WorldWideScience

Sample records for air-shower array combined

  1. L3+C air shower array

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01: a view of the L3+C air shower array; 50 scintillators on the roof of the SX-hall above L3. Photo 02: view of one of the detectors of the array.Photo 04: detectors seen against the background of the LEP Point 2 facilities.

  2. A critical analysis of air shower structure functions and size spectrum measurements with the NBU air shower array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Basak, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 11,000 showers in the size range 10 to the 4 to 10 to the 6 particles so far detected by the NBU air shower array has been analyzed using five different structure functions. A comparison of structure functions in terms: (1) of shower size; and (2) electron density at various core distances has been discussed to indicate the present status of structure functions in air shower analysis.

  3. Air shower measurements with the LOPES radio antenna array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.haungs@ik.fzk.de; Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from extensive air showers. Since radio waves suffer very little attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers. These waves can be recorded day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. LOPES is designed as a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. The LOPES antennas are absolutely amplitude calibrated allowing to reconstruct the electric field strength which can be compared with predictions from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. We report about the analysis of correlations present in the radio signals measured by the LOPES 30 antenna array. Additionally, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPES{sup STAR}) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory. Status, recent results of the data analysis and further perspectives of LOPES and the possible large scale application of this new detection technique are discussed.

  4. LORA: A scintillator array for LOFAR to measure extensive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the radio emission from extensive air showers, induced by high-energy cosmic rays, is one of the key science projects of the LOFAR radio telescope. The LOfar Radboud air shower Array (LORA) has been installed in the core of LOFAR in the Netherlands. The main purpose of LORA is to measure the properties of air showers and to trigger the read-out of the LOFAR radio antennas to register extensive air showers. The experimental set-up of the array of scintillation detectors and its performance are described

  5. Thunderstorm Observations by Air-Shower Radio Antenna Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Doll, P; Ender, M; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; 10.1016/j.asr.2011.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic, charged particles present in extensive air showers lead to a coherent emission of radio pulses which are measured to identify the shower initiating high-energy cosmic rays. Especially during thunderstorms, there are additional strong electric fields in the atmosphere, which can lead to further multiplication and acceleration of the charged particles and thus have influence on the form and strength of the radio emission. For a reliable energy reconstruction of the primary cosmic ray by means of the measured radio signal it is very important to understand how electric fields affect the radio emission. In addition, lightning strikes are a prominent source of broadband radio emissions that are visible over very long distances. This, on the one hand, causes difficulties in the detection of the much lower signal of the air shower. On the other hand the recorded signals can be used to study features of the lightning development. The detection of cosmic rays via the radio emission and the influence of s...

  6. Future Extensive Air Shower arrays: From Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sciascio, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Despite large progresses in building new detectors and in the analysis techniques, the key questions concerning the origin, acceleration and propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays are still open. A number of new EAS arrays is in progress. The most ambitious and sensitive project between them is LHAASO, a new generation multi-component experiment to be installed at very high altitude in China (Daocheng, Sichuan province, 4400 m a.s.l.). The experiment will face the open problems through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the wide energy range 1011 - 1018 eV. In this paper the status of the experiment will be summarized, the science program presented and the outlook discussed in comparison with leading new projects.

  7. Future Extensive Air Shower arrays: from Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Despite large progresses in building new detectors and in the analysis techniques, the key questions concerning the origin, acceleration and propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays are still open. A number of new EAS arrays is in progress. The most ambitious and sensitive project between them is LHAASO, a new generation multi-component experiment to be installed at very high altitude in China (Daocheng, Sichuan province, 4400 m a.s.l.). The experiment will face the open problems through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the wide energy range 10$^{11}$ - 10$^{18}$ eV. In this paper the status of the experiment will be summarized, the science program presented and the outlook discussed in comparison with leading new projects.

  8. Future Extensive Air Shower arrays: From Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sciascio Giuseppe Di

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite large progresses in building new detectors and in the analysis techniques, the key questions concerning the origin, acceleration and propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays are still open. A number of new EAS arrays is in progress. The most ambitious and sensitive project between them is LHAASO, a new generation multi-component experiment to be installed at very high altitude in China (Daocheng, Sichuan province, 4400 m a.s.l.. The experiment will face the open problems through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the wide energy range 1011 – 1018 eV. In this paper the status of the experiment will be summarized, the science program presented and the outlook discussed in comparison with leading new projects.

  9. Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinsheng; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liuming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiaobin; Lin, Yuhui; Zhang, Xueyao; Feng, Cunfeng; Jia, Huanyu; Zhou, Xunxiu; DanZengLuoBu,; Chen, Tianlu; Li, Haijin; Liu, Maoyuan; Yuan, Aifang

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment,...

  10. Measurement of horizontal air showers with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kambeitz, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA), at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, measures the radio emission of extensive air showers in the 30-80 MHz frequency range. AERA consists of more than 150 antenna stations distributed over 17 km$^2$. Together with the Auger surface detector, the fluorescence detector and the under-ground muon detector (AMIGA), AERA is able to measure cosmic rays with energies above 10$^{17}$ eV in a hybrid detection mode. AERA is optimized for the detection of air showers up to 60$^{\\circ}$ zenith angle, however, using the reconstruction of horizontal air showers with the Auger surface array, very inclined showers can also be measured. In this contribution an analysis of the AERA data in the zenith angle range from 62$^{\\circ}$ to 80$^{\\circ}$ will be presented. CoREAS simulations predict radio emission footprints of several km$^2$ for horizontal air showers, which are now confirmed by AERA measurements. This can lead to radio-based composition measurements and energy determi...

  11. Observation of Multi-Tev Gamma Rays from the Crab Nebula Using the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Cao, P Y; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Feng, Z Y; Fu, Y; Guo, H W; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Huang, Q; Huo, A X; Izu, K; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Labaciren; Li Jing Yi; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Luo, G X; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ouchi, T; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shi, Z Z; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Taira, K; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Utsugi, T; Wang, C R; Wang, H; Xu, X W; Yamamoto, Y; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, C S; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhaxi Sang Zhu; Zha Xi Ciren; Zhou, W D

    1999-01-01

    The Tibet experiment, operating at Yangbajing (4,300 m above sea level), is the lowest energy air shower array and the new high density array constructed in 1996 has sensitivity to $\\gamma$-ray air showers at energies as low as 3 TeV. With this new array, the Crab Nebula was observed in multi-TeV obtained the energy spectrum of $\\gamma$-rays in the energy region above 3 TeV which partially overlaps those observed with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. This is the first observation of $\\gamma$-ray signals from point sources with a conventional air shower array using scintillation detectors.

  12. Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Aguilar, S.; Palma, B.; Martinez, O.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the operation of an Extensive Air Shower Array located at the campus of the FCFM-BUAP. The array consists of 8 liquid scintillation detectors with a surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. The array was designed to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary particles that generate extensive air showers (EAS) in the region of 1013 eV - 1016 eV. The angular distribution measured with this array, Cos8(Theta) xSin(Theta), agrees very well with the literature. We also present the measured energies of a number of vertical showers in the range of 5 x1012 eV to 5 x1013 eV.

  13. Air Shower Radio Emission with Energy E$_0$$\\geq$10$^{19}$ eV by Yakutsk Array Data

    CERN Document Server

    Knurenko, S P

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents short technical description of Yakutsk Radio Array and some preliminary results obtained from measurements of radio emission at 32 MHz frequency induced by air shower particles with energy {\\epsilon}$\\geq$1$\\cdot$10$^{19}$ eV. The data obtained at Yakutsk array in 1987-1989 (first set of measurements) and 2009-2014 (new set of measurements). For the first time, at Yakutsk array radio emission from air shower with energy > 10$^{19}$ eV was registered including the shower with highest energy ever registered at Yakutsk array with energy $\\sim$2$\\cdot$10$^{20}$ eV.

  14. Measurement of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum above 1016 eV with the LOFAR Radboud Air Shower Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoudam, S.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Trinh, T.N.G.; van Kessel, L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy reconstruction of extensive air showers measured with the LOFAR Radboud Air Shower Array (LORA) is presented in detail. LORA is a particle detector array located in the center of the LOFAR radio telescope in the Netherlands. The aim of this work is to provide an accurate and independent e

  15. Temporal signatures of the Cherenkov light induced by extensive air showers of cosmic rays detected with the Yakutsk array

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    We analyze temporal characteristics of signals from the wide field-of-view (WFOV) Cherenkov telescope (CT) detecting extensive air showers (EAS) of cosmic rays (CR) in coincidence with surface detectors of the Yakutsk array. Our aim is to reveal causal relationships between measured characteristics and physical properties of EAS.

  16. Extensive Air Shower Array at the University of Puebla (EAS-BUAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Martinez, O.; Moreno, E.; Cotzomi, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2003-06-01

    We describe the design and operation of the first stage of the EAS-UAP extensive air shower array, as a detector of very high energy cosmic rays (1016 > Eo > 1014eV). The array is located at the Campus of Puebla University. It consist of 18 liquid scintillator detectors, with an active surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. One Auger Water Cherenkov detector is also included as part of the array. In this report we discuss the stability, the calibration, the arrival direction and lateral distribution function reconstruction capabilities of the detector array, as derived from the 10 detectors in operation in the first stage. Our results shows that the angular accuracy in arrival direction is less than 5.5° in the range from 20° to 60°. The measurements in the Water Cherenkov Detector show us the possibility to separete electromagnetic and muon component. The main characteristics of the array allow us also to use it as educational and training facility.

  17. Studies of Air Showers above 10^18 eV with the CHICOS Array

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, T W; Carlson, B E; Jillings, C J; Larson, M B; McKeown, R D; Hill, J E; Falkowski, B J; Seki, R; Sepikas, J; Yodh, G B; Wells, D; Chan, K C

    2005-01-01

    CHICOS (California HIgh school Cosmic ray ObServatory) is presently an array of more than 140 detectors distributed over a large area (~400 km^2) of southern California, and will consist of 180 detectors at 90 locations in the near future. These sites, located at area schools, are equipped with computerized data acquisition and automatic nightly data transfer (via internet) to our Caltech lab. The installed sites make up the largest currently operating ground array for ultra-high energy cosmic ray research in the northern hemisphere. The goal of CHICOS is to provide data related to the flux and distribution of arrival directions for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We have performed detailed Monte-Carlo calculations to determine the density and arrival-time distribution of charged particles in extensive air showers for the CHICOS array. Calculations were performed for proton primaries with energies 10^18 to 10^21 eV and zenith angles out to 50 degrees. We have developed novel parameterizations for both distribu...

  18. Observation of Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with the IceTop Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cru; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Clercq, C D; Ridder, S D; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Vries-Uiterweerd, G d; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Ha; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; Drift, D va de; Eijndhoven, N va; Overloop, A Va; Santen, J va; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the South Pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10^-3 level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30 degrees and an amplitude of (-1.58 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.52 (sys)) x 10^(-3) at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (-3.11 +/- 0.38 (stat) +/- 0.96 (sys)) x 10^(-3).

  19. A method of observing cherenkov light from extensive air shower at Yakutsk EAS array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Lev; Anatoly, Ivanov

    2016-07-01

    Proposed a new method for measuring the cherenkov light from the extensive air shower (EAS) of cosmic rays (CR), which allows to determine not only the primary particle energy and angle of arrival, but also the parameters of the shower in the atmosphere - the maximum depth and "age". For measurements Cherenkov light produced by EAS is proposed to use a ground network of wide-angle telescopes which are separated from each other by a distance 100-300 m depending on the total number of telescopes operating in the coincidence signals, acting autonomously, or includes a detector of the charged components, radio waves, etc. as part of EAS. In a results such array could developed, energy measurement and CR angle of arrival data on the depth of the maximum and the associated mass of the primary particle generating by EAS. This is particularly important in the study of galactic cosmic ray in E> 10^14 eV, where currently there are no direct measurements of the maximum depth of the EAS.

  20. The Telescope Array RADAR (TARA) Project and the Search for the Radar Signature of Cosmic Ray Induced Extensive Air Showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohira, Steven; TARA Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The TARA (Telescope Array Radar) cosmic ray detector has been in operation since May 2013. It is the most ambitious effort to date to test an idea that originated in the 1940's: that ionization produced by cosmic ray extensive air showers should reflect electromagnetic radiation. The observation of this effect would open the possibility that remote-sensing radar technology could be used to detect and reconstruct extensive air showers, thus increasing the aperture available for the study of the highest-energy cosmic rays. TARA employs a bi-static radar configuration, consisting of a 25 kW, 5 MW ERP transmitter at 54.1 MHz broadcasting across the Telescope Array surface detector. 40 km distant, a set of log-periodic receiver antennas are read out by two independent data acquisition systems employing different techniques to select signals of the form expected for radar targets moving at close to the speed of light. In this talk, we describe the TARA detector and present the first quantitative limits on the radar cross-section of extensive air showers.

  1. On Temporal Variations of the Multi-TeV Cosmic Ray Anisotropy using the Tibet III Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the large-scale two-dimensional sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays by Tibet Air Shower Array, with the data taken from 1999 November to 2008 December. To explore temporal variations of the anisotropy, the data set is divided into nine intervals, each in a time span of about one year. The sidereal anisotropy of magnitude about 0.1% appears fairly stable from year to year over the entire observation period of nine years. This indicates that the anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays remains insensitive to solar activities since the observation period covers more than a half of the 23rd solar cycle.

  2. Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : simulation and sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We have a plan to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We have deduced the attainable sensitivity of the muon detector array using our Monte Carlo simulation. We report here on the detailed procedure of our Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : physics goal and overview

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We are planning to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV (10 - 1000 TeV) energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We report on the possibility of detection of gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region in our field of view, based on the improved sensitivity of our air shower array deduced from the full Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Observation of PeV Gamma Rays from the Monogem Ring with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, J Y; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxi Sang Zhu; Zhou, X X

    2005-01-01

    We searched for steady PeV gamma-ray emission from the Monogem ring region with the Tibet air shower array from 1997 February to 2004 October. No evidence for statistically significant gamma-ray signals was found in a region 111$\\degr$ $\\leq$ R.A. $<$ 114$\\degr$, 12$\\fdg$5 $\\leq$ decl. $<$ 15$\\fdg$5 in the Monogem ring where the MAKET-ANI experiment recently claimed a positive detection of PeV high-energy cosmic radiation, although our flux sensitivity is approximately 10 times better than MAKET-ANI's. We set the most stringent integral flux upper limit at a 99% confidence level of 4.0 $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$ above 1 PeV on diffuse gamma rays extended in the 3$^{\\circ}$ $\\times$ 3$^{\\circ}$ region.

  5. Search for the Multi-TeV Gamma Rays from the Shell-Like SNR G40.5-0.5 Using the Tibet Air Shower Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-Long; TAN You-Hen; LU Hong; WANG Hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using observation data of the Tibet air shower array in different periods, a region with the highest excess of 4.4 σ in the multi-TeV was detected from the SNR G40.5-0.5 direction, although statistically insignificant yet. The position of the highest excess is located around the EGRET unidentified source 3EG J1903+0550.

  6. Underground Water Cherenkov Muon Detector Array with the Tibet Air Shower Array for Gamma-Ray Astronomy in the 100 TeV Region

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Feng Zhao Yang; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Feng Cun Feng; Feng, Z; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanj, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Tori, S; Wang, B; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhamg, N J; Zhamg, X, Y; Zhamg, Y; Zhamg, Yi; Zha Xisang Zhu; Zhou, X X; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We propose to build a large water-Cherenkov-type muon-detector array (Tibet MD array) around the 37,000 m$^{2}$ Tibet air shower array (Tibet AS array) already constructed at 4,300 m above sea level in Tibet, China. Each muon detector is a waterproof concrete pool, 6 m wide $\\times$ 6 m long $\\times$ 1.5 m deep in size, equipped with a 20 inch-in-diameter PMT. The Tibet MD array consists of 240 muon detectors set up 2.5 m underground. Its total effective area will be 8,640 m$^{2}$ for muon detection. The Tibet MD array will significantly improve gamma-ray sensitivity of the Tibet AS array in the 100 TeV region (10-1000 TeV) by means of gamma/hadron separation based on counting the number of muons accompanying an air shower. The Tibet AS+MD array will have the sensitivity to gamma rays in the 100 TeV region by an order of magnitude better than any other previous existing detectors in the world.

  7. Electronics and data acquisition system of the extensive air shower detector array at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.; Martinez, O.; Conde, R.; Murrieta, T.

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are playing an increasing role in DAQ systems in cosmic ray experiments due to their high speed and integration and their low cost and low power comsumption. In this paper we describe in detail the new electronics and data acquisition system based on FPGA boards of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this detector array is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 10 liquid scintillator detectors and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described also makes use of analog to digital converters with a resolution of 10 bits and sampling speeds of 100 MS/s to digitize the PMT signals. We also discuss the advantages of discriminating the PMT signals inside the FPGAs with respect to the conventional use of dedicated discrimination circuits.

  8. World's largest air shower array now on track of super-high-energy cosmic-rays Pierre Auger Observatory seeks source of highest-energy extraterrestrial particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "With the completion of its hundredth surface detector, the Pierre Auger Observatory, under construction in Argentina, this week became the largest cosmic-ray air shower array in the world. Managed by scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Pierre Auger project so far encompasses a 70-square-mile array of detectors that are tracking the most violent-and perhaps most puzzling- processes in the entire universe" (1 page).

  9. Observation of TeV Gamma Rays from the Fermi Bright Galactic Sources with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2009-01-01

    Using the Tibet-III air shower array, we search for TeV gamma-rays from 27 potential Galactic sources in the early list of bright sources obtained by the Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies above 100 MeV. Among them, we observe 7 sources instead of the expected 0.61 sources at a significance of 2 sigma or more excess. The chance probability from Poisson statistics would be estimated to be 3.8 x 10^-6. If the excess distribution observed by the Tibet-III array has a density gradient toward the Galactic plane, the expected number of sources may be enhanced in chance association. Then, the chance probability rises slightly, to 1.2 x 10^-5, based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. These low chance probabilities clearly show that the Fermi bright Galactic sources have statistically significant correlations with TeV gamma-ray excesses. We also find that all 7 sources are associated with pulsars, and 6 of them are coincident with sources detected by the Milagro experiment at a significance of 3 sigma or more at ...

  10. Search for TeV gamma rays emission from the shell-like SNR G40.5-0.5 using the Yangbajing extensive air shower array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using observation data of the Yangbajing extensive air shower array from October 2000 to September 2001, the TeV gamma rays from the shell-like SNR G40.5-0.5 direction were detected. A region with the highest excess of 4.4σ was found using two dimensional analysis method. The position of EGRET unidentified source GeV J1907+0557 is near the centrer of the region. (authors)

  11. Detection of thermal neutrons with the PRISMA-YBJ array in extensive air showers selected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Stenkin, Yu. V.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Aynutdinov, V.; Cai, Z. Y.; Guo, X. W.; Liu, Y.; Rulev, V.; Shchegolev, O. B.; Stepanov, V.; Volchenko, V.; Zhang, H.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a measurement of thermal neutrons, generated by the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS), by means of a small array of EN-detectors developed for the PRISMA project (PRImary Spectrum Measurement Array), novel devices based on a compound alloy of ZnS(Ag) and 6LiF. This array has been operated within the ARGO-YBJ experiment at the high altitude Cosmic Ray Observatory in Yangbajing (Tibet, 4300 m a.s.l.). Due to the tight correlation between the air shower hadrons and thermal neutrons, this technique can be envisaged as a simple way to estimate the number of high energy hadrons in EAS. Coincident events generated by primary cosmic rays of energies greater than 100 TeV have been selected and analyzed. The EN-detectors have been used to record simultaneously thermal neutrons and the air shower electromagnetic component. The density distributions of both components and the total number of thermal neutrons have been measured. The correlation of these data with the measurements carried out by ARGO-YBJ confirms the excellent performance of the EN-detector.

  12. Detection of thermal neutrons with the PRISMA-YBJ array in Extensive Air Showers selected by the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bartoli, B; Bi, X J; Cao, Z; Catalanotti, S; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; D'Amone, A; Danzengluobu,; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari, S M; Marsella, G; Mastroianni, S; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Salvini, P; Santonico, R; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yao, Z G; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhaxiciren,; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q; Stenkin, Yu V; Alekseenko, V V; Aynutdinov, V; Cai, Z Y; Guo, X W; Liu, Y; Rulev, V; Shchegolev, O B; Stepanov, V; Volchenko, V; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    We report on a measurement of thermal neutrons, generated by the hadronic component of extensive air showers (EAS), by means of a small array of EN-detectors developed for the PRISMA project (PRImary Spectrum Measurement Array), novel devices based on a compound alloy of ZnS(Ag) and 6LiF. This array has been operated within the ARGO-YBJ experiment at the high altitude Cosmic Ray Observatory in Yangbajing (Tibet, 4300 m a.s.l.). Due to the tight correlation between the air shower hadrons and thermal neutrons, this technique can be envisaged as a simple way to get information on the EAS hadronic component, avoiding the use of huge calorimeters. Coincident events generated by primary cosmic rays of energies greater than 100 TeV have been selected and analyzed. The EN-detectors have been used to record simultaneously thermal neutrons and the air shower electromagnetic component. The density distribution of both components and the total number of thermal neutrons have been measured. The correlation of these data w...

  13. Revised Upper Limits of the Diffuse Tev Gamma Rays from the Galactic Planes with the Tibet II and III Air Shower Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Yi Zhang Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X; al, et

    2006-01-01

    The flux upper limits of the diffuse gamma rays, from the inner and outer Galactic planes, are revised by factors of 4.0$\\sim$3.7 for mode energies 3$\\sim$10 TeV, respectively, by using the simulation results of the effective area ratios for gamma-ray induced showers and cosmic-ray induced ones in the Tibet air shower array. In our previous work, (Amenomori et al., ApJ, 580, 887, 2002) the flux upper limits were deduced only from the flux ratio of air showers generated by gamma rays versus cosmic rays. The details of the simulation are given in the paper (Amenomori et al., Advances in Space Research, 37, 1932, 2006). The present result using the same data as in ApJ suggests that the spectral index of source electrons is steeper than 2.2 and 2.1 for the inner and outer Galactic planes, respectively.

  14. Multi-TeV Gamma-Ray Flares from Markarian 421 in 2000 and 2001 Observed with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    OpenAIRE

    Amenomori, M.

    2003-01-01

    Several strong TeV gamma-ray flares were detected from Markarian 421 in the years 2000 and 2001 by the Tibet III air shower array at a level of statistical significance of 5.1 sigma. Markarian 421 was unprecedentedly active at X-ray and TeV gamma-ray energies during this period, and a positive correlation was found between the change of the ASM/RXTE X-ray flux and the Tibet TeV gamma-ray flux. When a power-law energy spectrum for gamma-rays from this source is assumed, the spectral index is c...

  15. Radio Detection of Horizontal Extensive Air Showers with AERA

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    AERA, the Auger Engineering Radio Array, located at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malarg\\"ue, Argentina measures the radio emission of extensive air showers in the 30-80 MHz frequency range and is optimized for the detection of air showers up to 60$^{\\circ}$ zenith angle. In this contribution the motivation, the status, and first results of the analysis of horizontal air showers with AERA will be presented.

  16. Detection of Multi-TeV $\\gamma$ Rays from Markarian 501 during an Unforeseen Flaring State in 1997 with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Cao, P Y; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Feng, Z Y; Fu, Y; Guo, H W; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Huang, Q; Huo, A X; Izu, K; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Labaciren; Li Jing Yi; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Luo, G X; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ouchi, T; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shi, Z Z; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Taira, K; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Utsugi, T; Wang, C R; Wang, H; Xu, X W; Yamamoto, Y; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, C S; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zha Xi Ciren; Zhaxi Sang Zhu; Zhou, W D

    2000-01-01

    In 1997, the BL Lac Object Mrk 501 entered a very active phase and was thebrightest source in the sky at TeV energies, showing strong and frequentflaring. Using the data obtained with a high density air shower array that hasbeen operating successfully at Yangbajing in Tibet since 1996, we searched forgamma-ray signals from this source during the period from February throughAugust in 1997. Our observation detected multi-TeV $\\gamma$-ray signals at the3.7-Sigma level during this period. The most rapid increase of the excesscounts was observed between April 7 and June 16 and the statisticalsignificance of the excess counts in this period was 4.7-Sigma. Among severalobservations of flaring TeV gamma-rays from Mrk 501 in 1997, this is the onlyobservation using a conventional air shower array. We present the energyspectrum of gamma-rays which will be worthy to compare with those obtained byimaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes.

  17. An updated search of steady TeV γ-ray point sources in northern hemisphere using the Tibet air shower array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using the data taken from Tibet Ⅱ High Density (HD) Array (1997 February--1999 September) and Tibet-Ⅲ array (1999 November--2005 November), our previous northern sky survey for TeV γ-ray point sources has now been updated by a factor of 2.8 improved statistics. From 0.0° to 60.0° in declination (Dec) range, no new TeV γ-ray point sources with sufficiently high significance were identified while the well-known Crab Nebula and Mrk421 remain to be the brightest TeV T-ray sources within the field of view of the Tibet air shower array. Based on the currently available data and at the 90% confidence level (C.L.), the flux upper limits for different power law index assumption are re-derived, which are approximately improved by 1.7 times as compared with our previous reported limits.

  18. Air shower radio detection with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemer, J; Apel, W D; Arteaga, J C; Badea, F; Bekk, K; Bozdog, H; Daumiller, K [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Baehren, L; Butcher, H [ASTRON, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bertaina, M; Chiavassa, A [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P L [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Brancus, I M [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M; Buchholz, P [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cossavella, F; Souza, V de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: Johannes.Bluemer@ik.fzk.de (and others)

    2008-07-15

    LOPES is an array of 30 radio antenna co-located with the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower detector in Karlsruhe, Germany. It is designed as a digital radio interferometer for the detection of radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES features high bandwidth and fast data processing. A unique asset is the concurrent operation with KASCADE-Grande. We report about the progress in understanding the radio signals measured by LOPES. In addition, the status and further perspectives of LOPES and the large scale application of this novel detection technique are sketched.

  19. GRAPES-3-A high-density air shower array for studies on the structure in the cosmic-ray energy spectrum near the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change in the spectral index from about -2.7 to -3.1 at ∼3x1015eV in the all-particle energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays is very significant for learning about the nature of cosmic sources of ultra-high energy particles and their acceleration and propagation in the galactic disk. Any observation of a fine structure in the spectrum would be important for improving our understanding of these physical processes. The GRAPES-3 air shower array has been designed to achieve higher precision in determination of various shower parameters to enable observation of any fine structure in the energy spectrum, if it exists. The details of the shower detectors, shower trigger and the data acquisition system are presented here along with estimates of trigger efficiencies from Monte Carlo simulations for primary photons (γ-rays) and several nuclei

  20. A likelihood method to cross-calibrate air-shower detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dembinski, H P; Mariş, I C; Roth, M; Veberič, D

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical treatment of the energy calibration of hybrid air-shower detectors, which combine a surface detector array and a fluorescence detector, to obtain an unbiased estimate of the calibration curve. The special features of calibration data from air showers prevent unbiased results, if a standard least-squares fit is applied to the problem. We develop a general maximum-likelihood approach, based on the detailed statistical model, to solve the problem. Our approach was developed for the Pierre Auger Observatory, but the applied principles are general and can be transferred to other air-shower experiments, even to the cross-calibration of other observables. Since our general likelihood function is expensive to compute, we derive two approximations with significantly smaller computational cost. In the recent years both have been used to calibrate data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We demonstrate that these approximations introduce negligible bias when they are applied to simulated t...

  1. Fluoresence Detection of Cosmic Ray Air Showers Between 10 16 . 5 eV and 1019 eV with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zundel, Zachary; Smith, Jeremy; Thomas, Stan; Abuzayyad, Tareq; Ivanov, Dmitri; Matthews, John; Jui, Charlie

    2014-03-01

    The Telescope Array Experiment has been observing cosmic ray air showers at energies above 1018 eV since 2008. TA operates three Fluorescence Detector (FD) sites, with telescopes that observe 3-31 deg in elevation. The FD sites are located at the periphery of a surface array of 507 scintillation counters covering 700 km2 , with 1.2 km spacing. The TA Collaboration has completed building a low-energy extension at its Middle drum FD site. Ten new telescopes currently observe between 33 and 51 degrees in elevation. A graded ground array of between 400 and 600m will be placed in front of the TALE FD. With these upgrades, the physics threshold of TA will be lowered to 10 16 . 5 eV. The TA Low Energy Extension (TALE) will explore the energy regime corresponding to that of the LHC in center-of-mass frame. This is also the range where the transition from galactic to extra- galactic cosmic ray flux is suspected to occur. We will give a brief overview of the physics, and report on the progress of TALE toward measuring the cosmic ray spectrum between 10 16 . 5 eV and 1019 eV.

  2. A study of the shadowing of galactic cosmic rays by the sun in a quiet phase of solar activity with the Tibet air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that the Sun's shadow by high energy cosmic rays moves year by year and its behavior is correlated with a time variation of the large-scale structure of the solar and interplanetary magnetic fields. The solar activity was near minimum in the period from 1996 through 1997. Using the data obtained with the Tibet air shower array, we examined the shadowing of cosmic rays by the Sun in this quiet phase of solar cycle, and found that the Sun's shadow was just in the apparent direction of the Sun, though it was observed at the position considerably away from the Sun to the south-west in the period between 1990 and 1993. It is known that the magnetic pole of equivalent solar dipole was reversed during the previous active phase, and near solar minimum the dipole was aligned with the rotating axis, preserving its N-pole on the north pole side of the Sun. This causes the solar magnetic field to shift the Sun's shadow to the east. Thus, the observed results suggest that the shift of the Sun's shadow due to...

  3. Observation of Polarised Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Mathys, S; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first direct measurement of the basic features of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above $3\\times10^{16}$\\,eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-beamed, coherent and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. An isotropic, unpolarised radiation is disfavoured as the dominant emission model. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at very high energy.

  4. A Northern Sky Survey for Steady TeV Gamma-Ray Point Sources Using the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, J Y; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takashima, M; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Utsugi, T; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S I; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Yi Zhang; Zhang, Y; Zhaxi Sang Zhu; Zhou, X X

    2005-01-01

    Results on TeV gamma-ray point source search using data taken from the Tibet HD (Feb. 1997 -- Sep. 1999) and Tibet III (Nov. 1999 -- Oct. 2001) arrays are presented. From 0 degree to 60 degree in declination (Dec), significan t excesses from the well-known steady source Crab Nebula and the high state of the flare type source Markarian 421 ar e observed. Because the levels of significance from other positions are not sufficiently high, a 90% confidence leve l (CL) upper limit on the flux is set assuming a Crab like energy spectrum. To allow cross-checking, two independentl y developed analyses are used in this work.

  5. Muonic footprint of simulated extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfani, Mona; Risse, Markus; Yushkov, Alexey [University of Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The number of muons at ground is one of the major parameters in extensive air showers to discriminate hadronic showers from photon ones. There are already numerous studies focusing on this matter and on using the muon content in combination with other parameters. In our study, we use CORSIKA showers for photon and proton primaries at E=10{sup 18} eV without thinning of shower muons to analyze the structure of the muonic footprint at different core distances.

  6. Large-Scale Sidereal Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic-Ray Intensity Observed by the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, J Y; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takashima, M; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Utsugi, T; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S I; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Yi Zhang; Zhang, Y; Zhaxi Sang Zhu; Zhou, X X

    2005-01-01

    We present the large-scale sidereal anisotropy ofgalactic cosmic-ray intensity in the multi-TeV region observed with the Tibet-IIIair shower array during the period from 1999 through 2003. The sidereal daily variation of cosmic rays observed in this experiment shows an excess of relative intensity around $4\\sim7 $ hours local sidereal time, as well as a deficit around 12 hours local sidereal time. While the amplitude of the excess is not significant when averaged over all declinations, the excess in individual declinaton bands becomes larger and clearer as the viewing direction moves toward the south. The maximum phase of the excess intensity changes from $\\sim$7 at the northern hemisphere to $\\sim$4 hours at the equatorial region. We also show that both the amplitude and the phase of the first harmonic vector of the daily variation are remarkably independent of primary energy in the multi-TeV region. This is the first result determining the energy and declination dependences of the full 24-hour profiles of t...

  7. Strong interactions in air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Dennis D. [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Theresienstraße, München (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universität, Max-von-Laue-Straße, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2015-03-02

    We study the role new gauge interactions in extensions of the standard model play in air showers initiated by ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Hadron-hadron events remain dominated by quantum chromodynamics, while projectiles and/or targets from beyond the standard model permit us to see qualitative differences arising due to the new interactions.

  8. Air Showers and Geomagnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Cillis, A N

    2000-01-01

    The influence of the geomagnetic field on the development of air showers is studied. The well known International Geomagnetic Reference Field was included in the AIRES air shower simulation program as an auxiliary tool to allow calculating very accurate estimations of the geomagnetic field given the geographic coordinates, altitude above sea level and date of a given event. Our simulations indicate that the geomagnetic deflections alter significantly some shower observables like, for example, the lateral distribution of muons in the case of events with large zenith angles (larger than 75 degrees). On the other hand, such alterations seem not to be important for smaller zenith angles. Global observables like total numbers of particles or longitudinal development parameters do not present appreciable dependences on the geomagnetic deflections for all the cases that were studied.

  9. CONEX and CORSIKA: a new 3D hybrid model for air shower simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hybrid air shower simulation code CONEX has been implemented as an option in the air shower Monte-Carlo model CORSIKA. In CONEX, Monte-Carlo simulation of high energy interactions is combined with a fast numerical solution of cascade equations. Low energy secondary particles can then be tracked within CORSIKA to obtain the lateral extension of the air shower. This allows the fast and realistic simulation of 3D showers at ultra-high energies.

  10. Study of hadronic component in air showers at Mt. Chacaltaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment of an air shower array, a hadron calorimeter (8 m2) and an emulsion chamber (8 m2, 15 cm Pb) is under way at Mt. Chacaltaya (5200 m above sea level, Bolivia), in order to study the hadron interactions and the primary cosmic rays in the energy region exceeding 1015 eV. The number of particles in the hadronic component in the air shower, which is detected by the hadron calorimeter, is not compatible with that obtained by simulations, indicating that violation of the Feynman scaling law is stronger at 1016 eV than the one assumed in the simulations. The average mass number of the primary cosmic rays, estimated from the distribution of the number of hadrons in the air shower, is = 2.8 ± 0.5 at 1016 eV

  11. Measurements of the muonic component of air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been developed by the Pierre Auger Collaboration to estimate the muon content of air showers from ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The data of the Pierre Auger Observatory will be compared with predictions based upon EPOS 1.99 and QGSJET-II-3 hadronic interaction models. In addition to the direct measures of the muonic content, the combination of a fluorescence detector and a muon sensitive surface array allows for a direct test of air shower simulations which is sensitive to both the shower core and large distances from the core. These methods reveal a deficit of muons in air shower simulations with proton primaries and that the energy assignment basedupon simulations of the surface array signal is systematically higher than that derived from the florescence detector. Summary: I will discuss the deficit in the number of muons currently predicted by simulations when compared to the data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. I will describe the methods used to measure the muon content, including sources of systematic uncertainty, and give their current results. Finally, I will present the Collaborations current understanding of the nature of the discrepancy, which could arise from an energy scale problem, composition, or deficiencies in the hadronic interaction models. See references [1, 2].

  12. The all-particle spectrum of primary cosmic rays in the wide energy range from 10^14 eV to 10^17 eV observed with the Tibet-III air-shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M

    2008-01-01

    We present an updated all-particle energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays in a wide range from 10^14 eV to 10^17 eV using 5.5 times 10^7 events collected in the period from 2000 November through 2004 October by the Tibet-III air-shower array located at 4300 m above sea level (atmospheric depth of 606 g/cm^2). The size spectrum exhibits a sharp knee at a corresponding primary energy around 4 PeV. This work uses increased statistics and new simulation calculations for the analysis. We performed extensive Monte Carlo calculations and discuss the model dependences involved in the final result assuming interaction models of QGSJET01c and SIBYLL2.1 and primary composition models of heavy dominant (HD) and proton dominant (PD) ones. Pure proton and pure iron primary models are also examined as extreme cases. The detector simulation was also made to improve the accuracy of determining the size of the air showers and the energy of the primary particle. We confirmed that the all-particle energy spectra obtained under v...

  13. LOPES Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Horneffer, A; Apel, W D; Badea, F; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Blümer, H; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Büttner, C; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; De Vos, C M; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Falcke, H; Fessler, F; Ghia, P L; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kant, G W; Klages, H O; Kolotaev, Yu; Maier, G; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Milke, J; Morello, C; Müller, M; Navarra, G; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Petcu, M; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Scholz, J; Stumpert, M; Thouw, T; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Valchierotti, S; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zagromski, S

    2004-01-01

    Radio pulses emitted in the atmosphere during the air shower development of high-energy primary cosmic rays were measured during the late 1960ies in the frequency range from 2 MHz to 520 MHz. Mainly due to difficulties with radio interference these measurements ceased in the late 1970ies. LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) is a new digital radio interferometer under development. Using high bandwidth ADCs and fast data processing it will be able to filter out most of the interference. By storing the whole waveform information in digital form one can analyze transient events like air showers even after they have been recorded. To test this new technology and to demonstrate its ability to measure air showers a "LOFAR Prototype Station" (LOPES) is set up to operate in conjunction with an existing air shower array (KASCADE-Grande). The first phase consisting of 10 antennas is already running. It operates in the frequency range of 40 to 80 MHz, using simple short dipole antennas and direct 2nd Nyquist sampling of the inco...

  14. A likelihood method to cross-calibrate air-shower detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Hans Peter; Kégl, Balázs; Mariş, Ioana C.; Roth, Markus; Veberič, Darko

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical treatment of the energy calibration of hybrid air-shower detectors, which combine a surface detector array and a fluorescence detector, to obtain an unbiased estimate of the calibration curve. The special features of calibration data from air showers prevent unbiased results, if a standard least-squares fit is applied to the problem. We develop a general maximum-likelihood approach, based on the detailed statistical model, to solve the problem. Our approach was developed for the Pierre Auger Observatory, but the applied principles are general and can be transferred to other air-shower experiments, even to the cross-calibration of other observables. Since our general likelihood function is expensive to compute, we derive two approximations with significantly smaller computational cost. In the recent years both have been used to calibrate data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We demonstrate that these approximations introduce negligible bias when they are applied to simulated toy experiments, which mimic realistic experimental conditions.

  15. Estimation of Lateral Distribution Function in Extensive Air Showers by Using AIRES Simulation System

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Al-Rubaiee A

    2013-01-01

    In this work the estimation of the lateral distribution function in Extensive Air showers was performed by using a system for air shower simulations which is called AIRES version 2.6 for different hadronic models like (QGSJET99, SIBYLL and SIBYLL1.6). The simulation was fulfilled in the high energy range (10^15-10^19 eV) for different primary particles like (gamma, protons and iron nuclei) for vertical showers. This simulation can be used to reconstruct the type and energy of the particle that generated Extensive Air showers for charged particles that registered with different arrays.

  16. Fluorescence Detection of Cosmic Ray Air Showers between 10^16.5 eV and 10^19 eV with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. N.; Zundel, Z.; Jui, C. C. H.; Smith, J. D.; Thomas, S. B.; Ivanov, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Telescope Array Experiment has been observing cosmic ray air showers at energies above 10^18 eV since 2008. TA operates three Fluorescence Detector (FD) sites, with telescopes that observe 3-31 deg in elevation. The FD sites are located at the periphery of a surface array of 507 scintillation counters covering 700 km^2, with 1.2km spacing. The TA Collaboration is in the process of building a low-energy extension at its Middle drum FD site. Ten new telescopes will observe between 33 and 51 degrees in elevation. A graded ground array of between 400 and 600m will be placed in front of the TALE FD. We have already observed multi-telescope cosmic ray events as well as the scattered light from the central laser (CLF). By 4/2013, all ten telescopes will have been commissioned and the first 35 scintillator counters will have been deployment by helicopter. With these upgrades, the physics threshold of TA will be lowered to 10^16.5 eV. The TA Low Energy Extension (TALE) will explore the energy regime corresponding to that of the LHC in center-of-mass frame. This is also the range where the transition from galactic to extra- galactic cosmic ray flux is suspected to occur. We will give a brief overview of the physics, and report on the progress of TALE.

  17. Cosmic ray air showers from sphalerons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Schichtel, Peter; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson marks a key ingredient to establish the electroweak structure of the Standard Model. Its non-abelian gauge structure gives rise to, yet unobserved, non-perturbative baryon and lepton number violating processes. We propose to use cosmic ray air showers, as measured, for example, at the Pierre Auger Observatory, to set a limit on the hadronic production cross section of sphalerons. We identify several observables to discriminate between sphaleron and QCD induced air showers.

  18. Radio emission of highly inclined cosmic ray air showers measured with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovic, Jelena; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D

    2006-01-01

    LOPES-10 (the first phase of LOPES, consisting of 10 antennas) detected a significant number of cosmic ray air showers with a zenith angle larger than 50$^{\\circ}$, and many of these have very high radio field strengths. The most inclined event that has been detected with LOPES-10 has a zenith angle of almost 80$^{\\circ}$. This is proof that the new technique is also applicable for cosmic ray air showers with high inclinations, which in the case that they are initiated close to the ground, can be a signature of neutrino events.Our results indicate that arrays of simple radio antennas can be used for the detection of highly inclined air showers, which might be triggered by neutrinos. In addition, we found that the radio pulse height (normalized with the muon number) for highly inclined events increases with the geomagnetic angle, which confirms the geomagnetic origin of radio emission in cosmic ray air showers.

  19. First Experimental Characterization of Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the overall characteristics of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers in the GHz frequency range. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above 3*10^16 eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-directed and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at energies above 10^17 eV.

  20. The radio signal from extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Revenu, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    The field of ultra-high energy cosmic rays made a lot of progresses last years with large area experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory, HiRes and the Telescope Array. A suppression of the cosmic ray flux at energies above $5.5x10^{19}$ eV is observed at a very high level of significance but the origin of this cut-off is not established: it can be due to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin suppression but it can also reflect the upper limit of particle acceleration in astrophysical objects. The key characteristics to be measured on cosmic rays is their composition. Upper limits are set above $10^{18}$ eV on primary photons and neutrinos and primary cosmic rays are expected to be hadrons. Identifying the precise composition (light or heavy nuclei) will permit to solve the puzzle. It has been proven that the radio signal emitted by the extensive air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays reflects their longitudinal profile and can help in constraining the primary particle. We review in this paper th...

  1. First Upper Limits on the Radar Cross Section of Cosmic-Ray Induced Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Othman, M Abou Bakr; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Besson, D; Blake, S A; Byrne, M; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Farhang-Boroujeny, B; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Gillman, W H; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hanson, J C; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jayanthmurthy, C; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kunwar, S; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Prohira, S; Pshirkov, M S; Rezazadeh-Reyhani, A; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Schurig, D; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takai, H; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Venkatesh, S; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2016-01-01

    TARA (Telescope Array Radar) is a cosmic ray radar detection experiment colocated with Telescope Array, the conventional surface scintillation detector (SD) and fluorescence telescope detector (FD) near Delta, Utah, U.S.A. The TARA detector combines a 40 kW, 54.1 MHz VHF transmitter and high-gain transmitting antenna which broadcasts the radar carrier over the SD array and within the FD field of view, towards a 250 MS/s DAQ receiver. TARA has been collecting data since 2013 with the primary goal of observing the radar signatures of extensive air showers (EAS). Simulations indicate that echoes are expected to be short in duration (~10 microseconds) and exhibit rapidly changing frequency, with rates on the order of 1 MHz/microsecond. The EAS radar cross-section (RCS) is currently unknown although it is the subject of over 70 years of speculation. A novel signal search technique is described in which the expected radar echo of a particular air shower is used as a matched filter template and compared to waveforms...

  2. First detection of extensive air showers with the EEE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; Fabbri, F L; Bressan, E; Librizzi, F; Sartorelli, G; Piragino, G; Ferroli, R Baldini; Maggiora, A; Siddi, E; Zuyeuski, R; Frolov, V; Serci, S; Selvi, M; Zichichi, A; Romano, F; La Rocca, P; Williams, M C S; Cicalo, C; D'Incecco, M; Panareo, M; Menghetti, H; Garbini, M; Moro, R; Cifarelli, L; Riggi, F; Hatzifotiadou, D; Scapparone, E; Chiavassa, A; Gustavino, C; De Gruttola, D; Coccetti, F; Bencivenni, C; Miozzi, S; De Pasquale, S

    2010-01-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is devoted to the study of extremely high energy cosmic rays by means of an array of particle detectors distributed all over the Italian territory. Each element of the array (called telescope in the following) is installed in a High School, with the further goal to introduce students to particle and astroparticle physics, and consists of three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC), that have excellent time resolution and good tracking capability. In this paper the first results on the detection of extensive air showers by means of time coincidences between two telescopes are presented.

  3. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; Buitink, S; Dallier, R; Ekers, R D; Falcke, H; James, C W; Martin, L; Revenu, B; Scholten, O; Schröder, F G

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays could be probed with very high precision mass measurements, hadronic interactions could be studied up to energies well beyond the reach of man-made particle accelerators, air shower tomography could be performed with very high spatial resolution exploiting the large instantaneous bandwidth and very uniform instantaneous $u$-$v$ coverage of SKA1-LOW, and the physics of thunderstorms and possible connections between cosmic rays and lightning initiation could be studied in unprecedented levels of detail. In this article, we describe the potential of SKA as an air shower radio detector from the perspective of existing radio detection efforts and discuss the associated technical requirements.

  4. Geomagnetic Field and Air Shower Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cillis, A N

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the geomagnetic field on the development of air showers is studied. The well known International Geomagnetic Reference Field was included in the AIRES air shower simulation program as an auxiliary tool to allow calculating very accurate estimations of the geomagnetic field given the geographic coordinates, altitude above sea level and date of a given event. Some test simulations made for representative cases indicate that some quantities like the lateral distribution of muons experiment significant modifications when the geomagnetic field is taken into account.

  5. A new observable in extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Canal, C A García; Masip, M; Sciutto, S J

    2016-01-01

    We find that the ratio r_{mu e} of the muon to the electromagnetic component of an extended air shower at the ground level provides an indirect measure of the depth X_{max} of the shower maximum. This result, obtained with the air-shower code AIRES, is independent of the hadronic model used in the simulation. We show that the value of r_{mu e} in a particular shower discriminates its proton or iron nature with a 98% efficiency. We also show that the eventual production of forward heavy quarks inside the shower may introduce anomalous values of r_{mu e} in isolated events.

  6. Fluorescence Detection of Cosmic Ray Air Showers Between 1016.5 and 1018.5 eV with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zundel, Zachary

    The Telescope Array (TA) Collaboration has completed construction of a low-energy extension to its Middle Drum telescope station. Ten new telescopes were added observing 32-59 degrees in elevation above the original telescopes. A graded array of scintillator detectors (SDs) with spacings of 400-600-1200 m is being installed in front of the telescope station. With these upgrades, the physics threshold will be lowered below 1016.5 eV. The TA Low Energy Extension (TALE) will explore the regime corresponding to the LHC center-of-mass energy. This is also the region where the transition from galactic to extra-galactic cosmic ray flux is suspected to occur. A brief overview of the physics is presented as well as a report on the progress toward measuring the cosmic ray spectrum between 1016.5 and 1018.5 eV.

  7. Application of an image intensifier to the study on hadrons in air shower, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the apparatus for observing cosmic ray air shower, the particle detection apparatus combining spark chamber, scintillator and photomultiplier tube is frequently used, but the exact detection of particle number is impossible with it when particle density is large. The authors have carried out the experiment to measure nuclear active particles in air shower and to grasp the central part of air shower as energy flow by utilizing an image intensifier tube. On the roof of building S, a laboratory was built, and a core detector of 2 m x 2 m area, 13 AS detectors of 0.25 m2 and an AS detector of 1 m2 were installed. The gate of the II was opened by utilizing coincidence pulses, and the position and amount of scintillation in the core detector was taken into a camera through the II. The time of observation was 289 hours, and the time of II operation was 113 hours. Total number of air shower recorded was 218 cases, and the centers of 120 cases among them were determined in the AS detectors at four corners. The centers of 39 cases were within the area of the core detector. In the coincident counting of air shower and burst carried out in the present experiment, the total delay time from the arrival of air shower to the gate pulse actuating the II was 1.6 sec. The core of air shower of about 106 size and 1.3 age was caught by this method. The problems for future are the determination of core position for the air shower of smaller size, and the meaning of spot images of II. (Kako, I.)

  8. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huege, T.; Bray, J. D.; Buitink, S.; Dallier, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H.; James, C. W.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Scholten, O.; Schröder, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic ray

  9. Cosmic ray air showers in the knee energy region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sanyal

    2003-03-01

    The cosmic ray extensive air showers in the knee energy region have been studied by the North Bengal University array. The differential size spectra at different atmospheric depths show a systematic shift of the knee towards smaller shower size with the increase in atmospheric depth. The measured values of spectral indices at below and above the knee are -2.45± 0.03 and -2.91± 0.05 respectively. Measurements at different atmospheric depths correspond to the same values within the error limits both for below and above the knee. The present experimental results have been compared with similar such experiments.

  10. Muons in Air Showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, M.

    We present measurements of muons in air showers at ultra-high energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory. The number of muons at the ground in air showers detected at large zenith angles is determined as a function of energy and the results are compared to air shower simulations. Furthermore, using data collected at zenith angles smaller than 60°, rescaling factors are derived that quantify the deficit of muon production in air shower simulations.

  11. Upgrading and testing the 3D reconstruction of gamma-ray air showers as observed with an array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Naumann-Godó, M; Degrange, B

    2009-01-01

    Stereoscopic arrays of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes allow to reconstruct gamma-ray-induced showers in 3 dimensions, which offers several advantages: direct access to the shower parameters in space and straightforward calorimetric measurement of the incident energy. In addition, correlations between the different images of the same shower are taken into account. An analysis method based on a simple 3D-model of electromagnetic showers was recently implemented in the framework of the H.E.S.S. experiment. In the present article, the method is completed by an additional quality criterion, which reduces the background contamination by a factor of about 2 in the case of extended sources, while keeping gamma-ray efficiency at a high level. On the other hand, the dramatic flares of the blazar PKS 2155-304 in July 2006, which provided H.E.S.S. data with an almost pure gamma-ray sample, offered the unique opportunity of a precision test of the 3D-reconstruction method as well as of the H.E.S.S. simulations u...

  12. Cosmic Ray Air Shower Detection with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: haungs@ik.fzk.de; Apel, W.D.; Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarb. und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, A.F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, 53010 Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box Mg-6, RO-7690 Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Dept. of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Butcher, H. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy)] (and others)

    2008-01-15

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to investigate radio pulses from extensive air showers experimentally and theoretically. Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the results of correlations with shower parameters present in the radio signals measured by LOPES-10. The extended setup LOPES-30 consists of 30 antennas which have an absolute calibration and the data of which will be compared with expectations from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. In addition, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPES{sup STAR}) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  13. The Chicago Air Shower Array (CASA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the ultrahigh energy flux sensitivity beyond that of existing detectors a new class of very large detectors must be built. In this paper we will discuss one approach to this goal. (orig.)

  14. Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

  15. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory : Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Bravo, A. Gascon; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Vitale, P. F. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui De Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Meza, J. J. Masias; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is pos

  16. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2015-01-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detecto

  17. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; D\\'\\iaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garc\\'\\ia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agëra, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Mart\\'\\inez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Mas\\'\\ias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodr\\'\\iguez-Fr\\'\\ias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiał kowski, A.; Šm\\'\\ida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade mode

  18. Probing atmospheric electric fields in thunderstorms through radio emission from cosmic-ray induced air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinh, Gia Thi Ngoc; Schellart, Pim; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Horandel, Jörg R.; Nelles, Anna; Rachen, Jörg Paul; Rutjes, Casper; Scholten, Olaf; ter Veen, Sander; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2015-01-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate the emission of radio waves which have been detected with LOFAR, an array of a large number of simple antennas p

  19. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  20. Simulation of Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Christian; Erdmann, Martin; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence o...

  1. New facts about muon production in Extended Air Shower simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Pierog, T

    2006-01-01

    Whereas air shower simulations are very valuable tools for interpreting cosmic ray data, there is a long standing problem: is seems to be impossible to accommodate at the same time the longitudinal development of air showers and the number of muons measured at ground. Using a new hadronic interaction model (EPOS) in air shower simulations produces considerably more muons, in agreement with results from the HiRes-MIA experiment. We find that this is mainly due to a better description of baryon-antibaryon production in hadronic interactions. This is a new aspect of air shower physics which has never been considered so far.

  2. Bursts of extensive air showers chaos vs. stochasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Y A; Zotov, M Yu; Fomin, Yu. A.

    2004-01-01

    Bursts of the count rate of extensive air showers (EAS) lead to the appearance of clusters in time series that represent EAS arrival times. We apply methods of nonlinear time series analysis to twenty EAS cluster events found in the data set obtained with the EAS-1000 prototype array. In particular, we use the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to compute the correlation dimension of the time series in the vicinity of the clusters. We find that four cluster events produce signs of chaos in the corresponding time series. By applying a number of supplementary methods we assess that the nature of the observed behaviour of the correlation dimension is likely to be deterministic. We compare our conclusions with the results of similar investigations performed by the EAS-TOP and LAAS groups.

  3. Radio emission from cosmic ray air showers : Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huege, T.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We present time-domain Monte Carlo simulations of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in the scheme of coherent geosynchrotron radiation. Our model takes into account the important air shower characteristics such as the lateral and longitudinal particle distributions, the particle track lengt

  4. Air Shower Events of High-Energy Cosmic Rays Measured at Seoul, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Wooram; Shin, Jae-Ik; Kim, Hongki; Lee, Seulgi; Lim, Sunin; Nam, Sinwoo; Yang, Jongmann; Cheon, Byunggu; Bang, Hyungchan; Kwon, Youngjoon

    2011-09-01

    The COsmic ray Research and Education Array (COREA) collaboration has installed an array of six detector stations at two high schools in and near Seoul, Korea for measurement of air-shower events from high-energy cosmic rays. Three stations are installed at each site, where each station consists of four plastic scintillation detectors covering an area of 2m2. In this presentation, we report the currenst status of the COREA project, describing the experimental equipment and measurement of coincident events.

  5. High-precision measurements of extensive air showers with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; Buitink, S; Dallier, R; Ekers, R D; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; James, C W; Martin, L; Revenu, B; Scholten, O; Schröder, F G; Zilles, A

    2015-01-01

    As of 2023, the Square Kilometre Array will constitute the world's largest radio telescope, offering unprecedented capabilities for a diverse science programme in radio astronomy. At the same time, the SKA will be ideally suited to detect extensive air showers initiated by cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere via their radio emission. With its very dense and uniform antenna spacing in a fiducial area of one km$^2$ and its large bandwidth of 50-350 MHz, the low-frequency part of the SKA will provide very precise measurements of individual cosmic ray air showers. These precision measurements will allow detailed studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy region of transition from a Galactic to an extragalactic origin. Also, the SKA will facilitate three-dimensional "tomography" of the electromagnetic cascades of air showers, allowing the study of particle interactions at energies beyond the reach of the LHC. Finally, studies of possible connections between air showers and lightning initiation ...

  6. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration of the whole system for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 19% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomical transients with LOFAR

  7. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Nelles, A; Karskens, T; Krause, M; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Erdmann, M; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Krause, R; Link, K; Norden, M J; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Schellart, P; Scholten, O; Schröder, F G; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, T N G; Weidenhaupt, K; Wijnholds, S J; Anderson, J; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Bregman, J; Brouw, W N; Bruüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Carbone, D; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; van Haarlem, M P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kohler, J; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Schwarz, D; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw- Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 35% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomic...

  8. pp Interaction in Extended Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Kohara, A Kendi; Kodama, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Applying the recently constructed analytic representation for the pp scattering amplitudes, we present a study of p-air cross sections, with comparison to the data from Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The amplitudes describe with precision all available accelerator data at ISR, SPS and LHC energies, and its theoretical basis, together with the very smooth energy dependence of parameters controlled by unitarity and dispersion relations, permit reliable extrapolation to higher energies and to asymptotic ranges. The comparison with cosmic ray data is very satisfactory in the whole pp energy interval from 1 to 100 TeV. High energy asymptotic behaviour of cross sections is investigated in view of the geometric scaling property of the amplitudes. The amplitudes predict that the proton does not behave as a black disk even at asymptotically high enegies, and we discuss possible non-trivial consequences of this fact for pA collision cross sections at higher energies.

  9. A search for microwave emission from cosmic ray air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher Lee

    At the highest energies, the sources of cosmic rays should be among the most powerful extragalactic accelerators. Large observatories have revealed a flux suppression above a few 1019 eV, similar to the expected effect of the interaction of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with the cosmic microwave background. The Pierre Auger Observatory has measured the largest sample of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers (EAS) at the highest energies leading to a precise measurement of the energy spectrum, hints of spatial anisotropy, and a surprising change in the chemical composition at the highest energies. To answer the question of the origin of UHECRs a larger sample of high quality data will be required to reach a statistically significant result. One of the possible techniques suggested to achieve this much larger data sample, in a cost effective way, is ultra-wide field of view microwave telescopes which would operate in an analogous way to the already successful fluorescence detection (FD) technique. Detecting EAS in microwaves could be done with 100% duty cycle and essentially no atmospheric effects. This presents many advantages over the FD which has a 10% duty cycle and requires extensive atmospheric monitoring for calibration. We have pursued both prototype detector designs and improved laboratory measurements, the results of which are reported herein, and published in (Alvarez-Muniz et al., 2013; Alvarez-Muniz et al., 2012a; Williams et al., 2013; Alvarez-Muniz et al., 2013). The Microwave Detection of Air Showers (MIDAS) experiment is the first ultra-wide field of view imaging telescope deployed to detect isotropic microwave emission from EAS. With 61 days of livetime data operating on the University of Chicago campus we were able to set new limits on isotropic microwave emission from extensive air showers. The new limits rule out current laboratory air plasma measurements (Gorham et al., 2008) by more than five sigma. The MIDAS experiment continues to

  10. A Fast Hybrid Approach to Air Shower Simulations and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, H J; Bleicher, M; Reiter, M; Soff, S; Stöcker, H; Stoecker, Horst

    2003-01-01

    The SENECA model, a new hybrid approach to air shower simulations, is presented. It combines the use of efficient cascade equations in the energy range where a shower can be treated as one-dimensional, with a traditional Monte Carlo method which traces individual particles. This allows one to reproduce natural fluctuations of individual showers as well as the lateral spread of low energy particles. The model is quite efficient in computation time. As an application of the new approach, the influence of the low energy hadronic models on shower properties for AUGER energies is studied. We conclude that these models have a significant impact on the tails of lateral distribution functions, and deserve therefore more attention.

  11. Radio emission of energetic cosmic ray air showers: Polarization measurements with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isar, P.G. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: gina.isar@ik.fzk.de; Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    LOPES is a radio antenna array co-located with the Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array DEtector, KASCADE-Grande in Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, which provides well-calibrated trigger information and air shower parameters for primary energies up to 10{sup 18}eV. By the end of 2006, the radio antennas were re-configured to perform polarization measurements of the radio signal of cosmic ray air showers, recording in the same time both, the East-West and North-South polarization directions of the radio emission. The main goal of these measurements is to reconstruct the polarization characteristics of the emitted signal. This will allow a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions. The current status of these measurements is reported here.

  12. Longitudinal development of extensive air showers: Hybrid code SENECA and full Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jeferson A.; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; de Souza, Vitor

    2005-06-01

    New experiments, exploring the ultra-high energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum with unprecedented detail, are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air shower modelling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. Some hybrid simulation codes have been proposed recently to this effect (e.g., the combination of the traditional Monte Carlo scheme and system of cascade equations or pre-simulated air showers). In this context, we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tri-dimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We extensively compare hybrid method with the traditional, but time consuming, full Monte Carlo code CORSIKA which is the de facto standard in the field. The hybrid scheme of the SENECA code is based on the simulation of each particle with the traditional Monte Carlo method at two steps of the shower development: the first step predicts the large fluctuations in the very first particle interactions at high energies while the second step provides a well detailed lateral distribution simulation of the final stages of the air shower. Both Monte Carlo simulation steps are connected by a cascade equation system which reproduces correctly the hadronic and electromagnetic longitudinal profile. We study the influence of this approach on the main longitudinal characteristics of proton, iron nucleus and gamma induced air showers and compare the predictions of the well known CORSIKA code using the QGSJET hadronic interaction model.

  13. Frequency spectra of cosmic ray air shower radio emission measured with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Nigl, A

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: We wish to study the spectral dependence of the radio emission from cosmic-ray air showers around 100 PeV (1017 eV). METHODS: We observe short radio pulses in a broad frequency band with the dipole-interferometer LOPES (LOFAR Prototype Station), which is triggered by a particle detector array named Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector (KASCADE). LOFAR is the Low Frequency Array. For this analysis, 23 strong air shower events are selected using parameters from KASCADE. RESULTS: The resulting electric field spectra fall off to higher frequencies. An average electric field spectrum is fitted with an exponential, or alternatively, with a power law. The spectral slope obtained is not consistent within uncertainties and it is slightly steeper than the slope obtained from Monte Carlo simulations based on air showers simulated with CORSIKA (Cosmic Ray Simulations for KASCADE). One of the strongest events was measured during thunderstorm activity in the vicinity of LOPES and shows the longest pulse length me...

  14. Radio Emission in Atmospheric Air Showers: Results of LOPES-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Apel, W D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-09-15

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by showers observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analyzed. We report about results of correlations found of the measured radio signals by LOPES-10 with shower parameters.

  15. Radio Emission in Atmospheric Air Showers: Results of LOPES-10

    CERN Document Server

    Haungs, A; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Hakenjos, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Haungs, Andreas; al, et

    2006-01-01

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by showers observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analyzed. We report about results of correlations found of the measured radio signals by LOPES-10 with shower parameters.

  16. Simulation of radiation energy release in air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Christian; Erdmann, Martin; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second-order dependence on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum shower development Xmax. In a measurement where Xmax is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor loss in accuracy. Our method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% in the determination of the energy in the electromagnetic air-shower component, which is well below current experimental uncertainties.

  17. Radio detection of Cosmic-Ray Air Showers and High-Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an introduction to the radio emission by particle cascades, an overview on the various experiments, and explains methods for the radio measurement of air-shower properties. Furthermore, potential applications of the radio technique in high-energy astroparticle physics are discussed. Due to the successful operation of digital radio experiments and due to the improved quantitative understanding of the emission, radio detection is back on the list of promising techniques for extensive air showers. With a threshold of about 100 PeV radio detectors are particularly useful to study the highest-energy galactic cosmic rays and ultra-high-energy extragalactic particles of all types. Various antenna arrays like LOPES, CODALEMA, AERA, LOFAR, and Tunka-Rex have shown that radio measurements can compete in precision with other techniques, in particular for the arrival direction, the energy, and the position of the shower maximum. The scientific potential of the radio technique seems to be maximum in c...

  18. Determining atmospheric electric fields from the radio footprint of cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers as measured with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebert, U.; Trinh, G. T. N.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Horandel, J.; Koehn, C.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.

    2014-01-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower, electric currents are induced that generate the emission of radio waves which have been detected with LOFAR (www.lofar.org), an array of a large number of

  19. Lateral Distribution of the Radio Signal in Extensive Air Showers Measured with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Brueggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; De Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kang, D; Kickelbick, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Oehlschläger, J; Over, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schroeder, F; Sima, O; Singh, K; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2009-01-01

    The antenna array LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. The coincident measurements allow us to reconstruct the electric field strength at observation level in dependence of general EAS parameters. In the present work, the lateral distribution of the radio signal in air showers is studied in detail. It is found that the lateral distributions of the electric field strengths in individual EAS can be described by an exponential function. For about 20% of the events a flattening towards the shower axis is observed, preferentially for showers with large inclination angle. The estimated scale parameters R0 describing the slope of the lateral profiles range between 100 and 200 m. No evidence for a direct correlation of R0 with shower parameters like azimuth angle, geomagnetic angle, or primary energy can be found. This indicates that the lateral profile is an intrinsic pr...

  20. Simulation of Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Glaser, Christian; Hörandel, Jörg R; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second-order dependence on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum shower development $X_\\mathrm{max}$. In a measurement where $X_\\mathrm{max}$ is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor loss in accuracy. Our method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% in the determination o...

  1. Simulation of the Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Glaser, Christian; Hörandel, Jörg R; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second order dependency on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum of the shower development $X_\\mathrm{max}$. In a measurement where $X_\\mathrm{max}$ is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor deterioration in accuracy. This method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% with ...

  2. A new model-independent approach for finding the arrival direction of an extensive air shower

    CERN Document Server

    Kh, H Hedayati

    2016-01-01

    A new accurate method for reconstructing the arrival direction of an extensive air shower (EAS) is described. Compared to existing methods, it is not subject to minimization of a function and, therefore, is fast and stable. This method also does not need to know detailed curvature or thickness structure of an EAS. It can have angular resolution of about 1 degree for a typical surface array in central regions. Also, it has better angular resolution than other methods in the marginal area of arrays.

  3. Analysis of extensive air showers with the hybrid code SENECA

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, J A; Medina-Tanco, G; Ortiz, Jeferson A.; Souza, Vitor de; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    The ultrahigh energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum has been explored with unprecedented detail. For this reason, new experiments are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air shower modeling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. In this sense we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tridimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We discuss the influence of this approach on the main longitudinal characteristics of proton, iron nucleus and gamma induced air showers for different hadronic interaction models. We also show the comparisons of our predictions with those of CORSIKA code.

  4. Analysis of extensive air showers with the hybrid code SENECA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jeferson A.; de Souza, Vitor; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    The ultrahigh energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum has been explored with unprecedented detail. For this reason, new experiments are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air shower modeling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. In this sense we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tridimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We discuss the influence of this approach on the main longitudinal characteristics of proton, iron nucleus and gamma induced air showers for different hadronic interaction models. We also show the comparisons of our predictions with those of CORSIKA code.

  5. Radio emission from cosmic ray air showers: Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; Huege, Tim; Falcke, Heino

    2004-01-01

    We present time-domain Monte Carlo simulations of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in the scheme of coherent geosynchrotron radiation. Our model takes into account the important air shower characteristics such as the lateral and longitudinal particle distributions, the particle track length and energy distributions, a realistic magnetic field geometry and the shower evolution as a whole. The Monte Carlo approach allows us to retain the full polarisation information and to carry out the calculations without the need for any far-field approximations. We demonstrate the strategies developed to tackle the computational effort associated with the simulation of a huge number of particles for a great number of observer bins and illustrate the robustness and accuracy of these techniques. We predict the emission pattern, the radial and the spectral dependence of the radiation from a prototypical 10^17 eV vertical air shower and find good agreement with our analytical results (Huege & Falcke 2003) and the...

  6. Cosmic ray radio emission as air shower detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of radio-detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (within the 10 to 100 MHz range) are discussed. Currently, air showers are detected by various methods, mainly based on particle detectors (KASCADE, Auger) or optical detection (Cerenkov radiation). Recently,to detect radio emission from cosmic ray air showers a method using electromagnetic radiation in low frequency domain (LOFAR) was proposed. We are investigating this possibility, using simulation codes created to investigate electromagnetic radiation of intricate antennae structure, for example fractal antennas. Some of the preliminary results will be communicated in this session. (authors)

  7. Measurement of the muon content in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veberič, Darko

    2016-07-01

    The muon content of extensive air showers produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays is an observable sensitive to the composition of primary particles and to the properties of hadronic interactions governing the evolution of air-shower cascades. We present different methods for estimation of the number of muons at the ground and the muon production depth. These methods use measurements of the longitudinal, lateral, and temporal distribution of particles in air showers recorded by the detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The results, obtained at about 140 TeV center-of-mass energy for proton primaries, are compared to the predictions of LHC-tuned hadronic-interaction models used in simulations with different primary masses. The models exhibit a deficitin the predicted muon content. The combination of these results with other independent mass composition analyses, such as those involving the depth of shower maximum observablemax, provide additional constraints on hadronic-interaction models for energies beyond the reach of the LHC.

  8. Measurement of the muon content in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veberič Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The muon content of extensive air showers produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays is an observable sensitive to the composition of primary particles and to the properties of hadronic interactions governing the evolution of air-shower cascades. We present different methods for estimation of the number of muons at the ground and the muon production depth. These methods use measurements of the longitudinal, lateral, and temporal distribution of particles in air showers recorded by the detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The results, obtained at about 140 TeV center-of-mass energy for proton primaries, are compared to the predictions of LHC-tuned hadronic-interaction models used in simulations with different primary masses. The models exhibit a deficitin the predicted muon content. The combination of these results with other independent mass composition analyses, such as those involving the depth of shower maximum observablemax, provide additional constraints on hadronic-interaction models for energies beyond the reach of the LHC.

  9. Precision measurements of cosmic ray air showers with the SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huege, T.; Bray, J.; Buitink, S.; Dallier, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Falcke, H. D. E.; James, C. W.; Martin, L.; Revenu, B.; Scholten, O.; Schroeder, F.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemented with suitable buffering techniques, the low-frequency part of the SKA can be used as an ultra-precise detector for cosmic-ray air showers at very high energies. This would enable a wealth of scientific applications: the physics of the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic ray

  10. Tau Air-Showers Signature of Ultra High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2001-01-01

    The discover of Ultra High Energy Neutrino of astrophysical nature may be already reached. Indeed upward and horizontal tau Air-showers emerging from the Earth crust or mountain chains offer the best and most powerful signal of Ultra High Energy UHE neutrinos nu_tau}, bar\

  11. Full Monte-Carlo description of the Moscow State University Extensive Air Shower experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Yu A; Karpikov, I S; Kulikov, G V; Kuznetsov, M Yu; Rubtsov, G I; Sulakov, V P; Troitsky, S V

    2016-01-01

    The Moscow State University Extensive Air Shower (EAS-MSU) array studied high-energy cosmic rays with primary energies ~(1-500) PeV in the Northern hemisphere. The EAS-MSU data are being revisited following recently found indications to an excess of muonless showers, which may be interpreted as the first observation of cosmic gamma rays at ~100 PeV. In this paper, we present a complete Monte-Carlo model of the surface detector which results in a good agreement between data and simulations. The model allows us to study the performance of the detector and will be used in further studies of the muon data.

  12. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independent method is used to cross-check that indeed we reach a nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a ''beacon transmitter'' which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA

  13. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independent method is used to cross-check that indeed we reach a nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a ``beacon transmitter'' which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA.

  14. The search for extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the status of the project to detect extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We report on detected anomalous signals and present a toy model to estimate at what altitudes we might expect to see air shower signals. According to this model, a significant number of high altitude horizontal air showers could be observed by radar techniques.

  15. Tunka-Rex: the Cost-Effective Radio Extension of the Tunka Air-Shower Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, F G; Budnev, N M; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Mirgazov, R R; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Savinov, V; Wischnewski, R; Zagorodnikov, A

    2015-01-01

    Tunka-Rex is the radio extension of the Tunka cosmic-ray observatory in Siberia close to Lake Baikal. Since October 2012 Tunka-Rex measures the radio signal of air-showers in coincidence with the non-imaging air-Cherenkov array Tunka-133. Furthermore, this year additional antennas will go into operation triggered by the new scintillator array Tunka-Grande measuring the secondary electrons and muons of air showers. Tunka-Rex is a demonstrator for how economic an antenna array can be without losing significant performance: we have decided for simple and robust SALLA antennas, and we share the existing DAQ running in slave mode with the PMT detectors and the scintillators, respectively. This means that Tunka-Rex is triggered externally, and does not need its own infrastructure and DAQ for hybrid measurements. By this, the performance and the added value of the supplementary radio measurements can be studied, in particular, the precision for the reconstructed energy and the shower maximum in the energy range of a...

  16. Amplified radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in thunderstorms

    CERN Document Server

    Buitink, S; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Y; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Buitink, Stijn

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic ray air showers produce radio emission, consisting in large part of geosynchrotron emission. Since the radiation mechanism is based on particle acceleration, the atmospheric electric field can play an important role. Especially inside thunderclouds large electric fields can be present. We examine the contribution of an electric field to the emission mechanism theoretically and experimentally. Two mechanisms of amplification of radio emission are considered: the acceleration radiation of the shower particles and the radiation from the current that is produced by ionization electrons moving in the electric field. We selected and evaluated LOPES data recorded during thunderstorms, periods of heavy cloudiness and periods of cloudless weather. We find that during thunderstorms the radio emission can be strongly enhanced. No amplified pulses were found during periods of cloudless sky or heavy cloudiness, suggesting that the electric field effect for radio air shower measurements can be safely ignored during ...

  17. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huege, T.; Apel, W.D. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, A.F. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bercuci, A. [Nat. Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Eng., 7690 Bucharest (Romania); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); IEKP, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [Nat. Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Eng., 7690 Bucharest (Romania); Buitink, S. [Dpt. Astrophysics, Radboud Univ., 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57072 Siegen (Germany); Butcher, H. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [IEKP, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-03-15

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  18. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buitink, S; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Hakenjos, A; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Huege, Tim; al, et

    2006-01-01

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. Progress in Air Shower Radio Measurements: Detection of Distant Events

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buitink, S; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D

    2006-01-01

    Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the analysis of correlations of radio signals measured by LOPES-10 with extensive air shower events reconstructed by KASCADE-Grande, including shower cores at large distances. The efficiency of detecting radio signals induced by air showers up to distances of 700 m from the shower axis has been investigated. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the effects of the reconstruction accuracy for shower core and arrival direction on the coherence of the measured radio signal. In addition, the correlations of the radio pulse amplitude with the primary cosmic ray energy and with the lateral distance from the shower core are studied.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Buitink, S; Falcke, H; Heck, D; Kuijpers, J

    2009-01-01

    The development of cosmic ray air showers can be influenced by atmospheric electric fields. Under fair weather conditions these fields are small, but the strong fields inside thunderstorms can have a significant effect on the electromagnetic component of a shower. Understanding this effect is particularly important for radio detection of air showers, since the radio emission is produced by the shower electrons and positrons. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to calculate the effects of different electric field configurations on the shower development. We find that the electric field becomes important for values of the order of 1 kV/cm. Not only can the energy distribution of electrons and positrons change significantly for such field strengths, it is also possible that runaway electron breakdown occurs at high altitudes, which is an important effect in lightning initiation.

  1. Observations of Microwave Continuum Emission from Air Shower Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Varner, G S; Beatty, J J; Connolly, A; Chen, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Miki, C; Konecny, R; Kowalski, J; Ng, J; Power, J G; Reil, K; Saltzberg, D; Stokes, B T; Walz, D

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator) laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) in summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous AWA observations with better precision and made additional measurements relevant to the calorimetric capabilities of the method. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology, and have made measurements indicating possible detection of cosmic ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, cou...

  2. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed which cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge-excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  3. Measurement of Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers with LOPES

    OpenAIRE

    Hoerandel, J. R.; Collaboration, for the LOPES

    2009-01-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance ...

  4. The neutron 'thunder' accompanying the extensive air shower

    OpenAIRE

    Erlykin, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations show that neutrons are the most abundant component among extensive air shower hadrons. However, multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core ('neutron thunder') are mostly not the neutrons of the shower, but have a secondary origin. The bulk of them is produced by high energy EAS hadrons hitting the monitors. The delays are due to the termalization and diffusion of neutrons in the moderator and reflector of the monitor accompanied by the ...

  5. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Muñiz J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  6. No muon excess in extensive air showers at ~10^17 eV primary energy: EAS-MSU muon versus surface detector data

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Yu A; Karpikov, I S; Kulikov, G V; Kuznetsov, M Yu; Rubtsov, G I; Sulakov, V P; Troitsky, S V

    2016-01-01

    Some discrepancies have been reported between observed and simulated muon content of extensive air showers: the number of observed muons exceeded the expectations in HiRes-MIA, Yakutsk and Pierre Auger Observatory data. Here, we analyze the data of the Moscow State University Extensive Air Shower (EAS-MSU) array on E_mu>~10 GeV muons in showers caused by ~10^17 eV primary particles and demonstrate that they agree with simulations (QGSJET-II-04 hadronic interaction model) once the primary composition inferred from the surface-detector data is assumed.

  7. Antennas for the Detection of Radio Emission Pulses from Cosmic-Ray induced Air Showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F M; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Antičić, T; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Bardenet, R; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bäuml, J; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boh\\'{čová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buroker, L; Burton, R E; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Diaz, J Chirinos; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; del Peral, L; del Río, M; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diep, P N; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fratu, O; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Gaior, R; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Roca, S T Garcia; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Bravo, A Gascon; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Gitto, J; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Jiraskova, S; Josebachuili, M; Kadija, K; Kampert, K H; Karhan, P; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kotera, K; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, J K; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lautridou, P; Coz, S Le; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, J; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Martraire, D; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurel, D; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Mertsch, P; Meurer, C; Meyhandan, R; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nhung, P T; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parra, A; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Porcelli, A; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivera, H; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rodriguez, G; Cabo, I Rodriguez; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F; Schulte, S; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Lopez, H H Silva; Sima, O; Śmia\\lkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanic, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Šuša, T; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; Berg, A M van den; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Widom, A; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Wommer, M; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Garcia, B Zamorano; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Zhou, J; Zhu, Y; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M; Charrier, D; Denis, L; Hilgers, G; Mohrmann, L; Philipps, B; Seeger, O

    2012-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is exploring the potential of the radio detection technique to study extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) addresses both technological and scientific aspects of the radio technique. A first phase of AERA has been operating since September 2010 with detector stations observing radio signals at frequencies between 30 and 80 MHz. In this paper we present comparative studies to identify and optimize the antenna design for the final configuration of AERA consisting of 160 individual radio detector stations. The transient nature of the air shower signal requires a detailed description of the antenna sensor. As the ultra-wideband reception of pulses is not widely discussed in antenna literature, we review the relevant antenna characteristics and enhance theoretical considerations towards the impulse response of antennas including polarization effects and multiple signal reflections. On the basis of the vector effective l...

  8. Circular polarization of radio emission from air showers probes atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gia Trinh, Thi Ngoc; Scholten, Olaf; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Horandel, Jörg R.; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Jorg; Rossetto, Laura; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    When a high-energy cosmic-ray particle enters the upper layer of the atmosphere, it generates many secondary high-energy particles and forms a cosmic-ray-induced air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that emit electromagnetic radiation. These radio waves can be detected with LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope. Events have been collected under fair-weather conditions as well as under atmospheric conditions where thunderstorms occur. For the events under the fair weather conditions the emission process is well understood by present models. For the events measured under the thunderstorm conditions, we observe a large fraction of the circular polarization near the core of the shower which is not shown in the events under the fair-weather conditions. This can be explained by the change of direction of the atmospheric electric fields with altitude. Therefore, measuring the circular polarization of radio emission from cosmic ray extensive air showers during the thunderstorm conditions helps to have a better understanding about the structure of atmospheric electric fields in the thunderclouds.

  9. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, Alexander; et al.

    2014-08-08

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  10. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Barber, K B; Bäuml, J; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; de Jong, S J; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L D\\'\\iaz; Diep, P N; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Hasankiadeh, Q Dorosti; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fernandes, M; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fox, B D; Fratu, O; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Fuji, T; Gaior, R; Garc\\'\\ia, B; Roca, S T Garcia; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garilli, G; Bravo, A Gascon; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Islo, K; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Coz, S Le; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agëra, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Malacari, M; Maldera, S; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Mart\\'\\inez; Martraire, D; Meza, J J Mas\\'\\ias; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, A J; Matthews, J; Matthiae, G; Maurel, D; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Meyhandan, R; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Newton, D; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Ochilo, L; Olinto, A; Oliveira, M; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Purrello, V; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Cabo, I Rodriguez; Fernandez, G Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodr\\'\\iguez-Fr\\'\\ias, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Sima, O; kowski, A Śmiał; Šm\\'\\ida, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Thao, N T; Theodoro, V M; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Travnicek, P; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; Berg, A M van den; van Velzen, S; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Whelan, B J; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Zhou, J; Zhu, Y; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M

    2014-01-01

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than $60^\\circ$ detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  11. Receiver system for radio observation of high-energy cosmic ray air showers and its behaviour in self trigger mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of high-energy cosmic rays is carried out by indirect measurements. Thereby the primary cosmic particle enters into the earth's atmosphere and generates a cosmic ray air shower by interactions with the air molecules. The secondary particles arriving at ground level are detected with particle detector arrays. The fluorescence light from the exited nitrogen molecules along the shower axis is observed with reflector telescopes in the near-ultraviolet range. In addition to these well-established detection methods, the radio observation of the geosynchrotron emission from cosmic ray air showers is investigated at present as a new observation method. Geosynchrotron emission is generated by the acceleration of the relativistic electron-positron-pairs contained in the air shower by Lorentz forces in the earth's magnetic field. At ground level this causes a single pulse of the electric field strength with a continuous frequency spectrum ranging from a few MHz to above 100 MHz. In this work, a suitable receiver concept is developed based on the signal properties of the geosynchrotron emission and the analysis of the superposed noise and radio frequency interferences. As the required receiver system was not commercially available, it was designed in the framework of this work and realised as system including the antenna, the receiver electronics and suitable data acquisition equipment. In this concept considerations for a large scale radio detector array have already been taken into account, like low power consumption to enable solar power supply and cost effectiveness. The result is a calibrated, multi-channel, digital wideband receiver for the complete range from 40 MHz to 80 MHz. Its inherent noise and RFI suppression essentially results from the antenna directional characteristic and frequency selectivity and allows effective radio observation of cosmic ray air showers also in populated environment. Several units of this receiver station have been deployed

  12. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerandel, J.R., E-mail: j.horandel@astro.ru.n [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplan etario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-02-21

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES{sup star} and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  13. Transition effect of extensive air showers in thick scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition effect of extensive air showers has been measured by means of the ''Kover'' facility of the Baksan neutrino laboratory. The transition effect represents the ratio of ''scintillation'' particle density detected with detectors and particle density under the facility concrete roof (21 gxcm-2). Measurement results are compared with data obtained by means of the program of electron-photon cascade gaming. Good agreement of experimental and calculational data has been obtained. It follows from the data in the paper that the transition effect for one scintillator in the absence of roof can be produced by the gaming rather reliably

  14. Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence and Cherenkov light emitted by extensive air showers

    OpenAIRE

    Pekala, J.; Homola, P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric scattering of light emitted by an air shower not only attenuates direct fluorescence light from the shower, but also contributes to the observed shower light. So far only direct and singly-scattered Cherenkov photons have been taken into account in routine analyses of the observed optical image of air showers. In this paper a Monte Carlo method of evaluating the contribution of multiply scattered light to the optical air shower image is presented, as well as results of simulations...

  15. Impact of Uncertainties in Hadron Production on Air-Shower Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Pierog, T.; Engel, R.; Heck, D.

    2006-01-01

    At high energy, cosmic rays can only be studied by measuring the extensive air showers they produce in the atmosphere of the Earth. Although the main features of air showers can be understood within a simple model of successive interactions, detailed simulations and a realistic description of particle production are needed to calculate observables relevant to air shower experiments. Currently hadronic interaction models are the main source of uncertainty of such simulations. We will study the...

  16. Impact of Uncertainties in Hadron Production on Air-Shower Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Pierog, T; Heck, D

    2006-01-01

    At high energy, cosmic rays can only be studied by measuring the extensive air showers they produce in the atmosphere of the Earth. Although the main features of air showers can be understood within a simple model of successive interactions, detailed simulations and a realistic description of particle production are needed to calculate observables relevant to air shower experiments. Currently hadronic interaction models are the main source of uncertainty of such simulations. We will study the effect of using different hadronic models available in CORSIKA and CONEX on extensive air shower predictions.

  17. Longitudinal development of extensive air showers: hybrid code SENECA and full Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, J A; De Souza, V; Ortiz, Jeferson A.; Tanco, Gustavo Medina

    2004-01-01

    New experiments, exploring the ultra-high energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum with unprecedented detail, are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air hower modeling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. Some hybrid simulation codes have been proposed recently to this effect (e.g., the combination of the traditional Monte Carlo scheme and system of cascade equations or pre-simulated air showers). In this context, we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tridimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We extensively compare hybrid method with the traditional, but time consuming, full Monte Carlo code CORSIKA which is the de facto standard in the field. The hybrid scheme of the SENECA code is based on the simulation of each particle with the traditional Monte Carlo method at two steps of the shower devel...

  18. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnis, C.

    1994-12-31

    Observations of high-energy gamma rays from astronomical sources have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Gamma rays with energies up to {approximately}10 GeV can be observed directly with space-based instruments. Above 100 GeV the low flux of gamma rays requires one to utilize ground-based instruments. Milagro is a new type of gamma-ray detector based on water Cerenkov technology. This new design will enable to continuously observe the entire overhead sky, and be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above {approximately}250 GeV. These attributes make Milagro an ideal detector for the study of high-energy transient phenomenon.

  19. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60 deg. and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions we define X(mu)max as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of X(mu)max as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

  20. Light Transmission Fluctuations from Extended Air Showers Produced by Cosmic-Rays and Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart

    Cosmic-ray and gamma-ray experiments that use the atmosphere as a calorimeter, such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and the Telescope Array (TA), require understanding the transmission of the light from the air shower of particles produced by the cosmic-ray or gamma-ray striking the atmosphere. To better understand the scattering and transmission of light to the detectors, HiRes measures light from different calibrated sources. We compare scattered light from laser shots a few kilometers away from the two HiRes detectors with direct light from stable portable light sources placed a few meters in front of the phototubes. We use two HiRes detectors to study and isolate contributions to fluctuations of the measured light. These contributions include fluctuations in the source intensity, the night sky background, scattering and transmission of the laser beam, the phototubes and electronics, and photostatistics. N o rth Mirror Fields of View

  1. Macroscopic treatment of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers based on shower simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Klaus; Scholten, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We can clearly relate the time signal to the time depende

  2. A macroscopic description of coherent geo-magnetic radiation from cosmic-ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Rusydi, F.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electromagnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays due to the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers it simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower a

  3. A realistic treatment of geomagnetic Cherenkov radiation from cosmic ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Klaus; de Vries, Krijn D.; Scholten, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We discuss the importance of a correct

  4. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Schellart; al et; J.W.T. Hessels; J. Swinbank; M.W. Wise

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmosp

  5. Probing atmospheric electric fields in thunderstorms through radio emission from cosmic-ray induced air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, P.; Trinh, T.N.G.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E; Falcke, H.; Bentum, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunder storms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmos

  6. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    CERN Document Server

    Cazon, L

    2013-01-01

    Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  7. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazon L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  8. Lateral density and arrival time distributions of Cherenkov photons in extensive air showers: a simulation study

    CERN Document Server

    Hazarika, P; Chitnis, V R; Acharya, B S; Das, G S; Singh, B B; Britto, R

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated some features of the density and arrival time distributions of Cherenkov photons in extensive air showers using different high and low energy hadronic interaction models available in the CORSIKA simulation package. We have found that, for all primary particles, their energies and hadronic interaction model combinations, the density distribution patterns of Cherenkov photons follow the negative exponential function with different coefficients and slopes depending on the type of primary particle, its energy and the type of model combination. Whereas the arrival time distribution patterns of Cherenkov photons follow the function of the form $t (r) = t_{0}e^{\\Gamma/r^{\\lambda}}$, with different values of the function parameters. Flatness of the density distribution increases with decreasing energy and increasing mass of the primary particle. The shift from the spherical shape of the arrival time distribution near the shower core increases with increasing mass of the low energy primary particl...

  9. The "Horizon-T" Experiment: Extensive Air Showers Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Beisembaev, R U; Dalkarov, O D; Ryabov, V A; Stepanov, A V; Vildanov, N G; Vildanova, M I; Zhukov, V V; Baigarin, K A; Beznosko, D; Sadykov, T X; Suleymenov, N S

    2016-01-01

    Horizon-T is an innovative detector system constructed to study Extensive Air Showers (EAS) in the energy range above 10^16 eV coming from a wide range of zenith angles (0 - 85 degrees). The system is located at Tien Shan high-altitude Science Station of Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences at approximately 3340 meters above the sea level. It consists of eight charged particle detection points separated by the distance up to one kilometer as well as optical detector subsystem to view the Vavilov-Cerenkov light from the EAS. The time resolution of charged particles and Vavilov-Cerenkov light photons passage of the detector system is a few ns. This level of resolution allows conducting research of atmospheric development of individual EAS.

  10. A new radiograpic method using electromagnetic component of air shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, A.; Okubo, S.; Tanaka, H.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel radiographic method to measure the density length with electromagnetic component of air shower. Air shower produced by a primary cosmic ray consists of muon component and electromagnetic component. Electromagnetic component is consists of electron, positron and photon. The penetration power of electromagnetic component is weaker than that of muon, so soft component is suitable for small scale structure thinner than 2 kg/cm^2 equivalent to 20m thick water, like buildings and small hills. But it requires particle identification which means distinguishing muon and electromagnetic component. Particle identification can be done with strong magnets and dense detectors, but it is very hard to use that kind of detector for radiography because of their weight and cost. We established the cheap and effective method to distinguish soft component and hard component statistically. We also performed measurements in Arimura observation vault of Mt. Sakurajima, Japan. As a result of this observation, we found there is an anti-correlation between soft component flux and rainfall. If the water content of the soil became larger, the amount of absorption increases. So this result can be interpreted as detecting the increase of the water content by soft component flux. This method can be applied for the quantitive compensation of the measurement data like absolute gravitymeter data and tiltmeter data which is easy to receive turbulence by rain. It is also expected that the quantitive compensation leads to the improvement in accuracy of diastrophism measurement and the improvement in presumed accuracy of magma movement inside a volcano.

  11. Air shower simulation for WASAVIES: warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Kataoka, R; Yasuda, H; Yashiro, S; Kuwabara, T; Shiota, D; Kubo, Y

    2014-10-01

    WASAVIES, a warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles (SEPs), is under development by collaboration between several institutes in Japan and the USA. It is designed to deterministically forecast the SEP fluxes incident on the atmosphere within 6 h after flare onset using the latest space weather research. To immediately estimate the aircrew doses from the obtained SEP fluxes, the response functions of the particle fluxes generated by the incidence of monoenergetic protons into the atmosphere were developed by performing air shower simulations using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system. The accuracy of the simulation was well verified by calculating the increase count rates of a neutron monitor during a ground-level enhancement, combining the response function with the SEP fluxes measured by the PAMELA spectrometer. The response function will be implemented in WASAVIES and used to protect aircrews from additional SEP exposure.

  12. Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence and Cherenkov light emitted by extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Pekala, J; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; 10.1016/j.nima.2009.03.244

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric scattering of light emitted by an air shower not only attenuates direct fluorescence light from the shower, but also contributes to the observed shower light. So far only direct and singly-scattered Cherenkov photons have been taken into account in routine analyses of the observed optical image of air showers. In this paper a Monte Carlo method of evaluating the contribution of multiply scattered light to the optical air shower image is presented, as well as results of simulations and a parameterization of scattered light contribution to measured shower signal.

  13. Latest Results from the Air Shower Simulation Programs CORSIKA and CONEX

    CERN Document Server

    Pierog, T; Heck, D; Ostapchenko, S; Werner, K

    2008-01-01

    Interpretation of EAS measurements strongly depends on detailed air shower simulations. The uncertainty in the prediction of shower observables for different primary particles and energies is currently dominated by differences between hadronic interaction models. The new models QGSJETII-3 and EPOS 1.6, which reproduce all major results of existing accelerator data (including detailed data of RHIC experiments for EPOS), have been implemented in the air shower simulation programs CORSIKA and CONEX. We show predictions of these new models and compare them with those from older models such as QGSJET01 or SIBYLL. Results for important air shower observables are discussed in detail.

  14. A Neutron Burst Associated with an Extensive Air Shower?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mauro; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Gusev, Anatoly; De Abreu, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    A portable and compact system based on a He-3 tube (LND, USA; model 25311) with an area of approximately 250 cm² and is used to record neutron count rates at ground level in the energy range of 0.025 eV to 10 MeV, in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil (23° 12' 45" S, 45° 52' 00" W; altitude, 660m). The detector, power supply, digitizer and other hardware are housed in an air-conditioned room. The detector power supply and digitizer are not connected to the main electricity network; a high-capacity 12-V battery is used to power the detector and digitizer. Neutron counts are accumulated at 1-minute intervals continuously. The data are stored in a PC for further analysis. In February 8, 2015, at 12 h 22 min (local time) during a period of fair weather with minimal cloud cover (< 1 okta) the neutron detector recorded a sharp (count rate = 27 neutrons/min) and brief (< 1 min) increase in the count rate. In the days before and after this event, the neutron count rate has oscillated between 0 and 3 neutrons/min. Since the occurrence of this event is not related with spurious signals, malfunctioning equipment, oscillations in the mains voltage, etc. we are led to believe that the sharp increase was caused by a physical source such as a an extensive air shower that occurred over the detector.

  15. The neutron 'thunder' accompanying the extensive air shower

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, A D

    2007-01-01

    Simulations show that neutrons are the most abundant component among extensive air shower hadrons. However, multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core ('neutron thunder') are mostly not the neutrons of the shower, but have a secondary origin. The bulk of them is produced by high energy EAS hadrons hitting the monitors. The delays are due to the termalization and diffusion of neutrons in the moderator and reflector of the monitor accompanied by the production of secondary gamma-quanta. This conclusion raises the important problem of the interaction of EAS with the ground, the stuff of the detectors and their environment since they have often hydrogen containing materials like polyethilene in neutron monitors. Such interaction can give an additional contribution to the signal in the EAS detectors. It can be particularly important for the signals from scintillator or water tank detectors at km-long distances from the EAS core where neutrons of the shower become the do...

  16. The neutron 'thunder' accompanying the extensive air shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlykin, A. D.

    2007-03-01

    Simulations show that neutrons are the most abundant component among extensive air shower (EAS) hadrons. However, multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core (neutron thunder) are mostly not the neutrons of the shower, but have a secondary origin. The bulk of them is produced by high energy EAS hadrons hitting the monitors. The delays are due to the thermalization and diffusion of neutrons in the moderator and reflector of the monitor accompanied by the production of secondary gamma quanta. This conclusion raises the important problem of the interaction of EAS with the ground, the stuff of the detectors and their environment since they have often hydrogen-containing materials like polyethilene in neutron monitors. Such interaction can give an additional contribution to the signal in the EAS detectors. It can be particularly important for the signals from scintillator or water tank detectors at kilometre-long distances from the EAS core, where neutrons of the shower become the dominant component after a few microseconds behind the EAS front.

  17. Extensive air showers, lightning, and thunderstorm ground enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, A.; Hovsepyan, G.; Kozliner, L.

    2016-09-01

    For lightning research, we monitor particle fluxes from thunderclouds, the so-called thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs) initiated by runaway electrons, and extensive air showers (EASs) originating from high-energy protons or fully stripped nuclei that enter the Earth's atmosphere. We also monitor the near-surface electric field and atmospheric discharges using a network of electric field mills. The Aragats "electron accelerator" produced several TGEs and lightning events in the spring of 2015. Using 1-s time series, we investigated the relationship between lightning and particle fluxes. Lightning flashes often terminated the particle flux; in particular, during some TGEs, lightning events would terminate the particle flux thrice after successive recovery. It was postulated that a lightning terminates a particle flux mostly in the beginning of a TGE or in its decay phase; however, we observed two events (19 October 2013 and 20 April 2015) when the huge particle flux was terminated just at the peak of its development. We discuss the possibility of a huge EAS facilitating lightning leader to find its path to the ground.

  18. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density, affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ~10% seasonal modulation and ~2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of pressure and density. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Moliere radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Bérat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; DiGiulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; GarcíaGámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kühn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; LaRosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmia\\lkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcuau, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; vandenBerg, A M; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the composition of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory, including examination of hadronic physics effects on the structure of extensive air showers. Submissions to the 31st ICRC, Lodz, Poland (July 2009).

  20. Artificial Neural Network as a FPGA Trigger for a Detection of Very Inclined Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    The observation of ultra-high energy neutrinos has become a priority in experimental astroparticle physics. Neutrinos can interact in the atmosphere (downward-going) or in the Earth crust (Earth-skimming), producing air showers that can be observed with arrays of detectors at the ground. The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory can detect these types of cascades. The distinguishing signature for neutrino events is the presence of very inclined showers produced close to the ground (i.e., after having traversed a large amount of atmosphere). Up to now, the Pierre Auger Observatory did not find any candidate on a neutrino event. This imposes competitive limits to the diffuse flux of neutrinos. A very low rate of events potentially generated by neutrinos is a significant challenge for a detection technique and requires both sophisticated algorithms and high-resolution hardware. We present a trigger based on a pipeline artificial neural network implemented in a large FPGA which after learning can...

  1. Prospects for a radio air-shower detector at South Pole

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    IceCube is currently not only the largest neutrino telescope but also one of the world's most competitive instruments for studying cosmic rays in the PeV to EeV regime where the transition from galactic to extra-galactic sources should occur. Further augmenting this observatory with an array of radio sensors in the 10-100 MHz regime will additionally permit observation of the geomagnetic radio emission from the air shower. Yielding complementary information on the shower development a triple-technology array consisting of radio sensors, the ground sampling stations of IceTop and the in-ice optical modules of IceCube, should significantly improve the understanding of cosmic rays, as well as enhance many aspects of the physics reach of the observatory. Here we present first results from two exploratory setups deployed at the South Pole. Noise measurements from data taken in two consecutive seasons show a very good agreement of the predicted and observed response of the antennas designed specifically for this pu...

  2. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Awal, N; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blanco, M; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Brogueira, P; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Hasankiadeh, Q Dorosti; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Eser, J; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; García, B; García-Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Golup, G; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Hervé, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A W Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Lang, A; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Coz, S Le; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Louedec, K; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Martraire, D; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meissner, R; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrov, Y; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Gomez, J D Sanabria; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Durán, M Suarez; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tepe, A; Theodoro, V M; Tibolla, O; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; Berg, A M van den; van Velzen, S; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vasquez, R; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yapici, T; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zuccarello, F

    2015-01-01

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independent method used for cross-checks that indeed we reach nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a "beacon transmitter" which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the posit...

  3. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62{\\deg} and 80{\\deg}. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A $10^{19}$ eV shower with a zenith angle of 67{\\deg}, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average $(2.68 \\pm 0.04 \\pm 0.48\\,(\\mathrm{sys.})) \\times 10^{7}$ muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. The logarithmic gain $\\text{d}\\ln{N_\\mu} / \\text{d}\\ln{E}$ of muons with increasing energy between $4 \\times 10^{18}$ eV and $5\\times 10^{19}$ eV is measured to be $(1.029\\, \\pm\\, 0.024\\, \\pm 0.030\\,(\\mathrm{sys.}))$.

  4. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Schellart, P; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  5. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields. PMID:25955053

  6. A Realistic Treatment of Geomagnetic Cherenkov Radiation from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Klaus; de Vries, Krijn D.; Scholten, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We discuss the importance of a correct treatment of the index of refraction in air, given by the law of Gladstone and Dale, which affects the pulses enormously for certain configurations, compared to a simplified treatment using a const...

  7. Radio measurements of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air showers by Tunka-Rex

    CERN Document Server

    Bezyazeekov, P A; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Schröder, F G

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the energy and the position of the shower maximum of air showers with energies $E \\gtrsim 100\\,$PeV using radio measurements performed with Tunka-Rex. A comparison to air-Cherenkov measurements of the same air showers with the Tunka-133 photomultiplier array confirms that the radio reconstruction works reliably. Splitting our data set into two seasons, we had blinded the Tunka-133 reconstruction for the second season, which we used as later, independent cross-check of the methods developed for the first season. This gives additional confidence in the radio reconstruction. An event-to-event comparison of Tunka-Rex and Tunka-133 shows that both experiments yield consistent values for energy and $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$. The energy precision of Tunka-Rex is comparable to the Tunka-133 precision of $15\\,\\%$, and comes with a $20\\,\\%$ uncertainty on the absolute scale dominated by the amplitude calibration of the antennas. For $X_{\\mathrm{max}}$, this is the first direct experimental correlation of radi...

  8. Measuring the radio emission of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.G., E-mail: Frank.Schroeder@kit.ed [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Asch, T. [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Baehren, L. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2010-05-21

    When ultra high energy cosmic rays hit the atmosphere, they produce a shower of millions of secondary particles. Thereby the charged particles in the shower emit a radio pulse whilst deflected in the Earth's magnetic field. LOPES is a digital antenna array measuring these radio pulses in the frequency range from 40 to 80 MHz. It is located at the site of and triggered by the air shower experiment KASCADE-Grande at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany. In its present configuration, it consists of 15 east-west-polarized and 15 north-south-polarized, absolutely calibrated short dipole antennas, as well as 10 LPDAs (with two channels each). Furthermore, it serves as a test bench for technological developments, like new antenna types or a radio-based self-triggering (LOPES{sup STAR}). To achieve a good angular reconstruction and to digitally form a beam into the arrival direction of the shower, it has a precise time calibration.

  9. The wavefront of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing measurements of the LOPES antenna array together with corresponding CoREAS simulations for more than 300 measured events with energy above $10^{17}$eV and zenith angles smaller than $45^\\circ$, we find that the radio wavefront of cosmic-ray air showers is of hyperbolic shape. At axis distances $\\gtrsim 50$m, the wavefront can be approximated by a simple cone. According to the simulations, the cone angle is clearly correlated with the shower maximum. Thus, we confirm earlier predictions that arrival time measurements can be used to study the longitudinal shower development, but now using a realistic wavefront. Moreover, we show that the hyperbolic wavefront is compatible with our measurement, and we present several experimental indications that the cone angle is indeed sensitive to the shower development. Consequently, the wavefront can be used to statistically study the primary composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. At LOPES, the experimentally achieved precision for the shower maximum is lim...

  10. The current status of the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Antia, H. M.; Dugad, S. R.; Goswami, U. D.; Hayashi, Y.; Iyer, A.; Ito, N.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Kawakami, S.; Minamino, M.; Mohanty, P. K.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Nonaka, T.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Ravindran, K. C.; Tanaka, H.; Tonwar, S. C.; Grapes-3 Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The GRAPES-3 is a dense extensive air shower array operating with ˜400 scintillator detectors and it also contains a 560 m 2 tracking muon detector ( E>1 GeV), at Ooty in India. 25% of scintillator detectors are instrumented with two fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for extending the dynamic range to ˜5×10 particles m -2 . The scintillators, signal processing electronics and data recording systems were fabricated in-house to cut costs and optimize performance. The muon multiplicity distribution of the EAS is used to probe the composition of primary cosmic rays below the 'knee', with an overlap with direct measurements. Search for multi-TeV γ-rays from point sources is done with the aid of the muon detector. A good angular resolution of 0.7° at 30 TeV, is measured from the shadow of the Moon on the isotropic flux of cosmic rays. A sensitive limit on the diffuse flux of 100 TeV γ-rays is placed by using muon detector to filter the charged cosmic ray background. A tracking muon detector allows sensitive measurements on coronal mass ejections and solar flares through Forbush decrease events. We have major expansion plans to enhance the sensitivity of the GRAPES-3 experiment in the areas listed above.

  11. The current status of the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S.K.; Antia, H.M.; Dugad, S.R.; Goswami, U.D. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Hayashi, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Iyer, A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Ito, N. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Karthikeyan, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Kawakami, S.; Minamino, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Mohanty, P.K.; Morris, S.D.; Nayak, P.K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Nonaka, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Oshima, A.; Rao, B.S.; Ravindran, K.C.; Tanaka, H. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2009-12-15

    The GRAPES-3 is a dense extensive air shower array operating with approx400 scintillator detectors and it also contains a 560 m{sup 2} tracking muon detector (E{sub m}u>1GeV), at Ooty in India. 25% of scintillator detectors are instrumented with two fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for extending the dynamic range to approx5x10{sup 3} particles m{sup -2}. The scintillators, signal processing electronics and data recording systems were fabricated in-house to cut costs and optimize performance. The muon multiplicity distribution of the EAS is used to probe the composition of primary cosmic rays below the 'knee', with an overlap with direct measurements. Search for multi-TeV gamma-rays from point sources is done with the aid of the muon detector. A good angular resolution of 0.7 deg. at 30 TeV, is measured from the shadow of the Moon on the isotropic flux of cosmic rays. A sensitive limit on the diffuse flux of 100 TeV gamma-rays is placed by using muon detector to filter the charged cosmic ray background. A tracking muon detector allows sensitive measurements on coronal mass ejections and solar flares through Forbush decrease events. We have major expansion plans to enhance the sensitivity of the GRAPES-3 experiment in the areas listed above.

  12. Light Transmission From Extended Air Showers Produced By Cosmic-Rays and Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. F.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Belov, K.; Cao, Z.; Chen, G.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kieda, D. B.; Matthews, J. N.; Salamon, M.; Sokolsky, P. V.; Smith, J. D.; Sommers, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Thomas, S. B.; Wiencke, L. R.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Clay, R. W.; Dawson, B. R.; Simpson, K.; Bells, J.; Boyer, J.; Knapp, B.; Song, B. H.; Zhang, X. Z.; SDSS Collaboration; High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration; Telescope Array/U. Tokyo Collaboration

    1999-05-01

    Cosmic-ray and gamma-ray experiments that use the atmosphere as a calorimeter, such as the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and the Telescope Array (TA), require understanding the transmission of the light from the air shower of particles produced by the cosmic-ray or gamma-ray striking the atmosphere. To better understand the scattering and transmission of light to the detectors, HiRes measures light from different calibrated sources. We compare scattered light from laser shots a few kilometers away from the two HiRes detectors, with direct light from stable portable light sources placed a few meters in front of the phototubes. We use two HiRes detectors to study and isolate contributions to fluctuations of the measured light. These contributions include fluctuations in the source intensity, the night sky background, scattering and transmission of the laser beam, the phototubes and electronics, and photostatistics. The High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration gratefully acknowledges the support of the US National Science Foundation, DOE, the US Army's Dugway Proving Grounds, and the support of our member universities.

  13. Simulation of radio emission from cosmic ray air shower with SELFAS2

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We present a microscopic computation of the radio emission from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the atmosphere. The strategy adopted is to compute each secondary particle contribution of the electromagnetic component and to construct the total signal at any location. SELFAS2 is a code which doesn't rely on air shower generators like AIRES or CORSIKA and it is based on the concept of air shower universality which makes it completely autonomous. Each positron and electron of the air shower is generated randomly following relevant distributions and tracking them along their travel in the atmosphere. We confirm in this paper earlier results that the radio emission is mainly due to the time derivative of the transverse current and the time derivative of the charge excess. The time derivative of the transverse current created by systematic deviations of charges in the geomagnetic field is usually dominant compared to the charge excess contribution except for the case of an air shower paral...

  14. Extensive Air Showers and Cosmic Ray Physics above 1017 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaina, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic Rays above 1017 eV allow studying hadronic interactions at energies that can not be attained at accelerators yet. At the same time hadronic interaction models have to be applied to the cosmic-ray induced air-shower cascades in atmosphere to infer the nature of cosmic rays. The reliability of air-shower simulations has become the source of one of the largest systematic uncertainty in the interpretation of cosmic-ray data due to the uncertainties in modeling the hadronic interaction driving the air-shower development. This paper summarises in the first part the recent results on the cosmic ray energy spectrum, composition and anisotropy from the knee region to the GZK cutoff [1, 2] of the spectrum by means of ground-based experiments. Most of the information reported in this contribution is taken from [3-5]. Aspects interconnecting cosmic ray and particle physics are reviewed in the second part of the paper.

  15. SELFAS2 : radio emission from cosmic ray air showers. Effect of realistic air refractive index

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Using the simulation code SELFAS2, we present predictions of the radio signal emitted by extensive air showers (EAS) during their development in the atmosphere. The radio emission in the MHz range coming from air showers is the superposition of two mechanisms: the variation of the transverse current due to the systematic opposite drift of electrons and positrons in the Earth's magnetic field and the variation of the charge excess due to the electrons in excess in the shower front. In this paper, we stress particularly the effect of the realistic air refractive index on the radio signal predicted by SELFAS2.

  16. Investigating of longitudinal development parameters through air shower simulation by different hadronic models

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Al-Rubaiee A

    2013-01-01

    In this work the simulation of the Extensive Air Showers was performed by investigating the longitudinal development parameters (N and Xmax) by using a system for air shower simulation which is called AIRES version 2.6.0 at the energy range (10^14-10^19 eV) for different primary particles like (gamma, electron, positron, proton and iron nuclei) and different zenith angles. The comparison of simulated longitudinal profile was fulfilled for different hadronic models (SIBYLL, QGSJET99 and SIBYLL S16).

  17. Influence of atmospheric electric fields on the radio emission from extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, T. N. G.; Scholten, O.; Buitink, S.; van den Berg, A. M.; Corstanje, A.; Ebert, U.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Köhn, C.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds have been shown to significantly modify the intensity and polarization patterns of the radio footprint of cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers. Simulations indicated a very nonlinear dependence of the signal strength in the frequency window of 30-80 MHz on the magnitude of the atmospheric electric field. In this work we present an explanation of this dependence based on Monte Carlo simulations, supported by arguments based on electron dynamics in air showers and expressed in terms of a simplified model. We show that by extending the frequency window to lower frequencies, additional sensitivity to the atmospheric electric field is obtained.

  18. Influence of Atmospheric Electric Fields on the Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Berg, A M van den; Corstanje, A; Ebert, U; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Köhn, C; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Rutjes, C; Schellart, P; Thoudam, S; ter Veen, S; de Vries, K D

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds have been shown to significantly modify the intensity and polarization patterns of the radio footprint of cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers. Simulations indicated a very non-linear dependence of the signal strength in the frequency window of 30-80 MHz on the magnitude of the atmospheric electric field. In this work we present an explanation of this dependence based on Monte-Carlo simulations, supported by arguments based on electron dynamics in air showers and expressed in terms of a simplified model. We show that by extending the frequency window to lower frequencies additional sensitivity to the atmospheric electric field is obtained.

  19. Energy Spectrum and Chemical Composition of Cosmic Rays between 0.3 and 10 PeV determined from the Cherenkov-Light and Charged-Particle distributions in Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Arqueros, F

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of the lateral distribution of Cherenkov photons with the wide-angle atmospheric Cherenkov light detector array AIROBICC and of the charged particle lateral distribution with the scintillator matrix of the HEGRA air-shower detector complex in air showers are reported. With the atmospheric shower-front sampling technique these detectors measure the electromagnetic component of an extensive air shower via the lateral density distribution of the shower particles and of the Cherenkov photons. The data are compared with events generated with the CORSIKA program package with the QGSJET hadronic-event generator. Consistency checks performed with primary energy-reconstruction methods based on different shower observables indicate satisfactory agreement between these extensive air shower simulations and the experimental data. The energy spectrum features a so called ``knee'' at an energy of E_knee = 3.98 (+4.66) (-0.83) (stat) +- 0.53 (syst) PeV. Power law fits to the differential energy spectrum yield in...

  20. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  1. Influence of atmospheric electric fields on the radio emission from extensive air showers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, T. N. G.; Scholten, O.; Buitink, S.;

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds have been shown to significantly modify the intensity and polarization patterns of the radio footprint of cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers. Simulations indicated a very nonlinear dependence of the signal strength in the frequency window of ...

  2. Prospects for radar detection of cosmic ray air showers with medium-frequency radio waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the highly relativistic motion of an extensive air shower allows one to increase the wavelength of the radar signal above its transverse size without giving rise to signal scattering. This increases the efficiency of detection due to an increase in the reflection from the shower and a lower level of sky noise in the frequency range of the reflected signal. (paper)

  3. The EHISTORY option of the air-shower simulation program CORSIKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, D.; Engel, R.

    2009-07-01

    This report describes the EHISTORY option, which gives additional information for all muons arriving at the detector level on their precursors, the grandmother and mother particles. These may help to improve the understanding of the production and propagation of muons in air showers. (orig.)

  4. Radio emission from cosmic ray air showers : simulation results and parametrization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huege, T.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a sophisticated model of the radio emission from extensive air showers in the scheme of coherent geosynchrotron radiation, providing a theoretical foundation for the interpretation of experimental data from current and future experiments. Having verified the model through compariso

  5. The shape of the radio wavefront of extensive air showers as measured with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Corstanje, A; Nelles, A; Buitink, S; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Hörandel, J R; Krause, M; Rachen, J P; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, G; Akker, M van den; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kohler, J; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Munk, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2014-01-01

    Extensive air showers, induced by high energy cosmic rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere, produce radio emission that is measured with the LOFAR radio telescope. As the emission comes from a finite distance of a few kilometers, the incident wavefront is non-planar. A spherical or conical shape of the wavefront has been proposed, but measurements of individual air showers have been inconclusive so far. For a selected high-quality sample of 161 measured extensive air showers, we have reconstructed the wavefront by measuring pulse arrival times to sub-nanosecond accuracy in 200 to 350 individual antennas. For each measured air shower, we have fitted a conical, spherical, and hyperboloid shape to the arrival times. The fit quality and a likelihood analysis show that a hyperboloid is the best parametrization. Using a non-planar wavefront shape gives an improved angular resolution, when reconstructing the shower arrival direction. Furthermore, a dependence of the wavefront shape on the shower geometry can be s...

  6. Measurement of the depth of maximum of extensive air showers above 1018eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K.D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2010-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, Xmax⁡, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 1018eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selec

  7. Influence of atmospheric electric fields on the radio emission from extensive air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trinh, T. N. G.; Scholten, O.; Buitink, S.; van den Berg, A. M.; Corstanje, A.; Ebert, U.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Horandel, J. R.; Kohn, C.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds have been shown to significantly modify the intensity and polarization patterns of the radio footprint of cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers. Simulations indicated a very nonlinear dependence of the signal strength in the frequency window of 30-

  8. The air shower maximum probed by Cherenkov effects from radio emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Krijn D.; Scholten, Olaf; Werner, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Radio detection of cosmic-ray-induced air showers has come to a flight the last decade. Along with the experimental efforts, several theoretical models were developed. The main radio-emission mechanisms are established to be the geomagnetic emission due to deflection of electrons and positrons in Ea

  9. Interpretation of the depths of maximum of extensive air showers measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K.H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S.H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R.M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Kotera, K.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulz, J.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2013-01-01

    To interpret the mean depth of cosmic ray air shower maximum and its dispersion, we parametrize those two observables as functions of the first two moments of the ln A distribution. We examine the goodness of this simple method through simulations of test mass distributions. The application of the p

  10. Radio emission from Air Showers. Comparison of theoretical approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Belov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    While the fluorescence and the ground counter techniques for the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) were being developed for decades, the interest in the radio detection diminished after the initial experiments in the 1960s. As a result, the fluorescence and the surface array techniques are more mature today, providing more reliable measurements of the primary cosmic particle energy, chemical composition and the inelastic cross-section. The advantages of the radio technique are 100 percent duty cycle and lower deployment and operational costs. Thus, the radio technique can greatly complement the fluorescence and the ground array detection and can also work independently. With the ANITA balloon detector observing UHECRs and the success of LOPES, CODALEMA and other surface radio detectors, the radio technique received a significant boost in recent years. Reliable Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are needed in order to obtain the energy and other parameters of the primary cosmic ray particle from the...

  11. Detection of Cherenkov light from air showers with Geiger-APDs

    CERN Document Server

    Otte, A N; Biland, A; Göbel, F; Lorenz, E; Pauss, F; Renker, D; Röser, U; Schweizer, T

    2007-01-01

    We have detected Cherenkov light from air showers with Geiger-mode APDs (G-APDs). G-APDs are novel semiconductor photon-detectors, which offer several advantages compared to conventional photomultiplier tubes in the field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. In a field test with the MAGIC telescope we have tested the efficiency of a G-APD / light catcher setup to detect Cherenkov light from air showers. We estimate a detection efficiency, which is 60% higher than the efficiency of a MAGIC camera pixel. Ambient temperature dark count rates of the tested G-APDs are below the rates of the night sky light background. According to these recent tests G-APDs promise a major progress in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.

  12. Measurement of the circular polarization in radio emission from extensive air showers confirms emission mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Scholten, O; Bonardi, A; Buitink, S; Correa, P; Corstanje, A; Hasankiadeh, Q Dorosti; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Mitra, P; Mulrey, K; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Schellart, P; Thoudam, S; ter Veen, S; de Vries, K D; Winchen, T

    2016-01-01

    We report here on a novel analysis of the complete set of four Stokes parameters that uniquely determine the linear and/or circular polarization of the radio signal for an extensive air shower. The observed dependency of the circular polarization on azimuth angle and distance to the shower axis is a clear signature of the interfering contributions from two different radiation mechanisms, a main contribution due to a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and a secondary component due to the build-up of excess charge at the shower front. The data, as measured at LOFAR, agree very well with a calculation from first principles. This opens the possibility to use circular polarization as an investigative tool in the analysis of air shower structure, such as for the determination of atmospheric electric fields.

  13. Radio emission in air showers measured by LOPES-10 in concidence with KASCADE-Grande observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, A.F.; Apel, W.D.; Asch, T. (and others)

    2006-05-15

    Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the analysis of correlations of radio signals measured by LOPES-10 with extensive air shower events reconstructed by KASCADE-Grande, including shower cores at large distances. The efficiency of detecting radio signals induced by air showers up to distances of 700m from the shower axis has been investigated. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the effects of the reconstruction accuracy for shower core and arrival direction on the coherence of the measured radio signal. In addition, the correlations of the radio pulse amplitude with the primary cosmic ray energy and with the lateral distance from the shower core are studied. (Orig.)

  14. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Atmospheric Profiles at the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their Relevance to Air Shower Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Keilhauer, B; Engel, R; Gora, D; Homola, P; Klages, H; Pekala, J; Risse, M; Unger, M; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focussing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

  16. Atmospheric profiles at the southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their relevance to air shower measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bluemer, J.; Engel, R.; Gora, D.; Homola, P.; Klages, H.; Pekala, J.; Risse, M.; Unger, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2005-07-01

    The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focusing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

  17. Enhancement of the radar signal of air showers due to time compression

    CERN Document Server

    Stasielak, J; Engel, R; Neunteufel, P; Pekala, J; Šm\\'\\ida, R; Werner, F; Wilczyński, H

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique at viewing angles smaller than $\\sim 25^\\circ$ to the shower axis. Considering a bistatic radar setup and shower geometries in which the receiver points into the arriving shower, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the short-lived plasma produced by the high-energy shower particles in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for scattering of radio waves and summing coherently contributions of the reflected radio wave over the volume of the plasma disk, we obtain the time evolution of the signal. We analyze the spectral power density of the radar echo and the received power. Based on the obtained results, we discuss possible modes of the radar detection of extensive air showers.

  18. Simulation of air shower image in fluorescence light based on energy deposits derived from CORSIKA

    OpenAIRE

    Gora, D.; Heck, D.; Homola, P.; Klages, H.; Pekala, J.; Risse, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2004-01-01

    Spatial distributions of energy deposited by an extensive air shower in the atmosphere through ionization, as obtained from the CORSIKA simulation program, are used to find the fluorescence light distribution in the optical image of the shower. The shower image derived in this way is somewhat smaller than that obtained from the NKG lateral distribution of particles in the shower. The size of the image shows a small dependence on the primary particle type.

  19. Photon air showers at ultra-high energy and the photonuclear cross-section

    OpenAIRE

    Risse, M.; Homola, P.; Engel, R.; Gora, D.; Heck, D.; Pekala, J.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental conclusions from air shower observations on cosmic-ray photons above 10^19 eV are based on the comparison to detailed shower simulations. For the calculations, the photonuclear cross-section needs to be extrapolated over several orders of magnitude in energy. The uncertainty from the cross-section extrapolation translates into an uncertainty of the predicted shower features for primary photons and, thus, into uncertainties for a possible data interpretation. After briefly reviewi...

  20. Primary Particle Type of the Most Energetic Fly's Eye Air Shower

    OpenAIRE

    Risse, M.; Homola, P.; Gora, D.; Pekala, J.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2004-01-01

    The longitudinal profile of the most energetic cosmic-ray air shower measured so far, the event recorded by the Fly's Eye detector with a reconstructed primary energy of about 320 EeV, is compared to simulated shower profiles. The calculations are performed with the CORSIKA code and include primary photons and different hadron primaries. For primary photons, preshower formation in the geomagnetic field is additionally treated in detail. For primary hadrons, the hadronic interaction models QGS...

  1. Constraints on hadronic models in extensive air showers with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Extensive air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays are sensitive to the details of hadronic interactions models, so we present the main results obtained using the data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The depth at which the maximum of the electromagnetic development takes place is the most sensitive parameter to infer the nature of the cosmic rays. However, the hadronic models cannot describe consistently the maximum and the muon measurements at energies higher than those reached at the LHC.

  2. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers in the digital era

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T

    2016-01-01

    In 1965 it was discovered that cosmic ray air showers emit impulsive radio signals at frequencies below 100 MHz. After a period of intense research in the 1960s and 1970s, however, interest in the detection technique faded almost completely. With the availability of powerful digital signal processing techniques, new attempts at measuring cosmic ray air showers via their radio emission were started at the beginning of the new millennium. Starting with modest, small-scale digital prototype setups, the field has evolved, matured and grown very significantly in the past decade. Today's second-generation digital radio detection experiments consist of up to hundreds of radio antennas or cover areas of up to 17 km$^{2}$. We understand the physics of the radio emission in extensive air showers in detail and have developed analysis strategies to accurately derive from radio signals parameters which are related to the astrophysics of the primary cosmic ray particles, in particular their energy, arrival direction and es...

  3. Extensive Air Showers and Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Rays: A Historical Review

    CERN Document Server

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of extensive air showers by Rossi, Schmeiser, Bothe, Kolh\\"orster and Auger at the end of the 1930s, facilitated by the coincidence technique of Bothe and Rossi, led to fundamental contributions in the field of cosmic ray physics and laid the foundation for high-energy particle physics. Soon after World War II a cosmic ray group at MIT in the USA pioneered detailed investigations of air shower phenomena and their experimental skill laid the foundation for many of the methods and much of the instrumentation used today. Soon interests focussed on the highest energies requiring much larger detectors to be operated. The first detection of air fluorescence light by Japanese and US groups in the early 1970s marked an important experimental breakthrough towards this end as it allowed huge volumes of atmosphere to be monitored by optical telescopes. Radio observations of air showers, pioneered in the 1960s, are presently experiencing a renaissance and may revolutionise the field again. In the last 7 dec...

  4. Measurement of cosmic-ray air showers with the Tunka Radio Extension (Tunka-Rex)

    CERN Document Server

    Bezyazeekov, P A; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Levinson, E; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Rühle, C; Schröder, F G; Wischnewski, R; Zagorodnikov, A

    2015-01-01

    Tunka-Rex is a radio detector for cosmic-ray air showers in Siberia, triggered by Tunka-133, a co-located air-Cherenkov detector. The main goal of Tunka-Rex is the cross-calibration of the two detectors by measuring the air-Cherenkov light and the radio signal emitted by the same air showers. This way we can explore the precision of the radio-detection technique, especially for the reconstruction of the primary energy and the depth of the shower maximum. The latter is sensitive to the mass of the primary cosmic-ray particles. In this paper we describe the detector setup and explain how electronics and antennas have been calibrated. The analysis of data of the first season proves the detection of cosmic-ray air showers and therefore, the functionality of the detector. We confirm the expected dependence of the detection threshold on the geomagnetic angle and the correlation between the energy of the primary cosmic-ray particle and the radio amplitude. Furthermore, we compare reconstructed amplitudes of radio pu...

  5. The Auger Engineering Radio Array and multi-hybrid cosmic ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, E. M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) aims at the detection of air showers induced by high-energy cosmic rays. As an extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory, it measures complementary information to the particle detectors, fluorescence telescopes and to the muon scintillators of the Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array (AMIGA). AERA is sensitive to all fundamental parameters of an extensive air shower such as the arrival direction, energy and depth of shower maximum. Since the radio emission is induced purely by the electromagnetic component of the shower, in combination with the AMIGA muon counters, AERA is perfect for separate measurements of the electrons and muons in the shower, if combined with a muon counting detector like AMIGA. In addition to the depth of the shower maximum, the ratio of the electron and muon number serves as a measure of the primary particle mass.

  6. New method for the time calibration of an interferometric radio antenna array

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, F G; Bähren, L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Krömer, O; Nehls, S; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.01.072

    2010-01-01

    Digital radio antenna arrays, like LOPES (LOFAR PrototypE Station), detect high-energy cosmic rays via the radio emission from atmospheric extensive air showers. LOPES is an array of dipole antennas placed within and triggered by the KASCADE-Grande experiment on site of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. The antennas are digitally combined to build a radio interferometer by forming a beam into the air shower arrival direction which allows measurements even at low signal-to-noise ratios in individual antennas. This technique requires a precise time calibration. A combination of several calibration steps is used to achieve the necessary timing accuracy of about 1 ns. The group delays of the setup are measured, the frequency dependence of these delays (dispersion) is corrected in the subsequent data analysis, and variations of the delays with time are monitored. We use a transmitting reference antenna, a beacon, which continuously emits sine waves at known frequencies. Variations of the relative del...

  7. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2016-07-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about 17km2, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of different detection techniques. For the direction and energy of air showers, the precision achieved by AERA is already competitive; for the type of primary particle, several methods are tested and optimized. By combining AERA with the particle detectors we aim for a better understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range from approximately 0.3 to 10 EeV, i.e., significantly higher energies than preceding radio arrays.

  8. Comparing LOPES measurements of air-shower radio emission with REAS 3.11 and CoREAS simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic ray air showers emit radio pulses at MHz frequencies, which can be measured with radio antenna arrays - like LOPES at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. To improve the understanding of the radio emission, we test theoretical descriptions with measured data. The observables used for these tests are the absolute amplitude of the radio signal, and the shape of the radio lateral distribution. We compare lateral distributions of more than 500 LOPES events with two recent and public Monte Carlo simulation codes, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS (v 1.0). The absolute radio amplitudes predicted by REAS 3.11 are in good agreement with the LOPES measurements. The amplitudes predicted by CoREAS are lower by a factor of two, and marginally compatible with the LOPES measurements within the systematic scale uncertainties. In contrast to any previous versions of REAS, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS now reproduce the shape of the measured lateral distributions correctly. This reflects a remarkable progress compared to the si...

  9. Beam combining of quantum cascade laser arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin G; Kansky, Jan; Goyal, Anish K; Pflügl, Christian; Diehl, Laurent; Belkin, Mikhail A; Sanchez, Antonio; Capasso, Federico A

    2009-08-31

    Wavelength beam combining was used to co-propagate beams from 28 elements in an array of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs). The beam-quality product of the array, defined as the product of near-field spot size and far-field divergence for the entire array, was improved by a factor of 21 by using wavelength beam combining. To demonstrate the applicability of wavelength beam combined DFB-QCL arrays for remote sensing, we obtained the absorption spectrum of isopropanol at a distance of 6 m from the laser array.

  10. Corsika+Herwig Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutrino Induced Atmospheric Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Selva, A D; Miele, G; Pastor, S; Pisanti, O; Rosa, L

    2003-01-01

    High-energy neutrino astronomy represents an open window both on astrophysical mechanisms of particle acceleration and on fundamental interactions. The possibility of detecting them in large earth-based apparatus, like AUGER, AMANDA, ANTARES, is quite challenging. In view of this, the capability of generating reliable simulations of air showers induced by neutrinos is mandatory in the analysis of experimental data. In this paper we describe preliminary results towards the development of a new version of the Monte Carlo CORSIKA, capable of handling neutrinos too as primary particles. In our approach the first interaction of the primary neutrino is simulated in CORSIKA with a call to the HERWIG event generator.

  11. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray composition from surface air shower and underground muon measurements at Soudan 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Soudan 2 experiment has performed time-coincident cosmic ray air shower and underground muon measurements. Comparisons to Monte Carlo predictions show that such measurements can make statistically significant tests of the primary composition in the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum. The results do not support any significant increase in the average primary mass with energy in the range of ∼104 TeV per nucleus. Some systematic uncertainties remain, however, particularly in the Monte Carlo modeling of the cosmic ray shower

  12. Testing Hadronic Interactions at Ultrahigh Energies with Air Showers Measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andrada, B; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Biteau, J; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Botti, A M; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Briechle, F L; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Cancio, A; Canfora, F; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dallier, R; D'Amico, S; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Debatin, J; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Dundovic, A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; Fuster, A; Gallo, F; García, B; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Golup, G; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gookin, B; Gordon, J; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Hasankiadeh, Q; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hulsman, J; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Lebrun, P; Legumina, R; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Mello, V B B; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Mockler, D; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Naranjo, I; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, H; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pedreira, F; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Peña-Rodriguez, J; Pepe, I M; Pereira, L A S; Perrone, L; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Rogozin, D; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Gomez, J D Sanabria; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento-Cano, C; Sato, R; Scarso, C; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Strafella, F; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Durán, M Suarez; Sudholz, T; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tepe, A; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valbuena-Delgado, A; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; Berg, A M van den; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yapici, T; Yelos, D; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zong, Z; Zuccarello, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray air showers probe particle physics at energies beyond the reach of accelerators. Here we introduce a new method to test hadronic interaction models without relying on the absolute energy calibration, and apply it to events with primary energy 6-16 EeV (E_CM = 110-170 TeV), whose longitudinal development and lateral distribution were simultaneously measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory. The average hadronic shower is 1.33 +- 0.16 (1.61 +- 0.21) times larger than predicted using the leading LHC-tuned models EPOS-LHC (QGSJetII-04), with a corresponding excess of muons.

  13. QGSJET-II: physics, recent improvements, and results for air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapchenko S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of high energy hadronic and nuclear interactions by the QGSJET-II generator is discussed. Recent updates related to the treatment of nonlinear effects inthe interaction dynamics and to the model calibration with new LHC data are described. A special attention is devoted to the predictions of the new model version forcharacteristics of extensive air showers initiated by high energy cosmic rays. In particular, an improved description of charge exchange processes in pion collisionsis discussed and the respective enhancement of the shower muon content is analyzed.

  14. Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Buitink, S; Falcke, H; Kuijpers, J

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of atmospheric electric fields on the radio pulse emitted by cosmic ray air showers. Under fair weather conditions the dominant part of the radio emission is driven by the geomagnetic field. When the shower charges are accelerated and deflected in an electric field additional radiation is emitted. We simulate this effect with the Monte Carlo code REAS2, using CORSIKA-simulated showers as input. In both codes a routine has been implemented that treats the effect of the electric field on the shower particles. We find that the radio pulse is significantly altered in background fields of the order of ~100 V/cm and higher. Practically, this means that air showers passing through thunderstorms emit radio pulses that are not a reliable measure for the shower energy. Under other weather circumstances significant electric field effects are expected to occur rarely, but nimbostratus clouds can harbor fields that are large enough. In general, the contribution of the electric field to the radio pulse ...

  15. Interpretation of measurements of the number of muons in extensive air shower experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Prado, Raul Ribeiro; Pimenta, Mário; de Souza, Vitor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the energy evolution of the muon content of air showers between $10^{18.4}$ and $10^{19.6}$ eV to be able to determine the most likely mass composition scenario from future number of muons measurements. The energy and primary mass evolution of the number of muons is studied based on the Heitler-Matthews model and Monte Carlo simulation of the air shower. A simple model to describe the evolution of the first and second moments of number of muons distributions is proposed and validated. An analysis approach based on the comparison between this model's predictions and data to discriminate among a set of composition scenarios is presented and tested with simulations. It is shown that the composition scenarios can be potentially discriminated under the conditions imposed by the method. The discrimination power of the proposed analysis is stable under systematic changes of the absolute number of muons from model predictions and on the scale of the reconstructed energy.

  16. Interpretation of measurements of the number of muons in extensive air shower experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Raul R.; Conceição, Ruben; Pimenta, Mário; de Souza, Vitor

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyze the energy evolution of the muon content of air showers between 1018.4 and 1019.6 eV to be able to determine the most likely mass composition scenario from future number of muons measurements. The energy and primary mass evolution of the number of muons is studied based on the Heitler-Matthews model and Monte Carlo simulation of the air shower. A simple model to describe the evolution of the first and second moments of number of muons distributions is proposed and validated. An analysis approach based on the comparison between this model's predictions and data to discriminate among a set of composition scenarios is presented and tested with simulations. It is shown that the composition scenarios can be potentially discriminated under the conditions imposed by the method. The discrimination power of the proposed analysis is stable under systematic changes of the absolute number of muons from model predictions and on the scale of the reconstructed energy.

  17. The MIDAS Experiment: A New Technique for the Detection of Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, C; Berlin, A; Bohacova, M; Facal, P; Genat, J F; Mills, E; Monasor, M; Privitera, P; Reyes, L C; d'Orfeuil, B Rouille; Wayne, S; Alekotte, I; Bertou, X; Bonifazi, C; Neto, J R T de Mello; Santos, E M; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Carvalho, W; Zas, E

    2010-01-01

    Recent measurements suggest free electrons created in ultra-high energy cosmic ray extensive air showers (EAS) can interact with neutral air molecules producing Bremsstrahlung radiation in the microwave regime. The microwave radiation produced is expected to scale with the number of free electrons in the shower, which itself is a function of the energy of the primary particle and atmospheric depth. Using these properties a calorimetric measurement of the EAS is possible. This technique is analogous to fluorescence detection with the added benefit of a nearly 100% duty cycle and practically no atmospheric attenuation. The Microwave Detection of Air Showers (MIDAS) prototype is currently being developed at the University of Chicago. MIDAS consists of a 53 feed receiver operating in the 3.4 to 4.2 GHz band. The camera is deployed on a 4.5 meter parabolic reflector and is instrumented with high speed power detectors and autonomous FPGA trigger electronics. We present the current status of the MIDAS instrument and...

  18. Study of muon bundles from extensive air showers with the ALICE detector at CERN LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtejer, K.

    2016-05-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. The large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber are exploited to study the muonic component of extensive air showers. We present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of the QGSJET hadronic interaction model was used to simulate the development of the resulting air showers. High multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons were also studied. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP without satisfactory explanations for the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. We demonstrate that the high muon-multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range.

  19. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays: analysis of extensive air showers and their associated electromagnetic signal in the MHz domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this HDR (accreditation to supervise research) report, the author proposes a review of the present results in the field of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. After a presentation of some results about the Fermi mechanism to accelerate cosmic rays, the author more particularly addresses the reconstruction of air showers, and the search for sources. He also addresses the radio signal emitted by air shower secondary positrons and electrons. He proposes an overview of the present knowledge on the basis of present experiments. Data show that the electric field is mainly due to the influence of the Earth magnetic field which acts on electrons and positrons, but more recently, the contribution due to electrons in excess seems to appear in data. The author reports the last advances in the field of simulation of the electric field, with notably the prediction of new signal produced by the disappearance of the air shower during its absorption by the soil

  20. A Measurement of Time-Averaged Aerosol Optical Depth using Air-Showers Observed in Stereo by HiRes

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Amann, J F; Archbold, G; Atkins, R; Belov, K; Belz, J W; Ben Zvi, S; Bergman, D R; Boyer, J H; Cannon, C T; Cao, Z; Connolly, B M; Fedorova, Y; Finley, C B; Hanlon, W F; Hoffman, C M; Holzscheiter, M H; Hughes, G A; Hüntemeyer, P; Jui, C C H; Kirn, M A; Knapp, B C; Loh, E C; Manago, N; Mannel, E J; Martens, K; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J N; O'Neill, A; Reil, K; Roberts, M D; Schnetzer, S R; Seman, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Song, C; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tupa, D; Westerhoff, S; Wiencke, L R

    2006-01-01

    Air fluorescence measurements of cosmic ray energy must be corrected for attenuation of the atmosphere. In this paper we show that the air-showers themselves can yield a measurement of the aerosol attenuation in terms of optical depth, time-averaged over extended periods. Although the technique lacks statistical power to make the critical hourly measurements that only specialized active instruments can achieve, we note the technique does not depend on absolute calibration of the detector hardware, and requires no additional equipment beyond the fluorescence detectors that observe the air showers. This paper describes the technique, and presents results based on analysis of 1258 air-showers observed in stereo by the High Resolution Fly's Eye over a four year span.

  1. On the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray using the muon arrival times from extensive air showers: Application for Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsene, N.; Rebel, H.; Sima, O. [Institute of Space Science (ISS), Bucharest-Magurele, P.O. Box MG-23 (Romania) and Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-11-20

    In this paper we study the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray by observing the muon arrival times in ground detectors. We analyzed extensive air showers (EAS) induced by proton and iron nuclei with the same energy 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV simulated with CORSIKA, and analyzed the muon arrival times at ground measured by the infill array detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO). From the arrival times of the core and of the muons the atmospheric depth of muon generation locus is evaluated. The results suggest a potential mass discrimination on the basis of muon arrival times and of the reconstructed atmospheric depth of muon production. An analysis of a larger set of CORSIKA simulations carried out for primary energies above 10{sup 18} eV is in progress.

  2. Primary Particle Type of the Most Energetic Fly's Eye Air Shower

    CERN Document Server

    Risse, M; Gora, D; Pekala, J; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H

    2004-01-01

    The longitudinal profile of the most energetic cosmic-ray air shower measured so far, the event recorded by the Fly's Eye detector with a reconstructed primary energy of about 320 EeV, is compared to simulated shower profiles. The calculations are performed with the CORSIKA code and include primary photons and different hadron primaries. For primary photons, preshower formation in the geomagnetic field is additionally treated in detail. For primary hadrons, the hadronic interaction models QGSJET01 and SIBYLL2.1 have been employed. The predicted longitudinal profiles are compared to the observation. A method for testing the hypothesis of a specific primary particle type against the measured profile is described which naturally takes shower fluctuations into account. The Fly's Eye event is compatible with any assumption of a hadron primary between proton and iron nuclei in both interaction models, although differences between QGSJET01 and SIBYLL2.1 in the predicted profiles of lighter nuclei exist. The primary ...

  3. Implementing the De-thinning Method for High Energy Cosmic Rays Extensive Air Shower Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Estupiñán, A; Núñez, L A

    2015-01-01

    To simulate the interaction of cosmic rays with the Earth atmosphere requires highly complex computational resources and several statistical techniques have been developed to simplify those calculations. It is common to implement the thinning algorithms to reduce the number of secondary particles by assigning weights to representative particles in the evolution of the cascade. However, since this is a compression method with information loss, it is required to recover the original flux of secondary particles without introduce artificial biases. In this work we present the preliminary results of our version of the de-thinning algorithm for the reconstruction of thinned simulations of extensive air showers initiated by cosmic rays and photons in the energy range $10^{15} < E/\\mathrm{eV} < 10^{17}$.

  4. Air shower simulation for background estimation in muon tomography of volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Béné

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main sources of background for the radiography of volcanoes using atmospheric muons comes from the accidental coincidences produced in the muon telescopes by charged particles belonging to the air shower generated by the primary cosmic ray. In order to quantify this background effect, Monte Carlo simulations of the showers and of the detector are developed by the TOMUVOL collaboration. As a first step, the atmospheric showers were simulated and investigated using two Monte Carlo packages, CORSIKA and GEANT4. We compared the results provided by the two programs for the muonic component of vertical proton-induced showers at three energies: 1, 10 and 100 TeV. We found that the spatial distribution and energy spectrum of the muons were in good agreement for the two codes.

  5. On noise treatment in radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, F G; Arteaga, J C; Asch, T; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Link, K; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J

    2010-01-01

    Precise measurements of the radio emission by cosmic ray air showers require an adequate treatment of noise. Unlike to usual experiments in particle physics, where noise always adds to the signal, radio noise can in principle decrease or increase the signal if it interferes by chance destructively or constructively. Consequently, noise cannot simply be subtracted from the signal, and its influence on amplitude and time measurement of radio pulses must be studied with care. First, noise has to be determined consistently with the definition of the radio signal which typically is the maximum field strength of the radio pulse. Second, the average impact of noise on radio pulse measurements at individual antennas is studied for LOPES. It is shown that a correct treatment of noise is especially important at low signal-to-noise ratios: noise can be the dominant source of uncertainty for pulse height and time measurements, and it can systematically flatten the slope of lateral distributions. The presented method can ...

  6. Changes in extensive air showers from isotropic Lorentz violation in the photon sector

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, J S; Risse, M

    2016-01-01

    We consider a theory with isotropic nonbirefringent Lorentz violation in the photon sector and explore the effects on the development of the electromagnetic component of extensive air showers in the Earth atmosphere. Specifically, we consider the case of a "fast" photon with a phase velocity larger than the maximum attainable velocity of a massive Dirac fermion (this case corresponds to a negative Lorentz-violating parameter $\\kappa$ in the action). The production of photons with energies above the threshold for photon decay prevents the conventional production of electron-positron pairs, which gets replaced by the prompt decay of photons into electron-positron pairs. This rapid production of charged leptons accelerates the shower development, decreasing the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum ($X_\\text{max}$) by an amount which could be measured by cosmic-ray observatories. Precise measurements of $X_\\text{max}$ could then improve existing limits on the negative Lorentz-violating parameter $\\kappa$ by se...

  7. CORSIKA implementation of heavy quark production and propagation in extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, A.; Gascón, A.

    2014-02-01

    Heavy quarks are commonly produced in current accelerator experiments. Hence it is natural to think that they should be likewise created in collisions with larger center of mass energies like the ones involving ultra-high energy cosmic rays and atmospheric nuclei. Despite this fact, a detailed treatment of heavy hadrons is missing in Monte Carlo generators of Extensive Air Showers (EAS). It is a must to improve the description of how heavy flavors appear and evolve in atmospheric showers. With this goal in mind, we study two different models for heavy quark production in proton-air collisions. We also analyze a dedicated treatment of heavy hadrons interactions with atmospheric nuclei. This paper shows how those models have been implemented as new options available in CORSIKA, one of the most used EAS simulators. This new computational tool allows us to analyze the effects that the propagation of heavy hadrons has in the EAS development.

  8. Quantum Black Holes Effects on the Shape of Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, Nicusor; Denton, Peter B; Micu, Octavian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to find a characteristic TeV scale quantum black holes decay signature in the data recorded by cosmic rays experiments. TeV black holes can be produced via the collisions of ultra high energetic protons (E > $10^18$ eV) with nucleons the from atmosphere. We focus on the case when the black holes decay into two particles moving in the forward direction in the Earth reference frame (back-to-back in the center of mass reference frame) and induce two overlapping showers. When reconstructing both the energy and the shape of the resultant air shower, there is a significant difference between showers induced only via standard model interactions and showers produced via the back-to-back decay of black holes as intermediate states.

  9. Failures in power-combining arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Rutledge, David B.; Cheng, Nai-Shuo; York, Robert A.; Weikle, Robert M., II; De Lisio, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    We derive a simple formula for the change in output when a device fails in a power-combining structure with identical matched devices. The loss is written in terms of the scattering coefficient of the failed device and reflection coefficient of an input port in the combining network. We apply this formula to several power combiners, including arrays in free space and enclosed waveguide structures. Our simulations indicate the output power degrades gracefully as devices fail, which is in agree...

  10. Results from Pion-Carbon Interactions Measured by NA61/SHINE for Improved Understanding of Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Hervé, Alexander E

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of extensive air shower measurements, produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, relies on the correct modeling of the hadron-air interactions that occur during the shower development. The majority of hadronic particles are produced at equivalent beam energies below the TeV range. NA61/SHINE is a fixed target experiment using secondary beams produced at CERN at the SPS. Hadron-hadron interactions have been recorded at beam momenta between 13 and 350 GeV/c with a wide-acceptance spectrometer. In this contribution we present measurements of the spectra of charged pions and the $\\rho^0$ production in pion-carbon interactions, which are essential for modeling of air showers.

  11. Measuring a Cherenkov ring in the radio emission from air showers at 110-190 MHz with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Nelles, A; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; de Vries, K D; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Hörandel, J R; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Akker, M van den; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Garrett, M A; Gunst, A W; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; Mevius, M; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, G; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Stapper, B W; Steinmetz, M; Stewart, A; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2014-01-01

    Measuring radio emission from air showers offers a novel way to determine properties of the primary cosmic rays such as their mass and energy. Theory predicts that relativistic time compression effects lead to a ring of amplified emission which starts to dominate the emission pattern for frequencies above ~100 MHz. In this article we present the first detailed measurements of this structure. Ring structures in the radio emission of air showers are measured with the LOFAR radio telescope in the frequency range of 110 - 190 MHz. These data are well described by CoREAS simulations. They clearly confirm the importance of including the index of refraction of air as a function of height. Furthermore, the presence of the Cherenkov ring offers the possibility for a geometrical measurement of the depth of shower maximum, which in turn depends on the mass of the primary particle.

  12. IceVeto. An extension of IceTop to veto air showers for neutrino astronomy with IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffenberg, Jan; Kemp, Julian; Raedel, Leif; Rongen, Martin; Schaufel, Merlin; Stahlberg, Martin; Hansmann, Bengt; Wiebusch, Christopher [RWTH Aachen University, Physikalische Institut III b (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    IceCube is the world's largest high-energy neutrino observatory, built at the geographic South Pole. For neutrino astronomy, a large background-free sample of well-reconstructed astrophysical neutrinos is essential. The main background for this signal are muons and neutrinos which are produced in cosmic-ray air showers in the Earth's atmosphere. The coincident detection of these air showers by the surface detector IceTop has been proven to be a powerful veto for atmospheric neutrinos and muons in the field of view of the southern hemisphere. This motivates a significant extension of IceTop. First estimates indicate that such a veto detector will more than double the discovery potential of current point source analyses. Here, we present the motivation and capabilities of different technologies based on simulations and measurements.

  13. Measurements of the Depth of Maximum of Air-Shower Profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory and their Composition Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, V.

    We describe how the analysis of air showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory leads to an accurate determination of the depth of maximum (Xmax). First, the analysis of the air-shower which leads to the reconstruction of Xmax is discussed. The properties of the detector and its measurement biases are treated and carefully taken into consideration. The Xmax results are interpreted in terms of composition, where the interpretation depends mainly on the hadronic interaction models. A global fit of the Xmax distribution yields an estimate of the abundance of four primaries species. The analysis represents the most statistically significant composition information ever obtained for energies above 1017.8 eV. The scenario that emerges shows no support for a strong flux of iron nuclei and a strong energy dependence of the proton fraction.

  14. Longitudinal profile of Nµ/Ne in extensive air showers: Implications for cosmic rays mass composition study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Purmohammad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nµ/Ne, muon to electron population ratio in extensive air showers at high altitudes has been shown to be a suitable estimator of primary cosmic rays mass composition. This study is based on simulated extensive air showers. The Nµ/Ne ratio has been obtained in 100 depths from the top of the atmosphere to the sea level for different primary particle masses and energies. An empirical relation between cosmic ray atomic mass and Nµ/Ne has been obtained. The relation has then been used for estimation of atomic masses of progenitors of another set of simulated showers. Although the estimated masses are rough, the accuracy of the estimation improves with observation altitude.

  15. Measurements in the Forward Phase-Space with the CMS Experiment and their Impact on Physics of Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083313; Quast, Günter; Ulrich, Ralf

    2015-11-18

    The astrophysical interpretation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays is based on detection of extensive air showers in indirect measurements. Hadronic interaction models that are needed for such analyses require parameters to be adjusted to collider data since soft particle production cannot be calculated from first principles. Within this work, the program CRMC was developed that unifies all air shower hadronic interaction models and supports the output formats used by collider experiments. Almost all LHC experiments have adopted the use these hadronic interaction models thanks to CRMC. The program can even be used in detector simulations to make direct comparison to reconstructed quantities from which the cosmic ray and the particle physics communities benefit immensely. Furthermore, nuclear effects were studied with the CMS experiments at the LHC. The production cross section was derived in recent proton-lead collision data at sqrt(s(NN)) = 5.02 TeV in order to study nuclear effects. The measurement constrain...

  16. Photon air showers at ultra-high energy and the photonuclear cross-section

    CERN Document Server

    Risse, M; Engel, R; Gora, D; Heck, D; Pekala, J; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H

    2006-01-01

    Experimental conclusions from air shower observations on cosmic-ray photons above 10^19 eV are based on the comparison to detailed shower simulations. For the calculations, the photonuclear cross-section needs to be extrapolated over several orders of magnitude in energy. The uncertainty from the cross-section extrapolation translates into an uncertainty of the predicted shower features for primary photons and, thus, into uncertainties for a possible data interpretation. After briefly reviewing the current status of ultra-high energy photon studies, the impact of the uncertainty of the photonuclear cross-section for shower calculations is investigated. Estimates for the uncertainties in the main shower observables are provided. Photon discrimination is shown to be possible even for rapidly rising cross-sections. When photon-initiated showers are identified, it is argued that the sensitivity of photon shower observables to the photonuclear cross-section can in turn be exploited to constrain the cross-section a...

  17. On noise treatment in radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.G., E-mail: frank.schroeder@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Apel, W.D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus South, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Asch, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita, Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus South, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Universitaet Siegen, Fachbereich Physik (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita, Torino (Italy); INAF Torino, Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (Italy); and others

    2012-01-11

    Precise measurements of the radio emission by cosmic ray air showers require an adequate treatment of noise. Unlike to usual experiments in particle physics, where noise always adds to the signal, radio noise can in principle decrease or increase the signal if it interferes by chance destructively or constructively. Consequently, noise cannot simply be subtracted from the signal, and its influence on amplitude and time measurement of radio pulses must be studied with care. First, noise has to be determined consistently with the definition of the radio signal which typically is the maximum field strength of the radio pulse. Second, the average impact of noise on radio pulse measurements at individual antennas is studied for LOPES. It is shown that a correct treatment of noise is especially important at low signal-to-noise ratios: noise can be the dominant source of uncertainty for pulse height and time measurements, and it can systematically flatten the slope of lateral distributions. The presented method can also be transferred to other experiments in radio and acoustic detection of cosmic rays and neutrinos.

  18. Coherent Radiation from Extensive Air Showers in the Ultra-High Frequency Band

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Romero-Wolf, Andrés; Tueros, Matías; Zas, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Using detailed Monte Carlo simulations we have characterized the features of the radio emission of inclined air showers in the Ultra-High Frequency band (300 MHz - 3 GHz). The Fourier-spectrum of the radiation is shown to have a sizable intensity well into the GHz frequency range. The emission is mainly due to transverse currents induced by the geomagnetic field and to the excess charge produced by the Askaryan effect. At these frequencies only a significantly reduced volume of the shower around the axis contributes coherently to the signal observed on the ground. The size of the coherently emitting volume depends on frequency, shower geometry and observer position, and is interpreted in terms of the relative time delays. At ground level, the maximum emission at high frequencies is concentrated in an elliptical ring-like region around the intersection of a Cherenkov cone with its vertex at shower maximum and the ground. The frequency spectrum of inclined showers when observed at positions that view shower max...

  19. The neutron 'thunder' accompanying the extensive air shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A D [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-03-15

    Simulations show that neutrons are the most abundant component among extensive air shower (EAS) hadrons. However, multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core (neutron thunder) are mostly not the neutrons of the shower, but have a secondary origin. The bulk of them is produced by high energy EAS hadrons hitting the monitors. The delays are due to the thermalization and diffusion of neutrons in the moderator and reflector of the monitor accompanied by the production of secondary gamma quanta. This conclusion raises the important problem of the interaction of EAS with the ground, the stuff of the detectors and their environment since they have often hydrogen-containing materials like polyethilene in neutron monitors. Such interaction can give an additional contribution to the signal in the EAS detectors. It can be particularly important for the signals from scintillator or water tank detectors at kilometre-long distances from the EAS core, where neutrons of the shower become the dominant component after a few microseconds behind the EAS front.

  20. Minimal Prospects for Radio Detection of Extensive Air Showers in the Atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, J. D.; Nelles, A.

    2016-07-01

    One possible approach for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos is to search for radio emission from extensive air showers created when they interact in the atmosphere of Jupiter, effectively utilizing Jupiter as a particle detector. We investigate the potential of this approach. For searches with current or planned radio telescopes we find that the effective area for detection of cosmic rays is substantial (∼3 × 107 km2), but the acceptance angle is so small that the typical geometric aperture (∼103 km2 sr) is less than that of existing terrestrial detectors, and cosmic rays also cannot be detected below an extremely high threshold energy (∼1023 eV). The geometric aperture for neutrinos is slightly larger, and greater sensitivity can be achieved with a radio detector on a Jupiter-orbiting satellite, but in neither case is this sufficient to constitute a practical detection technique. Exploitation of the large surface area of Jupiter for detecting ultra-high-energy particles remains a long-term prospect that will require a different technique, such as orbital fluorescence detection.

  1. Measurements of the muon content of air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiño, I.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory offers a unique window to study cosmic rays and particle physics at energies above 3 EeV (corresponding to a centre-of-mass energy of 75 TeV in proton-proton collisions) inaccessible to accelerator experiments. We discuss the different methods of estimating the number of muons in showers recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory, which is an observable sensitive to primary mass composition and to properties of the hadronic interactions in the shower. The muon content, derived from data with these methods, is presented and compared to predictions from the post-LHC hadronic interaction models for different primary composition. We find that models do not reproduce well the Auger observations, displaying a deficit of muons at the ground. In the light of these results, a better understanding of ultra-high energy extensive air showers and hadronic interactions is crucial to determine the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We report on the upgrade plans of the Pierre Auger Observatory to achieve this science goal.

  2. Minimal prospects for radio detection of extensive air showers in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, J D

    2016-01-01

    One possible approach for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos is to search for radio emission from extensive air showers created when they interact in the atmosphere of Jupiter, effectively utilizing Jupiter as a particle detector. We investigate the potential of this approach. For searches with current or planned radio telescopes we find that the effective area for detection of cosmic rays is substantial (~3*10^7 km^2), but the acceptance angle is so small that the typical geometric aperture (~10^3 km^2 sr) is less than that of existing terrestrial detectors, and cosmic rays also cannot be detected below an extremely high threshold energy (~10^23 eV). The geometric aperture for neutrinos is slightly larger, and greater sensitivity can be achieved with a radio detector on a Jupiter-orbiting satellite, but in neither case is this sufficient to constitute a practical detection technique. Exploitation of the large surface area of Jupiter for detecting ultra-high-energy particles remains a long-...

  3. Updated Event Rate for Horizontal and Upward Tau Air Showers in EUSO

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D; De Santis, M

    2003-01-01

    There is more and more expectation on EUSO outcoming project. This experiment, while monitoring at dark, downward to the Earth, a wide atmosphere layers, may discover, among common downward Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, UHECR showers, also first High Energy Neutrino-Induced Showers. These events are either originated in Air (EUSO Field of View) or within a widest Earth Crust ring crown leading to ultra high energy Tau whose decay in flight produce up-ward and horizontal showers. Most of those vertical downward neutrinos induced Shower in air, are drown in the dominant noise of downward UHECR showers. We showed and refine here the signature of Upward and Horizontal Upward and Horizontal Tau Air-Showers, UPTAUS and HORTAUs (or also named Earth skimming neutrinos), born within widest Earth Crust Crown (Sea or Rock) Areas surrounding EUSO field of view. These UPTAUs and HORTAUs effective masses and the consequent EUSO event Number are estimated by an unified exact analytical formula. The effective target Masses ...

  4. $$ Uncertainty from Extrapolation of Cosmic Ray Air Shower Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements at the LHC of the p-p total cross section have reduced the uncertainty in simulations of cosmic ray air showers. In particular of the depth of shower maximum, called $X_{max}$. However, uncertainties of other important parameters, in particular the multiplicity and elasticity of high energy interactions, have not improved, and there is a remaining uncertainty due to the total cross section. Uncertainties due to extrapolations from accelerator data, at a maximum energy of $\\sim$ one TeV in the p-p center of mass, to 250 TeV ($3\\times10^{19}$ eV in a cosmic ray proton's lab frame) introduce significant uncertainties in predictions of $$. In this paper we estimate a lower limit on these uncertainties. The result is that the uncertainty in $$ is larger than the difference among the modern models being used in the field. At the full energy of the LHC, which is equivalent to $\\sim 1\\times10^{17}$ eV in the cosmic ray lab frame, the extrapolation is not as extreme, and the uncertainty is approxim...

  5. Simulation studies of the information content of muon arrival time observations of high energy extensive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By extensive Monte Carlo calculations, using the air shower simulation code CORSIKA, EAS muon arrival time distributions and EAS time profiles up to 320 m distances from the shower centre have been generated, for proton, oxygen and iron induced showers using different hadronic interaction models as Monte Carlo generators. The model dependence and mass discriminating features have been scrutinised for three energies ranges, (1.0-1.78) 1015 eV, (1.0-1.78) 1016 eV and (1.78-3.16) 1016 eV. The present studies have been focussed to the exploration of the information carried by EAS time observables and their correlations in view of features discriminating the mass of the cosmic primary and different hadronic interaction models. Advanced non-parametric statistical methods based on Bayesian decision rules have been applied to scrutinise the EAS observables and to specify quantitatively the results. A first inspection allows some tentative conclusions: 1. The correlations of the local muon arrival time variables with the local muon density improves the true classification rate and discrimination features. It turns out that the correlation can be replaced by a single parameter: Δτq/ρμ. The classification gets improved by correlating the muon arrival times with the shower age, the shower size Ne and Nμtr; 2. Correlating the observation of Δτq/ρμ for two radial distances, the mass discrimination of the primaries get only slightly improved, different from our previous results analysing the (global) arrival times of the foremost muon correlated at two different radial distances; 3. Comparing the classification rates for different muon arrival time quantities: the first quartile, the median and the third quartile, by both considered models QGSJET and VENUS similar results have been obtained.The analysis of the median Δτ0.50 and of the slow component of the arrival time distribution, represented by Δτ0.75, improves the true-classification rate of the oxygen component

  6. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Bleve, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  7. Large-Area, UV-Optimized, Back-Illuminated Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large-area (3m2), UV-sensitive focal plane arrays are needed for observation of air showers from ultra-high energy cosmic rays (JEM-EUSO) as well as for...

  8. Measurement of arrival time of particles in extensive air showers using TDC32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Christiansen, J.; Hayashi, Y.; Jain, A.; Mohanty, P. K.; Ravindran, K. C.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2013-04-01

    Arrival time of particles in an extensive air shower (EAS) is a key physical parameter to determine its direction. EAS direction is useful for studies of anisotropy and composition of cosmic rays, and search for multi-TeV γ-rays sources. Accurate timing may be used to search exotic phenomena such as production of new particles at extremely high energies available during early stages of development of EAS and also for detecting sub-relativistic hadrons in EAS. Time to digital converters (TDCs) are used to perform this task. Traditional TDCs operate in the START-STOP mode with limited dynamic range and single-hit capability. With the advent of high luminosity collider LHC, need for TDCs with large dynamic range, multi-hit capability and TRIGGERED mode of operation became necessary. A 32 channel TDC was designed for the GRAPES-3 experiment on a CAMAC platform around TDC32, an ASIC developed by micro-electronics group at CERN, Geneva. Four modules were operated in the GRAPES-3 experiment. Here, we present details of the circuit design and their performance over several years. The multi-hit feature of this device was used to study the time structure of particles in the EAS on time scale of ~1 μs. The distribution of time intervals in the multi-hit data shows an exponential profile with a time constant of ~370 ns. These delayed particles are likely to be neutrons produced in the EAS core that were recorded in the scintillator detectors following the relativistic EAS front.

  9. Self-triggering of radio signals from cosmic ray air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asch, Thomas

    2009-02-15

    LOPES{sup STAR} is a prototype detector for future experiments on the observation of radio emission of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Absolutely calibrated measurements of the electric field strength with the LOPES{sup STAR} detector were performed in coincidence with the well-established air shower detector KASCADE-Grande. The experinmental configuration allowed a simultaneous observation of east-west and north-south polarised components of the electric field per antenna used. This thesis discusses in detail the influence of background sources on the detector configuration as well as the resulting self-trigger system. The implemented trigger suppresses strong background signals from the industrial environment on the site of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (rejection >99.9 %) and is the basis for a hardware self-trigger. Therefore, the system is adequate for any other detector site. Two different calibration methods are performed and cross-checked to convert the measured raw data into an electric field strength. Both methods result in the same frequency dependent calibration values within their uncertainties. Furthermore, the probable scale parameter of d{sub 0}=(137{+-}18) m. The comparison of selected events with Monte Carlo simulations on an event-by-event basis points out a good correspondence within the given uncertainties and confirms the geosynchrotron model. The overall angular resolution of the arrival direction results in only a few degrees. The presented methods and algorithms are developed for the trigger system and the analysis and are now standard tools for the data analysis in the LOPES collaboration. (orig.)

  10. Progress report on a new search for free e/3 quarks in the cores of 10(15) - 10(16) eV air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, A. L.; Bull, R. M.; Taylor, R. S.; Belford, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Leeds 3 sq m Wilson cloud chamber is being used in a new search for free e/3 quarks close to the axes of 10 to the 15th power - 10 to the 16th power eV air showers. A ratio trigger circuit is used to detect the incidence of air shower cores; the position of the shower center and the axis direction are determined from photographs of current-limited spark chambers. It is thus possible, for the first time, to know where we have looked for quarks in air showers and to select for scanning only those cloud chamber photographs where we have good evidence that the shower axis was close to the chamber. 250 g/sq cm of lead/concrete absorber above the cloud chamber serve to reduce particle densities and make a quark search possible very close to the shower axes. The current status of the search is given.

  11. Results and Perspectives of the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an extension of the Pierre Auger Cosmic-Ray Observatory. It is used to detect radio emission from extensive air showers with energies beyond $10^{17}~$eV in the $30 - 80~$MHz frequency band. After three phases of deployment, AERA now consists of more than 150 autonomous radio stations with different spacings, covering an area of about $17~$km$^2$. It is located at the same site as other Auger low-energy detector extensions enabling combinations with various other measurement techniques. The radio array allows different technical schemes to be explored as well as cross-calibration of our measurements with the established baseline detectors of the Auger Observatory. We report on the most recent technological developments and give an overview of the experimental results obtained with AERA. In particular, we will present the measurement of the radiation energy, i.e., the amount of energy that is emitted by the air shower in the form of radio emission, and its dependence...

  12. Measurement of the depth of maximum of extensive air showers above 10{18} eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anticić, T; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arisaka, K; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; Benzvi, S; Berat, C; Bergmann, T; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohácová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; de Mello Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Díaz Castro, M L; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fröhlich, U; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; García Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gómez Berisso, M; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kadija, K; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D-H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Lopez Agüera, A; Louedec, K; Lozano Bahilo, J; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martínez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meurer, C; Micanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Parra, A; Parrisius, J; Parsons, R D; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Rodriguez Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A

    2010-03-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10;{18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{-21}{+35}) g/cm{2}/decade below 10{18.24+/-0.05} eV, and (24+/-3) g/cm{2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  13. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2014-01-01

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  14. Slope of the lateral density function of extensive air showers around the knee region as an indicator of shower age

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Rajat K

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing simulated extensive air shower (EAS) events generated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA, this paper critically studies the characteristics of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS around the knee energy region of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. The study takes into account the issue of lateral shower age parameter as indicator of the stage of development of showers in the atmosphere. The correlation of lateral shower age parameter with other EAS observables is examined, using simulated data in the context of its possible use in a multi-parameter study of EAS, with a view to obtaining information about the nature of the shower initiating primaries at sea level EAS experiments. It is shown that the observed slope of the lateral density function in the 3-dimensional plot at least for the KASCADE data supports the idea of a transition from light to heavy mass composition around the knee.

  15. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

    2010-02-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  16. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. I. Measurements at energies above 10(17.8) eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-01-01

    We report a study of the distributions of the depth of maximum, X-max, of extensive air-shower profiles with energies above 10(17.8) eV as observed with the fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The analysis method for selecting a data sample with minimal sampling bias is describe

  17. Gamma-Hadron Separation Methods for the VERITAS Array of Four Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczynski, H; Duke, C; Holder, J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; Sembroski, G

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes have emerged as the most sensitive gamma-ray detectors in the energy range of about 100 GeV and above. The strengths of these arrays are a very large effective collection area on the order of 100,000 square meter, combined with excellent single photon angular and energy resolutions. The sensitivity of such detectors is limited by statistical fluctuations in the number of Cosmic Ray initiated air showers that resemble gamma-ray air showers in many ways. In this paper, we study the performance of simple event reconstruction methods when applied to simulated data of the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) experiment. We review methods for reconstructing the arrival direction and the energy of the primary photons, and examine means to improve on their performance. For a software threshold energy of 300 GeV (100 GeV), the methods achieve point source angular and energy resolutions of sigma[63%]= 0.1 degree (0.2 degree) an...

  18. Array size scaling of passive coherent beam combination in fiber laser array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhao Xue; Bing He; Jun Zhou; Jinchong Xue; Zhen Li; Houkang Liu; Qihong Lou

    2012-01-01

    Array size scaling of passive coherent beam combination is explored theoretically.The Strehl ratio variation with wavelength is simulated in 4-,9-,16-,and 25-channel fiber arrays.The average Strehl ratio and phase error are calculated.The Strehl ratio is found to be near 100% for arrays with less than 5 fibers,but decreases significantly for larger arrays.These results are in good agreement with the recent experimental results.

  19. Study of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function around the Knee Region in Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Rubaiee, A A; M., Marwah; Al-Douri, Y

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) was simulated with the CORSIKA code, in the energy range (10^13-10^16) eV. This simulation was performed for conditions and configurations of the Tunka EAS Cherenkov array for two primary particles (p and Fe). Basing on the simulated results, many approximated functions are structured for two primary particles and different zenith angles. This allowed us to reconstruct the EAS events, which is, to determine the type and energy of the primary particles that produced showers from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov radiation which measured with Tunka Cherenkov array experiment. Comparison of the calculated LDF of Cherenkov radiation with that measured at the Tunka EAS array shows the ability for identifying of the primary particle that initiated the EAS cascades determining of its primary energy around the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  20. New method for the time calibration of an interferometric radio antenna array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.G., E-mail: frank.schroeder@kit.ed [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Falcke, H. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Haungs, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Horneffer, A. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huege, T.; Isar, P.G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kroemer, O. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Nehls, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-04-11

    Digital radio antenna arrays, like LOPES (LOFAR PrototypE Station), detect high-energy cosmic rays via the radio emission from atmospheric extensive air showers. LOPES is an array of dipole antennas placed within and triggered by the KASCADE-Grande experiment on site of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. The antennas are digitally combined to build a radio interferometer by forming a beam into the air shower arrival direction which allows measurements even at low signal-to-noise ratios in individual antennas. This technique requires a precise time calibration. A combination of several calibration steps is used to achieve the necessary timing accuracy of about 1 ns. The group delays of the setup are measured, the frequency dependence of these delays (dispersion) is corrected in the subsequent data analysis, and variations of the delays with time are monitored. We use a transmitting reference antenna, a beacon, which continuously emits sine waves at known frequencies. Variations of the relative delays between the antennas can be detected and corrected for at each recorded event by measuring the phases at the beacon frequencies.

  1. Reconstruction of extensive air showers and measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range of 1 - 80 PeV at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepser, Stefan

    2008-06-24

    IceTop is a km{sup 2} scale detector array for highly energetic cosmic radiation. It is a part of the IceCube Observatory that is presently being built at the geographic South Pole. It aims for the detection of huge particle cascades induced by PeV cosmic rays in the atmosphere. These extensive air showers are detected by cylindrical ice tanks that collect the Cherenkov light produced by penetrating particles. The main goal of IceTop is the investigation of the energy distribution and chemical composition of PeV to EeV cosmic rays. This thesis presents the first analysis of highly energetic cosmic ray data taken with IceTop. First, the light response of the IceTop tanks is parametrised as a function of energy and particle type. An expectation function for the distribution of shower signals in the detector plane is developed. The likelihood fit based on that can reconstruct the recorded shower events with resolutions of 1.5 in direction, 9m in location of the shower center, and 12% in energy. This is well competitive with other experiments. The resulting energy response of the array is studied to set up response matrices for different primary nuclei and inclinations. These allow for a deconvolution of the distribution of reconstructed energies to derive the real energy spectrum. Two unfolding algorithms are implemented and studied, and response matrices are modeled for four different composition assumptions. With each assumption, energy spectra are unfolded for three different bins in inclination, using a data sample with an exposure of 3.86.10{sup 11} m{sup 2} s sr, taken in August 2007. The range of the spectrum is 1-80 PeV. Finally, a new analysis method is developed that uses the fact that cosmic rays in the PeV range are expected to be isotropic. It is shown that this requirement can be used for a likelihood estimation that is sensitive to composition without using additional information from other detector components. The analysis shows a clear preference of

  2. Time asymmetries in extensive air showers: a novel method to identify UHECR species

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, M T; Mariazzi, A G; Wahlberg, H; Arqueros, F; García-Pinto, D; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2009.03.001

    2009-01-01

    Azimuthal asymmetries in signals of non vertical showers have been observed in ground arrays of water Cherenkov detectors, like Haverah Park and the Pierre Auger Observatory. The asymmetry in time distributions of arriving particles offers a new possibility for the determination of the mass composition. The dependence of this asymmetry on atmospheric depth shows a clear maximum at a position that is correlated with the primary species. In this work a novel method to determine mass composition based on these features of the ground signals is presented and a Monte Carlo study of its sensitivity is carried out.

  3. Measurement of the Radiation Energy in the Radio Signal of Extensive Air Showers as a Universal Estimator of Cosmic-Ray Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anastasi, Gioacchino Alex; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Blazek, Jiri; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Boháčová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bretz, Thomas; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Anjos, Rita dos; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filipčič, Andrej; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Gamez, Diego; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; Głas, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Keilhauer, Bianca; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Kuempel, Daniel; Mezek, Gasper Kukec; Kunka, Norbert; Awad, Alaa Metwaly Kuotb; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mariş, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano; Micheletti, Maria Isabel; Middendorf, Lukas; Minaya, Ignacio A; Miramonti, Lino; Mitrica, Bogdan; Molina-Bueno, Laura; Mollerach, Silvia; Montanet, François; Morello, Carlo; Mostafá, Miguel; Moura, Celio A; Muller, Marcio Aparecido; Müller, Gero; Müller, Sarah; Navas, Sergio; Necesal, Petr; Nellen, Lukas; Nelles, Anna; Neuser, Jens; Nguyen, Phong H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, Mihai; Niechciol, Marcus; Niemietz, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Nitz, Dave; Nosek, Dalibor; Novotny, Vladimir; Nožka, Lyberis; Núñez, Luis; Ochilo, Livingstone; Oikonomou, Foteini; Olinto, Angela; Pacheco, Noelia; Selmi-Dei, Daniel Pakk; Palatka, Miroslav; Pallotta, Juan; Papenbreer, Philipp; Parente, Gonzalo; Parra, Alejandra; Paul, Thomas; Pech, Miroslav; Pękala, Jan; Pelayo, Rodrigo; Pepe, Iuri; Perrone, Lorenzo; Petermann, Emily; Peters, Christine; Petrera, Sergio; Petrov, Yevgeniy; Phuntsok, Jamyang; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pierog, Tanguy; Pieroni, Pablo; Pimenta, Mário; Pirronello, Valerio; Platino, Manuel; Plum, Matthias; Porcelli, Alessio; Porowski, Czeslaw; Prado, Raul Ribeiro; Privitera, Paolo; Prouza, Michael; Quel, Eduardo J; Querchfeld, Sven; Quinn, Sean; Rautenberg, Julian; Ravel, Olivier; Ravignani, Diego; Reinert, Darius; Revenu, Benoît; Ridky, Jan; Risse, Markus; Ristori, Pablo; Rizi, Vincenzo; de Carvalho, Washington Rodrigues; Rojo, Jorge Rubén Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, Maria Dolores; Rogozin, Dmytro; Rosado, Jaime; Roth, Markus; Roulet, Esteban; Rovero, Adrian; Saffi, Steven J; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Salazar, Humberto; Saleh, Ahmed; Greus, Francisco Salesa; Salina, Gaetano; Gomez, Jose Sanabria; Sánchez, Federico; Sanchez-Lucas, Patricia; Santos, Edivaldo Moura; Santos, Eva; Sarazin, Fred; Sarkar, Biswaijt; Sarmento, Raul; Sarmiento-Cano, Christian; Sato, Ricardo; Scarso, Carlos; Schauer, Markus; Scherini, Viviana; Schieler, Harald; Schmidt, David; Scholten, Olaf; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Schovánek, Petr; Schröder, Frank G; Schulz, Alexander; Schulz, Johannes; Schumacher, Johannes; Sciutto, Sergio; Segreto, Alberto; Settimo, Mariangela; Shadkam, Amir; Shellard, Ronald C; Sigl, Guenter; Sima, Octavian; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Šmída, Radomir; Snow, Gregory; Sommers, Paul; Sonntag, Sebastian; Sorokin, J; Squartini, Ruben; Srivastava, Yogendra N; Stanca, Denis; Stanič, Samo; Stapleton, James; Stasielak, Jaroslaw; Stephan, Maurice; Stutz, Anne; Suarez, Federico; Durán, Mauricio Suarez; Suomijärvi, Tiina; Supanitsky, A Daniel; Sutherland, Michael; Swain, John; Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Taborda, Oscar Alejandro; Tapia, Alex; Tepe, Andreas; Theodoro, Vanessa Menezes; Timmermans, Charles; Peixoto, Carlos J Todero; Toma, Gabriel; Tomankova, Lenka; Tomé, Bernardo; Tonachini, Aurelio; Elipe, Guillermo Torralba; Machado, Diego Torres; Travnicek, Petr; Trini, Marta; Ulrich, Ralf; Unger, Michael; Urban, Martin; Galicia, Jose F Valdés; Valiño, Ines; Valore, Laura; van Aar, Guus; van Bodegom, Patrick; Berg, Ad M van den; van Velzen, Sjoert; van Vliet, Arjen; Varela, Enrique; Cárdenas, Bernardo Vargas; Varner, Gary; Vasquez, Rafael; Vázquez, Jose R; Vázquez, Ricardo; Veberič, Darko; Verzi, Valerio; Vicha, Jakub; Videla, Mariela; Villaseñor, Luis; Vlcek, Brian; Vorobiov, Serguei; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wainberg, Oscar; Walz, David; Watson, Alan; Weber, Marc; Weidenhaupt, Klaus; Weindl, Andreas; Welling, Christoph; Werner, Felix; Widom, Allan; Wiencke, Lawrence; Wilczyński, Henryk; Winchen, Tobias; Wittkowski, David; Wundheiler, Brian; Wykes, Sarka; Yang, Lili; Yapici, Tolga; Yushkov, Alexey; Zas, Enrique; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zavrtanik, Marko; Zepeda, Arnulfo; Zimmermann, Benedikt; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We measure the energy emitted by extensive air showers in the form of radio emission in the frequency range from 30 to 80 MHz. Exploiting the accurate energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory, we obtain a radiation energy of 15.8 \\pm 0.7 (stat) \\pm 6.7 (sys) MeV for cosmic rays with an energy of 1 EeV arriving perpendicularly to a geomagnetic field of 0.24 G, scaling quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy. A comparison with predictions from state-of-the-art first-principle calculations shows agreement with our measurement. The radiation energy provides direct access to the calorimetric energy in the electromagnetic cascade of extensive air showers. Comparison with our result thus allows the direct calibration of any cosmic-ray radio detector against the well-established energy scale of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. Lateral distribution of Cherenkov light in extensive air showers at high mountain altitude produced by different primary particles in wide energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Mishev, A

    2005-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to obtain the lateral distribution of atmospheric Cherenkov light in extensive air showers produced by different primary particles precisely by. protons, Helium, Iron, Oxygen, Carbon, Nitrogen, Calcium, Silicon and gamma quanta in wide energy range at high mountain observation level of Chacaltaya cosmic ray station. The simulations are divided generally in two energy ranges 10GeV-10 TeV and 10 TeV-10 PeV. One large detector has been used for simulations, the aim being to reduce the statistical fluctuations of the obtained characteristics. The shape of the obtained lateral distributions of Cherenkov light in extensive air showers is discussed and the scientific potential for solution of different problems as well.

  5. Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence light from extensive air showers and effect of the aerosol size on the reconstruction of energy and depth of maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Louedec, K

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of the energy and the depth of maximum Xmax of an extensive air shower depends on the multiple scattering of fluorescence photons in the atmosphere. In this work, we explain how atmospheric aerosols, and especially their size, scatter the fluorescence photons during their propagation. Using a Monte Carlo simulation for the scattering of light, the dependence on the aerosol conditions of the multiple scattered light contribution to the recorded signal is fully parameterised. A clear dependence on the aerosol size is proposed for the first time. Finally, using this new parameterisation, the effect of atmospheric aerosols on the energy and on the Xmax reconstructions is presented for a typical extensive air shower observed by a ground-based detector: a systematic over-estimation of these two quantities is observed if aerosols of large size are neglected in the estimation of the multiple scattered fraction.

  6. Investigation of the radio wavefront of air showers with LOPES measurements and CoREAS simulations (ARENA 2014)

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, F G; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schoo, S; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the radio wavefront of cosmic-ray air showers with LOPES measurements and CoREAS simulations: the wavefront is of approximately hyperbolic shape and its steepness is sensitive to the shower maximum. For this study we used 316 events with an energy above 0.1 EeV and zenith angles below $45^\\circ$ measured by the LOPES experiment. LOPES was a digital radio interferometer consisting of up to 30 antennas on an area of approximately 200 m x 200 m at an altitude of 110 m above sea level. Triggered by KASCADE-Grande, LOPES measured the radio emission between 43 and 74 MHz, and our analysis might strictly hold only for such conditions. Moreover, we used CoREAS simulations made for each event, which show much clearer results than the measurements suffering from high background. A detailed description of our result is available in our recent paper published in JCAP09(2014)025. The present proceeding contains a summary and focuses on some additional aspects, e.g., the asymmetry of the wavefront: Accordin...

  7. Numerical simulations of compact intracloud discharges as the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche-Extensive Air Shower process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Nag, A.; Rakov, V. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Compact intracloud discharges (CIDs) are sources of the powerful, often isolated radio pulses emitted by thunderstorms. The VLF-LF radio pulses are called narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs). It is still not clear how CIDs are produced, but two categories of theoretical models that have previously been considered are the Transmission Line (TL) model and the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche-Extensive Air Showers (RREA-EAS) model. In this paper, we perform numerical calculations of RREA-EASs for various electric field configurations inside thunderstorms. The results of these calculations are compared to results from the other models and to the experimental data. Our analysis shows that different theoretical models predict different fundamental characteristics for CIDs. Therefore, many previously published properties of CIDs are highly model dependent. This is because of the fact that measurements of the radiation field usually provide information about the current moment of the source, and different physical models with different discharge currents could have the same current moment. We have also found that although the RREA-EAS model could explain the current moments of CIDs, the required electric fields in the thundercloud are rather large and may not be realistic. Furthermore, the production of NBPs from RREA-EAS requires very energetic primary cosmic ray particles, not observed in nature. If such ultrahigh-energy particles were responsible for NBPs, then they should be far less frequent than is actually observed.

  8. Results from hadroproduction in p+C collisions at the CERN SPS for understanding of extensive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysing extensive air showers resulting from interaction of cosmic particles with the Earth's atmosphere is a major experimental technique of studying high-energy cosmic rays, whose cross-sections are too low for efficient direct detection. Unfortunately, the modeling of many important observables of such showers strongly depends on the applied model of low-energy hadronic interactions, with significant differences between them. It has been shown that many constraints to be applied to these models can be obtained by studying identified-particle spectra from accelerator collisions - in particular at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, whose energy range matches well that of final hadroproduction in high-energy EAS observed by such experiments as KASCADE, KASCADE-Grande and Pierre Auger Observatory. Here we present soon-to-be-published measurements of the pion production cross-section obtained by the NA61/SHINE experiment at the SPS, in proton-carbon collisions at the beam energy of 31 GeV from the year 2007. Further analyses of identified-particle yields in SHINE, in particular with a pion beam, are in preparation.

  9. Extensive air showers generated by protons, nuclei, gamma-quanta and neutrinos at energy range 1 - 100 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Arsov, T. P.; Borisov, S. S.; Musin, F. I.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Mirzafatikhov, R. M.; Kasparov, G. M.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Platonov, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Basic science: nuclear physics, physics of elementary particles and connected with them astrophysics and cosmology, has studied the structure of matter on micro and macro scales. Gamma-astronomy and neutrino-astronomy, are unique experimental possibilities to search for high-energy cosmic ray sources (1012 - 1014 eV). Evidence has already been obtained of metagalactic sources exceeding by 106 - 1012 times the power of gamma-quanta galactic sources. This data puts into doubt the assumption about the galactic origin of the observed very high energy cosmic radiation. The energy spectrum of the majority of known gamma-sources with energy 1012 - 1014 eV is harder than the proton and cosmic ray nuclei spectrum. The problem of observing extensive air showers generated by neutrinos is connected with the extremely small effective cross-section of inelastic collisions of neutrinos with nuclei. However, two facts allow a search for showers generated by neutrinos. The hadron cascade with primary energy of more than 1012 eV leaves the ground to atmosphere from depth of ~ 300 g/cm2 without essential loss of total energy in the hadron cascade. The Cherenkov radiation in the atmosphere from such hadron cascades will be observed at distances from the telescope of 7.5 km over an area more than 7 . 105 m2. This partially compensates for the small cross-section of inelastic neutrino collisions. RFBR, FNP, GNTP

  10. Possibility of Using a Satellite-Based Detector for Recording Cherenkov Light from Ultrahigh-Energy Extensive Air Showers Penetrating into the Ocean Water

    CERN Document Server

    Shustova, O P; Khrenov, B A

    2011-01-01

    We have estimated the reflected component of Cherenkov radiation, which arises in developing of an extensive air shower with primary energy of 10^20 eV over the ocean surface. It has been shown that, under conditions of the TUS experiment, a flash of the reflected Cherenkov photons at the end of the fluorescence track can be identified in showers with zenith angles up to 20 degrees.

  11. Reconstruction of air shower muon densities using segmented counters with time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ravignani, D; Melo, D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant experimental effort made in the last decades, the origin of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays is still largely unknown. Key astrophysical information to identify where these energetic particles come from is provided by their chemical composition. It is well known that a very sensitive tracer of the primary particle type is the muon content of the showers generated by the interaction of the cosmic rays with air molecules. We introduce a likelihood function to reconstruct particle densities using segmented detectors with time resolution. As an example of this general method, we fit the muon distribution at ground level using an array of counters like AMIGA, one of the Pierre Auger Observatory detectors. For this particular case we compare the reconstruction performance against a previous method. With the new technique, more events can be reconstructed than before. In addition the statistical uncertainty of the measured number of muons is reduced, allowing for a better discrimination of t...

  12. Reconstruction of air shower muon densities using segmented counters with time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravignani, D.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Melo, D.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the significant experimental effort made in the last decades, the origin of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays is still largely unknown. Key astrophysical information to identify where these energetic particles come from is provided by their chemical composition. It is well known that a very sensitive tracer of the primary particle type is the muon content of the showers generated by the interaction of the cosmic rays with air molecules. We introduce a likelihood function to reconstruct particle densities using segmented detectors with time resolution. As an example of this general method, we fit the muon distribution at ground level using an array of counters like AMIGA, one of the Pierre Auger Observatory detectors. For this particular case we compare the reconstruction performance against a previous method. With the new technique, more events can be reconstructed than before. In addition the statistical uncertainty of the measured number of muons is reduced, allowing for a better discrimination of the cosmic ray primary mass.

  13. Energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays from 1016eV to 1019eV determined from air showers observed at 5200 m a.s.l

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy spectra of primary cosmic rays from 1016eV to 1019eV have been determined from electron-sizes as well as from muon-sizes of the same air showers observed at Mt. Chacaltaya. The spectrum from electron-sizes is significantly higher than that from muon-sizes. The discrepancy is discussed and an explanation is given under the assumption of possible existence of copious direct production of photons besides the production of charged and neutral pions at these high energies. The spectra are also compared with those by other groups and the discrepancies are discussed. (author)

  14. Influence of laser array performance on spectrally combined beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Yang, Lei; Zhong, Zheqiang; Zhang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Incoherent spectral beam combining (SBC) of multiple laser beams is accomplished along the emitters' arraying direction. Considering that the output beams from a laser array (LA) usually have deflection angles, positional displacements and divergence angles even after being collimated, a propagation model of SBC systems based on multilayer dielectric gratings has been built up. On the basis, properties of the spectrally combined beam affected by parameters of the LA have been discussed in detail. Simulation results show that with the increase in the deflection angle, both the power and the beam quality of the combined beam degrade dramatically. The positional displacement has little impact on the intensity distribution and the beam quality of combined beam but change the wavelength composition of the combined beam. The divergence angle strongly affects the intensity distribution and the beam quality of the combined beam. Additionally, the effect of the deflection angle on the output beam quality is more obvious and may shift the beam spot when comparing with that of the divergence angle.

  15. Perspective of detecting very high energy gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei with Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Yuan, Qiang; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Feng-Rong; Jia, Huan-Yu

    2016-10-01

    The detectability of active galactic nuclei (AGN), a major class of γ-ray emitters in the sky, by the newly planned Chinese project, Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), is investigated. The expectation is primarily based on the AGN catalog of Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT), with an extrapolation to the very high energy (VHE) range taking into account the absorption effect by the extragalactic background light (EBL). It is found that LHAASO may have the potential to detect more than several tens of the Fermi detected AGN, basically BL Lacertaes, with one-year sky survey. The capability of measuring the energy spectrum and light curve are also discussed.

  16. The non-destructive measurement of soil water content of upper part of the cave using soft component of air shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, A.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Okubo, S.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a new radiographic method to measure the time variation of the water content of the soil with soft component of air shower. Air shower produced by a primary cosmic ray consists of hard component and soft component. Hard component is mainly consists of muon, and soft components is consists of electron, positron and photon. The penetration power of soft component is weaker than that of hard component, so soft component is suitable for small scale structure thinner than 2 kg/cm2 equivalent to 20m thick water, like buildings and small hills. But it requires particle identification which means distinguishing hard component and soft component. Particle identification can be done with strong magnets and dense detectors, but it is very hard to use that kind of detector for radiography because of their weight and cost. We established the cheap and effective method to distinguish soft component and hard component statistically. We also performed measurements in Arimura observation pit of Mt. Sakurajima, Japan. As a result of this observation, we found there is an anti-correlation between soft component flux and rainfall. If the water content of the soil became larger, the amount of absorption increases. So this result can be interpreted as detecting the increase of the water content by soft component flux. This method can be applied for the quantitive compensation of the measurement data like absolute gravitymeter data and tiltmeter data which is easy to receive turbulence by rain. It is also expected that the quantitive compensation leads to the improvement in accuracy of diastrophism measurement and the improvement in presumed accuracy of magma movement inside a volcano. We will report this newly developed radiography method using soft component for small scale structure in detail and the result of measurement. Further improvement and possible application are also discussed.

  17. Combined Approach for Nonuniformity Correction in Infrared Focal Plane Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hui

    2009-01-01

    A new algorithm of nonuniformity correction for infrared focal plane array(IRFPA) is reported,which is a combined algorithm based on both the two-point correction and artificial neural networks correction.The combined algorithm is calibrated by two-point correction,and the calibrated correction coefficients are automatically modified by BP algorithm.So it is not only calibrated,but also real-time processed.In adaptive nonuniformity correction algorithm,the phenomena ghost artifact and target fade-out are avoided by edge extraction.In order to get intensified image,the modified median filters are adopted.The simulated data indicates the proposed scheme is an effective algorithm.

  18. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  19. The offline software package for analysis of radio emission from air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraenkel, Eric Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In anticipation of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) to be built at the Pierre Auger Observatory, radio functionality has been built into the Offline analysis framework. For the purpose of radio-hybrid analysis and to facilitate a standardized treatment of simulation as well as experimental d

  20. NICHE: The Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the Cosmic Ray (CR) nuclear composition around and above the Knee (~ 10^15.5 eV) has been difficult due to uncertainties inherent to the measurement techniques and/or dependence on hadronic Monte Carlo simulation models required to interpret the data. Measurement of the Cherenkov air shower signal, calibrated with air fluorescence measurements, offers a methodology to provide an accurate measurement of the nuclear composition evolution over a large energy range. NICHE will use an array of widely-spaced, non-imaging Cherenkov counters to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air shower Cherenkov signal to extract CR nuclear composition measurements and to cross-calibrate the Cherenkov energy and composition measurements with TA/TALE fluorescence and surface detector measurements.

  1. Design study of an air-Cherenkov telescope for harsh environments with efficient air-shower detection at 100 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Auffenberg, Jan; Middendorf, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Rädel, Leif; Schaufel, Merlin; Schoenen, Sebastian; Schumacher, Johannes; Wiebusch, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Telescopes, designed with semi-conductor based photo sensors, have the potential to detect Cherenkov or fluorescence light emitted by cosmic-rays in the atmosphere. Such telescopes promise a high duty cycle and efficiency in remote harsh environments. Given the relatively low costs and robustness of these instruments, this technology could prove interesting especially if deployed in large numbers with existing and future extended cosmic-ray and gamma ray detectors, including the Pierre Auger observatory, HAWC, IceCube and CTA. They may have the potential to enhance the sensitivity of these instruments for the detection of high-energy gamma rays and cosmic-ray air showers. In addition, for neutrino telescopes such a technology could prove to be an efficient cosmic-ray veto on the surface. In this contribution the current motivation, design, and development of a prototype SiPM based air Cherenkov telescope is described. The results of initial sensitivity studies, and the readiness of the system for first tests,...

  2. The performance of a prototype array of water Cherenkov detectors for the LHAASO project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large high-altitude air-shower observatory (LHAASO) is to be built at Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, China. This observatory is intended to conduct sub-TeV gamma astronomy, and as an important component of the LHAASO project, a water Cherenkov detector array (WCDA) is proposed. To investigate engineering issues and fully understand the water Cherenkov technique for detecting air showers, a prototype array at 1% scale of the LHAASO-WCDA has been built at Yang-Ba-Jing, Tibet, China. This paper introduces the prototype array setup and studies its performance by counting rate of each photomultiplier tube (PMT), trigger rates at different PMT multiplicities, and responses to air showers. Finally, the reconstructed shower directions and angular resolutions of the detected showers for the prototype array are given. -- Highlights: • The technique of the water Cherenkov array is studied. • Engineering issues of the water Cherenkov array are investigated. • The PMTs and electronics of the water Cherenkov array are tested. • Some key parameters of the water Cherenkov array are measured

  3. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array (PISA 2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about View the $17\\,$km$^2$, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of...

  4. Results on the spectrum and composition of cosmic rays from the IceTop air shower array of the IceCube Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilav Serap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on measurements of the energy spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays above 1 PeV with the data taken during the construction phase of the IceTop and IceCube detectors. We discuss our current systematics and observation of a structure in the energy spectrum above 20 PeV where the mass composition gets heavier than iron nuclei.

  5. EAS selection in the EMMA underground array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkamo, J.; Bezrukov, L.; Enqvist, T.;

    2013-01-01

    The first measurements of the Experiment with MultiMuon Array (EMMA) have been analyzed for the selection of the Extensive Air Showers (EAS). Test data were recorded with an underground muon tracking station and a satellite station separated laterally by 10 metres. Events with tracks distributed...... over all of the tracking detector area and even extending over to the satellite station are identified as EAS. The recorded multiplicity spectrum of the events is in general agreement with CORSIKA EAS simulation and demonstrates the array's capability of EAS detection....

  6. Readout electronics for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, R.; Bai, L.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Yang, C.; Cao, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), supported by IHEP of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a multipurpose project with a complex detectors array for high energy gamma ray and cosmic ray detection. The Wide Field of view Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA), as one of the components of the LHAASO project, aim to tag each primary particle that causes an air shower. The WFCTA is a portable telescope array used to detect cosmic ray spectra. The design of the readout electronics of the WFCTA is described in this paper Sixteen photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), together with their readout electronics are integrated into a single sub-cluster. To maintain good resolution and linearity over a wide dynamic range, a dual-gain amplification configuration on an analog board is used The digital board contains two 16channel 14-bit, 50 Msps analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and its power consumption, noise level, and relative deviation are all tested.

  7. First results of the Standalone Antenna Array of the CODALEMA Radio Detection Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    A, Belletoile

    2011-01-01

    CODALEMA is one of the pioneer experiments dedicated to the recent field of cosmic ray radio detection. It is located at the radio observatory of Nancay (France). The detector setup combined until recently a ground particle detector and an array of active dipole antennas covering a total area of 0.25 km^2. The experiment is now going through a major upgrade with the deployment around the existing apparatus of a Standalone Antenna Array, which consists of 60 standalone new generation radio-detection stations and which will cover an area of 1.5 km^2 (33 stations deployed over the spring of 2011 and 27 stations to be deployed in late 2011). This new setup is intended to tackle the remaining unknowns of extensive air shower radio detection so as to make this technique a reliable and mature tool for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) physics. The latest results from the original CODALEMA array are discussed together with the first results of the Standalone Antenna Array.

  8. Beam splitter and combiner based on Bloch oscillations in spatially modulated waveguide arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zhong, Weiping; Wen, Feng; Guo, Yang; Guo, Yao; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate the light beam propagation in periodic waveguide arrays which are elaborately modulated with certain structures. We find that the light beam may split, coalesce, deflect, and be localized during propagation in these spatially modulated waveguide arrays. All the phenomena originate from Bloch oscillations, and supply possible method for fabricating on-chip beam splitters and beam combiners.

  9. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment to explore the highest energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah,USA, is designed for observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  10. Formation of Combined Surface Features of Protrusion Array and Wrinkles atop Shape-Memory Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, W. M.; Tong, T. H.

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective approach to realize two combined surface features of different scales together, namely submillimeter-sized protrusion array and microwrinkles, atop a polystyrene shape-memory polymer. Two different types of protrusions, namely flat-top protrusion and crown-shaped protrusion, were studied. The array of protrusions was produced by the Indentation-Polishing-Heating (IPH) process. Compactly packed steel balls were used for making array of indents. A thin gold layer was sputter deposited atop the polymer surface right after polishing. After heating for shape recovery, array of protrusions with wrinkles on the top due to the buckling of gold layer was produced.

  11. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosin V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014. The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ⋅ 1015–1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  12. Combined array CGH plus SNP genome analyses in a single assay for optimized clinical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bi, Weimin; Shaw, Chad; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Pursley, Amber N; Lalani, Seema; Hixson, Patricia; Gambin, Tomasz; Tsai, Chun-hui; Bock, Hans-Georg; Descartes, Maria; Probst, Frank J; Scaglia, Fernando; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lupski, James R; Eng, Christine; Cheung, Sau Wai; Bacino, Carlos; Patel, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, both array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping have proven to be powerful genomic technologies utilized for the evaluation of developmental delay, multiple congenital anomalies, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Differences in the ability to resolve genomic changes between these arrays may constitute an implementation challenge for clinicians: which platform (SNP vs array CGH) might best detect the underlying genetic cause for the disease in the patient? While only SNP arrays enable the detection of copy number neutral regions of absence of heterozygosity (AOH), they have limited ability to detect single-exon copy number variants (CNVs) due to the distribution of SNPs across the genome. To provide comprehensive clinical testing for both CNVs and copy-neutral AOH, we enhanced our custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array that has exon-targeted coverage of 1860 genes with 60,000 SNP probes, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis - Comprehensive (CMA-COMP). Of the 3240 cases evaluated by this array, clinically significant CNVs were detected in 445 cases including 21 cases with exonic events. In addition, 162 cases (5.0%) showed at least one AOH region >10 Mb. We demonstrate that even though this array has a lower density of SNP probes than other commercially available SNP arrays, it reliably detected AOH events >10 Mb as well as exonic CNVs beyond the detection limitations of SNP genotyping. Thus, combining SNP probes and exon-targeted array CGH into one platform provides clinically useful genetic screening in an efficient manner.

  13. A Monte Carlo study to measure the energy spectra of the primary cosmic-ray components at the knee using a new Tibet AS core detector array

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Chen, W Y; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; He, Z T; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Li, W J; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Liu, C; Liu, J S; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Qian, X L; Qu, X B; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shao, J; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, H; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yang, Z; Yasue, S; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhai, L M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2013-01-01

    A new hybrid experiment has been started by AS{\\gamma} experiment at Tibet, China, since August 2011, which consists of a low threshold burst-detector-grid (YAC-II, Yangbajing Air shower Core array), the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water Cherenkov muon detector (MD). In this paper, the capability of the measurement of the chemical components (proton, helium and iron) with use of the (Tibet-III+YAC-II) is investigated by means of an extensive Monte Carlo simulation in which the secondary particles are propagated through the (Tibet-III+YAC-II) array and an artificial neural network (ANN) method is applied for the primary mass separation. Our simulation shows that the new installation is powerful to study the chemical compositions, in particular, to obtain the primary energy spectrum of the major component at the knee.

  14. Reconstruction of events from the Radio Array AERA using a spherical shower shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is in operation at the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory. It consists of 24 LPDA antennas and is designed to measure cosmic ray induced air showers by the detection of the radio pulse emitted during the shower development. The shape of the radio pulse is expected to exhibit a curvature. Assuming the incoming radio signal to be a spherical wave, its 3-dimensional space point can be reconstructed using the arrival times of the radio pulse if observed at at least four antenna positions. We analyze the first AERA data using this method and search for nearby radio wave point sources and cosmic ray induced air showers.

  15. Arrays is Space to detect Upward Tau and Highest Altitude Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2001-01-01

    Ultra High Energy, UHE, upward Tau neutrinos Tau, anti-neutrino Tau, above hundred TeVs and up to tens PeV energies, of relevant astrophysical nature, may lead to UHE Taus and consequent Up-ward Tau air-Showers {UPTAUS} after interaction on Earth crust surface. The UPTAUS discover may open a new UHE Tau Neutrino Astrophysics. A new generation of Gamma, X, optical and Radio Arrays in Space may discover, in the same Auger spirit, such up-coming Air-showers as well as an additional Tau signal: the nearly Horizontal Tau AIR-Shower {HORTAUS} originated by UHE neutrinos tau at 10^{19} eV energies arising from a thin Earth crust corona at few tens of degree below the horizons; a degree above the horizons, there should be over common diffused cosmic ray albedo, an additional High Altitudes (nearly Horizontal) Showers {HIAS}, by more common Cosmic Rays primaries at PeVs up to EeV and ZeV energies, both of hadronic or of electro-magnetic $\\gamma$ nature. Mini-arrays detectors in high Altitude Balloons tails facing the ...

  16. Combining nanoimprint lithography with dynamic templating for the fabrication of dense, large-area nanoparticle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golze, Spencer D.

    The study of nanomaterials is a developing science with potentially large benefits in the development of catalysts, optical and chemical sensors, and solid state memory devices. As several of these devices require large arrays of nanoparticles, one of the greatest obstacles in material characterization and device development is the reliable manufacture of nanopatterns over a large surface area. In addition, various applications require different nanoparticle size and density. High density arrays with small nanoparticle sizes are difficult to achieve over a large surface area using current manufacturing processes. Herein, Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) and Dynamic Templating are combined to create a new manufacturing process capable of developing high density arrays with small nanoparticle sizes. The NIL process involves the stamping of a polymer coated substrate by a silicon stamp with patterned nanofeatures. The stamp is then removed, leaving the pattern in the polymer, which is first etched and then coated with a thin layer of metal, filling the recessed regions of the pattern. The excess polymer is dissolved, leaving a pattern of nanoparticles on the substrate matching the pattern on the stamp. When Dynamic Templating is applied, a very thin layer of metal can be coated, which forms small nanoparticle sizes when dewetted. A custom NIL system has been developed to combine these two processes together, which has now proven to yield consistent large-area, dense arrays with a small nanoparticle size. An array spacing of 700 nm has been achieved, along with a nanoparticle size of 90 nm. Arrays have been created in gold and palladium, where there is now the potential to combine them with other solution-based syntheses which should lead to complex nanoparticle geometries suitable for sensor applications.

  17. A comparison of minimum norm and MUSIC for a combined MEG/EEG sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, H.; Argin, F.; Klinkenbusch, L.

    2012-09-01

    Many different algorithms for imaging neuronal activity with magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG) have been developed so far. We validate the result of other authors that a combined MEG/EEG sensor array provides smaller source localisation errors than a single MEG or single EEG sensor array for the same total number of sensors. We show that Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) provides smaller localisation errors than an unweighted minimum norm method for activity located in the cortical sulcus regions. This is important for many medical applications, e.g. the localisation of the origin of epileptic seizures (focal epilepsy) that can be located very deep in the cortical sulcus.

  18. Electrostatic Discharge Test of Multi-Junction Solar Array Coupons After Combined Space Environmental Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Hoang, Bao; Funderburk, Victor V.; Wong, Frankie; Gardiner, George

    2010-01-01

    A set of multi-junction GaAs/Ge solar array test coupons were subjected to a sequence of 5-year increments of combined environmental exposure tests. The test coupons capture an integrated design intended for use in a geosynchronous (GEO) space environment. A key component of this test campaign is conducting electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests in the inverted gradient mode. The protocol of the ESD tests is based on the ISO/CD 11221, the ISO standard for ESD testing on solar array panels. This standard is currently in its final review with expected approval in 2010. The test schematic in the ISO reference has been modified with Space System/Loral designed circuitry to better simulate the on-orbit operational conditions of its solar array design. Part of the modified circuitry is to simulate a solar array panel coverglass flashover discharge. All solar array coupons used in the test campaign consist of 4 cells. The ESD tests are performed at the beginning of life (BOL) and at each 5-year environment exposure point. The environmental exposure sequence consists of UV radiation, electron/proton particle radiation, thermal cycling, and ion thruster plume. This paper discusses the coverglass flashover simulation, ESD test setup, and the importance of the electrical test design in simulating the on-orbit operational conditions. Results from 5th-year testing are compared to the baseline ESD characteristics determined at the BOL condition.

  19. Propagation of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Rumao; Si, Lei; Ma, Yanxing; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2012-08-10

    The propagation properties of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions through non-Kolmogorov turbulence are studied in detail both analytically and numerically. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the beam width of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions propagating through turbulence are derived based on the combination of statistical optics methods and the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The effect of beam distortions, such as amplitude modulation and phase fluctuation, is studied by numerical examples. The numerical results reveal that phase fluctuations have significant influence on the spreading of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays in non-Kolmogorov turbulence, and the effects of the phase fluctuations can be negligible as long as the phase fluctuations are controlled under a certain level, i.e., a>0.05 for the situation considered in the paper. Furthermore, large phase fluctuations can convert the beam distribution rapidly to a Gaussian form, vary the spreading, weaken the optimum truncation effects, and suppress the dependence of spreading on the parameters of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  20. Phase-Locked Fibre Array for Coherent Combination and Atmosphere Aberration Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing; XIAO Rui

    2006-01-01

    We report a fibre amplifier array that not only achieves coherent beam combination by compensation of phase noises of fibre amplifier, but also accomplishes correction of atmosphere aberration. It is of master-oscillatormultiple-amplifier (MOPA) configuration, which can be phase-locked by the multidither principle or heterodyne detection principle. First laboratory experiments of atmosphere aberration compensation of a three-element fibre amplifier array are reported. The atmosphere aberration is created by a phase screen in the experiment. The phase changes of the beam, which are introduced by the fibre amplifier and the phase screen, are both detected by the heterodyne detection method. Phase modulators are controlled to compensate for the phase in the three paths. No matter whether there is a phase screen producing atmosphere aberration or not, the dim dynamic interference fringes in the far field turn to a clear and stable pattern, and the peak intensity is maximized. It is indicated that the fibre amplifier array is phase-locked, and coherent combination of the three beams is achieved.It can be used not only to obtain high power fibre laser array but also in laser space communication.

  1. Alborz-I array: A simulation on performance and properties of the array around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Soheila; Bahmanabadi, Mahmud; Pezeshkian, Yousef; Mortazavi Moghaddam, Saba

    2016-03-01

    The first phase of the Alborz Observatory Array (Alborz-I) consists of 20 plastic scintillation detectors each one with surface area of 0.25 m2spread over an area of 40 × 40 m2 realized to the study of Extensive Air Showers around the knee at the Sharif University of Technology campus. The first stage of the project including construction and operation of a prototype system has now been completed and the electronics that will be used in the array instrument has been tested under field conditions. In order to achieve a realistic estimate of the array performance, a large number of simulated CORSIKA showers have been used. In the present work, theoretical results obtained in the study of different array layouts and trigger conditions are described. Using Monte Carlo simulations of showers the rate of detected events per day and the trigger probability functions, i.e., the probability for an extensive air shower to trigger a ground based array as a function of the shower core distance to the center of array are presented for energies above 1 TeV and zenith angles up to 60°. Moreover, the angular resolution of the Alborz-I array is obtained.

  2. Alborz-I array: a simulation on performance and properties of the array around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi, Soheila; Bahmanabadi, Mahmud; Pezeshkian, Yousef; Moghaddam, Saba Mortazavi

    2014-01-01

    The first phase of the Alborz Observatory Array (Alborz-I) consists of 20 plastic scintillation detectors each one with surface area of 0.25 $m^{2}$ spread over an area of 40$\\times$40 $m^{2}$ realized to the study of Extensive Air Showers around the $\\it knee$ at the Sharif University of Technology campus. The first stage of the project including construction and operation of a prototype system has now been completed and the electronics that will be used in the array instrument has been test...

  3. A digital combining-weight estimation algorithm for broadband sources with the array feed compensation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for estimating the optimum combining weights for the Ka-band (33.7-GHz) array feed compensation system was developed and analyzed. The input signal is assumed to be broadband radiation of thermal origin, generated by a distant radio source. Currently, seven video converters operating in conjunction with the real-time correlator are used to obtain these weight estimates. The algorithm described here requires only simple operations that can be implemented on a PC-based combining system, greatly reducing the amount of hardware. Therefore, system reliability and portability will be improved.

  4. Primary proton and helium spectra at energy range from 50 TeV to 1015 eV observed with the new Tibet AS core detector array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jing

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new EAS hybrid experiment has been designed by constructing a YAC (Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array inside the existing Tibet-III air shower array. The first step of YAC, called “YAC-I” has been successfully carried out in 2009–2010 together with Tibet-III air-shower array. YAC-II has also been operated from 2011. Preliminary results of YAC-I and performance of YAC-II are presented in this paper. The primary proton and helium spectra at energy range from50 TeV to 1015 eV derived from YAC-I data based on QGSJET2 and SIBYLL2.1 are reported. The obtained P+He spectrum is smoothly connected with directobservation data below 100 TeV and also with our previously reported results at higher energies within statistical error s. Based on these results and the sharp kneeof all-particle energy spectrum observed by our experiment, the possible origin of the sharp knee is discussed. See the published papers.

  5. Combining 3D structure with glycan array data provides insight into the origin of glycan specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Oliver C; Tessier, Matthew B; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Foley, Bethany L; Woods, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Defining how a glycan-binding protein (GBP) specifically selects its cognate glycan from among the ensemble of glycans within the cellular glycome is an area of intense study. Powerful insight into recognition mechanisms can be gained from 3D structures of GBPs complexed to glycans; however, such structures remain difficult to obtain experimentally. Here an automated 3D structure generation technique, called computational carbohydrate grafting, is combined with the wealth of specificity information available from glycan array screening. Integration of the array data with modeling and crystallography allows generation of putative co-complex structures that can be objectively assessed and iteratively altered until a high level of agreement with experiment is achieved. Given an accurate model of the co-complexes, grafting is also able to discern which binding determinants are active when multiple potential determinants are present within a glycan. In some cases, induced fit in the protein or glycan was necessary to explain the observed specificity, while in other examples a revised definition of the minimal binding determinants was required. When applied to a collection of 10 GBP-glycan complexes, for which crystallographic and array data have been reported, grafting provided a structural rationalization for the binding specificity of >90% of 1223 arrayed glycans. A webtool that enables researchers to perform computational carbohydrate grafting is available at www.glycam.org/gr (accessed 03 March 2016).

  6. A 16 element quasi-optical FET oscillator power combining array with external injection locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Joel; Itoh, Tatsuo

    1992-03-01

    The authors present analysis, design and experimental results of a 16 element planar oscillator array for quasi-optical power combining. Each element in the array consists of a single FET oscillator with an input port for injection of the locking signal, and an output port which is connected to a patch radiator. The array is synchronized using a 16-way power dividing network which distributes the locking signal to the oscillating elements. The array is constructed using a two-sided microstrip configuration, with the oscillators and feed network on one side of a ground plane, and the patch radiators on the opposite side. An effective radiated power (ERP) of 28.2 W CW with an isotropic conversion gain of 9.9 dB was measured at 6 GHz. For an injected power of 10.3 dBm, a locking range of 453 MHz at a center frequency of 6.015 GHz was obtained; a bandwidth of 7.5 percent. Because of the simple nature of the individual oscillator elements, this approach is well suited to MMIC implementation.

  7. SST-GATE: A dual mirror telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Zech, A; Blake, S; Boisson, C; Costille, C; De-Frondat, F; Dournaux, J -L; Dumas, D; Fasola, G; Greenshaw, T; Hervet, O; Huet, J -M; Laporte, P; Rulten, C; Savoie, D; Sayede, F; Schmoll, J

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the world's first open observatory for very high energy gamma-rays. Around a hundred telescopes of different sizes will be used to detect the Cherenkov light that results from gamma-ray induced air showers in the atmosphere. Amongst them, a large number of Small Size Telescopes (SST), with a diameter of about 4 m, will assure an unprecedented coverage of the high energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum (above ~1TeV to beyond 100 TeV) and will open up a new window on the non-thermal sky. Several concepts for the SST design are currently being investigated with the aim of combining a large field of view (~9 degrees) with a good resolution of the shower images, as well as minimizing costs. These include a Davies-Cotton configuration with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) based camera, as pioneered by FACT, and a novel and as yet untested design based on the Schwarzschild-Couder configuration, which uses a secondary mirror to reduce the plate-scale and to all...

  8. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Schwanke, U; Sulanke, K -H; Vorobiov, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E>20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger wi...

  9. Simulating a Measurement of the 2nd Knee in the Cosmic Ray Spectrum with an Atmospheric Fluorescence Telescope Tower Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescence telescope tower array has been designed to measure cosmic rays in the energy range of 1017–1018 eV. A full Monte Carlo simulation, including air shower production, light generation and propagation, detector response, electronics, and trigger system, has been developed for that purpose. Using such a simulation tool, the detector configuration, which includes one main tower array and two side-trigger arrays, 24 telescopes in total, has been optimized. The aperture and the event rate have been estimated. Furthermore, the performance of the Xmax⁡ technique in measuring composition has also been studied.

  10. Efficiency and uniformity measurements of a light concentrator in combination with a SiPM array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rihl, Mariana, E-mail: mariana.rihl@assoc.oeaw.ac.at [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Brunner, Stefan Enrico; Gruber, Lukas [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, Karlsplatz 13, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Marton, Johann; Suzuki, Ken [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-21

    A position sensitive Cherenkov detector was built, consisting of 64 SiPMs with an active area of 3×3 mm{sup 2} and a pixel size of 100×100μm{sup 2}. The sensitive area is increased by a light concentrator which consists of 64 pyramid-shaped funnels. These funnels have an entrance area of 7×7 mm{sup 2} and an exit area of 3×3 mm{sup 2}, guaranteeing a sufficient position resolution e.g. for the barrel DIRC detector of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The efficiency and uniformity of the light concentrator in combination with the SiPM array was tested by scanning the array in two dimensions, using a pulsed light beam. Results of these tests and comparison with simulations are given here.

  11. Efficiency and uniformity measurements of a light concentrator in combination with a SiPM array

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, Mariana; Gruber, Lukas; Marton, Johann; Suzuk, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A position sensitive Cherenkov detector was built, consisting of 64 SiPMs with an active area of 3x3 mm^2 and a pixel size of 100x100 \\mu m^2. The sensitive area is increased by a light concentrator which consists of 64 pyramid-shaped funnels. These funnels have an entrance area of 7x7 mm^2 and an exit area of 3x3 mm^2, guaranteeing a sufficient position resolution e.g. for the barrel DIRC detector of the PANDA experiment at FAIR. The efficiency and uniformity of the light concentrator in combination with the SiPM array was tested by scanning the array in two dimensions, using a pulsed light beam. Results of these tests and comparison with simulations are given here.

  12. Power combiners/dividers for loop pickup and kicker arrays for FNAL stochastic cooling rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.K.; Nemetz, R.

    1985-05-01

    The anti-proton accumulator and debuncher at FNAL will use stochastic methods to ''cool'' the beam. Pairs of quarter-wavelength directional-coupler loops are used to detect and kick the beam. The loops are copper plates which are flush with the upper and lower wall of a rectangular beam pipe. The plates, when surrounded by a properly sized pocket, form a 100-ohm transmission-line directional coupler. As the beam passes, a signal which gives position and time information, is induced in the plates. But, because the signal levels are low (<.5 picowatts per pair), a power combiner (usually several primary combiners feeding a secondary combiner) is used to combine the outputs of many loops. Subsequently, the combined signal is amplified, filtered and then fed into a divider, (that is, a combiner operating in reverse). The divider distributes the signal into a different set of loops which modify (kick) the beam's position. Since the loop couplers are arranged linearly, in arrays of various lengths, combiners also provide a convenient method of reducing the number of vacuum feedthroughs and preamplifiers and their related costs in performance and dollars. In this note we describe various stripline combiner systems that add the outputs of 4, 8, 16 or 32 loops.

  13. Data Acquisition, Triggering, and Filtering at the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, J L

    2012-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is currently detecting cosmic rays of energies at and above 10^17 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory, by triggering on the radio emission produced in the associated air showers. The radio-detection technique must cope with a significant background of man-made radio-frequency interference, but can provide information on shower development with a high duty cycle. We discuss our techniques to handle the challenges of self-triggered radio detection in a low-power autonomous array, including triggering and filtering algorithms, data acquisition design, and communication systems.

  14. JouFLU: an upgraded FLUOR beam combiner at the CHARA Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomé, E.; Scott, N.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Mollier, B.; Reess, J. M.; Chapron, F.; Buey, T.; Sevin, A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Coudé du Foresto, V.

    2012-07-01

    FLUOR, which has been operational on CHARA since 2002, is an infrared fiber beam combiner. The telescope array will soon be fitted with an adaptive optics system, which will enhance the interferometer performance. In this framework, FLUOR has been entirely redeveloped and will be able to measure visibilities with higher accuracy and better sensitivity. The technical upgrades consist of improving some existing systems and developing new features. The bench, which is now remotely operable, primarily offers spectral dispersion (long fringes scanning), a more sensitive camera and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer mode. This paper presents the detailed opto-mechanical design of JouFLU (FLUOR rejuvenation), and the current instrument status.

  15. A novel coil array for combined TMS/fMRI experiments at 3 T

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro de Lara, Lucia I.; Windischberger, Christian; Kuehne, Andre; Woletz, Michael; Sieg, Jürgen; Bestmann, Sven; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Strasser, Bernhard; Moser, Ewald; Laistler, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To overcome current limitations in combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies by employing a dedicated coil array design for 3 Tesla. Methods The state‐of‐the‐art setup for concurrent TMS/fMRI is to use a large birdcage head coil, with the TMS between the subject's head and the MR coil. This setup has drawbacks in sensitivity, positioning, and available imaging techniques. In this study, an ultraslim 7‐channel receive‐only...

  16. A COMBINED FULL-WAVE BCG-FFT METHOD FOR RADIATION OF MICROSTRIP ANTENNA ARRAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hou; Peng Hongli; Liu Qizhong; Yin Yingzeng; Gong Shuxi

    2001-01-01

    A method of combining BiConjugate Gradient(BCG) with Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) to analyze the radiation of microstrip antenna arrays is presented, where the spatially discrete BCG-FFT for analyzing microstrip structure is used and the del operators on Green's functions are transferred from the singular kernel to the expansion and testing functions. The resultant equations are solved by using BCG method in which the matrix-vector product is evaluated efficiently with FFT. The calculated patterns are in good agreement with the measured data.

  17. X{sub max}{sup μ} vs. N{sup μ} from extensive air showers as estimator for the mass of primary UHECR's. Application for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsene, Nicusor [Institute of Space Science, P.O.Box MG-23, Ro 077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania and Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Sima, Octavian [Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-02-24

    We study the possibility of primary mass estimation for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's) using the X{sub max}{sup μ} (the height where the number of muons produced on the core of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is maximum) and the number N{sup μ} of muons detected on ground. We use the 2D distribution - X{sub max}{sup μ} against N{sup μ} in order to find its sensitivity to the mass of the primary particle. For that, we construct a 2D Probability Function Prob(p,Fe | X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) which estimates the probability that a certain point from the plane (X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) corresponds to a shower induced by a proton, respectively an iron nucleus. To test the procedure, we analyze a set of simulated EAS induced by protons and iron nuclei at energies of 10{sup 19}eV and 20° zenith angle with CORSIKA. Using the Bayesian approach and taking into account the geometry of the infill detectors from the Pierre Auger Observatory, we observe an improvement in the accuracy of the primary mass reconstruction in comparison with the results obtained using only the X{sub max}{sup μ} distributions.

  18. Alborz-I array: a simulation on performance and properties of the array around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Abdollahi, Soheila; Pezeshkian, Yousef; Moghaddam, Saba Mortazavi

    2015-01-01

    The first phase of the Alborz Observatory Array (Alborz-I) consists of 20 plastic scintillation detectors each one with surface area of 0.25 $m^{2}$ spread over an area of 40$\\times$40 $m^{2}$ realized to the study of Extensive Air Showers around the $\\it knee$ at the Sharif University of Technology campus. The first stage of the project including construction and operation of a prototype system has now been completed and the electronics that will be used in the array instrument has been tested under field conditions. In order to achieve a realistic estimate of the array performance, a large number of simulated CORSIKA~\\cite{a} showers have been used. In the present work, theoretical results obtained in the study of different array layouts and trigger conditions are described. Using Monte Carlo simulations of showers the rate of detected events per day and the trigger probability functions, i.e., the probability for an extensive air shower to trigger a ground based array as a function of the shower core dista...

  19. Combining transverse field detectors and color filter arrays to improve multispectral imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Miguel A; Valero, Eva M; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier; Langfelder, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    This work focuses on the improvement of a multispectral imaging sensor based on transverse field detectors (TFDs). We aimed to achieve a higher color and spectral accuracy in the estimation of spectral reflectances from sensor responses. Such an improvement was done by combining these recently developed silicon-based sensors with color filter arrays (CFAs). Consequently, we sacrificed the filter-less full spatial resolution property of TFDs to narrow down the spectrally broad sensitivities of these sensors. We designed and performed several experiments to test the influence of different design features on the estimation quality (type of sensor, tunability, interleaved polarization, use of CFAs, type of CFAs, number of shots), some of which are exclusive to TFDs. We compared systems that use a TFD with systems that use normal monochrome sensors, both combined with multispectral CFAs as well as common RGB filters present in commercial digital color cameras. Results showed that a system that combines TFDs and CFAs performs better than systems with the same type of multispectral CFA and other sensors, or even the same TFDs combined with different kinds of filters used in common imaging systems. We propose CFA+TFD-based systems with one or two shots, depending on the possibility of using longer capturing times or not. Improved TFD systems thus emerge as an interesting possibility for multispectral acquisition, which overcomes the limited accuracy found in previous studies. PMID:24921886

  20. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented. (paper)

  1. Monolithic integrated four DFB lasers array with a polymer-based combiner for WDM applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaere, E.; Bouadma, N.; Zyss, J.

    1998-01-01

    Compact and low cost integrated photonic components will be of significant importance for a wider penetration of optical technologies into private customer access systems. Hybrid semiconductor/polymer integrated technologies are very promising to achieve this goal by virtue of the highly flexible nature of polymers at both molecular and material scale, of their compatibility with processing steps used in semiconductor technologies, and of their reasonably low cost. One example is an integrated semiconductor 4-wavelength laser array with a polymer based 1-4 passive optical combiner on the same substrate. The polymer waveguide structure is a polysulfone material stripe embedded in PMMA cladding layers, and the laser structure is a buried ridge stripe (BRS). The optical coupling between the active and passive elements is a butt-joint coupling via a reactive ion beam etched (RIBE) semiconductor mirror facet. Such a photonic integration simplifies the optical coupling between a laser array and single mode fibers, while reducing the packaging cost. This optical device has been achieved with interesting performances such as small dimension size (1.2 × 0.5 mm), low laser threshold current, and output powers for each laser from the polymeric waveguide port of at least 1.5 mW without additional on-chip optical amplification.

  2. Combination of Polymer Technology and Carbon Nanotube Array for the Development of an Effective Drug Delivery System at Cellular Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggio Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, a carbon nanotube (CNT array-based system combined with a polymer thin film is proposed as an effective drug release device directly at cellular level. The polymeric film embedded in the CNT array is described and characterized in terms of release kinetics, while in vitro assays on PC12 cell line have been performed in order to assess the efficiency and functionality of the entrapped agent (neural growth factor, NGF. PC12 cell differentiation, following incubation on the CNT array embedding the alginate delivery film, demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed solution. The achieved results indicate that polymeric technology could be efficiently embedded in CNT array acting as drug delivery system at cellular level. The implication of this study opens several perspectives in particular in the field of neurointerfaces, combining several functions into a single platform.

  3. Jouvence of Fluor: Upgrades of a Fiber Beam Combiner at the CHARA Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, N. J.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Lhomé, E.; Ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Coudé Du Foresto, V.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.

    The FLUOR (Fiber Linked Unit for Optical Recombination) interferometric beam combiner located at the CHARA Array on Mt. Wilson, California has recently undergone a program of major upgrades known as Jouvence of FLUOR (JouFLU). These upgrades seek to improve the precision, use, and observing efficiency of FLUOR as well as introduce new modes of operation. A Fourier Transform Spectrograph (FTS) mode and a spectral dispersion mode have been added to improve calibration and data collection. New mechanized stages and new cameras have been added to FLUOR for alignment and pupil plane imaging. Entirely new control/command software has been written for FLUOR which brings it into compliance with CHARA software standards. This allows for continued software upgrades and full remote operation capability. The new JouFLU instrument is now operating on sky and is expected to achieve accurate interferometric visibility amplitude measurements with 0.1 to 0.3% precision.

  4. Research on phase-detecting method for coherent combining beams in fiber laser array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel method for phase-detecting of each individual beam in coherent beam combining system of fiber laser array based on the property of time-shift of fast Fourier transform is reported. It takes advantage of the relative movement of fringepattern to detect the phase shift between each individual beam and reference beam. No frequency shift component for reference beam is required in the system. At the same time, the acquisition fringe-pattern is firstly tailored to a few multiple of fringes in order to reduce the phase-detecting error caused by energy leakage during the course of fast Fourier transform.This technique can greatly reduce the effect of energy leakage and thus improve the phase-detecting precision. Basic principle of the new phase-detecting method is described in detail, and numerical results show that the phase-detecting error is less than 1/1000 wavelength by utilizing our method.

  5. Combined flame and electrodeposition synthesis of energetic coaxial tungsten-oxide/aluminum nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhizhong; Al-Sharab, Jafar F; Kear, Bernard H; Tse, Stephen D

    2013-09-11

    A nanostructured thermite composite comprising an array of tungsten-oxide (WO2.9) nanowires (diameters of 20-50 nm and lengths of >10 μm) coated with single-crystal aluminum (thickness of ~16 nm) has been fabricated. The method involves combined flame synthesis of tungsten-oxide nanowires and ionic-liquid electrodeposition of aluminum. The geometry not only presents an avenue to tailor heat-release characteristics due to anisotropic arrangement of fuel and oxidizer but also eliminates or minimizes the presence of an interfacial Al2O3 passivation layer. Upon ignition, the energetic nanocomposite exhibits strong exothermicity, thereby being useful for fundamental study of aluminothermic reactions as well as enhancing combustion characteristics. PMID:23899165

  6. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.; Zhai, L.-M.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.-B.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jin, H.-B.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Feng, C.-F.; Jia, H.-Y.; Zhou, X.-X.; Danzengluobu; Chen, T.-L.; Labaciren; Liu, M.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Zhaxiciren

    2016-06-01

    Since 2014, a new hybrid experiment consisting of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD) has been continued by the Tibet ASγ collaboration to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays in the wide energy range including the ``knee''. In this experiment, YAC-II is used to select high energy core events induced by cosmic rays in the above energy region, while MD is used to estimate the type of nucleus of primary particles by measuring the number of muons contained in the air showers. However, the dynamic range of each MD cell is only 5 to 2000 photoelectrons (PEs) which is mainly designed for observation of high-energy celestial gamma rays. In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their ``knee'' positions with energy up to 1016 eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100–106 PEs according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirements in each MD cell, which are responsible for the range of 100–10000 PEs and 2000–1000000 PEs, respectively. That is, MD cell is expected to be able to measure the number of muons over 6 orders of magnitudes.

  7. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.; Zhai, L.-M.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.-B.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jin, H.-B.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Feng, C.-F.; Jia, H.-Y.; Zhou, X.-X.; Danzengluobu; Chen, T.-L.; Labaciren; Liu, M.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Zhaxiciren

    2016-06-01

    Since 2014, a new hybrid experiment consisting of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD) has been continued by the Tibet ASγ collaboration to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays in the wide energy range including the ``knee''. In this experiment, YAC-II is used to select high energy core events induced by cosmic rays in the above energy region, while MD is used to estimate the type of nucleus of primary particles by measuring the number of muons contained in the air showers. However, the dynamic range of each MD cell is only 5 to 2000 photoelectrons (PEs) which is mainly designed for observation of high-energy celestial gamma rays. In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their ``knee'' positions with energy up to 1016 eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100-106 PEs according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirements in each MD cell, which are responsible for the range of 100-10000 PEs and 2000-1000000 PEs, respectively. That is, MD cell is expected to be able to measure the number of muons over 6 orders of magnitudes.

  8. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias;

    2010-01-01

    /losses and gene expression profiles show strong similarity between cancers in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction with frequent upregulation of CDK6 and EGFR, whereas gastric cancer displays distinct genetic changes. These data suggest that molecular diagnostics and targeted therapies can......15, 13q34, and 12q13, whereas different profiles with gains at 5p15, 7p22, 2q35, and 13q34 characterized gastric cancers. CDK6 and EGFR were identified as putative target genes in cancers of the esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction, with upregulation in one quarter of the tumors. Gains......-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization and 27k oligo gene expression arrays, and putative target genes were validated in an extended series. Adenocarcinomas in the distal esophagus and the gastroesophageal junction showed strong similarities with the most common gains at 20q13, 8q24, 1q21-23, 5p...

  9. Stereo-scopy of {gamma}-ray air showers with the H.E.S.S. telescopes: first images of the supernova remnants at TeV; Stereoscopie de gerbes de {gamma} avec les telescopes H.E.S.S.: premieres images de vestiges de supernovae au TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne [Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    The H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System) experiment in gamma-ray Astronomy consists of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes devoted to the observation of the gamma-ray sky in the energy domain above 100 GeV and extending up to several tens of TeV. This thesis presents a new reconstruction method of gamma-ray induced air showers which takes full advantage of the stereo-scopy and of the fine-grain imaging of the H.E.S.S. cameras. This new method provides an angular resolution better than 0.1 angle, an energy resolution of about 15% at zenith and a very efficient hadronic rejection based on a cut on the lateral spread of the electromagnetic shower which does not depend on simulations. A new background subtraction method, well adapted to the study of extended sources, was also developed. No assumption, either on the distribution of gamma-rays in the field of view, or on the distribution of hadrons are necessary. It provides two sky maps obtained from a maximum likelihood fit: one for {gamma}-rays and the other for hadrons. These two analysis methods were applied to the study of the shell-type supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and RX J0852.0-4622 (Vela Junior), allowing for the first time to resolve their morphology in the gamma-ray domain. The study of these sources should answer the question: 'can shell-type supernova remnants accelerate cosmic-rays up to the knee (5 x 10{sup 15} eV)?'. A morphological and spectral study of these sources combined with a comparison of a simple model of emission processes (from electrons and protons accelerated in supernova remnants) provides some constraints on the parameters of the leptonic process. Nevertheless, this scenario cannot be excluded. The different results obtained are discussed and compared with a third shell-type supernova remnant observed by H.E.S.S. but not detected: SN 1006. (author)

  10. Muon-hadron detector of the carpet-2 array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Klimenko, N. F.

    2016-05-01

    The 1-GeV muon-hadron detector of the Carpet-2 multipurpose shower array at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences (INR, Moscow, Russia) is able to record simultaneously muons and hadrons. The procedure developed for this device makes it possible to separate the muon and hadron components to a high degree of precision. The spatial and energy features of the muon and hadron extensive-air-shower components are presented. Experimental data from the Carpet-2 array are contrasted against data from the EAS-TOP and KASCADE arrays and against the results of the calculations based on the CORSIKA (GHEISHA + QGSJET01) code package and performed for primary protons and iron nuclei.

  11. New air fluorescence detectors employed in the Telescope Array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tokuno, H; Takeda, M; Kadota, K; Ikeda, D; Chikawa, M; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Honda, K; Inoue, N; Kakimoto, F; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Matthews, J N; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Okuda, T; Ozawa, S; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Shibata, T; Taketa, A; Thomas, S B; Tomida, T; Tsunesada, Y; Udo, S; Abu-zayyad, T; Aida, R; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fukuda, T; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Iguchi, T; Ikuta, K; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Oshima, A; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takita, M; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Troitsky, S; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the Telescope Array (TA) experiment, based in Utah, USA, has been observing ultra high energy cosmic rays to understand their origins. The experiment involves a surface detector (SD) array and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations. FD stations, installed surrounding the SD array, measure the air fluorescence light emitted from extensive air showers (EASs) for precise determination of their energies and species. The detectors employed at one of the three FD stations were relocated from the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment. At the other two stations, newly designed detectors were constructed for the TA experiment. An FD consists of a primary mirror and a camera equipped with photomultiplier tubes. To obtain the EAS parameters with high accuracies, understanding the FD optical characteristics is important. In this paper, we report the characteristics and installation of new FDs and the performances of the FD components. The results of the monitored mirror reflectance during the observation ti...

  12. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; Aab, Alexander; Abreu, Pedro; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin

    2015-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For ...

  13. SST-GATE: A dual mirror telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zech, A.; Amans, J.-P.; Blake, S; Boisson, C.; Costille, C.; De-Frondat, F.; Dournaux, J. -L.; Dumas, D.; Fasola, G.; T. Greenshaw; Hervet, O.; Huet, J. -M.; Laporte, P.; Rulten, C.; Savoie, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the world's first open observatory for very high energy gamma-rays. Around a hundred telescopes of different sizes will be used to detect the Cherenkov light that results from gamma-ray induced air showers in the atmosphere. Amongst them, a large number of Small Size Telescopes (SST), with a diameter of about 4 m, will assure an unprecedented coverage of the high energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum (above ~1TeV to beyond 100 TeV) and will ope...

  14. Distribution of EAS arrival times according to data of the EAS-1000 prototype array

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Yu A; Kulikov, G V; Solovyeva, V I; Sulakov, V P; Vedeneev, O V; Zotov, M Yu; Fomin, Yu. A.

    2002-01-01

    We have analysed arrival times of extensive air showers (EAS) registered with the EAS-1000 prototype array during the period from August, 1997 till February, 1999. Our analysis has revealed that though the vast majority of samples of consecutive time intervals between EAS arrival times obey the exponential distribution, there are sequences of showers that have another distribution and thus violate the homogeneity hypothesis. The search for correlation between such events and clusters of showers and events with big delays between arrival times was also carried out.

  15. Status of Project GRAND's Proportional Wire Chamber Array

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, J; Barchie, J; D'Andrea, C; Dunford, M; Green, M; Gress, J; Lin, T; Race, D; Skibba, R; Van Laecke, G; Wysocki, M

    2001-01-01

    Project GRAND is an extensive air shower array of proportional wire chambers. It has 64 stations in a 100m x 100m area; each station has eight planes of proportional wire chambers with a 50 mm steel absorber plate above the bottom two planes. This arrangement of planes, each 1.25 square meters of area, allow an angular measurement for each track to 0.25 degrees in each of two projections. The steel absorber plate allows a measurement of the identity of each muon track to 96% accuracy. Two data-taking triggers allow data to be simultaneously taken for a) extensive air showers (multiple coincidence station hits) at about 1 Hz and b) single muons (single tracks of identified muons) at 2000 Hz. Eight on-line computers pre-analyze the single track data and store the results on magnetic tape in compacted form with a minimum of computer dead-time. One additional computer reads data from the shower triggers and records this raw data on a separate magnetic tape with no pre-analysis.

  16. Quark Matter Induced Extensive Air Showers

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    If the dark matter of our galaxy is composed of nuggets of quarks or antiquarks in a colour superconducting phase there will be a small but non-zero flux of these objects through the Earth's atmosphere. A nugget of quark matter will deposit only a small fraction of its kinetic energy in the atmosphere and is likely to be undetectable. If however the impacting object is composed of antiquarks the energy deposited can be quite large. In this case nuclear annihilations within the nugget will tri...

  17. Search of primary cosmic rays sources at 5x10**13 - 5x10**14 eV with Tien Shan CHRONOTRON - KLARA array

    CERN Document Server

    Gudkova, E N

    2015-01-01

    The primary cosmic ray sources are searched by means of CHRONOTRON - KLARA separate array of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute Tien Shan station. It was done on the base of 35 millions observed PCR extensive air showers from 5x10**13 to 5x10**14 eV energies. The data analysis was carried on the method of the direct selection of local areas in equatorial coordinates where the deviation of event numbers exceeded the definite value from normal Gaussian standard. These directions are compared with other arrays observed results and with coordinates of astrophysical sources.

  18. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ying Zhangm Jing; Zhai, Liu-Ming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Feng, Cun-Feng; Jia, Huan-Yu; Zhou, Xun-Xiu; Dan-Zen, Luo-bu; Chen, Tian-Lu; Laba, Ci-Ren; Mao-Yuan,; Gao, Qi; Zha-xi, Ci-ren

    2016-01-01

    A new hybrid experiment has been constructed to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays around the "knee" in the wide energy range by the Tibet AS$\\gamma$ collaboration at Tibet, China, since 2014. They consist of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD). In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their "knee" positions in the energy range lower than $10^{16}$ eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100 - $10^{6}$ photoelectrons (PEs) according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. This is the first comparison between R5912-PMT and CR365-PMT. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirem...

  19. Energy Spectrum of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays Observed with the Telescope Array Using a Hybrid Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2013-01-01

    We measure the spectrum of cosmic rays with energies greater than $10^{18.2}$ eV with the Fluorescence Detectors (FDs) and the Surface Detectors (SDs) of the Telescope Array Experiment using the data taken in our first 2.3-year observation from May 27 2008 to September 7 2010. A hybrid air shower reconstruction technique is employed to improve accuracies in determination of arrival directions and primary energies of cosmic rays using both FD and SD data. The energy spectrum presented here is in agreement with our previously published spectra and the HiRes results.

  20. Energy Spectrum of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays Observed with the Telescope Array Using a Hybrid Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Aida, R.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; B.G. Cheon; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, E. J.; Cho, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    We measure the spectrum of cosmic rays with energies greater than $10^{18.2}$ eV with the Fluorescence Detectors (FDs) and the Surface Detectors (SDs) of the Telescope Array Experiment using the data taken in our first 2.3-year observation from May 27 2008 to September 7 2010. A hybrid air shower reconstruction technique is employed to improve accuracies in determination of arrival directions and primary energies of cosmic rays using both FD and SD data. The energy spectrum presented here is ...

  1. TARA: Forward-scattered radar detection of UHECR at the telescope array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, J.; Abu Bakr Othman, M.; Allen, C.; Barcikowski, E.; Besson, D.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Ikeda, D.; Hanlon, W.; Kunwar, S.; Lundquist, J. P.; Kravchenko, I.; Larson, S.; Myers, I.; Nakamura, T.; Rankin, J. S.; Sagawa, H.; Sokolsky, P.; Takai, H.; Terasawa, T.; Thomson, G. B.

    2013-06-01

    Increased event statistics will be required to definitively answer the question of the origin(s) of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). Using current technologies however, achieving the necessary statistics may be financially and practically impossible. We describe the status and plans of the TARA project, an effort to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays by their forward scattered or "bistatic" radar signature. Bistatic radar holds promise as a new remote sensing technique for UHECR, without the duty cycle limitations of nitrogen fluorescence detectors. Such a technique could prove key in advancing the study of UHECR beyond the constraints of the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. TARA consists of a low-VHF television transmitter illuminating the air above the Telescope Array (TA), and a set of radio receivers on the far side of TA approximately 50 km distant from the transmitter. We have collected radar data since April 2011 using a 2 kW transmitter at 54.1 MHz. Recently, we received permission to increase our broadcast power to 40 kW and our effective radiated power (ERP) to 6 MW. On the receiver end, we are employing software-defined radio receivers and developing real-time trigger algorithms based on the expected air shower radar echo. In addition to presenting an overview of the project status and future plans, we will present the most recent results of searches for coincidences between radar echoes and Telescope Array air shower events.

  2. TARA: Forward-scattered radar detection of UHECR at the telescope array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takai H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased event statistics will be required to definitively answer the question of the origin(s of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR. Using current technologies however, achieving the necessary statistics may be financially and practically impossible. We describe the status and plans of the TARA project, an effort to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays by their forward scattered or “bistatic” radar signature. Bistatic radar holds promise as a new remote sensing technique for UHECR, without the duty cycle limitations of nitrogen fluorescence detectors. Such a technique could prove key in advancing the study of UHECR beyond the constraints of the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. TARA consists of a low-VHF television transmitter illuminating the air above the Telescope Array (TA, and a set of radio receivers on the far side of TA approximately 50 km distant from the transmitter. We have collected radar data since April 2011 using a 2 kW transmitter at 54.1 MHz. Recently, we received permission to increase our broadcast power to 40 kW and our effective radiated power (ERP to 6 MW. On the receiver end, we are employing software-defined radio receivers and developing real-time trigger algorithms based on the expected air shower radar echo. In addition to presenting an overview of the project status and future plans, we will present the most recent results of searches for coincidences between radar echoes and Telescope Array air shower events.

  3. Multispot array combined with S1 nuclease-mediated elimination of unpaired nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Dong Min; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    The accurate detection of mismatched base pairs is critical to many DNA hybridization-based applications in basic research and diagnostics. We herein demonstrate that mismatched DNAs on a multispot array can be accurately detected in a multiplexed way by employing the S1 nuclease-based mismatched......-target duplex. This technique of performing S1 nuclease-mediated cleavage on a multispot array offers high specificity and high-throughput detection of mismatched DNAs. It is expected that this assay system will prove useful for single-assay genotyping and/or the diagnosis of various diseases and pathogens....

  4. Combined Dynamic Arrays for Storing and Searching Semi-Ordered Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    When performing bioinformatics analysis on tandem mass spectrometry data, there is a computational need to efficiently store and sort these semi-ordered data sets. To solve this problem, a new data structure based on dynamic arrays was designed and implemented in an algorithm that parses semi-order...

  5. Coherent beam combination of adaptive fiber laser array with tilt-tip and phase-locking control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiong; Wang Xiao-Lin; Zhou Pu; Su Rong-Tao; Geng Chao; Li Xin-Yang; Xu Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental study on tilt-tip (TT) and phase-locking (PL) control in a coherent beam combination (CBC) system of adaptive fiber laser array.The TT control is performed using the adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC),and the PL control is realized by the phase modulator (PM).Cascaded and simultaneous controls of TT and PL using stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm are investigated in this paper.Two-fiber-laser-,four-fiber-laser-,and six-fiber-laser-arrays are employed to study the TT and PL control.In the cascaded control system,only one high-speed CMOS camera is used to collect beam data and a computer is used as the controller.In a simultaneous control system one high-speed CMOS camera and one photonic detector (PD) are employed,and a computer and a control circuit based on field programmable gate array (FPGA) are used as the controllers.Experimental results reveal that both cascaded and simultaneous controls of TT using AFOC and PL using PM in fiber laser array are feasible and effective.Cascaded control is more effective in static control situation and simultaneous control can be applied to the dynamic control system directly.The control signals of simultaneous PL and TT disturb each other obviously and TT and PL control may compete with each other,so the control effect is limited.

  6. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. [National Technological University, Faculty Mendoza (CONICET/CNEA), Mendoza (Argentina); Abreu, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Anticic, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Anzalone, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo (INAF), Palermo (Italy); Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Arganda, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Arisaka, K. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Assis, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aublin, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France)

    2010-01-21

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above 3x10{sup 18}eV, for all zenith angles between 0 deg. and 60 deg., independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  7. Trigger and Aperture of the Surface Detector Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2011-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above $3\\times 10^{18}$ eV, for all zenith angles between 0$^\\circ$ and 60$^\\circ$, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  8. Combining Seismic Arrays to Image Detailed Rupture Properties of Large Earthquakes: Evidence for Frequent Triggering of Multiple Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M.; Kiser, E.

    2010-12-01

    Imaging detailed rupture characteristics using the back-projection method, which time-reverses waveforms to their source, has become feasible in recent years due to the availability of data from large aperture arrays with dense station coverage. In contrast to conventional techniques, this method can quickly and indiscriminately provide the spatio-temporal details of rupture propagation. Though many studies have utilized the back-projection method with a single regional array, the limited azimuthal coverage often leads to skewed resolution. In this study, we enhance the imaging power by combining data from two arrays, i.e., the Transportable Array (TA) in the United States and the High Sensitivity Seismographic Network (Hi-net) in Japan. This approach suppresses artifacts and achieves good lateral resolution by improving distance and azimuthal coverage while maintaining waveform coherence. We investigate four large events using this method: the August 15, 2007 Pisco, Peru earthquake, the September 12, 2007 Southern Sumatra earthquake, the September 29, 2009 Samoa Islands earthquake, and the February 27, 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake. In every case, except the Samoa Islands event, the distance of one of the arrays from the epicenter requires us to use the direct P wave and core phases in the back-projection. One of the common features of the rupture characteristics obtained from the back-projection analysis is spatio-temporal rupture discontinuities, or discrete subevents. Both the size of the gaps and the timing between subevents suggest that multiple segments are involved during giant earthquakes, and that they trigger slip on other faults. For example, the 2009 Samoa Islands event began with a rupture propagating north for about 15 seconds followed by a much larger rupture that originated 30 km northwest of the terminus of the first event and propagated back toward the southeast. The involvement of multiple rupture segments with different slip characteristics

  9. Automatic Combination of Microfluidic Nanoliter-Scale Droplet Array with High-Speed Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, N.-Q.; Fang, Q.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we developed a novel approach for interfacing a microfluidic two-dimensional droplet array to a high-speed capillary electrophoresis (HSCE) system. Picoliter-scale sample injection (ca. 200 pL) from a nanoliter-scale droplet array covered by nonvolatile oil was automatically achieved using the spontaneous injection mode, without the interference from the cover oil and the need of special droplet extraction interface as in previously reported systems. The system was applied in consecutive separations of 25 different samples of amino acids with a whole separation time less than 15 min, as well as on-line monitoring of in-droplet derivatizing reaction of amino acids by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) over 3 hours. High separation speed (up to 100 samples per hour) and high separation efficiency (up to 9.22 × 105 N/m) were achieved.

  10. Results from and prospects for the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Berg A.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA is one of the low-energy enhancements of the Pierre Auger Observatory. AERA is based on experience obtained with the LOPES and CODALEMA experiments in Europe and aims to study in the MHz region the details of the emission mechanism of radio signals from extensive air showers. The data from AERA will be used to assess the sensitivity of MHz radiation to the mass composition of cosmic rays. Because of its energy threshold at 2 × 1017 eV the dip region in the cosmic-ray flux spectrum can be studied in detail. We present first results of AERA and of its prototypes and we provide an outlook towards the future.

  11. The ETscope Ground Array for the ULTRA Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, J.; Fava, L.; Lebrun, L.; Teyssier, D.; Vallania, P.; Vigorito, C.; EUSO Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The ETscope detector designed for the ULTRA experiment is a small array made of 7 particle detection stations. operating simultaneously with an optical telescope it ˇ detects the Extensive Air Showers in coincidence with the Cerenkov light, diffused by the impact on the ground. The main goal of the detector is the characterization of the impinging shower by the measurement of size and arrival direction. These informations, together with the UV light measurement and an accurate MC simulation, will allow the determination of the diffusing features of the ground. Since it must be placed on different surfaces including sea, it has been optimized as portable, floating and waterpro of detector. First test has been performed during October 2002 at Mont-Cenis in the Alps region, at the France-Italy border. Detector performances and preliminary results will be discussed here.

  12. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anastasi, Gioacchino Alex; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Blazek, Jiri; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Boháčová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bretz, Thomas; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Anjos, Rita dos; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filipčič, Andrej; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Gamez, Diego; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; Głas, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Keilhauer, Bianca; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Kuempel, Daniel; Mezek, Gasper Kukec; Kunka, Norbert; Awad, Alaa Metwaly Kuotb; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mariş, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano; Micheletti, Maria Isabel; Middendorf, Lukas; Minaya, Ignacio A; Miramonti, Lino; Mitrica, Bogdan; Molina-Bueno, Laura; Mollerach, Silvia; Montanet, François; Morello, Carlo; Mostafá, Miguel; Moura, Celio A; Muller, Marcio Aparecido; Müller, Gero; Müller, Sarah; Navas, Sergio; Necesal, Petr; Nellen, Lukas; Nelles, Anna; Neuser, Jens; Nguyen, Phong H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, Mihai; Niechciol, Marcus; Niemietz, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Nitz, Dave; Nosek, Dalibor; Novotny, Vladimir; Nožka, Lyberis; Núñez, Luis; Ochilo, Livingstone; Oikonomou, Foteini; Olinto, Angela; Pacheco, Noelia; Selmi-Dei, Daniel Pakk; Palatka, Miroslav; Pallotta, Juan; Papenbreer, Philipp; Parente, Gonzalo; Parra, Alejandra; Paul, Thomas; Pech, Miroslav; Pękala, Jan; Pelayo, Rodrigo; Pepe, Iuri; Perrone, Lorenzo; Petermann, Emily; Peters, Christine; Petrera, Sergio; Petrov, Yevgeniy; Phuntsok, Jamyang; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pierog, Tanguy; Pieroni, Pablo; Pimenta, Mário; Pirronello, Valerio; Platino, Manuel; Plum, Matthias; Porcelli, Alessio; Porowski, Czeslaw; Prado, Raul Ribeiro; Privitera, Paolo; Prouza, Michael; Quel, Eduardo J; Querchfeld, Sven; Quinn, Sean; Rautenberg, Julian; Ravel, Olivier; Ravignani, Diego; Reinert, Darius; Revenu, Benoît; Ridky, Jan; Risse, Markus; Ristori, Pablo; Rizi, Vincenzo; de Carvalho, Washington Rodrigues; Rojo, Jorge Rubén Rodriguez; Rodríguez-Frías, Maria Dolores; Rogozin, Dmytro; Rosado, Jaime; Roth, Markus; Roulet, Esteban; Rovero, Adrian; Saffi, Steven J; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Salazar, Humberto; Saleh, Ahmed; Greus, Francisco Salesa; Salina, Gaetano; Gomez, Jose Sanabria; Sánchez, Federico; Sanchez-Lucas, Patricia; Santos, Edivaldo Moura; Santos, Eva; Sarazin, Fred; Sarkar, Biswaijt; Sarmento, Raul; Sarmiento-Cano, Christian; Sato, Ricardo; Scarso, Carlos; Schauer, Markus; Scherini, Viviana; Schieler, Harald; Schmidt, David; Scholten, Olaf; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Schovánek, Petr; Schröder, Frank G; Schulz, Alexander; Schulz, Johannes; Schumacher, Johannes; Sciutto, Sergio; Segreto, Alberto; Settimo, Mariangela; Shadkam, Amir; Shellard, Ronald C; Sigl, Guenter; Sima, Octavian; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Šmída, Radomir; Snow, Gregory; Sommers, Paul; Sonntag, Sebastian; Sorokin, J; Squartini, Ruben; Srivastava, Yogendra N; Stanca, Denis; Stanič, Samo; Stapleton, James; Stasielak, Jaroslaw; Stephan, Maurice; Stutz, Anne; Suarez, Federico; Durán, Mauricio Suarez; Suomijärvi, Tiina; Supanitsky, A Daniel; Sutherland, Michael; Swain, John; Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Taborda, Oscar Alejandro; Tapia, Alex; Tepe, Andreas; Theodoro, Vanessa Menezes; Tibolla, Omar; Timmermans, Charles; Peixoto, Carlos J Todero; Toma, Gabriel; Tomankova, Lenka; Tomé, Bernardo; Tonachini, Aurelio; Elipe, Guillermo Torralba; Machado, Diego Torres; Travnicek, Petr; Trini, Marta; Ulrich, Ralf; Unger, Michael; Urban, Martin; Galicia, Jose F Valdés; Valiño, Ines; Valore, Laura; van Aar, Guus; van Bodegom, Patrick; Berg, Ad M van den; van Velzen, Sjoert; van Vliet, Arjen; Varela, Enrique; Cárdenas, Bernardo Vargas; Varner, Gary; Vasquez, Rafael; Vázquez, Jose R; Vázquez, Ricardo; Veberič, Darko; Verzi, Valerio; Vicha, Jakub; Videla, Mariela; Villaseñor, Luis; Vlcek, Brian; Vorobiov, Serguei; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wainberg, Oscar; Walz, David; Watson, Alan; Weber, Marc; Weidenhaupt, Klaus; Weindl, Andreas; Welling, Christoph; Werner, Felix; Widom, Allan; Wiencke, Lawrence; Wilczyński, Henryk; Winchen, Tobias; Wittkowski, David; Wundheiler, Brian; Wykes, Sarka; Yang, Lili; Yapici, Tolga; Yushkov, Alexey; Zas, Enrique; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zavrtanik, Marko; Zepeda, Arnulfo; Zimmermann, Benedikt; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy density is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge excess emission components. The spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8 MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving per...

  13. Design of optical element combining Fresnel lens with microlens array for uniform light-emitting diode lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangzhen; Wang, Lili; Li, Fuli; Kong, Depeng

    2012-09-01

    One kind of optical element combining Fresnel lens with microlens array is designed simply for LED lighting based on geometrical optics and nonimaging optics. This design method imposes no restriction on the source intensity pattern. The designed element has compact construction and can produce multiple shapes of illumination distribution. Taking square lighting as an example, tolerance analysis is carried out to determine tolerance limits for applying the element in the assembly process. This element can produce on-axis lighting and off-axis lighting. PMID:23201944

  14. Control of the plasmonic resonance of a graphene coated plasmonic nanoparticle array combined with a nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sio, Luciano; Cataldi, Ugo; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a switchable plasmonic device based on a conductive graphene oxide (cGO) coated plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) array, layered with nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as an active medium. A monolayer of NPs has been immobilized on a glass substrate through electrostatic interaction, and then grown in place using nanochemistry. This monolayer is then coated with a thin (less then 100nm) cGO film which acts simultaneously as both an electro-conductive and active medium. The combination of the conductive NP array with a separate top cover substrate having both cGO and a standard LC alignment layer is used for aligning a NLC film in a hybrid configuration. The system is analysed in terms of morphological and electro-optical properties. The spectral response of the sample characterized after each element is added (air, cGO, NLC) reveals a red-shift of the localized plasmonic resonance (LPR) frequency of approximately 62nm with respect to the NP array surrounded by air. The application of an external voltage (8Vpp) is suitable to modulate (blue shift) the LPR frequency by approximately 22nm.

  15. Compression and radiation of high-power short rf pulses. II. A novel antenna array design with combined compressor/radiator elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation of compressed high power short RF pulses using two different types of antennas: (i) A simple monopole antenna and (ii) a novel array design, where each of the elements is constructed by combining a compressor and a radiator. The studies on the monopole antenna demonstrate the possibility of a high power short RF pulse\\'s efficient radiation even using simple antennas. The studies on the novel array design demonstrate that a reduced size array with lower pulse distortion and power decay can be constructed by assembling the array from elements each of which integrates a compressor and a radiator. This design idea can be used with any type of antenna array; in this work it is applied to a phased array.

  16. A Combined Gas and Liquid Chemical Sensor Array for Fuel Adulteration Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiziack, Nadja K. L.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.; Mattoso, Luiz Henrique C.

    2011-09-01

    A multisensor system combining electronic tongue (ET) and nose (EN) was here developed to improve fuel quality control. Several impedance microelectrode sensors, with different geometries and sensoactive materials, were used separately and simultaneously in both liquid and vapor samples. The combined system significantly improved the substance discrimination compared to isolated ET and EN.

  17. Branched zinc oxide nanorods arrays modified paper electrode for electrochemical immunosensing by combining biocatalytic precipitation reaction and competitive immunoassay mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoqiang; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jinghua; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2015-12-15

    Branched zinc oxide nanorods (BZR) arrays, an array with high charge carries collection efficiency and specific surface area, are grown on the reduced graphene oxide-paper working electrode for the first time to construct a paper-based electrochemical (EC) immunosensor. Typically, the BZR are fabricated via a simple hydrothermal process, which can provide abundant sites for antibodies loading. By combining the large surface area of porous zinc oxide (PZS) and good biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), PZS-AuNPs (PZS@Au) nanocomposites are designed to label horseradish peroxide (HRP) and antigens. After a competitive reaction between antigens and PZS@Au nanocomposites labeled antigens, the signal labels are introduced into the immunosensor, in which, HRP participate in biocatalytic precipitation process. The produced precipitate reduces the electrode surface area and hinders the electron transfer. With the increase of concentration of antigens, the signal labels introduced into the sensor decrease, thus, a signal-on immunoassay for α-fetoprotein detection is constructed. The proposed paper-based EC immunosensor combines enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation reaction and competitive immunoassay mode for the first time, and possesses a wide linear range from 0.2 pg mL(-1) to 500 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.08 pg mL(-1). In addition, the proposed method is simple, sensitive and specific and can be a promising platform for other protein detection.

  18. Developments for coating, testing, and aligning Cherenkov Telescope Array mirrors in T\\"ubingen

    CERN Document Server

    Bonardi, A; Kendziorra, E; Pühlhofer, G

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation very-high energy gamma-ray air-shower Cherenkov observatory. CTA will consist of many segmented-mirror telescopes of three different diameters, placed in two arrays, one in the Northern hemisphere and one in the South, thus covering the whole sky. The total number of mirror tiles will be of the order of 10000, corresponding to a reflective area of ~10^4 m^2. The Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics in T\\"ubingen is developing procedures to coat glass-substrate-based mirror tiles, is participating to the CTA mirror prototype testing, and is prototyping Active Mirror Control alignment mechanics, electronics and software. We will present the current status of our work and plans for future developments.

  19. A continuous watch of the northern sky above 40 TeV with the CYGNUS array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, T.J.; Miller, R.; Sinnis, C. [and others

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The aim of the project has been to continuously monitor the northern sky for transient high-energy gamma-ray emission from astrophysical sources. Potential objects of such emission include gamma-ray bursts and flares from active galaxies. At the start of this project, the CYGNUS extensive air shower array was used for the monitoring; CYGNUS has an energy threshold of {approximately}40 TeV. In August, 1996, the CYGNUS data-acquisition computer suffered a fatal hardware problem so data-taking with the array ended. The Milagrito detector, which is much more sensitive than CYGNUS, started taking data in February 1997 and has continued the sky monitoring. The authors are presently honing reconstruction algorithms for Milagrito. When this is complete, the data taken since February will be analyzed for transient emission.

  20. The Hybrid Energy Spectrum of TA's Middle Drum Detector and Surface Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The Telescope Array experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using a hybrid detector. Fluorescence telescopes measure the longitudinal development of the extensive air shower generated when a primary cosmic ray particle interacts with the atmosphere. Meanwhile, scintillator detectors measure the lateral distribution of secondary shower particles that hit the ground. The Middle Drum (MD) fluorescence telescope station consists of 14 telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiment, providing a direct link back to the HiRes measurements. Using the scintillator detector data in conjunction with the telescope data improves the geometrical reconstruction of the showers significantly, and hence, provides a more accurate reconstruction of the energy of the primary particle. The Middle Drum hybrid spectrum is presented and compared to that measured by the Middle Drum station in monocular mode. Further, the hybrid data establishes a link between the Middle Drum data and the surface array. A com...

  1. Extension of Cherenkov Light LDF Parametrization for Tunka and Yakutsk EAS Arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. A. Al-Rubaiee

    2014-12-01

    The Cherenkov light Lateral Distribution Function (LDF) from particles initiated Extensive Air Showers (EAS) with ultrahigh energies ( > 1016 eV) was simulated using CORSIKA program for configuration of Tunka and Yakutsk EAS arrays for different primary particles (p, Fe and O2) and different zenith angles. By depending on the Breit–Wigner function, a parametrization of the Cherenkov light LDF was reconstructed on the basis of this simulation as a function of the primary energy. The comparison of the approximated Cherenkov light LDF with that measured on Tunka and Yakutsk EAS arrays gives the possibility of identification of energy spectrum and mass composition of particles initiating EAS about the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum. The extrapolation of approximated Cherenkov light LDF for energies 20, 30 and 50 PeV was obtained for different primary particles and different zenith angles.

  2. Study of Halitosis-Substance Sensing at Low Concentration Using an Electrochemical Sensor Array Combined with a Preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, Yosuke; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    A method for quantitative detection and discrimination of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) using an electrochemical sensor array combined with a preconcentrator was proposed. Halitosis is due to VSCs produced by bacterial metabolism inside the oral cavity. An organoleptic test is typically performed by a dental clinician for the assessment of halitosis, although it is a subjective test. Thus, an objective evaluation of halitosis is required. In this study, it was possible to discriminate among the VSCs such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and dimethyl sulfide ((CH3)2S) over the range of 200ppb to 1000ppb. Moreover, mixture of two VSC vapors (H2S and CH3SH) at various mixing ratios were measured. The results indicated that the sensor responses to mixed samples satisfied the linear superposition. The mixture compositions of VSCs were almost correctly obtained from the sensor responses using partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis.

  3. A 1.55-μm laser array monolithically integrated with an MMI combiner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Li; Zhu Hongliang; Liang Song; Wang Baojun; Zhang Can; Zhao Lingjuan; Bian Jing

    2013-01-01

    The monolithic integration of four 1.55-μm range InGaAsP/InP distributed feedback lasers with a 4 × 1multimode-interference (MMI) optical combiner using the varied width ridge method is proposed and demonstrated.The average output power is 1.5 mW when the current of LD is 100 mA and the threshold current is 30-35 mA at 25 ℃.The lasing wavelength is 1.55-μm range and 40 dB sidemode suppression ratio is obtained.The four channels can operate separately or simultaneously.

  4. Combined Analysis of SNP Array Data Identifies Novel CNV Candidates and Pathways in Ependymoma and Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Wajnberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variation is a class of structural genomic modifications that includes the gain and loss of a specific genomic region, which may include an entire gene. Many studies have used low-resolution techniques to identify regions that are frequently lost or amplified in cancer. Usually, researchers choose to use proprietary or non-open-source software to detect these regions because the graphical interface tends to be easier to use. In this study, we combined two different open-source packages into an innovative strategy to identify novel copy number variations and pathways associated with cancer. We used a mesothelioma and ependymoma published datasets to assess our tool. We detected previously described and novel copy number variations that are associated with cancer chemotherapy resistance. We also identified altered pathways associated with these diseases, like cell adhesion in patients with mesothelioma and negative regulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in ependymoma patients. In conclusion, we present a novel strategy using open-source software to identify copy number variations and altered pathways associated with cancer.

  5. The exposure of the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Dembinski, H.; Denkiewicz, A.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gascon, A.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weinidl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2011-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It consists of a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level and a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The "hybrid" detection mode combines th

  6. Combination of nucleic acid and protein isolation with tissue array construction: using defined histologic regions in single frozen tissue blocks for multiple research purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Sun, Yuan; Kong, Qing-You; Zhang, Kai-Li; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Qian; Liu, Jia

    2003-09-01

    Precise dissection of defined histological regions for nucleic acid and protein isolation is a precedent step in finding out cancer-related alterations, and high quality tissue microarrays are demanded in the validation of screened genetic alterations by multiple in situ approaches. In this study, a combined technique was developed by which sample isolation and tissue array construction could be performed on the defined morphological region(s) in single tissue block. The RNA and protein samples generated from the selected portions were of good quality and sufficient for multiple experimental purposes. The frozen tissue arrays constructed on a novel recipient are suitable for multiple in situ evaluations including immunohistochemical staining and mRNA hybridisation. In most cases, the data obtained from in situ assays coincided well with the ones revealed by RT-PCR and Western blot hybridisation. The potential experimental bias caused by cell contamination can be amended by tissue array-based retrospective examination. The combination of tissue-selective sample preparations with tissue array construction thus provide a tool by which comprehensive cancer research can be performed on defined histological regions in a series of single frozen tissue blocks.

  7. The Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array (NICHE): A TA/TALE Extension to Measure the Flux and Composition of Very-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Krizmanic, John

    2013-01-01

    Co-sited with TA/TALE, the Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array (NICHE) will measure the flux and nuclear composition of cosmic rays from below 10^16 eV to 10^18 eV in its initial deployment. Furthermore, the low-energy threshold can be significantly decreased below the cosmic ray knee via counter redeployment or by including additional counters. NICHE uses easily deployable detectors to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve an event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy, each with excellent resolution. NICHE will have sufficient area and angular acceptance to have significant overlap with the TA/TALE detectors to allow for energy cross-calibration. Simulated NICHE performance has shown that the array has the ability to distinguish between several different composition models as well as measure the end of Galactic cosmic ray spectrum.

  8. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  9. Development of the optical system for the SST-1M telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Seweryn, K; Błocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Bulik, T.; Cadoux, F.; Christov, A.; Chruślińska, M.; Curyło, M.; della Volpe, D.; Dyrda, M.; Favre, Y.; Frankowski, A.; Grudnik, Ł.; Grudzińska, M.; Heller, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Lyard, E.; Mach, E.; Mandat, D.; Marszałek, A.; Michałowski, J.; Moderski, R.; Montaruli, T.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Pech, M.; Porcelli, A.; Prandini, E.; Pueschel, E.; Rajda, P.; Rameez, M.; Rozwadowski, P.; Schioppa, E. jr; Schovanek, P.; Skowron, K.; Sliusar, V.; Sowiński, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Toscano, S.; Pujadas, I. Troyano; Walter, R.; Wiȩcek, M.; Zagdański, A.; Ziȩtara, K.; Żychowski, P.; Barciński, T.; Karczewski, M.; Kukliński, J. Nicolau; Płatos, Ł.; Rataj, M.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.

    2015-01-01

    The prototype of a Davies-Cotton small size telescope (SST-1M) has been designed and developed by a consortium of Polish and Swiss institutions and proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. The main purpose of the optical system is to focus the Cherenkov light emitted by extensive air showers in the atmosphere onto the focal plane detectors. The main component of the system is a dish consisting of 18 hexagonal mirrors with a total effective collection area of 6.47 m2 (including the shadowing and estimated mirror reflectivity). Such a solution was chosen taking into account the analysis of the Cherenkov light propagation and based on optical simulations. The proper curvature and stability of the dish is ensured by the mirror alignment system and the isostatic interface to the telescope structure. Here we present the design of the optical subsystem together with the performance measurements of its components.

  10. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, Alexander [Universitat Siegen (Germany). et al.

    2015-08-19

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy density is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge excess emission components. We found that the spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. This radiation energy – corrected for geometrical effects – is used as a cosmic-ray energy estimator. Performing an absolute energy calibration against the surface-detector information, we observe that this radio-energy estimator scales quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy as expected for coherent emission. Finally we find an energy resolution of the radio reconstruction of 22% for the data set and 17% for a high-quality subset containing only events with at least five radio stations with signal.

  11. Energy estimation of cosmic rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A. W.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30-80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy deposit per area is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two-dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge-excess emission components. The spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8 MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. This radiation energy—corrected for geometrical effects—is used as a cosmic-ray energy estimator. Performing an absolute energy calibration against the surface-detector information, we observe that this radio-energy estimator scales quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy as expected for coherent emission. We find an energy resolution of the radio reconstruction of 22% for the data set and 17% for a high-quality subset containing only events with at least five radio stations with signal.

  12. The ARCADE Raman Lidar System for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Valore, Laura; Doro, Michele; Iarlori, Marco; Rizi, Vincenzo; Tonachini, Aurelio Siro; Vallania, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation of ground-based very high energy gamma-ray instruments; the facility will be organized in two arrays, one for each hemisphere. The atmospheric calibration of the CTA telescopes is a critical task. The atmosphere affects the measured Cherenkov yield in several ways: the air-shower development itself, the variation of the Cherenkov angle with altitude, the loss of photons due to scattering and absorption of Cherenkov light out of the camera field-of-view and the scattering of photons into the camera. In this scenario, aerosols are the most variable atmospheric component in time and space and therefore need a continuous monitoring. Lidars are among the most used instruments in atmospheric physics to measure the aerosol attenuation profiles of light. The ARCADE Lidar system is a very compact and portable Raman Lidar system that has been built within the FIRB 2010 grant and is currently taking data in Lamar, Colorado. The ARCADE Lidar is proposed to operat...

  13. NICHE: Using Cherenkov radiation to extend Telescope Array to sub-PeV energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Douglas; Krizmanic, John; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Belz, John; Thomson, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    The Non-Imaging CHErenkov (NICHE) Array will measure the flux and nuclear composition evolution of cosmic rays (CRs) from below 1 PeV to 1 EeV. NICHE will be co-sited with the Telescope Array (TA) Low Energy (TALE) extension, and will observe events simultaneously with the TALE telescopes acting in imaging-Cherenkov mode. This will be the first hybrid-Cherenkov (simultaneous imaging and non-imaging Cherenkov) measurements of CRs in the Knee region of the CR energy spectrum. NICHE uses easily deployable detectors to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve an event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy, each with excellent resolution. First generation detectors are under construction and will form an initial prototype array (j-NICHE) that will be deployed in Summer 2016. In this talk, the NICHE design, array performance, prototype development, and status will be discussed as well as NICHE's ability to measure the cosmic ray nuclear composition as a function of energy.

  14. Detection of Upward Air Showers with the EUSO Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hillman, L.; Zuccaro, Al; Adams, J.; Cline, D.

    2003-01-01

    Upward-going showers in the atmosphere can be detected by an orbiting satellite with appropriate instrumentation. If the method only uses directional Cherenkov radiation, it is difficult to discriminate the red shower events from the background noises of very short pulse. A spectroscopic polychromatic optical design can intentionally blur the focusing of photons at shorter wavelengths (300 - 330 nm), spreading the image size to 2 x 2 or 3 x 3 pixels. False triggers due to random chance coincidence of noises can be drastically reduced with a spectroscopic polychromatic, refractive telescope.

  15. The neutron 'thunder' accompanying large extensive air showers

    OpenAIRE

    Erlykin, A. D.

    2006-01-01

    The bulk of neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core (~'neutron thunder'~) are produced by high energy EAS hadrons hitting the monitors. This conclusion raises an important problem of the interaction of EAS with the ground, the stuff of the detectors and their environment. Such interaction can give an additional contribution to the signal in the EAS detectors at {\\em km}-long distances from the large EAS core after a few $\\mu s$ behind the EAS front.

  16. A Neutron Burst Associated with an Extensive Air Shower?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mauro; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Gusev, Anatoly; De Abreu, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    A portable and compact system based on a He-3 tube (LND, USA; model 25311) with an area of approximately 250 cm² and is used to record neutron count rates at ground level in the energy range of 0.025 eV to 10 MeV, in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil (23° 12' 45" S, 45° 52' 00" W; altitude, 660m). The detector, power supply, digitizer and other hardware are housed in an air-conditioned room. The detector power supply and digitizer are not connected to the main electricity network; a high-capacity 12-V battery is used to power the detector and digitizer. Neutron counts are accumulated at 1-minute intervals continuously. The data are stored in a PC for further analysis. In February 8, 2015, at 12 h 22 min (local time) during a period of fair weather with minimal cloud cover (shower that occurred over the detector.

  17. ArrayMining: a modular web-application for microarray analysis combining ensemble and consensus methods with cross-study normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnogor Natalio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analysis of DNA microarray data provides a valuable diagnostic tool for the investigation of genetic components of diseases. To take advantage of the multitude of available data sets and analysis methods, it is desirable to combine both different algorithms and data from different studies. Applying ensemble learning, consensus clustering and cross-study normalization methods for this purpose in an almost fully automated process and linking different analysis modules together under a single interface would simplify many microarray analysis tasks. Results We present ArrayMining.net, a web-application for microarray analysis that provides easy access to a wide choice of feature selection, clustering, prediction, gene set analysis and cross-study normalization methods. In contrast to other microarray-related web-tools, multiple algorithms and data sets for an analysis task can be combined using ensemble feature selection, ensemble prediction, consensus clustering and cross-platform data integration. By interlinking different analysis tools in a modular fashion, new exploratory routes become available, e.g. ensemble sample classification using features obtained from a gene set analysis and data from multiple studies. The analysis is further simplified by automatic parameter selection mechanisms and linkage to web tools and databases for functional annotation and literature mining. Conclusion ArrayMining.net is a free web-application for microarray analysis combining a broad choice of algorithms based on ensemble and consensus methods, using automatic parameter selection and integration with annotation databases.

  18. Micro-lens array based 3-D color image encryption using the combination of gravity model and Arnold transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Suping; Lu, Yucheng; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Bo; Peng, Runling; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a 3-D image encryption scheme based on micro-lens array. The 3-D image can be reconstructed by applying the digital refocusing algorithm to the picked-up light field. To improve the security of the cryptosystem, the Arnold transform and the Gravity Model based image encryption method are employed. Experiment results demonstrate the high security in key space of the proposed encryption scheme. The results also indicate that the employment of light field imaging significant strengthens the robustness of the cipher image against some conventional image processing attacks.

  19. Combining the switched-beam and beam-steering capabilities in a 2-D phased array antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Che; Chen, Yin-Bing; Hwang, Ruey-Bing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development, fabrication, and measurement of a novel beam-forming system consisting of 16 subarray antennas, each containing four aperture-coupled patch antennas, and the application of this system in smart wireless communication systems. The beam patterns of each of the subarray antennas can be switched toward one of nine zones over a half space by adjusting the specific phase delay angles among the four antenna elements. Furthermore, when all subarrays are pointed at the same zone, slightly continuous beam steering in around 1° increments can be achieved by dynamically altering the progressive phase delay angle among the subarrays. Phase angle calibration was implemented by coupling each transmitter output and down converter into the in-phase/quadrature baseband to calculate the correction factor to the weight. In addition, to validate the proposed concepts and the fabricated 2-D phased array antenna system, this study measured the far-field radiation patterns of the aperture-coupled patch array integrated with feeding networks and a phase-calibration system to carefully verify its spatially switched-beam and beam-steering characteristics at a center frequency of 2.4 GHz which can cover the industrial, scientific, and medical band and some long-term evolution applications. In addition, measured results were compared with calculated results, and agreement between them was observed.

  20. Combined Use of FSR Sensor Array and SVM Classifier for Finger Motion Recognition Based on Pressure Distribution Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Li; Li Jiang; Hong Liu; Hegao Cai; Dapeng Yang

    2012-01-01

    For controlling dexterous prosthetic hand with a high number of active Degrees of Freedom (DOF),it is necessary to reliably extract control volitions of finger motions from the human body.In this study,a large variety of finger motions are discriminated based on the diversities of the pressure distribution produced by the mechanical actions of muscles on the forearm.The pressure distribution patterns corresponding to the motions were measured by sensor array which is composed of 32 Force Sensitive Resistor (FSR) sensors.In order to map the pressure patterns with different finger motions,a multiclass classifier was designed based on the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm.The multi-subject experiments show that it is possible to identify as many as seventeen different finger motions,including individual finger motions and multi-finger grasping motions,with the accuracy above 99% in the in-session validation.Further,the cross-session validation demonstrates that the performance of the proposed method is robust for use if the FSR array is not reset.The results suggest that the proposed method has great application prospects for the control of multi-DOF dexterous hand prosthesis.

  1. Analysis of a Combined Antenna Arrays and Reverse-Link Synchronous DS-CDMA System over Multipath Rician Fading Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yong-Seok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the BER analysis of antenna array (AA receiver in reverse-link asynchronous multipath Rician channels and analyze the performance of an improved AA system which applies a reverse-link synchronous transmission technique (RLSTT in order to effectively make a better estimation of covariance matrices at a beamformer-RAKE receiver. In this work, we provide a comprehensive analysis of user capacity which reflects several important factors such as the ratio of the specular component power to the Rayleigh fading power, the shape of multipath intensity profile, and the number of antennas. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that for the case of a strong specular path's power or for a high decay factor, the employment of RLSTT along with AA has the potential of improving the achievable capacity by an order of magnitude.

  2. The ASTRI mini-array within the future Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellone, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a large collaborative effort aimed at the design and operation of an observatory dedicated to very high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics in the energy range from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV, which will yield about an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity with respect to the current major arrays (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS). Within this framework, the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics is leading the ASTRI project, whose main goals are the design and installation on Mt. Etna (Sicily) of an end-to-end dual-mirror prototype of the CTA small size telescope (SST) and the installation at the CTA Southern site of a dual-mirror SST mini-array composed of nine units with a relative distance of about 300 m. The innovative dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical solution adopted for the ASTRI Project allows us to substantially reduce the telescope plate-scale and, therefore, to adopt silicon photo-multipliers as light detectors. The ASTRI mini-array is a wider international effort. The mini-array, sensitive in the energy range 1-100 TeV and beyond with an angular resolution of a few arcmin and an energy resolution of about 10-15%, is well suited to study relatively bright sources (a few × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 at 10 TeV) at very high energy. Prominent sources such as extreme blazars, nearby well-known BL Lac objects, Galactic pulsar wind nebulae, supernovae remnants, micro-quasars, and the Galactic Center can be observed in a previously unexplored energy range. The ASTRI mini-array will extend the current IACTs sensitivity well above a few tens of TeV and, at the same time, will allow us to compare our results on a few selected targets with those of current (HAWC) and future high-altitude extensive air-shower detectors.

  3. First results from the L3+C experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ladrón de Guevara, P

    2001-01-01

    The L3+C experiment combines the high precision spectrometer of the L3 detector at LEP, CERN, with a small air shower array. The momenta of the cosmic ray induced muons can be measured from 20 to 2000 GeV /c. During the 1999 data taking period 5 billion muon events were recorded in the spectrometer. From April to November, 2000, an additional 6.8 billion muon events have been recorded as well as 33 million air shower events. Here the first results on the muon momentum spectrum and charge ratio will be presented. (9 refs).

  4. Fingerprint Analysis of Desmodium Triquetrum L. Based on Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detector Combined with Chemometrics Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiling; Zhao, Cui; Liang, Xianrui; Ying, Yin; Han, Bing; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A fingerprinting approach was developed by means of ultra high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector for the quality control of Desmodium triquetrum L., an herbal medicine widely used for clinical purposes. Ten batches of raw material samples of D. triquetrum were collected from different regions of China. All UPLC analyses were carried out on a Waters ACQUITY UPLC BEH shield RP18 column (2.1 × 50 mm, 1.7 µm particle size) at 60°C, with a gradient mobile phase composed of 0.1% aqueous formic acid and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.45 mL/min. The method validation results demonstrated the developed method possessing desirable reproducibility, efficiency, and allowing fingerprint analysis in one chromatographic run within 13 min. The quality assessment was achieved by using chemometrics methods including similarity analysis, hierarchical clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The developed method can be used for further quality control of D. triquetrum. PMID:26791345

  5. Combined subtractive cDNA cloning and array CGH: an efficient approach for identification of overexpressed genes in DNA amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paepe Anne

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of proto-oncogenes by DNA amplification is an important mechanism in the development and maintenance of cancer cells. Until recently, identification of the targeted genes relied on labour intensive and time consuming positional cloning methods. In this study, we outline a straightforward and efficient strategy for fast and comprehensive cloning of amplified and overexpressed genes. Results As a proof of principle, we analyzed neuroblastoma cell line IMR-32, with at least two amplification sites along the short arm of chromosome 2. In a first step, overexpressed cDNA clones were isolated using a PCR based subtractive cloning method. Subsequent deposition of these clones on a custom microarray and hybridization with IMR-32 DNA, resulted in the identification of clones that were overexpressed due to gene amplification. Using this approach, amplification of all previously reported amplified genes in this cell line was detected. Furthermore, four additional clones were found to be amplified, including the TEM8 gene on 2p13.3, two anonymous transcripts, and a fusion transcript, resulting from 2p13.3 and 2p24.3 fused sequences. Conclusions The combinatorial strategy of subtractive cDNA cloning and array CGH analysis allows comprehensive amplicon dissection, which opens perspectives for improved identification of hitherto unknown targeted oncogenes in cancer cells.

  6. The combination of rotating disk photocatalytic reactor and TiO2 nanotube arrays for environmental pollutants removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined photocatalytic system on one single TiO2-nanotube (TNT)/Ti photocatalyst, which was indeed the functional combination of photon-efficient thin-film and conventional bulk-phase photocatalysis processes, was effectively developed in rotating disk photocatalytic reactor for environmental purification applications. The TNT/Ti rotating disk, of uniform size and well-aligned, was successfully prepared by direct anodic oxidation on a dominantly large surface area of 38 cm2, compared to the typical 1 cm2 in available literature. To estimate the potentials of combined photocatalytic system for environmental applications, the degradation of rhodamine B was carried out under the optimized conditions, a substrate removal efficiency of nearly 90% and a mineralization efficiency of 56% were observed for initial 20 mg/L solution after 3 h treatment. Compared with the combined photocatalytic system on TiO2 nanoparticle disk, a significant improvement in substrate removal efficiency of about 25-40% was observed on TNT/Ti disk. It was confirmed that the main degradation of rhodamine B occurred on the upper half of TNT/Ti disk above the heavily colorized sample solution, which was attributed to the superior UV utilization efficiency and the resultant high interfacial photoactivity.

  7. Experimental aspects of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Sommers, P

    2006-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays are detected as extensive air showers, and properties of the primary cosmic rays are deduced from measurements of those air showers. The physics of air showers is reviewed here in order to explain how the measurement techniques work. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory (near this school in Malargue) is used to illustrate the experimental methods. The Auger Observatory combines a surface array of water Cherenkov detectors with atmospheric uorescence detectors. This `hybrid' measurement technique provides high resolution and measurement cross-checks. In conjunction with a complementary site in the northern hemisphere, the Auger Observatory expects to map the arrival directions over the full sky as well as measuring the cosmic-ray energy spectrum and statistical properties of the mass distribution.

  8. Dynamic Performance Comparison of Two Kalman Filters for Rate Signal Direct Modeling and Differencing Modeling for Combining a MEMS Gyroscope Array to Improve Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guangmin; Yuan, Weizheng; Xue, Liang; Xie, Jianbing; Chang, Honglong

    2015-10-30

    In this paper, the performance of two Kalman filter (KF) schemes based on the direct estimated model and differencing estimated model for input rate signal was thoroughly analyzed and compared for combining measurements of a sensor array to improve the accuracy of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscopes. The principles for noise reduction were presented and KF algorithms were designed to obtain the optimal rate signal estimates. The input rate signal in the direct estimated KF model was modeled with a random walk process and treated as the estimated system state. In the differencing estimated KF model, a differencing operation was established between outputs of the gyroscope array, and then the optimal estimation of input rate signal was achieved by compensating for the estimations of bias drifts for the component gyroscopes. Finally, dynamic simulations and experiments with a six-gyroscope array were implemented to compare the dynamic performance of the two KF models. The 1σ error of the gyroscopes was reduced from 1.4558°/s to 0.1203°/s by the direct estimated KF model in a constant rate test and to 0.5974°/s by the differencing estimated KF model. The estimated rate signal filtered by both models could reflect the amplitude variation of the input signal in the swing rate test and displayed a reduction factor of about three for the 1σ noise. Results illustrate that the performance of the direct estimated KF model is much higher than that of the differencing estimated KF model, with a constant input signal or lower dynamic variation. A similarity in the two KFs' performance is observed if the input signal has a high dynamic variation.

  9. Dynamic Performance Comparison of Two Kalman Filters for Rate Signal Direct Modeling and Differencing Modeling for Combining a MEMS Gyroscope Array to Improve Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangmin Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of two Kalman filter (KF schemes based on the direct estimated model and differencing estimated model for input rate signal was thoroughly analyzed and compared for combining measurements of a sensor array to improve the accuracy of microelectromechanical system (MEMS gyroscopes. The principles for noise reduction were presented and KF algorithms were designed to obtain the optimal rate signal estimates. The input rate signal in the direct estimated KF model was modeled with a random walk process and treated as the estimated system state. In the differencing estimated KF model, a differencing operation was established between outputs of the gyroscope array, and then the optimal estimation of input rate signal was achieved by compensating for the estimations of bias drifts for the component gyroscopes. Finally, dynamic simulations and experiments with a six-gyroscope array were implemented to compare the dynamic performance of the two KF models. The 1σ error of the gyroscopes was reduced from 1.4558°/s to 0.1203°/s by the direct estimated KF model in a constant rate test and to 0.5974°/s by the differencing estimated KF model. The estimated rate signal filtered by both models could reflect the amplitude variation of the input signal in the swing rate test and displayed a reduction factor of about three for the 1σ noise. Results illustrate that the performance of the direct estimated KF model is much higher than that of the differencing estimated KF model, with a constant input signal or lower dynamic variation. A similarity in the two KFs’ performance is observed if the input signal has a high dynamic variation.

  10. Dynamic Performance Comparison of Two Kalman Filters for Rate Signal Direct Modeling and Differencing Modeling for Combining a MEMS Gyroscope Array to Improve Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guangmin; Yuan, Weizheng; Xue, Liang; Xie, Jianbing; Chang, Honglong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of two Kalman filter (KF) schemes based on the direct estimated model and differencing estimated model for input rate signal was thoroughly analyzed and compared for combining measurements of a sensor array to improve the accuracy of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscopes. The principles for noise reduction were presented and KF algorithms were designed to obtain the optimal rate signal estimates. The input rate signal in the direct estimated KF model was modeled with a random walk process and treated as the estimated system state. In the differencing estimated KF model, a differencing operation was established between outputs of the gyroscope array, and then the optimal estimation of input rate signal was achieved by compensating for the estimations of bias drifts for the component gyroscopes. Finally, dynamic simulations and experiments with a six-gyroscope array were implemented to compare the dynamic performance of the two KF models. The 1σ error of the gyroscopes was reduced from 1.4558°/s to 0.1203°/s by the direct estimated KF model in a constant rate test and to 0.5974°/s by the differencing estimated KF model. The estimated rate signal filtered by both models could reflect the amplitude variation of the input signal in the swing rate test and displayed a reduction factor of about three for the 1σ noise. Results illustrate that the performance of the direct estimated KF model is much higher than that of the differencing estimated KF model, with a constant input signal or lower dynamic variation. A similarity in the two KFs' performance is observed if the input signal has a high dynamic variation. PMID:26528980

  11. Ordered silicon nanowire arrays prepared by an improved nanospheres self-assembly in combination with Ag-assisted wet chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guobin; Westphalen, Jasper; Drexler, Jan; Plentz, Jonathan; Dellith, Jan; Dellith, Andrea; Andrä, Gudrun; Falk, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    An improved Langmuir-Blodgett self-assembly process combined with Ag-assisted wet chemical etching for the preparation of ordered silicon nanowire arrays is presented in this paper. The new process is independent of the surface conditions (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) of the substrate, allowing for depositing a monolayer of closely packed polystyrene nanospheres onto any flat surface. A full control of the morphology of the silicon nanowire is achieved. Furthermore, it is observed that the formation of porous-Si at the tips of the nanowires is closely related to the release of Ag nanoparticles from the Ag mask during the etching, which subsequently redeposit on the surface initially free of Ag, and these Ag nanoparticles catalyze the etching of the tips and lead to the porous-Si formation. This finding will help to improve the resulting nano- and microstructures to get them free of pores, and renders it a promising technology for low-cost high throughput fabrication of specific optical devices, photonic crystals, sensors, MEMS, and NEMS by substituting the costly BOSCH process. It is shown that ordered nanowire arrays free of porous structures can be produced if all sources of Ag nanoparticles are excluded, and structures with aspect ratio more than 100 can be produced.

  12. Detection of number of sources and DOA stimation based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity using acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (direction of arrival) estimation of underwater remote targets, a novel subspace-decomposition method based on the cross covariance matrix of the pressure and the particle velocity of acoustic vector sensor arrays (AVSA) was proposed.Whereafter, using spatio-temporal virtual tapped-delay-line, a new eigenvector-based criteria of detection of number of sources and of subspace partition is also presented. The theoretical analysis shows that the new source detection and direction finding method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods using particle velocity information of acoustic vector sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, has better estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate, the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  13. Wideband high-resolution direction of arrival estimation method based on the pressure-velocity combined processing using the acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xingyu; YANG Desen; ZHAO Chunhui

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation of underwater distant wideband targets, a novel coherent signal-subspace method based on the cross spectral matrix of pressure and particle velocity using the Acoustic Vector Sensor Array (AVSA)is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods in using particle velocity information of Acoustic Vector Sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, namely, the P-V cross spectrum, has better DOA estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. By theoretical analysis, both focusing principle and eigendecomposition theory based on the P-V cross spectral matrix are given.At the same time, the corresponding criteria for source number detection is also presented.Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR).

  14. Quantitative and chemical fingerprint analysis for the quality evaluation of Isatis indigotica based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector combined with chemometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Xie, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Rui; Huang, Shan-Jun; Li, Yi-Ming; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2012-01-01

    A simple and reliable method of ultra-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (UPLC-PDA) was developed to control the quality of Radix Isatidis (dried root of Isatis indigotica) for chemical fingerprint analysis and quantitative analysis of eight bioactive constituents, including R,S-goitrin, progoitrin, epiprogoitrin, gluconapin, adenosine, uridine, guanosine, and hypoxanthine. In quantitative analysis, the eight components showed good regression (R > 0.9997) within test ranges, and the recovery method ranged from 99.5% to 103.0%. The UPLC fingerprints of the Radix Isatidis samples were compared by performing chemometric procedures, including similarity analysis, hierarchical clustering analysis, and principal component analysis. The chemometric procedures classified Radix Isatidis and its finished products such that all samples could be successfully grouped according to crude herbs, prepared slices, and adulterant Baphicacanthis cusiae Rhizoma et Radix. The combination of quantitative and chromatographic fingerprint analysis can be used for the quality assessment of Radix Isatidis and its finished products.

  15. Performance and costs of a roof-sized PV/thermal array combined with a ground coupled heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) panel is a combination of photovoltaic cells with a solar thermal collector, generating solar electricity and solar heat simultaneously. Hence, PVT panels are an alternative for a combination of separate PV panels and solar thermal collectors. A promising system concept, consisting of 25 m2 of PVT panels and a ground coupled heat pump, has been simulated in TRNSYS. It has been found that this system is able to cover 100% of the total heat demand for a typical newly-built Dutch one-family dwelling, while covering nearly all of its own electricity use and keeping the long-term average ground temperature constant. The cost of such a system has been compared to the cost of a reference system, where the PVT panels have been replaced with separate PV panels (26 m2) and solar thermal collectors (7 m2), but which is otherwise identical. The electrical and thermal yield of this reference system is equal to that of the PVT system. It has been found that both systems require a nearly identical initial investment. Finally, a view on future PVT markets is given. In general, the residential market is by far the most promising market. The system discussed in this paper is expected to be most successful in newly-built low-energy housing concepts. (Author)

  16. Spectrum measurement with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) fluorescence detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zundel, Zachary James

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is the largest Ultra High Energy cosmic ray observatory in the northern hemisphere and is designed to be sensitive to cosmic ray air showers above 1018eV. Despite the substantial measurements made by TA and AUGER (the largest cosmic ray observatory in the southern hemisphere), there remains uncertainty about whether the highest energy cosmic rays are galactic or extragalactic in origin. Locating features in the cosmic ray energy spectrum below 1018eV that indicate a transition from galactic to extragalactic sources would clarify the interpretation of measurements made at the highest energies. The Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) is designed to extend the energy threshold of the TA observatory down to 1016.5eV in order to make such measurements. This dissertation details the construction, calibration, and operation of the TALE flu- orescence detector. A measurement of the flux of cosmic rays in the energy range of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV is made using the monocular data set taken between September 2013 and January 2014. The TALE fluorescence detector observes evidence for a softening of the cosmic spectrum at 1017.25+/-0.5eV. The evidence of a change in the spectrum motivates continued study of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV cosmic rays.

  17. A novel approach combining the Calgary Biofilm Device and Phenotype MicroArray for the characterization of the chemical sensitivity of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santopolo, L; Marchi, E; Frediani, L; Decorosi, F; Viti, C; Giovannetti, L

    2012-01-01

    A rapid method for screening the metabolic susceptibility of biofilms to toxic compounds was developed by combining the Calgary Biofilm Device (MBEC device) and Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology. The method was developed using Pseudomonas alcaliphila 34, a Cr(VI)-hyper-resistant bacterium, as the test organism. P. alcaliphila produced a robust biofilm after incubation for 16 h, reaching the maximum value after incubation for 24 h (9.4 × 10(6) ± 3.3 × 10(6) CFU peg(-1)). In order to detect the metabolic activity of cells in the biofilm, dye E (5×) and menadione sodium bisulphate (100 μM) were selected for redox detection chemistry, because they produced a high colorimetric yield in response to bacterial metabolism (340.4 ± 6.9 Omnilog Arbitrary Units). This combined approach, which avoids the limitations of traditional plate counts, was validated by testing the susceptibility of P. alcaliphila biofilm to 22 toxic compounds. For each compound the concentration level that significantly lowered the metabolic activity of the biofilm was identified. Chemical sensitivity analysis of the planktonic culture was also performed, allowing comparison of the metabolic susceptibility patterns of biofilm and planktonic cultures.

  18. Fingerprint analysis of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves based on ultra performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector combined with similarity analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianrui Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A method for chemical fingerprint analysis of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves was developed based on ultra performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (UPLC-PAD combined with similarity analysis (SA and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA. Materials and Methods: 10 batches of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves samples were collected from different regions of China. UPLC-PAD was employed to collect chemical fingerprints of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves. Results: The relative standard deviations (RSDs of the relative retention times (RRT and relative peak areas (RPA of 10 characteristic peaks (one of them was identified as rutin in precision, repeatability and stability test were less than 3%, and the method of fingerprint analysis was validated to be suitable for the Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves. Conclusions: The chromatographic fingerprints showed abundant diversity of chemical constituents qualitatively in the 10 batches of Hibiscus mutabilis L. leaves samples from different locations by similarity analysis on basis of calculating the correlation coefficients between each two fingerprints. Moreover, the HCA method clustered the samples into four classes, and the HCA dendrogram showed the close or distant relations among the 10 samples, which was consistent to the SA result to some extent.

  19. Fabrication of long-focal-length plano-convex microlens array by combining the micro-milling and injection molding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Kirchberg, Stefan; Jiang, Bing-Yan; Xie, Lei; Jia, Yun-Long; Sun, Lei-Lei

    2014-11-01

    A uniform plano-convex spherical microlens array with a long focal length was fabricated by combining the micromilling and injection molding processes in this work. This paper presents a quantitative study of the injection molding process parameters on the uniformity of the height of the microlenses. The variation of the injection process parameters, i.e., barrel temperature, mold temperature, injection speed, and packing pressure, was found to have a significant effect on the uniformity of the height of the microlenses, especially the barrel temperature. The filling-to-packing switchover point is also critical to the uniformity of the height of the microlenses. The optimal uniformity was achieved when the polymer melts completely filled the mold cavity, or even a little excessively filled the cavity, during the filling stage. In addition, due to the filling resistance, the practical filling-to-packing switchover point can vary with the change of the filling processing conditions and lead to a non-negligible effect on the uniformity of the height of the microlenses. Furthermore, the effect of injection speed on the uniformity of the height of the microlenses was analyzed in detail. The results indicated that the effect of injection speed on the uniformity of the height of the microlenses is mainly attributed to the two functions of injection speed: transferring the filling-to-packing switchover point and affecting the distribution of residual flow stress in the polymer melt. PMID:25402902

  20. Structural and optical nanoscale analysis of GaN core-shell microrod arrays fabricated by combined top-down and bottom-up process on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcus; Schmidt, Gordon; Metzner, Sebastian; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Debnath, Ratan; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Wen, Baomei; Blanchard, Paul; Motayed, Abhishek; King, Matthew R.; Davydov, Albert V.; Christen, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Large arrays of GaN core-shell microrods were fabricated on Si(111) substrates applying a combined bottom-up and top-down approach which includes inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of patterned GaN films grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and selective overgrowth of obtained GaN/Si pillars using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The structural and optical properties of individual core-shell microrods have been studied with a nanometer scale spatial resolution using low-temperature cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL) directly performed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). SEM, TEM, and CL measurements reveal the formation of distinct growth domains during the HVPE overgrowth. A high free-carrier concentration observed in the non-polar \\{ 1\\bar{1}00\\} HVPE shells is assigned to in-diffusion of silicon atoms from the substrate. In contrast, the HVPE shells directly grown on top of the c-plane of the GaN pillars reveal a lower free-carrier concentration.

  1. Deciphering transcriptional networks that govern Coffea arabica seed development using combined cDNA array and real-time RT-PCR approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmona, Jordi; Dussert, Stéphane; Descroix, Frédéric; de Kochko, Alexandre; Bertrand, Benoît; Joët, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Due to its economic importance, Coffea arabica is becoming the subject of increasing genomic research and, in particular, the genes involved in the final chemical composition of the bean and the sensorial quality of the coffee beverage. The aim of the present study was to decipher the transcriptional networks that govern the development of the C. arabica seed, a model for non-orthodox albuminous seeds of tropical origin. For this purpose, we developed a transcriptomic approach combining two techniques: targeted cDNA arrays, containing 266 selected candidate gene sequences, and real-time RT-PCR on a large subset of 111 genes. The combination of the two techniques allowed us to limit detection of false positives and to reveal the advantages of using large real-time RT-PCR screening. Multivariate analysis was conducted on both datasets and results were broadly convergent. First, principle component analysis (PCA) revealed a dramatic re-programming of the transcriptional machinery between early cell division and elongation, storage and maturation phases. Second, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) led to the identification of 11 distinct patterns of gene expression during seed development as well as to the detection of genes expressed at specific developmental stages that can be used as functional markers of phenological changes. In addition, this study led to the description of gene expression profiles for quality-related genes, most of them formerly uncharacterised in Coffea. Their involvement in storage compound synthesis and accumulation during endosperm development and final metabolic re-adjustments during maturation is discussed. PMID:18026845

  2. The modeling of the nuclear composition measurement performance of the Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array (NICHE)

    CERN Document Server

    Krizmanic, John; Sokolsky, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In its initial deployment, the Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array (NICHE)will measure the flux and nuclear composition of cosmic rays from below 10^16 eV to 10^18 eV by using measurements of the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve a robust event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy. NICHE will have sufficient area and angular acceptance to have significant overlap with TA/TALE, within which NICHE is located, to allow for energy cross-calibration. In order to quantify NICHE's ability to measure the cosmic ray nuclear composition, 4-component composition models were constructed based upon a poly-gonato model of J. Hoerandel using simulated Xmax distributions of the composite composition as a function of energy. These composition distributions were then unfolded into individual components via an analysis technique that included NICHE's simulated Xmax and energy resolution performance as a function of energy as well as the effects of finite event statistics. Details of the construc...

  3. Combined Nonuniformity Correction Algorithm of Infrared Focal Plane Arrays%红外焦平面联合非均匀性校正算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪闻青; 杨南生; 王晓东; 苏俊波; 苏兰; 胡志斌

    2011-01-01

    分别分析了红外焦平面阵列(IRFPA)基于定标的非均匀性校正(NUC)算法和基于场景的NUC算法的优势和问题.在此基础上提出了联合NUC算法,其中利用基于定标的两点校正法来初步消除探测器的非均匀性,然后再采用基于场景的时域高通校正法和新型自适应滤波校正法来抑制探测器非均匀性参数漂移的影响,同时减弱系统噪声对成像质量的破坏.实验结果表明,与两点法、时域高通法以及传统自适应滤波法等具有较大工程应用价值的NUC算法相比,联合NUC算法具有稳定而且性能更为优良的校正效果.%The advantages and disadvantages in nonuniformity correction (NUC) algorithms based on calibration and scene of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) are analysed separately. The combined NUC algorithm is presented.Two-point NUC algorithm based on calibration is adopted to remove the nonuniformity of the detector simply. The influences of detectors' NUC parameters which will change with time are weakened by using the scene-based temporal high-pass filter algorithm and new-style adaptive filter algorithm. The disadvantages for image quality introduced by ynoises are weakened too. The experimental results show that the combined NUC algorithm is more stable and better than some NUC algorithms with great value in project applications, such as two point NUC algorithm, temporal highpass filter NUC algorithm and former adaptive filter NUC algorithm.

  4. Micromachined electrode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  5. Design studies for a multi-TeV gamma-ray telescope array : PeX (PeV eXplorer)

    CERN Document Server

    Denman, Jarrad

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) This thesis presents work towards the design of a new array of Image Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) to detect multi-TeV gamma-ray sources. The array consists of 5 telescopes in a square layout with one central telescope, known as the Pevatron eXplorer or PeX. PeX is a PeV (10^{15} eV) cosmic ray explorer that aims to study and discover gamma-ray sources in the 1 to 500 TeV range. The initial PeX design has been influenced by the HEGRA CT-System and H.E.S.S. configurations. One important feature of multi-TeV air showers is their ability to trigger telescopes at large core distance (>400m). PeX will utilise large core distance events to improve the performance and illustrate the viability of a sparse array for multi-TeV gamma-ray astronomy. One important aspect of the thesis (Chapter 6) was the investigation of a new time-based image cleaning method. The arrival time between photons in two adjacent pixels in the camera is used to apply an extra cut which helps mitigate night sky background....

  6. The Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array (NICHE): A TA/TALE extension to measure the flux and composition of Very-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Douglas; Krizmanic, John; Sokolsky, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Co-sited with TA/TALE, the Non-Imaging CHErenkov Array (NICHE) will measure the flux and nuclear composition of cosmic rays from below 10^16 eV to over 10^18 eV in its initial deployment. Furthermore, the low-energy reach can be lowered below the cosmic ray knee via counter redeployment or additional counters. NICHE uses easily deployable detectors to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve an event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy, each with excellent resolution. NICHE will have sufficient area and angular acceptance to have significant overlap with the TA/TALE detectors to allow for energy cross-calibration. Simulated NICHE performance has shown that the array has the ability to distinguish between several different composition models as well as measure the end of Galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this talk, the NICHE design, array performance, and status will be discussed as well as NICHE's ability to measure the cosmic ray nuclear composition as a function of energy.

  7. Combined array-comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-loss of heterozygosity analysis reveals complex changes and multiple forms of chromosomal instability in colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaasenbeek, Michelle; Howarth, Kimberley; Rowan, Andrew J;

    2006-01-01

    Cancers with chromosomal instability (CIN) are held to be aneuploid/polyploid with multiple large-scale gains/deletions, but the processes underlying CIN are unclear and different types of CIN might exist. We investigated colorectal cancer cell lines using array-comparative genomic hybridization ...

  8. Flexible retinal electrode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  9. Liquid-liquid extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-diode array-ultra-violet for simultaneous determination of antineoplastic drugs in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Lima Sanson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection method for simultaneous analysis of four chemically and structurally different antineoplastic drugs (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and ifosfamide was developed. The assay was performed by isocratic elution, with a C18 column (5 µm, 250 x 4.6 mm and mobile phase constituted by water pH 4.0- acetonitrile-methanol (68:19:13, v/v/v, which allowed satisfactory separation of the compounds of interest. LLE, with ethyl acetate, was used for sample clean-up with recoveries ranging from 60 to 98%. The linear ranges were from 0.5 to 100 µg mL-1, for doxorubicin and 1 to 100 µg mL-1, for the other compounds. The relative standard deviations ranged from 5.5 to 17.7%. This method is a fast and simple alternative that can be used, simultaneously, for the determination of the four drugs in plasma, with a range enabling quantification of the drugs in pharmacokinetics, bioequivalence and therapeutic drug-monitoring studies.Um método de extração líquido-líquido (ELL combinado com cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência-detector de arranjo de diodos foi desenvolvido para análise simultânea de quatro fármacos antineoplásicos quimicamente e estruturalmente diferentes (ciclofosfamida, doxorrubicina, fluoruracila e ifosfamida. O estudo foi realizado sob condições isocráticas, com coluna C18 (5µm, 250 x 4.6 mm e fase móvel constituída por água pH 4.0-acetonitrila-metanol (68:19:13, v/v/v, que permitiu separação satisfatória dos analitos de interesse. A ELL, com acetato de etila, foi utilizada para limpeza da amostra, com recuperação variando de 60 a 98%. As faixas foram lineares de 0,5 a 100 µg mL-1 para doxorrubicina e 1 a 100 µg mL-1 para os outros compostos. O desvio padrão relativo variou de 5,5 a 17,7%. Este método é uma alternativa rápida e simples que pode ser usado, simultaneamente, para a determinação dos

  10. The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (CALOR2010 Proceedings)

    CERN Document Server

    Necesal, Petr

    2010-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a facility designed for the study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The Observatory combines two different types of detectors: a surface array of 1600 water Cherenkov stations placed on a 1.5 km triangular grid covering over 3000 km$^2$; and a fluorescence detector of 24 telescopes located in 4 buildings at the perimeter of the surface array. The fluorescence telescopes, each consisting of 440 photomultipliers, collect the ultraviolet light produced when the charged secondary particles in an air shower excite nitrogen molecules in the atmosphere. Because the intensity of the nitrogen fluorescence is proportional to the energy deposited in the atmosphere during the air shower, the air fluorescence measurements can be used to make a calorimetric measurement of the cosmic ray primary energy. Showers observed independently by the surface array and fluorescence telescopes, called hybrid events, are critical to the function of the Observatory, as they allow for a model-independent ca...

  11. Development of a SiPM Camera for a Schwarzschild-Couder Cherenkov Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Otte, A N; Dickinson, H.; Funk, S.; Jogler, T.; Johnson, C.A.; Karn, P.; Meagher, K.; Naoya, H.; Nguyen, T.; Okumura, A.; Santander, M.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Stier, A.; Tajima, H.; Tibaldo, L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wakely, S.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the development of a novel 11328 pixel silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) camera for use with a ground-based Cherenkov telescope with Schwarzschild-Couder optics as a possible medium-sized telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The finely pixelated camera samples air-shower images with more than twice the optical resolution of cameras that are used in current Cherenkov telescopes. Advantages of the higher resolution will be a better event reconstruction yielding improved background suppression and angular resolution of the reconstructed gamma-ray events, which is crucial in morphology studies of, for example, Galactic particle accelerators and the search for gamma-ray halos around extragalactic sources. Packing such a large number of pixels into an area of only half a square meter and having a fast readout directly attached to the back of the sensors is a challenging task. For the prototype camera development, SiPMs from Hamamatsu with through silicon via (TSV) technology are used. We give ...

  12. A composition study of ultra high energy cosmic rays using timing information from the 750m infill array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for the purpose of detecting extensive air showers from ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR). It consists of an array of water cherenkov detectors, the surface detector (SD), and atmospheric fluorescence telescopes, the fluorescence detector. The determination of the mass composition of UHECR is one of its main tasks and may give important hints on their sources and accelerators. One approach to deduce it from data of the SD is to use the risetime, the time it takes for the integrated signal of a surface detector station to rise from 10% to 50% of its final value. For the 750 m infill array, that was commissioned in 2008 as a part of the AMIGA extension and makes energies below 1 EeV accessible to the SD, risetime studies have yet to be performed. To use risetime for the determination of mass composition one has to condense the information of the stations from a single event to one mass sensitive observable that can be compared with simulations. Therefore risetime has to be corrected for azimuthal asymmetry, furthermore its dependance on the distance to the shower core and zenith angle has to be taken into account. Details on the implementation and the results are shown.

  13. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  14. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy. PMID:21041397

  15. Quality assessment of crude and processed ginger by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xianmei; Yu, Jiangyong; Zhao, Ming; Zhao, Bin; Xue, Xingyang; Che, ChunTao; Meng, Jiang; Wang, Shumei

    2015-09-01

    A sensitive, simple, and validated high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry detection method was developed for three ginger-based traditional Chinese herbal drugs, Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Rhizome Preparatum, and Zingiberis Rhizome Carbonisata. Chemometrics methods, such as principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and analysis of variance, were also employed in the data analysis. The results clearly revealed significant differences among Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Rhizome Preparatum, and Zingiberis Rhizome Carbonisata, indicating variations in their chemical compositions during the processing, which may elucidate the relationship of the thermal treatment with the change of the constituents and interpret their different clinical uses. Furthermore, the sample consistency of Zingiberis Rhizoma, Zingiberis Rhizome Preparatum, and Zingiberis Rhizome Carbonisata can also be visualized by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry analysis followed by principal component analysis/hierarchical cluster analysis. The comprehensive strategy of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis coupled with chemometrics should be useful in quality assurance for ginger-based herbal drugs and other herbal medicines.

  16. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes During Anther Abortion of Taigu Genic Male Sterile Wheat by Combining Suppression Subtractive Hybridization and cDNA Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Shan Chang; Rong-Hua Zhou; Xiu-Ying Kong; Zeng-Liang Yu; Ji-Zeng Jia

    2006-01-01

    Taigu Genic Male Sterile Wheat (TGMSW; Triticum aestivum L.), a dominant genic male sterile germplasm, is of considerable value in the genetic improvement of wheat because of its stable inherence, complete male abortion, and high cross-fertilization rate. To identify specially transcribed genes in sterile anther, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed with sterile anther as the tester and fertile anther as the driver. A total of 2 304 SSH inserts amplified by polymerase chain reaction were arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with 32P-labeled probes prepared from the RNA of forward- and reverse-subtracted anthers. Ninety-six clones were scored as upregulated in sterile anthers compared with the corresponding fertile anthers and some clones were selected for sequencing and analysis in GenBank. Based on their putative functions, 87 non-redundant clones were classified into the following groups: (i) eight genes involved in metabolic processes; (ii) four material transportation genes;(iii) three signal transduction-associated genes; (iv) four stress response and senescence-associated protein genes; (v) seven other functional protein genes; (vi) five genes with no known function; and (vii)another 56 genes with no match to the databases. To test the hybridization efficiency, eight genes were selected and analyzed by Northern blot. The results of the present study provide a comprehensive overview of the genes and gene products involved in anther abortion in TGMSW.

  17. The hybrid performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Miguel, A.; /New Mexico U.

    2005-08-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects ultra-high energy cosmic rays by implementing two complementary air-shower techniques. The combination of a large ground array and fluorescence detectors, known as the hybrid concept, means that a rich variety of measurements can be made on a single shower, providing much improved information over what is possible with either detector alone. In this paper the hybrid reconstruction approach and its performance are described.

  18. Soldered solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, H. C.

    1982-06-01

    The ability of soldered interconnects to withstand a combination of long life and severe environmental conditions was investigated. Improvements in joint life from the use of solder mixes appropriate to low temperature conditons were studied. Solder samples were placed in a 150 C oven for 5 weeks (= 12 yr at 80 C, or 24 at 70 C according to Arrhenius's rule). Conventional and high solder melting point array samples underwent 1000 thermal cycles between -186 and 100 C. Results show that conventional and lead rich soldered arrays can survive 10 yr geostationary orbit missions.

  19. A Combined Antenna Arrays and Reverse-Link Synchronous DS-CDMA System over Frequency-Selective Fading Channels with Power Control Error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Seok Kim

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An improved antenna array (AA has been introduced, in which reverse-link synchronous transmission technique (RLSTT is incorporated to effectively make better an estimation of covariance matrices at a beamformer-RAKE receiver. While RLSTT is effective in the first finger at the RAKE receiver in order to reject multiple-access interference (MAI, the beamformer estimates the desired user's complex weights, enhancing its signal and reducing cochannel interference (CCI from the other directions. In this work, it is attempted to provide a comprehensive analysis of user capacity which reflects several important factors such as the shape of multipath intensity profile (MIP, the number of antennas, and power control error (PCE. Theoretical analysis, confirmed by the simulations, demonstrates that the orthogonality provided by employing RLSTT along with AA may make the DS-CDMA system insensitive to the PCE even with fewer numbers of antennas.

  20. The fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Facultad Regional Mendoza, (UTN-FRM), Mendoza (Argentina); Abreu, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Aguirre, C. [Universidad Catolica de Bolivia, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Anzalone, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo (INAF), Palermo (Italy); Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Arganda, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Argiro, S. [Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Arisaka, K. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arneodo, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi , L' Aquila (Italy); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-21

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It combines a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level together with a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The fluorescence detector comprises 24 large telescopes specialized for measuring the nitrogen fluorescence caused by charged particles of cosmic ray air showers. In this paper we describe the components of the fluorescence detector including its optical system, the design of the camera, the electronics, and the systems for relative and absolute calibration. We also discuss the operation and the monitoring of the detector. Finally, we evaluate the detector performance and precision of shower reconstructions.

  1. The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bacher, A; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barbosa, H J M; Barenthien, N; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Bérat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Bollmann, E; Bolz, H; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Bracci, F; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, D CaminL; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Castro, J; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordero, A; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J W; Cuautle, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daudo, F; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Gibbs, K; Giller, M; Gitto, J; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gomez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grashorn, E; Grassi, V; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Grygar, J; Guardincerri, Y; Guardone, N; Guerard, C; Guarino, F; Gumbsheimer, R; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hofman, G; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovský, M; Hucker, H; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kern, H; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kopmann, A; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Malek, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Marchetto, F; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Martineau, O; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mucchi, M; Müller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nerling, F; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nicotra, D; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Oßwald, B; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Pouryamout, J; Prado, L; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, G Raia J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Reis, H C; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Roberts, M D; Rodríguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; b, H Salazar; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, G Schleif A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Sequieros, G; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Smiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcuau, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Trapani, P; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tuci, V; Tueros, M; Tusi, E; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vitali, G; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wild, N; Wiebusch, C; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wörner, G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; b, A Zepeda; Ziolkowski, M

    2009-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It combines a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level together with a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The fluorescence detector comprises 24 large telescopes specialized for measuring the nitrogen fluorescence caused by charged particles of cosmic ray air showers. In this paper we describe the components of the fluorescence detector including its optical system, the design of the camera, the electronics, and the systems for relative and absolute calibration. We also discuss the operation and the monitoring of the detector. Finally, we evaluate the detector performance and precision of shower reconstructions.

  2. Measurements of Cosmic Rays with IceTop/IceCube: Status and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburro, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    The IceCube Observatory at the South Pole is composed of a cubic kilometer scale neutrino telescope buried beneath the icecap and a square-kilometer surface water Cherenkov tank detector array known as IceTop. The combination of the surface array with the in-ice detector allows the dominantly electromagnetic signal of air showers at the surface and their high-energy muon signal in the ice to be measured in coincidence. This ratio is known to carry information about the nuclear composition of the primary cosmic rays. This paper reviews the recent results from cosmic-ray measurements performed with IceTop/IceCube: energy spectrum, mass composition, anisotropy, search for PeV gamma sources, detection of high energy muons to probe the initial stages of the air shower development, and study of transient events using IceTop in scaler mode.

  3. 基于组合模理论设计的激光二极管阵列外腔%External Cavity Design for Laser Diode Bar Based on Calculation of Combined Array Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏宙平; 朱焯炜; 阙立志

    2012-01-01

    针对激光二极管阵列提出了“组合模”慨念,计算了组合模的远场分布,每个组合模在远场的空间分布呈双瓣结构,基于激光二极管阵列组合模的远场分布特征,设计了离轴外腔反馈的激光二极管阵列,运用此装置所获得激光二极管阵列的远场分布有了明显变化,与自由运转的激光二极管阵列相比,离轴外腔反馈的激光二极管阵列远场宽度减少了4.3倍,在抽运电流为16 A时,测得输出激光的功率1.82W,这相当于相同电流下自由运转激光器输出功率的79%.组合模理论不仅可以用来指导设计一维离轴外腔反馈激光二极管阵列,而且也可以用于设计二维离轴外腔反馈激光二极管阵列.二维离轴外腔反馈激光二极管阵列可以产生高功率,高光束质量输出的激光.%In this paper,the concept of "combined array mode" for laser diode bar is proposcd.and the far-field profile of "combined array mode" is calculated.The far-field of each combined array mode exhibits a two-lobe profile with different angular position. On the basis of the characteristic of far-field profile of combined array mode,an off-axis external cavity feedback laser diode bar is designed. By employing the setup,the far-field profile of laser diode bar is narrowed by 4.3 times compared with the free- running laser diode bar. The output power of external cavity feedback laser diode bar is about 1.82 W at the drive current of 16 A.or 79% of the radiated power of the free-running state.The theory of combined array mode cannot only be applied to design the external cavity feedback laser diode har but also can be designed the external cavity feeedback laser diode stack.

  4. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  5. The TALE Infill Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    The TALE Infill Array in conjunction with the TALE Tower Detector will provide hybrid coverage of the cosmic ray energy spectrum down to 3x10^16 eV. It will consist of about 100, two square meter scintillators on the surface spaced at 400 m; and 24 buried twelve square meter scintillators. The combination of surface and underground detectors will allow for the determination of the muon content of showers and thus give a handle on cosmic ray composition.

  6. Characterization of genetic rearrangements in esophageal squamous carcinoma cell lines by a combination of M-FISH and array-CGH: further confirmation of some split genomic regions in primary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal and genomic aberrations are common features of human cancers. However, chromosomal numerical and structural aberrations, breakpoints and disrupted genes have yet to be identified in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Using multiplex-fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and oligo array-based comparative hybridization (array-CGH), we identified aberrations and breakpoints in six ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, we detected recurrent breakpoints in primary tumors by dual-color FISH. M-FISH and array-CGH results revealed complex numerical and structural aberrations. Frequent gains occurred at 3q26.33-qter, 5p14.1-p11, 7pter-p12.3, 8q24.13-q24.21, 9q31.1-qter, 11p13-p11, 11q11-q13.4, 17q23.3-qter, 18pter-p11, 19 and 20q13.32-qter. Losses were frequent at 18q21.1-qter. Breakpoints that clustered within 1 or 2 Mb were identified, including 9p21.3, 11q13.3-q13.4, 15q25.3 and 3q28. By dual-color FISH, we observed that several recurrent breakpoint regions in cell lines were also present in ESCC tumors. In particular, breakpoints clustered at 11q13.3-q13.4 were identified in 43.3% (58/134) of ESCC tumors. Both 11q13.3-q13.4 splitting and amplification were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P = 0.004 and 0.022) and advanced stages (P = 0.004 and 0.039). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only 11q13.3-q13.4 splitting was an independent predictor for LNM (P = 0.026). The combination of M-FISH and array-CGH helps produce more accurate karyotypes. Our data provide significant, detailed information for appropriate uses of these ESCC cell lines for cytogenetic and molecular biological studies. The aberrations and breakpoints detected in both the cell lines and primary tumors will contribute to identify affected genes involved in the development and progression of ESCC

  7. Combination of 768-well microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis with duplex PCR of X and Y chromosome markers for quality control of epidemiological DNA banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuwen; Chen, Xiao-he; Day, Ian N M

    2006-08-01

    Large DNA banks for human epidemiological studies have become an increasingly important research tool. The power of genotype-phenotype studies is dependent both on the quality of phenotyping and of genotyping and of correct linking of phenotypes to genotypes. Samples must be tracked through numerous steps between subject or patient and post-genotypic data. Only one phenotype, sex, has a perfect and binary correlation with genotype. In mixed sex studies, it may be advantageous for purposes of quality control to keep sexes mixed during the steps from acquisition to DNA bank, in order to be able to check later for sample swaps. We have designed a duplex PCR combining an amplicon from MAOA marking the X chromosome and an amplicon from DDX3Y marking the Y chromosome. We combined this with a simple economical palmtop sized 768-well microplate compatible electrophoresis system developed in-house for examination of duplex PCR products. We applied this quality control test in the validation of two DNA banks.

  8. Search for Galactic PeV gamma rays with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Golup, G.; Goodman, J. A.; Gora, D.; Grant, D.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jlelati, O.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klaes, J.; Klein, S. R.; Koehne, J-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koepke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Luenemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meszaros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; de los Heros, C. Perez; Pieloth, D.; Pirk, N.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raedel, L.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H. -G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheel, M.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schoeneberg, S.; Schoenherr, L.; Schoenwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoessl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Strom, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Usner, M.; van der Drift, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zilles, A.; Zoll, M.; Aartsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray induced air showers are notable for their lack of muons, compared to hadronic showers. Hence, air shower arrays with large underground muon detectors can select a sample greatly enriched in photon showers by rejecting showers containing muons. IceCube is sensitive to muons with energies ab

  9. Advanced functionality for radio analysis in the Offline software framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coopers, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Denkiewicz, A.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Diaz; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parr, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) necessitates the development of a powerful framework for the analysis of radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers. As AERA performs "radio-hybrid" measurements of air shower radio emission in coincidence with the surface particle detectors a

  10. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  11. Measurement of the cosmic ray composition at the knee with the SPASE-2/AMANDA-B10 detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, J; Andrés, E; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Bay, R C; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Binon, F; Biron, A; Boersma, D J; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Bouhali, O; Burgess, T; Carius, S; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; Davour, A; De Clercq, C; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Dickinson, E; Ekstrom, P; Engel, R; Evenson, P; Feser, T; Gaisser, T K; Ganugapati, R; Gaug, M; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hauschildt, T; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hinton, J A; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Karle, A; Kim, J; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kühn, K; Lamoureux, J I; Leich, H; Leuthold, M; Lindahl, P; Liubarsky, I; Lloyd Evans, J; Madsen, J; Mandli, K; Marciniewski, P; Martino, J R; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Messarius, T; Miller, T C; Minaeva, Y; Miocinovic, P; Mock, P C; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogleman, H; Olbrechts, P; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rochester, K; Ross, D; Sander, H G; Schinarakis, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Tilav, S; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Wang, Y R; Watson, A A; Wiebusch, C; Wiedemann, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Wu, W; Yodh, G; Young, S; Pérez de los Heros, C; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2004.04.007

    2004-01-01

    The mass composition of high-energy cosmic rays at energies above 10 /sup 15/ eV can provide crucial information for the understanding of their origin. Air showers were measured simultaneously with the SPASE-2 air shower array and the AMANDA-B10 Cherenkov telescope at the South Pole. This combination has the advantage to sample almost all high-energy shower muons and is thus a new approach to the determination of the cosmic ray composition. The change in the cosmic ray mass composition was measured versus existing data from direct measurements at low energies. Our data show an increase of the mean log atomic mass by about 0.8 between 500 TeV and 5 PeV. This trend of an increasing mass through the "knee" region is robust against a variety of systematic effects.

  12. 用于空间功率合成的线阵馈电焦散抛物曲面天线%Linear array feed caustic parabolic curved antenna for spatial power combinating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢泽明; 王立新; 阮水生

    2012-01-01

    提出了一种用于空间功率合成的焦散抛物曲面天线,该反射面天线是由xoz平面的一条抛物线沿着yoz平面上的另一条抛物线正交扫描所形成的,天线用8单元E面喇叭线阵进行偏馈。研究了天线的反射面结构参数对天线性能的影响以及横向偏焦电扫描特性,给出了不同辐射方向下阵列的相位配置公式。仿真和实验结果表明:提出的方案可以在给定方向合成高增益波束,与同样线阵馈电的抛物柱面天线相比,H面3dB波束宽度从8.2°下降到了5°,天线增益提高了2.2dB.%A caustic parabolic curved antenna for spatial power combination is proposed in this paper.The reflector antenna is formed by a parabola in the xoz plane orthogonal scanning along the other parabola in the yoz plane.And antenna is offset fed with a line array of 8 E-plane sector horns.Both the impact of antenna structural parameters to the antenna performance and the electric scanning properties of the transversal displacement from focus are studied.A formula is given to configure the phases of the array for a given beam deflection angle.Simulation and experiment show that the designed antenna can combine a high gain beam at a given direction.Compared with the parabolic cylindrical antenna with the same aperture,the H-plane 3 dB beam width decreases from 6.9° to 5°,and the antenna gain increases by 2.2 dB.

  13. Universal lateral distribution of energy deposit in air showers and its application to shower reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Gora, D; Heck, D; Homola, P; Klages, H; Pekala, J; Risse, M; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H

    2006-01-01

    The light intensity distribution in a shower image and its implications to the primary energy reconstructed by the fluorescence technique are studied. Based on detailed CORSIKA energy deposit simulations, a universal analytical formula is derived for the lateral distribution of light in the shower image and a correction factor is obtained to account for the fraction of shower light falling into outlying pixels in the detector. The expected light profiles and the corresponding correction of the primary shower energy are illustrated for several typical event geometries. This correction of the shower energy can exceed 10%, depending on shower geometry.

  14. Universal lateral distribution of energy deposit in air showers and its application to shower reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Gora, D.; Engel, R.; Heck, D.; Homola, P.; Klages, H.; Pekala, J.; Risse, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2005-01-01

    The light intensity distribution in a shower image and its implications to the primary energy reconstructed by the fluorescence technique are studied. Based on detailed CORSIKA energy deposit simulations, a universal analytical formula is derived for the lateral distribution of light in the shower image and a correction factor is obtained to account for the fraction of shower light falling into outlying pixels in the detector. The expected light profiles and the corresponding correction of th...

  15. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A.; et al.

    2014-12-31

    Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (Xmax), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the distributions with predictions from a variety of hadronic interaction models for variations in the composition of the primary cosmic rays and examining the quality of the fit. Regardless of what interaction model is assumed, we find that our data are not well described by a mix of protons and iron nuclei over most of the energy range. Acceptable fits can be obtained when intermediate masses are included, and when this is done consistent results for the proton and iron-nuclei contributions can be found using the available models. We observe a strong energy dependence of the resulting proton fractions, and find no support from any of the models for a significant contribution from iron nuclei. However, we also observe a significant disagreement between the models with respect to the relative contributions of the intermediate components.

  16. Geometric structures in hadronic cores of extensive air showers observed by KASCADE

    CERN Document Server

    Kampert, K H; Apel, W D; Badea, F; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Blümer, H; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Büttner, C; Chilingarian, A A; Daumiller, K; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fessler, F; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Klages, H O; Maier, G; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Milke, J; Müller, M; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Petcu, M; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Risse, M; Roth, M; Schatz, G; Schieler, H; Scholz, J; Stumpert, M; Thouw, T; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Vardanyan, A; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zagromski, S

    2005-01-01

    The geometric distribution of high-energy hadrons >100 GeV in shower cores measured with the KASCADE calorimeter is analyzed. The data are checked for sensitivity to hadronic interaction features and indications of new physics as discussed in the literature. The angular correlation of the most energetic hadrons and in particular the fraction of events with hadrons being aligned are quantified by means of the commonly used parameter lambda_4. The analysis shows that the observed lambda_4 distribution is compatible with that predicted by simulations and is not linked to an angular correlation from hadronic jet production at high energy. Another parameter, d_4^max, describing distances between hadrons measured in the detector, is found to be sensitive both to the transverse momenta in secondary hadron production and the primary particle type. Transverse momenta in high-energy hadron interactions differing by a factor two or more from what is assumed in the standard simulations are disfavoured by the measured d_4...

  17. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 1018eV

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, J.; et al.

    2010-01-01

    The successful installation and commissioning of the Pierre Auger Observatory would not have been possible without the strong commitment and effort from the technical and administrative staff in Malargüe. We are very grateful to the following agencies and organizations for financial support: Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Fundación Antorchas, Gobierno De La Provincia de Mendoza, Municipalidad de Malargüe, NDM Holdings and Valle Las Leñas, in gratitude for their continuing cooperation o...

  18. Radio wave emitted by an extensive air showers in 10KHz to 1MHz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichimura, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of radio waves in a frequency range of less than 1MHz in an EAS shower is discussed. Estimates of radio intensities at 10KHz, 100KHz and 1MHz in EAS showers made on the basis of the Kahn-Lerche theory. Negative charge excess in a shower is the main source of low frequency radio emission, in spite of the importance of the contribution of transverse current in the geomagnetic field in a higher frequency range. An estimate is also made for radio intensity produced when the shower hits the ground. The contribution of this process seems to be important at a large distance, i.e., beyond 1km from the shower axis.

  19. Simulation Study on Identifiability of UHE Gamma-ray Air Showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Y.; Inoue, N.; Miyazawa, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Vankov, H.P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgaria Academy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-01-15

    The chemical composition of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) comic rays is one of unsolved mysteries, and its study will give us fruitful information on the origin and acceleration mechanism of UHE cosmic rays. Especially, a detection of UHE gamma-rays by hybrid experiments, such as AUGER and TA, will be a key to solve these questions. The characteristics of UHE gamma-ray showers have been studied by comparing the lateral and longitudinal structures of shower particles calculated with AIRES and our own simulation code, so far. There are apparent differences in a slope of lateral distribution ({eta}) and a depth of shower maximum (Xmax) between gamma-ray and proton induced showers because UHE gamma-ray showers are affected by the LPM effect and the geomagnetic cascading process in an energy region of >10{sup 19.5}eV. Different features between gamma-ray and proton showers are pointed out from the simulation study and an identifiability of gamma-ray showers from proton ones is also discussed by the method of Neural-Network-Analysis.

  20. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertania, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-01-01

    Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (X-max), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the d

  1. Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubinova, Anna; Rutjes, Casper; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia Thi Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    We derive that lightning can start if the electric field is 15% of the breakdown field, and if elongated ice particles of 6 cm length and 100 free electrons per cm(3) are present. This is one particular example set from a parameter range that we discuss as well. Our simulations include the permittiv

  2. The shower size parameter as estimator of extensive air shower energy in fluorescence telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Vitor; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Ortiz, Jeferson A.; Sanchez, Federico

    2005-01-01

    The fluorescence technique has been successfully used to detect ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by indirect measurements. The underlying idea is that the number of charged particles in the atmospheric shower, i.e, its longitudinal profile, can be extracted from the amount of emitted nitrogen fluorescence light. However the influence of shower fluctuations and the very possible presence of different nuclear species in the primary cosmic ray spectrum makes the estimate of the shower energy from th...

  3. Quantitative and Chemical Fingerprint Analysis for the Quality Evaluation of Isatis indigotica based on Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detector Combined with Chemometric Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Tao Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple and reliable method of ultra-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (UPLC-PDA was developed to control the quality of Radix Isatidis (dried root of Isatis indigotica for chemical fingerprint analysis and quantitative analysis of eight bioactive constituents, including R,S-goitrin, progoitrin, epiprogoitrin, gluconapin, adenosine, uridine, guanosine, and hypoxanthine. In quantitative analysis, the eight components showed good regression (R > 0.9997 within test ranges, and the recovery method ranged from 99.5% to 103.0%. The UPLC fingerprints of the Radix Isatidis samples were compared by performing chemometric procedures, including similarity analysis, hierarchical clustering analysis, and principal component analysis. The chemometric procedures classified Radix Isatidis and its finished products such that all samples could be successfully grouped according to crude herbs, prepared slices, and adulterant Baphicacanthis cusiae Rhizoma et Radix. The combination of quantitative and chromatographic fingerprint analysis can be used for the quality assessment of Radix Isatidis and its finished products.

  4. A microsensor array for biochemical sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Steenkiste, Filip; Baert, Kris; Debruyker, Dirk; Spiering, Vincent; Schoot, van der Bart; Arquint, Philippe; Born, Reinhard; Schumann, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    A microsensor array to measure chemical properties of biological liquids is presented. A hybrid integration technique is used to mount four sensor chips on a micro flow channel: a pressure, temperature, pH, combined pO2 and pCO2 sensor chip. This results in a microsensor array which is developed to

  5. Spatiotemporal light localization in infiltrated waveguide arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Per Dalgaard; Neshev, D.N-; Sukhorukov, A.A.;

    2008-01-01

    We study light propagation in hexagonal waveguide arrays and show that simultaneous spatiotemporal localisation is possible by combination of engineered anomalous dispersion through selective excitation of Bloch-modes and spatial confinement in a nonlinear defect mode.......We study light propagation in hexagonal waveguide arrays and show that simultaneous spatiotemporal localisation is possible by combination of engineered anomalous dispersion through selective excitation of Bloch-modes and spatial confinement in a nonlinear defect mode....

  6. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  7. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2009-05-12

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  8. MARTA - Muon Auger RPC for the Tank Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellard, R.C.; Maurizio, D. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pimenta, M. [LIP, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The Pierre Auger Observatory was built with the goal of making a major contribution to the understanding of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR), their origin and nature. It is sensitive to energies above roughly 10{sup 18} eV and it is fully efficient above 3 X 10{sup 18} eV. It has collected data with an exposure of over 31000 km{sup 2} .sr.year, since 2008. However, it has a poor discrimination capability to separate the electromagnetic and the muonic component of an air shower. A good separation capability is an important tool to improve the identification of the primary composition of cosmic rays. MARTA is a proposed detector to address this issue. It based on a well known technology of RPC's (Resistive Plate Chambers). We will present the physics requirements of Auger, for a muon detector, that leads to a better understanding of the structure of air showers and describe how MARTA comply with them. This will allow to: Measure the energy evolution of the distribution of the number of muons in the showers; Disentangle mass composition changes from a change in hadronic interactions at high energies; Improve the energy measurement by subtracting the muon component from the tank signal; Increase the primary photon discrimination power; Improve the estimation of the missing energy in air showers. We describe the detector, its capabilities, and the prototypes with are already installed in the Observatory. We discuss the problems which may arise in running these type of detectors under the harsh conditions of the pampas and the solutions that are proposed to face them. (author)

  9. 基于衬底温度的红外焦平面联合非均匀性校正%Combined nonuniformity correction algorithm of infrared focal plane arrays based on substrate temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐艳秋; 孙强; 赵建; 姚凯男

    2016-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages in nonuniformity correction (NUC) algorithms based on calibration and scene of infrared focal plane arrays(IRFPA) were analysed separately. The combined NUC algorithm was presented. The thermal imaging system extracted the gain and offset factor from the FLASH which storged beforehand according to the substrate temperature of the IRFPA at the moment of power on. These factor was adopted to remove the nonuniformity of the detector simply. Based on the analysis of the characteristic of residual noise after initial correction, the P-M filter was used to replace the linear spatial average filter in the Neural Network nonuniformity correction algorithm (NN-NUC), which could preserve the image edge. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accelerate the rate of convergence, reduces the correction error largely, and avoids the image degradation caused by the response drift of IRFPA.%分别分析了红外焦平面阵列(IRFPA)基于定标的非均匀性校正法(NUC)和基于场景的NUC算法各自的优势和问题,在此基础上提出了联合非均匀性校正方法。根据上电时刻焦平面衬底的温度值,从FLASH中提取事先存储的对应温度区间的增益和偏置校正参数,初步消除探测器的非均匀性。通过分析初步校正后图像残余非均匀性噪声的特性,提出了用具有保边缘特性的P-M滤波取代传统神经网络算法中的四邻域均值滤波来获得期望图像,从而减小了图像边缘误差。实验结果表明,该算法收敛速度快,校正精度高,有效避免了因红外焦平面响应特性漂移而引起的图像降质。

  10. Height Detection of Broad-Spectrum Flame Based on Combination Sensor Array%基于组合传感器阵列的广谱火焰高度检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学颖; 杨遂军; 傅琳; 叶树亮

    2013-01-01

    易燃性是泡沫气雾剂安全性测试中的一种重要参数,也是化学危险品分类及标记全球协调制度(GHS)中安全数据制定以及GB/T 21632-2008《危险品喷雾剂泡沫可燃性试验方法》喷雾剂分类的重要依据,由火焰高度和火焰燃烧时间描述.针对现代工业中泡沫气雾剂易燃性采用人工检测效率低、危险性大等缺点,研制了泡沫气雾剂易燃性自动检测系统,提出了一种组合传感器阵列的广谱火焰高度检测技术,在此基础上设计齿梳状遮光罩消除相邻传感器及非水平方向入射光线的干扰.多种典型试样测定结果表明该方法检测火焰高度结果稳定、误差满足要求.%Flammability is an important parameter in the security test of the aerosol foam,which described by the height and burning time of the flame.It is also an important basis of the establishment of the security data in the classification of the hazardous chemicals and marks the globally harmonized system(GHS) and classification of the aerosol in GB/T 21632-2008.In modem industry,the flammability of aerosol foam detected by hand,the detection efficiency is very low and the process is very dangerous.To solve the problem,this paper proposed an automatic detection system to get the flammability of aerosol foam and presented a Broadspectrum flame height measurement technique which the sensors combined to an array.In this form,it designed a comb lens hood to eliminate the interference from the adjacent sensor and non-horizontal incident light.According to the result of using multiple representative samples,this method to detect the height of the flame will get stable results and little error.

  11. Micromirror Arrays for Adaptive Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, E.J.

    2000-08-07

    The long-range goal of this project is to develop the optical and mechanical design of a micromirror array for adaptive optics that will meet the following criteria: flat mirror surface ({lambda}/20), high fill factor (> 95%), large stroke (5-10 {micro}m), and pixel size {approx}-200 {micro}m. This will be accomplished by optimizing the mirror surface and actuators independently and then combining them using bonding technologies that are currently being developed.

  12. Reconstruction accuracy of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M

    2007-01-01

    The reconstruction of extensive air showers (arrival direction, core position and energy estimation) by the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is discussed together with the corresponding accuracy. We determine the angular reconstruction accuracy as a function of the station multiplicity by using two different aproaches. We discuss statistical and systematic uncertainties in the determination of the signal at 1000 m from the core, S(1000), which is used to estimate the primary energy.

  13. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  14. Strong variations of cosmic ray intensity during thunderstorms and associated pulsations of the geomagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kanonidi, K Kh; Lidvansky, A S; Sobisevich, L E

    2011-01-01

    Strong variations of the intensity of secondary cosmic rays during thunderstorms are found to be accompanied in some cases by very clear pulsations of the geomagnetic field. The experiment is carried out in the Baksan Valley, North Caucasus, the Carpet air shower array being used as a particle detector. Magnetic field measurements are made with high-precision magnetometers located deep underground in the tunnel of the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, several kilometers apart from the air shower array.

  15. Eigenbeamforming array systems for sound source localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    D study aims at enhancing the performance of uniform circular ar- rays, and to a lesser extent, spherical arrays, for two- and three-dimensional localization problems, respectively. These array geometries allow to perform eigenbeamforming, beamforming based on the decomposition of the sound field in a...... spherical scatterer is recommended instead. A better visualization in the entire frequency range can be achieved with deconvo- lution methods, as they allow the recovery of the sound source distribution from a given beamformed map. Three efficient methods based on spectral procedures, originally conceived...... for planar-sparse arrays, are adapted to circular arrays. They rely on the fact that uniform circular arrays present an azimuthal response that is rather independent on the focusing direction. Finally, a method based on the combination of beamforming and acoustic holog- raphy is introduced for both...

  16. Behavior of Elastoplastic Auxetic Microstructural Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Aboudi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A continuum-based micromechanical model is employed for the prediction of the elasto-plastic behavior of periodic microstructural arrays that can generate negative values of Poisson’s ratios. The combined effects of the negative Poisson’s ratio generated by the array microstructure and the elastoplastic behavior of the constituents are studied. A design methodology for the determination of the constituents’ properties of two-phase arrays that generate required values of negative Poisson’s ratio is considered.

  17. Polarization tomography of metallic nanohole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Altewischer, E; Van Exter, M P; Woerdman, J P; Alkemade, P F A; Van Zuuk, A; Van der Drift, E

    2004-01-01

    We report polarization tomography experiments on metallic nanohole arrays with square and hexagonal symmetry. As a main result, we find that a fully polarized input beam is partly depolarized after transmission through a nanohole array. This loss of polarization coherence is found to be anisotropic, i.e. it depends on the polarization state of the input beam. The depolarization is ascribed to a combination of two factors: i) the nonlocal response of the array due to surface plasmon propagation, ii) the non-plane wave nature of a practical input beam.

  18. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  19. SEPS solar array design and technology evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    The technology developments required and a preliminary design of a lightweight 25 kW solar array for the solar electric propulsion stage (SEPS) have been defined. The requirements for a 65 W/Kg SEPS solar array system requires significant component weight reductions over present state-of-the-art flexible solar arrays in both electrical and structural-mechanical designs. A requirement for operation from 0.3 au to 6.0 au presents a wide range of temperature environments as well as severe combined thermal/vacuum/UV radiation environments. Additional requirements are capability for partial array retraction operation, and capability for full retraction and automatic preloading for survival of the Shuttle reentry environment. An assessment of current lightweight flexible solar array technology is made against the SEPS solar array requirements and new technology requirements are defined. A preliminary design and the operating characteristics of a flat-fold solar array system meeting the SEPS requirements is presented. A full-width, 10-ft-tall functional array model, including representative welded electrical modules and a model astromast, was fabricated and tested.

  20. Novel optoacoustic array for noninvasive monitoring of blood parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Valeriy G.; Petrov, Yuriy Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Petrova, Irina Y.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2009-02-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of blood parameters such as total hemoglobin concentration and saturation (oxygenation) is important for diagnostics in large populations of patients. We developed a novel optoacoustic array for monitoring of these variables in arteries and veins. The array allows for measurements without scanning, reduces the data acquisition time, and minimizes the influence of motion artifacts. The array combines a custom-made fiber-optic delivery system and multiple piezoelectric transducers. We tested the array in vitro and in vivo. The array design and materials allowed for sensitive measurement of optoacoustic signals without distortion and provided real time measurement of these parameters both in vitro and in vivo without scanning.

  1. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  2. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  3. Telescope Array Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, H.; Yoshida, S. [Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Yoshii, H. [Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime, 790-8577 (Japan); Tanaka, K. [Hiroshinma City University, 3-4-1 Ozuka-Higashi, Asa-Minami-ku, Hiroshima, 731-3194 (Japan); Cohen, F.; Fukushima, M.; Hayashida, N.; Hiyama, K.; Ikeda, D.; Kido, E.; Kondo, Y.; Nonaka, T.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Ozawa, S.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Takeda, M. [ICRR, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan)] (and others)

    2008-01-15

    The TA observatory is a hybrid detector system consisting of both a surface detector array as well as a set of fluorescence detectors. The observatory will measure the energy spectrum, anisotropy and composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The surface detectors are being deployed and the array should be complete by the end of February, 2007. We will soon be collecting hybrid data at the Telecope Array.

  4. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  5. Phased array antenna matching: Simulation and optimization of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudgeon, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized simulation of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements is reported using mutual coupling and wide angle impedance matching in phased arrays. Special emphasis is given to circular polarization. The aforementioned computer program has as variable inputs: frequency, polarization, grid geometry, element size, dielectric waveguide fill, dielectric plugs in the waveguide for impedance matching, and dielectric sheets covering the array surface for the purpose of wide angle impedance matching. Parameter combinations are found which produce reflection peaks interior to grating lobes, while dielectric cover sheets are successfully employed to extend the usable scan range of a phased array. The most exciting results came from the application of computer aided optimization techniques to the design of this type of array.

  6. Ordered arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A combination of a “top-down” approach (substrate-conformal imprint lithography and two “bottom-up” approaches (dewetting and dealloying enables fabrication of perfectly ordered 2-dimensional arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles. The dewetting of Au/Ag bilayers on the periodically prepatterned substrates leads to the interdiffusion of Au and Ag and the formation of an array of Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles. The array of alloy nanoparticles is transformed into an array of nanoporous gold nanoparticles by a following dealloying step. Large areas of this new type of material arrangement can be realized with this technique. In addition, this technique allows for the control of particle size, particle spacing, and ligament size (or pore size by varying the period of the structure, total metal layer thickness, and the thickness ratio of the as-deposited bilayers.

  7. Solar array deployment mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  8. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  9. First results from the FPGA/NIOS Adaptive FIR Filter Using Linear Prediction Implemented in the AERA Radio Stations to Reduce Narrow Band RFI for Radio Detection of Cosmic Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Głas, D.; Timmermans, C.; Collaboration, T. Wijnen for the Pierre Auger

    2014-01-01

    The FPGA/NIOS FIR filter based on linear prediction (LP) to suppress radio frequency interference (RFI) has been installed in several radio stations in the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) experiment. AERA observes coherent radio emission from extensive air showers induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays to make a detailed study of the development of the electromagnetic part of air showers. Radio signals provide complementary information to that obtained from Auger surface detectors, whi...

  10. The IceTop experiment in 2010

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2010-01-01

    We present the current status of the IceTop air shower array on top of the IceCube neutrino detector that IceTop can use as a huge detector of TeV muons. We laos give a brief discussion of different types of air shower events that contain information on the spectrum and composition of the cosmic rays in a wide energy range.

  11. Measuring chemical composition and particle cross-section of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by a ground radio array

    CERN Document Server

    Belov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique to measure chemical composition and particle cross-section of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using radio data. We relate the geometry of the radio footprint on the ground to the depth of the extensive air shower maximum. We suggest to use the spectral information of the radio signal to improve the shower maximum reconstruction by minimum number of antennas on the ground.

  12. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  13. P systems with array objects and array rewriting rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.G. Subramanian; R. Saravanan; M. Geethalakshmi; P. Helen Chandra; M. Margenstern

    2007-01-01

    Array P systems were introduced by Pǎun Gh. which is linking the two areas of membrane computing and picture grammars. Puzzle grammars were introduced by us for generating connected picture arrays in the two-dimensional plane, motivated by the problem of tiling the plane. On the other hand, incorporating into arrays the developmental type of generation used in the well-known biologically motivated L systems, Siromoney and Siromoney proposed a very general rectangular array generating model, called extended controlled tabled L array system (ECTLAS). In this paper we introduce two variations of the array P system, called BPG array P system and parallel array P system. The former has in the regions array objects and basic puzzle grammar rules (BPG), which are a specific kind of puzzle grammar rules. In the latter, the regions have rectangular array objects and tables of context-free rules. We examine these two types of P systems for their array generative power.

  14. Test of the hadronic interaction models at around *10 TeV with Tibet EAS core data

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid experiment has been started by AS{\\gamma} collaboration at Tibet, China, since May 2009, that consists of a burst-detector-grid (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core array) and the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III). The first step of YAC, called YAC-I, contains 16 detector units and observes high energy electromagnetic particles in air-shower cores within several meters from the shower axis, and Tibet-III array measures the total energy and the arrival direction of air showers. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models currently used for air-shower simulations such as QGSJET, SIBYLL, EPOS etc. through the multi-parameter measurement in air-shower cores. In this paper, we used a data set collected from May 1st 2009 through February 23rd 2010 by the YAC-I. The effective live time used for the present analysis is 169.65 days. The preliminary results of the interaction model checking at *10 TeV energy region is reported in this paper.

  15. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  16. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  17. Optical Design of Segmented Hexagon Array Solar Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegele, Vince

    2000-01-01

    A segmented array of mirrors was designed for a solar concentrator test stand at MSFC for firing solar thermal propulsion engines. The 144 mirrors each have a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The mirror segments are aluminum hexagons that had the surface diamond turned and quartz coated. The array focuses sunlight reflected from a heliostat to a 4 inch diameter spot containing 10 kw of power at the 15-foot focal point. The derivation of the surface figure for the respective mirror elements is shown. The alignment process of the array is discussed and test results of the system's performance is given.

  18. Parallel Access of Out-Of-Core Dense Extendible Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Rotem, Doron

    2007-07-26

    Datasets used in scientific and engineering applications are often modeled as dense multi-dimensional arrays. For very large datasets, the corresponding array models are typically stored out-of-core as array files. The array elements are mapped onto linear consecutive locations that correspond to the linear ordering of the multi-dimensional indices. Two conventional mappings used are the row-major order and the column-major order of multi-dimensional arrays. Such conventional mappings of dense array files highly limit the performance of applications and the extendibility of the dataset. Firstly, an array file that is organized in say row-major order causes applications that subsequently access the data in column-major order, to have abysmal performance. Secondly, any subsequent expansion of the array file is limited to only one dimension. Expansions of such out-of-core conventional arrays along arbitrary dimensions, require storage reorganization that can be very expensive. Wepresent a solution for storing out-of-core dense extendible arrays that resolve the two limitations. The method uses a mapping function F*(), together with information maintained in axial vectors, to compute the linear address of an extendible array element when passed its k-dimensional index. We also give the inverse function, F-1*() for deriving the k-dimensional index when given the linear address. We show how the mapping function, in combination with MPI-IO and a parallel file system, allows for the growth of the extendible array without reorganization and no significant performance degradation of applications accessing elements in any desired order. We give methods for reading and writing sub-arrays into and out of parallel applications that run on a cluster of workstations. The axial-vectors are replicated and maintained in each node that accesses sub-array elements.

  19. Design of a Novel MEMS Gyroscope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Sun; Wei Wang(College of William and Mary); Xiaoyong Lv

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a novel four degree-of-freedom (DOF) MEMS vibratory gyroscope. A MEMS gyroscope array is then presented using the novel gyroscope unit. In the design of the proposed 4-DOF MEMS vibratory gyroscope, the elements of the drive-mode are set inside the whole gyroscope architecture, and the elements of sense-mode are set around the drive-mode, which thus makes it possible to combine several gyroscope units into a gyroscope array through sense-modes of all the units. The complete ...

  20. Coherent addition of two dimensional array of fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Moti; Davidson, Nir; Friesem, Asher A; Luria, Elena; Krupkin, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Configurations for efficient free space coherent addition of four separate fiber lasers arranged in two dimensional array are presented. They include compact and robust interferometric combiners that can be inserted either inside or outside the cavity of the combined lasers system. The results reveal that over 85% combining efficiency can be obtained.

  1. The transient scattering mechanism of dipole array with reflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xue-Qin; Wang Jun-Hong; Li Zeng-Rui

    2008-01-01

    The transient backscattering mechanisms of a dipole array with reflector have been investigated from different aspects:time-domain,frequency-domain,and combined time-frequency domain,using 4×8 dipole arrays with reflector as an example.The data of scattering from the arrays under the incidence of Gaussian pulses are obtained by finite differential time domain method.The influences of the array structural parameters,incident wave parameters,and incident angles on the waveforms,spectrum,and time-frequency representations of the backseattered fields of the arrays are analysed and conclusions are drawn.From these characteristics and conclusions,it is possible to deduce the array structure inversely from the backscattered field.

  2. Optimizing Chemical Sensor Array Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimal selection of array sensors for a chemical sensing application is a nontrivial task. It is commonly believed that ''more is better'' when choosing the number of sensors required to achieve good chemical selectivity. However, cost and system complexity issues point towards the choice of small arrays. A quantitative array optimization is carried out to explore the selectivity of arrays of partially-selective chemical sensors as a function of array size. It is shown that modest numbers (dozens) of target analytes are completely distinguished with a range of arrays sizes. However, the array selectivity and the robustness against sensor sensitivity variability are significantly degraded if the array size is increased above a certain number of sensors, so that relatively small arrays provide the best performance. The results also suggest that data analyses for very large arrays of partially-selective sensors will be optimized by separately anal yzing small sensor subsets

  3. Fabrication of a novel nanocomposite based on sol-gel process for hollow fiber-solid phase microextraction of aflatoxins: B1 and B2, in cereals combined with high performane liquid chromatography-diode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Sorayaei, Hoda; Samadi, Fateme; Masrournia, Mahboubeh; Bakherad, Zohreh

    2011-10-15

    The new pre-concentration technique, hollow fiber-solid phase microextraction based on carbon nanotube reinforced sol-gel and liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection was applied to determination of aflatoxins B(1), B(2) (AFB(1), AFB(2)) in rice, peanut and wheat samples. This research provides an overview of trends related to synthesis of solid phase microextraction (SPME) sorbnents that improves the assay of aflatoxins as the semi-polar compounds in several real samples. It mainly includes summary and a list of the results for a simple carbon nanotube reinforced sol-gel in-fiber device. This device was used for extraction, pre-concentration and determination of aflatoxins B1, B2 in real samples. In this technique carbon nanotube reinforced sol was prepared by the sol-gel method via the reaction of phenyl trimethoxysilane (PTMS) with a basic catalyst (tris hydroxymethyl aminomethan). The influences of microextraction parameters such as pH, ageing time, carbon nanotube contents, desorption conditions, desorption solvent and agitation speed were investigated. Optimal HPLC conditions were: C(18) reversed phase column for separation, water-acetonitril-methanol (35:10:55) as the mobile phase and maximum wavelength for detection was 370 nm. The method was evaluated statistically and under optimized conditions, the detection limits for the analytes were 0.074 and 0.061 ng/mL for B1 and B2 respectively. Limit of quantification for B1 and B2 was 0.1 ng/mL too (n=7). The precisions were in the range of 2.829-2.976% (n=3), and linear ranges were within 0.1 and 400 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cereals (peanut, wheat, rice) with the relative recoveries from 47.43% to 106.83%. PMID:21925977

  4. Imaging antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  5. FEL phased array configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  6. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  7. Lateral charged particle distribution of extensive air showers - source of information about energy and nature of the primary cosmic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CORSIKA simulated showers for H, C and Fe cosmic primaries in 8 energy intervals from 1016 eV to 1018 eV, taking into account the response of KASCADE-Grande detectors, have been used to reconstruct the charged particle density for KASCADE-Grande observations, based on the Linsley lateral distribution function (LDF). Extensive studies have been done to investigate features for energy estimation and mass discrimination of cosmic primaries around 1017 eV. It has been found that the charged particle density distribution of EAS exhibits interesting information for both aspects: at larger distances from shower core, around 500 m - 600 m the charge particle density could be used as energy identifier, and at shorter distances from shower core, around, 100 m - 200 m, it signals the mass of the EAS primary. (author)

  8. Energy, altitude, and mass dependence of steepness of the lateral distribution function of electrons and muons in extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastegarzadeh, G.; Rafezi, L.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, the energy and mass dependence of the steepness of the lateral distribution function of electrons and muons (η) are investigated. Based on a CORSIKA simulation, different characteristics of η for proton, helium, oxygen, and iron primaries in the energy range 10{sup 14}–10{sup 17} eV are presented. It is found that η is a mass sensitive parameter, and its potential as a mass discrimination parameter between light and heavy primaries is studied. Moreover, the altitude dependence of η for KASCADE and Auger experiments (110 and 1400 m) is discussed. It is shown that the Auger experiment is potentially more effective for applying this parameter as a mass discriminator between light and heavy cosmic ray components, especially at high energies.

  9. Experimental Research on Atmospheric Electric Field and Extensive Air Shower Particle Increasing During Thunderstorms with ARGO-YBJ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bin; ZHANG Ying; JIA Huan-Yu

    2008-01-01

    From April lst to August 14th, 2006, thunderstorms had been recorded at Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory by ARGO-YBJ experiment. This paper analyzed the correlation between atmospheric electric field (AEF) and "scaler mode" counting rate during thunderstorm. Counting rates of multiplicities n = 1,2 were found to have a large increase ( from 1.02% to 9.03% ), while there was few or no changes in those of multiplicities n =3 and n≥4 during the thunderstorms. The counts of different multiplicities had different feedbacks on the violent change of AEF, which showed that their energy and most components were distinguishing.

  10. Optic detectors calibration for measuring ultra-high energy extensive air showers Cherenkov radiation by 532 nm laser

    CERN Document Server

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of a PMT matrix is crucial for the treatment of the data obtained with Cherenkov tracking detector. Furthermore, due to high variability of the aerosol abundance in the atmosphere depending on season, weather etc. A constant monitoring of the atmospheric transparency is required during the measurements. For this purpose, besides traditional methods, a station for laser atmospheric probing is used.

  11. The Submillimeter Array

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, P T P; Lo, K Y; Ho, Paul T.P.; Moran, James M.; Lo, Kwok Yung

    2004-01-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA), a collaborative project of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), has begun operation on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. A total of eight 6-m telescopes comprise the array, which will cover the frequency range of 180-900 GHz. All eight telescopes have been deployed and are operational. First scientific results utilizing the three receiver bands at 230, 345, and 690 GHz have been obtained and are presented in the accompanying papers.

  12. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  13. Increasing the specificity and function of DNA microarrays by processing arrays at different stringencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, Martin; Petersen, Jesper; Poulsen, Lena

    2009-01-01

    building arrays, because they combine high sample throughput with investigation of optimal assay conditions. The array processors can increase specificity in all DNA microarray assays, e.g. for gene expression, and microRNA and mutation analysis. Increased specificity of the array will also benefit...... microarray-based loci selection prior to high-throughput sequencing....

  14. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Richard N.

    2015-08-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to observe 22 millisecond pulsars in three bands: 40cm (band centre 732 MHz), 20cm (1369 MHz) and 10cm (3100 MHz). Coherent de-dispersion systems are used for the 40cm and 20cm bands and digital polyphase filterbanks are used for the 20cm and 10cm bands. Observations are made at intervals of two to three weeks and observations times for each pulsar in each band are typically one hour. Regular PPTA observations commenced in early 2005 but earlier timing data, primarily in the 20cm band, exist for many of the pulsars back to 1994. Pipeline processing scripts are based on PSRCHIVE routines and take into account instrumental offsets. Timing analyses include modelling of dispersion variations and red and white noise in the data. The primary scientific goal of the PPTA project is the detection of gravitational waves, either a stochastic background from supermassive black-hole binary systems in distant galaxies or from individual binary systems. The PPTA data sets have many other applications including establishment of a pulsar-based timescale, improvement of solar-system ephemerides and studies of the individual pulsars. PPTA data sets have been made available to the International Pulsar Timing Array consortium and analysis of the combined data sets is progressing. Recent developments, both instrumental and science-related, will be described.

  15. The in-capillary DPPH-capillary electrophoresis-the diode array detector combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode for screening and quantifying major antioxidants in Cuscuta chinensis Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Tian, Ji; Li, Jin; Azietaku, John Teye; Zhang, Bo-Li; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Chang, Yan-Xu

    2016-07-01

    An in-capillary 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-CE-the DAD (in-capillary DPPH-CE-DAD) combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode has been developed to screen and quantify the active antioxidant components of Cuscuta chinensis Lam. The operation parameters were optimized with regard to the pH and concentration of buffer solution, SDS, β-CDs, organic modifier, as well as separation voltage and temperature. Six antioxidants including chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, hyperin, isoquercitrin, and astragalin were screened and the total antioxidant activity of the complex matrix was successfully evaluated based on the decreased peak area of DPPH by the established DPPH-CE-DAD method. Sensitivity was enhanced under reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode and 10- to 31-fold of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity for each analyte was attained. The results demonstrated that the newly established in-capillary DPPH-CE-DAD method combined with reversed-electrode polarity stacking mode could integrate sample concentration, the oxidizing reaction, separation, and detection into one capillary to fully automate the system. It was considered a suitable technique for the separation, screening, and determination of trace antioxidants in natural products. PMID:26955793

  16. The International Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N

    2013-01-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) is an organisation whose raison d'etre is to facilitate collaboration between the three main existing PTAs (the EPTA in Europe, NANOGrav in North America and the PPTA in Australia) in order to realise the benefits of combined PTA data sets in reaching the goals of PTA projects. Currently, shared data sets for 39 pulsars are available for IPTA-based projects. Operation of the IPTA is administered by a Steering Committee consisting of six members, two from each PTA, plus the immediate past Chair in a non-voting capacity. A Constitution and several Agreements define the framework for the collaboration. Web pages provide information both to members of participating PTAs and to the general public. With support from an NSF PIRE grant, the IPTA facilitates the organisation of annual Student Workshops and Science Meetings. These are very valuable both in training new students and in communicating current results from IPTA-based research.

  17. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose pri...

  18. The Murchison Widefield Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, Daniel A.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Ord, Stephen M.; Bernardi, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory site allows the Murchison Widefield Array to employ a simple RFI blanking scheme and still calibrate visibilities and form images in the FM radio band. The techniques described are running autonomously in our calibration and imagin

  19. Cantilever array sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Peter Lang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized microfabricated sensors have enormous potential in gas detection, biochemical analysis, medical applications, quality and process control, and product authenticity issues. Here, we highlight an ultrasensitive mechanical way of converting (bio-chemical or physical processes into a recordable signal using microfabricated cantilever arrays.

  20. Bandwidth Reconfigurable Metamaterial Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael J. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterial structures provide innovative ways to manipulate electromagnetic wave responses to realize new applications. This paper presents a conformal wideband metamaterial array that achieves as much as 10 : 1 continuous bandwidth. This was done by using interelement coupling to concurrently achieve significant wave slow-down and cancel the inductance stemming from the ground plane. The corresponding equivalent circuit of the resulting array is the same as that of classic metamaterial structures. In this paper, we present a wideband Marchand-type balun with validation measurements demonstrating the metamaterial (MTM array’s bandwidth from 280 MHz to 2800 MHz. Bandwidth reconfiguration of this class of array is then demonstrated achieving a variety of band-pass or band-rejection responses within its original bandwidth. In contrast with previous bandwidth and frequency response reconfigurations, our approach does not change the aperture’s or ground plane’s geometry, nor does it introduce external filtering structures. Instead, the new responses are realized by making simple circuit changes into the balanced feed integrated with the wideband MTM array. A variety of circuit changes can be employed using MEMS switches or variable lumped loads within the feed and 5 example band-pass and band-rejection responses are presented. These demonstrate the potential of the MTM array’s reconfiguration to address a variety of responses.