in northern latitudes, particularly in the Arctic, have remained airborne

  17. Observation of fallout deposition in an outdoor swimming pool 50 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), outdoor school swimming pools at Fukushima were decontaminated to curb the redistribution of radioactivity into downstream farmlands. In the process, the radioactivity concentrations of the pool water and sediment substances (residue) were measured to estimate the deposition density of the fallout. At a pool situated 50 km away from the NPP, the average concentrations of radiocesium (134+137Cs) for the water and residue were quantified as 170 Bq L−1 and 3.6 × 105 Bq kg−1, respectively. Taking account of the radioactivity concentrations and of the water balance in and around the pool, the deposition density of radiocesium, as of August 2011, was precisely determined to be 0.32 ± 0.03 MBq m−2 (k = 1). The density corroborated the previous results obtained by other methods, i.e., airborne surveys, in-situ Ge surveys and soil samplings at neighboring locations. Other than radiocesium, the only gamma-emitting nuclide detected was 110mAg, with a concentration of 560 Bq kg−1 in the residue. The radioactivity concentrations of 89Sr, 90Sr, 238Pu and 239+240Pu in the water were all less than the minimum detectable activities – 2, 0.1, 0.002 and 0.002 Bq L−1, respectively. - Highlights: • Deposition density of radiocesium was estimated at a swimming pool in Fukushima. • The density was determined with a small standard uncertainty of approximately 10%. • Water balance was simulated for estimating radioactivity budget in the pool. • Detected gamma-emitting nuclide was 110mAg other than radiocesium. • Radiocesium was much dominant compared with 89Sr, 90Sr, 110mAg, 238Pu and 239+240Pu

  18. The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-13

    In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is

  19. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout like thyroid cancer is significantly higher in iodine deficient populations .There is need to institute disaster preparedness measures to mitigate the damage in case of a nuclear accident. Interventions to control adverse fallout of nuclear radiation include evacuation, sheltering and food controls as well as iodine prophylaxis

  20. The radioactive fall-out harm of nuclear burst to crops and its protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive contamination in the ground burst center is severe and the contaminated area is often large, as well as the effect of radioactive contamination is long. With different kinds of crops, the effects of external contamination caused by the fall-out are different. The contamination can easily be reduced by wind or rain. On the leaf surface it can be washed off and reduced to 10%. A small amount of fission product can be absorbed through plant roots. It is mainly distributed in leaves and stems. The radioactive contamination of fall-out would damage the crops and reduce the production. After an atmospheric test, the fall-out of 90Sr and 137Cs plays an important role in the biological effects. The absorption and distribution of radioactive contaminants in crops, their chemical states in soil and the measures to reduce the absorbed radioactivity are respectively studied

  1. Meteorological requirements and operational fallout prediction techniques for Plowshare nuclear detonations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meteorological support requirements for Plowshare nuclear detonations are shown to depend on a number of factors. The importance of adequate support to the effective planning and safe conduct of a nuclear detonation is described. An example of the influence of atmospheric conditions on radioactive cloud development and local transport and fallout of radioactive debris is presented. Prediction of the future state of atmospheric wind structure, required for fallout predictions depends on an adequate definition of its initial state and its rate of change. This definition, in turn, is shown to depend on an upper wind-sounding network of appropriate station density. An operational technique currently used for nuclear cratering fallout predictions is described and shown to produce results of useful accuracy. (author)

  2. Influence of the Chernobyl fallout on 137Cs wine activities on the Rhone valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of the Chernobyl fallout on 137CS wine activities on the Rhone valley. Some parts of the Rhone valley have been quite strongly, affected by the Chernobyl fallout, with 137Cs deposits sometimes higher than 20 000 Bq m-2. In those regions, most of agricultural surfaces are devoted to vineyards for famous vintages. This study shows that the consequences of the Chernobyl fallout in wine were visible but very weak. 137CS wine activities did not reached 1 Bq 1-1. Such limited consequences are linked to the date of the deposit, the first week of May 1986, at the beginning of vineyard plant foliar development. Since 1986, this activity has strongly decreased to be in 2000 close to those existing before the accident: some milli-becquerel per litre. 137Cs activities in soil, mainly contained within the 20 first centimeters, are weakly available for vineyard roots. (authors)

  3. South African Airborne Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Airborne operations entail the delivery of ground troops and their equipment by air to their area of operations. They can also include the subsequent support of these troops and their equipment by air. Historically, and by definition, this would encompass delivery by fixed-wing powered aircraft, by glider, by parachute or by helicopter. Almost any troops can be delivered by most of these means. However, the technical expertise and physical as well as psychological demands required by parachuting have resulted in specialist troops being selected and trained for this role. Some of the material advantages of using parachute troops, or paratroops, are: the enormous strategic reach provided by the long-distance transport aircraft used to convey them; the considerable payload which these aircraft are capable of carrying; the speed with which the parachute force can deploy; and the fact that no infrastructure such as airfields are required for their arrival. Perhaps most attractively to cash-strapped governments, the light equipment scales of parachute units’ makes them economical to establish and maintain. There are also less tangible advantages: the soldiers selected are invariably volunteers with a willingness or even desire to tackle challenges; their selection and training produces tough, confident and aggressive troops, psychologically geared to face superior odds and to function independently from other units; and their initiative and self-reliance combined with a high level of physical fitness makes them suitable for a number of different and demanding roles.

  4. Fallout deposition in the Marshall Islands from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Harold L; Bouville, André; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Deposition densities (Bq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in nuclear weapons testing fallout from tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls (1946-1958) have been estimated on a test-specific basis for 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. A complete review of various historical and contemporary data, as well as meteorological analysis, was used to make judgments regarding which tests deposited fallout in the Marshall Islands and to estimate fallout deposition density. Our analysis suggested that only 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in substantial fallout deposition on any of the 23 inhabited atolls. This analysis was confirmed by the fact that the sum of our estimates of 137Cs deposition from these 20 tests at each atoll is in good agreement with the total 137Cs deposited as estimated from contemporary soil sample analyses. The monitoring data and meteorological analyses were used to quantitatively estimate the deposition density of 63 activation and fission products for each nuclear test, plus the cumulative deposition of 239+240Pu at each atoll. Estimates of the degree of fractionation of fallout from each test at each atoll, as well as of the fallout transit times from the test sites to the atolls were used in this analysis. The estimates of radionuclide deposition density, fractionation, and transit times reported here are the most complete available anywhere and are suitable for estimations of both external and internal dose to representative persons as described in companion papers. PMID:20622548

  5. Hot particles and the Cold War. Investigating fallout from nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entering the next century, more than 2000 nuclear test explosions of various sizes and varieties will have been recorded. Nearly all of them were conducted during the Cold War period ending in the 1990s. Atmospheric nuclear tests dispersed radioactive residues into the environment. They are partitioned between the local ground (or water surface) and the tropospheric and stratospheric regions, depending on the type of test, location, and yield. The subsequent precipitation carrying the residues leads to both local and global fallout. Concentrations of certain radionuclides can result in formation of 'hot particles' - tiny bits of materials containing radioactive chemical elements. Local fallout includes large radioactive aerosols, particles which are generally deposited within about 100 kilometers of the test site. Local radioactive contamination at nuclear weapon test sites additionally is attributed to safety trials of nuclear devices that often dispersed fissile material. This material is released in various forms, including plutonium vapour, plutonium aerosols of various sizes, plutonium oxide particulates, plutonium-coated particles, and sizeable lumps of plutonium-contaminated structural material destroyed by the test explosion. Global fallout encompasses both tropospheric and stratospheric fallout. The first consists of aerosols that are not carried across the tropopause and that deposit With a mean residence time of up to 30 days. During this time, the residues become dispersed in the latitude band of injection, following trajectories governed by wind patterns. Stratospheric fallout arises from particles that later give rise to widespread global fallout, most of which is in the hemisphere where the nuclear test was conducted. It accounts for most of the residues of long-lived fission products

  6. Wavelet Based Fractal Analysis of Airborne Pollen

    CERN Document Server

    Degaudenzi, M E

    1999-01-01

    The most abundant biological particles in the atmosphere are pollen grains and spores. Self protection of pollen allergy is possible through the information of future pollen contents in the air. In spite of the importance of airborne pol len concentration forecasting, it has not been possible to predict the pollen concentrations with great accuracy, and about 25% of the daily pollen forecasts have resulted in failures. Previous analysis of the dynamic characteristics of atmospheric pollen time series indicate that the system can be described by a low dimensional chaotic map. We apply the wavelet transform to study the multifractal characteristics of an a irborne pollen time series. We find the persistence behaviour associated to low pollen concentration values and to the most rare events of highest pollen co ncentration values. The information and the correlation dimensions correspond to a chaotic system showing loss of information with time evolution.

  7. Fallout 137Cs activity and associated dose in the coastal marine environment of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coastal marine environment is important for India since a considerable percentage of the human population resides in coastal areas. Fallout radionuclides as well as non-radioactive substances have polluted the coastal marine environment of India. The introduction of 137Cs, a fallout radionuclide, considered as global pollutant, into marine environment has created the need for marine environmental data. The main objective is to provide data on the present level of 137Cs that is important from the standpoint of radiological health and dose associated with it. Such database will also provide benchmark that will be helpful in assessing the impact of additional contribution to marine radioactivity in the future. (author)

  8. The I.R.S.N.-2003 model of Chernobylsk accident fallout in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conclusion, the whole of the method impreciseness, the sometime important variation between the very simplifying hypothesis used and the available data ( especially for the air contamination and the fallout of nuclear tests), the variations between the results of the model and the measurements, its incompatible results with these ones exposed and validated in the report I.P.S.N.-1997, lead to consider that the I.R.S.N.-2003 model does not allow a reliable quantitative estimation of Chernobylsk fallout and let alone the dosimetry estimations for which it has been used. (N.C.)

  9. Organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernette, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary review of the literature on organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation. Fallout-shelter options are evaluated along two dimensions: shelter size, and extent of shelteree participation in the shelter construction. Four functional criteria are used in the evaluation: decision-making, member coordination, social control, and maintaining morale. Smaller shelters requiring shelteree participation in construction appear preferable as measured in most of these criteria. Additional factors mentioned include demographic characteristics of the shelter population, degree and type of ventilation system, and availability of medical equipment and personnel. 10 references.

  10. Distribution of neptunium and plutonium in New Mexico lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) contaminated by atmospheric fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 237Np, 239Pu and 240Pu were determined in lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) that were collected from ten locations in New Mexico between 2011 and 2013 using isotope dilution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). The observed isotopic ratios for 237Np/239Pu and 240Pu/239Pu indicate trace contamination from global and regional fallout (e.g. Trinity test and atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site). The fact that actinide contamination is detected in recent lichen collections suggests continuous re-suspension of fallout radionuclides even 50 years after ratification of the Limited Test Ban Treaty. (author)

  11. Local fallout from nuclear test detonations. Volume 2. Compilation of fallout patterns and related test data. Supplement. Foreign nuclear tests. Sanitized

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenthau, M.; Showers, R.L.

    1964-10-01

    The available fallout patterns and related test data for nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United Kingdom, the Republic of France, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, are included in this supplement to NDL-TR-34. The related test data for the British and French tests include: date and time of detonation, location of test site, total yield, fission yield, type of burst and placement, height of burst, cloud-top and -bottom heights, crater data, and wind information up to nuclear cloud-top height. No fallout patterns are available for any of the Soviet detonations. The list of Soviet detonations, which is as comprehensive as possible, contains the chronological order of the detonations, date, yield, type of burst and location of test site.

  12. The development of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry: case study in technological innovation and acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne γ-ray spectrometry is now accepted as a technique with worldwide applications for geological mapping, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring. The first suggestions to use airborne radiation detectors for uranium exploration were made in 1943. Early results were disappointing; progress resulted from advances in nuclear instrumentation combined with recognition of the need for large detector-crystal arrays. Development of an effective operational system required the integration of geochemical and geological knowledge with nuclear physics, extending over two decades. The establishment of standards and calibration procedures allowed the first maps of surface radioelement concentrations based on quantitative airborne γ-ray spectrometry to be published in 1971. User-acceptance of the method grew from extensive demonstration of its capabilities, made obvious with the introduction of colour map displays. (author)

  13. SGA-WZ: A New Strapdown Airborne Gravimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaidong Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Inertial navigation systems and gravimeters are now routinely used to map the regional gravitational quantities from an aircraft with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. However, airborne gravimeter of this kind is limited by the inaccuracy of the inertial sensor performance, the integrated navigation technique and the kinematic acceleration determination. As the GPS technique developed, the vehicle acceleration determination is no longer the limiting factor in airborne gravity due to the cancellation of the common mode acceleration in differential mode. A new airborne gravimeter taking full advantage of the inertial navigation system is described with improved mechanical design, high precision time synchronization, better thermal control and optimized sensor modeling. Apart from the general usage, the Global Positioning System (GPS after differentiation is integrated to the inertial navigation system which provides not only more precise altitude information along with the navigation aiding, but also an effective way to calculate the vehicle acceleration. Design description and test results on the performance of the gyroscopes and accelerations will be emphasized. Analysis and discussion of the airborne field test results are also given.

  14. ISRO's dual frequency airborne SAR pre-cursor to NISAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, V. Manavala; Suneela, T. J. V. D.; Bhan, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly embarked on NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) operating in L-band and S-band, which will map Earth's surface every 12 days. As a pre-cursor to the NISAR mission, ISRO is planning an airborne SAR (L&S band) which will deliver NISAR analogue data products to the science community. ISRO will develop all the hardware with the aim of adhering to system design aspects of NISAR to the maximum extent possible. It is a fully polarimetric stripmap SAR and can be operated in single, dual, compact, quasi-quad and full polarimetry modes. It has wide incidence angle coverage from 24°-77° with swath coverage from 5.5km to 15 km. Apart from simultaneous imaging operations, this system can also operate in standalone L/S SAR modes. This system is planned to operate from an aircraft platform with nominal altitude of 8000meters. Antenna for this SAR will be rigidly mounted to the aircraft, whereas, motion compensation will be implemented in the software processor to generate data products. Data products for this airborne SAR will be generated in slant & ground range azimuth dimension and geocoded in HDF5/Geotiff formats. This airborne SAR will help to prepare the Indian scientific community for optimum utilization of NISAR data. In-order to collect useful science data, airborne campaigns are planned from end of 2016 onwards.

  15. Air-borne geophysical prospecting using Helicopter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The air-borne geophysical prospecting can investigate geological properties widely and quickly. In this investigation, we applied 3-types of geophysical prospecting, those were Electro-magnetic, Magnetic, and Radiometric method. We can measure apparent resistivity of ground on Electro-magnetic method, radioactivity on Radiometric method, and magnetization on Magnetic method. We can measure also resistivity distribution in the depth direction by measuring electro magnetic response to various frequencies. Conducting measurement, analysis and interpretation of above-mentioned 3-geophysical properties, we solved the geological structure from the distribution of geophysical properties in this area. We also tried to study and discuss comparison and correspondence with the present geological map. The air-borne Electro-magnetic method showed that the regions distributed with Sarabetsu Formation and Isachi Formation, which mainly consists of sandstone and conglomerate, have high apparent resistivity about 30-500 Ω·m. The regions distributed with Kowama Formation, Wakkanai Formation and Mashihoro Formation (Upper Mudstone Layer), which mainly consists of mudrock, have low resistivity 1-10 Ω·m in the depth over than dozens of meters, though some area dozens of meter below the surface have high resistivity about 50-200 Ω·m. Magnetic method showed that magnetization tends to decrease from southwest to northeast and this result corresponded with previous large scale magnetic intensity map (Geological Survey of Japan, 1992). High magnetic anomaly area, which spread from north-northwest to south-southeast, is found on a boundary between Sarabetsu and Isachi formation. Mashihoro formation, which is located east side of Nukanan fault, has also high magnetic anomaly area. Radiometric method showed that high radioactivity areas are distributed in alluvial depressions along Tenshio river and small river in the hill, while low radioactivity area are distributed in Tertiary

  16. Advanced airborne geophysics for site and watershed characterization and remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.; Hodges, G. [Fugro Airborne Surveys, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2007-04-01

    Airborne geophysics systems now have the ability to make accurately map the conductivity of the earth's subsurface. This article provided details of various site characterization surveys conducted using helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) surveys. Recent improvements in computer software, the use of global positioning systems (GPS), lasers, and fiber optics have increased the ability of HEM systems to accurately map ground conditions. Airborne electromagnetic survey techniques were used to characterize the geological features and lithology of the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) on the eastern shore of Clear Lake in California. Natural conduits for the movement of groundwater were identified. Data showed that acidic water and mercury from the mine were contaminating the lake. The data showed good agreement with results obtained from previous conventional geologic and hydrologic investigations. HEM surveys were also used to characterize conductive mine pools and groundwater plumes at areas in the eastern United States that contained abandoned surface and underground coal mines. HEM was used to delineate source areas and flow paths for acidic, metal-containing groundwater, and data obtained from the surveys were used to plan mitigation activities. The survey identified 11 mine pools, as well as flooded workings that had previously not been mapped. HEM surveys were also used to map water-bearing fractures in areas of crystalline bedrock in drought-ridden regions in Brazil. Information from the surveys was used to locate drill targets for water wells. A test survey was used to identify wellheads leaking methane in a privately-owned gas field in Wyoming. Five methane leakage plumes were detected as a result of the survey. HEM geophysical surveys have also been used to map conductivity variations due to changes in water salinity at the Biscayne aquifer in the Florida everglades. It was concluded that airborne and HEM surveys provide significant cost savings when

  17. Fallout of thorium and uranium isotopes from the 1982 eruption of the El Chichon volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marked increases in the concentration of thorium and uranium isotopes observed in rain samples collected at Fayetteville (36 deg N, 94 deg W), Arkansas, during 1983 are attributed to the fallout from the 1982 eruption of El chichon volcano in Mexico. (author)

  18. Multifractal analysis of Chernobyl fall-out: Self-organized criticality and hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors argue for a multifractal analysis of the Chernobyl fall-out, necessary to capture its high degree of inhomogeneity. They show that it may be the result of a (non classical) Self Organized Critical transport mechanism. The authors proceed to a preliminary empirical estimate of critical orders of moments corresponding to first order multifractal phase transitions

  19. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 1. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), presents a summary evaluation of various shelter options for use in the case where the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft2 per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft2 per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The authors find that the FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. The authors also find that, in terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements

  20. Radiation doses in Sweden as a result of the Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation doses from the Chernobyl fallout originate mainly from two sources: External irradiation (ground radiation) and internal irradiation from radioactive materials accumulated in the human body via food. In addition there are an inhalation dose and a radiation dose from the radioactive cloud. The level of doses from the various sources is presented

  1. The IAEA programme on the acquisition of data for the fallout isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, in collaboration with the World Meteorogical Organization, has been working since 1961 on a long-term project for acquistion, processing and publication of data for the isotopic composition (T,D, 180) of the fallout on a global scale. At present, IAEA has data, compiled from 347 hydrometeorogical stations in 79 countries. The analysis of isotope data, obtained from the global station network for more than 20 years, allows the following conclusions: (i)The global trends of forming the isotope composition of atmospheric fallout, which are one of the maior links of the hydrogeological cycle, are clarified; (ii)These regularities enabled the use of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in scientific research and the practice; (iii)Extensive studies of the resourses of surface and ground water and of their genesis and dynamics have been carried out, using the fallout isotopic composition as an input function; (iv)The effectiveness of further efforts in isotope composition data acquisition is limited by the lack of analyses using models of the global atmospheric circulation; (v)Further regular observations of the variations in fallout isotope composition are needed for some large regions of Eurasia, Africa and the polar region

  2. Evaluation of fallout strontium-90 accumulation in bone and cancer mortality risk in Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical model was developed for evaluating a fallout 90Sr accumulation in Japanese bone through its dietary intake, and was validated by comparing the estimates of 90Sr concentration in bone with the observed. The mortality risk by the radiation-induced leukemia and bone cancer was evaluated based on the NUREG/CR-4214 model. The main results obtained in this study under the limited assumptions are as follows: (1) The mathematical model was developed to relate 90Sr concentration in an environment with the mortality risk due to the radiation-induced leukemia and bone cancer through dietary intake of fallout 90Sr. (2) The leukemia mortality risk due to the fallout 90Sr is about one order larger than the bone cancer mortality risk, and is evaluated to be larger than 10-6 for Japanese who were born before early 1970's. (3) The leukemia mortality risk due to the fallout 90Sr is about 10% level in 1992 of the leukemia mortality risk expected by the benzene in ambient air. (author)

  3. Public health impact of fallout from British nuclear weapons tests in Australia, 1952-1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1952-1957, Britain conducted 12 full-scale nuclear weapons tests in Australia in five series, viz. Hurricane(1952), Totem(1953), Mosaic(1956), Buffalo(1956) and Antler(1957). Radioactive fallout from the tests reached many parts of Australia. This report reviews the pathways by which the radionuclides in the fallout could have irradiated the population. The methodology is presented for estimating the radiation doses and values are derived from the available data. The possible effect that the radiation exposure had on public health is assessed. Estimation of the radiation doses is approached in two parts: (a) the contributions from the Mosaic, Buffalo and Antler series which were monitored, and (b) the contributions from the Hurricane and Totem series for which there are few fallout data. In part (a), the activities of the radionuclides making up the measured fallout are established by calculation. Standard models are then used to derive the radiation doses for the population centres - from external radiation, from ingestion of radionuclides in food and from inhalation of radionuclides in air. A simple treatment is adopted to estimate radiation doses from drinking contaminated water. For Part (b), the data assembled in (a) provide the basis for developing statistical models for predicting radiation doses from weapon yields and trajectories of the radioactive clouds. The models are then applied to give the radiation doses to population centres following the tests in Hurricane and Totem, using their yields and trajectories. 71 refs., 20 tabs., 8 figs

  4. Assessment of leukemia and thyroid disease in relation to fallout in Utah: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of one year's work on the effects of fallout on the development of leukemia and thyroid disease in humans residing in Utah. Divided into 37 subphases, this report evaluates the development of predictive models, the use of dosimetry, and various cohort studies. (FI)

  5. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft2 per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft2 per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements

  6. Gamma ray spectra recorded from the fallout collected in May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the gamma ray spectra recorded from the fallout collective in Bucharest and Brasov in May, 1986 was carried out. Relative activities of the assigned radionuclides were computed and the duration of the 235U fuel irradiation has been deduced. (author)

  7. Pine needle activity and the washing effect as a measure of fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallout and natural radionuclides in pine needles are measured by Ge(Li) detector coupled with a multichannel analyser. Washing effect on pine needle activity is also measured by washing the samples with water and other chemicals. High extents of washing-out of activity were observed in case of running water and hydrochloric acid. (author)

  8. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.; Hill, L.G.; Lynch, E.P.; Tanzman, E.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.

  9. Lead-210 and Beryllium-7 fallout rates on the southeastern coast of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Christian J., E-mail: zinosanders@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Fluminense (UFF), Departamento de Geoquimica, Outeiro de Sao Joao Baptista s/n, Morro do Valonguinho Centro, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Smoak, Joseph M. [University of South Florida (USF), Environmental Science, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Cable, Peter H. [Tulane University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New Orleans, LA (United States); Patchineelam, Sambasiva R. [Universidade Federal de Fluminense (UFF), Departamento de Geoquimica, Outeiro de Sao Joao Baptista s/n, Morro do Valonguinho Centro, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Sanders, Luciana M. [Istituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro 22780 (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Total {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be fallout rates were measured on the coastal region of Niteroi, Brazil. The monthly depositional flux of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be varied by a factor of 26, from 1.7 to 43.3 mBq cm{sup -2} year{sup -1} and {approx}27, from 7.5 to 203.5 mBq cm{sup -2} year{sup -1}, respectively. The relatively large oscillations in the depositional flux of {sup 210}Pb at this study site were likely due to variations in air mass sources, while the {sup 7}Be fluctuations may be driven by a combination of weather conditions. Local geology could support the periodic high fluxes of {sup 210}Pb from continental air masses, as shifting oceanic wind sources were affirmed by the uncorrelated {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be fallout activities and {sup 7}Be/{sup 210}Pb ratios. The {sup 210}Pb atmospheric deposition was found to be in agreement with local sediment inventories, an important consideration in geochemical studies that estimate sedimentation processes. - Highlights: > Fallout rates of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be indicate depositional flux during a 12-month period. > Oscillations in {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be fallout are driven by geology ({sup 210}Pb) and weather. > Regional trends in {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb fluxes used in geochemical processes.

  10. Three years of practical use of airborne gravity gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, E.

    2003-04-01

    BHP Billiton has successfully built and deployed three airborne gravity gradiometer (AGG) systems, (Newton, Einstein and Galileo) based upon the Bell Airspace (now Lockheed Martin) Gravity Gradient Instruments developed for the United States Department of Defense. A second-generation gradiometer (Feynman) is presently nearing completion. The GGI technology is based on groups of four (4) accelerometers where the accelerometers are equi-spaced on a circle. The configuration successfully rejects both common mode accelerations and rotations about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the complement. The GGI is mounted within an aircraft in a specially designed, inertially stabilized platform, which significantly reduces sensitivity to noise and turbulence. The BHP Billiton AGG Technology provides high quality gravity maps with a resolution and sensitivity to map gravity anomalies associated with both minerals and hydrocarbon deposits. To date the purpose built and designed hardware and data processing algorithms, in conjunction with several other geophysical survey instruments, have been deployed against a broad range of mineral and hydrocarbon targets, a total of over 300,000km of operational flights having been made. Data will also be presented on the in-flight sensitivity of a gravity gradiometer to the airborne environment. It will also outline some of the many unexpected problems that were encountered in the 18-month flight trials required to achieve satisfactory airborne operation.

  11. Distribution of Np and Pu in Swedish lichen samples (Cladonia stellaris) contaminated by atmospheric fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Patric E-mail: patric.lindahl@radfys.lu.se; Roos, Per; Eriksson, Mats; Holm, Elis

    2004-07-01

    The activity concentrations of {sup 237}Np and the two Pu isotopes, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, were determined in lichen samples (Cladonia stellaris) contaminated by fallout from atmospheric nuclear test explosions and the Chernobyl accident. The samples were collected at 18 locations in Sweden, from north to south, between 1986 and 1988 and analysed with high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. Data on the activity ratios {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs measured previously were also included in this study for comparison. The {sup 237}Np activity concentration ranged from 0.08{+-}0.01 to 2.08{+-}0.17 mBq kg{sup -1}, depending on the location of the sampling site and time of collection. The {sup 239+240}Pu activity concentration ranged from 0.09{+-}0.01 to 4.09{+-}0.15 Bq kg{sup -1}, with the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratio ranging between 0.16{+-}0.01 and 0.44{+-}0.03, the higher ratios indicating a combination of weapons test fallout and Chernobyl fallout. The {sup 237}Np/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratios ranged between 0.06{+-}0.01 and 0.42{+-}0.04, the lower ratios indicating combination of weapons test fallout and Chernobyl fallout. At a well-defined sampling site at Lake Rogen (62.32 deg. N, 12.38 deg. E), additional lichen samples were collected between 1987 and 1998 to study the distribution of Np and Pu in different layers. The concentrations of the two elements follow each other quite well in the profile.

  12. Mapping invasive weeds and their control with spatial information technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    We discuss applications of airborne multispectral digital imaging systems, imaging processing techniques, global positioning systems (GPS), and geographic information systems (GIS) for mapping the invasive weeds giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta) and Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) and fo...

  13. Airborne Gravity Gradiometry Resolves a Full Range of Gravity Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataragio, J.; Brewster, J.; Mims, J.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) was flown at high altitude coincident with Airborne Gravity (AG) flown in 2003 in West Arnhem Land, Australia. A preliminary analysis of two data sets indicates that the Air\\-FTGR system has the capability of resolving intermediate to long wavelengths features that may be associated with relatively deeper geological structures. A comparison of frequency filtered slices and power spectral density (PSD) for both data sets using the short (> 5 km), intermediate (10 km) and long (20 km) wavelengths reveals that high altitude Air\\-FTGR data show greater response in high frequency anomalies than a conventional Airborne Gravity and matches well with the AG even at the longest wavelengths anomalies. The effect of line spacing and target resolution was examined between the two data sets. Reprocessed gradient and AG data at 2, 4 and 6 km line spacing suggest that Air\\-FTGR could be effectively flown at a comparatively wider line spacing to resolve similar targets the AG would resolve with tighter line spacing. Introduction Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) data have been available to the mining industry since 2002 and their use for geologic applications is well established. However, Air\\-FTGR data has been mostly considered and used in mapping and delineation of near surface geological targets. This is due to the fact that gravity gradiometer measurements are well suited to capture the high frequency signal associated with near\\-surface targets ( Li, 2001). This is possible because the gradiometer signal strength falls off with the cube of the distance to the target. Nonetheless, in recent years there has been an increasing demand from the mining, oil, and gas industry in utilizing Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometer as a mapping tool for both regional and prospect level surveys. Air\\-FTGR as a Regional Mapping Tool Several, relatively low altitude surveys have been successfully flown in Brazil, Canada and Australia

  14. Dual-core mass-balance approach for evaluating mercury and210Pb atmospheric fallout and focusing to lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, P.C.; Fuller, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Determining atmospheric deposition rates of mercury and other contaminants using lake sediment cores requires a quantitative understanding of sediment focusing. Here we present a novel approach that solves mass-balance equations for two cores algebraically to estimate contaminant contributions to sediment from direct atmospheric fallout and from watershed and in-lake focusing. The model is applied to excess 210Pb and Hg in cores from Hobbs Lake, a high-altitude lake in Wyoming. Model results for excess 210Pb are consistent with estimates of fallout and focusing factors computed using excess 210Pb burdens in lake cores and soil cores from the watershed and model results for Hg fallout are consistent with fallout estimated using the soil-core-based 210Pb focusing factors. The lake cores indicate small increases in mercury deposition beginning in the late 1800s and large increases after 1940, with the maximum at the tops of the cores of 16-20 ??g/m 2year. These results suggest that global Hg emissions and possibly regional emissions in the western United States are affecting the north-central Rocky Mountains. Hg fallout estimates are generally consistent with fallout reported from an ice core from the nearby Upper Fremont Glacier, but with several notable differences. The model might not work for lakes with complex geometries and multiple sediment inputs, but for lakes with simple geometries, like Hobbs, it can provide a quantitative approach for evaluating sediment focusing and estimating contaminant fallout.

  15. Data fusion techniques for object space classification using airborne laser data and airborne digital photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joong Yong

    The objective of this research is to investigate possible strategies for the fusion of airborne laser data with passive optical data for object space classification. A significant contribution of our work is the development and implementation of a data-level fusion technique, direct digital image georeferencing (DDIG). In DDIG, we use navigation data from an integrated system (composed of global positioning system (GPS) and inertial measurement unit (IMU)) to project three-dimensional data points measured with the University of Florida's airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) system onto digital aerial photographs. As an underlying math model, we use the familiar collinearity condition equations. After matching the ALSM object space points to their corresponding image space pixels, we resample the digital photographs using cubic convolution techniques. We call the resulting images pseudo-ortho-rectified images (PORI) because they are orthographic at the ground surface but still exhibit some relief displacement for elevated objects; and because they have been resampled using a interpolation technique. Our accuracy tests on these PORI images show that they are planimetrically correct to about 0.4 meters. This accuracy is sufficient to remove most of the effects of the central perspective projection and enable a meaningful fusion of the RGB data with the height and intensity data produced by the laser. PORI images may also be sufficiently accurate for many other mapping applications, and may in some applications be an attractive alternative to traditional photogrammetric techniques. A second contribution of our research is the development of several strategies for the fusion of data from airborne laser and camera systems. We have conducted our work within the sensor fusion paradigm formalized in the optical engineering community. Our work explores the fusion of these two types of data for precision mapping applications. Specifically, we combine three different types of

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  17. Wavelet-based fractal analysis of airborne pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degaudenzi, M. E.; Arizmendi, C. M.

    1999-06-01

    The most abundant biological particles in the atmosphere are pollen grains and spores. Self-protection of a pollen allergy is possible through information about future pollen contents in the air. In spite of the importance of airborne pollen concentration forecasting, it has not been possible to predict the pollen concentrations with great accuracy, and about 25% of daily pollen forecasts result in failures. Previous analyses of the dynamic characteristics of atmospheric pollen time series indicate that the system can be described by a low dimensional chaotic map. We apply a wavelet transform to study the multifractal characteristics of an airborne pollen time series. The information and the correlation dimensions correspond to a chaotic system showing a loss of information with time evolution.

  18. [Comparative analysis of the radionuclide composition in fallout after the Chernobyl and the Fukushima accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenko, K V; Shinkarev, S M; Abramov, Iu V; Granovskaia, E O; Iatsenko, V N; Gavrilin, Iu I; Margulis, U Ia; Garetskaia, O S; Imanaka, T; Khoshi, M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear accident occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (March 11, 2011) similarly to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (April 26, 1986) is related to the level 7 of the INES. It is of interest to make an analysis of the radionuclide composition of the fallout following the both accidents. The results of the spectrometric measurements were used in that comparative analysis. Two areas following the Chernobyl accident were considered: (1) the near zone of the fallout - the Belarusian part of the central spot extended up to 60 km around the Chernobyl NPS and (2) the far zone of the fallout--the "Gomel-Mogilev" spot centered 200 km to the north-northeast of the damaged reactor. In the case of Fukushima accident the near zone up to about 60 km considered. The comparative analysis has been done with respect to refractory radionuclides (95Zr, 95Nb, 141Ce, 144Ce), as well as to the intermediate and volatile radionuclides 103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140La, 140Ba and the results of such a comparison have been discussed. With respect to exposure to the public the most important radionuclides are 131I and 137Cs. For the both accidents the ratios of 131I/137Cs in the considered soil samples are in the similar ranges: (3-50) for the Chernobyl samples and (5-70) for the Fukushima samples. Similarly to the Chernobyl accident a clear tendency that the ratio of 131I/137Cs in the fallout decreases with the increase of the ground deposition density of 137Cs within the trace related to a radioactive cloud has been identified for the Fukushima accident. It looks like this is a universal tendency for the ratio of 131I/137Cs versus the 137Cs ground deposition density in the fallout along the trace of a radioactive cloud as a result of a heavy accident at the NPP with radionuclides releases into the environment. This tendency is important for an objective reconstruction of 131I fallout based on the results of 137Cs measurements of soil samples carried out at

  19. Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) on left rear fuselage of DC-8 Airborne Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    A view of the Airborne Synthetic Aperature Radar (AIRSAR) antenna on the left rear fuselage of the DC-8. The AIRSAR captures images of the ground from the side of the aircraft and can provide precision digital elevation mapping capabilities for a variety of studies. The AIRSAR is one of a number of research systems that have been added to the DC-8. NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  20. The use of airborne geophysics for levee classification and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Joseph B.

    2011-12-01

    This research is the first known application into using airborne geophysical methods to evaluate and classify levees. This research is an important step toward developing new technologies and methods to rapidly screen and evaluate earthen flood control levees for safety against flooding. An investigation of airborne geophysical methods was conducted on levees in the lower Rio Grande Valley and involved electromagnetic induction, magnetometer, and LiDAR surveys of the levee system. Airborne EM signatures were analyzed by geologic mapping of floodplain depositional environments, examination of published soils data, and drilling of borings. A geographic information system was developed to manage the various data sets and evaluate historic land use changes and development of the flood control systems to better understand the signatures using airborne methods. This research presents information about the historic basis for evaluating and classifying levees, which is based primarily on the federal perspective and flood control experiences in the lower Mississippi River Valley, where national floodplain engineering methods and standards were developed. This research examines the evolution of today's flood control policy, and the development of engineering assessment procedures, and the application of geophysical methods to provide critical information about levee failure mechanisms and assessment of flood control systems. This research demonstrates that topographic base maps and Sengpiel sections showing the results of electrical conductivity or resistivity surveys at different frequencies along the levee corridor provide accurate and valuable information to determine the composition of floodplain soils and the foundation stratigraphy to assess modes of levee failure, to aid in the placement of borings to obtain material properties of the levee and foundation, and to determine the extent of levee reaches with similar properties for the engineering analysis. The main

  1. Regional-scale airborne electromagnetic surveying of the Yucatan karst aquifer (Mexico): geological and hydrogeological interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondwe, Bibi Ruth Neuman; Ottowitz, David; Supper, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    -spectral remote sensing imagery, shuttle radar topography data and frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey data were used to map karst-aquifer structure on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Anomalous AEM responses correlated with topographic features and anomalous spectral reflectance of the terrain...

  2. Retention of simulated fallout nuclides in agricultural crops. 1. Experiments on leys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Aake; Rosen, K.; Haak, E

    1998-12-31

    Experiments with artificial wet depositions of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 85}Sr during the growth period were carried out. The studies are complementary to the experiences after the Chernobyl fallout. The aim was to get a description of the relative transfer to the harvest products of new clover-grass leys and old grass leys after initial depositions of tracer nuclides at different times during the growth period. The reduction in transfer with time, from deposition to sampling, depends partly on dilution by growth and partly on fall-off to the ground. The reduction half-time for the nuclide content showed a range 10 - 14 days. The data obtained in the experiments can extend the basis for prediction of the consequences of fallout events at different times to new as well as to old leys in the field 8 refs, 18 figs, 12 tabs

  3. Detection of hot fallout on Taiwan in the period 1971-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of fallout during the period of 1971-1975 is presented. Relatively high activity from nuclear tests at Lop Nor off mainland China was detected twice in this period. The gamma-ray spectrum of the hot fallout after the 11th nuclear test is given. The high activity peaks in the figures included are indicated with corresponding dates and sequence number of the tests for easy identification and comparison. The calibration of thermoluminescent dosimeters for the low exposure rates is presented. The gross beta activities are much more likely to build up in milk and surface water samples. Their intensity and duration are more significant than other foodstuff samples, and the timing of their appearance is more predictable. (author)

  4. Atmospheric lead fallout over the last century recorded in Gulf of Lions sediments (Mediterranean Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six marine sediment cores from the Gulf of Lions continental slope (700-1700 m water depth) were analyzed for stable lead isotopes and 21Pb geochronology in order to reconstruct lead atmospheric fallout pattern during the last century. The detrital lead contribution is 25 μg g-1 and the mean sediment anthropogenic inventory is 110 ± 7 μg cm-2, a little bit higher than atmospheric deposition estimate. Anthropogenic lead accumulation in sediments peaked in early 1970s (1973 ± 2) in agreement with lead emissions features. For the period 1986-1997, the sediment signal also reflect the decrease of atmospheric lead described by independent atmospheric fallout investigations. The anthropogenic Pb deposition in the late 1990s was similar to the 1950s deposition, attesting thus of the output of European environmental policies

  5. Total alpha and beta activity of air and fallout in Belgrade from 2006 to 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of radioactivity control of air and fallout in Belgrade from 2006 to 2008 are presented. The measurements were carried out by low-background proportional gas alpha beta counter PIC-WPC-9550. The system was calibrated with 241Am for total alpha and 90Sr for total beta activity measurements. Efficiency for α and β activity measurement was 31% and 46%, respectively. Monthly average values of the total alpha and beta activity in air varied between 0.003 and 0.053 mBq/m3 and between 0.02 and 0.40 mBq/m3, respectively. Monthly average of the total alpha and beta activity of fallout varied between 0.022 and 0.55 Bq/m2 and between 0.15 and 4.7 Bq/m2, respectively. (author)

  6. 2001 North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program (NCFMP) Lidar: Phase 1B (Cape Fear and Lumber River Basins)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This airborne LiDAR terrain mapping data was acquired in the spring of 2001. The data were collected for the floodplain mapping program for the state of North...

  7. 2001 North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program (NCFMP) Lidar: Phase 1A (Neuse, Pasquotank, Tar-Pamlico, White Oak River Basins)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This airborne LiDAR terrain mapping data was acquired January through March 2001. The data were collected for the floodplain mapping program for the state of North...

  8. Determination of soil loss by 137Cs fallout radionuclide in Ömerli watershed of İstanbul, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    KIZILTAŞ, Muhammet Sahip; HACIYAKUPOĞLU, Sevilay; Gökbulak, Ferhat; HIZAL, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Soil erosion and sedimentation in watersheds are usually part of the information to be considered for soil and water conservation measures. Soil loss is generally estimated with models or measured with plot studies. Although fallout radionuclides (FRN) methodology provides a powerful technique for predicting the impacts of proposed land management strategies on soil erosion and sediment yield within river basins and estimates erosion based on fallout radioisotopes (Cs-137, Pb-210, Be-7) radio...

  9. Using airborne laser altimetry to improve river flood extents delineated from SAR data

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, D.C.; M. S. Horritt; Dall'Amico, J. T.; Scott, Tania Ruth; P. D. Bates

    2007-01-01

    Flood extent maps derived from SAR images are a useful source of data for validating hydraulic models of river flood flow. The accuracy of such maps is reduced by a number of factors, including changes in returns from the water surface caused by different meteorological conditions and the presence of emergent vegetation. The paper describes how improved accuracy can be achieved by modifying an existing flood extent delineation algorithm to use airborne laser altimetry (LiDAR) as well as SAR d...

  10. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in air-borne dust; October, 1977 to March, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The samples of rain and dry fallout, air-borne dust, service water and fresh water, soil, sea water, sea sediment, total diet, rice, milk, vegetables, tea, fish, shellfishes and seaweed, and fresh water fishes, their sampling and prior treatment are described. The methods of separating Sr-90 and Cs-137 and their measurement are explained. The estimations of stable Sr, K and Ca are made by atomic absorption spectroscopy, flame spectrophotometry and potassium permanganate titration, respectively. The general plan of radioactivity survey in Japan is shown. As the environmental data, the results of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in air-borne dust obtained from October, 1977, to March, 1978, and the locations of sampling are given. In a table, the locations of sampling, the period of sampling, the absorbed volume (m3), and the amounts of Sr-90 and Cs-137 (10-3 pCi/m3) are shown. The maximum values are 4.4 x 10-3 pCi/m3 of Sr-90 and 6.0 x 10-3 pCi/m3 of Cs-137 found in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, from October to November, 1977. (Kako, I.)

  11. Some perspectives on action levels in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximum permissible radiation levels for planned activities must be distinguished from action levels as applied to protect people and animals after nuclear accidents. The essential thing with action levels is the optimal balance between the danger of the radiation and the harm involved in the counter measures themselves. Among other things these counter measures are dependent on the magnitude of the fallout, i.e. on the apprehended doses to man and animals

  12. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitan, J.B.; Bergan, T.D.; Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway); Melbye, O.J. [Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Use of 7Be fallout to document soil erosion and soil redistribution within Chilean vineyards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated Watershed Management for the Sustainability of Agricultural Lands was initiated in 2005 with the aim of developing a management model for sustainable agricultural systems through the use of nuclear and chemical techniques to assess the impacts of human practices. The project focuses mainly on pesticides management and modelling, including a test of the use of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) especially 7Be, as a short term erosion/sedimentation soil tracer

  14. Source apportionment of mercury in dust fallout at urban residential area of Central India

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pervez; G. Balakrishna; Tiwari, S

    2009-01-01

    The components and quantities of atmospheric dust fallout have been reported to be the pollution indicator of large urban areas. The multiplicity and complexity of sources of atmospheric dusts in urban regions (e.g. industrial complexes composed of a variety of industrial processes, automobiles, construction activities etc.) has put forward the need of source apportionment of these sources indicating their contribution to specific environmental receptor. The study presented...

  15. HASL measurements of fallout following the September 26, 1976 Chinese nuclear test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported from measurements of radioactivity in the fallout from the nuclear test conducted by the Peoples Republic of China on September 26th, 1976. These measurements were carried on through Monday, October 18th. Results of these measurements made in New York and New Jersey, including external radiation exposure, air concentrations, deposition and the concentration of radioiodine in milk, are reported. An estimate of the thyroid dose from milk consumption is also included

  16. Fallout in East Tennessee following Chinese nuclear tests of 1976 to 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fallout levels in East Tennessee following the Chinese nuclear tests of 1976 to 1978 are given. The environmental surveillance activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are outlined, as well as their integration into the nationwide monitoring network. A method for rapid determination of 131I in milk is described; these levels in milk are highlighted, along with airfilter and rainwater data. Maximum radiological dose commitments, as a result of the recent tests, are presented

  17. Radioactive fallout caused by the reactor accident at Chernobyl: Observations April-May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma spectrum of 25 samples has been measured. The release has contained some 30 isotopes. Zr 95, Nb 95, Ru 103, Te 129, Te 131, Te 132, I 131, I 132, Cs 134, Cs 136, Cs 137, Ba 140, La 140 and Ce 141 have been most frequent. Te 132 and/or I 131 have constituted the major part of the enhanced activity, in the areas with increased fallout (G.B.)

  18. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members. - Highlights: • We measured the spatial distribution of U isotopes, major elements, and radioactivity in five glassy fallout spherules. • In two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is heterogenous and correlated with major elements. • In two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is approximately homogenous. • These results reflect variable mixing within fallout spherules between U from the device and U from the soil. • We use these results to discuss the evidence and roles of various fallout formation processes

  19. URINARY EXCRETION OF RADIONUCLIDES FROM MARSHALLESE EXPOSED TO FALLOUT FROM THE 1954 BRAVO NUCLEAR TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Payne S.; Simon, Steven L.; Ibrahim, Shawki A.

    2010-01-01

    Soon after the Bravo nuclear test at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands on 1 March 1954, urine samples were collected for analysis of excreted radioactivity from native residents exposed to radioactive fallout on two atolls as well as from U.S. military personnel on a third atoll. The earliest acquired samples, obtained by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), were assayed for various radionuclides and provided the first known measurements of 131I in urine following exposure to fallo...

  20. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Observations of Fallout from the Fukushima Reactor Accident in San Francisco Bay Area Rainwater

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B; Chodash, Perry A

    2011-01-01

    We have observed fallout from the recent Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident in samples of rainwater collected in the San Francisco Bay area. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples show clear evidence of fission products - 131,132I, 132Te, and 134,137Cs. The activity levels we have measured for these isotopes are very low and pose no health risk to the public.

  2. Transfer of fallout radionuclides by Fukushima NPP accident from tree crown to forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Y.; Kato, H.; Wakahara, T.; Kawamori, A.; Tsujimura, M.

    2011-12-01

    Radioactive contamination has been detected in Fukushima and the neighboring prefectures due to the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. The total deposition of radioactive materials in fallout samples for 137Cs ranged from 0.02to >10 M Bq/m2 for Cs-137. Experimental catchments have been established in Yamakiya district, Kawamata Town, Fukushima prefecture, located about 35 km from Fukushima power plant, and designated as the evacuated zone. Approximate Cs-137 fallout in this area is 200-600k Bq/m2. We established 3 forest sites: broad leaf tree forest and two Japanese cedar forest plantation (young and mature). In each site we installed towers of 8-12 meters. Using these towers, we sampled tree leaves, and measure Cs-137 and Cs-134 in the laboratory, and also we have measure Cs-137, Cs-134 content at various height in each forest using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector (Ortech; Detective-EX). We also measured the throughfall, stem flow and litter fall inside of the forest. In each site, we establish the 20 m x 20 m plot to monitor the changes of fallout radionuclides through time with the portable HPGe detector. The monitoring is now ongoing but we found significant amount of Cs-134 and Cs-137 has been trapped by cedar forest plantations especially young trees, but not so much in broad leaf trees. The trapped Cs-137 and Cs-134 is then washed by rainfall and found into throughfall. Therefore, in forest ecosystems, the fallout has been still ongoing, and and effective remediation method in forested area (especially cedar plantation) can be removing the trees.

  3. Twenty-year review of medical findings in a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented of results of medical examinations of inhabitants of the Marshall Islands during the 20-year period following the exposure of Rongelap people to radioactive fallout in 1954. The initial effect observed was β burns of the skin of some individuals. Few significant findings were observed during the subsequent 9-year period, although an increase in miscarriages and stillbirths among the exposed women was noted. In 1963 some thyroid abnormalities and growth retardation of some children were noted. (177 references)

  4. Surficial redistribution of fallout 131iodine in a small temperate catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Joshua D.; Hamm, Nathan T.; Renshaw, Carl E.; Dade, W. Brian; Magilligan, Francis J.; Gartner, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Isotopes of iodine play significant environmental roles, including a limiting micronutrient (127I), an acute radiotoxin (131I), and a geochemical tracer (129I). But the cycling of iodine through terrestrial ecosystems is poorly understood, due to its complex environmental chemistry and low natural abundance. To better understand iodine transport and fate in a terrestrial ecosystem, we traced fallout 131iodine throughout a small temperate catchment following contamination by the 11 March 2011 ...

  5. The health after effects on children exposed to Chernobyl radiation fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the long-term health consequences that are now being detected in Ukrainian adolescents who, as children, were exposed to Chornobyl radiation fallout fifteen years ago. The information presented will emphasize the importance of ensuring that nuclear power plants are built and operated with all the safeguards needed to prevent a recurrence of the Chornobyl disaster

  6. Airborne measurements of spatial NO2 distributions during AROMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Seyler, André; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Lindemann, Carsten; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In September 2014 several European research groups conducted the ESA funded Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign to test and intercompare newly developed airborne observation sytsems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies. The IUP Bremen contributed to this campaign with its Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) on board a Cessna 207 turbo, operated by the FU Berlin. AirMAP allows the retrieval of integrated NO2 column densities in a stripe below the aircraft at a fine spatial resolution of up to 30 x 80 m2, at a typical flight altitude. Measurements have been performed over the city of Bucharest, creating for the first time high spatial resolution maps of Bucharest's NO2 distribution in a time window of approx. 2 hours. The observations were synchronised with ground-based car MAX-DOAS measurements for comparison. In addition, measurements were taken over the city of Berlin, Germany and at the Rovinari power plant, Romania. In this work the results of the research flights will be presented and conclusions will be drawn on the quality of the measurements, their applicability for satellite data validation and possible improvements for future measurements.

  7. An integrated airborne gravity survey of an offshore area near the northern Noto Peninsula, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komazawa, Masao; Okuma, Shigeo; Segawa, Jiro

    2010-02-01

    An airborne gravity survey using a helicopter was carried out in October 2008, offshore along the northern Noto Peninsula, to understand the shallow and regional underground structure. Eleven flight lines, including three tie lines, were arranged at 2km spacing within 20km of the coast. The total length of the flight lines was ~700km. The Bouguer anomalies computed from the airborne gravimetry are consistent with those computed from land and shipborne gravimetry, which gradually decrease in the offshore direction. So, the accuracy of the airborne system is considered to be adequate. A local gravity low in Wajima Bay, which was already known from seafloor gravimetry, was also observed. This suggests that the airborne system has a structural resolution of ~2km. Reduction of gravity data to a common datum was conducted by compiling the three kinds of gravity data, from airborne, shipborne, and land surveys. In the present study, we have used a solid angle numerical integration method and an iteration method. We finally calculated the gravity anomalies at 300m above sea level. We needed to add corrections of 2-5mGals in order to compile the airborne and shipborne gravity data smoothly, so the accuracy of the Bouguer anomaly map is considered to be nearly 2mGal on the whole, and 5mGals at worst in limited or local areas.

  8. Airborne Ultrasonic Tactile Display BCI

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Katsuhiko; Mori, Hiromu; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Rutkowski, Tomasz M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents results of our project, which studied whether contactless and airborne ultrasonic tactile display (AUTD) stimuli delivered to a user's palms could serve as a platform for a brain computer interface (BCI) paradigm. We used six palm positions to evoke combined somatosensory brain responses to implement a novel contactless tactile BCI. This achievement was awarded the top prize in the Annual BCI Research Award 2014 competition. This chapter also presents a comparison with a...

  9. Mapping out Map Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferjan Ormeling

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing the requirements for map data quality, map users and their library/archives environment, the paper focuses on the metadata the user would need for a correct and efficient interpretation of the map data. For such a correct interpretation, knowledge of the rules and guidelines according to which the topographers/cartographers work (such as the kind of data categories to be collected, and the degree to which these rules and guidelines were indeed followed are essential. This is not only valid for the old maps stored in our libraries and archives, but perhaps even more so for the new digital files as the format in which we now have to access our geospatial data. As this would be too much to ask from map librarians/curators, some sort of web 2.0 environment is sought where comments about data quality, completeness and up-to-dateness from knowledgeable map users regarding the specific maps or map series studied can be collected and tagged to scanned versions of these maps on the web. In order not to be subject to the same disadvantages as Wikipedia, where the ‘communis opinio’ rather than scholarship, seems to be decisive, some checking by map curators of this tagged map use information would still be needed. Cooperation between map curators and the International Cartographic Association ( ICA map and spatial data use commission to this end is suggested.

  10. Time-dependent behaviour of radiocaesium: A new method to compare the mobility of weapons test and Chernobyl derived fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental radiocaesium (137Cs) originates primarily from two sources, atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, and the Chernobyl accident. It has not, to our knowledge, previously been possible statistically to compare changes in the environmental mobility of 137Cs from these two sources since the weapons test fallout varied in a complex manner over a number of years. A novel technique is presented for curve-fitting measurements with a time-dependent input function such as that for weapons test fallout. Different models were fitted to measurements of both pre- and post-Chernobyl 137Cs activity concentrations in five major Finnish rivers. It was shown that there was no significant difference in the temporal changes in 137Cs mobility from these two sources during the years after fallout. Transport parameters derived from weapons test measurements gave good predictions of the long-term contamination of these rivers by Chernobyl fallout. Changes in 137Cs activity concentrations in rivers after Chernobyl have previously been shown to decline as a result of slow sorption to clay minerals in catchment soils. It is shown that weapons test fallout also exhibited this slow decline over time. Rates of decline in 137Cs activity concentrations 10 years after fallout correspond to effective ecological half-lives (Teff) in the range 10-30 years. Removal of activity from the catchment was found to have no significant effect on the long-term decline in 137Cs activity concentrations in these rivers

  11. Automating the Coupling of ORIGEN with GADRAS via the Fallout Analysis Tool for National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear forensic teams will be deployed to collect and evaluate fallout samples on the ground in the scenario of a low-yield nuclear detonation in a heavily populated area. Quick non-destructive methods of predicting the quality of the sample before it is analyzed in detail are essential for efficient post-event collections. In this work, the process of exporting Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) results into Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) has been automated within the Fallout Analysis Tool. This coupling allows for the simulation of detector responses to fallout samples with varying degrees of fractionation. The degree to which the samples are fractionated depends on the location of the samples in the fallout field. In the following study, this phenomenon is examined, as its understanding is important to the investigation of debris distribution. The simulated detector spectra from GADRAS can be used to compare peak ratios of volatile-refractory isotope pairs in order to determine the degree of fractionation. Simulated fractionated fallout samples from DELFIC for a 10 kt, pure 235U fission surface burst were modeled for distances ranging to 256 km out from ground zero, and for times up to 1 week from detonation. The fractionation ratios, also known as r values, from isotope concentrations, photon lines and peak areas of four volatile-refractory pairs were calculated and compared. Fractionation prediction via the peak areas method was evaluated for each pair by comparing the results with the simulated radionuclide inventory.

  12. Concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs rain and dry fallout, milk and service water in Aichi Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation by radioactivation analysis was carried out on the Sr-90 and Cs-137 concentrations in fallout, milk and source water and tap water from 1977 to 1987. The variation of the monthly and yearly amounts of Sr-90 and Cs-137 fallouts agreed well, and those have decreased for the last 11 years though affected by the nuclear experiments in China. The effect of the Chernobyl-4 accident on April 26, 1986 appeared conspicuously in the Cs-137 fallout, and the monthly fallout in May, 1986 was 3.50 mCi/km2. As to the Sr-90 and Cs-137 concentrations in milk and service water, only the Cs-137 concentration in milk was correlated with the course for years before the Chernobyl-4 accident. The effect of the Chernobyl-4 accident was conspicuous in the Cs-137 concentration similarly to the case of fallout. In this case, in the measurement of service water after a half year, the data returned to the normal value, but in the case of milk, the decrease was slow. The method of investigation, the monthly and yearly fallout of Sr-90 and Cs-137, the Sr-90 and Cs-137 concentrations in milk and service water are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Variations of 129I in the atmospheric fallout of Tokyo, Japan: 1963-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Chiaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Yuka; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Aoyama, Michio; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric fallout samples collected from Tokyo between 1963 and 2003 were analyzed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in order to determine (129)I/(127)I ratios and to examine the deposition rate of (129)I and its secular variation in Tokyo. The (129)I/(127)I ratios in the atmosphere during 1963-1977 ranged from 1 × 10(-8) to 2 × 10(-8). This is roughly 4 orders of magnitude higher than pre-atomic levels, possibly due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The calculated monthly atmospheric deposition rates of (129)I differed from those produced by nuclear fallout of (90)Sr and (137)Cs, indicating that the variations in (129)I deposition are not influenced exclusively by either nuclear bomb testing or by the Chernobyl accident. After 1978, high (129)I depositions (up to 0.13 mBq/m(2)/month) were observed. The (129)I depositions started to increase markedly at the latter half of the 1970s. The secular variation of the estimated annual (129)I deposition in Tokyo showed a close relationship between the annual atmospheric discharge of (129)I from the Tokai Reprocessing plant. Therefore, the atmospheric fallout collected from Tokyo after the late 1970s is influenced primary by the (129)I discharge from the Tokai Reprocessing plant. PMID:22694935

  14. Concentration of 7Be in the lower atmosphere and fallout rate in Tokai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium-7, cosmic ray produced radioactivity, its monthly average concentration in the lower atmosphere and monthly fallout rate were measured in Tokai, Japan. Then, the monthly variations were compared with those of fission products due to nuclear detonations in the atmosphere. The concentration of 7Be in the lower atmosphere ranged from 0.5 x 10-1 pCi/m3 to 2.5 x 10-1 pCi/m3 in Tokai between the observed period, 1975 - 1977. The fallout rate of 7Be vibrated widely, its range was from the detection limits to 1.2 x 104 pCi/m2. The monthly variations were not always the same with variations of the fission products. Fallout rate of 7Be depended on the rain strongly. The concentration of 7Be in the rain was measured, too. Then the range was from 9.2 pCi/l to 1.9 x 102 pCi/l between the observed period 1976.9 - 1977.2. (author)

  15. Childhood leukaemia in Great Britain and fallout from nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible effects of radiation from fallout on childhood leukaemia mortality from 1950 to 1987 and registrations from 1963 to 1987 were assessed using a division of Great Britain into regions with higher rainfall and a consequently higher fallout radiation dose in the 1960s and regions with lower rainfall and a lower radiation dose. Childhood leukaemia mortality rates declined and registration rates increased throughout the period. For ages 0-14 years, the differences between rates in wet regions and dry regions were small and appeared unrelated to periods of low, medium and high radiation exposure based on dose equivalent to the red bone marrow after birth. For the 0-4 years age group the highest ratios of leukaemia death rates and registration rates in the wet compared with the dry part of Great Britain occurred in the period of highest radiation exposure after birth. The death rate ratio was significantly raised in the period of high exposure compared with the surrounding medium exposure periods, but the difference in registration rate ratios between the high exposure period and the medium exposure period following was not statistically significant. The results might be explained by survival and registration changes, or chance in the case of registrations, but do not exclude the possibility that low doses of radiation from fallout were responsible for an increased risk of leukaemia in young children in Great Britain. (author)

  16. Estimation of the Adriatic sea water turnover time using fallout 90Sr as a radioactive tracer

    CERN Document Server

    Franic, Z

    2004-01-01

    Systematic, long term measurements, starting in 1963, of 90Sr activity concentrations in sea water have been performed at four locations (cities of Rovinj, Rijeka, Split and Dubrovnik) along the Croatian coast of the Adriatic sea. In addition, fallout samples were collected in the city of Zadar. 90Sr activity concentrations are in good correlation with the fallout activity, the coefficient of correlation being 0.72. After the nuclear moratorium on atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in 1960s, 90Sr activity concentrations in sea water exponentially dropped from 14.8 +/- 2.4 Bq/m3 in 1963 to 2.0 +/- 0.3 Bq/m3 in 2003. In the same period, the total annual 90Sr land surface deposit in Zadar fell by three orders of magnitude, from 713.3 Bq/m2 in 1963 to 0.4 Bq/m2 in 2003. Using strontium sea water and fallout data, a mathematical model was developed to describe the rate of change of 90Sr activity concentrations in the Adriatic sea water and estimate its mean residence time in the Adriatic. By fitting the experimental d...

  17. The calculation of fallout protection factors using the VCS adjoint Monte Carlo methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vehicle Code System (VCS) was designed to compute initial radiation protection factors from distal sources for the shielding object such that radiation environments on a coupling boundary surface could be specified by a two-dimensional discrete ordinate (R,Z) calculation with the DOT code at a single range interval. The VCS procedure does not allow fixed sources of radiation internal to the coupling surface. This constraint on VCS is important for the analysis of fallout radiation protection factors. A new code, in a VCS framework, computes radiation protection factors from nuclear fallout for complex three-dimensional structures. Fallout radiation protection factor computations present at least two significant differences from the normal application of VCS to initial radiation: (1) there are radiation sources (on ground and roofs) local to the detector which cannot normally be excluded from the interior of a boundary surface and (2) the distal radiation environment is well-characterized by a one-dimensional discrete ordinates computation in plane geometry with the ANISN code. Thus, major features of this new code procedure include the addition of logic to score particles at potential source surfaces (e.g., roof and ground surfaces) within the Monte Carlo geometry, the addition of logic in the coupling procedure to treat these scores, and the addition of a capability to couple the ANISN plane geometry free-field fluxes instead of the two-dimensional DOT free-field fluxes

  18. NASA Student Airborne Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, E. L.; Shetter, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) is a unique summer internship program for advanced undergraduates and early graduate students majoring in the STEM disciplines. SARP participants acquire hands-on research experience in all aspects of an airborne research campaign, including flying onboard an major NASA resource used for studying Earth system processes. In summer 2012, thirty-two participants worked in four interdisciplinary teams to study surface, atmospheric, and oceanographic processes. Participants assisted in the operation of instruments onboard the NASA P-3B aircraft where they sampled and measured atmospheric gases and imaged land and water surfaces in multiple spectral bands. Along with airborne data collection, students participated in taking measurements at field sites. Mission faculty and research mentors helped to guide participants through instrument operation, sample analysis, and data reduction. Over the eight-week program, each student developed an individual research project from the data collected and delivered a conference-style final presentation on his/her results. We will discuss the results and effectiveness of the program from the first four summers and discuss plans for the future.

  19. Airborne remote sensing of estuarine intertidal radionuclide concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to map industrial discharges through remote sensing provides a powerful tool in environmental monitoring. Radionuclide effluents have been discharged, under authorization, into the Irish Sea from BNFL (British Nuclear Fuels Pic.) sites at Sellafield and Springfields since 1952. The quantitative mapping of this anthropogenic radioactivity in estuarine intertidal zones is crucial for absolute interpretations of radionuclide transport. The spatial resolutions of traditional approaches e.g. point sampling and airborne gamma surveys are insufficient to support geomorphic interpretations of the fate of radionuclides in estuaries. The research presented in this thesis develops the use of airborne remote sensing to derive high-resolution synoptic data on the distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in the intertidal areas of the Ribble Estuary, Lancashire, UK. From multidate surface sediment samples a significant relationship was identified between the Sellafield-derived 137Cs and 241Am and clay content (r2 = 0.93 and 0.84 respectively). Detailed in situ, and laboratory, reflectance (0.4-2.5μm) experiments demonstrated that significant relationships exist between Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) simulated reflectance and intertidal sediment grain-size. The spectral influence of moisture on the reflectance characteristics of the intertidal area is also evident. This had substantial implications for the timing of airborne image acquisition. Low-tide Daedalus ATM imagery (Natural Environmental Research Council) was collected of the Ribble Estuary on May 30th 1997. Preprocessing and linear unmixing of the imagery allowed accurate sub-pixel determinations of sediment clay content distributions (r2 = 0.81). Subsequently, the established relationships between 137Cs and 241Am and sediment grain-size enabled the radionuclide activity distributions across the entire intertidal area (92 km2) to be mapped at a geomorphic scale (1.75 m). The accuracy of these maps was

  20. Forest Fire Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Fire Logistics Airborne Mapping Equipment (FLAME) system, mounted in a twin-engine and airplane operated by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is an airborne instrument for detecting and pinpointing forest fires that might escape ground detection. The FLAME equipment rack includes the operator interface, a video monitor, the system's control panel and film output. FLAME's fire detection sensor is an infrared line scanner system that identifies fire boundaries. Sensor's information is correlated with the aircraft's position and altitude at the time the infrared imagery is acquired to fix the fire's location on a map. System can be sent to a fire locale anywhere in the U.S. at the request of a regional forester. USFS felt a need for a more advanced system to deliver timely fire information to fire management personnel in the decade of the 1990s. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) conducted a study, jointly sponsored by NASA and USDA, on what advanced technologies might be employed to produce an end-to-end thermal infrared fire detection and mapping system. That led to initiation of the Firefly system, currently in development at JPL and targeted for operational service beginning in 1992. Firefly will employ satellite-reference position fixing and provide performance superior to FLAME.

  1. Monitoring and evaluation techniques for airborne contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Yihua [China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    1997-06-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of airborne contamination are of great importance for the purpose of protection of health and safety of workers in nuclear installations. Because airborne contamination is one of the key sources to cause exposure to individuals by inhalation and digestion, and to cause diffusion of contaminants in the environment. The main objectives of monitoring and evaluation of airborne contamination are: to detect promptly a loss of control of airborne material, to help identify those individuals and predict exposure levels, to assess the intake and dose commitment to the individuals, and to provide sufficient documentation of airborne radioactivity. From the viewpoint of radiation protection, the radioactive contaminants in air can be classified into the following types: airborne aerosol, gas and noble gas, and volatile gas. In this paper, the following items are described: sampling methods and techniques, measurement and evaluation, and particle size analysis. (G.K.)

  2. Topography and Vegetation Characterization using Dual-Wavelength Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, A. L.; Bradford, B.; Magruder, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring Earth surface dynamics at an ever increasing resolution has helped to support the characterization of local topography, including vegetated and urban environments. Airborne remote sensing using light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is naturally suited to characterize vegetation and landscapes as it provides detailed three-dimensional spatial data with multiple elevation recordings for each laser pulse. The full waveform LIDAR receiver is unique in this aspect as it can capture and record the complete temporal history of the reflected signal, which contains detailed information about the structure of the objects and ground surfaces illuminated by the beam. This study examines the utility of co-collected, dual-wavelength, full waveform LIDAR data to characterize vegetation and landscapes through the extraction of waveform features, including total waveform energy, canopy energy distribution, and foliage penetration metrics. Assessments are performed using data collected in May 2014 over Monterey, CA, including the Naval Postgraduate School campus area as well as the Point Lobos State Natural Reserve situated on the Monterey coast. The surveys were performed with the Chiroptera dual-laser LIDAR mapping system from Airborne Hydrography AB (AHAB), which can collect both green (515nm) and near infrared (1064nm) waveforms simultaneously. Making use of the dual waveforms allows for detailed characterization of the vegetation and landscape not previously possible with airborne LIDAR.

  3. Projected lifetime cancer risks from exposure to regional radioactive fallout in the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Charles E; Bouville, André; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946-1958 at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the MI archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external irradiation resulting from exposure to radioactive fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses for cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948-1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 y (1959-1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% to 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. By sub-population, the projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28% to 69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2.4% to 22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2.2% (0.5% to 4.8%) and 0.8% (0.2% to 1.8%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied, by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and

  4. Electrospray Collection of Airborne Contaminants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In stark contrast to current stagnation-based methods for capturing airborne particulates and biological aerosols, our demonstrated, cost-effective electrospray...

  5. Long-Term Consequences of Radioactive Fallout From Conflicts Involving Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S. L.; Bouville, A.

    2006-12-01

    This presentation will summarize past exposures of the public to radioactive fallout from nuclear testing and extrapolate to the possible fallout-related consequences from detonation of multiple warheads that might accompany international conflicts. Long-term consequences could be of three distinct types: (1) the abandonment of living areas that might be heavily contaminated; (2) the necessity to curtail use of particular agricultural products and foods, and (3) life-shortening due to increased rates of cancer and possibly some non-cancer diseases among the exposed populations. While the actual health and economic impact on the surviving public after such conflicts could vary tremendously depending on the number and sizes of explosions (fission yields), height of detonations, and the public's proximity to explosion sites, it is clear that multiple detonations would disperse radioactive products over large geographic areas. Our understanding of radioactive fallout is based on studies carried out for more than five decades on weapons testing fallout that originated from sites worldwide including Nevada, the Soviet Union, four locations in the Pacific, and elsewhere. Those studies have led to an understanding of the composition of radioactive fallout, of its radioactive qualities, and of its capacity to contaminate ground and agricultural products, as well as dwellings and workplaces located from a few km to tens of thousands of km from the explosion site. Though the most severe individual health consequences from exposure to fallout would most likely develop relatively close to the detonation sites (within a few hundred km), wide geographic distribution of fallout, well beyond the borders of the nations involved in the conflict, would affect much larger populations and would likely cause elevated cancer rates and cancer-related deaths among them for many decades following. While acute radiation symptoms (and even death) can result from very high short-term exposures

  6. Calibration and Validation of Airborne InSAR Geometric Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The image registration or geo-coding is a very important step for many applications of airborne interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), especially for those involving Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation, which requires an accurate knowledge of the geometry of the InSAR system. While the trajectory and attitude instabilities of the aircraft introduce severe distortions in three dimensional (3-D) geometric model. The 3-D geometrical model of an airborne SAR image depends on the SAR processor itself. Working at squinted model, i.e., with an offset angle (squint angle) of the radar beam from broadside direction, the aircraft motion instabilities may produce distortions in airborne InSAR geometric relationship, which, if not properly being compensated for during SAR imaging, may damage the image registration. The determination of locations of the SAR image depends on the irradiated topography and the exact knowledge of all signal delays: range delay and chirp delay (being adjusted by the radar operator) and internal delays which are unknown a priori. Hence, in order to obtain reliable results, these parameters must be properly calibrated. An Airborne InSAR mapping system has been developed by the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) to acquire three-dimensional geo-spatial data with high resolution and accuracy. To test the performance of the InSAR system, the Validation/Calibration (Val/Cal) campaign has carried out in Sichun province, south-west China, whose results will be reported in this paper

  7. AIRBORNE HIGH-RESOLUTION DIGITAL IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado-Molina, J.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost airborne digital imaging system capable to perform aerial surveys with small-format cameras isintroduced. The equipment is intended to obtain high-resolution multispectral digital photographs constituting so aviable alternative to conventional aerial photography and satellite imagery. Monitoring software handles all theprocedures involved in image acquisition, including flight planning, real-time graphics for aircraft position updatingin a mobile map, and supervises the main variables engaged in the imaging process. This software also creates fileswith the geographical position of the central point of every image, and the flight path followed by the aircraftduring the entire survey. The cameras are mounted on a three-axis stabilized platform. A set of inertial sensorsdetermines platform's deviations independently from the aircraft and an automatic control system keeps thecameras at a continuous nadir pointing and heading, with a precision better than ± 1 arc-degree in three-axis. Thecontrol system is also in charge of saving the platform’s orientation angles when the monitoring software triggersthe camera. These external orientation parameters, together with a procedure for camera calibration give theessential elements for image orthocorrection. Orthomosaics are constructed using commercial GIS software.This system demonstrates the feasibility of large area coverage in a practical and economical way using smallformatcameras. Monitoring and automatization reduce the work while increasing the quality and the amount ofuseful images.

  8. Airborne campaigns for CryoSat pre-launch calibration and validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Forsberg, René; Skourup, Henriette;

    2010-01-01

    From 2003 to 2008 DTU Space together with ESA and several international partners carried out airborne and ground field campaigns in preparation for CryoSat validation; called CryoVEx: CryoSat Validation Experiments covering the main ice caps in Greenland, Canada and Svalbard and sea ice...... in the Arctic Ocean. The main goal of the airborne surveys was to acquire coincident scanning laser and CryoSat type radar elevation measurements of the surface; either sea ice or land ice. Selected lines have been surveyed along with detailed mapping of validation sites coordinated with insitu field work...

  9. Chemical Microsensor Instrument for UAV Airborne Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) proposes to develop a miniaturized Airborne Chemical Microsensor Instrument (ACMI) suitable for real-time, airborne measurements of...

  10. Geophex airborne unmanned survey system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This nonintrusive system will provide open-quotes stand-offclose quotes capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits two operators to rapidly conduct geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance, of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak anomalies can be detected

  11. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  12. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, I.J.; Keiswetter, D. [Geophex, Ltd., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide {open_quotes}stand-off{close_quotes} capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. This system permits rapid geophysical characterization of hazardous environmental sites. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected.

  13. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) (Global Carbon Cycle)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This bimonthly contractor progress report covers the operation, maintenance and data management of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Monthly activities included: mission planning, sensor operation and calibration, data processing, data analysis, network development and maintenance and instrument maintenance engineering and fabrication.

  14. Airborne measurements of NO2 shipping emissions using imaging DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andreas C.; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Seyler, André; Ruhtz, Thomas; Lindemann, Carsten; Wittrock, Folkard; Burrows, John P.

    2014-05-01

    NOx (NO and NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry and affect human health and the environment. Shipping emissions contribute substantially to the global emissions of anthropogenic NOx. Due to globalization and increased trade volume, the relative importance emissions from ships gain even more importance. The Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP), developed at IUP Bremen, has been used to perform measurements of NO2 in the visible spectral range. The observations allow the determination of spatial distributions of column densities of NO2 below the aircraft. Airborne measurements were performed over Northern Germany and adjacent coastal waters during the NOSE (NO2 from Shipping Emissions) campaign in August 2013. The focus of the campaign activities was on shipping emissions, but NO2 over cities and power plants has been measured as well. The measurements have a spatial resolution below the order of 100 × 30 m2, and they reveal the large spatial variability of NO2 and the evolution of NO2 plumes behind point sources. Shipping lanes as well as plumes of individual ships are detected by the AirMAP instrument. In this study, first results from the NOSE campaign are presented for selected measurement areas.

  15. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results

  16. Airborne fourier infrared spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer has been interfaced to a 35 cm aperture telescope and a digital data processing and display system and flown in a downward-viewing configuration on a Queen Air aircraft. Real-time spectral analysis and display software were developed to provide the means to direct aircraft flight operations based on atmospheric and/or surface features identified on 1 to 8 cm-1 resolution infrared spectra. Data are presented from ground-based tests consisting of simultaneous horizontal path measurements by the FTIR system and an infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) observing gas volumes generated in an open-ended chamber. Airborne FUR data are presented on the tracking of a surface-released puff of SF6 gas to a downwind distance of 45 km in a time period of 1.5 hours. The experiment demonstrated the real time tracking of a gas tracer cloud to provide atmospheric transport and diffusion information and for directing airborne in-situ sensors for optimum cloud sampling. 5 refs., 5 figs

  17. Gamma-ray thermoluminescence measurements: a record of fallout deposition in Hiroshima?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D

    2012-05-01

    In certain Hiroshima neighborhoods, radiation measurements using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) exceed what can be explained by the initial gamma-ray doses and uncertainties from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). This problem was not previously recognized as being isolated to certain parts of that city. The ratio between TLD measurements and DS02 dose calculations for gamma rays appear to grow larger than unity up to more than three with increasing ground range, but closer examination shows the excess TLD dose (0.1, 0.2, or possibly up to 0.8 Gray) is correlated with certain neighborhoods and could be due to radioactive fallout. At Nagasaki, the TLD measurements do not show this same excess, probably because there were no TLD measurements taken more than 800 m downwind (eastward) from the Nagasaki hypocenter, so that any small excess TLD dose was masked by larger initial gamma-ray doses of 25-80 Gray in the few downwind samples. The DS02 Report had noted many measurements lower than the DS02 calculation for several Nagasaki TLD samples, independent of ground range. This was explained as being the result of previously unaccounted urban shielding which was observed from Nagasaki pre-bomb aerial photos. However, the Hiroshima excess TLD dose issue was not resolved. If the excess TLD doses at Hiroshima are an indication of fallout, it may be possible to use additional TLD studies to make better estimates of the locations and radiation doses to survivors from the fallout after the bombings at both cities. PMID:22421931

  18. Transfer of 137Cs from Chernobyl fallout to meat and milk in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air, soil, forage, milk and meat samples were analysed for 137Cs and 134Cs following the Chernobyl accident. Deposition of fallout varied widely, the heaviest being in northwestern Hungary. Controlled experiments were conducted on State farms at four locations to determine the transfer coefficients from forage to the milk (Fm) of cows, sheep and goats and to the meat (Ff) of cows and sheep, goats and roe deer. Forage contaminated by Chernobyl fallout in late May of 1986 produced lower Fm and Ff values than worldwide fallout in the 1960s because the form of 137Cs deposited on forage was less available to cattle and sheep. The lower transfer has important implications for assessing the dose commitment of the human population. The second cutting of forage in 1986 and all cuttings in 1987 had greatly reduced concentrations of 137Cs but the Fm and Ff values were much higher, thereby suggesting that after removal of the original deposition the 137Cs in plants was in a more soluble form. Roe deer were fed the same hay as sheep for 50 days and the Ff was 0.35 for deer meat and 0.08 for sheep meat. Cattle fed the same hay produced beef with an Ff of 0.007. Potassium ferric hexacyanoferrate was fed at 0.3 or 0.6 g/d to lactating goats for 9 weeks. The Fm and Ff values were reduced to about 20% of those for the controls. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Mapping submarine sand waves with multiband imaging radar - 2. Experimental results and model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, J.; Wensink, G.J.; Calkoen, C.J.; Kooij, M.W.A. van der

    1997-01-01

    On August 16, 1989, and on July 12, 1991, experiments were performed to study the mapping of submarine sand waves with the airborne imaging radar, a polarimetric (and, in 1991, interferometric) airborne P, L, and C band synthetic aperture radar system. The experiments took place in an area 30 km off

  20. Local fall-out and the animal food chain; Retombees locales et chaine alimentaire animale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, G.; Mercier, F.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The local consequences of fresh fall-out, especially in the case of atmospheric nuclear explosions, are reviewed from the point of view of the internal contamination of the consumer of foodstuffs of animal origin. The edibility of foodstuffs derived from animals having grazed in the presence of fall-out is evaluated both from the wholesome and radio-toxicological points of view. The contamination level of these foodstuffs is calculated as a function of the ground fall-out, and of agronomical and ecological parameters for each radio-nuclide of the animal food chain. The internal exposure of the human consumer is calculated from this level as a function of the diet and of various parameters especially temporal. The equivalent dose to each critical organ, including the digestive tract is deduced from the burdens of each organ. From this a nutritional hygiene in the areas affected by fall-out is obtained, in relationship to the action levels fixed by the responsible authorities in exceptional circumstances. Criteria for these action levels are given as function of the food rations. (authors) [French] Les consequences locales des retombees fraiches, notamment dans le cas d'explosions nucleaires atmospheriques, sont passees en revue en ce qui concerne les problemes de contamination interne du consommateur de denrees d'origine animale. La comestibilite des aliments provenant de betes de boucherie ayant pature sous les retombees est evaluee au double point de vue de la salubrite et de la radiotoxicologie. Le niveau de contamination de ces denrees est calcule en fonction de la retombee au sol, des parametres agronomiques et ecologiques pour chaque radioelement de la chaine alimentaire animale. La contamination interne du consommateur humain est calculee a partir de ce niveau en fonction des modalites d'ingestion et de divers parametres, notamment temporels. L'equivalent de dose au niveau de chaque organe critique, y compris le tube digestif, est deduit

  1. Uranium fallout from the nuclear-powered satellites and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing trends of the concentrations of sup(234)U, sup(235)U and sup(238)U in rain observed during the period between April 1984 and June 1985 at Fayetteville (36 deg N, 94 deg W), Arkansas, and peak concentrations of sup(234)U and sup(235)U observed in a number of rain samples collected in May and June 1985 appear to be the effects of delayed fallout from the eruption of El Chichon volcano and the 1983 fall of the nuclear-powered satellite Kosmos-1402, respectively. (author)

  2. Soluble and particle-associated fallout radionuclides in Mediterranean water and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From measurements in Mediterranean seawater and sediments, fallout 137Cs, 90Sr, and 239240Pu behaved mostly as soluble nuclides tracing Mediterranean water movement, whereas 55Fe and 241Am behaved more as particle-associated nuclides and were relatively rapidly removed to the sediments. Patterns of nuclide distribution within sediments showed depths of penetration in the order 55Fe > (239240Pu, 137Cs) > 241Am and were thought to result from biological mixing on nuclides whose arrival rates varied in the same order

  3. Far field nuclear fallout experience and countermeasure strategy: A cost-benefit re-appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time of the year (April, May) when the fallout occurred, had influence on the consequences. In spring no animals were out grazing and almost no standing crops could receive direct surface contamination. However, uptake and the transfer in the semi-natural ecosystem became considerable important. In semi-natural ecosystems, soils often have a low mineral content and very little clay and this usually means less findings of the radiocaesium. Even before the Chernobyl accident occurred, it was known that the root uptake of radiocaesium in a semi-natural ecosystem was higher than average in agricultural ecosystems

  4. Somatic effects in man due to chronic radiation exposure: Health effects from fallout and radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed review containts a short introduction and the following chapters: 1. Background of nuclear technology with special emphasis on the production and toxicity of nuclear fuels; 2. The nuclear power industry (mainly dealing with the growth of the industry and the Chernobyl accident); 3. The use of nuclear weapons and their effects; 4. Health studies of populations around the Rocky Flats nuclear plant, the Windscale nuclear plant and the Savannah River nuclear installation; 5. Health studies of populations exposed to radioactive clouds and plumes, residing in a contaminated environment and ingesting food and water containing fallout radionuclides. (MG)

  5. The Wasteland violin:sonic modality and affective immersion in Fallout 3: New Vegas

    OpenAIRE

    Sallamo, L. (Lauri)

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find new tools for examining the mechanics underlying the onset of emotive response and consequently the experience of immersion during gameplay. My method was to investigate how particular sound events and soundscapes may affect the gaming experience as a whole by analyzing the soundscape crafted for a game that mixes elements of two popular game genres in its sound design. The game used as the primary source in this study was Fallout 3: New Vegas by Obsi...

  6. Appendix to health and safety laboratory environmental quarterly. [Tabulated data on fallout radioactivity in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    Data are tabulated on: the content of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 89/Sr in monthly deposition at monitoring sites in the USA and other locations throughout the world; the content of /sup 90/Sr in milk samples collected in New York City; the content of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr in samples of drinking water collected in New York City; and the content of fallout radionuclides and lead in samples of surface air collected at various world sites during 1976. (CH)

  7. Toxoplasma antibodies and retinochoroiditis in the Marshall Islands and their association with exposure to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly universal serologic evidence of Toxoplasma gondii infection was found to have occurred by adulthood in 517 Marshallese tested in 1981-1982. The prevalence and incidence of retinal lesions compatible with toxoplasmosis were 3.9% and 273 cases/year/100,000 seropositive persons, respectively, thus indicating a significant public health problem. Seronegativity was significantly more common in a subgroup of Marshallese that had received 110-190 rads of total-body gamma radiation as a consequence of accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. Despite this finding there was no evidence of an increase in clinically significant lesions in exposed persons

  8. A fractal view of Chernobyl fallout in Northern Italy and Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractals are associated with irregularity and represent a powerful tool for investigating phenomena featuring a complex behaviour, as it is the case of the atmospheric processes playing a role in spreading the radioactive pollution of Chernobyl in the environment. The introduction of fractals in environmental sciences is quite recent. Fractals may account for the presence of strong fluctuations and for the high variability characterising the natural events involved in the Chernobyl fallout: the geographical sparseness of pollutant and the presence of 'hot spots' make it advisable to use fractals as a theoretical framework for modelling

  9. Fallout deposits of Chernobyl radiocesium in the Norwegian Sea and North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of Cs-137 and Cs-134 from the Chernobyl fallout in the marine environment is described and quantified. Seawater samples and sediments from the Norwegian Sea were analysed by γ-spectroscopy. The influence of biogenic processes in the surface layer of the ocean on sedimentation was investigated and the type and bonding of radiocesium to suspended particles from the German Bight was assessed by sequential extractions. The results are compared with long-standing pollution from fuel reprocessing plants and nuclear arms tests. (HP) With 44 figs., 15 tabs

  10. The transfer of fallout cesium-137 from browse to moose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating the transfer of fallout cesium-137 from soil to browse to moose (Alces alces) to wolf (Canis lupis) to promote our understanding of the movement of radionuclides through natural food chains. The first part of this study is concerned with moose food habits. Early winter food habits of moose from Hecla Island and Manitoba Game Hunting Area 26 in south central and south eastern Manitoba were studied. In 86 rumen samples, 25 food types were identified. Three methods of food habit determination were used: (1) percentage occurrence of food types, (2) subjective abundance scores and (3) percentage dry weight. All three methods yielded very similar results

  11. Forage intake rates of mule deer estimated with fallout cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forage intake rates of 87 wild, Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) collected over a 2-year period from the Cache la Poudre Drainage, Colorado, were estimated utilizing available data on fallout cesium-137 concentrations in the deer and their inferred diet. The method employed involved the convolution of an intake function and a retention function. Ingestion rates are reported and analyzed by sex, season, and age class. An overall mean forage intake of 21.9 grams air dry forage/kg carcass weight/day was calculated. Adult animals consumed significantly (less than 0.01) more than adults throughout the year. (U.S.)

  12. Early detection of radioactive fall-out by gamma-spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive fallout should be detected as early as possible. A new and efficient method for detection of low-level irradiation from manmade radioactivity is developed. Radiation abnormalities are detectable down to air kerma rate, of 0.5 to 1.0 nGy h(-1) for Cs-137 and even lower for I-131...... For multi-gamma energy radioactivity the detection level is 2.6-3.5 nGy h(-1). A standard NaI detector and a 512-channel analyser are used together with noise adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD). Statistical noise is removed and the measured spectra are reproduced using spectral components...

  13. Report of the expert committee on the review of data on atmospheric fallout arising from British nuclear tests in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terms of reference of the committee were to review the published scientific literature and other relevant scientific data on the short and long-term effects of fallout arising from British nuclear tests in Australia; to comment on the adequacy of the data available and the collection methodology; to assess the fallout levels arising from each of the tests, the immediate and subsequent hazards from the fallout to the Australian population and individual Australians, including Australian personnel involved and aborigines in South Australia, and the adequacy of the criteria for safe firing of each of the tests. A comparison is made of radiation protection standards adopted during the nuclear test period with current standards. The recommendations include the setting up of a public inquiry to determine how the conduct and consequences of the British nuclear tests affected the health and well-being of Australians

  14. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial 137Cs deposition of 1 kBq m-2 on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial 137Cs deposition of 1 kBq m-2 was determined to be about 500 mSv. (authors)

  15. Feasibility of using 236U to reconstruct close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first results on the feasibility of using 236U to reconstruct the level and spatial distribution of close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima A-bomb are reported, coupled with the use of global fallout 137Cs and 239+240Pu. The results for global fallout 236U in soil samples (0-30 cm) from Ishikawa prefecture showed that the deposition density of 236U from the global fallout can be accurately evaluated using AMS. All deposited 236U, 137Cs and 239+240Pu appeared to have been recovered using 30-cm cores. It was also noted from the depth profiles for 236U/239+240Pu and 236U/137Cs ratios that the downward behavior of 236U in the soil was apparently similar to that of 239+240Pu, while the 137Cs was liable to be retained in upper layers compared with 236U and 239+240Pu. The accumulated levels were 1.78 x 1013 atoms m-2 for 236U, 4340 Bq m-2 for 137Cs and 141 Bq m-2 for 239+240Pu. The ratios of 236U/137Cs and 236U/239+240Pu were (4.10 ± 0.12) x 109 and (1.26 ± 0.04) x 1011 atoms Bq-1, respectively. Results of 236U, 137Cs and 239+240Pu measurements for the seven soil cores (0-30 cm) from Hiroshima were discussed on the basis of ratios of 236U/137Cs and 236U/239+240Pu by comparing with those from the background area in Ishikawa, indicating that the global fallout dominates the current level of 236U accumulation in soil in the Black-rain area around Hiroshima after the Hiroshima bomb, and the contribution of the close-in fallout 236U produced by the Hiroshima A-bomb seems difficult to observe.

  16. Nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Privatisation of the power industry in the UK is one of the government's main policies. As such its abandonment, or postponement into a later possible term, is seen to be politically intolerable, despite the complex problems that have already been encountered. To meet this absolute criteria, major changes in the early plans have recently been announced that have profound importance for many of those involved. Civil engineering is one of the groups concerned and this review considers the practical limitations facing government and the likely consequential changes for the industry as the privatisation process is implemented. (author)

  17. Fallout beryllium-7 as a soil and sediment tracer in river basins: current status and needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alex; Blake, Will H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Mabit, Lionel; Keith-Roach, Miranda J.

    2013-04-01

    Beryllium-7 is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant natural production and fallout via precipitation coupled with its ability to bind to soil particles have underpinned its application as a sediment tracer. The short half-life of beryllium-7 (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing sediment dynamics over short time periods, thus, enabling assessment of the effect of land use change upon soil redistribution. Although beryllium-7 has been widely applied as a tracer to date, there remain crucial gaps in understanding relating to the assumptions for its use. To further support the application of beryllium-7 as a tracer across a range of environments requires consideration of both the current strengths and shortcomings of the technique to direct research needs. Here we review research surrounding the assumptions underpinning beryllium-7 use as a tracer and identify key knowledge gaps relating to i) the effects of rain shadowing and vegetation interception upon beryllium-7 fallout uniformity at the hillslope-scale; ii) the effect of preferential flow pathways upon beryllium-7 depth distribution in soil and overland flow upon beryllium-7 inventory uniformity and iii) the potential for beryllium-7 desorption in saline and reducing environments. To provide continued support for the use of beryllium-7 as a hillslope and catchment-scale tracer, there is an urgent need to undertake further research to quantify the effect of these factors upon tracer estimates.

  18. Migration of fallout radiocaesium in a grassland soil from 1986 to 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertical migration of 134Cs, deposited by the Chernobyl fallout (1986), and 137Cs, deposited by the Chernobyl and the global fallout, in the soil of an undisturbed Bavarian grassland in Germany was investigated from 1986 to 2001. The activity-depth profiles of both isotopes at ten sampling dates were evaluated by the classical convection-dispersion equation and a random walk particle model. In both models, the apparent migration velocity v and the apparent dispersion coefficient D were assumed to be independent of time. However, optimized values of v and D were significantly different for the different locations sampled at different times. If nevertheless constant values of v and D were used, the simulated activity densities per soil layer were out of the range of the spatial variability of the observed activity densities determined in 2001. It is concluded that without further simultaneous investigations e.g. on bioturbation at the study site, migration parameters of radiocaesium determined by classical transport models based on convection and dispersion during the first years after the deposition of the activity cannot be used for predictive purposes

  19. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

  20. Vertical distribution and migration of global fallout Pu in forest soils in southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil samples collected in southwestern China were analyzed for Pu isotopes. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios were around 0.18, which indicated the dominant source of global fallout. Consistent sub-surface maximums followed by exponential decline of 239+240Pu activities in the soil cores were observed. Most of the Pu has still remained in the 0–10 cm layers since its deposition. Convection velocities and dispersion coefficients for Pu migration in the soils were estimated by the convection–dispersion equation (CDE) model. The effective convection velocities and effective dispersion coefficients ranged from 0.05 to 0.11 cm/y and from 0.06 to 0.29 cm2/y, respectively. Other factors that control the vertical migration of Pu in soil besides precipitation, soil particle size distribution and organic matter were suggested. Long-term migration behaviors of Pu in the soils were simulated. The results provide the Pu background baseline for further environmental monitoring and source identification of non-global fallout Pu inputs in the future. - Highlights: • Pu isotopes in the soil cores collected in southwestern China were analyzed. • Background baseline data of Pu isotopes in the soils were given. • Parameters of convection–dispersion equation model for Pu migration were estimated. • Long-term migration behavior of Pu in soil was simulated