WorldWideScience

Sample records for air water interfaces

  1. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  2. Anisotropic diffusion of volatile pollutants at air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ping CHEN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The volatile pollutants that spill into natural waters cause water pollution. Air pollution arises from the water pollution because of volatilization. Mass exchange caused by turbulent fluctuation is stronger in the direction normal to the air-water interface than in other directions due to the large density difference between water and air. In order to explore the characteristics of anisotropic diffusion of the volatile pollutants at the air-water interface, the relationship between velocity gradient and mass transfer rate was established to calculate the turbulent mass diffusivity. A second-order accurate smooth transition differencing scheme (STDS was proposed to guarantee the boundedness for the flow and mass transfer at the air-water interface. Simulations and experiments were performed to study the trichloroethylene (C2HCl3 release. By comparing the anisotropic coupling diffusion model, isotropic coupling diffusion model, and non-coupling diffusion model, the features of the transport of volatile pollutants at the air-water interface were determined. The results show that the anisotropic coupling diffusion model is more accurate than the isotropic coupling diffusion model and non-coupling diffusion model. Mass transfer significantly increases with the increase of the air-water relative velocity at a low relative velocity. However, at a higher relative velocity, an increase in the relative velocity has no effect on mass transfer.

  3. Anisotropic diffusion of volatile pollutants at air-water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-ping CHEN; Jing-tao CHENG; Guang-fa DENG

    2013-01-01

    The volatile pollutants that spill into natural waters cause water pollution. Air pollution arises from the water pollution because of volatilization. Mass exchange caused by turbulent fluctuation is stronger in the direction normal to the air-water interface than in other directions due to the large density difference between water and air. In order to explore the characteristics of anisotropic diffusion of the volatile pollutants at the air-water interface, the relationship between velocity gradient and mass transfer rate was established to calculate the turbulent mass diffusivity. A second-order accurate smooth transition differencing scheme (STDS) was proposed to guarantee the boundedness for the flow and mass transfer at the air-water interface. Simulations and experiments were performed to study the trichloroethylene (C2HCl3) release. By comparing the anisotropic coupling diffusion model, isotropic coupling diffusion model, and non-coupling diffusion model, the features of the transport of volatile pollutants at the air-water interface were determined. The results show that the anisotropic coupling diffusion model is more accurate than the isotropic coupling diffusion model and non-coupling diffusion model. Mass transfer significantly increases with the increase of the air-water relative velocity at a low relative velocity. However, at a higher relative velocity, an increase in the relative velocity has no effect on mass transfer.

  4. Ultrafast dynamics of water at the water-air interface studied by femtosecond surface vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Huib J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of water molecules at the water-air interface, using surfacespecific two-dimensional infrared sum-frequency generation (2D-SFG spectroscopy. The data reveal the occurrence of surprisingly fast energy transfer and reorientational dynamics at aqueous interfaces.

  5. Microscopic dynamics of nanoparticle monolayers at air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, R; Basu, J K

    2013-04-15

    We present results of surface mechanical and particle tracking measurements of nanoparticles trapped at the air-water interface as a function of their areal density. We monitor both the surface pressure (Π) and isothermal compression modulus (ϵ) as well as the dynamics of nanoparticle clusters, using fluorescence confocal microscopy while they are compressed to very high density near the two dimensional close packing density Φ∼0.82. We observe non-monotonic variation in both ϵ and the dynamic heterogeneity, characterized by the dynamical susceptibility χ4 with Φ, in such high density monolayers. We provide insight into the underlying nature of such transitions in close packed high density nanoparticle monolayers in terms of the morphology and flexibility of these soft colloidal particles. We discuss the significance our results in the context of related studies on two dimensional granular or colloidal systems. PMID:23411354

  6. Structure and dynamics of egg white ovalbumin adsorbed at the air/water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, A. van; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    The molecular properties of egg white ovalbumin adsorbed at the air/water interface were studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) techniques. Ovalbumin adsorbed at the air/ water interface adopts a characteristic partially unf

  7. Self Assembly of Ionic Liquids at the Air/Water Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Minofar, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, aug (2015), s. 27-40. ISSN 2245-4551 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Ionic liquids * air/water interface * self assembly * ion-water interaction * ion-ion interaction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  8. Surface Tension of Ab Initio Liquid Water at the Water-Air Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    We report calculations of the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the simulation cell size dependence of the surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which show that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is required for the small system used in the AIMD simulation. The AIMD sim...

  9. Neutron reflectivity measurement of polymer monolayer and brush at the air/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studied on amphiphilic polymer monolayer structure at the air/water interface by X-ray and neutron reflectometry. By complemently use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry, we have found (1) the existence of carpet layer in ionic polymer brush in monolayer system and (2) characteristic structural change in polymer/subphase interface. Furthermore, interesting experiment on small ion distribution was carried out by NR with contrast variation method. With our experimental examples, characteristic points in the neutron reflectivity measurement at the air/water interface and further possibility in this research area are discussed. (author)

  10. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface.The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes

  11. Crystalline mono- and multilayer self-assemblies of oligothiophenes at the air-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isz, S.; Weissbuch, I.; Kjær, K.; Bouwman, W.G.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Palacin, S.; Ruaudel-Teixier, A.; Leiserowitz, L.; Lahav, M.

    1997-01-01

    aromatic nonamphiphilic molecules, self-aggregated at the air-water interface. As model systems we have examined the deposition of quaterthiophene (S-4), quinquethiophene (S-5). and sexithiophene (S-6) from chloroform solutions on the water surface. The structures of the films were determined by surface...

  12. Scanning force microscopy at the air-water interface of an air bubble coated with pulmonary surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R.; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-01-01

    To study the structure-function relationship of pulmonary surfactant under conditions close to nature, molecular films of a model system consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, and surfactant-associated protein C were prepared at the air-water interface of air bubbles about the size of human alveoli (diameter of 100 microm). The high mechanical stability as well as the absence of substantial film flow, inherent to small air bubbles, allowed for scanning ...

  13. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria. PMID:26943272

  14. Thermodynamics of iodide adsorption at the instantaneous air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of ion adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler ["Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010), 10.1021/jp909219k]. Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost water layer, and the interfacial location of the ion is favored by enthalpy and opposed by entropy.

  15. Haloalkanes at air-water and air-ice interfaces: A computational study with implications in atmospheric chemistry and water treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roeselová, Martina; Habartová, Alena; Minofar, Babak; Toubin, C.

    Dallas: American Chemical Society, 2014. 214PHYS. ISSN 0065-7727. [National Spring Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) /247./. 16.03.2014-20.03.2014, Dallas] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : haloalkanes * air-water interfaces * air-ice interfaces Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. Characterization of predominantly hydrophobic poly(styrene)-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers at air/water and cyclohexane/water interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial tension measurements are employed to explore the spreading behavior of predominantly hydrophobic poly(styrene)--poly(ethylene oxide), PS-PEO, diblock copolymers at air/water and cyclohexane/water interfaces. Two copolymers with 7%- and 15.5%-PEO are examined in this study. The former is expected to have a PS block limiting area in air roughly equal to the limiting PEO pancake area, whereas the latter is expected to have a limiting PS block area in air approximately 3 times smaller than the limiting PEO pancake area. At the air/water interface, the 7%-PEO copolymer does not spread well, which is attributed to interference from the hydrophobic PS block. In contrast, the 7%-PEO copolymer spreads well at the cyclohexane/water interface, producing an isotherm with a terminating mean molecular area 3 times smaller than that obtained at the air/water interface. The 15.5%-PEO copolymer spreads well at both the air/water ad cyclohexane/water interfaces due to less interference from the smaller hydrophobic PS block. These observations are compared to compression isotherms, and the results are discussed in terms of the solvating nature of the adjacent cyclohexane phase for the PS block

  17. Demonstration of adaptive optics for mitigating laser propagation through a random air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Phillip; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new concept of mitigating signal distortions caused by random air-water interface using an adaptive optics (AO) system. This is the first time the concept of using an AO for mitigating the effects of distortions caused mainly by a random air-water interface is presented. We have demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the distortions using AO in a laboratory water tank for investigating the propagation effects of a laser beam through an airwater interface. The AO system consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor for mitigating surface water distortions has a unique way of stabilizing and aiming a laser onto an object underneath the water. Essentially the AO system mathematically takes the complex conjugate of the random phase caused by air-water interface allowing the laser beam to penetrate through the water by cancelling with the complex conjugates. The results show the improvement of a number of metrics including Strehl ratio, a measure of the quality of optical image formation for diffraction limited optical system. These are the first results demonstrating the feasibility of developing a new sensor system such as Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) utilizing AO for mitigating surface water distortions.

  18. Surface Tension of Ab Initio Liquid Water at the Water-Air Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    We report calculations of the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the simulation cell size dependence of the surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which show that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is required for the small system used in the AIMD simulation. The AIMD simulations reveal that the double-{\\xi} basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress, while the triple and quadruple-{\\xi} basis sets give similar results. We further demonstrate that the van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension, while van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in the value for the surface tension that is too high. T...

  19. Differential Effects of Lysophosphatidylcholine on the Adsorption of Phospholipids to an Air/Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Samares C.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    To determine how the hydrophobic surfactant proteins promote insertion of the surfactant lipids into an air/water interface, we measured the effect of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) on adsorption. Existing models contend that the proteins function either by disordering the lipids or by stabilizing a negatively curved structure located between the adsorbing vesicle and the interface. Because LPC produces greater disorder but positive curvature, the models predict opposite effects. With vesicles...

  20. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  1. Emulsion droplet spreading at air/water interfaces: mechanisms and relevance to the whipping of cream

    OpenAIRE

    Hotrum, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords:emulsion, spreading coefficient, surface tension, emulsifier, whipped cream, dairy foam, partial coalescence In this thesis, the interaction between emulsion droplets and expanding air/water interfaces was investigated. The objective was to deepen our knowledge concerning the physical processes that take place at the expanding air surfaces that form during aeration of emulsions. Emulsions can become aerated as a result of various processing operations, for example, stirring or pourin...

  2. Protonation, Hydrolysis, and Condensation of Mono- and Trifunctional Silanes at the Air/Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Britt, David W; Hlady, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    The protonation, hydrolysis, and condensation kinetics of octadecyldimethylmethoxysilane (OMMS) and octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) at the air/water interface were investigated using a monolayer trough. OTMS chemical condensation within physically condensed phases was observed in transferred monolayers using fluorescence microscopy. Molecular area increases and decreases attributed to protonation and hydrolysis, respectively, of silane methoxy groups were measured by a surface balance. These...

  3. Emulsion droplet spreading at air/water interfaces: mechanisms and relevance to the whipping of cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hotrum, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords:emulsion, spreading coefficient, surface tension, emulsifier, whipped cream, dairy foam, partial coalescence In this thesis, the interaction between emulsion droplets and expanding air/water interfaces was investigated. The

  4. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  5. Ozonolysis of Uric Acid at the Air/Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) epoxide, peroxide, and ozonide species produced in aqueous UA microdroplets exposed to O3(g) are detected by online mass spectrometry within ∼1 ms. UA conversions are independent of its initial concentration below ∼0.1 mM and are unaffected by addition of excess H2O2 or t-butanol. UA reactivity increases ∼380 times from pH 4 to 7, which is at variance with the pH-independent rates reported for the UA + O3(aq) reaction in bulk water. At pH ∼7, UA and ascorbic acid (AH2) microdro...

  6. Proton Availability at the Air/Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The acidity of the water surface sensed by a colliding gas is determined in experiments in which the protonation of gaseous trimethylamine (TMA) on aqueous microjets is monitored by online electrospray mass spectrometry as a function of the pH of the bulk liquid (pH_(BLK)). TMAH^+ signal intensities describe a titration curve whose equivalence point at pH_(BLK) 3.8 is dramatically smaller than the acidity constant of trimethylammonium in bulk solution, pK_A(TMAH^+) = 9.8. Notably, the degree ...

  7. Polyelectrolyte brushes at the air/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanostructure of amphiphilic diblock copolymer monolayer on water surface was investigated by in situ X-ray and neutron reflectivity. The diblock copolymers used have a long hydrophobic chain and a polyelectrolyte chain as a hydrophilic block. The monolayer was found not to have a simple double layer structure (hydrophobic layer / hydrophilic (carpet) layer) but to have a three layer structure consisting of hydrophobic layer, hydrophilic dense carpet layer, and polyelectrolyte brush layer when the polyelectrolyte block is long enough and the surface pressure (i.e. brush density) is high enough. The transition from carpet only to carpet/brush double layer structure in hydrophilic layer was observed as a function of polyelectrolyte chain length, the surface pressure. When the hydrophilic chain is a weak polyelectrolyte, the monolayer first expanded and then shrunk with increasing salt concentration in the subphase. For the strongly ionic polyelectrolyte, the monolayer structure was not affected by salt addition up to ∼0.2 M. These observations can be explained by a balance of the charged state of the brush chain, an electrostatic repulsion between brush chains and salt concentration in the brush layer

  8. Self-Assembly of Peptides at the Air/Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    Peptides are commonly used as building blocks for design and development of novel materials with a variety of application areas ranging from drug design to biotechnology. The precise control of molecular architecture and specific nature of the nonbonded interactions among peptides enable aggregates with well defined structural and functional properties. The interaction of peptides with interfaces leads to dramatic changes in their conformational and aggregation behavior. In this talk, I will discuss our research on the interplay of intermolecular forces and influence of interfaces. In the first part the amphiphilic nature of short peptide oligomers and their behavior at the air/water interface will be discussed. The surface driving force and its decomposition will be analyzed. In the second part aggregation of peptides in bulk water and at an interface will be discussed. Different design features which can be tuned to control aggregation behavior will be analyzed.

  9. Hydrodynamics of a fixed camphor boat at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhiraj; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Ravi; Mandre, Shreyas; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when introduced at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and the camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface. This radial spreading of camphor is due to Marangoni forces setup by the camphor concentration gradient. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of this process for a camphor tablet held fixed at the air-water interface. During the initial transient, the time-dependent spread radius R (t) of camphor scales algebraically with time t (R (t) ~t 1 / 2) in agreement with empirical scalings reported for spreading of volatile oils on water surface. But unlike surfactants, the camphor stops spreading when the influx of camphor from the tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the outflux of camphor due to evaporation, and a steady-state condition is reached. The spreading camphor however, shears the underlying fluid and sets up bulk convective flow. We explain the coupled steady-state dynamics between the interfacial camphor spreading and bulk convective flow with a boundary layer approximation, supported by experimental evidence. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  10. Proteins at air-water interfaces: a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Allan, Daniel B; Leheny, Robert L; Reich, Daniel H

    2014-11-01

    We present a coarse-grained model to describe the adsorption and deformation of proteins at an air-water interface. The interface is introduced empirically in the form of a localized field that couples to a hydropathy scale of amino acids. We consider three kinds of proteins: protein G, egg-white lysozyme, and hydrophobin. We characterize the nature of the deformation and the orientation of the proteins induced by their proximity to and association with the interface. We also study protein diffusion in the layer formed at the interface and show that the diffusion slows with increasing concentration in a manner similar to that for a colloidal suspension approaching the glass transition. PMID:25310625

  11. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact. PMID:22717083

  12. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  13. Crystalline self-assembly into monolayers of folded oligomers at the air-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, K.; Godt, A.; Howes, P.B.; Kjær, K.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Lahav, M.; Wegner, G.; Leiserowitz, L.; Weissbuch, I.

    2000-01-01

    Insertion of the 115-bis(ethynylene)benzene unit as a rigid spacer into a linear alkyl chain, thus separating the two resulting stems by 9 Angstrom, induces chain folding at the air-water interface. These folded molecules self-assemble into crystalline monolayers at this interface, with the plane...... the number and position of the hydrophilic groups in the molecule. The molecules form ribbons with a higher crystal coherence in the direction of stacking between the molecular ribbons, and a lower coherence along the ribbon direction. A similar molecule, but with a spacer unit that imposes a 5...

  14. The Equilibria of Lipid–K+ Ions in Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Petelska, Aneta D.; Figaszewski, Zbigniew A.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of K+ ion interaction with monolayers of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin, PC) or cholesterol (Ch) was investigated at the air/water interface. We present surface tension measurements of lipid monolayers obtained using a Langmuir method as a function of K+ ion concentration. Measurements were carried out at 22°C using a Teflon trough and a Nima 9000 tensiometer. Interactions between lecithin and K+ ions or Ch and K+ ions result in significant deviations from the additivity rule. An eq...

  15. Separating Octadecyltrimethoxysilane Hydrolysis and Condensation at the Air/Water Interface through Addition of Methyl Stearate

    OpenAIRE

    Britt, David W; Hlady, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    The hydrolysis and condensation of octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) at the air/water interface were monitored through molecular area changes at a constant surface pressure of 10 mN/m. The onset of condensation was delayed through the addition of methyl stearate (SME) acting as an inert filler molecule. In the absence of SME, complete gelation of OTMS required 30 h, during which time OTMS condensation occurred concomitantly with hydrolysis. In the presence of SME, the OTMS monolayer gelation r...

  16. Spontaneous patterning of quantum dots at the air-water interface

    OpenAIRE

    Sear, Richard P.; Chung, Sung-Wook; Markovich, Gil; Gelbart, William M; Heath, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Nanoparticles deposited at the air-water interface are observed to form circular domains at low density and stripes at higher density. We interpret these patterns as equilibrium phenomena produced by a competition between an attraction and a longer-ranged repulsion. Computer simulations of a generic pair potential with attractive and repulsive parts of this kind, reproduce both the circular and stripe patterns. Such patterns have a potential use in nanoelectronic applications.

  17. Sticky water surfaces: helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K; Backus, Ellen H G; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-14

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface. PMID:25494788

  18. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J.; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K.; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface.

  19. Two-dimensional Insect Flight on an Air-Water Interface is a Chaotic Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional flapping wing insect flight on an air-water interface provides a successful foraging strategy to explore an ecological niche on the surface of a pond. However, the complex interplay of surface tension, aerodynamic forces, biomechanics and neural control that enables two-dimensional flight is unknown. Here we report the discovery of two-dimensional flight in the waterlily beetle Galerucella nymphaeae, which is the fastest reported propulsion mode for an insect on a fluid interface. Using kinematics derived from high-speed videography coupled with analytical models, we demonstrate that two-dimensional flight is a chaotic interfacial oscillator, thus significantly constraining the possible range of flight parameters. Discovery of this complex dynamics in two-dimensional flight on time scales similar to neural responses indicates the challenge of evolving active flight control on a fluid interface.

  20. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid-coated air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids-covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation. PMID:27516601

  1. Crystalline self-assembly into monolayers of folded oligomers at the air-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, K.; Godt, A.; Howes, P.B.; Kjær, K.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Lahav, M.; Wegner, G.; Leiserowitz, L.; Weissbuch, I.

    2000-01-01

    Insertion of the 115-bis(ethynylene)benzene unit as a rigid spacer into a linear alkyl chain, thus separating the two resulting stems by 9 Angstrom, induces chain folding at the air-water interface. These folded molecules self-assemble into crystalline monolayers at this interface, with the plane...... of the folding unit almost perpendicular to the water surface, as determined by synchrotron grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. Three distinct molecular shapes, of the types U, inverted U, and M, were obtained in the two-dimensional crystalline state, depending upon the number of spacer units, and...... the number and position of the hydrophilic groups in the molecule. The molecules form ribbons with a higher crystal coherence in the direction of stacking between the molecular ribbons, and a lower coherence along the ribbon direction. A similar molecule, but with a spacer unit that imposes a 5...

  2. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid–coated air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D. James; George, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids–covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation.

  3. Effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yi Y; Gitiafroz, Roya; Acosta, Edgar; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2005-11-01

    The in vitro adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces is affected by both the composition of the surfactant preparations and the conditions under which the assessment is conducted. Relevant experimental conditions are surfactant concentration, temperature, subphase pH, electrolyte concentration, humidity, and gas composition of the atmosphere exposed to the interface. The effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of a therapeutic lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), was studied by measuring the dynamic surface tension (DST). Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used in conjunction with three different experimental methodologies, i.e., captive bubble (CB), pendant drop (PD), and constrained sessile drop (CSD), to measure the DST. The experimental results obtained from these three methodologies show that for 100% relative humidity (RH) at 37 degrees C the rate of adsorption of BLES at an air-water interface is substantially slower than for low humidity. It is also found that there is a difference in the rate of surface tension decrease measured from the PD and CB/CSD methods. These experimental results agree well with an adsorption model that considers the combined effects of entropic force, electrostatic interaction, and gravity. These findings have implications for the development and evaluation of new formulations for surfactant replacement therapy. PMID:16262325

  4. Dynamic Study of Gemini Surfactant and Single-chain Surfactant at Air/Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Jian CHEN; Gui Ying XU; Shi Ling YUAN; Hai Ying SUN

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation are used to study the properties of gemini surfactant of ethyl-α,ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (C12C2C12) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) at the air/water interface, respectively. In the two systems,the surfactant concentrations are both 28 wt. %, and other conditions are also the same. After reaching the thermodynamic equilibrium, the concentration profiles, the radial distributions functions (RDF) and the mean squared displacement (MSD) are investigated. Theresults reveal that the surface activity of C12C2C12 suffactant is higher than DTAB surfactant.

  5. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase

  6. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, C., E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Gupta, Adbhut, E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Joshi, Aditya, E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Manjuladevi, V., E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Gupta, Raj Kumar, E-mail: karthik.c@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, Rajasthan -333031 (India); Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore - 560080 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  7. Formation and Collapse of Biodegradable Polymer Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Woong; Ohn, Kimberly; Won, You-Yeon

    2011-03-01

    Poly(lactide-ran-glycolide) (PLGA) is widely used as an excipient in formulations of aerosol drugs. It has recently been reported that the surface pressure-area isotherm of PLGA at the air-water interface shows a plateau at intermediate compression levels and a sharp rise in pressure upon further compression. In order to investigate the molecular origin of this behavior, we have conducted an extensive set of surface pressure and AFM imaging measurements with PLGA materials having a range of different molecular weights. The results suggest that (1) the plateau occurs due to the formation (and collapse) of a continuous water-free monolayer of the polymer under continuous compression, and (2) the monolayer becomes significantly resistant to compression at high compression because at that condition the collapsed domains become large enough to become glassy. We will also demonstrate that this property of PLGA allows the polymer to be used as an anchoring block to form a smooth biodegradable monolayer of block copolymers at the air-water interface.

  8. Chemical denaturation of globular proteins at the air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray and neutron reflectometry has been used to probe the equilibrium surface structure of hen egg white lysozyme (lysozyme) and bovine β -lactoglobulin (β -lactoglobulin) under denaturing conditions at the air-water interface. This was achieved by performing experiments on 10 mg mL-1 protein solutions containing increasing concentrations of guanidinium hydrochloride For solutions containing no G.HCl, the surface structure of the proteins was represented by a two-layer model with total thicknesses of 48 Angstroms and 38 Angstroms for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. The total volume of a single protein molecule and the associated water molecules was determined to be approximately 45 (0.3) nm3 for lysozyme, and 60 (0.3) nm3 for β -lactoglobulin. The thickness dimensions and the total volumes compared favourably with the crystal dimensions of 45 x 30 x 30 Angstroms (40.5 nm3 ), and 36 x 36 x 36 Angstroms (47 nm3 ) for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. This comparison suggests that when no denaturant was present, the structures of lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin were near to their native conformations at the air-water The response to the presence of the chemical denaturant was different for each protein. The surface layer of β -lactoglobulin expanded at very low concentrations (0.2 mol dm-3 ) of G.HCl, where the lysozyme layer contracted. At higher concentrations, unfolding of both the proteins led to the formation of a third diffuse layer. In general, lysozyme appeared to be less responsive to the chemical denaturant, which is most likely a result of the higher disulfide content of lysozyme. A protocol allowing quantitative analysis of the contribution from the air-water interface to the chemical denaturation of a protein was developed. The protocol involved calculation of the Gibbs free energy of a protein at zero denaturant concentration, by using the change in the adsorbed layer thickness as an order parameter

  9. Hydration, Orientation, and Conformation of Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Sumi N; Gordon, Brittany P; Valley, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Laura E; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2015-06-18

    Aqueous-phase processing of methylglyoxal (MG) has been suggested to constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected because its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form geminal diols, as well as because MG and its hydration products can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active, but an improved description of its surface behavior is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation. These studies investigate MG adsorption, focusing on its hydration state at the air-water interface, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach that involves vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. Together, the experimental and theoretical data show that MG exists predominantly in a singly hydrated state (diol) at the interface, with a diol-tetrol ratio at the surface higher than that for the bulk. In addition to exhibiting a strong surface activity, we find that MG significantly perturbs the water structure at the interface. The results have implications for understanding the atmospheric fate of methylglyoxal. PMID:25989368

  10. Catechol oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Camm, Robert C; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2014-12-16

    Anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons promptly react with hydroxyl radicals undergoing oxidation to form phenols and polyphenols (e.g., catechol) typically identified in the complex mixture of humic-like substances (HULIS). Because further processing of polyphenols in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can continue mediated by a mechanism of ozonolysis at interfaces, a better understanding about how these reactions proceed at the air-water interface is needed. This work shows how catechol, a molecular probe of the oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in SOA, can contribute interfacial reactive species that enhance the production of HULIS under atmospheric conditions. Reactive semiquinone radicals are quickly produced upon the encounter of 40 ppbv-6.0 ppmv O3(g) with microdroplets containing [catechol] = 1-150 μM. While the previous pathway results in the instantaneous formation of mono- and polyhydroxylated aromatic rings (PHA) and chromophoric mono- and polyhydroxylated quinones (PHQ), a different channel produces oxo- and dicarboxylic acids of low molecular weight (LMW). The cleavage of catechol occurs at the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-water interface through the formation of (1) an ozonide intermediate, (2) a hydroperoxide, and (3) cis,cis-muconic acid. However, variable [catechol] and [O3(g)] can affect the ratio of the primary products (cis,cis-muconic acid and trihydroxybenzenes) and higher order products observed (PHA, PHQ, and LMW oxo- and dicarboxylic acids). Secondary processing is confirmed by mass spectrometry, showing the production of crotonic, maleinaldehydic, maleic, glyoxylic, and oxalic acids. The proposed pathway can contribute precursors to aqueous SOA (AqSOA) formation, converting aromatic hydrocarbons into polyfunctional species widely found in tropospheric aerosols with light-absorbing brown carbon. PMID:25423038

  11. Neutron reflection study of the interaction between Rubisco and SDOBS at the air water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The properties of a mixed layer of proteins and surfactants are of direct relevance to a range of applications. They play an important role in the stability of foams and emulsions, and removal of protein stains from a surface [1]. Different techniques have been employed to improve understanding of the complex behaviour of these mixed systems. These include surface tension and rheology measurements which give the macroscopic behaviour of a mixed system, and fluorescence microscopy and Brewster angle microscopy which provide microscopic properties at interfaces. Knowledge at a molecular level can be achieved by neutron reflection, which reveals structural details of a mixed layer [2]. Previous neutron reflection work has been focussed on model systems such as lysozyme and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) because detailed knowledge of each component is available in literature, and the protein is commercially available [3]. In this work, we focussed our study on a system closely related to laundry process by using a mixture of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylaseloxygenase (Rubisco) and sodium dodecyl benzyl sulphonate (SDaBS). Rubisco exists in bacteria and all green plants and non-green algae, and is the most abundant protein in nature. This makes it a good representative of the class of grassy stains. SDaBS, on the other hand, represents the group of surfactants dodecyl benzene sulphonate, which are the most important group of synthetic surfactants in laundry detergents. Recently, we have studied the disassembly of pre-adsorbed Rubisco network by SDaBS at an air-water interface by directly measuring the mechanical properties of the Rubisco network at the air-water interface [4], thus identifying appropriate experimental conditions for neutron study in this work.

  12. Relative Order of Sulfuric Acid, Bisulfate, Hydronium, and Cations at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2015-11-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), bisulfate (HSO4(-)), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) are among the most abundant species in tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols due to high levels of atmospheric SO2 emitted from biomass burning and volcanic eruptions. The air/aqueous interfaces of sulfuric acid and bisulfate solutions play key roles in heterogeneous reactions, acid rain, radiative balance, and polar stratospheric cloud nucleation. Molecular-level knowledge about the interfacial distribution of these inorganic species and their perturbation of water organization facilitates a better understanding of the reactivity and growth of atmospheric aerosols and of the aerosol surface charge, thus shedding light on topics of air pollution, climate change, and thundercloud electrification. Here, the air/aqueous interface of NaHSO4, NH4HSO4, and Mg(HSO4)2 salt solutions as well as H2SO4 and HCl acid solutions are investigated by means of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected (HD) VSFG spectroscopy. VSFG spectra of all acid solutions show higher SFG response in the OH-bonded region relative to neat water, with 1.1 M H2SO4 being more enhanced than 1.1 M HCl. In addition, VSFG spectra of bisulfate salt solutions highly resemble that of the dilute H2SO4 solution (0.26 M) at a comparable pH. HD-VSFG (Im χ((2))) spectra of acid and bisulfate salt solutions further reveal that hydrogen-bonded water molecules are oriented preferentially toward the bulk liquid phase. General agreement between Im χ((2)) spectra of 1.1 M H2SO4 and 1.1 M HCl acid solutions indicate that HSO4(-) ions have a similar surface preference as that of chloride (Cl(-)) ions. By comparing the direction and magnitude of the electric fields arising from the interfacial ion distributions and the concentration of each species, the most reasonable relative surface preference that can be deduced from a simplified model follows the order H3O(+) > HSO4(-) > Na(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+) > SO4(2-). Interestingly

  13. [Diurnal variations of greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface of aquaculture ponds in the Min River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Tong, Chuan; He, Qing-Hua; Huang, Jia-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Wetland reclamation and aquaculture is one of the main disturbance types in coastal wetlands. Diurnal variations of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface were determined using a floating chambers + gas chromatography method in a shrimp pond, and a mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp in October in the Shanyutan Wetland of the Min River estuary, southeast China. Meanwhile, the meteorological indicators in ground surface and physical, chemical and biological indicators of surface water were also measured. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface all demonstrated distinct diurnal variations. Both shrimp pond and mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp functioned as a sink of CO2 [the diurnal averaged CO2 fluxes were -48.79 and -105.25 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively], and a source of CH4 [the diurnal averaged CH4 fluxes were 1.00 and 5.74 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively]; the diurnal averaged CO2 and CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture of fish and shrimp pond were higher than that of the shrimp pond. Greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface from the aquaculture ponds were influenced by many factors. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the concentration of Chlorophyll was the major factor affecting the CO2 fluxes, and the concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the shrimp pond; whereas water temperature and Chlorophyll were the major factors affecting the CO2 fluxes, and dissolved oxygen, PO4(3-) and pH were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp. PMID:23379142

  14. Anomalous spreading behaviour of polyethyleneglycoldistearate monolayers at air/water interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S John Collins; Aruna Dhathathreyan; T Ramasami

    2001-04-01

    Spreading behaviour of the dimeric surfactant polyethyleneglycoldistearate (PEGDS) monolayer at air/water interface has been studied using surface pressure-area ( -) isotherms as a function of temperature. The isotherms show a plateau suggesting a transition between a liquid expanded (LE) and a condensed state. The condensed state possibly arises due to nucleation and growth of multilayers from the monolayer. Isobaric measurements of both - and - at constant area show transitions at = 295 K. These plots suggest a melting followed by formation of condensed microcrystallites. Structure optimization carried out using various angles of orientation of the alkyl tails with respect to the backbone in PEGDS reveals tilt transitions of the tails in different states which can be related to the packing behaviour seen in the isotherms. Optical microscopy has been used to confirm the structures in these states.

  15. Correlation reflectance spectroscopy of heterogeneous silver nanoparticle films upon compression at the air/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Gassin, Gaelle [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Harfouch, Yara El [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Benichou, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Bachelier, Guillaume [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Russier-Antoine, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Jonin, Christian [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Roux, Stephane [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, UMR CNRS 5260, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Claude Louis Berthollet, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Tillement, Olivier [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents, UMR CNRS 5260, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Claude Louis Berthollet, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Brevet, Pierre-Francois [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 5579, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Batiment Alfred Kastler, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2008-02-06

    Alkanethiol passivated silver nanoparticles were spread at an air/water interface to form a single monolayer film. The surface pressure isotherms and the UV-visible absorbance spectra of the film were recorded as a function of compression, whereas the dynamic behaviour was investigated by reflectance correlation spectroscopy. The film is shown to be inhomogeneous, formed by domains of particles separated by large areas of low particle density. Two distinct motions were observed: Brownian diffusion of the domains and their translational flow due to convection. From the characteristic diffusion time of the domains, and using a Stokes-Einstein analysis, the domain size is determined as a function of surface compression. The domains start to form and grow once a fixed average particle density is reached. Above this density threshold, the attractive van der Waals forces between the particles are dominating compared with the repulsion forces due to the alkanethiol chains.

  16. Mechanical tuning of molecular machines for nucleotide recognition at the air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinoda Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure. As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule. This molecular machine can discriminate ribonucleotides based on a twofold to tenfold difference in binding constants under optimized conditions including accompanying ions in the subphase and lateral surface pressures of its Langmuir monolayer. The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

  17. DNS and measurements of scalar transfer across an air-water interface during inception and growth of Langmuir circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsi, A.; Ma, Y.; Buckley, M.; Tejada-Martinez, A. E.; Veron, F.

    2016-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s have been conducted and scalar transfer from the air side to the water side and subsequent vertical transport in the water column have been analysed. Two simulations are compared: one with a freely deforming interface, giving rise to gravity-capillary waves and aqueous Langmuir turbulence (LT) characterized by small-scale (centimeter-scale) Langmuir cells (LC), and the other with the interface intentionally held flat, i.e., without LC. It is concluded that LT serves to enhance vertical transport of the scalar in the water side and in the process increases scalar transfer efficiency from the air side to the water side relative to the shear-dominated turbulence in the flat interface case. Furthermore, transition to LT was observed to be accompanied by a spike in scalar flux characterized by an order of magnitude increase. These episodic flux increases, if linked to gusts and overall unsteadiness in the wind field, are expected to be an important contributor in determining the long-term average of the air-sea gas fluxes.

  18. Spread Films of Human Serum Albumin at the Air-Water Interface: Optimization, Morphology, and Durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard A; Ang, Joo Chuan; Sebastiani, Federica; Tummino, Andrea; White, John W

    2015-12-22

    It has been known for almost one hundred years that a lower surface tension can be achieved at the air-water interface by spreading protein from a concentrated solution than by adsorption from an equivalent total bulk concentration. Nevertheless, the factors that control this nonequilibrium process have not been fully understood. In the present work, we apply ellipsometry, neutron reflectometry, X-ray reflectometry, and Brewster angle microscopy to elaborate the surface loading of human serum albumin in terms of both the macroscopic film morphology and the spreading dynamics. We show that the dominant contribution to the surface loading mechanism is the Marangoni spreading of protein from the bulk of the droplets rather than the direct transfer of their surface films. The films can be spread on a dilute subphase if the concentration of the spreading solution is sufficient; if not, dissolution of the protein occurs, and only a textured adsorbed layer slowly forms. The morphology of the spread protein films comprises an extended network with regions of less textured material or gaps. Further, mechanical cycling of the surface area of the spread films anneals the network into a membrane that approach constant compressibility and has increased durability. Our work provides a new perspective on an old problem in colloid and interface science. The scope for optimization of the surface loading mechanism in a range of systems leading to its exploitation in deposition-based technologies in the future is discussed. PMID:26607026

  19. Hydrogen bonding and orientation effects on the accommodation of methylamine at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Carignano, Marcelo A.; Kais, Sabre; Zhu, Chongjing; Zhong, Jie; Zeng, Xiao C.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Methylamine is an abundant amine compound detected in the atmosphere which can affect the nature of atmospheric aerosol surfaces, changing their chemical and optical properties. Molecular dynamics simulation results show that methylamine accommodation on water is close to unity with the hydrophilic head group solvated in the interfacial environment and the methyl group pointing into the air phase. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bond network indicates stronger hydrogen bonds between water and the primary amine group at the interface, suggesting that atmospheric trace gases will likely react with the methyl group instead of the solvated amine site. These findings suggest new chemical pathways for methylamine acting on atmospheric aerosols in which the methyl group is the site of orientation specific chemistry involving its conversion into a carbonyl site providing hydrophilic groups for uptake of additional water. This conversion may explain the tendency of aged organic aerosols to form cloud condensation nuclei. At the same time, formation of NH2 radical and formaldehyde is suggested to be a new source for NH2 radicals at aerosol surfaces, other than by reaction of absorbed NH3. The results have general implications for the chemistry of other amphiphilic organics, amines in particular, at the surface of atmospherically relevant aerosols.

  20. Hydrogen bonding and orientation effects on the accommodation of methylamine at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Ross D; Carignano, Marcelo A; Kais, Sabre; Zhu, Chongjing; Zhong, Jie; Zeng, Xiao C; Francisco, Joseph S; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Methylamine is an abundant amine compound detected in the atmosphere which can affect the nature of atmospheric aerosol surfaces, changing their chemical and optical properties. Molecular dynamics simulation results show that methylamine accommodation on water is close to unity with the hydrophilic head group solvated in the interfacial environment and the methyl group pointing into the air phase. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bond network indicates stronger hydrogen bonds between water and the primary amine group at the interface, suggesting that atmospheric trace gases will likely react with the methyl group instead of the solvated amine site. These findings suggest new chemical pathways for methylamine acting on atmospheric aerosols in which the methyl group is the site of orientation specific chemistry involving its conversion into a carbonyl site providing hydrophilic groups for uptake of additional water. This conversion may explain the tendency of aged organic aerosols to form cloud condensation nuclei. At the same time, formation of NH2 radical and formaldehyde is suggested to be a new source for NH2 radicals at aerosol surfaces, other than by reaction of absorbed NH3. The results have general implications for the chemistry of other amphiphilic organics, amines in particular, at the surface of atmospherically relevant aerosols. PMID:27276960

  1. Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of capsules of haemoglobin at air/water and solid/air interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Maheshkumar; A Dhathathreyan

    2013-03-01

    Organized assemblies of capsules of haemoglobin (Hb), in the size range of 0.1 to 0.3 in Langmuir films have been studied at air/water interface below and above the isoelectric point. Spread films of these organizates suggest that there is no expulsion of individual particles or particle assemblies at the interface and the particles are stable. Dynamic surface tension and the associated dilational and shear visco-elasticity in these films suggest that the capsules are highly elastic. Multilayer films of the capsules using Langmuir-Blodgett technique have been fabricated by sequential deposition on solid surfaces. These films have been characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and Fourier transform infrared with reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIR-RAS). No appreciable change in the secondary structural features of Hb is seen from CD studies indicating the stability of the protein in these organized assemblies. Sizes of these capsules change near the isoelectric point and large swollen multiwalled capsules are formed. The elastic films of capsules of Hb provide a useful post preparation approach for modification of the surface roughness, porosity, and permeability of pre-assembled polypeptide microcapsules.

  2. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  3. Effects of thermodynamics parameters on mass transfer of volatile pollutants at air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ping Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A transient three-dimensional coupling model based on the compressible volume of fluid (VOF method was developed to simulate the transport of volatile pollutants at the air-water interface. VOF is a numerical technique for locating and tracking the free surface of water flow. The relationships between Henry’s constant, thermodynamics parameters, and the enlarged topological index were proposed for nonstandard conditions. A series of experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the transport of benzene and carbinol. The simulation results agreed with the experimental results. Temperature had no effect on mass transfer of pollutants with low transfer free energy and high Henry’s constant. The temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants with high transfer free energy and low Henry’s constant was affected by temperature. The total enthalpy and total transfer free energy increased significantly with temperature, with significant fluctuations at low temperatures. The total enthalpy and total transfer free energy increased steadily without fluctuation at high temperatures.

  4. A comparison of recent methods for modelling mercury fluxes at the air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantozzi L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury flux is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Notwithstanding, the emission of mercury from surface water to the atmosphere is as much as 50% of total annual emissions of this metal into the atmosphere. In recent years, much effort has been made in theoretical and experimental researches to quantify the total mass flux of mercury to the atmosphere. In this study the most recent atmospheric modelling methods and the information obtained from them are presented and compared using experimental data collected during the Oceanographic Campaign Fenice 2011 (25 October – 8 November 2011, performed on board the Research Vessel (RV Urania of the CNR in the framework of the MEDOCEANOR ongoing program. A strategy for future numerical model development is proposed which is intended to gain a better knowledge of the long-term effects of meteo-climatic drivers on mercury evasional processes, and would provide key information on gaseous Hg exchange rates at the air-water interface.

  5. epi-Fluorescence imaging at the air-water interface of fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Kristen; Sacks, Stuart; Li, Shanghao; Leblanc, Roger M

    2014-08-18

    Protein fibrillization is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases. This process has been studied using spectroscopic and microscopic methods. In this study, epi-fluorescence at the air-water interface was developed as an innovative technique for observing fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin. PMID:24976597

  6. THIN-FILM BEHAVIOR OF POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATES) .1. MONOLAYERS AT THE AIR-WATER-INTERFACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRINKHUIS, RHG; SCHOUTEN, AJ

    1991-01-01

    The monolayer behavior of PMMA of varying tacticities at the air-water interface was studied. A difference in lateral cohesive energy is argued to be responsible for the fact that the pressure area isotherms of isotactic PMMA deviate strongly from those of syndiotactic PMMA. At low surface pressures

  7. Thin-Film Behavior of Poly(methyl methacrylates). 1. Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhuis, R.H.G.; Schouten, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    The monolayer behavior of PMMA of varying tacticities at the air-water interface was studied. A difference in lateral cohesive energy is argued to be responsible for the fact that the pressure area isotherms of isotactic PMMA deviate strongly from those of syndiotactic PMMA. At low surface pressures

  8. Formation of a Rigid Hydrophobin Film and Disruption by an Anionic Surfactant at an Air/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Zhang, Xujun; Russo, Paul S; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins produced by fungi. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been associated with Dutch elm disease. Like other hydrophobins, CU stabilizes air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams, and emulsions and as dispersants. The practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, alone and in the presence of added surfactants. In this study, the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces is characterized by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to adsorb irreversibly at air/water interfaces. The magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure until CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the sequential addition of strong surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the bulk liquid adjacent to the interface. SDS is found to coadsorb to interfaces precoated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU by SDS. Sequential adsorption results in mixed layers with properties not observed in interfaces generated from complexes formed in the bulk. These results lend insight to the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. PMID:27164189

  9. Gas transfer at the air-water interface in a turbulent flow environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlina

    2005-07-01

    The gas transfer process across the air-water interface in a bottom-shear-induced turbulent environment was investigated to gain improved fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms that control the process. For this purpose, it is necessary to reveal the hydrodynamics of the flow field as well as the molecular diffusion and the turbulent transport contributions to the total flux. Therefore, detailed laboratory experiments were conducted to obtain this information. The experiments were performed in a grid-stirred tank using a combined Particle Image Velocimetry - Laser Induced Fluorescence (PIV-LIF) technique that has been developed for these near surface gas transfer measurements. The turbulence characteristics of the velocity near the interface were acquired from the PIV measurements and showed generally good agreement with the theoretical profiles from Hunt and Graham (1978). The LIF technique enabled visualization of the planar concentration fields which provided more insight into the gas transfer mechanisms. The high data resolution allowed detailed quantification of the concentration distribution within the thin aqueous boundary layer. The interrelated interpretation of the obtained results suggest that the gas transfer process is controlled by a spectrum of different eddy sizes and the gas transfer at different turbulence levels can be associated to certain eddy sizes. For high turbulence levels the gas transfer should be asymptotic to the small eddy model, whereas for low turbulence level to the large eddy model. The new results of turbulent mass flux should aid as an excellent database in refining numerical models and developing more accurate models for the prediction of the transfer velocity. (orig.)

  10. Interfacial Interactions and Nanostructure Changes in DPPG/HD Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaze Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant (LS plays a crucial role in regulating surface tension during normal respiration cycles by decreasing the work associated with lung expansion and therefore decreases the metabolic energy consumed. Monolayer surfactant films composed of a mixture of phospholipids and spreading additives are of optional utility for applications in lung surfactant-based therapies. A simple, minimal model of such a lung surfactant system, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-(1-gylcerol] (DPPG and hexadecanol (HD, was prepared, and the surface pressure-area (π-A isotherms and nanostructure characteristics of the binary mixture were investigated at the air/water interface using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB and atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analyzed in terms of compression modulus (Cs-1 , excess Gibbs free energy (ΔGexcπ , activity coefficients (γ, and interaction parameter (ξ. The results of this paper provide valuable insight into basic thermodynamics and nanostructure of mixed DPPG/HD monolayers; it is helpful to understand the thermodynamic behavior of HD as spreading additive in LS monolayer with a view toward characterizing potential improvements to LS performance brought about by addition of HD to lung phospholipids.

  11. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water andd air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainity of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of bethic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water inteface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2--6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models

  12. Multi-scale modeling of mycosubtilin lipopeptides at the air/water interface: structure and optical second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, Claire; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Benichou, Emmanuel; Besson, Françoise; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2014-02-01

    Monolayers of the lipopeptide mycosubtilin are studied at the air/water interface. Their structure is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. All-atom models suggest that the lipopeptide is flexible and aggregates at the interface. To achieve simulation times of several microseconds, a coarse-grained (CG) model based on the MARTINI force field was also used. These CG simulations describe the formation of half-micelles at the interface for surface densities up to 1 lipopeptide per nm(2). In these aggregates, the tyrosine side chain orientation is found to be constrained: on average, its main axis, as defined along the C-OH bond, aligns along the interface normal and points towards the air side. The origin of the optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from mycosubtilin monolayers at the air/water interface is also investigated. The molecular hyperpolarizability of the lipopeptide is obtained from quantum chemistry calculations. The tyrosine side chain contribution to the hyperpolarizability is found to be dominant. The orientation distribution of tyrosine, associated with a dominant hyperpolarizability component along the C-OH bond of the tyrosine, yields a ratio of the susceptibility elements χ((2))(ZZZ)/χ((2))(ZXX) consistent with the experimental measurements recently reported by M. N. Nasir et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 19919]. PMID:24346061

  13. Surface Tension Drives the Orientation of Crystals at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-07-21

    The fabrication of oriented crystalline thin films is essential for a range of applications ranging from semiconductors to optical components, sensors, and catalysis. Here we show by depositing micrometric crystal particles on a liquid interface from an aerosol phase that the surface tension of the liquid alone can drive the crystallographic orientation of initially randomly oriented particles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the particles at the interface are identical to those of a monocrystalline sample cleaved along the {104} (CaCO3) or {111} (CaF2) face. We show how this orientation effect can be used to produce thin coatings of oriented crystals on a solid substrate. These results also have important implications for our understanding of heterogeneous crystal growth beneath amphiphile monolayers and for 2D self-assembly processes at the air-liquid interface. PMID:27389283

  14. Energy and water vapor transport across a simplified cloud-clear air interface

    CERN Document Server

    Gallana, Luca; De Santi, Francesca; Iovieno, Michele; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simplified physics of the could interface where condensation, evaporation and radiation are neglected and momentum, thermal energy and water vapor transport is represented in terms of the Boussinesq model coupled to a passive scalar transport equation for the vapor. The interface is modeled as a layer separating two isotropic turbulent regions with different kinetic energy and vapor concentration. In particular, we focus on the small scale part of the inertial range as well as on the dissipative range of scales which are important to the micro-physics of warm clouds. We have numerically investigated stably stratified interfaces by locally perturbing at an initial instant the standard temperature lapse rate at the cloud interface and then observing the temporal evolution of the system. When the buoyancy term becomes of the same order of the inertial one, we observe a spatial redistribution of the kinetic energy which produce a concomitant pit of kinetic energy within the mixing layer. In this sit...

  15. Structural properties of phosphatidylcholine in a monolayer at the air/water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaknin, D.; Kjær, K.; Als-Nielsen, J.;

    1991-01-01

    conception of the interface structure. It is found that in the LC phase (which is analogous to the L-beta phase in vesicle dispersions) the head group is interpenetrated with subphase water (4 +/- 2.5 molecules per lipid) and the average tilt angle of the hydrophobic chains from the surface normal is 33...

  16. Influence of the tyrosine environment on the second harmonic generation of iturinic antimicrobial lipopeptides at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Benichou, Emmanuel; Loison, Claire; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Besson, Françoise; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-12-01

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) response at the air-water interface from the tyrosine-containing natural iturinic cyclo-lipopeptides mycosubtilin, iturin A and bacillomycin D is reported. It is shown that this response is dominated by the single tyrosine residue present in these molecules owing to the large first hyperpolarizability arising from the non-centrosymmetric aromatic ring structure of this amino acid. The SHG response of these iturinic antibiotics is also compared to the response of surfactin, a cyclo-lipopeptide with a similar l,d-amino acid sequence but lacking a tyrosine residue, and PalmATA, a synthetic linear lipopeptide possessing a single tyrosine residue but lacking the amino acid sequence structuring the cycle of the iturinic antibiotics. From the light polarization analysis of the SHG response, it is shown that the tyrosine local environment is critical in defining the SHG response of these peptides at the air-water interface. Our results demonstrate that tyrosine, similar to tryptophan, can be used as an endogenous molecular probe of peptides and proteins for SHG at the air-water interface, paving the way for SHG studies of other tyrosine-containing bioactive molecules. PMID:24149982

  17. Dynamics of amphiphilic diblock copolymers at the air-water interface

    OpenAIRE

    STOCCO, Antonio; Tauer, Klaus; Pispas, Stergios; Sigel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Two polyisoprene-polyethyleneoxide diblock copolymers with different block length ratios adsorbed to the water surface were investigated by multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry, evanescent wave light scattering, and surface tension experiments. In a semidilute interfacial regime, the transition from a two-dimensional to a "mushroom" regime, in which polymer chains form loops and tails in the subphase, was discussed. A diffusion mechanism parallel to the interface was probed by evanescent ...

  18. Toward a unified picture of the water self-ions at the air-water interface: a density functional theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Marcel D; Kuo, I-Feng W; Tobias, Douglas J; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-17

    The propensities of the water self-ions, H3O(+) and OH(-), for the air-water interface have implications for interfacial acid-base chemistry. Despite numerous experimental and computational studies, no consensus has been reached on the question of whether or not H3O(+) and/or OH(-) prefer to be at the water surface or in the bulk. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the bulk vs interfacial behavior of H3O(+) and OH(-) that employs forces derived from density functional theory with a generalized gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional (specifically, BLYP) and empirical dispersion corrections. We computed the potential of mean force (PMF) for H3O(+) as a function of the position of the ion in the vicinity of an air-water interface. The PMF suggests that H3O(+) has equal propensity for the interface and the bulk. We compare the PMF for H3O(+) to our previously computed PMF for OH(-) adsorption, which contains a shallow minimum at the interface, and we explore how differences in solvation of each ion at the interface vs in the bulk are connected with interfacial propensity. We find that the solvation shell of H3O(+) is only slightly dependent on its position in the water slab, while OH(-) partially desolvates as it approaches the interface, and we examine how this difference in solvation behavior is manifested in the electronic structure and chemistry of the two ions. PMID:24762096

  19. Adsorption at the air-water interface and emulsification properties of grain legume protein derivatives from pea and broad bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukala, A; Papalamprou, E; Makri, E; Doxastakis, G; Braudo, E E

    2006-12-01

    Functional properties of native and modified (through induced autolysis) pea (Pisum sativum L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) protein derivatives are studied. In specific, protein solubility and behavior at the air-water interface through surface pressure measurements are investigated. Furthermore the ability of the protein products to act as emulsifying agents and to stabilize emulsions is studied through oil droplet size distribution measurements and by the protein adsorbed at the oil-water interface. The data reveal that the ability of the proteins to act as surfactants and build up a rigid film around the oil droplets, mainly depends on their suitable molecular configuration and structure. Hydrolysis did not promote the functionality of the legume proteins. Broad bean exhibited better functionality than pea, before and after hydrolysis. Some comparisons were also made with lupin (Lupinus albus L.) protein isolate. PMID:17049437

  20. Study of relaxation process of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine monolayers at air-water interface: Effect of electrostatic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Wei; Weis, Martin; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2011-04-01

    The instability of organic monolayer composed of polar molecules at the air-water interface has been a spotlight in interface science for many decades. However, the effect of electrostatic energy contribution to the free energy in the system is still not understood. Herein, we investigate the mechanical and electrical properties by studying the isobaric relaxation process of a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine monolayer on water subphase with various concentrations of divalent ions to reveal the effect of electrostatic energy on thermodynamics and kinetics of the collapse mechanism. Our results demonstrate that electrical energy among the dipolar molecules plays an important role in the stability of monolayer and enhances the formation of micelles into subphase under high pressure. In addition, to confirm the electrostatic energy contribution, the well-known thermal effect on the stability of the film is compared. Hence, the general description of the monolayer free energy with contribution of electrostatic energy is suggested to describe the phase transition.

  1. OH-Radical Oxidation of Surface-Active cis-Pinonic Acid at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke

    2016-05-26

    Gaseous biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are immediately oxidized by gaseous oxidants to form BVOC-acids that rapidly condense onto aqueous aerosol phase and thus contribute to the growth of atmospheric particles. Because BVOC-acids are highly hydrophobic and hence surface-active in nature, it seems critical to study the oxidation by gaseous hydroxyl radical (·OH(g)) at the air-water interface. Here we report on the fast (≤10 μs) oxidation of aqueous cis-pinonic acid (C10H16O3, CPA, cis-pinonate anion's m/z = 183), a representative BVOC-acid, by ·OH(g) at the air-water interface for the first time. We find that cis-pinonate anion is more enriched at the air-water interface by ∼4 and ∼14 times than n-octanoate anion at 10 and 100 μM, respectively, as revealed by an interface-specific mass spectrometry of the equimolar mixture of microjets. Exposure of aqueous CPA microjets to ·OH(g) pulses from the 266 nm laser photolysis of O3(g)/O2(g)/H2O(g)/N2(g) mixtures yields pinonic peroxyl radicals (m/z = 214) that lead to the functionalization products carbonyls (m/z = 197), alcohols (m/z = 199), and pinonic hydroperoxides (m/z = 215) in addition to smaller-mass products including carbonyls (m/z = 155 and 157). We confirmed the formation of the corresponding alcohols, aldehydes, and hydroperoxides in experiments performed in D2O solvent. The analysis of total mass balance implies a significant amount (>70%) of products would be emitted into the gas-phase during the heterogeneous ·OH-oxidations. Our results suggest ·OH-oxidations of amphiphilic BVOC-acids at the air-water interface may play a far more significant role in photochemical aging process of aqueous aerosols than previously assumed. PMID:27098046

  2. Chemical denaturation of globular proteins at the air/water interface: an x-ray and neutron reflectometry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: X-ray and neutron reflectometry has been used to probe the equilibrium surface structure of hen egg white lysozyme (lysozyme) and bovine β -lactoglobulin (β -lactoglobulin) under denaturing conditions at the air-water interface. This was achieved by performing experiments on 10 mg mL -1 protein solutions containing increasing concentrations of the chemical denaturant guanidinium hydrochloride (G.HCl). For solutions containing no G.HCl, the surface structure of the proteins was represented by a two-layer model with total thicknesses of 48 Angstroms and 38 Angstroms for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. The total volume of a single protein molecule and the associated water molecules was evaluated to be approximately 45 (0.3) nm3 for lysozyme, and 60 (0.3) nm3 for β-lactoglobulin. The thickness dimensions and the total volumes compared favourably with the crystal dimensions of 45 x 30 x 30 Angstroms (40.5 nm3),1 and 36 x 36 x 36 Angstroms (47 nm3) 2 for lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin, respectively. This comparison suggests that when no denaturant was present, the structures of lysozyme and β -lactoglobulin were near to their native conformations at the air-water interface. The response to the presence of the chemical denaturant was different for each protein. The surface layer of β-lactoglobulin expanded at very low concentrations (0.2 mol dm-3 ) of G.HCl. In contrast, the lysozyme layer contracted. At higher concentrations, unfolding of both the proteins led to the formation of a third diffuse layer. In general, lysozyme appeared to be less responsive to the chemical denaturant, which is most likely a result of the higher disulfide content of lysozyme. A protocol allowing quantitative thermodynamic analysis of the contribution from the air-water interface to the chemical denaturation of a protein was developed

  3. Palmitate Luciferin: A molecular design for the second harmonic generation study of ion complexation at the air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A molecular organic chromophore, Palmitate-Luciferin, has been synthesized for studying ion complexation at the air-water interface using second harmonic generation (SHG). This molecule was designed through the addition of a long hydrophobic palmitoyl alkyl chain to the aromatic π-electron system of Luciferin. We first demonstrate that this organic chromophore is a potential candidate for SHG studies of ion complexation with the measurement of its first hyper-polarizability in aqueous solutions by hyper Rayleigh scattering (HRS) with and without calcium ions. Then, we characterize the Palmitate-Luciferin surfactant properties at the air-water interface combining surface tension measurements with a surface SHG study and Brewster angle imaging. These results allow us to build a molecular description of the chromophore at the interface and observe its molecular reorganization during the monolayer compression leading to the formation of aggregates. Finally, we show that the initial goal of the designing work is achieved since Palmitate-Luciferin indeed exhibits a higher SHG response in the presence of calcium ions in the aqueous sub-phase as expected. (authors)

  4. Influence of dissolved humic substances on the mass transfer of organic compounds across the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Ksenia; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dissolved humic substances (DHS) on the rate of water-gas exchange of two volatile organic compounds was studied under various conditions of agitation intensity, solution pH and ionic strength. Mass-transfer coefficients were determined from the rate of depletion of model compounds from an apparatus containing a stirred aqueous solution with continuous purging of the headspace above the solution (dynamic system). Under these conditions, the overall transfer rate is controlled by the mass-transfer resistance on the water side of the water-gas interface. The experimental results show that the presence of DHS hinders the transport of the organic molecules from the water into the gas phase under all investigated conditions. Mass-transfer coefficients were significantly reduced even by low, environmentally relevant concentrations of DHS. The retardation effect increased with increasing DHS concentration. The magnitude of the retardation effect on water-gas exchange was compared for Suwannee River fulvic and humic acids, a commercially available leonardite humic acid and two synthetic surfactants. The observed results are in accordance with the concept of hydrodynamic effects. Surface pressure forces due to surface film formation change the hydrodynamic characteristics of water motion at the water-air interface and thus impede surface renewal. PMID:22051345

  5. Towards Organized Hybrid Nanomaterials at the Air/Water Interface Based on Liquid-Crystal/ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczesny, Jan; Wolska-Pietkiewicz, Małgorzata; Binkiewicz, Ilona; Wróbel, Zbigniew; Wadowska, Monika; Matuła, Kinga; Dzięcielewski, Igor; Pociecha, Damian; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Lewiński, Janusz; Hołyst, Robert

    2015-11-16

    The ability to self-assemble nanosized ligand-stabilized metal oxide or semiconductor materials offers an intriguing route to engineer nanomaterials with new tailored properties from the disparate components. We describe a novel one-pot two-step organometallic approach to prepare ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) coated with deprotonated 4-(dodecyloxy)benzoic acid (i.e., an X-type liquid-crystalline ligand) as a model LC system (termed ZnO-LC1 NCs). Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of the resulting hybrids are investigated. The observed behavior of the ZnO NCs at the air/water interface is rationalized by invoking a ZnO-interdigitation process mediated by the anchored liquid-crystalline shell. The ordered superstructures form according to mechanism based on a ZnO-interdigitation process mediated by liquid crystals (termed ZIP-LC). The external and directed force applied upon compression at the air/water interface and the packing of the ligands that stabilize the ZnO cores drives the formation of nanorods of ordered internal structure. To study the process in detail, we follow a nontraditional protocol of thin-film investigation. We collect the films from the air/water interface in powder form (ZnO-LC1 LB), resuspend the powder in organic solvents and utilize otherwise unavailable experimental techniques. The structural and physical properties of the resulting superlattices were studied by using electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray studies, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis, UV/Vis absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. PMID:26427916

  6. Thermodynamic, morphological and structural properties of dissociated fatty acid monolayers at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Research on monolayers of amphiphilic lipids on aqueous solution is of basic importance in surface science. Due to the applicability of a variety of surface sensitive techniques, floating insoluble monolayers are very suitable model systems for the study of order, structure formation and material transport in two dimensions or the interactions of molecules at the interface with ions or molecules in the bulk (headword 'molecular recognition'). From the behavior of monolayers conclusions can be drawn on the properties of lipid layers on solid substrates or in biological membranes. This work deals with specific and fundamental interactions in monolayers both on the molecular and on the microscopic scale and with their relation to the lattice structure, morphology and thermodynamic behavior of monolayers at the air-water interface. As model system especially monolayers of long chain fatty acids are used, since there the molecular interactions can be gradually adjusted by varying the degree of dissociation by means of the suphase pH value. For manipulating the molecular interactions besides the subphase composition also temperature and monolayer composition are systematically varied. The change in the monolayer properties as a function of an external parameter is analyzed by means of isotherm and surface potential measurements, Brewster-angle microscopy, X-ray diffraction at grazing incidence and polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. For this a quantitative measure for the molecular interactions and for the chain conformational order is derived from the X-ray data. The most interesting results of this work are the elucidation of the origin of regular polygonal and dendritic domain shapes, the various effects of cholesterol on molecular packing and lattice order of long chain amphiphiles, as well as the detection of an abrupt change in the head group bonding interactions, the chain conformational order and the phase transition pressure

  7. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  8. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew;

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  9. Photochemical formation of silver and gold nanostructures at the air-water interface and their electrocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report a simple method of fabricating silver and gold nanostructures at the air-water interface, which can be spontaneously assembled through the reduction of AgNO3 and HAuCl4 with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the presence of polyacrylic acid (PAA), respectively. It was found that the building blocks in the silver nanostructure are mainly interwoven silver nanofilaments, while those of the gold nanostructure are mainly different sizes of gold nanoparticles and some truncated gold nanoplates, and even coalescence into networks. At the air-water interface, these silver and gold nanostructures can be easily transferred onto the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) slides and used for electrochemical measurements. After a replacement reaction with H2PdCl4, the silver nanostructure is transformed into a Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructure, with good electrocatalytic activity for O2 reduction. The gold nanostructure can also show high electrocatalytic activity to the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) with a detection limit of about 10 μM NaNO2 at S/N = 3

  10. Dynamics of adsorption of polyallylamine hydrochloride/sodium dodecyl sulphate at water/air and water/hexane interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sharipova, A.; Aidarova, S.; Fainerman, V. B.; Stocco, A.; Černoch, Peter; Miller, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 391, 1-3 (2011), s. 112-118. ISSN 0927-7757. [International Symposium on Surfactants in Solution /18./ - SIS 2010. Melbourne, 14.11.2010-19.11.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : mixed adsorption layers * polymer/surfactant mixtures * water/oil interface Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.236, year: 2011

  11. Water at Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin H; Hodgson, Andrew; Liu, Li-Min; Limmer, David T; Michaelides, Angelos; Pedevilla, Philipp; Rossmeisl, Jan; Shen, Huaze; Tocci, Gabriele; Tyrode, Eric; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Werner, Josephina; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-07-13

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives many electrochemical reactions, and the liquid/vapor interface, which governs the uptake and release of trace gases by the oceans and cloud droplets. In this article we review some of the recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge of the properties of aqueous interfaces and discuss open questions and gaps in our understanding. PMID:27232062

  12. Effect of the spacer group on the behavior of the cationic Gemini surfactant monolayer at the air/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Qibin; Zhang Dazhi; Li Rong [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu Honglai [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)], E-mail: hlliu@ecust.edu.cn; Hu Ying [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Department of Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2008-10-01

    Surface properties of the insoluble cationic bis-(quaternary ammonium halide) surfactants (Gemini) with polymethylene spacer at the air/water interface were investigated. The monolayers were transferred onto mica by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique and the corresponding LB films were characterized by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the contact angle of water. For the Gemini surfactants with the different spacer length, it was found that the surface pressure-molecular area isotherms resemble to each other. The limiting area increases rapidly and almost linearly with the increase of spacer length for the short spacers, but reaches a maximum at s = 10 and decreases slightly at s > 10. The AFM images show that the surface micelles and the multilayer aggregates gradually appear with the increase of surface pressure. No matter what the surface pressures are, the main structure of the monolayer almost keeps the same, which suggested that the major molecules lie nearly flat on the water surface, while the increase of surface pressure forces the minor alkyl chains to turn only partly or completely vertical to the water surface and even to overturn. This is the cause that the contact angle of water on LB film increases slightly with the surface pressure.

  13. Structure and conformation of peptides at air/aqueous interface and their impact on interfacial water structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Jena, Kailash; Tomar, Deepak

    Process of protein folding is very essential for the proper functioning of the protein molecules at membrane surface and other organelles. Understanding the process of protein folding at various biological relevant aqueous interfaces are very important to understand various complicated chemical and physical processes relevant to chemistry, physics, and medicine. The building blocks of proteins molecules are amino acids and the chemistry of each amino acid is very different; as a consequence their sequence plays an important role for various conformations upon adsorption for the protein molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the interfacial structure and conformation of two amino acids (L-Proline and L-Tyrosine) and peptide molecules formed from these two amino acids (L-Tyr-Pro). We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to probe the air/aqueous interface. We have studied the impact of adsorption of the amino acids and the peptide molecules on the interfacial water structure by slowly varying concentration and ionic strength of the solutions. Our preliminary result shows a huge impact of the adsorption process of peptide molecules on the hydrogen bonding environment of interfacial structure of water. Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar, Punjab-140001.

  14. Supramolecular 1-D polymerization of DNA origami through a dynamic process at the 2-dimensionally confined air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Minami, Kosuke; Kawamata, Ibuki; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Murata, Satoshi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-14

    In this study, a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) system has been utilized for the regulation of polymerization of a DNA origami structure at the air-water interface as a two-dimensionally confined medium, which enables dynamic condensation of DNA origami units through variation of the film area at the macroscopic level (ca. 10-100 cm(2)). DNA origami sheets were conjugated with a cationic lipid (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, 2C18N(+)) by electrostatic interaction and the corresponding LB-film was prepared. By applying dynamic pressure variation through compression-expansion processes, the lipid-modified DNA origami sheets underwent anisotropic polymerization forming a one-dimensionally assembled belt-shaped structure of a high aspect ratio although the thickness of the polymerized DNA origami was maintained at the unimolecular level. This approach opens up a new field of mechanical induction of the self-assembly of DNA origami structures. PMID:27091668

  15. Monolayer behaviour of chiral compounds at the air-water interface: 4-hexadecyloxy-butane-1,2-diol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietz, R.; Rettig, W.; Brezesinski, G.;

    1996-01-01

    Monolayers of the pure S-enantiomer (x(S) = 1) and of two mixtures x(S) = 0.75 and x(S) = 0.5 (racemate) of 4-hexadecyloxy-butane-1,2-diol (C16H33-O-CH2-CH2-CHOH-CH2OH) (HOBD) have been studied at the air-water interface by thermodynamic measurements, fluorescence microscopy and X-ray diffraction....... The isotherms depend only slightly on chirality. Above the transition pressure pi(c) condensed domains with a polygonal shape are formed. In all cases the domains start to destabilize from the notch. The branches of the S-enantiomer turn only clockwise, whereas domains of the mixtures show branches...

  16. The Equilibria of Diosgenin-Phosphatidylcholine and Diosgenin-Cholesterol in Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Katarzyna; Jastrzebska, Izabella; Petelska, Aneta Dorota

    2016-08-01

    Diosgenin (Dio) has shown many treatment properties, but the most important property is cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated monolayers of Dio, cholesterol (Ch), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the air/water interface. The measurements were carried with a Langmuir Teflon trough and a Nima 9000 tensiometer program. The surface tension values of pure and mixed monolayers were used to calculate π-A isotherms and determine molecular surface areas. We were able to demonstrate the formation of complexes between Dio and PC and Dio and Ch molecules also. We considered the equilibrium between individual components and the formed complexes. In addition, we established that diosgenin and the lipids formed highly stable 1:1 complexes. PMID:27350149

  17. Impact of biogenic amine molecular weight and structure on surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-02-01

    The oligoamines, such as ethylenediamine to pentaethylenetetramine, and the aliphatic biogenic amines, such as putrescine, spermidine and spermine, strongly interact with anionic surfactants, such as sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS. It has been shown that this results in pronounced surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface and the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption which depends upon solution pH and oligoamine structure. In the neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, results presented here the role of the oligoamine structure on the adsorption of SDS is investigated more fully using a range of different biogenic amines. The effect of the extent of the intra-molecular spacing between amine groups on the adsorption has been extended by comparing results for cadavarine with putrescine and ethylenediamine. The impact of more complex biogenic amine structures on the adsorption has been investigated with the aromatic phenethylamine, and the heterocyclic amines histamine and melamine. The results provide an important insight into how surfactant adsorption at interfaces can be manipulated by the addition of biogenic amines, and into the role of solution pH and oligoamine structure in modifying the interaction between the surfactant and oligoamine. The results impact greatly upon potential applications and in understanding some of the important biological functions of biogenic amines. PMID:26524255

  18. When water molecules meet air

    OpenAIRE

    Hsie, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Verde, Ana Vila; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-01-01

    About 70% of our planet is covered in water. Most of that water exists as water in the bulk – the neighbors of water molecules are other water molecules – and only a small fraction of molecules are at the air-water interface. Despite the small relative abundance of interfacial water, it is of the utmost importance: it governs the chemistry involving the surface of oceans and seawater aerosols, or the small water droplets forming clouds. Reactions at the air-water interface are directly releva...

  19. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  20. Adsorption of egg phosphatidylcholine to an air/water and triolein/water bubble interface: use of the 2-dimensional phase rule to estimate the surface composition of a phospholipid/triolein/water surface as a function of surface pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsche, Matthew A; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M

    2010-03-11

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces, including all membranes, the alveoli of the lungs, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bubble of either air or triolein (TO) formed in a low-salt buffer. The surface tension (gamma) was measured using a drop tensiometer. We observed that EPC binds irreversibly to both interfaces and at equilibrium exerts approximately 12 and 15 mN/m of pressure (Pi) at an air and TO interface, respectively. After EPC was bound to the interface, the unbound EPC was washed out of the cuvette, and the surface was compressed to study the Pi/area relationship. To determine the surface concentration (Gamma), which cannot be measured directly, compression isotherms from a Langmuir trough and drop tensiometer were compared. The air-water interfaces had identical characteristics using both techniques; thus, Gamma on the bubble can be determined by overlaying the two isotherms. Both TO and EPC are surface-active, so in a mixed TO/EPC monolayer, both molecules will be exposed to water. Since TO is less surface-active than EPC, as Pi increases, the TO is progressively ejected. To understand the Pi/area isotherm of EPC on a TO bubble, a variety of TO-EPC mixtures were spread at the air-water interface. The isotherms show an abrupt break in the curve caused by the ejection of TO from the monolayer into a new bulk phase. By overlaying the compression isotherm above the ejection point with a TO bubble compression isotherm, Gamma can be estimated. This allows determination of Gamma of EPC on a TO bubble as a function of Pi. PMID:20151713

  1. Organization of T-shaped facial amphiphiles at the air/water interface studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieger, Christian; Chen, Bin; Tschierske, Carsten; Kressler, Jörg; Blume, Alfred

    2012-10-11

    We studied the behavior of monolayers at the air/water interface of T-shaped facial amphiphiles which show liquid-crystalline mesophases in the bulk. The compounds are composed of a rigid p-terphenyl core (TP) with two terminal hydrophobic ether linked alkyl chains of equal length and one facial hydrophilic tri(ethylene oxide) chain with a carboxylic acid end group. Due to their amphiphilic nature they form stable Langmuir films at the air/water interface. Depending on the alkyl chain length they show markedly different compression isotherms. We used infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) to study the changes in molecular organization of the TP films upon compression. We could retrieve information on layer thickness, alkyl chain crystallization, and the orientation of the TP cores within the films. Films of TPs with long (16 carbon atoms: TP 16/3) and short (10 carbon atoms: TP 10/3) alkyl chains were compared. Compression of TP 16/3 leads to crystallization of the terminal alkyl chains, whereas the alkyl chains of TP 10/3 stay fluid over the complete compression range. TP 10/3 shows an extended plateau in the compression isotherm which is due to a layering transition. The mechanism of this layering transition is discussed. Special attention was paid to the question of whether a so-called roll-over collapse occurs during compression. From the beginning to the end of the plateau, the layer thickness is increased from 15 to 38 Å and the orientation of the TP cores changes from parallel to the water surface to isotropic. We conclude that the plateau in the compression isotherm reflects the transition of a TP monolayer to a TP multilayer. The monolayer consists of a sublayer of well-organized TP cores underneath a sublayer of fluid alkyl chains whereas the multilayer consists of a well oriented bottom layer and a disordered top layer. Our findings do not support the model of a roll-over collapse. This study demonstrates how the IRRA band intensity of OH

  2. Toward a simple molecular understanding of sum frequency generation at air-water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Smith, Jared D.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2009-01-13

    Second-order vibrational spectroscopies successfully isolate signals from interfaces, but they report on intermolecular structure in a complicated and indirect way. Here we adapt a perspective on vibrational response developed for bulk spectroscopies to explore the microscopic fluctuations to which sum frequency generation (SFG), a popular surface-specific measurement, is most sensitive. We focus exclusively on inhomogeneous broadening of spectral susceptibilities for OH stretching of HOD as a dilute solute in D{sub 2}O. Exploiting a simple connection between vibrational frequency shifts and an electric field variable, we identify several functions of molecular orientation whose averages govern SFG. The frequency-dependence of these quantities is well captured by a pair of averages, involving alignment of OH and OD bonds with the surface normal at corresponding values of the electric field. The approximate form we obtain for SFG susceptibility highlights a dramatic sensitivity to the way a simulated liquid slab is partitioned for calculating second-order response.

  3. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  4. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring the...

  5. Oxidation of monolayers of partly converted dimethoxy-substituted poly(p-phenylenevinylene) precursor polymers at the air-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagting, J.G.; Schouten, A.J.; Hagting, A

    2000-01-01

    We observed that the poly(p-phenylenevinylene) units in Langmuir monolayers of partly converted dimethoxy-substituted poly(p-phenylenevinylene) precursor polymers oxidize at the air-water interface. This reaction even happened in the dark and therefore can not be attributed to a photooxygenation rea

  6. Water, CO2 and Energy Exchange at Vegetation-air Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li XIAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to analyze water and heat fluxes, CO2 fluxes and energy balance in wheat ecosystem in Luancheng County of Hebei Province. [Method] Based on data of water and heat flux, and CO2 fluxes, routine meteorological and biomass data in Luancheng in 2008, water and heat fluxes, CO2 fluxes and energy balance in wheat ecosystem were explored. [Result] The results showed that latent and sensible heat and CO2 fluxes were of obvious daily and seasonal changes; latent and sensible heat fluxes shaped an inverted U in daily change, and CO2 fluxes were of a U-shape; daily flux peak differed significantly. Furthermore, the change of latent heat, sensible heat and CO2 fluxes were closely related to environ- mental factors. Detailedly, the three were sensitive to light intensity and net radiation, and correlation coefficients were 0.92, 0.66, 0.65 and 0.90, 0.69, 0.74, respectively. Besides, the fluxes, sensitive to temperature, proved better in sunny day, especially for latent flux which is more sensitive to water in soils after precipitation. In addition, closure degree of energy balance in wheat fields was 0.91 and non-closure, caused by measurement error and neglection of heat storage, was observed, too. What's more. closure degree differed in months and time periods within a day. [Conclusion] The research concluded water and heat fluxes, CO2 fluxes, transport mechanisms and concerning factors, providing scientific reference for revealing mechanism of evapo- ration and heat dissipation of canopy, relationship between photosynthesis and water use efficiencyand energy distribution mechanism.

  7. Energy and Water Balance at Soil-Air Interface in a Sahelian Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is an improvement of the parameterization of the soil moisture in the scheme of the Land Surface Process Model (LSPM) for applications over desert areas. In fact, in very dry conditions, the water vapour flux plays an important role in the evaporation processes and influences the underground profiles of humidity and temperature. The improved version of soil moisture parametcrization in the LSPM scheme has been checked by using the data taken from the database of the field experiment HAPEX-Sahel (Hydrology-Atmosphere Pilot Experiment in the Sahel, 1990-1992). Model simulations refer to three dif ferent stations located in Niger (Fallow, Millet and Tiger sites) where input data for LSPM and observations were simultaneously available. The results of simulations taking into account the water vapour flux in the soil model LSPM, seem to compare better with the observed behaviour of soil moisture and turbulent heat fluxes than those overlooking the water vapour flux, confirming the great importance of the water vapour in such dry conditions.

  8. Computational study of shock waves propagating through air-plastic-water interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Del Razo, Mauricio J

    2015-01-01

    The following study is motivated by experimental studies in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent research has demonstrated that low intensity non-impact blast wave exposure frequently leads to mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI); however, the mechanisms connecting the blast waves and the mTBI remain unclear. Collaborators at the Seattle VA Hospital are doing experiments to understand how blast waves can produce mTBI. In order to gain insight that is hard to obtain by experimental means, we have developed conservative finite volume methods for interface-shock wave interaction to simulate these experiments. A 1D model of their experimental setup has been implemented using Euler equations for compressible fluids. These equations are coupled with a Tammann equation of state (EOS) that allows us to model compressible gas along with almost incompressible fluids or elastic solids. A hybrid HLLC-exact Eulerian-Lagrangian Riemann solver for Tammann EOS with a jump in the parameters has been developed. The model has sho...

  9. Structure and vibrational spectroscopy of salt water/air interfaces: Predictions from classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brown, E. C.; Mucha, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Tobias, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, - (2005), s. 7934-7940. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 644; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE 0431512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vibrational spectroscopy * salt water * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.033, year: 2005

  10. Two-dimensional crystallography of amphiphilic molecules at the air-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquemain, D.; Grayer Wolf, S.; Leveiller, F.; Deutsch, M.; Kjær, K.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Lahav, M.; Leiserowitz, L.

    1992-01-01

    review recent results obtained from them for Langmuir films. The methods have been successfully applied in the elucidation of the structure of crystalline aggregates of amphiphilic molecules such as alcohols, carboxylic acids and their salts, alpha-amino acids, and phospholipids at the water surface. In...... solute species. Examples are given where singly or doubly charged ions bound to the two-dimensional (2D) crystal form either an ordered or diffuse counterionic layer. Finally, the surface diffraction methods provide data on transfer of structural information from 2D clusters to 3D single crystals, which...... had been successfully accomplished by epitaxial-like crystallization both in organic and inorganic crystals....

  11. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H E; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex. PMID:20835481

  12. Kinetics of marine surfactant adsorption at an air water interface. Baltic Sea studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanis³aw J. Pogorzelski

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the results of studies of natural surface film adsorption kinetics carried out in inland waters and in shallow offshore regions of the Baltic Sea during 2000-01 under calm sea conditions. The novel approach presented here for the adsorption dynamics is based on the mixed kinetic-diffusion model and analyses of the surface pressure-time plots at short (t ->0 and long( t -> ∞ adsorption time intervals. Values of the effective relative diffusion coefficient Deff / D (= 0.008-0.607 and energy barrier for adsorption Ea / RT (= 0.49-7.10 agree well with the data reported for model non-ionic surfactant solutions of pre-cmc concentrations. Wind speed is one of the factors affecting the adsorption barrier via the increased surface pressure of the natural film exposed to wind shear stress (~ U102, and enters the relation Ea / RT = 1.70 U101/3.

  13. Superposition-additive approach: thermodynamic parameters of clusterization of monosubstituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2011-12-21

    The applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole electric polarisabilities, molecular diamagnetic susceptibilities, π-electron circular currents, as well as for the estimation of the thermodynamic parameters of substituted alkanes, was demonstrated earlier. Now the applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the description of clusterization of fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, carboxylic acids at the air/water interface is studied. Two superposition-additive schemes are used that ensure the maximum superimposition of the graphs of the considered molecular structures including the intermolecular CH-HC interactions within the clusters. The thermodynamic parameters of clusterization are calculated for dimers, trimers and tetramers. The calculations are based on the values of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization calculated earlier using the semiempirical quantum chemical PM3 method. It is shown that the proposed approach is capable of the reproduction with sufficiently enough accuracy of the values calculated previously. PMID:22042000

  14. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed. PMID:25697294

  15. Conversion of Iodide to Hypoiodous Acid and Molecular Iodine at the Air-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillar, E. A.; Guzman, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosols continuously transfer a significant amount of halides to the marine boundary layer, where they play a major role in the depletion of tropospheric ozone. The reactivity of iodide is of special interest in sea spray aerosols, where this species is enriched relative to chloride and bromide in surface seawater. This work presents laboratory experiments that provide mechanistic information to understand the reactivity of halides in atmospheric aerosols. Pneumatically assisted electrospray is used to aerosolize solutions of sodium iodide (0.01-100 μM), which are rapidly (~3 μs) oxidized by ozone at 25 °C. Reaction products include HIO, IO2-, IO3-, I2, HI2O-, and I3-, all identified by mass spectrometry. The distribution of products varies along two different reaction pathways, one favoring the production of I2 and HIO for typical tropospheric ozone levels (~50 ppbv), and another one directed to the production of IO3- at higher oxidizer concentrations. The formation of products increases exponentially with rising concentrations of initial sodium iodide, [NaI]0. The process is determined to be pH independent for the pH range 6-8 representative of surface waters. The substitution of aqueous solutions by organic solvents, such as methanol or acetonitrile, causes a decrease in the surface tension and lifetime of the droplets, leading to larger I2 production. The presence of surface active organic compounds, which alter the structure of the interfacial region, promote the pathway of I2 formation over IO3-. In conclusion, this presentation will show how the oxidation of iodide in aqueous microdroplets can release reactive gas-phase species, such as I2 and HIO, capable to affect tropospheric ozone globally. Normalized intensity of products observed during the ozonolysis of iodide solutions at 130 ppbv ozone. Cone voltage = 70 V, needle voltage = 2.5 kV.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  17. Miscibility of dl-α-tocopherol β-glucoside in DPPC monolayer at air/water and air/solid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunert, G; Makowiecki, J; Piosik, E; Hertmanowski, R; Polewski, K; Martynski, T

    2016-10-01

    The role of newly synthesized tocopherol glycosidic derivative in modifying molecular organization and phase transitions of phospholipid monolayer at the air/water interface has been investigated. Two-component Langmuir films of dl-α-tocopheryl β-D-glucopyranoside (BG) mixed with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the whole range of mole fractions were formed at the water surface. An analysis of surface pressure versus mean molecular area (π-A) isotherms and Brewster angle microscope images showed that the presence of BG molecules changes the structure and packing of the DPPC monolayer in a BG concentration dependent manner. BG molecules incorporated into DPPC monolayer inhibit its liquid expanded to liquid condensed phase transition proportionally to the BG concentration. The monolayers were also transferred onto solid substrates and visualized using an atomic force microscope. The results obtained indicate almost complete miscibility of BG and DPPC in the monolayers at surface pressures present in the biological cell membrane (30-35·10(-3) N·m(-1)) for a BG mole fraction as high as 0.3. This makes the monolayer less packed and more disordered, leading to an increased permeability. The results support our previous molecular dynamics simulation data. PMID:27287132

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of small halogenated organics at the air-water interface: implications in water treatment and atmospheric chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Habartová, Alena; Valsaraj, K. T.; Roeselová, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 38 (2013), s. 9205-9215. ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06181S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : aerosol * air bubbles * interfacial concentration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.775, year: 2013

  19. Morphology and thermochromic phase transition of merocyanine J-aggregate monolayers at the air-water and solid-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Noritaka; Saito, Kentaro; Serata, Toshinori; Aida, Hiroaki; Uesu, Yoshiaki

    2001-07-01

    Thermal changes of the merocyanine dye (MD) monolayer at the air-water interface were investigated under various subphase conditions in order to elucidate the formation mechanism and to control morphological and chromatic properties of two-dimensional MD J-aggregate crystallites (JC) formed in the monolayer. The dissociation temperature (Td) of the JC to the monomer MD was measured for different counterions of MD molecules in the subphase. The JC size was found to be dependent on the subphase temperature; it becomes larger when the JC is formed at a temperature closer to Td. This phenomenon is qualitatively reproduced by the numerical simulation of the Cahn-Hilliard equation. In the case of the MD monolayer on the subphase which contains two kinds of counterions, it exhibits a reversible thermochromic transition between two different JC states. The chromatic change is discrete, and is attributed to the structural phase transition of the JC induced by the mutual recombination of two kinds of counterions to MD molecules. The structural difference between the high and low temperature JC states is examined by the point dipole model. The transition temperature and thermal hysteresis width can be varied by the fraction of 2 counterions. In situ observations using a multipurpose nonlinear optical microscope revealed that the transition is of first order and the nucleation and growth process of the low temperature phase in the high temperature matrix was observed. The JC size of the low temperature phase became much larger through the recrystallization process. For future application of this phenomenon, an airtight cell consisting of two monolayers at the solid-water interface and the subphase was developed. In the cell, the same reversible transition occurs, but with a slow relaxation.

  20. Molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-n-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines at the air-water interface and Cu(II)-promoted vesicle formation via metal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Miao, Wangen; Liu, Huijin; Zhang, Xianfeng; Du, Xuezhong

    2010-09-01

    The molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-N-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines (HPA) at the air-water interface on pure water and aqueous Cu(II) subphases have been investigated using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). The Schiff base units were oriented with their long axes almost perpendicular to the water surface, and both imine and pyridinyl nitrogen atoms of the Schiff base units were coordinated to Cu(II) ions together with their geometrical conversions. The alkyl chains in the monolayers were quantitatively determined on the assumption that the HPA monolayers at the air-water interface were composed of sublayers of alkyl chains and Schiff base units, and the chain orientation angle on pure water was 30 +/- 2 degrees and increased to 37 +/- 2 degrees on the aqueous Cu(II) subphase. The HPA amphiphiles could not be dispersed in pure water but could self-organize into vesicles with metal-coordinated headgroups and interdigitated-packed alkyl chains in the presence of Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-vis spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the aggregate structures and specific properties of the coordinated vesicles. PMID:20698514

  1. Adaptive chemistry of bifunctional gold nanoparticles at the air/water interface. A synchrotron X-ray study of giant amphiphiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.; Brust, M.; Bjørnholm, T.

    2004-01-01

    A series of ligand stabilized gold nanoparticles with diameters close to 3 nm were studied as Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and reflectivity. Alkylthiols with different length and/or terminal functional group (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) were...... environmental responsiveness, as they adapt to an amphiphilic distribution of ligands around the gold core when spread at the water surface. Likewise nanoparticles of mixed long and short alkyl chains respond to lateral pressure by adopting a structure where the short alkyl chains determine the in-plane nearest...

  2. Ellipsometric study of molecular orientations of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase at the air-water interface by simultaneous determination of refractive index and thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Marco; Schmid, Reiner P; Schnitzlein, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Ellipsometric studies of very thin organic films suffer from the low refractive index contrast between layer and bulk substrate. We demonstrate that null ellipsometry can not only provide detailed information about the adsorption kinetics and surface excess values, but in addition on layer thicknesses with submonolayer resolution of a lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus at the air-water interface. While measuring very close to the Brewster angle, refractive indices and layer-thicknesses can both be determined with a precision that is sufficiently high to make conclusions on the density and orientation of the molecules at the interface. The orientation was found to be concentration- and pH value-dependent. At the isoelectric point, the lipase was almost vertically oriented with respect to the surface, while for pure distilled water and low lipase concentration a rather horizontal alignment was found. Further experiments, varying the size of the interfacial area in a Langmuir trough, confirm the different layer structures. PMID:26735895

  3. Fullerene films and fullerene-dodecylamine adduct monolayers at air-water interfaces studied by neutron and x-ray reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J.Y.; Vaknin, D.; Uphaus, R.A.;

    1994-01-01

    for by a single model structure defined in terms of the dimensions of an average cell and its chemical composition. This model ascribes a total thickness of about 29 angstrom to the molecular interface layer with the following internal structure. The fullerenes (with several alkyl chains attached......Neutron and X-ray reflection measurements and surface pressure isotherms of spread films of the fullerene-dodecylamine adduct C60-[NH2(CH2)11CH3]x all indicate that this material may form monomolecular layers on water surfaces. The reflection data sets (neutron on both H2O and D2O) can be accounted......) form a central stratum and the remainder alkyl tails are located close to both the air and the water interfaces. The alkyl moieties close to the aqueous substrate are hydrated. The reflection experiments and the isotherms suggest that on average 8 +/- 3 dodecylamine molecules are present per fullerene...

  4. Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Cristina M.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-07-01

    Methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are exchanged between wetlands and the atmosphere through multiple pathways. One of these pathways, the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gas through the surface water, is often underestimated in importance. We constructed a model wetland in the laboratory with artificial emergent plants to investigate the mechanisms and magnitude of this transport. We measured gas transfer velocities, which characterize the near-surface stirring driving air-water gas transfer, while varying two stirring processes important to gas exchange in other aquatic environments: wind and thermal convection. To isolate the effects of thermal convection, we identified a semiempirical model for the gas transfer velocity as a function of surface heat loss. The laboratory results indicate that thermal convection will be the dominant mechanism of air-water gas exchange in marshes with emergent vegetation. Thermal convection yielded peak gas transfer velocities of 1 cm h-1. Because of the sheltering of the water surface by emergent vegetation, gas transfer velocities for wind-driven stirring alone are likely to exceed this value only in extreme cases.

  5. Effects of the conjugation of whey proteins with gellan polysaccharides on surfactant-induced competitive displacement from the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B; Ikeda, S

    2016-08-01

    Whey proteins can be used to stabilize foams and emulsions against coalescence because of their ability to form viscoelastic films at the interface that resist film rupture on collision between colloidal particles. However, whey proteins are competitively displaced from the interface if small-molecule surfactants are added, leading to destabilization of the entire system. This is because surfactants are more effective in molecular packing at the interface, and they lower interfacial tension to a greater degree than whey proteins do, but their interfacial films are poor in viscoelasticity. We hypothesized that whey proteins would become more resistant to surfactant-induced competitive displacement if they were conjugated with network-forming polysaccharides. The protein moiety of the conjugate would be expected to enable its adsorption to the interface, and the polysaccharide moiety would be expected to form self-assembled networks, strengthening the interfacial film as a whole. In this study, whey proteins were conjugated with gellan polysaccharides using the Maillard reaction. Atomic force microscopy images of interfacial films formed by the whey protein-gellan conjugate at the air-water interface and transferred onto mica sheets using the Langmuir-Blodgett method revealed that gellan did form self-assembled networks at the interface and that interfacial films also contained a large number of unconjugated whey protein molecules. Following the addition of a small-molecule surfactant (Tween 20) to the sub-phase, surface pressure increased, indicating spontaneous adsorption of surfactants to the interface. Atomic force microscopy images showed decreases in interfacial area coverage by whey proteins as surface pressure increased. At a given surface pressure, the interfacial area coverage by whey protein-gellan conjugates was greater than coverage by unconjugated whey proteins, confirming that whey proteins became more resistant to surfactant-induced displacement after

  6. Simulated Solvation of Organic Ions II: Study of Linear Alkylated Carboxylate Ions in Water Nanodrops and in Liquid Water. Propensity for Air/Water Interface and Convergence to Bulk Solvation Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2015-09-10

    We investigated the solvation of carboxylate ions from formate to hexanoate, in droplets of 50 to 1000 water molecules and neat water, by computations using standard molecular dynamics and sophisticated polarizable models. The carboxylate ions from methanoate to hexanoate show strong propensity for the air/water interface in small droplets. Only the ions larger than propanoate retain propensity for the interface in larger droplets, where their enthalpic stabilization by ion/water dispersion is reduced there by 3 kcal mol(-1) per CH2 group. This is compensated by entropy effects over +3.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1) per CH2 group. On the surface, the anionic headgroups are strongly oriented toward the aqueous core, while the hydrophobic alkyl chains are repelled into air and lose their structure-making effects. These results reproduce the structure-making effects of alkyl groups in solution, and suggest that the hydrocarbon chains of ionic headgroups and alkyl substituents solvate independently. Extrapolation to bulk solution using standard extrapolation schemes yields absolute carboxylate solvation energies. The results for formate and acetate yield a proton solvation enthalpy of about 270 kcal mol(-1), close to the experiment-based value. The largest carboxylate ions yield a value smaller by about 10 kcal mol(-1), which requires studies in much larger droplets. PMID:26287943

  7. Numerical tools to estimate the flux of a gas across the air-water interface and assess the heterogeny of its forcing functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. N. de C. da S. Vieira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical tool was developed for the estimation of gas fluxes across the air water interface. The primary objective is to use it to estimate CO2 fluxes. Nevertheless application to other gases is easily accomplished by changing the values of the parameters related to the physical properties of the gases. A user friendly software was developed allowing to build upon a standard kernel a custom made gas flux model with the preferred parametrizations. These include single or double layer models; several numerical schemes for the effects of wind in the air-side and water-side transfer velocities; the effect of turbulence from current drag with the bottom; and the effects on solubility of water temperature, salinity, air temperature and pressure. It was also developed an analysis which decomposes the difference between the fluxes in a reference situation and in alternative situations into its several forcing functions. This analysis relies on the Taylor expansion of the gas flux model, requiring the numerical estimation of partial derivatives by a multivariate version of the collocation polynomial. Both the flux model and the difference decomposition analysis were tested with data taken from surveys done in the lagoonary system of Ria Formosa, south Portugal, in which the CO2 fluxes were estimated using the IRGA and floating chamber method whereas the CO2 concentrations were estimated using the IRGA and degasification chamber. Observations and estimations show a remarkable fit.

  8. Hydroxyl radical reactivity at the air-ice interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Kahan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals are important oxidants in the atmosphere and in natural waters. They are also expected to be important in snow and ice, but their reactivity has not been widely studied in frozen aqueous solution. We have developed a spectroscopic probe to monitor the formation and reactions of hydroxyl radicals in situ. Hydroxyl radicals are produced in aqueous solution via the photolysis of nitrite, nitrate, and hydrogen peroxide, and react rapidly with benzene to form phenol. Similar phenol formation rates were observed in aqueous solution and bulk ice. However, no reaction was observed at air-ice interfaces, or when bulk ice samples were crushed prior to photolysis to increase their surface area. We also monitored the heterogeneous reaction between benzene present at air-water and air-ice interfaces with gas-phase OH produced from HONO photolysis. Rapid phenol formation was observed on water surfaces, but no reaction was observed at the surface of ice. Under the same conditions, we observed rapid loss of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH anthracene at air-water interfaces, but no loss was observed at air-ice interfaces. Our results suggest that the reactivity of hydroxyl radicals toward aromatic organics is similar in bulk ice samples and in aqueous solution, but is significantly suppressed in the quasi-liquid layer (QLL that exists at air-ice interfaces.

  9. How does spacer length of imidazolium gemini surfactants control the fabrication of 2D-Langmuir films of silver-nanoparticles at the air-water interface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sougata; Biswas, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-09-15

    A series of gemini surfactants based on cationic imidazolium ring as polar headgroup, abbreviated as [Im-n-Im], 2Br(-) (n=2, 5, 6 and 12), was synthesized. Their ability to stabilize silver nanoparticles in aqueous media was investigated. The resulting suspensions were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They exhibit specific morphologies by adopting different supramolecular assemblies in aqueous media depending on the internal packing arrangements and on the number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-]. Individual colloids were extracted from the aqueous to chloroform layer and spread at the air/water interface to allow the formation of well-defined Langmuir films. By analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, the details about the packing behavior and orientation of the imidazolium gemini surfactant capped silver nanoparticles were obtained. Morphological features of the dynamic process of monolayer compression at the air-water interface were elucidated using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). These monolayers were further transferred on mica sheets by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique at their associated collapse pressure and the morphology of these monolayers was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-] of the gemini surfactants exerted critical influence in modulating the characteristics of the resulting Langmuir films. PMID:24998058

  10. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  11. Coordination assisted molecular assemblies of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid with copper (II) ion at the air/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) was found to form stable Langmuir films at the air/water interface through the coordination with Cu(II) ion in the subphase although the compound itself could not form monolayer on a plain water surface. The Langmuir films can be transferred onto solid substrates by a Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) method. Surface pressure-area isotherm and measurement of the UV-Vis and FT-IR spectra of the transferred LS films confirmed the coordination between the carboxylic group and Cu(II) ion in the Langmuir films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements indicated that the Langmuir film was composed of small nanoparticles with a diameter of several tens of nanometers. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement on the transferred LS films revealed that the film formed a clear layer structure with a distance of 3.9 nm, which was in agreement with the height measurement from the AFM

  12. Study of the iron corrosion at the interface of different media (water, air) submitted to protons irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the deep geological disposal, stainless steel containers of the vitrified waste will be put in carbon steel overpacks. After the closing of the storage site, overpacks will be in contact with a humid air and a radioactive medium. After hundred years, overpacks could be in contact with water radiolysis in an anoxic medium. In this context, my PhD work is a fundamental study which is the understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of pure iron under proton irradiation. This corrosion is affected by the contact of iron with different atmospheres (air, nitrogen) and water. In the case of the atmospheric iron corrosion under irradiation, we have studied the influence of the proton beam flux. During this work, we have characterized the structure of the oxides formed at the iron surface. The structure formed does not correspond to iron oxides and hydroxides indexed. However, we have shown that the oxide structure is close to that of lepidocrocite and bernalite. Moreover, we have determined the oxygen diffusion coefficient in iron under irradiation and we have shown that the irradiation accelerates of 6 orders of magnitude the iron corrosion. In addition, the irradiations which were realized in different gas have put in evidence the negligible role of nitrates, and the importance of the O2/H2O coupling on the iron corrosion. Finally, we have shown the influence of the relative humidity, the maximum of the corrosion being observed for a relative humidity close to 45%. In the case of the iron corrosion in aqueous media under irradiation, the influence of the oxygen dissolved in water has been studied using a surface marker. We have put in evidence that the corrosion is twice more significant in aerated medium than in deaerated medium. Moreover, the influence of radicals has been shown. An irradiated sample is more corroded than a sample put in contact with a H2O2 solution. Finally, the follow-up of the iron potential under irradiation have shown the majority role of the

  13. Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-09-17

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

  14. Polarized total-reflection x-ray absorption fine structure for self-assembled monolayer of zinc porphyrin at air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method is applied to the air-solution interface. Under the total reflection condition, the XAFS method becomes surface sensitive, enabling the self-assembled monolayer of a metal complex at the solution surface to analyze in situ. Furthermore the introduction of two types of linearly polarized x rays allows us to determine the selective orientation of a planar metal complex at the surface. We obtain spectra for a square planar complex, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrinato zinc(II) (ZnTPPC) adsorbed on the aqueous solution surface forming a monolayer with two polarized x rays and compared them with spectra of the same compound in a bulk solution and in solid powder. The polarized XAFS spectra exhibit different features leading to the unambiguous conclusion that the plane of the ZnTPPC molecule is oriented parallel to the air-water interface and that there is no coordination to the axial sites of the zinc atom

  15. Homochiral oligopeptides by chiral amplification within two-dimensional crystalline self-assemblies at the air-water interface; Relevance to biomolecular handedness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weissbuch, I.; Zepik, H.; Bolbach, G.; Shavit, E.; Tang, M.; Jensen, T.R.; Kjær, K.; Leiserowitz, L.; Lahav, M.

    2003-01-01

    -aqueous solution interface after injection of appropriate catalysts into the water subphase. The experimental relative abundance of oligopeptides with homochiral sequence generated from (R,S)-C-18-TE-Lys and (R,S)-C-18-TE-Glu, as determined by mass spectrometry on enantioselectively deuterium-labeled samples, was......A possible role that might have been played by ordered clusters at interfaces for the generation of homochiral oligopeptides under prebiotic conditions has been probed by a catalyzed polymerization of amphiphilic activated a-amino acids, in racemic and chiral non-racemic forms, which had self......-stearyl-glutamic thioacid (C-18-thio-Glu). According to insitu grazing incidence X-ray diffraction measurements on the water surface, (R,S)-C-18-TE-Lys, (RA-C-18-TE-Glu, and (R,S)-C-18-Glu-NCA amphiphiles self-assembled into ordered racemic 2D crystallites. Oligopeptides 2-12 units long were obtained at the air...

  16. Adsorption of Egg-PC to an Air/Water and Triolein/Water Bubble Interface: Use of the 2-Dimensional Phase Rule to Estimate the Surface Composition of a Phospholipid/Triolein/Water Surface as a Function of Surface Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsche, Matthew A.; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces including all membranes, the alveoli of the lung, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg-phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bu...

  17. Visualization of an adsorption model for surfactant transport from micelle solutions to a clean air/water interface using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing; Yuan, Mingjun

    2011-05-01

    This work pertains to visualizing a transport model for adsorption of surfactants from micelle solutions onto a clean air/water interface. Under the condition of surfactant adsorption from very dilute solutions, the time scale for diffusion of a surfactant monomer is much slower than the time scale for kinetic breakdown of the aggregates. A theoretical model predicts two regimes for the adsorption dynamics. We visualize these two regimes under the mechanism of solubilization using fluorescence microscopy, in which an insoluble fluorescent probe, NBD-HAD (4-(hexadecylamino)-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole), is used to illuminate the micelles. The dye fluoresces in the microenvironment of micelles but is quenched in the aqueous solution on laser excitation. The region containing micelles is illuminated, but the region which does not contain micelles appears dark. For surfactant solution of C(14)E(6) at concentration just above the critical micelle concentration (C(CMC)), C(CMC)=4.4 mg/L, a dark region between the bright image of the air/water interface and the micelle-containing zone is observed. This dark region becomes smaller with time and finally disappears once equilibrium is reached. For a surfactant solution of C(14)E(6) at the concentration of 4.74C(CMC), which is higher than a critical total surfactant concentration (C(T)(c)) of 4.25C(CMC), we observe bright images through surfactant solutions during the adsorption process. Fluorescence images validate the theoretical model. PMID:21349535

  18. Air/Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  19. Clean Air and Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    The air we breathe and the water we drink are both vital components of our health. Nevertheless, bacteria, pollutants, and other contaminates can alter life-giving air and water into health-threatening hazards. Learn about how scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work to protect the public from air and water-related health risks.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  20. Nanostructure of polymer monolayer and polyelectrolyte brush at air/water interface by X-ray and neutron reflectometry

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, H; Matsumoto, K

    2003-01-01

    The nanostructure of amphiphilic diblock copolymer monolayer on water was directly investigated by in situ X-ray and neutron reflectivity techniques. The diblock copolymer consists of polysilacyclobutane, which is very flexible, as a hydrophobic block and polymethacrylic acid, an anionic polymer, as a hydrophilic block. The polymers with shorter hydrophilic segment formed a very smooth and uniform monolayer with hydrophobic layer on water and dense hydrophilic layer under the water. But the longer hydrophilic segment polymer formed three-layered monolayer with polyelectrolyte brush in addition to hydrophobic and dense hydrophilic layers. The dense hydrophilic layer is thought to be formed to avoid a contact between hydrophobic polymer layer and water. Its role is something like a 'carpet'. An additional interesting information is that the thickness of the 'carpet layer' is almost 15A, independent the surface pressure and hydrophilic polymer length. Highly quantitative information was obtained about the nanost...

  1. Investigating the pathway for the photochemical formation of VOCs in presence of an organic monolayer at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Ciuraru, Raluca; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Investigating the pathway for the photochemical formation of VOCs in presence of an organic monolayer at the air/water interface. Liselotte Tinel, Stéphanie Rossignol, Raluca Ciuraru and Christian George Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR5256, IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69626, France Recently the surface microlayer (SML) has received growing attention for its role in the deposition and emission of trace gases. This SML is presumably a highly efficient environment for photochemical reactions thanks to its physical and chemical properties, showing enrichment in chromophores [1]. Still, little is known about the possible photochemical processes that could influence the emission and deposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the SML. A recent study underlines the particularity of the presence of an organic microlayer, showing enhanced formation of peptide bonds at the air-water interface, although this reaction is thermodynamically disfavoured in bulk water [2]. Also, emissions of small gas phase carbonyl compounds formed photochemically by dissolved organic matter have been measured above natural water and glyoxal, for example, measured above the open ocean is thought to be photochemically produced [3, 4]. This study presents the results of a set of laboratory studies set up in order to better understand the role of the SML in the photochemical production of VOCs. Recently, our group has shown the formation of VOCs by light driven reactions in a small quartz reactor (14mL) containing aqueous solutions of humic acids (HA) in the presence of an organic (artificial or natural) microlayer [5]. The main VOCs produced were oxidized species, such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols, as classically can be expected by the oxidation of the organics present at the interface initiated by triplet excited chromophores present in the HA. But also alkenes, dienes, including isoprene and

  2. Conformational analysis of gramicidin-gramicidin interactions at the air/water interface suggests that gramicidin aggregates into tube-like structures similar as found in the gramicidin-induced hexagonal HII phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasserua, R.; Killian, J.A.; Kruijff, B. de; Ruysschaert, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of interaction and the type of aggregate structure in lateral assemblies of up to five gramicidin molecules in the β6.3 helical conformation at the air/water interface was calculated using conformational analysis procedures. It was found that within the aggregate two types of gramicid

  3. Measurement of the Surface Dilatational Viscosity of an Insoluble Surfactant Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface Using a Pendant Drop Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Jose; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When a fluid interface with surfactants is at rest, the interfacial stress is isotropic (as given by the equilibrium interfacial tension), and is described by the equation of state which relates the surface tension to the surfactant surface concentration. When surfactants are subjected to shear and dilatational flows, flow induced interaction of the surfactants; can create interfacial stresses apart from the equilibrium surface tension. The simplest relationship between surface strain rate and surface stress is the Boussinesq-Scriven constitutive equation completely characterized by three coefficients: equilibrium interfacial tension, surface shear viscosity, and surface dilatational viscosity Equilibrium interfacial tension and surface shear viscosity measurements are very well established. On the other hand, surface dilatational viscosity measurements are difficult because a flow which change the surface area also changes the surfactant surface concentration creating changes in the equilibrium interfacial tension that must be also taken into account. Surface dilatational viscosity measurements of existing techniques differ by five orders of magnitude and use spatially damped surface waves and rapidly expanding bubbles. In this presentation we introduce a new technique for measuring the surface dilatational viscosity by contracting an aqueous pendant drop attached to a needle tip and having and insoluble surfactant monolayer at the air-water interface. The isotropic total tension on the surface consists of the equilibrium surface tension and the tension due to the dilation. Compression rates are undertaken slow enough so that bulk hydrodynamic stresses are small compared to the surface tension force. Under these conditions we show that the total tension is uniform along the surface and that the Young-Laplace equation governs the drop shape with the equilibrium surface tension replaced by the constant surface isotropic stress. We illustrate this technique using

  4. Sea spray production by bag breakup mode of fragmentation of the air-water interface at strong and hurricane wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    Sea sprays is a typical element of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) of large importance for marine meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and climate studies. They are considered as a crucial factor in the development of hurricanes and severe extratropical storms, since they can significantly enhance exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. This exchange is directly provided by spume droplets with the sizes from 10 microns to a few millimeters mechanically torn off the crests of a breaking waves and fall down to the ocean due to gravity. The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Experimental core of our work comprise laboratory experiments employing high-speed video-filming, which have made it possible to disclose how water surface looks like at extremely strong winds and how exactly droplets are torn off wave crests. We classified events responsible for spume droplet, including bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" or liquid filaments (Koa, 1981) and "bag breakup", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film, "bags". The process is similar to "bag-breakup" mode of fragmentation of liquid droplets and jets in gaseous flows. Basing on statistical analysis of results of these experiments we show that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism On the base of general principles

  5. Monolayers of gemini surfactants and their catanionic mixtures with sodium dodecyl sulfate at the air-water interface: Chain length and composition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monolayers of cationic gemini surfactants and their catanionic mixtures with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), have been investigated with the Langmuir trough technique, at the air-water interface. The gemini surfactants are of the alkanediyl-α,ω-bis(alkyldimethylammonium) type, here designated as m-2-m, where m and 2 are the alkyl chain and spacer lengths, respectively. For the neat geminis, the stability of the monolayer increases as the chain length increases, starting from soluble films of 12-2-12 to stable films of 18-2-18. For the equicharged m-2-m/SDS mixtures (with m = 12, 14, 16 and 18), stable monolayers are obtained. The effect of the gemini chain length on the phase behavior and molecular organization of the films is discussed on the basis of pressure-area isotherms for compression or compression-expansion cycles. The pressure-temperature plots, at constant trough area, yield the desorption temperature and suggest the desorption mechanism of the film molecules. Furthermore, the effect of the mixing molar ratio between m-2-m and SDS on the isotherms, for m = 12 and 14, has also been investigated. It is concluded from the mean area per molecule that the gemini molecules when in excess with respect to equicharged composition desorb from the film, so that the electroneutral composition is maintained

  6. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions. PMID:26775740

  7. Conformational analyses of bacillomycin D, a natural antimicrobial lipopeptide, alone or in interaction with lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Besson, Françoise

    2012-12-01

    Bacillomycin D is a natural antimicrobial lipopeptide belonging to the iturin family. It is produced by Bacillus subtilis strains. Bacillomycin D is characterized by its strong antifungal and hemolytic properties, due to its interaction with the plasma membrane of sensitive cells. Until now, only few limited analyses were conducted to understand the biological activities of bacillomycin D at the molecular level. Our purpose was to analyze the conformation of bacillomycin D using IR spectroscopy and to model its interactions with cytoplasmic membranes using Langmuir interfacial monolayers. Our findings indicate that bacillomycin D contains turns and allow to model its three-dimensional structure. Bacillomycin D formed a monolayer film at the air-water interface and kept its turn conformation, as shown by polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). To identify the membrane lipid target of bacillomycin D, its interactions with pure lipid monolayers were analyzed and an original behavior of the lipopeptide toward cholesterol-containing monolayers was shown. This original behavior was lost when bacillomycin D was interacting with pure cholesteryl acetate monolayers, suggesting the involvement of the alcohol group of cholesterol in the lipopeptide-cholesterol interaction. PMID:22967349

  8. Thermodynamic and structural studies of mixed monolayers: Mutual mixing of DPPC and DPPG with DoTAP at the air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipid monomolecular films at the air-water interface are useful model membranes to understand miscibility among various components. Surface pressure (π)-area (A) isotherms of pure and mixed monolayers of dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane (DoTAP)-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DoTAP-dipalmitoyphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were constructed using a surface balance. DPPC and DPPG produced isotherms as expected and reported earlier. DoTAP, an unsaturated lipid, demonstrated a continuous π-A isotherm. Associative interactions were identified in DPPC-DoTAP mixtures compared to the pure components, while DPPG-DoTAP mixtures showed repulsive interaction up to an equimolar ratio. Compression moduli of the monolayers revealed that DPPC-DoTAP mixtures had increasing stability with increasing surface pressure, but addition of DoTAP to DPPG showed instability at low and intermediate concentrations. In both cases increased stability was returned at higher XDoTAP values and surface pressures. Lipid monolayer film thickness values, determined on a gold coated glass substrate by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), indicated a systematic change in height profile for DPPC-DoTAP mixtures with increasing XDoTAP. However, DPPG-DoTAP mixed monolayer systems demonstrated a biphasic response. The SPR data were in excellent agreement with our interpretation of the structure of solid supported lipid monolayers.

  9. Water at interface with proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Iskrov, Svilen

    2010-01-01

    Water is essential for the activity of proteins. However, the effect of the properties of water on the behavior of proteins is only partially understood. Recently, several experiments have investigated the relation between the dynamics of the hydration water and the dynamics of protein. These works have generated a large amount of data whose interpretation is debated. New experiments measure the dynamics of water at low temperature on the surface of proteins, finding a qualitative change (crossover) that might be related to the slowing down and stop of the protein's activity (protein glass transition), possibly relevant for the safe preservation of organic material at low temperature. To better understand the experimental data several scenarios have been discussed. Here, we review these experiments and discuss their interpretations in relation with the anomalous properties of water. We summarize the results for the thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled water at an interface. We consider also the effect o...

  10. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind shear

  11. Self-Assembled Large-Scale Monolayer of Au Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface Used as a SERS Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghua; Xu, Minmin; Yuan, Yaxian; Gu, Renao; Yao, Jianlin

    2016-05-10

    Self-assembly of metal nanoparticles has attracted considerable attention because of its unique applications in technologies such as plasmonics, surface-enhanced optics, sensors, and catalysts. However, fabrication of ordered nanoparticle structures remains a significant challenge. Thus, developing an efficient approach for the assembly of large-scale Au nanoparticles films for theoretical studies and for various applications is highly desired. In this paper, a facial approach for fabricating a monolayer film of Au nanoparticles was developed successfully. Using the surfactant polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), a large-scale monolayer film of well-ordered, uniform-sized Au nanoparticles was fabricated at the air/water interface. The film exhibited a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure having interparticle gaps smaller than 2 nm. These gaps generated numerous uniform "hot spots" for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. The as-prepared monolayer film could be transferred to a solid substrate for use as a suitable SERS substrate with high activity, high uniformity, and high stability. The low spot-to-spot and substrate-to-substrate variations of intensity (film onto a glassy carbon electrode produced an Au electrode with clean, well-defined nanostructure suitable for electrochemical SERS measurements. The adsorption process of ionic liquids on the electrode with the monolayer film is similar to that on bulk metal electrodes. The present strategy provides an effective way for self-assembly of Au nanoparticles into well-defined nanostructures that may form optimal reproducible SERS substrates for quantitative analysis. It also provides an electrode with clean, well-defined nanostructure for electrochemical investigations. PMID:27101361

  12. Controlled deposition of functionalized silica coated zinc oxide nano-assemblies at the air/water interface for blood cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Dewan, Srishti; Chawla, Seema; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Sumana, Gajjala; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-09-21

    We report results of the studies relating to controlled deposition of the amino-functionalized silica-coated zinc oxide (Am-Si@ZnO) nano-assemblies onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The monolayers have been deposited by transferring the spread solution of Am-Si@ZnO stearic acid prepared in chloroform at the air-water interface, at optimized pressure (16 mN/m), concentration (10 mg/ml) and temperature (23 °C). The high-resolution transmission electron microscopic studies of the Am-Si@ZnO nanocomposite reveal that the nanoparticles have a microscopic structure comprising of hexagonal assemblies of ZnO with typical dimensions of 30 nm. The surface morphology of the LB multilayer observed by scanning electron microscopy shows uniform surface of the Am-Si@ZnO film in the nanometer range (<80 nm). These electrodes have been utilized for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) detection by covalently immobilizing the amino-terminated oligonucleotide probe sequence via glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. The response studies of these fabricated electrodes carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that this Am-Si@ZnO LB film based nucleic acid sensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA (10(-6)-10(-16) M) with a detection limit of 1 × 10(-16) M. This fabricated platform is validated with clinical samples of CML positive patients and the results demonstrate its immense potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:27590542

  13. Conformational analysis of gramicidin-gramicidin interactions at the air/water interface suggests that gramicidin aggregates into tube-like structures similar as found in the gramicidin-induced hexagonal HII phase

    OpenAIRE

    Brasserua, R.; Killian, J A; Kruijff, B. de; Ruysschaert, J M

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of interaction and the type of aggregate structure in lateral assemblies of up to five gramicidin molecules in the β6.3 helical conformation at the air/water interface was calculated using conformational analysis procedures. It was found that within the aggregate two types of gramicidin interaction occur. One leading to a linear organization with a mean interaction energy between monomers of −6 kcal/mol and one in a perpendicular direction leading to a circularly organization w...

  14. DIFFUSIVE EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. (R825245)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved and gas-phase concentrations of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 46 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured at eight sites on the Chesapeake Bay at four different times of the year to estimate net diffusive air-water gas exchange rates. Gaseous PAHs ar...

  15. The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Marco; Cannicci, Stefano; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mostert, Bruce; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Giomi, Folco

    2016-01-01

    The principle of oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance in ectotherms suggests that the long-term upper limits of an organism's thermal niche are equivalent to the upper limits of the organism's functional capacity for oxygen provision to tissues. Air-breathing ectotherms show wider thermal tolerances, since they can take advantage of the higher availability of oxygen in air than in water. Bimodal species move from aquatic to aerial media and switch between habitats in response to environmental variations such as cyclical or anomalous temperature fluctuations. Here we tested the prediction that bimodal species cope better with thermal stress than truly aquatic species using the crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus as a model species. When in water, oxygen consumption rates of P. marmoratus acutely rise during warming. Beyond a temperature threshold of 23 °C the crab's aerobic metabolism in air remains lower than in water. In parallel, the haemolymph oxygen partial pressure of submerged animals progressive decreases during warming, while it remains low but constant during emersion. Our results demonstrate the ability of a bimodal breathing ectotherm to extend its thermal tolerance during air-breathing, suggesting that there are temperature-related physiological benefits during the evolution of the bimodal life style. PMID:26758742

  16. The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2016-01-13

    The principle of oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance in ectotherms suggests that the long-term upper limits of an organism\\'s thermal niche are equivalent to the upper limits of the organism\\'s functional capacity for oxygen provision to tissues. Air-breathing ectotherms show wider thermal tolerances, since they can take advantage of the higher availability of oxygen in air than in water. Bimodal species move from aquatic to aerial media and switch between habitats in response to environmental variations such as cyclical or anomalous temperature fluctuations. Here we tested the prediction that bimodal species cope better with thermal stress than truly aquatic species using the crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus as a model species. When in water, oxygen consumption rates of P. marmoratus acutely rise during warming. Beyond a temperature threshold of 23 °C the crab\\'s aerobic metabolism in air remains lower than in water. In parallel, the haemolymph oxygen partial pressure of submerged animals progressive decreases during warming, while it remains low but constant during emersion. Our results demonstrate the ability of a bimodal breathing ectotherm to extend its thermal tolerance during air-breathing, suggesting that there are temperature-related physiological benefits during the evolution of the bimodal life style.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) deposition to and exchange at the air-water interface of Luhu, an urban lake in Guangzhou, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban lakes are vulnerable to the accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds, such as PAHs from wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Little was reported on the seasonal patterns of atmospheric deposition of PAHs under Asian monsoon climate. Bulk (dry + wet) particle deposition, air-water diffusion exchange, and vapour wet deposition of PAHs in a small urban lake in Guangzhou were estimated based on a year-round monitoring. The total PAH particle deposition fluxes observed were 0.44-3.46 μg m-2 day-1. The mean air-water diffusive exchange flux was 20.7 μg m-2 day-1. The vapour deposition fluxes of PAHs ranged 0.15-8.26 μg m-2 day-1. Remarkable seasonal variations of particulate PAH deposition, air-water exchange fluxes and vapour wet deposition were influenced by seasonal changes in meteorological parameters. The deposition fluxes were predominantly controlled by the precipitation intensity in wet season whereas by atmospheric concentration in dry season. - The PAH deposition fluxes were predominantly controlled by the precipitation intensity in wet season whereas by atmospheric concentration in dry season

  18. Superposition-additive approach in the description of thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization of substituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Vasylyev, A O; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2012-12-01

    The superposition-additive approach developed previously was shown to be applicable for the calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole polarizability, molecular diamagnetic susceptibility, π-electronic ring currents, etc. In the present work, the applicability of this approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization at the water/air interface of alkanes, fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, nitriles, fatty acids (C(n)H(2n+1)X, X is the functional group) and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids (C(n)H(2n-1)COOH) is studied. Using the proposed approach the thermodynamic quantities determined agree well with the available data, either calculated using the semiempirical (PM3) quantum chemical method, or obtained in experiments. In particular, for enthalpy and Gibbs' energy of the formation of substituted alkane monomers from the elementary substances, and their absolute entropy, the standard deviations of the values calculated according to the superposition-additive scheme with the mutual superimposition domain C(n-2)H(2n-4) (n is the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain) from the results of PM3 calculations for alkanes, alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, fatty acids, nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids are respectively: 0.05, 0.004, 2.87, 0.02, 0.01, 0.77, and 0.01 kJ/mol for enthalpy; 2.32, 5.26, 4.49, 0.53, 1.22, 1.02, 5.30 J/(molK) for absolute entropy; 0.69, 1.56, 3.82, 0.15, 0.37, 0.69, 1.58 kJ/mol for Gibbs' energy, whereas the deviations from the experimental data are: 0.52, 5.75, 1.40, 1.00, 4.86 kJ/mol; 0.52, 0.63, 1.40, 6.11, 2.21 J/(molK); 2.52, 5.76, 1.58, 1.78, 4.86 kJ/mol, respectively (for nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids experimental data are not available). The proposed approach provides also quite accurate estimates of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of boiling and melting, critical temperatures and standard heat

  19. Diffusive exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface of the Patapsco River, an urbanized subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamford, H.A.; Offenberg, J.H.; Larsen, R.K.; Ko, F.C.; Baker, J.E. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Air-water exchange fluxes of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined along a transect in the Patapsco River from the Inner Harbor of Baltimore, MD, to the mainstem of the northern Chesapeake Bay. Sampling took place at six sites during three sampling intensives (June 1996, February 1997, and July 1997) and at one site every ninth day between March 1997 and March 1998 to measure spatial, daily, and annual variability in the fluxes. The direction and magnitude of the daily fluxes of individual PAHs were strongly influenced by the wind speed and direction, by the air temperature, and by the highly variable PAH concentrations in the gas and dissolved phases. Individual fluxes ranged from 14,200 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} net volatilization of fluorene during high winds to 11,400 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} net absorption of phenanthrene when prevailing winds blowing from the northwest across the city of Baltimore elevated gaseous PAH concentrations over the water. The largest PAH volatilization fluxes occurred adjacent to the stormwater discharges, driven by elevated dissolved PAH concentrations in surface waters. Estimated annual volatilization fluxes ranged from 1.1 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} for chrysene to 800 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} for fluorene.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C in spread monolayers at the air-water interface: II. Monolayers of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C and phospholipids.

    OpenAIRE

    Taneva, S; Keough, K M

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of the hydrophobic pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and DPPC:DPPG (7:3, mol:mol) in spread monolayers at the air-water interface has been studied. At low concentrations of SP-C (about 0.5 mol% or 3 weight%protein) the protein-lipid films collapsed at surface pressures of about 70 mN.m-1, comparable to those of the lipids alone. At initial protein concentrations higher than 0.8 mol%, or 4 weight...

  1. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and light-emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive di-carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and atmosphere of the marine boundary layer is discussed.

  2. Isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric air; use of a diffusion model at the water/atmosphere interface in Velenje Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Kanduč

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available CO2 concentrations (partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and isotope compositions of carbon dioxide in air (δ13CCO2, temperature (T and relative humidity (H have been measured in the atmosphere in the Velenje Basin. Samples were collected monthly in the calendar year 2011 from 9 locations in the area where the largest thermal power plant in Slovenia with the greatest emission of CO2 to the atmosphere (around 4M t/year is located. Values of pCO2 ranged from 239 to 460 ppm with an average value of 294 ppm, which is below the average atmospheric CO2 pressure (360 ppm. δ13CCO2 ranged from -18.0 to -6.4 ‰, with an average value of -11.7 ‰. These values are similar to those measured in Wroclaw, Poland. We performed the comparison of δ13CCO2 values in atmospheric air with Wroclaw since researchers used similar approach to trace δ13CCO2 around anthropogenic sources. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC in rivers and lakes from the Velenje basin changes seasonally from -13.5 to -7.1‰. The values of δ13CDIC indicate the occurrence of biogeochemical processes in the surface waters, with dissolution of carbonates and degradation of organic matter being the most important. A concentration and diffusion model was used to calculate the time of equilibration between dissolved inorganic carbon in natural sources (rivers and atmospheric CO2.

  3. Automatic Web-Based, Radio-Network System To Monitor And Control Equipment For Investigating Gas Flux At Water - Air Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Wik, M.; Beckman, P.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). Robust measurements of natural GHG emissions are vital for evaluating regional to global carbon budgets and for assessing climate feedbacks on natural emissions to improve climate models. Diffusive and ebullitive (bubble) transport are two major pathways of gas release from surface waters. To capture the high temporal variability of these fluxes in a well-defined footprint, we designed and built an inexpensive automatic device that includes an easily mobile diffusive flux chamber and a bubble counter, all in one. Besides a function of automatically collecting gas samples for subsequent various analyses in the laboratory, this device utilizes low cost CO2 sensor (SenseAir, Sweden) and CH4 sensor (Figaro, Japan) to measure GHG fluxes. To measure the spatial variability of emissions, each of the devices is equipped with an XBee module to enable a local radio communication DigiMesh network for time synchronization and data readout at a server-controller station on the lakeshore. Software of this server-controller is operated on a low cost Raspberry Pi computer which has a 3G connection for remote monitoring - controlling functions from anywhere in the world. From field studies in Abisko, Sweden in summer 2014 and 2015, the system has resulted in measurements of GHG fluxes comparable to manual methods. In addition, the deployments have shown the advantage of a low cost automatic network system to study GHG fluxes on lakes in remote locations.

  4. Modeling of Kinetics of Air Entrainment in Water Produced by Vertically Falling Water Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelė VAIDELIENĖ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the process of air entrainment in water caused by vertically falling water flow in the free water surface. The new kinetic model of air entrainment in water was developed. This model includes the process of air entrapment, as well as air removal, water sputtering and resorption. For the experimental part of this study a new method based on digital image processing was developed. Theoretical and experimental methods were used for determining air concentration and its distribution in water below the air-water interface. A new presented mathematical model of air entrainment process allows determining of air bubbles and water droplets concentrations distribution. The obtained theoretical and experimental results were in good agreement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4871

  5. Chemical physics of water-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vis, Mark; Erné, Ben H; Tromp, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A brief review is given on recent progress in experimental and theoretical investigations of the interface between coexisting aqueous phases of biopolymers. The experimental aspects are introduced using results obtained from a model system consisting of aqueous mixtures of nongelling gelatin and dextran. The focus is on the interfacial tension and interfacial electric potential (Donnan potential). These quantities are experimentally accessible and can be shown to be closely related. PMID:26746162

  6. Surface Pressure and Elasticity of Hydrophobin HFBII Layers on the Air-Water Interface: Rheology Versus Structure Detected by AFM Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanimirova, R.D.; Gurkov, T.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Balashev, K.T.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Pelan, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we combine experiments with Langmuir trough and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the reasons for the special properties of layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin spread on the airwater interface. The hydrophobin interfacial layers possess the highest surface dilatational and she

  7. Observations on the Air-Serum Interface of Milk Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Brooker, B E

    1985-01-01

    A new rapid method for the preparation of milk foams for transmission electron microscopy is described . The air-serum interface of foams made from skimmed milk consists of a uniform electron dense layer (5 nm thick) to which casein micelles become secondarily attached . Changes in bubble volume lead to the formation of folds of excess interfacial material which project into the aqueous phase. Using collapsed bubble ghosts to study the attachment of micelles to the airserum interface it was c...

  8. Rheology of asphaltene-toluene/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztukowski, Danuta M; Yarranton, Harvey W

    2005-12-01

    The stability of water-in-crude oil emulsions is frequently attributed to a rigid asphaltene film at the water/oil interface. The rheological properties of these films and their relationship to emulsion stability are ill defined. In this study, the interfacial tension, elastic modulus, and viscous modulus were measured using a drop shape analyzer for model oils consisting of asphaltenes dissolved in toluene for concentrations varying from 0.002 to 20 kg/m(3). The effects of oscillation frequency, asphaltene concentration, and interface aging time were examined. The films exhibited viscoelastic behavior. The total modulus increased as the interface aged at all asphaltene concentrations. An attempt was made to model the rheology for the full range of asphaltene concentration. The instantaneous elasticity was modeled with a surface equation of state (SEOS), and the elastic and viscous moduli, with the Lucassen-van den Tempel (LVDT) model. It was found that only the early-time data could be modeled using the SEOS-LVDT approach; that is, the instantaneous, elastic, and viscous moduli of interfaces aged for at most 10 minutes. At longer interface aging times, the SEOS-LVDT approach was invalid, likely because of irreversible adsorption of asphaltenes on the interface and the formation of a network structure. PMID:16316096

  9. Attractions between charged colloids at water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Oettel, M.; Dominguez, A; Dietrich, S.

    2005-01-01

    The effective potential between charged colloids trapped at water interfaces is analyzed. It consists of a repulsive electrostatic and an attractive capillary part which asymptotically both show dipole--like behavior. For sufficiently large colloid charges, the capillary attraction dominates at large separations. The total effective potential exhibits a minimum at intermediate separations if the Debye screening length of water and the colloid radius are of comparable size.

  10. Injection of Helium 3 and SF6 in a lake for the determination of gaseous exchange rates at the water-air interface: implementation, analysis and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the hypothesis of an under-rating of the exchange velocity at the ocean-atmosphere interface that could explain the lack of CO2 in the global CO2 balance, an experiment was carried out in two lakes at the Kerguelen Islands where strong winds are common, in order to evaluate precisely the relation between the transfer coefficient and the wind velocity: 3He and SF6 tracers were injected in the lakes; concentration evolutions were recorded and results are shown to validate the above assumption. 6 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs

  11. Air-water centrifugal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  12. The Buenos Aires water concession

    OpenAIRE

    Alcázar, Lorena; Manuel A. Abdala; Shirley, Mary M.

    2000-01-01

    The signing of a concession contract for the Buenos Aires water and sanitation system in December 1992, attracted worldwide attention, and caused considerable controversy in Argentina. It was one of the worlds largest concessions, but the case was also interesting for other reasons. The concession was implemented rapidly, in contrast with slow implementation of privatization in Santiago, for ...

  13. The apparent charge of nanoparticles trapped at a water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Roth, Joseph; Bohinc, Klemen; May, Sylvio

    2016-05-14

    Charged spherical nanoparticles trapped at the interface between water and air or water and oil exhibit repulsive electrostatic forces that contain a long-ranged dipolar and a short-ranged exponentially decaying component. The former are induced by the unscreened electrostatic field through the non-polar low-permittivity medium, and the latter result from the overlap of the diffuse ion clouds that form in the aqueous phase close to the nanoparticles. The magnitude of the long-ranged dipolar interaction is largely determined by the residual charges that remain attached to the air- (or oil-) exposed region of the nanoparticle. In the present work we address the question to what extent the charges on the water-immersed part of the nanoparticle provide an additional contribution to the dipolar interaction. To this end, we model the electrostatic properties of a spherical particle - a nanoparticle or a colloid - that partitions equatorially to the air-water interface, thereby employing nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory in the aqueous solution and accounting for the propagation of the electric field through the interior of the particle. We demonstrate that the apparent charge density on the air-exposed region of the particle, which determines the dipole potential, is influenced by the electrostatic properties in the aqueous solution. We also show that this electrostatic coupling through the particle can be reproduced qualitatively by a simple analytic planar capacitor model. Our results help to rationalize the experimentally observed weak but non-vanishing salt dependence of the forces that stabilize ordered two-dimensional arrays of interface-trapped nanoparticles or colloids. PMID:27049110

  14. Specific Na+ and K+ Cation Effects on the Interfacial Water Molecules at the Air/Aqueous Salt Solution Interfaces Probed with Non-resonant Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Hong-tao; Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hong-fei

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the polarization dependent non-resonant second harmonic generation (SHG) measurement of the interfacial water molecules at the aqueous solution of the following salts: NaF, NaCl, NaBr, KF, KCl, and KBr. Through quantitative polarization analysis of the SHG data,the orientational parameter D value and the relative surface density of the interfacial water molecules at these aqueous solution surfaces were determined. From these results we found that addition of each of the six sal...

  15. Specific Na+ and K+ Cation Effects on the Interfacial Water Molecules at the Air/Aqueous Salt Solution Interfaces Probed with Non-resonant Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Hong-tao; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hong-fei

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the polarization dependent non-resonant second harmonic generation (SHG) measurement of the interfacial water molecules at the aqueous solution of the following salts: NaF, NaCl, NaBr, KF, KCl, and KBr. Through quantitative polarization analysis of the SHG data,the orientational parameter D value and the relative surface density of the interfacial water molecules at these aqueous solution surfaces were determined. From these results we found that addition of each of the six salts caused increase of the thickness of the interfacial water layer at the surfaces to a certain extent. Noticeably, both the cations and the anions contributed to the changes, and the abilities to increase the thickness of the interfacial water layer were in the following order: KBr > NaBr > KCl > NaCl ~ NaF > KF. Since these changes can not be factorized into individual anion and cation contributions, there are possible ion pairing or association effects, especially for the NaF case. We also found that the orientational ...

  16. TPPS和Gemini表面活性剂的复合膜及其手性的研究%Supramolecular Assembly and Chirality of a Complex Film between Achiral TPPS and a Gemini Surfactant at the Air/water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 王金本; 刘鸣华

    2004-01-01

    研究了一种新的gemini表面活性剂(C 12H24-α,ω-(C12H25N+(CH3)2Br-)2,(简写为C12-C12-C12)和TPPS在气液界面上形成的复合膜及其手性.实验发现,单独C12-C12-C12不能在纯水表面形成稳定的单分子膜,但当亚相中存在TPPS时,可形成稳定的单分子膜.通过水平提拉法将复合膜转移到固体基板上,发现在适当的pH值条件下,TPPS可在复合膜中形成J-聚集体,并且发现,尽管Gemini表面活性剂和TPPS都是非手性的,TPPS的J-聚集体表现出强烈的Cotton效应.另外,gemini表面活性剂的两个正电荷中心对TPPS的J-聚集体的手性并不能表现出协同效应.%Supramolecular assembly and chirality between a novel gemini surfactant (C12H24-α, ω-(C12H25N + (CH3)2Br-)2,(abbreviated as C12-C12-C12) and TPPS (tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphine) at the air/water interface were investigated. It was found that although the gemini surfactant itself could not form a stable monolayer at the air/water interface, when there existed TPPS in the subphase, a stable complex monolayer could be formed. The complex monolayer could be transferred onto solid substrate by a horizontal lifting method. At a certain pH value of the subphase, TPPS could form a J-aggregate. It was further found that the J-aggregate of TPPS showed a strong split Cotton effect in the transferred film although both the gemini surfactant and TPPS are achiral. Further investigation through AFM measurements revealed that the nanothread formed in the transferred film was responsible for the chirality of the multilayer film. In addition, the two positive charge center of the gemini surfactant did not necessarily play the cooperative role in inducing the chirality of TPPS J-aggregate.

  17. Supramolecular nano-architectures and two-dimensional/three-dimensional aggregation of a bolaamphiphilic diacid at the air/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spreading behavior and nano-architectures of a bolaamphiphilic diacid, 1, 13-tridecandicarboxylic acid (TDA) on water surface and the subphase containing Eu(III) ion were investigated. It was found that although TDA itself could not spread on water surface, it could form an ultrathin film on the aqueous subphase containing Eu(III) ion. In addition, interesting nano-architectures were observed for the transferred film on mica surface. It was found that the formation and change of the nano-architectures were depended on the surface pressure and concentration of Eu(III) ion in the subphase. A rectangular slide morphology was observed for the film spread on an aqueous subphase containing lower concentration of Eu(III), while a walnut-like nano-architectures were observed for the film spread on a higher concentration of Eu(III) ion. Flower structure was observed at a higher surface pressure. The nano-architecture can be further regulated through mixing TDA with octadecylamine (OA) in which linear fiber nanostructure was obtained. It was revealed that while the nano-architectures were formed mainly through a three dimensional aggregation in the case of TDA/Eu(III) films, a two-dimensional aggregation occurred when TDA was mixed with OA. A series of methods such as atomic force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the supramolecular structures. A possible mechanism for the formation of these nano-architectures was discussed

  18. X-ray grazing incidence studies of the 2D crystallization of monolayers of 1-alcohols at the air water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, J.F.; Renault, A.; Konovalov, O.; Chevigny, E.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Grübel, G.; Berge, B.

    1994-01-01

    A new undulator producing an X-ray beam of high brilliance has been used at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF, Beamline-9, Troika) for investigating the structure of two-dimensional crystals of 1-tetradecanol, 1-dodecanol, 1-decanol and 1-nonanol. These fatty alcohols with...... relatively short chains crystallize in a hexagonal structure akin to that of alkanes in the Rotator II phase. The high flux obtained under grazing incidence conditions has permitted a detailed investigation to be made of the in-plane (Q(x)) and out-of-plane (Q(z)) diffraction from the monolayers. When...... chain molecules do not remain perfectly perpendicular to the water surface....

  19. The impact and bounce of air bubbles at a flat fluid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Rogerio; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-04-01

    The rise and impact of bubbles at an initially flat but deformable liquid-air interface in ultraclean liquid systems are modelled by taking into account the buoyancy force, hydrodynamic drag, inertial added mass effect and drainage of the thin film between the bubble and the interface. The bubble-surface interaction is analyzed using lubrication theory that allows for both bubble and surface deformation under a balance of normal stresses and surface tension as well as the long-range nature of deformation along the interface. The quantitative result for collision and bounce is sensitive to the impact velocity of the rising bubble. This velocity is controlled by the combined effects of interfacial tension via the Young-Laplace equation and hydrodynamic stress on the surface, which determine the deformation of the bubble. The drag force that arises from the hydrodynamic stress in turn depends on the hydrodynamic boundary conditions on the bubble surface and its shape. These interrelated factors are accounted for in a consistent manner. The model can predict the rise velocity and shape of millimeter-size bubbles in ultra-clean water, in two silicone oils of different densities and viscosities and in ethanol without any adjustable parameters. The collision and bounce of such bubbles with a flat water/air, silicone oil/air and ethanol/air interface can then be predicted with excellent agreement when compared to experimental observations. PMID:26924623

  20. Quantum chemical clarification of the alkyl chain length threshold of nonionic surfactants for monolayer formation at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2016-03-21

    A theoretical basis is provided for the experimental fact that for various surfactant classes the alkyl chain length threshold varies for the formation of condensed monolayers. The existence of the alkyl chain length threshold for a surfactant enabling the formation of monolayers is determined by the entropy increment to the Gibbs' energy, assessed by using the quantum chemical semiempiric method PM3. The value of the clusterization threshold is not stipulated by the surfactant solubility in water, rather by the electron-donor and electron-seeking properties of the head groups. These properties in turn impact the value of the solubility threshold for surfactants. The value of the clusterization threshold depends quadratically on the substituent constants, i.e. it is independent of whether the functional group is a donor or an acceptor of electrons. Rather it depends only on the donor or the acceptor 'force' of the substituent. The square-law dependence of the surface clusterization threshold of the amphiphile on the solubility threshold is evidenced. PMID:26957020

  1. Ordered supramolecular assembly of bis[3,4,12,13,21,22,30, 31-octa(dodecylthio)-2,3-naphthalocyaninato] erbium at the air/water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Ya; nli

    2001-01-01

    -type (na)phthalocyaninato and porphyrinato rare earth complexes, Polyhedron, 2000, 19:1381.[12]Jiang. J.. Kasuga, K., Dennis, P. et al., Supramolecular Photosensitive and Electroactive Materials, New York: Academic Press. 2001. 113-210.[13]Van Nostrum. C. F., Nolte, R. J. M., Functional supramolecular material: self-assembly of phthalocyanines and porphyraszines. Chem. Commun., 1996: 2385.[14]Liu. Y., Shigehara, K., Yamada, A., Purification of lutetium diphthalocyanine and electrochromism of its Langmuir-Blodgett films, Thin Solid Films, 1989, 179: 303.[15]Liu. Y.. Shigehara, K., Hara, M. et al., Electrochemistry and electrochromic behavior of Langmuir-Blodgett films of octakis-substituted rare-earth metal diphthalocyanines, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991,113: 440.[16]Jones, R., Hunter, R. A., Davidson, K., Ordered Langmuir-Blodgett films of a substituted lutetium bisphthalocyanine, Thin Solid Films,1994, 250: 249.[17]Jones, R., Krier, A., Davidosn, K., Structure electrical conductivity and electrochromism in thin film of substituted and unsubstituted lanthanide bisphthalocyanines, Thin Solid Films, 1997, 298: 228.[18]Qian, D. -J., Liu, H. -G., Jiang, J., Monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett films of (phthalocyaninato)(tetra-4-pyridylporphyrinato) cerium double-decker heteto complex, Colloids and Surfaces A, 2000,163:191.[19]Honig, E. P., Hengst, J. H. T., Engelsen, D. D., Langmuir-Blodgett deposition ratios, J. Colloid Interface Sci., 1973, 45:92.[20]Smolenyak, P., Peterson, R., Nesesny, K. et al., Highly ordered thin films of octasubstituted phthalocyanines, J. Am. Chem.Soc., 1999, 121: 8628.[21]Kasha, M., Rawls, H. R., E1-Bayoumi, M. A., The excition model in molecular spectroscopy, Pure Appl. Chem., 1965, 11: 371.[22]Fujiki, M., Tabei, H., Kurihara, T., Self-assembling features of soluble nickel phthalocyanines, J. Phys. Chem., 1988, 92:1281.[23]Osburn, E. J., Chau, L. -K., Chen, S. -Y. et al., Novel amphiphilic phthalocyanines

  2. Diurnal methane flux across water-air interface in summer in Nihe reservoir%泥河水库夏季水-气界面甲烷通量日变化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洪贤; 慈雪伦; 黄璞祎

    2012-01-01

    为研究东北地区灌溉型水库的甲烷日排放特征,试验采用静态浮箱法于2008年7月测定了泥河水库水-气界面的甲烷通量.结果发现,泥河水库夏季甲烷平均排放通量为13.48 mg/(m2·h);夜间(21:00)甲烷排放最低,日间(5:00和9:00)最高.不同时刻的甲烷通量存在显著差异(P<0.05),21:00的甲烷排放通量显著低于5:00和9:00的甲烷通量.泥河水库出水口、库中心和进水口的甲烷通量差异不显著.相关分析表明,甲烷通量与总氮存在显著正相关(P<0.05),与气温、水温、水中总有机碳、水中溶解有机碳、总磷、水深、风速、溶氧等环境因子均未达到显著相关.%In order to study diurnal methane emission of irrigated reservoir in northeast China, Static floating chamber methods were used to measure methane flux across water-air interface in Nihe reservoir in July 2008. The results indicated that the mean methane flux of Nihe reservoir was 13.48 mg/(m2 · H) in summer; the lowest emission occurred at night (21:00) and the emission peak observed at day (5:00 and 9:00). There was significant difference between different time of day (P <0.05) and the methane flux at 21:00 was significantly lower than that of at 5 :00 and 9:00. There was no significant difference in outlet, center and outlet of reservoir. Correlation analysis showed that methane flux was positive relation significantly with total nitrogen (P <0.05 ) , and there were no significant relation with other environmental factors including air temperature, water temperature, total organic carbon , dissolved organic carbon, total phosphoric, water depth, wind speed and dissolved oxygen.

  3. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.

    2010-12-16

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  4. Long term stability of immiscible ferrofluid/water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouin, Bernard; Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2010-11-01

    Recently we have demonstrated pinned-contact, coupled droplet pairs of aqueous ferrofluids in air that can form electromagnetically-activated capillary switches and oscillators. The great variety of available ferrofluids, however, enables the use of immiscible oil-based ferrofluid droplets in a water environment to obtain the same behavior. Such immersed ferrofluid oscillators exhibit natural frequencies (for 5 mm devices) of about 10 Hz. Here we report on the observation of a gradual increase in the resonant frequency of the system in time. Experimental observations suggest that the drift in the natural frequency is a consequence of changes occurring at the ferrofluid/water interface. The interfacial structure of such a complex system (water, oil, surfactant, iron particles) is examined along with its evolution in time, using various microscopy techniques.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the solution - air interface of aqueous sodium nitrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thomas, J. L.; Roeselová, Martina; Dang, L. X.; Tobias, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 16 (2007), s. 3091-3098. ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05ME798; GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE-0209719; NSF(US) CHE-0431312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : aqueous sodium nitrate * air -water interface * molecular dynamics simulation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.918, year: 2007

  6. Responses of Marine Bacteria Under Starvation Conditions at a Solid-Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, Beverley; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Marshall, Kevin C.

    1983-01-01

    Size changes during starvation of 17 marine bacterial isolates at a solid-water interface and in the liquid phase were examined. Twelve rod-shaped, hydrophilic bacteria decreased in size more rapidly at the solid surface than in the liquid phase, a result parallel to that observed previously for one of the strains at an air-water interface. On the other hand, three rod-shaped, hydrophobic bacteria diminished in size more rapidly in the liquid phase than at the solid-water interface. The rapid...

  7. Stereoselective synthesis of (2S,3S,4Z-4-fluoro-1,3-dihydroxy-2-(octadecanoylaminooctadec-4-ene, [(Z-4-fluoroceramide], and its phase behavior at the air/water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    for natural ceramide.ConclusionsAsymmetric aldol reaction proved to be successful for the preparation of enantiopure 4-fluoroceramide. Surface/pressure isotherms and hysteresis curves of ceramide and its 4-fluoro derivative showed that the presence of fluorine leads to stronger intermolecular interactions between the hydrophobic chains of neighboring molecules, and therefore to increasing stability of the monolayer of 4-fluoroceramide at the air water interface.

  8. Improving the indoor air quality using water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article briefly describes the principle of a Danish air cleaning device called the Aqua-Wall. This is a clear acrylic wall with filters and pump and liquid that ripples down the vertical wall. The liquid is cleaned water to which is added harmless chemicals that prevent bacteria and algal growth. By means of this falling water and a patent that makes the water bind microorganisms and dust particles the system cleans the air and creates a natural air humidity

  9. Adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) at the Oil/Water Interface: A Neutron Reflection Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, M; Hosking, S L; Petkov, J T; Tucker, I M; Webster, J R P; Zarbakhsh, A; Lu, J R

    2015-05-26

    The structure of the adsorbed protein layer at the oil/water interface is essential to the understanding of the role of proteins in emulsion stabilization, and it is important to glean the mechanistic events of protein adsorption at such buried interfaces. This article reports on a novel experimental methodology for probing protein adsorption at the buried oil/water interface. Neutron reflectivity was used with a carefully selected set of isotopic contrasts to study the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the hexadecane/water interface, and the results were compared to those for the air/water interface. The adsorption isotherm was determined at the isoelectric point, and the results showed that a higher degree of adsorption could be achieved at the more hydrophobic interface. The adsorbed BSA molecules formed a monolayer on the aqueous side of the interface. The molecules in this layer were partially denatured by the presence of oil, and once released from the spatial constraint by the globular framework they were free to establish more favorable interactions with the hydrophobic medium. Thus, a loose layer extending toward the oil phase was clearly observed, resulting in an overall broader interface. By analogy to the air/water interface, as the concentration of BSA increased to 1.0 mg mL(-1) a secondary layer extending toward the aqueous phase was observed, possibly resulting from the steric repulsion upon the saturation of the primary monolayer. Results clearly indicate a more compact arrangement of molecules at the oil/water interface: this must be caused by the loss of the globular structure as a consequence of the denaturing action of the hexadecane. PMID:25875917

  10. The effect of the nasopharyngeal air cavity on x-ray interface doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, W.K. [Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Hong Kong Baptist Hospital, 222 Waterloo Road, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wu, P.M.; Leung, H.T.; Lo, T.C.; Chung, C.W.; Kwong, D.L.W.; Sham, S.T. [Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy (Hong Kong)

    1998-03-01

    We investigated the impact of air cavities in head and neck cancer patients treated by photon beams based on clinical set-ups. The phantom for investigation was constructed with a cubic air cavity of 4x4x4cm{sup 3} located at the centre of a 30x30x16cm{sup 3} solid water slab. The cavity cube was used to resemble an extreme case for the nasal cavity. Apart from measuring the dose profiles and central axis percentage depth dose distribution, the dose values in 0.25x0.25x0.25cm{sup 3} voxels at regions around the air cavity were obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. A mean dose value was taken over the voxels of interest at each depth for evaluation. Single-field results were added to study parallel opposed field effects. For 10x10cm{sup 2} parallel opposed fields at 4, 6 and 8 MV, the mean dose at regions near the lateral interfaces of the cavity cube were decreased by 1 to 2% due to the lack of lateral scatter, while the mean dose near the proximal and distal interfaces was increased by 2 to 4% due to the greater transmission through air. Secondary build-up effects at points immediately beyond the air cavity cube are negligible using field sizes greater than 4x4cm{sup 2}. For most head and neck treatment, the field sizes are usually 6x6cm{sup 2} or greater, and most cavity volumes are smaller than our chosen dimensions. Therefore, the influence of closed air cavities on photon interface doses is not significant in clinical treatment set-ups. (author)

  11. The effect of the nasopharyngeal air cavity on x-ray interface doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the impact of air cavities in head and neck cancer patients treated by photon beams based on clinical set-ups. The phantom for investigation was constructed with a cubic air cavity of 4x4x4cm3 located at the centre of a 30x30x16cm3 solid water slab. The cavity cube was used to resemble an extreme case for the nasal cavity. Apart from measuring the dose profiles and central axis percentage depth dose distribution, the dose values in 0.25x0.25x0.25cm3 voxels at regions around the air cavity were obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. A mean dose value was taken over the voxels of interest at each depth for evaluation. Single-field results were added to study parallel opposed field effects. For 10x10cm2 parallel opposed fields at 4, 6 and 8 MV, the mean dose at regions near the lateral interfaces of the cavity cube were decreased by 1 to 2% due to the lack of lateral scatter, while the mean dose near the proximal and distal interfaces was increased by 2 to 4% due to the greater transmission through air. Secondary build-up effects at points immediately beyond the air cavity cube are negligible using field sizes greater than 4x4cm2. For most head and neck treatment, the field sizes are usually 6x6cm2 or greater, and most cavity volumes are smaller than our chosen dimensions. Therefore, the influence of closed air cavities on photon interface doses is not significant in clinical treatment set-ups. (author)

  12. Interference-robust Air Interface for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    new 5th Generation (5G) RAT standard is expected to support data rates greater than 10 Gbps with very low latency, very low energy consumption and provide the required scalability that will allow the network to transport a 1000 to 10000 times more mobile data traffic in 2020 than a similar network...... would do in 2010. To meet these challenging network capacity expansion requirements, the design of the new 5G RAT standard will make use of three main strategies: more antennas, more spectrum and more cells. All these strategies will have important roles in the new system, but the deployment of a...... expected gains. Due to the fundamental role of inter-cell interference in this type of networks, the inter-cell interference problem must be addressed since the beginning of the design of the new standard. This Ph.D. thesis deals with the design of an interference-robust air interface for 5G small cell...

  13. Environmental Chemistry: Air and Water Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, H. Stephen; Seager, Spencer L.

    This is a book about air and water pollution whose chapters cover the topics of air pollution--general considerations, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons and photochemical oxidants, sulfur oxides, particulates, temperature inversions and the greenhouse effect; and water pollution--general considerations, mercury, lead, detergents,…

  14. Ellipsoidal Janus Nanoparticles Assembled at Spherical Oil/Water Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luu, X-C; Striolo, A.

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium behavior of ellipsoidal Janus nanoparticles adsorbed at spherical oil/water interfaces was investigated using dissipative particle dynamics simulations. Several phenomena were documented that were not observed on similar simulations for planar oil/water interfaces. The nanoparticles were found to yield isotropic, radial nematic phases, and axial nematic domains, depending on the nanoparticle characteristics (aspect ratio and surface chemistry), particle density at the interfac...

  15. Study of the iron corrosion at the interface of different media (water, air) submitted to protons irradiation; Etude de la corrosion du fer a l'interface de differents milieux (eau, air) soumis a l'irradiation de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapuerta, S

    2005-10-15

    During the deep geological disposal, stainless steel containers of the vitrified waste will be put in carbon steel overpacks. After the closing of the storage site, overpacks will be in contact with a humid air and a radioactive medium. After hundred years, overpacks could be in contact with water radiolysis in an anoxic medium. In this context, my PhD work is a fundamental study which is the understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of pure iron under proton irradiation. This corrosion is affected by the contact of iron with different atmospheres (air, nitrogen) and water. In the case of the atmospheric iron corrosion under irradiation, we have studied the influence of the proton beam flux. During this work, we have characterized the structure of the oxides formed at the iron surface. The structure formed does not correspond to iron oxides and hydroxides indexed. However, we have shown that the oxide structure is close to that of lepidocrocite and bernalite. Moreover, we have determined the oxygen diffusion coefficient in iron under irradiation and we have shown that the irradiation accelerates of 6 orders of magnitude the iron corrosion. In addition, the irradiations which were realized in different gas have put in evidence the negligible role of nitrates, and the importance of the O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O coupling on the iron corrosion. Finally, we have shown the influence of the relative humidity, the maximum of the corrosion being observed for a relative humidity close to 45%. In the case of the iron corrosion in aqueous media under irradiation, the influence of the oxygen dissolved in water has been studied using a surface marker. We have put in evidence that the corrosion is twice more significant in aerated medium than in deaerated medium. Moreover, the influence of radicals has been shown. An irradiated sample is more corroded than a sample put in contact with a H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. Finally, the follow-up of the iron potential under irradiation have shown

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of water permeation across Nafion membrane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kevin B; Benziger, Jay B; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-07-24

    Permeation of water across the membrane/vapor and membrane/liquid-water interfaces of Nafion is studied using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, providing direct calculations of mass-transfer resistance. Water mass transfer within one nanometer of the vapor interface is shown to be 2 orders of magnitude slower than at any other point within the membrane, in qualitative agreement with permeation experiments. This interfacial resistance is much stronger than the resistance suggested by prior simulation work calculating self-diffusivity near the interface. The key difference between the prior approach and the NEMD approach is that the NEMD approach implicitly incorporates changes in solubility in the direction normal to the interface. Water is shown to be very insoluble near the vapor interface, which is rich in hydrophobic perfluorocarbon chains, in agreement with advancing contact angle experiments. Hydrophilic side chains are buried beneath this hydrophobic layer and aligned toward the interior of the membrane. Hydrophilic pores are not exposed to the vapor interface as proposed in prior theoretical work. At the membrane/liquid-water interface, highly swollen polymer chains extend into the liquid-water phase, forming a nanoscopically rough interface that is consistent with atomic force microscopy experiments. In these swollen conformations, hydrophilic side chains are exposed to the liquid-water phase, suggesting that the interface is hydrophilic, in agreement with receding contact angle experiments. The mass-transfer resistance of this interface is negligible compared to that of the bulk, in qualitative agreement with permeation experiments. The water activity at the vapor and liquid-water interfaces are nearly the same, yet large conformational and transport differences are observed, consistent with a mass-transfer-based understanding of Schroeder's paradox for Nafion. PMID:24971638

  17. ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC ENHANCED TRANSPORT AND TRAPPING OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES TO A MICROFLUIDIC AIR-LIQUID INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandström, Niklas; Frisk, Thomas; Stemme, Göran; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for greatly improved transport and trapping of airborne sample to a microfluidic analysis system by integrating an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) air pump with a microfluidic air-liquid interface. In our system, a negative corona discharge partially ionizes the air around a sharp electrode tip while the electrostatic field accelerates airborne particles towards an electrically grounded liquid surface, where they absorb. The air-liquid interface is fixated at the micro...

  18. The production of drops by the bursting of a bubble at an air liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrozes, J. S.; Ligneul, P.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism arising during the bursting of a bubble at an air-liquid interface is described. A single bubble was followed from an arbitrary depth in the liquid, up to the creation and motion of the film and jet drops. Several phenomena were involved and their relative order of magnitude was compared in order to point out the dimensionless parameters which govern each step of the motion. High-speed cinematography is employed. The characteristic bubble radius which separates the creation of jet drops from cap bursting without jet drops is expressed mathematically. The corresponding numerical value for water is 3 mm and agrees with experimental observations.

  19. The Influence of Sorbitol on the Adsorption of Surfactants at the Air-Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples; Thompson; Tucker; Penfold; Thomas; Lu

    1996-12-25

    Neutron reflection and surface tension have been used to study the adsorption of the nonionic surfactant monododecyl hexaethylene glycol (C12E6) and the mixed nonionic-anionic surfactants n-dodecyl triethylene glycol (C12E3) and Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at the air-liquid interface. Water and a sorbitol (d-glucitol, CH2OH(HCOH)4CH2OH)/water mixture were selected as the solvents. The addition of 300 g/liter of sorbitol to an aqueous solution of C12E6 reduces the critical micellar concentration, cmc, from approximately 7 x 10(-5) to approximately 3 x 10(-5) M, and increases the surface pressure at the cmc; the effect on the C12E3/SDS mixture is less. Despite these changes, the pattern of adsorption at the air-liquid interface is essentially unaltered by the addition of sorbitol, and the surface tension and neutron reflectivity data are in good agreement. The consequences of the sorbitol addition are however seen directly in the structure of the C12E6 monolayer. The ethylene oxide (EO) chain is more extended than in water, and more displaced from the solvent, consistent with dehydration of the ethylene oxide group. PMID:8978541

  20. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  1. Deposition and retention of air pollutants on vegetation and other atmospheric interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of the deposition of aerosols and gases are applied to biological and ecological problems concerning the filtering aspect of atmospheric interfaces, especially vegetation, with respect to air pollution, and also the resulting pollutant effect. In order to determine the deposition of aerosols, numerous field experiments were carried out. The deposition of gases was treated on the basis of current literature data. The experiments indicate that the deposition of aerosols on grass largely depends on aerosol diameter, dry weight per unit area and the wind velocity or turbulence of the air layer near the ground. Of the interfaces studied, namely soil without vegetation, water, filter paper, smooth and structured metals, grass, clover and trees, the latter had the greatest dust collecting capability. It is recommended that in the afforestation of areas in the close proximity of industrial regions the common beech, silver birch and Japanese larch should be taken into particular consideration due to their great deposition effectiveness with respect to dusts and their comparatively high resistance to pollutant gases. Silver birch and moreover red horse chestnut should be considered for filtering the air in urban regions because of the high aerosol deposition. (orig./HP)

  2. Nitrous oxide supersaturation at the liquid/air interface of animal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrated animal feeding operations around the globe generate large amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the surrounding atmosphere. Liquid animal waste systems have received little attention with respect to N2O emissions. We hypothesized that the solution chemistry of animal waste aqueous suspensions would promote conditions that lead to N2O supersaturation at the liquid/air interface. The concentration of dissolved N2O in poultry litter (PL) aqueous suspensions at 25 deg. C was 0.36 μg N2O mL-1, at least an order of magnitude greater than that measured in water in equilibrium with ambient air, suggesting N2O supersaturation. There was a nonlinear increase in the N2O Henry constants of PL from 2810 atm/mole fraction at 35 deg. C to 17 300 atm/mole fraction at 41 deg. C. The extremely high N2O Henry constants were partially ascribed to N2O complexation with aromatic moieties. Complexed N2O structures were unstable at temperatures > 35 deg. C, supplying the headspace with additional free N2O concentrations. - Temperature-dependent N2O supersaturation at the liquid/air interface of animal waste.

  3. Photosensitized production of functionalized and unsaturated organic compounds at the air-sea interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuraru, Raluca; Fine, Ludovic; van Pinxteren, Manuela; D'Anna, Barbara; Herrmann, Hartmut; George, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) has different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to the subsurface water, with an enrichment of organic matter i.e., dissolved organic matter including UV absorbing humic substances, fatty acids and many others. Here we present experimental evidence that dissolved organic matter, such as humic acids, when exposed to sunlight, can photosensitize the chemical conversion of linear saturated fatty acids at the air-water interface into unsaturated functionalized gas phase products (i.e. saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and acids, alkenes and dienes,…) which are known precursors of secondary organic aerosols. These functionalized molecules have previously been thought to be of biological origin, but here we demonstrate that abiotic interfacial photochemistry has the potential to produce such molecules. As the ocean is widely covered by the SML, this new understanding will impact on our ability to describe atmospheric chemistry in the marine environment.

  4. Cavity-water interface is polar

    OpenAIRE

    Friesen, Allan D.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations of the electrostatics and dynamics of water hydration shells surrounding Kihara cavities given by a Lennard-Jones (LJ) layer at the surface of a hard-sphere cavity. The local dielectric response of the hydration layer substantially exceeds that of bulk water, with the magnitude of the dielectric constant peak in the shell increasing with the growing cavity size. The polar shell propagates into bulk water to approximately the cavity radius. The s...

  5. Molecular dynamics study of the water/n-alkane interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations on the interface between liquid water and liquid n-alkane (including octane, nonane, decane, undecane and dodecane) have been performed with the purpose to study the interfacial properties: (Ⅰ) density profile; (Ⅱ) molecular orientation; (Ⅲ) interfacial tension and the temperature effect on the interfacial tension. Simulation results show that at the interface the structures of both water and n-alkane are different from those in the bulk. Water has an orientational preference due to the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule maximized. N-alkane has a more lateral orientation with respect to the interface in order to be in close contact with water. The calculated individual phase bulk density and interfacial tension of water/n-alkane systems are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones.

  6. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone. PMID:24930493

  7. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  8. The Influence of Air Cavity on Interface Doses for Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Bum; Kwon, Young Ho; Chung, Se Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, You Hyun [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Junior College of Allied Health Sciences Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-15

    When a high energy photon beam is used to treat lesions located in the upper respiratory air passages or in maxillary sinus, the beams often must traverse an air cavity before it reaches the lesion. Because of this traversal of air, it is not clear that the surface layers of the lesion forming the air-tumor tissue interface will be in a state of near electronic equilibrium; if they are not, underdosing of these layers could result. Although dose corrections at large distances beyond an air cavity are accountable by attenuation differences, perturbations at air-tissue interfaces are complex to measure or calculate. This problem has been investigated for 4 MV and 10 MV X-ray beams which are becoming widely available for radiotherapy with linear accelerator. Markus chamber was used for measurement with various air cavity geometries in X-ray beams. Underdosing effects occur at both the distal and proximal air cavity interface. The magnitude depended on geometry, energy, field sizes and distance from the air-tissue interfaces. As the cavity thickness increased, the central axis dose at the distal interface decreased. Increasing field size remedied the underdosing, as did the introduction of lateral walls. Following a 20 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3} air cavity, 4 x 4 cm field there was an 11.5% and 13% underdose at the distal interface, while a 20 x 20 x 2 cm{sup 3} air cavity yield a 24% and 29% loss for the 4 MV and 10 MV beams, respectively. The losses were slightly larger for the 10 MV beams. The measurements reported here can be used to guide the development of new calculation models under non-equilibrium conditions. This situation is of clinical concern when lesions such as larynx and maxillary carcinoma beyond air cavities are irradiated.

  9. Development of a Bench-Top Air-to-Water Heat Pump Experimental Apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    H. I. Abu-Mulaweh

    2009-01-01

    A bench-top air-to-water heat pump experimental apparatus was designed,developed, and constructed for instructional and demonstrative purposes. Thisair-to-water heat pump experimental apparatus is capable of demonstratingthermodynamics and heat transfer concepts and principles. This heat pumpexperimental setup was designed around the vapor compression refrigerationcycle. This experimental apparatus has an intuitive user interface, reliable, safefor student use, and portable. The interface is ...

  10. Interfacial nanobubbles are leaky: permeability of the gas/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Sean R; Wu, Xi; An, Hongjie; Craig, Vincent S J; Mega, Tony L; Zhang, Xuehua

    2014-06-24

    Currently there is no widespread agreement on an explanation for the stability of surface nanobubbles. One means by which several explanations can be differentiated is through the predictions they make about the degree of permeability of the gas-solution interface. Here we test the hypothesis that the gas-solution interface of surface nanobubbles is permeable by experimental measurements of the exchange of carbon dioxide. We present measurements by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), demonstrating that the gas inside surface nanobubbles is not sealed inside the bubbles, but rather exchanges with the dissolved gas in the liquid phase. Such gas transfer is measurable by using the infrared active gas CO2. We find that bubbles formed in air-saturated water that is then perfused with CO2-saturated water give rise to distinctive gaseous CO2 signals in ATR-FTIR measurements. Also the CO2 gas inside nanobubbles quickly dissolves into the surrounding air-saturated water. AFM images before and after fluid exchange show that CO2 bubbles shrink upon exposure to air-equilibrated liquid but remain stable for hours. Also air bubbles in contact with CO2-saturated water increase in size and Ostwald ripening occurs more rapidly due to the relatively high gas solubility of CO2 in water. PMID:24863586

  11. Penguin vision in air and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, H C; Sivak, J G

    1984-01-01

    Refractive states measured by retinoscopy and photorefraction indicate that rockhopper (Eudyptes crestatus), Magellanic (Spheniscus magellanicus) and gentoo (Pygoscelis papua) penguins are approximately emmetropic in air and water. Extensive myopia in air, as predicted by early authors, is nonexistent. Photorefractive measurements of refractive state in water indicate that rockhopper, gentoo, Magellanic and king (Aptenodytes patagonica) penguins can accommodate sufficiently to make up for the loss of refractive power of the cornea. Corneas of rockhopper and Megellanic penguins are flattened relative to the overall size of the eye. This feature minimizes the optical effect of submergence. PMID:6534014

  12. 77 FR 9625 - Presentation of Final Conventional Conformance Test Criteria and Common Air Interface (CAI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Presentation of Final Conventional Conformance Test Criteria and Common Air Interface (CAI) Features/Functionalities Under Test in the Project 25...

  13. INFLUENCE OF FILLING WATER ON AIR CONCENTRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-hua; MA Fei; DAI Hui-chao

    2011-01-01

    The filling water inside the cavity below an aerator occurs for the flow of low Froude number or the small bottom slope of a spillway.The aerator may cease to protect against cavitation damages,and may even act as a generator of cavitation if it is fully filled by water.The experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of the geometric parameters,and then the filling water on the air concentration.The results show that the filling water,or the net cavity length,is closely related to the plunging jet length for a given aerator,and the air concentration at some section is proportional to the ratio Ln/Lj at a fixed Lj for different geometric parameters of aerators.Secondly,at the same ratio of Ln / Lj,the aerator with a larger height or a larger angle of ramp,or a larger bottom slope,would have a larger plunging jet length,and then a larger net cavity length based on the ratio of Ln / Lj.As a result,the large space of cavity,or the high air concentration of the flow could be obtained although the filling water increases also based on the fact that Lf=Lj- Ln.It is the space of the cavity that is the dominant factor to affect the air concentration of the flow.

  14. Water Intercalation for Seamless, Electrically Insulating, and Thermally Transparent Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-27

    The interface between functional nanostructures and host substrates is of pivotal importance in the design of their nanoelectronic applications because it conveys energy and information between the device and environment. We report here an interface-engineering approach to establish a seamless, electrically insulating, while thermally transparent interface between graphene and metal substrates by introducing water intercalation. Molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles calculations are performed to demonstrate this concept of design, showing that the presence of the interfacial water layer helps to unfold wrinkles formed in the graphene membrane, insulate the electronic coupling between graphene and the substrate, and elevate the interfacial thermal conductance. The findings here lay the ground for a new class of nanoelectronic setups through interface engineering, which could lead to significant improvement in the performance of nanodevices, such as the field-effect transistors. PMID:26720217

  15. Combined air and water pollution control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Billy C. (Inventor); Jarrell, Lamont (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A bioaquatic air pollution control system for controlling both water and atmospheric pollution is disclosed. The pollution control system includes an exhaust for directing polluted gases out of a furnace and a fluid circulating system which circulates fluid, such as waste water, from a source, past the furnace where the fluid flow entrains the pollutants from the furnace. The combined fluid and pollutants are then directed through a rock/plant/microbial filtering system. A suction pump pumps the treated waste water from the filter system past the exhaust to again entrain more pollutants from the furnace where they are combined with the fluid (waste water) and directed to the filter system.

  16. Unitary water-to-air heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1977-10-01

    Performance and cost functions for nine unitary water-to-air heat pumps ranging in nominal size from /sup 1///sub 2/ to 26 tons are presented in mathematical form for easy use in heat pump computer simulations. COPs at nominal water source temperature of 60/sup 0/F range from 2.5 to 3.4 during the heating cycle; during the cooling cycle EERs range from 8.33 to 9.09 with 85/sup 0/F entering water source temperatures. The COP and EER values do not include water source pumping power or any energy requirements associated with a central heat source and heat rejection equipment.

  17. Large capacity water and air bath calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EG and G Mound Applied Technologies has developed an 11 in. x 17 in. sample size water bath and an 11 in. x 17 in. sample size air bath calorimeter which both function under servo control mode of operation. The water bath calorimeter has four air bath preconditioners to increase sample throughput and the air bath calorimeter has two air bath preconditioners. The large capacity calorimeters and preconditioners were unique to Mound design which brought about unique design challenges. Both large capacity systems calculate the optimum set temperature for each preconditioner which is available to the operator. Each system is controlled by a personal computer under DOS which allows the operator to download data to commercial software packages when the calorimeter is idle. Qualification testing yielded a one standard deviation of 0.6% for 0.2W to 3.0W Pu-238 heat standard range in the water bath calorimeter and a one standard deviation of 0.3% for the 6.0W to 20.0W Pu-238 heat standard range in the air bath calorimeter

  18. Determining Water Fluxes Across Surface Water/Groundwater Interfaces Using Temperature Data and Numerical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, B. J.; Boutt, D. F.

    2007-12-01

    Daily water releases from an upstream dam on the Deerfield River create significant differences in stage of up to .5 meters. These differences cause the river to change from a gaining stream to a losing stream on a daily basis. In this study, we use Thermochron iButtons to measure changes in groundwater temperature to assess water fluxes between the river and surficial aquifer. The causes for the temperature changes observed in the groundwater are (1) diurnal heating of surface water as air temperatures increase, and (2) changes in temperature caused by an influx of reservoir water from dam releases. We deploy a pressure transducer with iButtons which are inserted into the riverbed and riverbank at 10 cm intervals to create thermal cross sections. To account for heterogeneity in the riverbed material, the iButtons are installed along three cross section lines. One line is in coarse sand and gravel, another is in sand and silt, and the third, which is the control, is on an unregulated river that flows into the Deerfield. The control, which is downstream of the first two sites, only experiences temperature variations caused by diurnal air temperature changes. The temperature data are used to calibrate coupled numerical models of groundwater flow and heat transport. Through these models we can derive hydraulic conductivity estimates of the riverbed material, groundwater velocities during release events, and water fluxes across the surface water-groundwater interface. Groundwater velocity and flux estimates are useful for evaluating mass transport mechanisms and nutrient cycling in the near stream environment.

  19. SPECIATION OF HEAVY METALS AT WATER-SEDIMENT INTERFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Ferronato; Livia Vittori Antisari; Monica Marianna Modesto; Gilmo Vianello

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to understand the equilibrium relationship between the heavy metals concentrations in superficial water and pore water. At  water-sediment interface, the equilibrium rapidly changed and it is influenced by chemico-physical parameters of aquatic ecosystems. The hydraulic safety of Bologna plain (North Italy) depends on network of artificial canals and they are related with natural rivers of Reno basin (Reno river and its tributaries). The natural and artificial w...

  20. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  1. Effect of pool turbulence on direct contact condensation at a steam/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of direct contact condensation beat transfer have been made for the case where the process takes place at the horizontal interface between saturated steam and a pool of water in a vertical cylindrical test section. A submerged vertical jet of subcooled water was injected upwards on the axis to promote the condensation and water was withdrawn at the same rate from the bottom of the pool. In conjunction with the above study, measurements of the turbulent velocity fluctuations just below a free surface produced by the injection of a vertical submerged jet have been measured using hot film anemometry on an isothermal air-water test facility of similar geometry for similar flow conditions at ambient temperature. A correlation is proposed in terms of a Stanton number based on turbulent velocity fluctuation near the interface on the liquid-side. Our results are in good agreement with those of others for similar configurations when compared in terms of condensation Stanton number. (author)

  2. Temporal variability of CO₂ fluxes at the sediment-air interface in mangroves (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Audrey; Marchand, Cyril; Deborde, Jonathan; Allenbach, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Carbon budgets in mangrove forests are uncertain mainly due to the lack of data concerning carbon export in dissolved and gaseous forms. Temporal variability of in situ CO2 fluxes was investigated at the sediment-air interface in different seasons in different mangrove stands in a semi-arid climate. Fluxes were measured using dynamic closed incubation chambers (transparent and opaque) connected to an infra-red gas analyzer. Microclimatic conditions and chl-a contents of surface sediments were determined. Over all mangrove stands, CO2 fluxes on intact sediments were relatively low, ranging from -3.93 to 8.85 mmolCO₂·m(-2)·h(-1) in the light and in the dark, respectively. Changes in the fluxes over time appeared to depend to a great extent on the development of the biofilm at the sediment surface. We suggest that in intact sediments and in the dark, CO2 fluxes measured at the sediment-air interface rather reflect the metabolism of benthic organisms than sediment respiration (heterotrophic and autotrophic). However, without the biofilm, sediment water content and air temperature were main drivers of seasonal differences in CO2 fluxes, and their influence differed depending on the intertidal location of the stand. After removal of the biofilm, Q10 values in the Avicennia and the Rhizophora stands were 1.84 and 2.1, respectively, revealing the sensitivity of mangrove sediments to an increase in temperature. This study provides evidence that, if the influence of the biofilm is not taken into account, the in situ CO2 emission data currently used to calculate the budget will lead to underestimation of CO2 production linked to heterotrophic respiration fueled by organic matter detritus from the mangrove. PMID:25302449

  3. The Role of Wind Waves in Dynamics of the Air-Sea Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Polnikov, Vladislav G

    2010-01-01

    Wind waves are considered as an intermediate small-scale dynamic process at the air-sea interface,which modulates radically middle-scale dynamic processes of the boundary layers in water and air. It is shown that with the aim of a quantitative description of the impact said, one can use the numerical wind wave models which are added with the blocks of the dynamic atmosphere boundary layer (DABL) and the dynamic water upper layer (DWUL). A mathematical formalization for the problem of energy and momentum transfer from the wind to the upper ocean is given on the basis of the well known mathematical representations for mechanisms of a wind wave spectrum evolution. The problem is solved quantitatively by means of introducing special system parameters: the relative rate of the wave energy input, IRE, and the relative rate of the wave energy dissipation, DRE. For two simple wave-origin situations, the certain estimations for values of IRE and DRE are found, and the examples of calculating an impact of a wind sea on...

  4. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-07-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 mm square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3 . Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ } ) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  5. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  6. Interactions of anesthetics with the membrane-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Cieplak, P.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the potency of conventional anesthetics correlates with lipophilicity, an affinity to water also is essential. It was recently found that compounds with very low affinities to water do not produce anesthesia regardless of their lipophilicity. This finding implies that clinical anesthesia might arise because of interactions at molecular sites near the interface of neuronal membranes with the aqueous environment and, therefore, might require increased concentrations of anesthetic molecules at membrane interfaces. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we calculated in molecular dynamics simulations the free energy profiles for the transfer of anesthetic 1,1,2-trifluoroethane and nonanesthetic perfluoroethane across water-membrane and water-hexane interfaces. Consistent with the hypothesis, it was found that trifluoroethane, but not perfluoroethane, exhibits a free energy minimum and, therefore, increased concentrations at both interfaces. The transfer of trifluoroethane from water to the nonpolar hexane or interior of the membrane is accompanied by a considerable, solvent-induced shift in the conformational equilibrium around the C-C bond.

  7. Melittin at a membrane/water interface: Effects on water orientation and water penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Michal; Becker, Oren M.

    1999-11-01

    Melittin, a small peptide found in bee venom, is known to induce membrane lysis. A molecular dynamics simulation of melittin embedded in a hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer is analyzed in order to study the peptide's effect on water molecules at the membrane/water interface. The peptide, with a protonated N-terminus, was embedded in a trans-bilayer orientation. The simulation highlights the microscopic mechanism by which melittin induces the formation of transmembrane water "pores," leading to membrane lysis. It was found that melittin has a profound effect on the behavior of the water molecules at the membrane/water interface. It modifies the orientation of the water dipoles and induces water penetration into the bilayer. In fact, melittin's residue Lys-7 and its protonated N-terminus facilitate the formation of transmembrane water pores by steering water penetration from both sides of the bilayer. The initial step towards pore formation takes about 200 ps, and the process relays on melittin's bent conformation and tilted orientation. A large body of experimental observations supports the simulation results and the suggested microscopic mechanism.

  8. The critical crossover at the n-hexane-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to estimates of the parameters of the critical crossover in monolayers of long-chain alcohol molecules adsorbed at the n-hexane-water interface, all systems in which this phenomenon is observed are characterized by the same value of the critical exponent ν ∼ 1.8.

  9. Local order of liquid water at the electrochemical interface

    CERN Document Server

    Pedroza, Luana S; Fernández-Serra, M -V

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure and dynamics of liquid water in contact with Pd and Au (111) surfaces using \\emph{ab initio} molecular dynamics simulations with and without van der Waals interactions. Our results show that the structure of water at the interface of these two metals is very different. For Pd, we observe the formation of two different domains of preferred orientations, with opposite net interfacial dipoles. One of these two domains has a large degree of in-plane hexagonal order. For Au a single domain exists with no in-plane order. For both metals, the structure of liquid water at the interface is strongly dependent on the use of dispersion forces. The origin of the structural domains observed in Pd is associated to the interplay between water/water and water/metal interactions. This effect is strongly dependent on the charge transfer that occurs at the interface, and which is not modeled by current state of the art semi-empirical force fields.

  10. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  11. Anomalous Effects in Air While Cooling Water

    CERN Document Server

    Sardo, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Water is a unique compound with many anomalies and properties not fully understood. Designing an experiment in the laboratory to study such anomalies, we set up a series of experiments where a tube was placed inside a sealed container with thermocouples attached to the outer surface of the tube and in the air adjacent to the tube. Alternately, deionized water and other compounds were added to the tube and cooled to freezing. Several of the thermocouples suspended in the air and adjacent to the tube showed thermal oscillations as the overall temperature of the container was decreasing. The temperature of the thermocouples increased and decreased in a sinusoidal way during part of the cool down to freezing. Thermal oscillations as large as 3 degrees Celsius were recorded with typical frequencies of about 5 oscillations per minute.

  12. Air entrainment into annular water flows in a vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental investigation was carried out on air entrainment into water flowing downward in a vertical pipe. Local flow rates of water and air in a fluid layer of annular flow, formed on the pipe wall, were measured precisely by using a small tube probe. Measurements were also made of local flow rates of water and air in bubbly flow downstream of annular water flow. Distributions of local flow rates in the radial direction of the pipe for annular flow regime indicate that the fluid layer consists of a water layer adjacent to the pipe wall and a water-air (two-phase fluid) layer located inside of the water layer. The water-air layer is formed as a result of air entrainment. The departure of air bubbles from a water pool to air phase was found for bubbly flow regime. (author)

  13. Conjugated polymelectrolyte assembly at water-oil interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Huang, Caili; Thomas, Russell; Russell Team

    Conjugated polyelectrolytes featured with conjugated backbone and functional side chains are interesting optoelectronic materials and widely used to modify electrodes in electronic devices such as light emitting diodes and solar cells to enhance device performance. Conjugated polyelectrolyte can be designed to have alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic side chains, and thus inducing interesting surface and interface properties. In this work, we using polyfluorene based material, to study its behavior at water-toluene interface. The aliphatic side-chains will favorably interact with toluene, and amine side-chains will interact with water, making this material a good surfactant. At interface the polymer chain is stretched to a Janus type of geometry. Flattened molecules will assemble into ultra thin films via pi-pi intermolecular stacking, and thus creating barriers between liquids. When liquid volume is reduced, jamming at interface will show up. These properties are strongly affected by the environment of the liquids, such as temperature and PH values, and polyelectrolyte diffusion to interfaces. This study leads to new methods to structure liquids using single component, which can be extended to applications such as electro-spinning or fabricate flow devices.

  14. Air-Water Gas Exchange in Wetland Water Columns Due To Wind and Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a parameterization of the air-water gas transfer rate in wetlands, and do so in terms of easily measured environmental variables. This parameterization is intended to support biogeochemical modeling in wetlands by providing an interfacial flux of key importance. Our approach uses laboratory experiments describe the oxygen transfer across an air-water interface in a model wetland. The oxygen transfer is sensitive to the externally imposed wind, vegetation characteristics, and vertical thermal convection. We vary these systematically, determining the gas transfer (or "piston") velocity that describes interfacial gas flux. We measure velocity vector fields near the air-water interface using particle image velocimetry, and use these measurements to help explain the mechanisms behind the measured trends in oxygen transfer. The explanatory power of these measurements includes the relationship between plant geometry and surface divergence. We explore the potential impact of our results on wetland modeling and management, for issues such as carbon sequestration and methane emission.

  15. Nitrous oxide supersaturation at the liquid/air interface of animal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Andra, Syam S; Hardy, Michael; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali; Bach, Stephan B H; Mullens, Conor P

    2009-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations around the globe generate large amounts of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in the surrounding atmosphere. Liquid animal waste systems have received little attention with respect to N(2)O emissions. We hypothesized that the solution chemistry of animal waste aqueous suspensions would promote conditions that lead to N(2)O supersaturation at the liquid/air interface. The concentration of dissolved N(2)O in poultry litter (PL) aqueous suspensions at 25 degrees C was 0.36 microg N(2)O mL(-1), at least an order of magnitude greater than that measured in water in equilibrium with ambient air, suggesting N(2)O supersaturation. There was a nonlinear increase in the N(2)O Henry constants of PL from 2810 atm/mole fraction at 35 degrees C to 17 300 atm/mole fraction at 41 degrees C. The extremely high N(2)O Henry constants were partially ascribed to N(2)O complexation with aromatic moieties. Complexed N(2)O structures were unstable at temperatures > 35 degrees C, supplying the headspace with additional free N(2)O concentrations. PMID:19573962

  16. A theoretical remark about waves on a static water surface beneath a layer of moving air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, T.; Hayashi, R.; Yasutomi, Z.

    1990-12-01

    Grundy and Tuck (1987) treat the problem of large-amplitude waves on an air-water interface where the air is a steady nonuniform flow and the water is stationary. Both periodic nonlinear Stokes-like waves far downstream and a configuration of the water surface from the edge region of a hovercraft were computed. However, there is no work that treats the existence of such Stokes-like waves theoretically. The present work aims to prove the existence of such solutions in the case where the cushion pressure is low, that is, the depression at the upstream stagnation point from the mean water level is small.

  17. SWAN: An expert system with natural language interface for tactical air capability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    SWAN is an expert system and natural language interface for assessing the war fighting capability of Air Force units in Europe. The expert system is an object oriented knowledge based simulation with an alternate worlds facility for performing what-if excursions. Responses from the system take the form of generated text, tables, or graphs. The natural language interface is an expert system in its own right, with a knowledge base and rules which understand how to access external databases, models, or expert systems. The distinguishing feature of the Air Force expert system is its use of meta-knowledge to generate explanations in the frame and procedure based environment.

  18. Adsorption of diatoms at the oil-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathollahi, Niloofar; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Statistically robust experimental observations on 3D trajectory of diatoms approaching an oil-water interface is crucial for understanding sorption mechanisms of active particles, and interfacial rheology with over-arching implications in interfacial dynamics, droplet break and coalescence. Digital Holographic Cinematography is utilized to measure 3-D trajectories of diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudomona and T. weissflogii and simultaneously track the interface. Experiments are conducted in a 300 × 100 × 100 mm chamber containing 32 ppt artificial seawater. A stationary pendant drop is created on the tip of a needle located at the center of the chamber. Three oil samples, Louisiana crude, hexadecane, and mineral oil, are used. Diatoms are injected at a height above the drop with a negligible velocity, where Diatom precipitates freely on its excess weight. Holograms of diatom and drop are recorded at 5 fps with a magnification of 1.3X and are streamed in real time allowing for long-term study of sorption onto a slowly aging interface. A novel autofocus algorithm enables us to determine 3D locations within an uncertainty of 0.05 particle diameter. This allows us to perform super-resolution measurement to determine the effects of location and orientation of diatoms on the adsorption rate at the oil-water interface. Funded by GoMRI.

  19. Protein denaturation by combined effect of shear and air-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1997-06-20

    The effect of shear alone on the aggregation of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) has been found to be insignificant. This study focused on the synergetic effect of shear and gas-liquid interface on these two model proteins. Two shearing systems, the concentric-cylinder shear device (CCSD) and the rotor/stator homogenizer, were used to generate high shear (> 10(6)) in aqueous solutions in the presence of air. High shear in the presence of an air-liquid interface had no major effect on rhDNase but caused rhGH to form noncovalent aggregates. rhGH aggregation was induced by the air-liquid interface and was found to increase with increasing protein concentration and the air-liquid interfacial area. The aggregation was irreversible and exhibited a first-order kinetics with respect to the protein concentration and air-liquid interfacial area. Shear and shear rate enhanced the interaction because of its continuous generation of new air-liquid interfaces. In the presence of a surfactant, aggregation could be delayed or prevented depending upon the type and the concentration of the surfactant. The effect of air-liquid interface on proteins at low shear was examined using a nitrogen bubbling method. We found that foaming is very detrimental to rhGH even though the shear involved is low. The use of anti-foaming materials could prevent rhGH aggregation during bubbling. The superior stability exhibited by rhDNase may be linked to the higher surface tension and lower foaming tendency of its aqueous solution. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 54: 503-512, 1997. PMID:18636406

  20. Molecular Simulations of Halomethanes at the Air/Ice Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Habartová, Alena; Hormain, L.; Pluhařová, Eva; Briquez, S.; Monnerville, M.; Toubin, C.; Roeselová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 39 (2015), s. 10052-10059. ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06181S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics simulations * water models * ice Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2014

  1. Bacterial Adhesion to Hexadecane (Model NAPL)-Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, S.; Zoueki, C. R.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    The rates of biodegradation of NAPLs have been shown to be influenced by the adhesion of hydrocarbon- degrading microorganisms as well as their proximity to the NAPL-water interface. Several studies provide evidence for bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation at alkane- or crude oil-water interfaces, but there is a significant knowledge gap in our understanding of the processes that influence initial adhesion of bacteria on to NAPL-water interfaces. In this study bacterial adhesion to hexadecane, and a series of NAPLs comprised of hexadecane amended with toluene, and/or with asphaltenes and resins, which are the surface active fractions of crude oils, were examined using a Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The microorganisms employed were Mycobacterium kubicae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida, which are hydrocarbon degraders or soil microorganisms. MATH assays as well as electrophoretic mobility measurements of the bacterial cells and the NAPL droplet surfaces in aqueous solutions were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7). Asphaltenes and resins were shown to generally decrease microbial adhesion. Results of the MATH assay were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria- hydrocarbon interactions based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) model of free energy of interaction between the cell and NAPL droplets. In this model the free energy of interaction between two colloidal particles is predicted based on electrical double layer, van der Waals and hydrophobic forces. It is likely that the steric repulsion between bacteria and NAPL surfaces, caused by biopolymers on bacterial surfaces and aphaltenes and resins at the NAPL-water interface contributed to the decreased adhesion compared to that predicted by the XDLVO model.

  2. Molecular Threading: Mechanical Extraction, Stretching and Placement of DNA Molecules from a Liquid-Air Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Andrew C.; Andregg, Michael; Kemmish, Kent; Hamalainen, Mark; Bowell, Charlotte; Bleloch, Andrew; Klejwa, Nathan; Lehrach, Wolfgang; Schatz, Ken; Stark, Heather; Marblestone, Adam; Church, George; Own, Christopher S.; Andregg, William

    2013-01-01

    We present “molecular threading”, a surface independent tip-based method for stretching and depositing single and double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA is stretched into air at a liquid-air interface, and can be subsequently deposited onto a dry substrate isolated from solution. The design of an apparatus used for molecular threading is presented, and fluorescence and electron microscopies are used to characterize the angular distribution, straightness, and reproducibility of stretched DNA depos...

  3. SPECIATION OF HEAVY METALS AT WATER-SEDIMENT INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Ferronato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to understand the equilibrium relationship between the heavy metals concentrations in superficial water and pore water. At  water-sediment interface, the equilibrium rapidly changed and it is influenced by chemico-physical parameters of aquatic ecosystems. The hydraulic safety of Bologna plain (North Italy depends on network of artificial canals and they are related with natural rivers of Reno basin (Reno river and its tributaries. The natural and artificial water courses flowed in agricultural, urban and industrial land. The heavy metals concentration in water and sediment discriminated the human pressure on the land and their spatial distribution in sediment could predict the hazard of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. We compared the heavy metals concentrations in pore water and superficial water determined in natural rivers and artificial canals, and more pollution in artificial canals than natural rivers was found. Furthermore, the coefficient of partition (log Kd between water and sediments was calculated to evaluate the bioavailability of heavy metals adsorbed on the sediments. The heavy metals extracted in deionised water at equilibrium after 16 h showed higher concentrations than those determined directly on water samples.

  4. Air-water countercurrent annular flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathan, D.

    1979-09-01

    Countercurrent annular flow of air and water in circular tubes of diameters ranging from 6.4 to 152 mm is investigated. Experimental measurements include liquid fraction, pressure gradients and countercurrent gas and liquid fluxes. Influences of tube end geometries on the countercurrent fluxes are isolated. Analogies between countercurrent flow, open channel flow, and compressible flow are established. Interfacial momentum transfer between the phases are characterized by empirical friction factors. The dependence of interfacial friction factors on tube diameter is shown to yield a basis for extending the present results to larger tubes.

  5. Photodetoxification and purification of water and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Blake, D.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The scope of interest in this section is basic research in photochemistry that can remove barriers to the development of photochemical technologies for the removal of hazardous chemicals from contaminated air or water (photodetoxification). Photochemistry is be broadly interpreted to include direct photochemistry, indirect photochemistry (sensitized and photocatalytic), photochemistry of species adsorbed on inert surfaces, and complementary effects of high energy radiation photons and particles. These may occur in either homogeneous or heterogeneous media. The photon source may span the range from ionizing radiation to the near infrared.

  6. Air-water countercurrent annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countercurrent annular flow of air and water in circular tubes of diameters ranging from 6.4 to 152 mm is investigated. Experimental measurements include liquid fraction, pressure gradients and countercurrent gas and liquid fluxes. Influences of tube end geometries on the countercurrent fluxes are isolated. Analogies between countercurrent flow, open channel flow, and compressible flow are established. Interfacial momentum transfer between the phases are characterized by empirical friction factors. The dependence of interfacial friction factors on tube diameter is shown to yield a basis for extending the present results to larger tubes

  7. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.;

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  8. Design and Implementation of a Single-Frequency Mesh Network Using OpenAirInterface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltenberger Florian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OpenAirInterface is an experimental open-source real-time hardware and software platform for experimentation in wireless communications and signal processing. With the help of OpenAirInterface, researchers can demonstrate novel ideas quickly and verify them in a realistic environment. Its current implementation provides a full open-source software modem comprising physical and link layer functionalities for cellular and mesh network topologies. The physical (PHY layer of the platform targets fourth generation wireless networks and thus uses orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA together with multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO techniques. The current hardware supports 5 MHz bandwidth and two transmit/receive antennas. The media access (MAC layer of the platform supports an abundant two-way signaling for enabling collaboration, scheduling protocols, as well as traffic and channel measurements. In this paper, we focus on the mesh topology and show how to implement a single-frequency mesh network with OpenAirInterface. The key ingredients to enable such a network are a dual-stream MIMO receiver structure and a distributed network synchronization algorithm. We show how to implement these two algorithms in real-time on the OpenAirInterface platform. Further more, we provide results from field trials and compare them to the simulation results.

  9. An exploratory study of the human-machine interface for controlling Maritime Unmanned Air Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breda, L. van

    1995-01-01

    Under contract by the Royal Netherlands Navy an exploratory study was conducted on the design of the user interface for Maritime Unmanned Air Vehicles (MUAVs) control. The goal of this study was to gain more insight into the various parameters that may influence system performance, given the present

  10. Interference-Robust Air Interface for 5G Ultra-dense Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Mahmood, Nurul Huda;

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-dense deployment of small cells is foreseen as the solution to cope with the exponential increase of the data rate demand targeted by the 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology. In this article, we propose an interference-robust air interface built upon the usage of advanced receivers...

  11. An open loop equilibrator for continuous monitoring of radon at the groundwater-surface water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous monitoring system (CMS) using an open loop equilibrator for assessment of 222Rn at the groundwater-surface water interface was developed and tested. For the characterization and validation of the system, three air loops (open loop, closed loop, and open bubble loop) were tested in relation to high and precise count rates, rapid response, and equilibration of radon. The water and air stream is fed to the equilibrator by an experimental setup with a commercial submersible water pump and the internal pump with built-in radon-in-air detector. Efficiency calibration of the CMS is done by simultaneous determination of a groundwater sample using liquid scintillation counting, and the RAD7 accessories RAD-H2O, BigBottle RAD-H2O. The higher count rates are provided by the closed loop. However, the open loop with bubbler (open bubble loop) provides the best precision count rates, rapid response, and equilibration time. The CMS allows radon determination in discrete water samples as well as continuous water streams. (author)

  12. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  13. Computational study of effect of water finger on ion transport through water-oil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Nobuaki; Wang, Lingjian; Morita, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    When an ion transports from water to oil through water-oil interface, it accompanies hydrated water molecules and transiently forms a chain of water, called "water finger." We thoroughly investigated the role of the water finger in chloride ion transport through water-dichloromethane interface by using molecular dynamics technique. We developed a proper coordinate w to describe the water finger structure and calculated the free energy landscape and the friction for the ion transport as a function of ion position z and the water finger coordinate w. It is clearly shown that the formation and break of water finger accompanies an activation barrier for the ion transport, which has been overlooked in the conventional free energy curve along the ion position z. The present analysis of the friction does not support the hypothesis of augmented local friction (reduced local diffusion coefficient) at the interface. These results mean that the experimentally observed rate constants of interfacial ion transfer are reduced from the diffusion-limited one because of the activation barrier associated to the water finger, not the anomalous local diffusion. We also found that the nascent ion just after the break of water finger has excessive hydration water than that in the oil phase.

  14. Testing and Performance Analysis on Air Conditioner cum Water Dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. U. V.Kongrea , A. R. Chiddarwarb , P. C. Dhumatkarc , A.B.Aris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The work on developing the heat pumps for space conditioning and water heating has been gone for half a century. The earlier water heating pumps and air to water heating pumps gives only hot water and space conditioning. But in this air conditioning cum water dispenser we get hot and cold water with hot and cold air, thus the system becomes multifunctional. The actual cycles and operating conditions for air and water cycle present in this paper. The paper introduced basic design principles and the test analysis performed in the laboratory. The test results were found encouraging especially the parameters of dispenser output along with air conditioner. The paper also introduced comfort conditions and suitable coefficient of performance with respect to atmospheric condition, without sacrificing the air conditioning output

  15. Evanescent-wave dynamic light scattering at an oil-water interface: Diffusion of interface-adsorbed colloids

    OpenAIRE

    STOCCO, Antonio; Mokhtari, Tahereh; Haseloff, Günter; Erbe, Andreas; Sigel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    A light-scattering goniometer for evanescent-wave dynamic light scattering (EWDLS) measurements at a liquid-fluid interface is introduced, and used for measurements on two charge-stabilized polystyrene colloid systems adsorbed to alkane-water interfaces. The goniometer allows an independent variation of the penetration depth and the scattering vector components parallel and perpendicular to a liquid-fluid interface. The possible illumination geometries are compared. Ellipsometry at the liquid...

  16. Water at an electrochemical interface - a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Adam; Reed, Stewart; Madden, Paul; Chandler, David

    2008-08-22

    The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the properties of water in an aqueous ionic solution close to an interface with a model metallic electrode are described. In the simulations the electrode behaves as an ideally polarizable hydrophilic metal, supporting image charge interactions with charged species, and it is maintained at a constant electrical potential with respect to the solution so that the model is a textbook representation of an electrochemical interface through which no current is passing. We show how water is strongly attracted to and ordered at the electrode surface. This ordering is different to the structure that might be imagined from continuum models of electrode interfaces. Further, this ordering significantly affects the probability of ions reaching the surface. We describe the concomitant motion and configurations of the water and ions as functions of the electrode potential, and we analyze the length scales over which ionic atmospheres fluctuate. The statistics of these fluctuations depend upon surface structure and ionic strength. The fluctuations are large, sufficiently so that the mean ionic atmosphere is a poor descriptor of the aqueous environment near a metal surface. The importance of this finding for a description of electrochemical reactions is examined by calculating, directly from the simulation, Marcus free energy profiles for transfer of charge between the electrode and a redox species in the solution and comparing the results with the predictions of continuum theories. Significant departures from the electrochemical textbook descriptions of the phenomenon are found and their physical origins are characterized from the atomistic perspective of the simulations.

  17. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: michinelatti@gmail.com; Andreolli do Amaral, Thais Helena [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Borsatto, Maria Cristina [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2007-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  18. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces

  19. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; do Amaral, Thais Helena Andreolli; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  20. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  1. Mathematical model of water droplets evaporation in air stream

    OpenAIRE

    Дикий, Микола Олександрович; Соломаха, Андрій Сергійович; Петренко, Валерій Георгієвич

    2013-01-01

    Capacity of a gas turbine power plant strongly depends on the ambient temperature, making it profitable in many cases to cool air supplying water in the air stream. The article identifies the key provisions and presents the equations that describe the process of evaporation of water droplets in the air stream. The model is based on commonly known and chacked dependences of Nu = f (Re, Pr); Sh = f (Re, Sc). The developed system of equations allows finding the parameters of humid air, depending...

  2. Janus particles at the planar water-oil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Jiang, Shan; Granick, Steve

    2008-03-01

    Amphiphilic Janus particles (hydrophobic on one side, hydrophilic on the other) were placed at the planar water-oil interface at various surface coverage and found to self-assemble into two-dimensional crystals with long-range hexagonal order, which we studied by fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. Surprising dependence is observed not only on the surface chemical makeup of the hydrophilic side but also on the Janus balance (i.e. the relative sizes of hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions), which is analogous to the HLB balance that characterizes molecular surfactants.

  3. Brine crude oil interactions at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms. The ion specific interaction between fines and polar fractions of crude oil at the oil-water interface has been less explored. In this study the relative affinity between different ions and the oil surface was determined. The experiments prove the importance of Ca2+, SO42-, and HPO42- ions......-, HPO42-, and HCO3- (anions), were studied through gas chromatographic analysis. Crude oil from the North Sea was doped with various fractions of organic acids to mimic different polar behavior. Increased brine concentration showed up to 15% upsurge of polar fractions on the oil-water emulsion formation......The impact of brine salinity and its ionic composition on oil displacement efficiency has been investigated extensively in recent years due to the potential of enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Wettability alterations through relative interactions at the mineral surface have been the basis of proposed...

  4. Growth of large naphthalene and anthracene single-crystal sheets at the liquid–air interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postnikov, V. A., E-mail: postva@yandex.ru [Donbas National Academy of Civil Engineering and Architecture (Ukraine); Chertopalov, S. V. [Donetsk National University (Ukraine)

    2015-07-15

    The growth of organic single crystals of naphthalene (C{sub 10}H{sub 8}) and anthracene (C{sub 14}H{sub 10}) at the liquid‒air interface from a mixture of solvents has been investigated. The growth technique used in the study makes it possible to obtain single-crystal sheets up to 10 mm in size for 24 h. The surface morphology and structure of the crystals have been analyzed by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. C{sub 10}H{sub 8} and C{sub 14}H{sub 10} single crystals grow coplanarly along the (001) plane. A thermodynamic model of the flat-crystal nucleus formation at the liquid‒air interface, based on the analysis of the change in the free Gibbs energy, is considered.

  5. Growth of large naphthalene and anthracene single-crystal sheets at the liquid–air interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of organic single crystals of naphthalene (C10H8) and anthracene (C14H10) at the liquid‒air interface from a mixture of solvents has been investigated. The growth technique used in the study makes it possible to obtain single-crystal sheets up to 10 mm in size for 24 h. The surface morphology and structure of the crystals have been analyzed by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. C10H8 and C14H10 single crystals grow coplanarly along the (001) plane. A thermodynamic model of the flat-crystal nucleus formation at the liquid‒air interface, based on the analysis of the change in the free Gibbs energy, is considered

  6. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    OpenAIRE

    Otávio Augusto Capeloto; Vitor Santaella Zanuto; Luis Carlos Malacarne; Mauro Luciano Baesso; Gustavo Vinicius Bassi Lukasievicz; Stephen Edward Bialkowski; Nelson Guilherme Castelli Astrath

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density.

  7. Electromagnetic Resonances of a Straight Wire on an Earth-Air Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, John M.; Sandler, Sheldon S.; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2011-01-01

    Using a variational method, we recently determined an electromagnetic “signature” for characterizing a straight wire in free space. The signature consists of the first five resonant frequencies and their widths, more compactly expressed as the first five complex-valued resonant frequencies. Here we apply the variational method to the much more complicated case of determining the same signature for a straight wire or wire pair on a flat interface between a homogeneous earth and air. To calcula...

  8. High resolution microprofiling, fractionation and speciation at sediment water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Duester, Lars; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    Within aquatic environments, the exchange between the sediment and the overlaying water is often driven by steep gradients of, e.g., the oxygen concentration, the redox potential or the pH value at the sediment water interface (SWI). Important transport processes at the SWI are sedimentation and resuspension of particulate matter and diffusional fluxes of dissolved substances. To gain a better understanding of the key factors and processes determining the fate of substances at the SWI, methods with a spatial high resolution are required that enable the investigation of several sediment parameters in parallel to different analytes of interest in the sediment pore water. Moreover, beside the total content, questions concerning the speciation and fractionation are of concern in studying the different (transport) processes. Due to the availability of numerous micro-sensors and -electrodes (e.g., O2, redox potential, pH value, H2S, N2O) and the development of methods for pore water sampling [1], the toolbox to study the heterogeneous and often dynamic conditions at the SWI at a sub-millimetre scale were considerably improved. Nevertheless, the methods available for pore water sampling often require the installation of the sampling devices at the sampling site and/or intensive preparation procedures that may influence the conditions at the area studied and/or the characteristics of the samples taken. By combination of a micro profiling system with a new micro filtration probe head connected to a pump and a fraction collector, a micro profiling and micro sampling system ("missy") was developed that enables for the first time a direct, automate and low invasive sampling of small volumes (Micro-scale biogeochemical heterogeneity in sediments: A review of available technology and observed evidence. Earth-Science Reviews, 2009. 92(1-2): p. 81-97. 2. Fabricius, A.-L., et al., New Microprofiling and Micro Sampling System for Water Saturated Environmental Boundary Layers

  9. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  10. Water orientation and hydrogen-bond structure at the fluorite/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Rémi; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Bonn, Mischa; Perez-Haro, María-José; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-04-01

    Water in contact with mineral interfaces is important for a variety of different processes. Here, we present a combined theoretical/experimental study which provides a quantitative, molecular-level understanding of the ubiquitous and important CaF2/water interface. Our results show that, at low pH, the surface is positively charged, causing a substantial degree of water ordering. The surface charge originates primarily from the dissolution of fluoride ions, rather than from adsorption of protons to the surface. At high pH we observe the presence of Ca-OH species pointing into the water. These OH groups interact remarkably weakly with the surrounding water, and are responsible for the “free OH” signature in the VSFG spectrum, which can be explained from local electronic structure effects. The quantification of the surface termination, near-surface ion distribution and water arrangement is enabled by a combination of advanced phase-resolved Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation spectra of CaF2/water interfaces and state-of-the-art ab initio molecular dynamics simulations which include electronic structure effects.

  11. Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions

  12. Interfacial phenomena at the compressed co2-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bharatwaj

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Compressed CO2 is considered to be a viable alternative to toxic volatile organic solvents with potential applications in areas including separation reactions, and materials formation processes. Thus an interest in CO2 stems from the fact that it is very inexpensive, has low toxicity, and is not a regulated. However, compressed CO2 has a zero dipole moment and weak van der Waals forces and thus is a poor solvent for both polar and most high molecular weight solutes, characteristics that severely restrict its applicability. In order to overcome this inherent inability, surfactant-stabilized organic and aqueous dispersions in CO2 have been proposed. This work will discuss fundamentals and recent advances in the design of amphiphiles for the novel CO2-water interface.

  13. Air quality in natural areas: Interface between the public, science and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural areas are important interfaces between air quality, the public, science and regulation. In the United States and Canada, national parks received over 315 million visits during 2004. Many natural areas have been experiencing decreased visibility, increased ozone (O3) levels and elevated nitrogen deposition. Ozone is the most pervasive air pollutant in North American natural areas. There is an extensive scientific literature on O3 exposure-tree response in chambered environments and, lately, free-air exposure systems. Yet, less is known about O3 impacts on natural terrestrial ecosystems. To advance scientifically defensible O3 risk assessment for natural forest areas, species-level measurement endpoints must be socially, economically and ecologically relevant. Exposure-based indices, based on appropriate final endpoints, present an underused opportunity to meet this need. Exposure-plant indices should have a high degree of statistical significance, have high goodness of fit, be biologically plausible and include confidence intervals to define uncertainty. They must be supported by exposure-response functions and be easy to use within an air quality regulation context. Ozone exposure-response indices developed within an ambient air context have great potential for improving risk assessment in natural forest areas and enhancing scientific literacy. - Appropriate endpoints and exposure-response indices can improve assessment of air pollutant risk to forests in natural areas

  14. Dynamic Surface Properties of Asphaltenes and Resins at the Oil-Air Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauget, Fabrice; Langevin, Dominique; Lenormand, Roland

    2001-07-15

    Because of the existence of large reserves, the production of heavy oils is presently the object of much interest. Some heavy oil reservoirs show anomalous behavior in primary production, with rates of production better than predicted. In Canada and Venezuela some heavy oils are produced in the form of "bubbly" oil, which is stable for several hours in open vessels. These crude oils are therefore commonly called "foamy oils". Since the presence of bubbles could be responsible for an enhanced rate of production, a better knowledge of the properties of the gas-oil interface is desirable. We have experimentally studied the effect of concentration of asphaltenes and resins on static and dynamic properties of oil-air interfaces and also on bulk viscosity. The experiments include surface tension measurements using the pendant-drop method, surface viscosity by the oscillating-drop method, foamability by continuous gas injection, and film lifetime. All the experiments were performed using resins and asphaltenes in toluene solutions at 20 degrees C. At first asphaltenes enhance foamability and film lifetime. All the experiments performed showed a change in regime for asphaltene concentrations around 10% by weight, possibly due to clustering. At the studied concentrations, the adsorption process at the air-oil interface is not diffusion controlled but rather involves a reorganization of asphaltene molecules in a network structure. The formation of a solid skin is well identified by the increase of the elastic modulus. This elastic modulus is also an important property for foam stability, since a rigid interface limits bubble rupture. The interface rigidity at long times decreases with increases in resin fraction, which could decrease foam stability as well as emulsion stability. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11427016

  15. Pressure dependence of Kapitza resistance at gold/water and silicon/water interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Kapitza length at solid/liquid interfaces under the effects of bulk liquid pressures. Gold and silicon were utilized as hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid walls with different wetting surface behaviors, while the number of confined liquid water molecules was adjusted to obtain different pressures inside the channels. The interactions of solid/liquid couples were reparameterized accurately by measuring the water contact angle of solid substrates. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the structure, normal stress, and temperature distribution of liquid water to elucidate thermal energy transport across interfaces. Our results demonstrate excellent agreement between the pressures of liquid water in nano-channels and published thermodynamics data. The pressures measured as normal stress components were characterized using a long cut-off distance reinforced by a long-range van der Waals tail correction term. To clarify the effects of bulk liquid pressures on water structure at hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid surfaces, we defined solid/liquid interface spacing as the distance between the surface and the peak value of the first water density layer. Near the gold surface, we found that interface spacing and peak value of first water density layer were constant and did not depend on bulk liquid pressure; near the silicon surface, those values depended directly upon bulk liquid. Our results reveal that the pressure dependence of Kapitza length strongly depends on the wettability of the solid surface. In the case of the hydrophilic gold surface, Kapitza length was stable despite increasing bulk liquid pressure, while it varied significantly at the hydrophobic silicon surface

  16. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials. PMID:25127447

  17. Virtual prototype interface for the Air Force Manned SpacePlane project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.; Lewis, John; Johnson, Troy D.

    1998-08-01

    The advent of requirements for worldwide deployment of space assets in support of Air Force operational missions has resulted in the need for a Manned SpacePlane (MSP) that can perform these missions with minimal preflight preparation and little, if any, in-orbit support from a mission control center. Because successful mission accomplishment will depend almost completely upon the MSP crew and the on-board capabilities of the spaceplane, the MSP user interface is a crucial component of successful mission accomplishment. In recognition of this fact, the USAF Phillips Laboratory in conjunction with USAF Space Command initiated the Virtual SpacePlane (VSP) project. To function effectively as an MSP interface development platform, the VSP must demonstrate the capability to simulate anticipated MSP missions and portray the MSP in operation throughout its entire flight regime, from takeoff through space operations and on to recovery via a horizontal landing at an airfield. Therefore, we architected, designed, and implemented a complete VSP that can be used to simulate anticipated Manned SpacePlane missions. The primary objective of the VSP is to be a virtual prototype for user interface design and development, the VSP software architecture and design facilities uncovering, refining and validating MSP user interface requirements. The Virtual SpacePlane reuses software components developed for the Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler (SM) distributed virtual environment (DVE) applications, the Common Object Database (CODB) architecture, and Information Pod (Pod) interface tools developed in our labs. The Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler supplied baseline interface components and tools, 3D graphical models, vehicle motion dynamics models, and DVE communication capabilities. Because we knew that the VSP's requirements would expand and evolve over the life of the project, we use the CODB architecture to facilitate our use of Rapid Evolutionary and Exploratory

  18. Turbulence structure and CO2 transfer at the air-sea interface and turbulent diffusion in thermally-stratified flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in clarifying environmental flow phenomena. This report summarizes research on two turbulence structure and diffusion topics; turbulence structure and the gas transfer mechanism across the air-sea (air-water) interface and the heat and momentum transfer mechanism in thermally stratified flows. The first study shows the relationship between the carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer mechanism across a sheared air-water interface and the turbulence structure near the interface. The results revealed that the conventional proportional relationship between CO2 transfer velocity across the air-sea interface and mean wind speed over the sea surface is incorrect. The second study numerically clarified the significant effects of molecular diffusivity (the Prandtl number) of active heat on heat transfer in stable thermally-stratified Hows. The results obtained from the two studies are described in the next two chapters. Since the results are mainly quoted from a series of previously published and in press works by Komori et al.'s research group (see references), this report might be considered as a summary of those works

  19. Oriented crystalline monolayers and bilayers of 2 x 2 silver(1) grid architectures at the air-solution interface: Their assembly and crystal structure elucidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weissbuch, J.; Baxter, P.N.W.; Kuzmenko, I.; Cohen, H.; Cohen, S.; Kjær, K.; Howes, P.B.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Lehn, J.M.; Leiserowitz, L.; Lahav, M.

    2000-01-01

    Oriented crystalline monolayers, similar to 14 Angstrom thick, of a 2 x 2 Ag+ grid complex, self-assembled at the air-solution interface starting from an water-insoluble ligand 3,6-bis[2-(6-phenylpyridine)]pyridazine spread on silver-ion-containing solutions,were examined by grazing-incidence X....... Such a phase transition is of relevance to the understanding of crystal nucleation....

  20. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  1. Biomimetic synthesis and morphological control of metal carbonates at the air/solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomimetic approaches can provide a means of fabricating nanostructured materials under environmentally benign conditions. In this paper, we synthesized metal carbonate films, such as calcite, strontianite, malachite, and hydrozincite films, at the air-solution interface of solutions containing corresponding metal ions by using inflowing CO2 from the atmosphere. The addition of acidic polymers, fulfilling the role of an acidic protein in biomineralization, provided CaCO3 nanofibers, SrCO3 nanofibers oriented in a specific direction, and copper carbonate and zinc carbonate hydroxide thin films. The metal carbonates prepared in this study were used as precursors for the formation of metal oxide nanocrystals via pyrolysis. This work showed that various metal carbonates and metal oxides with nanostructures can be prepared by using atmospheric CO2. - Highlights: ► Biomimetic synthesis of metal carbonate nanofilms at the air/solution interface. ► The reaction between metal ions and carbonate ions derived from CO2 in the air. ► Calcium, strontium, copper and zinc carbonates were formed. ► The morphologies of the nanofilms were controlled by adding the acidic polymer. ► Nanostructured metal oxides were prepared by pyrolysis of the metal carbonates.

  2. Efficiency of air/liquid interfaces in detaching bacteria from a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Gas/liquid interfaces are known to be significantly more effective than shear stress in detaching microscale colloids from substrates by inducing surface tension forces. Providing that a three-phase contact at the interface of a gas bubble, the liquid phase and the particle occurs, the magnitude of the surface tension force can potentially exceed by orders of magnitude the adhesion force, which keeps the micro particles on the surface. We investigate the ability of a moving air/liquid interface to stimulate the detachment of bacteria from a surface. Bacteria are micron-sized living organisms with strong tendency to attach to almost any substrate that they come into contact with. Attachment of bacteria on the surface is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of their growth medium, substrate, and cell surface. Moreover, once fixed on the surface, the microorganisms evolve in time to create intricate biofilm structures, which are highly challenging to be removed. The objective of this study to characterise the efficiency of this detachment process as a function of bacterial attachment as well as hydrodynamic parameters such the surface tension and the interface velocity. Swiss National Science Foundation P2ELP2-158896.

  3. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-04-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw , the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  4. Water orientation and hydrogen-bond structure at the fluorite/water interface

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Rémi; Bonn, Mischa; Perez-Haro, María-José; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi1, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    Water in contact with mineral interfaces is important for a variety of different processes. Here, we present a combined theoretical-experimental study which provides a quantitative, molecular-level understanding of the ubiquitous and important flourite-water interface. Our results show that, at low pH, the surface is positively charged, causing a substantial degree of water ordering. The surface charge originates primarily from the dissolution of fluoride ions, rather than from adsorption of protons to the surface. At high pH we observe the presence of Ca-OH species pointing into the water. These OH groups interact remarkably weakly with the surrounding water, and are responsible for the free OH signature in the SFG spectrum, which can be explained from local electronic structure effects. The quantification of the surface termination, near-surface ion distribution and water arrangement is enabled by a combination of advanced phase-resolved Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation spectra of flourite-water interfa...

  5. Method to estimate drag coefficient at the air/ice interface over drifting open pack ice from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.

    1984-01-01

    A knowledge in near real time, of the surface drag coefficient for drifting pack ice is vital for predicting its motions. And since this is not routinely available from measurements it must be replaced by estimates. Hence, a method for estimating this variable, as well as the drag coefficient at the water/ice interface and the ice thickness, for drifting open pack ice was developed. These estimates were derived from three-day sequences of LANDSAT-1 MSS images and surface weather charts and from the observed minima and maxima of these variables. The method was tested with four data sets in the southeastern Beaufort sea. Acceptable results were obtained for three data sets. Routine application of the method depends on the availability of data from an all-weather air or spaceborne remote sensing system, producing images with high geometric fidelity and high resolution.

  6. Investigations of hydraulic operating conditions of air lift pump with three types of air-water mixers

    OpenAIRE

    Kalenik Marek

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of hydraulic operating conditions of air lift pump with three types of air-water mixers. The paper presents the analysis of results of the investigations concerning the influence of various constructive solutions of the air-water mixers on hydraulic operating conditions of the air lift pump. The scope of the investigations encompassed the determination of characteristics of delivery head and delivery rate for three types of air-water mixers applied in the constructed air lift p...

  7. Linear GPR inversion for lossy soil and a planar air-soil interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional inversion scheme for fixed-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR) is derived that takes into account the loss in the soil and the planar air-soil interface. The forward model of this inversion scheme is based upon the first Born approximation and the dyadic Green function for a...... two-layer medium. The forward model is inverted using the Tikhonov-regularized pseudo-inverse operator. This involves two steps: filtering and backpropagation. The filtering is carried out by numerically solving Fredholm integral equations of the first kind and the backpropagation is performed using...

  8. Light production at an explosive/air interface. Period covered: October--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canada, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Detonation front arrival time measurements are compared for an optoelectronic and an antenna technique. Fiber optics and photodiodes are used for the optoelectronic method while the antenna technique depends on radiated signals at an explosive/air interface. Analysis indicates that signals measured by the respective techniques are not caused by the same physical mechanism; thus, even though the results are not directly comparable the signals should be self-consistent for a given technique. The optical signals were found to have greater jitter in time and larger variation in magnitude than those signals obtained by the antenna technique.

  9. Spectroscopic Properties of Benzene at the Air-Ice Interface: A Combined Experimental-Computational Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kania, R.; Malongwe, J. K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; Krousko, J.; Gladich, I.; Roeselová, Martina; Heger, D.; Klán, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 35 (2014), s. 7535-7547. ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/10/1724; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11021 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0947; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1214; European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0037 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * atmospheric air/ice interfaces Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2014

  10. Diffusion-controlled Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactant at Air/Solution Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊吉; 徐芸; 孙红秀

    2013-01-01

    For the diffusion-controlled adsorption, the expression of dynamic surface adsorption Γ(t) was ob-tained by solving the diffusion equation. Two cases, i.e. the short and long time limits, were mainly discussed in this paper. From the measured dynamic surface tension of aqueous surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions at 25 °C, the adsorption kinetics of SDS at air/solution interface was studied. It was proved that for both of the short and long time limits, the adsorption process of SDS was controlled by diffusion.

  11. Dispersion Relation of a Surface Wave at a Rough Metal-Air Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kotelnikov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We derived a dispersion relation of a surface wave at a rough metal-air interface. In contrast to previous publications, we assumed that an intrinsic surface impedance due to a finite electric conductivity of the metal can be of the same order as the roughness-induced impedance. We then applied our results to the analysis of a long-standing problem of the discrepancy between the experimental data on the propagation of surface waves in the terahertz range of frequencies and the classical Drude theory.

  12. The role of transition metal interfaces on the electronic transport in lithium–air batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jingzhe; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer;

    2011-01-01

    Low electronic conduction is expected to be a main limiting factor in the performance of reversible lithium–air, Li–O2, batteries. Here, we apply density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function calculations to determine the electronic transport through lithium peroxide, Li2O2, formed...... at the cathode during battery discharge. We find the transport to depend on the orientation and lattice matching of the insulator–metal interface in the presence of Au and Pt catalysts. Bulk lithium vacancies are found to be available and mobile under battery charging conditions, and found to pin the...

  13. Tritiated water vapor in the surface air at Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium concentration in water vapor in the air near the surface and in the precipitation at Tokyo was measured during the period from 9 August to 20 November in 1974. From August to the middle of October, tritium mixing ratios in the surface air had relatively higher values except those in air masses which were associated with a typhoon. The mixing ratios of tritium in the air decreased abruptly at the middle of October, which indicates the decrease of tritium influx from aloft. These data exhibit the salient feature that variations in tritium concentration in TR are linear to the reciprocal of the content of water vapor during each period. Tritium concentrations in vapor and rain water collected simultaneously show nearly equal values. One of the reasons for the good correlation of tritium concentration between falling drops and ambient air is considered to be the result of the rapid isotopic exchange. (author)

  14. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components. 20 references

  15. ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE CONDENSATION TO WATER RECOVERY BY HOME AIR CONDITIONERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth’s atmosphere contains billion cubic meters of fresh water, which is considerable as a reliable water resource, especially in sultry areas. What is important in this context, how to extract the water, in an economic manner. In order to extract water from air conditioner, no need to spend any cost, because water produced as a by-product and trouble production. This cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the quantity and chemical quality of water obtained from Bandar Abbas air conditioners; at intervals beginning of March to early December of 2010. Sixty six samples were taken in cluster random plan. Bandar Abbas divided into four clusters; based on distance to shore and population density. Chemical tests which included: Turbidity, alkalinity, total hardness, Dissolved Solids (TDS and Electrical Conductivity (EC and quantity measurement were performed on them. Obtained water had slightly acidic pH, near to neutral range. Total dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, total hardness and alkalinity of extracted water were in low rate. Each air conditioner produced 36 liter per day averagely. Split types obtained more water to window air conditioners. With regard to some assumptions, approximately 4680 to 9360 cubic meter per day water is obtainable which is suitable for many municipal and industrial water applications.

  16. The Orientation and Charge of Water at the Hydrophobic Oil Droplet - Water Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, R.; Rick, S. W.; Jungwirth, Pavel; de Beer, A. G. F.; de Aguiar, H. B.; Samson, J.; Roke, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 26 (2011), s. 10204-10210. ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: DFG(DE) 560398; European Research Council(XE) 240556; NSF(US) CHE-0611679 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : oil/water interface * sum frequency scattering * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.907, year: 2011

  17. Air flotation treatment of salmon processing waste water

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses methods for the reduction of the pollution strength of salmon processing waste water. Past research has indicated the success of air pressure...

  18. On air entrainment into water in an overflow piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study was made of air entrainment into water flowing downwards in a vertical pipe. The static pressure distributions along the pipe axis and the velocity distributions in a water layer formed on the wall of pipe were precisely measured to examine the behaviors of flows and air entrainment. The amount of air entrained through the water passage was also measured at the exit of the pipe, as the water flow rate was varied. Moreover, flow visualization was conducted to ascertain flow patterns in the pipe. The results obtained indicate that, with steady overflow being maintained, such flows as annular, mixing and bubbly flows are observed along a pipeline. Air entrainment takes place predominantly in annular flows adjacent to the wall of the pipe. (author)

  19. Structure and Depletion at Fluoro- and Hydro-carbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kashimoto, Kaoru; Yoon, Jaesung; Hou, Binyang; Chen, Chiu-hao; Lin, Binhua; Aratono, Makoto; Takiue, Takanori; Schlossman, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vapor-like depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose super-hydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These...

  20. Air encapsulation. II. Profile water storage and shallow water table fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a wet soil, volumetric encapsulated air contents can easily approach 0.06 m3 m-3. The objective of this study was to determine, through simulation, the effect of air encapsulation on profile water storage and shallow water table fluctuations and whether air encapsulation should be considered in modeling field events. Using a two-dimensional soil moisture code that included a routine designed to model air encapsulation, the authors simulated profile water storage changes during hypothetical rainfall events and water table responses during actual rainfall events. The simulation results indicated that, following the infiltration of 10 mm of water, profile moisture content differences with and without air encapsulation would be 3 m-3 and thus may not be measurable in the field with a neutron probe. Water table levels, however, rose significantly higher in the profile when air was encapsulated. Depending on the initial depth of the water table and the moisture characteristic, the water table rises were two to five times those when air was not encapsulated. For water tables located within 1.3 m of the surface, application of the model to actual rainfall events improved the fit to the measured water table data. In those situations where water table level predictions are important (e.g., wetlands, stream banks), researchers should consider air encapsulation in their analysis of water table fluctuations

  1. Sea Water Air Conditioning [SWAC]: A Cost Effective Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Elsafty

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The energy demand for air conditioning is quite extensive due to the hot and humid summer climate in Egypt. The rapid increase in non industrial electricity consumption is due to the rural electrification and the presence of many buildings that are air conditioned in summer using electricity. Deep cold ocean and sea water is a valuable natural resource that can be used for energy production, cooling, desalination, aquaculture and agriculture. The most economic viable use of this deep water is to air-condition buildings through a sea water air conditioning system (SWAC. This study reports the results of a technical and economical assessment of the potential use of sea water air conditioning (SWAC other than the conventional vapor compression systems used to air condition hotels at a new tourists resort called “Sahl-Hasheesh”,18km south of Hurghada, Egypt. This study analyzed and sized the major components of the Sea water Air Conditioning (SWAC system, determined the operational performance, and estimated the probable costs. The economic analysis was based on two different methods, the simple pay back and the net present value (NPV method. The results showed that the SWAC system is the preferred option for its short payback period as well as the minimum net present value when being applied at Sahl-Hasheesh area. Large energy savings approaching 80% compared to the conventional ones. This is in addition to the low green house gas emissions.

  2. Modeling and computational issues far air/water quality problems: a grid computing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report some results on the design of a grid computing application in the field of environmental sciences. The case study concerns the integration of several independent computational models (weather, air and water quality and sea wave and currents) aver a grid computing infrastructure. The aim of the project is the development of an efficient, high-performance and general purpose distributed laboratory far environmental modeling. Expected end users may be either researchers in computational environmental sciences, whom a standard interface to access existing and distributed resources (database, models, visualization tools, parallel computers and virtual organisation's collaborative community facilities) is provided, or ordinary citizens who can access the results of operational runs of the integrated system far obtaining short-scale forecasts using a web-based interface. Presently, the application continuously supplies real-time forecasts and scenario analysis far both weather and air quality and it is interactively serviceable via a dedicated web portal

  3. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation

  4. Air and Soil Water Vapour Density Variations in Akungba Akoko

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi O.M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available – A temperature and humidity measuring equipment constructed with Silicon lab Si7015 integrated circuit sensor was used to monitor temperature and humidity, compute water saturation and vapour densities for air and soil and to interpret three days variations in Akungba Akoko. The sensors were inserted 5 cm into the soil and 2m away in the troposphere. Two hour records of both parameters were taken from 9 am to 5 pm for 3 days. Air and soil water saturation and vapour density data were computed from the 2 measured parameters by using the ITU-2003 formula. Interpretations of resulting curves showed that increase in vapour density in soil is more than that of air during rainfall and this increase with temperature. The average soil water saturation data and vapour density are also higher in soil. It is suggested that the soil water vapour density and water saturation interpretation should be done for areas with landslides and pollution tendencies

  5. Coherent description of transport across the water interface: From nanodroplets to climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T.; Lervik, Anders; Badam, Vijay Kumar; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-03-01

    Transport of mass and energy across the vapor-liquid interface of water is of central importance in a variety of contexts such as climate models, weather forecasts, and power plants. We provide a complete description of the transport properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water with the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Transport across the planar interface is then described by 3 interface transfer coefficients where 9 more coefficients extend the description to curved interfaces. We obtain all coefficients in the range 260-560 K by taking advantage of water evaporation experiments at low temperatures, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005 rigid-water-molecule model at high temperatures, and square gradient theory to represent the whole range. Square gradient theory is used to link the region where experiments are possible (low vapor pressures) to the region where nonequilibrium molecular dynamics can be done (high vapor pressures). This enables a description of transport across the planar water interface, interfaces of bubbles, and droplets, as well as interfaces of water structures with complex geometries. The results are likely to improve the description of evaporation and condensation of water at widely different scales; they open a route to improve the understanding of nanodroplets on a small scale and the precision of climate models on a large scale.

  6. Langmuir films of solids-free bitumen and bitumen fractions at toluene/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solovyev, A.; Zhang, L.; Xu, Z.; Masliyah, J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    This study examined the interfacial behaviour of bitumen and bitumen fractions at an organic solvent/water interface using a Langmuir trough and atomic force microscope (AFM). The objective was to better understand the stability of water-in-solvent diluted bitumen emulsions. The accumulation of interfacially active components at the oil/water interfaces promotes the formation of interfacial films, which resist the coalescence of water droplets thereby stabilizing water-in-oil emulsions. The bitumen fractions included maltene, and asphaltene films at the toluene/de-ionized water interface. Langmuir films of bitumen, maltene and asphaltene were spread at toluene/water interfaces where they exhibited different interfacial pressure-area isotherms. Asphaltenes were found to be irreversibly adsorbed at the toluene/water interface when the films were subjected to multiple washings with fresh toluene. Interfacial pressure-area isotherms remained unchanged. Consecutive washings of maltene films with fresh toluene showed a progressive loss of interfacial materials from the toluene/water interface. However, the pressure-area isotherms showed a consistent shift during the first 2 consecutive bitumen film washings and then no further shift with subsequent washings. After the first 2 washings, the isotherms were same as the original asphaltene films. According to AFM images of Langmuir-Blodgett films deposited from the toluene/water interface, the topographical features of asphaltene films resembled that of bitumen films. However, they were very different from that of maltene films. The study results demonstrated that the bitumen film at a toluene/water interface is composed primarily of asphaltenes. The asphaltenes contribute to the stability of water-in-diluted bitumen emulsions because they are irreversibly adsorbed at the interface. tabs., figs.

  7. Drop Impact on Liquid Surfaces: Formation of Lens and Spherical Drops at the Air-Liquid Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Yakhshi-Tafti, Ehsan; Kumar, Ranganathan; 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.06.029

    2010-01-01

    Droplets at the air-liquid interface of immiscible liquids usually form partially-submerged lens shapes (e.g. water on oil). In addition to this structure, we showed that droplets released from critical heights above the target liquid can sustain the impact and at the end maintain a spherical ball-shape configuration above the surface, despite undergoing large deformation. Spherical drops are unstable and will transform into the lens mode due to slight disturbances. Precision dispensing needles with various tip diameter sizes were used to release pendant drops of deionized water onto the surface of fluorocarbon liquid (FC-43, 3M). A cubic relationship was found between the nozzle tip diameter and the released droplet diameter. Drop impact was recorded by a high speed camera at a rate of 2000 frames per second. In order for the water drops to sustain the impact and retain a spherical configuration at the surface of the target liquid pool, it is required that they be of a critical size and be released from a ce...

  8. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  9. Numerical research on the mechanism of contaminant release through the porous sediment-overlying water interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑淑君; 曹洋; 郭加宏

    2014-01-01

    After the pollutant discharged into the river or lake has been reduced, the release of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water may cause the river and lake be contaminated again. On the condition that the overlying water flow does not lead to sediment suspension, numerical researches are carried out for the mechanism of contaminant release through the sediment-overlying water interface. The overlying water flow is calculated as turbulence. The sediment is regarded as isotropic homogeneous porous medium, therefore the seepage field in the porous sediment layer is obtained by solving Darcy’s equations. Coupled two dimensional steady flows of the overlying water and the pore water in the sediment are calculated. Based on the flow fields obtained, the unsteady contaminant solute transportation process in the pore water in the sediment and the overlying water is numerically simulated, as the shapes of the sediment-overlying water interface are flat or periodic triangular respectively. Numerical results show that the exchange of the pore water and the overlying water is an important factor which decides the release flux of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water. The pressure distribution produced by the overlying water flow along the sediment-overlying water interface, as it is not flat, may induce the seepage of the pore water in the sediment and through the sediment-overlying water interface, which may increase the release flux of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water.

  10. Development of a Bench-Top Air-to-Water Heat Pump Experimental Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. I. Abu-Mulaweh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A bench-top air-to-water heat pump experimental apparatus was designed,developed, and constructed for instructional and demonstrative purposes. Thisair-to-water heat pump experimental apparatus is capable of demonstratingthermodynamics and heat transfer concepts and principles. This heat pumpexperimental setup was designed around the vapor compression refrigerationcycle. This experimental apparatus has an intuitive user interface, reliable, safefor student use, and portable. The interface is capable of allowing dataacquisition by a computer. A PC-based control system which consists ofLabVIEW and data acquisition unit is employed to monitor and control thisexperimental laboratory apparatus. This paper provides details about thedevelopment of this unit and the integration of the electrical/electronic componentand the control system.

  11. Cocurrent flow in an atmospheric pressure air-water model of a PWR hot leg at 0.114 scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental work has been carried out with air and water in a 0.114 times scale model of the proposed Sizewell 'B' PWR hot leg. The model was accurate from the entry from the reactor vessel to the tube plate in the steam generator. Visual observations are summarized in a flow map in the coordinates of an air Froude number versus a water Froude number. The map shows a predominantly stratified system with spray occurring at higher air flowrates and surges appearing at higher water flowrates. Also, at very low air flowrates, long bubbles of air passed along the top of the hot leg through water filling the pipe. A previous theory predicts the water level in the reactor vessel in terms of the air and water flowrates. This theory also agrees with data from other sources on the level in the hot leg in terms of the discharge of two phases through a horizontal hot leg break. The data includes results for steam and water at pressures up to 62 bar. Correlations for the interface level in the hot leg are developed. Data for lower air flowrates agrees substantially with a theory for the onset of slugging. (author)

  12. The exchange of SVOCs across the air-sea interface in Singapore's coastal environment

    OpenAIRE

    He, J.; Balasubramanian, R

    2010-01-01

    Coastal areas are vulnerable to the accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds, such as PAHs, OCPs and PCBs from atmospheric inputs. Dry particulate and wet depositions, and air-water diffusive exchange in the Singapore's south coastal area, where most of chemical and oil refinery industries are situated in, were estimated. Based on a yearly dataset, the mean annual dry particulate deposition fluxes of ∑16-PAHs, ∑7 OCPs and &am...

  13. Free-surface Flow Interface And Air-Entrainment Modelling Using OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The use of hydraulic structures to control flooding has a history of long practice within civil engineering infrastructure. Hydraulic structures under turbulent flow conditions frequently involve free surface fl ow and interactions between air and water. This can be observed in different kinds of structures, e.g. gullies, manholes or stepped spillways. In this doctoral program, Computational Fluid Dynamics numerical models will be used to simulate...

  14. Heat and mass transfer of water at nanoscale solid-liquid interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fasano, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    A better physical understanding of heat and mass transfer of water at nanoscale solid interfaces is essential for the rational design of novel nanoconstructs for clean water and energy as well as for biomedical applications. Both nanoscale transfer phenomena are strongly influenced by solid-liquid nonbonded interactions occurring at the interface. First, classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) is used for investigating water transport in the proximity of several inorganic and biological solid surfa...

  15. Relating water and air flow characteristics in coarse granular materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Canga, Eriona; Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm;

    2013-01-01

    Water pressure drop as a function of velocity controls w 1 ater cleaning biofilter operation 2 cost. At present this relationship in biofilter materials must be determined experimentally as no 3 universal link between pressure drop, velocity and filter material properties have been established. 4...... Pressure drop - velocity in porous media is much simpler and faster to measure for air than for water. 5 For soils and similar materials, observations show a strong connection between pressure drop – 6 velocity relations for air and water, indicating that water pressure drop – velocity may be estimated 7...... water flow was 10 investigated using a common biofilter medium, Leca® consisting of rounded porous particles of 2 – 16 11 mm diameter. Pressure drop – velocity relations for water flow were measured for 14 different Leca ® 12 particle size fractions and compared to measurements of the pressure drop...

  16. Plants Clean Air and Water for Indoor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services Inc., founded by longtime government environmental scientist B.C. "Bill" Wolverton, is an environmental consulting firm that gives customers access to the results of his decades of cutting-edge bioremediation research. Findings about how to use plants to improve indoor air quality have been published in dozens of NASA technical papers and in the book, "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office." The book has now been translated into 12 languages and has been on the shelves of bookstores for nearly 10 years. A companion book, "Growing Clean Water: Nature's Solution to Water Pollution," explains how plants can clean waste water. Other discoveries include that the more air that is allowed to circulate through the roots of the plants, the more effective they are at cleaning polluted air; and that plants play a psychological role in welfare in that people recover from illness faster in the presence of plants. Wolverton Environmental is also working in partnership with Syracuse University, to engineer systems consisting of modular wicking filters tied into duct work and water supplies, essentially tying plant-based filters into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Also, the company has recently begun to assess the ability of the EcoPlanter to remove formaldehyde from interior environments. Wolverton Environmental is also in talks with designers of the new Stennis Visitor's Center, who are interested in using its designs for indoor air-quality filters

  17. Behaviour of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, Triton X-100 and Triton X-114 in mixed monolayer at the (water–air) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Synergetic effect of the binary and ternary mixtures of surfactants at their concentration equal to 1 · 10−5 M in the reduction of the water surface tension. -- Highlights: • Joos equation modified by us is useful for the ternary mixtures of surfactant. • Composition of the CTAB + TX-100 + TX-114 monolayer is not proportional to the bulk phase. • Synergetic effect of the TX-100, TX-114 and CTAB mixtures is confirmed by the adsorption efficiency. • Adsorption efficiency of ternary mixtures is not related to their effectiveness. -- Abstract: The measured values of the surface tension of aqueous solution of binary and ternary mixtures including CTAB, TX-100 and TX-114 were compared to those calculated from the Joos equation modified by us. It appeared that it is possible to predict, at the first approximation, the changes of the surface tension of aqueous solutions studied as a function of concentration of all possible binary and ternary mixtures in the range from 0 to the minimal value of their surface tension. However, the deviations of the calculated values of surface tension from those measured depend on the synergetic effect in the reduction of water surface tension. This effect was established by the values of the molecular interaction parameter calculated from the Rosen and Hua equations. From these equations the relative mole fraction of three surfactants in the mixed monolayer at the (water–air) interface was also determined and compared to that obtained by using surface excess concentrations of particular surfactants in this monolayer. As follows from this comparison the Rosen and Hua equations give the proper relation between the mole fraction of TX-100, TX-114 and CTAB in the monolayer but on the condition it is determined at the same concentration of each surfactant in the mixture. The synergetic effect of ternary mixture in the reduction of the water surface tension is also reflected in the changes of the values of the

  18. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    OpenAIRE

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; Velde, Ype

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in surface waters is controlled strongly by biogeochemical nutrient cycling processes at the soil-water interface. The mechanisms and rates of the iron oxidation process with associated binding of phos...

  19. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferron George A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes, in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Results A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure, repeatable (2. The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates, but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57% is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 μg/cm2 showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8 and oxidative stress (HO-1 markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 μg/cm2 ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. Conclusion The ALICE is a useful tool for dose-controlled nanoparticle (or solute exposure of cells at the air-liquid interface. Significant differences between cellular response after ZnO nanoparticle exposure under submerged and air-liquid interface conditions suggest that pharmaceutical and toxicological studies with inhaled (nano-particles should be performed under the more realistic air-liquid interface, rather than submerged cell conditions.

  20. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  1. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect

  2. Sorption of colloids, organics, and metals onto gas-water interfaces: Transport mechanisms and potential remediation technology. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Although contaminant sorption at mineral surfaces has received much recognition as a major mechanism controlling contaminant behavior in subsurface environments, virtually no attention has been given to the possibility of contaminant sorption at gas-water interfaces. Moreover, no effort has yet been advanced to optimize such interactions for the purpose of facilitating in-situ remediation. Gas-water interfaces, unlike water-solid interfaces, are mobile. Therefore, associations of contaminants with gas-water interfaces can be very important not only in subsurface contaminant distributions, but also in contaminant transport, and potentially in remediation. The first objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of interactions between contaminants and gas-water interfaces. The anticipated results will provide insights into the poorly understood phenomenon of contaminant interactions with the gas-water interface, and improve the current conceptual models of contaminant behavior in subsurface environments. The second purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of using surfactant stabilized microbubbles for in-situ remediation. Both pump-and-treat, and air sparging remediation methods are ineffective at displacing contaminants in zones which are advectively inaccessible. Stable microbubbles can migrate beyond preferential flow pathways and enter lower permeability zones by buoyant rise. The microbubbles can deliver oxygen and nutrients for promoting aerobic degradation of organic contaminants, and also deliver surfactants for emulsifying NAPLs.'

  3. Small-angle reflectometry of milk protein (β -casein) at the air/serum interface and its conformational changes due to fat content and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The surface structure of dispersed emulsions play a key role in stability of the system. Proteins being one of the most important surface-active components in foods stabilise interfaces by self-interaction, resulting in a stiff visco-elastic adsorbed layer. These interactions are sensitive to disruptive effects of lipids. Previous kinetics studies by the group 1 using the X-ray reflectivity method to investigate the surface adsorption of milk proteins indicate that β -casein had a stronger affinity for the air-liquid interface compared to whey proteins. It has been shown that initially a dense protein layer, with the thickness of 20 Angstroms is formed then a second more diffuse layer with lower volume density of protein follows. Here we report the conformational changes (with particular emphasise on the β -casein tail) occurred at the air-milk serum interface due to the effects of milk fat content, temperature and the milk preparation technique (ie homogenisation vs microfluidisation). In the effect of fat content on the adsorption of protein into the interface the key conclusion is that at lower temperatures the surface composition remains unchanged. The compositional changes, however, become significant at room temperature indicating adsorption of less reflective-water-soluble components into the surface layer. Repulsive interactions between casein aggregates are also involved. Microfluidised samples having the advantage of smaller particle size prove to be more stable to fat or temperature effects compared to the corresponding homogenised milks

  4. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  5. The structure of lipopolysaccharide from rough strains of escherichia coli at the air – liquid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer membrane (OM) of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope is an important biological interface as it initiates bacterial cell adhesion, activates innate immunity during infection, withstands environmental stresses and acts as a gate keeper to nutrients and toxins. The OM is a complex structure consisting of an asymmetric bilayer with an inner leaflet of phospholipids and an outer leaflet of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with LPS consisting of approximately 75 % of the Gram-negative bacterial surface. Due to the complexity of LPS there are very few OM models that include this important molecule and thus little is known about LPS structure at interfaces. In this work we used a truncated LPS from E. coli (Rc-LPS, consisting of Lipid A and the first seven sugars of the core polysaccharide) to form stable monolayers at the air – liquid interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectometry were used to probe the vertical structure of the monolayers, with the neutron reflectometry enhanced by the production of a deuterated Rc- LPS. The lateral structure was studied with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Brewster angle microscopy. It was found that at surface pressures above 20 mN/m the Rc-LPS monolayers could be resolved as hydrocarbon tails, inner headgroup, and outer headgroup of polysaccharide with increasing solvation from tails to outer headgroup. The lateral organisation of the hydrocarbon tails was of an oblique hexagonal unit cell across all surface pressures with only the tilt angle of the chains changing with surface pressure. The study of the monolayer structure provides the first complete analysis of a realistic E. coli OM surface model.

  6. Superhydrophobic surfaces of the water bug Notonecta glauca: a model for friction reduction and air retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Ditsche-Kuru

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobic surfaces of plants and animals are of great interest for biomimetic applications. Whereas the self-cleaning properties of superhydrophobic surfaces have been extensively investigated, their ability to retain an air film while submerged under water has not, in the past, received much attention. Nevertheless, air retaining surfaces are of great economic and ecological interest because an air film can reduce friction of solid bodies sliding through the water. This opens perspectives for biomimetic applications such as low friction fluid transport or friction reduction on ship hulls. For such applications the durability of the air film is most important. While the air film on most superhydrophobic surfaces usually lasts no longer than a few days, a few semi-aquatic plants and insects are able to hold an air film over a longer time period. Currently, we found high air film persistence under hydrostatic conditions for the elytra of the backswimmer Notonecta glauca which we therefore have chosen for further investigations. In this study, we compare the micro- and nanostructure of selected body parts (sternites, upper side of elytra, underside of elytra in reference to their air retaining properties. Our investigations demonstrate outstanding air film persistence of the upper side of the elytra of Notonecta glauca under hydrostatic and hydrodynamic conditions. This hierarchically structured surface was able to hold a complete air film under hydrostatic conditions for longer than 130 days while on other body parts with simple structures the air film showed gaps (underside of elytra or even vanished completely after a few days (sternites. Moreover, the upper side of the elytra was able to keep an air film up to flow velocities of 5 m/s. Obviously the complex surface structure with tiny dense microtrichia and two types of larger specially shaped setae is relevant for this outstanding ability. Besides high air film persistence, the

  7. Two-Dimensional Heterodyne-Detected VSFG Spectroscopy of Water Molecules at Charged Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation (2D-HD-VSFG spectroscopy of water at interfaces has been realized for the first time. In the present study, 2D-HD-VSFG spectra were measured at a charged monolayer / isotopically diluted water interface. In contrast to the 2D-IR spectrum of bulk isotopically diluted water, the 2D-HD- VSFG of the charged interface shows a narrower bleach band in the higher frequency region immediately after the photoexcitation. The results clearly show that the dynamics of the water at the charged interface is different from that in the bulk, reflecting the different environment where water molecules are located.

  8. Investigations of hydraulic operating conditions of air lift pump with three types of air-water mixers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalenik Marek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of hydraulic operating conditions of air lift pump with three types of air-water mixers. The paper presents the analysis of results of the investigations concerning the influence of various constructive solutions of the air-water mixers on hydraulic operating conditions of the air lift pump. The scope of the investigations encompassed the determination of characteristics of delivery head and delivery rate for three types of air-water mixers applied in the constructed air lift pump. Using the obtained results, the efficiency of the three types of air-water mixers applied in this air lift pump was determined. The analysis was carried out and there was checked whether the improved analytical Stenning-Martin model can be used to design air lift pumps with the air-water mixers of these types. The highest capacity in the water transport was reached by the air lift pump with the 1st type air-water mixer, the lowest one – with the 3rd type air-water mixer. The water flow in the air lift pump increases along with the rise in the air flow. The lower are the hydraulic losses generated during flow of the air flux by the air-water mixer, the higher is the air lift pump capacity. Along with the rise in the water delivery head, the capacity of the air lift pump decreases. The highest efficiency is reached by the air lift pump with the 1st type air-water mixer, the lowest – with the 3st type air-water mixer. The efficiency of the air lift pump for the three investigated types of air-water mixers decreases along with the rise in air flow rate and water delivery head. The values of submergence ratio (h/L of the delivery pipe, calculated with the use of the improved analytical Stenning-Martin model, coincide quite well with the values of h/L determined from the measurements.

  9. Properties of Nanocrystalline Thin Films of Metals and Semiconductors Obtained at the Water-Oil Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, Gemma Louise

    2013-01-01

    The natural world artfully harnesses the interface between immiscible liquids tocarry out vital processes such as growing bones and contracting muscles. In contrast,synthetic chemists generally regard such an interface as an intractable barrier to becircumvented by the use of phase transfer reagents. A small number of studies haveexplored the use of the water-oil interface to synthesize inorganic nanostructures, materialsthat have assumed great significance in recent times. In these studies, ...

  10. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  11. Behavior of Water Jet Accompanied with Air Suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hironobu; Ishido, Tsutomu; Ihara, Akio

    In order to atomize a liquid, the authors have investigated the behavior of air-water jets. In a series of experiments, we have discovered a strange phenomenon that the water jet accompanied with air suction from the free surface has made a periodic radial splash of water drop. The purpose of the present paper is to clear out the origin of this phenomenon and the behavior of water jet accompanied with air suction. The behavior of water jet has been photographed by a digital camera aided with a flashlight and high-speed video camera. Those experiments enable us to find the origin of a periodic radial splash due to a formation of single air bubble at the flow separation region inside the nozzle and due to explosive expansion of the bubble after injected in the free space. In order to analyze the radial splash of water, we have conducted the equation of spherical liquid membrane. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the experimental results and good agreement has been obtained in radial expansion velocity.

  12. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  13. New type of capillary for use as ion beam collimator and air-vacuum interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoytschew, V.; Schulte-Borchers, M.; Božičević Mihalića, Iva; Perez, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Glass capillaries offer a unique way to combine small diameter ion beam collimation with an air-vacuum interface for ambient pressure ion beam applications. Usually they have an opening diameter of a few microns, limiting the air inflow sufficiently to maintain stable conditions on the vacuum side. As the glass capillaries generally are quite thin and fragile, handling of the capillary in the experiment becomes difficult. They also introduce an X-ray background produced by the capillary wall material, which has to be shielded or subtracted from the data for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) applications. To overcome both drawbacks, a new type of conical glass capillary has been developed. It has a higher wall thickness eliminating the low energy X-ray background produced by common capillaries and leading to a more robust lens. The results obtained in first tests show, that this new capillary is suitable for ion beam collimation and encourage further work on the capillary production process to provide thick wall capillaries with an outlet diameter in the single digit micro- or even nanometre range.

  14. Sensible heat flux at the spray-laden air-sea interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D. H.; Sullivan, P.

    2013-12-01

    Air-sea exchange processes are typically parameterized in large-scale numerical models owing to the prohibitively large length and time scales involved. For example, intensity predictions of tropical cyclones rely heavily on accurate knowledge of the fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture from the ocean surface, but these quantities must be computed using bulk flux coefficients since small-scale exchange processes cannot be fully resolved. As a result, these exchange coefficients attempt to represent a large number of physical processes, whose individual roles are difficult to distinguish. One such near-surface process is the formation and transport of sea spray, which has been identified as a possible source of flux modification. In this study, we investigate the role of spray in the turbulent transfer of sensible heat at the air-sea interface using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and a Lagrangian point-particle tracking technique. This is a follow-up to our previous work where the influence of spray on the transfer of momentum was examined. Our idealized simulations suggest that sea spray has the ability to greatly enhance the transfer of sensible heat at the ocean surface, in agreement with existing sea spray models. The physical explanation of this behavior and a discussion of its apparent contradiction with observational studies will be included. Simulation snapshot showing particle-turbulence interaction

  15. Air sparging and soil vapor extraction to remediate ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Air Sparging and Soil Vapor Extraction System was chosen to remediate petroleum impacted ground water over traditional remedial alternatives, such as ''pump and treat'', to expedite site closure. Field pilot testing, computer modeling and cost benefit analyses performed for several alternatives. Air Sparging and Soil Vapor Extraction pilot studies proved this technology to be the most effective with respect to remedial and economic concerns. Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) were closed at the facility located in North Eastern North Carolina in August of 1992. During UST closure, petroleum impacted ground water and soils were encountered. ATEC performed a Comprehensive Site assessment to delineate the impacted soil and ground water plume. Following completion of the site assessment, a Corrective Action Plan was prepared. As part of the Corrective Action Plan preparation, field pilot testing was performed to evaluate remedial alternatives and provide information for full scale design. The full scale treatment system was installed and started in January 1994. This effective Remedial System was selected over other options due to successful pilot testing results with site closure petitioning scheduled within 12 to 14 months after start up. The Air Sparging System, properly applied, is an effective and ''quick'' remedial option with no generation of ground water for disposal and permitting. This paper concentrates on the Air Sparging application applied at this North Carolina site. Although Vapor extraction was also implemented, this presentation does not elaborate on vapor extraction design or implementation and only discusses vapor extraction where it is directly related to the Air Sparging System

  16. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  17. Emission to air, water and ground: legislation in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses Norwegian legislation on emission to air, water and ground. Pollution in the sense of the law is defined as ''the addition of solid matter, gas or liquid to air, water or ground''. The concept of pollution is, however, more far-reaching as even noise, light and radiation may be regarded as pollution although these are not discussed. Any pollution is prohibited. But there are two exceptions: commonly accepted pollutions such as arising from wood burning and agriculture, and emissions allowed by special permission from the National State Pollution Control Authority. The article also discusses liability issues

  18. Optical imaging of air and water bubbles flowing through oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Guilherme; Martelli, Cicero; Patyk, Rodolfo L.; da Silva, Marco J.; Vendruscolo, Tiago P.; Morales, Rigoberto E. M.

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of optically detecting air and water bubbles flowing through the oil is presented. By scanning wavelengths it is possible to add functionalities by implementing a spectroscopy based chemical detection that can directly lead to chemical detection and imaging and/or chemical species tomography of flowing fluids. In this article, a halogen lamp (175 - 1000 W and centered at 1.2 mm) and an IR-array camera (8-12 μm, 31 x 32 pixels and 10 fps) is used to observe the three-phase flow involving oil, air and water.

  19. Air and Soil Water Vapour Density Variations in Akungba Akoko

    OpenAIRE

    Afolabi O.M.

    2015-01-01

    – A temperature and humidity measuring equipment constructed with Silicon lab Si7015 integrated circuit sensor was used to monitor temperature and humidity, compute water saturation and vapour densities for air and soil and to interpret three days variations in Akungba Akoko. The sensors were inserted 5 cm into the soil and 2m away in the troposphere. Two hour records of both parameters were taken from 9 am to 5 pm for 3 days. Air and soil water saturation and vapour density data were compute...

  20. Fiber-optic based instrumentation for water and air monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper real-time in-situ water and air monitoring capabilities based on fiber-optic sensing technology are described. This relatively new technology combines advances in fiber optic and optoelectronics with chemical spectorscopic techniques to enable field environmental monitoring of sub ppm quantities of specific pollutants. The advantages of this technology over conventional sampling methods are outlined. As it is the more developed area the emphasis is on water quality monitoring rather than air. Examples of commercially available, soon-to be available and laboratory systems are presented. One such example is a system used to detect hydrocarbon spills and leaking of underground hydrocarbon storage tanks

  1. A Monthly Water-Balance Model Driven By a Graphical User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a monthly water-balance model driven by a graphical user interface, referred to as the Thornthwaite monthly water-balance program. Computations of monthly water-balance components of the hydrologic cycle are made for a specified location. The program can be used as a research tool, an assessment tool, and a tool for classroom instruction.

  2. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  3. Natural attenuation of organic contaminants at the interface between groundwater and surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middeldorp, P.; Staps, S.; Rijnaarts, H. [TNO-MEP Environment, Energy and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Roelofsen, F.; Valstar, J. [TNO-NITG, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Smits, J. [WL/Delf Hydraulics (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    There are strong indications that the interface between groundwater and surface water plays an important role in the natural degradation of organic contaminants (NA-interface). This is especially the case for mobile contaminants that are relatively persistent in an anaerobic (subsurface) environment, and are mineralised relatively easy under more oxidized environmental conditions (e.g. benzene, chlorobenzene, vinyl chloride, the light aliphatic fraction of mineral oil, etc.). These compounds are often also present as degradation products of natural or stimulated in situ biodegradation processes. Previous investigations have indicated indirectly that NA-interface processes contribute to a reduction of contaminant flux into surface water systems. Until now, no straightforward assessment and quantification of NA-interface has been performed. Moreover, limit values for allowable influx of contamination from a site into a surface water system do not exist. This prevents a possible beneficial use of NA-interface processes as a part of a cost-effective and integrated soil and water quality management. This project aims to gain more understanding of the occurrence of NA-interface processes, to quantify their contribution to emission reduction towards the surface water system and, in case of substantial contribution, to promote application of NA-interface as a part of a cost-effective integrated environmental management of contaminated sites and surrounding water bodies. The project's starting point is that the surface water is regarded as an object of risk and not as a reactor. Thus, effective degradation in the interface does not move environmental problems to surface water systems, but eliminates contaminants by natural occurring processes, thus protecting the aquatic ecosystem. (orig.)

  4. Realistic modelling of water/solid interfaces from ab Initio molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Tocci, G.

    2014-01-01

    Water/solid interfaces are of utmost importance to a number of technological processes. Theoretical studies, based on ab initio approaches are suitable to unveil processes occurring at water/solid interfaces and can therefore be instrumental to delineate guidelines to improve the efficiency of these processes. In this thesis we study several systems of current interest using ab initio methods based on density functional theory (DFT). By going often beyond the use of standard DFT methods and a...

  5. Water, Air, Earth and Cosmic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc, which

  6. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  7. Structural organization of liquid crystals at liquid crystal-air interface: Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and computational simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadati, Monirosadat; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Bu, Wei; Sevgen, Emre; Liang, Zhu; Erol, Cem; Taheri Qazvini, Nader; Rahimi, Mohammad; Lin, Binhua; Roux, Benoit; Schlossman, Mark; de Pablo, Juan J.

    Numerous applications of liquid crystals (LC) rely on control of molecular orientation at an interface. However, little is known about the precise molecular structure of such interfaces. In this work, we have performed synchrotron X-ray reflectivity measurements accompanied by an advanced theoretical and computational analysis to study the structural organization of liquid crystals at the air-liquid crystal interface. The X-ray reflectivity was measured from two nematic (5CB) and smectic (8CB) liquid crystals at several temperatures, in the nematic phase and above the nematic-isotropic transition. Our computational simulations and X-ray reflectivity results indicate that in the case of 8CB nematic phase, incipient bulk smectic fluctuations are pinned at the interface to form temperature-dependent multilayers at the interface. Such layers can extend far from the interface. However, the interface of 5CB in the nematic phase exhibits a relatively small number of layers. These measurements will be extended to the study of the LC-aqueous electrolyte interfaces to understand the effects of electrostatic interactions and external stimuli on the interfacial anchoring energy and LC orientational ordering.

  8. Modern methods of water and air purification from mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Dolina, L. F.; Chornaya, A. Yu.; Nagornaya, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    People can be exposed to mercury in any form in different circumstances. Depending on the amount of mercury and duration of exposure potential acute poisoning, chronic poisoning, micromercurialism. As of release into the environment (air, sediment, water), it undergoes a series of complex transformations. Methylmercury is the most highly toxic form of mercury, it is especially enhanced in the food chain. Extreme danger as contaminants in natural waters are heavy metals, have a toxic effect on...

  9. Unveiling Microscopic Structures of Charged Water Interfaces by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Chieh; Zha, Shuai; Liu, Xing; Yang, Shanshan; Guo, Pan; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping; Shen, Y Ron; Tian, Chuanshan

    2016-01-01

    A sum-frequency spectroscopy scheme is developed that allows the measurement of vibrational spectra of the interfacial molecular structure of charged water interfaces. The application of this scheme to a prototype lipid-aqueous interface as a demonstration reveals an interfacial hydrogen-bonding water layer structure that responds sensitively to the charge state of the lipid headgroup and its interaction with specific ions. This novel technique provides unique opportunities to search for better understanding of electrochemistry and biological aqueous interfaces at a deeper molecular level. PMID:26799031

  10. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body

  11. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  12. Flooding velocities for air and water in vertical tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of the limiting, or flooding, velocities for countercurrent annular flow of air and water in vertical tubes is reported. The data are correlated in terms of dimensionless groups which are similar to those already in use for describing flooding in packed towers. The relevance of the results to the problem of burnout in boiling equipment is discussed. (author)

  13. Water, air and fire at work in Hero's machines

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Known as the Michanikos, Hero of Alexandria is considered the inventor of the world's first steam engine and of many other sophisticated devices. Here we discuss three of them as described in his book "Pneumatica". These machines, working with water, air and fire, are clear examples of the deep knowledge of fluid dynamics reached by the Hellenistic scientists.

  14. Role of cationic and nonionic surfactants on biocidal efficiency in diesel-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, N; Maruthamuthu, S; Palaniswamy, N

    2007-06-15

    Biodegradation occurs at the interface between diesel and water. The microbial contamination can result in inhibitor/fuel degradation that leads to the unacceptable level of turbidity, filter plugging, corrosion of storage tanks, pipeline and souring of stored products. Hence, selection of biocides/inhibitors is an important aspect in petroleum product transporting pipeline. Three biocides (cationic and nonionic) were employed to study the biodegradation of diesel in diesel-water interface. The biocidal efficiency on biodegradation of diesel was examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Polyoxyethyleneglycol dodecyl ether [BRIJ-35] and polyethylene glycol-p-isooctylphenyl ether [TRITON-X-100] had higher bactericidal efficiency than Dodecyl ethyl dimethyl ammonium bromide [DDAB]. But the cationic biocide (DDAB) gave good biocidal efficiency at the interface. The data are explained in terms of a model that postulates the formation of "micelle" at the diesel-water interface. PMID:17363228

  15. Balancing soft elasticity and low surface polarity in films of charged BSA capsules at air/fluid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Madhumitha; Jaganathan, Maheshkumar; Dhathathreyan, Aruna; Miller, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between charged BSA colloids and the buffer at air/fluid interface has been studied using spread films of the capsules of the protein prepared at pH 4.5 and 7.5 (below and above the pI of BSA). Surface pressure-surface concentration plots, interfacial dilational rheology and Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation have been used to characterize the films. The study shows that below the pI of the protein, the positively charged colloids entrain more water on the surface which leads to partial neutralization of the charges. Results suggest that the charged capsules are elastic due to the strongly adsorbed protein layers that restrict deformation and any small shape fluctuations is likely due to the distortion of the viscoelastic surface layer at pH=4.5. Capsules of BSA behave as 'soft elastic membrane' with interfacial properties lying between that of an elastic membrane and a slightly soluble diffuse capsule with low interfacial tension. Such elastic capsules would find applications in drug delivery and food colloids. PMID:27318961

  16. Air and water quality monitor assessment of life support subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Ken; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Holder, D.; Humphries, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preprotype air revitalization and water reclamation subsystems (Mole Sieve, Sabatier, Static Feed Electrolyzer, Trace Contaminant Control, and Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporative Subsystem) were operated and tested independently and in an integrated arrangement. During each test, water and/or gas samples were taken from each subsystem so that overall subsystem performance could be determined. The overall test design and objectives for both subsystem and integrated subsystem tests were limited, and no effort was made to meet water or gas specifications. The results of chemical analyses for each of the participating subsystems are presented along with other selected samples which were analyzed for physical properties and microbiologicals.

  17. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Nait Chabane

    Full Text Available The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I egg-shaped (27%; II ball-shaped (50%; and III irregular pellicles (23%. One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen.

  18. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  19. Evaluation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reduction Kinetics Related to Liquid-Air-Interface Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid-air interface (LAI) corrosion has been a concern for causing leaks in the carbon steel tanks used for holding high-level radioactive liquid waste. To assist in understanding the mechanism of LAI corrosion, the kinetics of nitrate and nitrite reduction reactions were investigated electrochemically. Cyclic voltammetry and cathodic polarization measurements indicated that the nitrite reduction reaction exhibited faster kinetics than the nitrate reduction reaction at higher cathodic overpotential. However, the primary reduction reaction at the open circuit potential under aerated conditions was the oxygen reduction reaction. The reduction of residual oxygen was also the dominant cathodic reaction at open circuit potential in deaerated conditions. Moreover, the kinetics of oxygen reduction on steel electrodes were significantly influenced by the sample immersion conditions (partial vs. full) for aerated liquid nuclear waste simulants, but not for deaerated conditions. Lastly, the gaseous products formed during LAI corrosion were analyzed using the gas detector tube method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and found to contain NH3, NO2 and NO. However, the results suggested that these products were caused by the local acidification generated by the hydrolysis of cations after LAI corrosion underwent extensive propagation, instead of being directly reduced in alkaline conditions. Thus, the results in this work showed that the kinetics of nitrate and nitrite reduction could not generate a salt concentration cell in the meniscus region to cause LAI corrosion

  20. Effect of water and air flow on concentric tubular solar water desalting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We optimized the augmentation of condense by enhanced desalination methodology. ► We measured ambient together with solar radiation intensity. ► The effect of cooling air and water flowing over the cover was studied. -- Abstract: This work reports an innovative design of tubular solar still with a rectangular basin for water desalination with flowing water and air over the cover. The daily distillate output of the system is increased by lowering the temperature of water flowing over it (top cover cooling arrangement). The fresh water production performance of this new still is observed in Sri Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore (11° North, 77° East), India. The water production rate with no cooling flow was 2050 ml/day (410 ml/trough). However, with cooling air flow, production increased to 3050 ml/day, and with cooling water flow, it further increased to 5000 ml/day. Despite the increased cost of the water cooling system, the increased output resulted in the cost of distilled water being cut in roughly half. Diurnal variations of a few important parameters are observed during field experiments such as water temperature, cover temperature, air temperature, ambient temperature and distillate output.

  1. Structure, Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics at the Water - Graphene Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Tod; Schwartz, Craig; Lawler, Keith; Prendergast, David

    The recent discovery of an ordered two-dimensional phase of water with a square lattice between graphene sheets has led to tremendous interest in the structure of confined water, particularly under pressure. Despite being recently discovered, this finding is fiercely being debated, with other researchers suggesting that the observed structures is due to the presence of NaCl, while various theoretical models predict the formation of water ice between graphene only under enormous external pressures. Herein, by examining the EELS data, combined with simulated spectroscopy calculations and molecular dynamic simulations, we examine the thermodynamic properties of nano-encapsulated water, and demonstrate how charge transfer and chemical defects alters the phase diagram. This work was performed as a user project at the Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Dosimetry Modeling for Predicting Radiolytic Production at the Spent Fuel - Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William H.; Kline, Amanda J.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2006-04-30

    Modeling of the alpha, beta, and gamma dose from spent fuel as a function of particle size and fuel to water ratio was examined. These doses will be combined with modeling of G values and interactions to determine the concentration of various species formed at the fuel water interface and their affect on dissolution rates.

  3. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortony, Julia H.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M.; Kausik, Ravinath; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi

    2011-01-01

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (~r-3) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (=100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ~10 Å distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  4. Charge-based forces at the Nafion-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ronnie; Pollack, Gerald H

    2013-02-26

    Interfacial water lying next to hydrophilic surfaces has been shown to be spectroscopically, mechanically, and electrically distinct from bulk water. Interfacial water has also been shown to exclude negatively and positively charged microspheres and has thus become known as the "exclusion zone". Measurements have demonstrated that exclusion zones exhibit a negative electrical potential on the order of -100 mV relative to bulk water, with a corresponding distribution of positive protons in the bulk water region beyond the exclusion zone. This separation of charge is hypothesized to create an electrostatic force between the exclusion zone and the proton-enriched zone beyond. To test this hypothesis, a hydrophilic Nafion ring was attached to the tip of a deflectable ribbonlike force sensor. The sensor was designed to obstruct the flow of protons from one side of the lever to the other, so that any proton-based force would remain unilateral. pH-sensitive dye measurements confirmed that the protons were largely confined to one side. When the lever assembly was exposed to water, the sensor deflected toward the protons. Over a period of 20 min, deflection amounted to approximately 20 μm, corresponding to a force of approximately 22 μN. Hence, electrostatic forces are confirmed. If exclusion zones exist ubiquitously at hydrophilic surfaces, including biological surfaces, then the resulting electrostatic forces may play significant roles in many biological phenomena including adhesion and protein folding. PMID:23311934

  5. Connecting Water Quality With Air Quality Through Microbial Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M. Elias

    Aerosol production from surface waters results in the transfer of aquatic materials (including nutrients and bacteria) to air. These materials can then be transported by onshore winds to land, representing a biogeochemical connection between aquatic and terrestrial systems not normally considered. In urban waterfront environments, this transfer could result in emissions of pathogenic bacteria from contaminated waters. Despite the potential importance of this link, sources, near-shore deposition, identity and viability of microbial aerosols are largely uncharacterized. This dissertation focuses on the environmental and biological mechanisms that define this water-air connection, as a means to build our understanding of the biogeochemical, biogeographical, and public health implications of the transfer of surface water materials to the near-shore environment in both urban and non-urban environments. The effects of tidal height, wind speed and fog on coastal aerosols and microbial content were first quantified on a non-urban coast of Maine, USA. Culture-based, culture-independent, and molecular methods were used to simultaneously sample microbial aerosols while monitoring meteorological parameters. Aerosols at this site displayed clear marine influence and high concentrations of ecologically-relevant nutrients. Coarse aerosol concentrations significantly increased with tidal height, onshore wind speed, and fog presence. Tidal height and fog presence did not significantly influence total microbial aerosol concentrations, but did have a significant effect on culturable microbial aerosol fallout. Molecular analyses of the microbes settling out of near-shore aerosols provided further evidence of local ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes. Aerosol and surface ocean bacterial communities shared species and in general were dominated by organisms previously sampled in marine environments. Fog presence strengthened the microbial connection between water and land through

  6. Stationary rotary force waves on the liquid-air core interface of a swirl atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, J. J.; Cooper, D.; Yule, A. J.; Nasr, G. G.

    2015-11-01

    A one-dimensional wave equation, applicable to the waves on the surface of the air-core of a swirl atomizer is derived analytically, by analogy to the similar one-dimensional wave equation derivation for shallow-water gravity waves. In addition an analogy to the flow of water over a weir is used to produce an analytical derivation of the flow over the lip of the outlet of a swirl atomizer using the principle of maximum flow. The principle of maximum flow is substantiated by reference to continuity of the discharge in the direction of streaming. For shallow-water gravity waves, the phase velocity is the same expression as for the critical velocity over the weir. Similarly, in the present work, the wave phase velocity on the surface of the air-core is shown to be the same expression as for the critical velocity for the flow at the outlet. In addition, this wave phase velocity is shown to be the square root of the product of the radial acceleration and the liquid thickness, as analogous with the wave phase velocity for shallow water gravity waves, which is the square root of the product of the acceleration due to gravity and the water depth. The work revisits the weirs and flumes work of Binnie et al. but using a different methodology. The results corroborate with the work of Binnie. High speed video, Laser Doppler Anemometry and deflected laser beam experimental work has been carried out on an oversize Perspex (Plexiglas) swirl atomizer. Three distinctive types of waves were detected: helical striations, low amplitude random ripples and low frequency stationary waves. It is the latter wave type that is considered further in this article. The experimentally observed waves appear to be stationary upon the axially moving flow. The mathematical analysis allows for the possibility of a negative value for the phase velocity expression. Therefore the critical velocity and the wave phase velocity do indeed lead to stationary waves in the atomizer. A quantitative comparison

  7. Volume entrained in the wake of a disc intruding into an oil-water interface

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2016-01-01

    An object moving through a plane interface into a fluid deforms the interface in such a way that fluid from one side of the interface is entrained into the other side, a phenomenon known as Darwin's drift. We investigate this phenomenon experimentally using a disc which is started exactly at the interface of two immiscible fluids, namely oil and water. First, we observe that due to the density difference between the two fluids the deformation of the interface is influenced by gravity, and show that there exits a time window of universal behavior. Secondly, we show by comparing with boundary integral simulations that, even though the deformation is universal, our results cannot be fully explained by potential flow solutions. We attribute this difference to the starting vortex, which is created in the wake of the disc. Universal behavior is preserved, however, because the size and strength of the vortex shows the same universality as the potential flow solution.

  8. Heat exchange at air-sea interface in the South China Sea during monsoon periods in 1986

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Disheng; LU Boming; FENG Weizhong; XU Jianping; YAN Jinghua; ZHAO Xue; ZHOU Shuihua; ZHANG Jiwei; QIAO Guanyu; LIN Fu

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the interaction between the sea and monsoon in the South China Sea, the heat exchanges at air-sea interface during monsoon periods in 1986 were calculated using observational data. It shows that when the summer monsoon bursts and prevails over the South China Sea, the air-sea interface heat exchange is strong and the latent heat rises rapidly in the intertropical convergence zone and the tropic cyclone system near 20.49°N, 114.14°E. On May 24, 1986, the sensible heat became positive in the typhoon system. The heating exchange indicates that heat is transported from ocean to atmosphere, with major contribution of latent heat. When the summer monsoon prevails over the South China Sea and the weather is fine, even SST (sea surface temperature) is high, but sensible heat appears to be negative. The heat exchange indicates that heat is transported from atmosphere to ocean, with major contribution of short-wave radiation absorbed by sea surface and sensible heat. When summer monsoon is over and the northeast monsoon prevails over the South China Sea, the heat exchange at air-sea interface is very strong. The heating exchange shows that the ocean heats the atmosphere, with major contribution of latent heat when cold air arrives at the sea surface and the sensible heat rises to positive rapidly. Therefore it can be concluded that the heat exchange at air-sea interface is different from the SST in South China Sea. When the summer monsoon prevails over the South China Sea, the main trend is the ocean responding to the atmosphere.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Bilberry Extract Water-in-Oil Emulsions: Sensing the Water-Oil Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Frank, Kerstin; Zehentbauer, Florian M; Schuchmann, Heike P

    2016-01-01

    Water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions are of great interest in many areas of the life sciences, including food technology, bioprocess engineering, and pharmaceuticals. Such emulsions are complex multi-component systems and the molecular mechanisms which lead to a stable emulsion are yet to be fully understood. In this work, attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy is applied to a series of w/o emulsions of an aqueous anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract dispersed in a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil phase. The content of the emulsifier polyglycerin-polyricinoleat (PGPR) has been varied systematically in order to investigate whether or not its concentration has an impact on the molecular stabilization mechanisms. The molecular stabilization is accessed by a careful analysis of the IR spectrum, where changes in the vibrational frequencies and signal strengths indicate alterations of the molecular environment at the water/oil interface. The results suggest that adding emulsifier in excess of 1% by weight does not lead to an enhanced stabilization of the emulsion. PMID:27089376

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Bilberry Extract Water-in-Oil Emulsions: Sensing the Water-Oil Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Kiefer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-oil (w/o emulsions are of great interest in many areas of the life sciences, including food technology, bioprocess engineering, and pharmaceuticals. Such emulsions are complex multi-component systems and the molecular mechanisms which lead to a stable emulsion are yet to be fully understood. In this work, attenuated total reflection (ATR infrared (IR spectroscopy is applied to a series of w/o emulsions of an aqueous anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract dispersed in a medium chain triglyceride (MCT oil phase. The content of the emulsifier polyglycerin-polyricinoleat (PGPR has been varied systematically in order to investigate whether or not its concentration has an impact on the molecular stabilization mechanisms. The molecular stabilization is accessed by a careful analysis of the IR spectrum, where changes in the vibrational frequencies and signal strengths indicate alterations of the molecular environment at the water/oil interface. The results suggest that adding emulsifier in excess of 1% by weight does not lead to an enhanced stabilization of the emulsion.

  11. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (∼r-3) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 μl) and dilute (≥100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ∼10 A distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  12. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  13. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF_{6}-air interface with a minimum-surface feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF_{6}-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability. PMID:26871149

  14. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF6-air interface with a minimum-surface feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF6-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  15. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  16. Water percolation through the root-soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Pascal; Kroener, Eva; Vontobel, Peter; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Plant roots exude a significant fraction of the carbon assimilated via photosynthesis into the soil. The mucilaginous fraction of root exudates affects the hydraulic properties of the soil near the roots, the so called rhizosphere, in a remarkable and dynamic way. After drying, mucilage becomes hydrophobic and limits the rewetting of the rhizosphere. Here, we aim to find a quantitative relation between rhizosphere rewetting, particle size, soil matric potential and mucilage concentration. We used a pore-network model in which mucilage was randomly distributed in a cubic lattice. The general idea was that the mucilage concentration per solid soil surface increases the contact angle between the liquid and solid phases consequently limiting the rewetting of pores covered with dry mucilage. We used the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the mucilage concentration at which pores are not wettable for varying particle sizes and matric potentials. Then, we simulated the percolation of water across a cubic lattice. Our simulations predicted that above a critical mucilage concentration water could not flow through the porous medium. The critical mucilage concentration decreased with increasing particle size and decreasing matric potential. The model was compared with experiments of capillary rise in soils of different particle size and mucilage concentration. The experiments confirmed the percolation behaviour of the rhizosphere rewetting. Mucilage turned hydrophobic at concentrations above 0.1 mg/cm². The critical mucilage concentration at matric potential of -2.5 hPa was ca. 1% [g/g] for fine sand and 0.1 % [g/g] for coarse sand. Our conceptual model is a first step towards a better understanding of the water dynamics in the rhizosphere during rewetting and it can be used to predict in what soil textures rhizosphere water repellency becomes a critical issue for root water uptake.

  17. Similarity of coupled heat and mass transfer between air-water and air-liquid desiccant direct-contact systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao-Hua; Jiang, Yi [Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Zhen [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-12-15

    Packed-bed heat and mass transfer devices are widely used in air-conditioning systems, such as cooling tower, evaporative cooler of air-water direct-contact devices, dehumidifier and regenerator of air-liquid desiccant direct-contact devices. Similarities of heat and mass transfer characteristics between air-water and air-liquid desiccant devices are considered and investigated in this paper. Same reachable handling region of outlet air can be obtained for both air-water and air-liquid desiccant devices, which is among three boundary lines, isenthalpic line of inlet air, iso-relative humidity line of inlet fluid (water or desiccant), and the connecting line of inlet statuses of air and fluid. Inlet conditions of air and fluid affect heat and mass transfer characteristics to some extent, so that a zonal method is proposed only according to the relative statuses of inlet air to inlet fluid. Four zones, dehumidification zones A, D and regeneration zones B, C, are divided for air-desiccant direct-contact devices. The first three zones A, B and C are divided for air-water direct-contact devices, with the same zonal properties as those of air-desiccant devices. In order to obtain better humidification performance, fluid should be heated (in zone C) rather than air (in zone B). And fluid should be cooled (in zone A) rather than air (in zone D) to obtain better dehumidification performance. Counter-flow pattern should be applied for best mass transfer performance in the same conditions within the recommended zone A or C, while parallel-flow pattern is the best in zone B or D. (author)

  18. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  19. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging (OKC, OK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  20. Dynamic modeling of an air source heat pump water heater

    OpenAIRE

    Fardoun, Farouk; Ibrahim, Oussama; Zoughaib, Assaad

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a dynamic simulation model to predict the performance of an air source heat pump water heater (ASHPWH). The mathematical model consists of submodels of the basic system components i.e. evaporator, condenser, compressor, and expansion valve. These submodels were built based on fundamental principles of heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, empirical relationships and manufacturer's data as necessary. The model simulation was carried out u...

  1. Induced activity in accelerator structures, air and water

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    A summary is given of several 'rules of thumb' which can be used to predict the formation and decay of radionuclides in the structure of accelerators together with the dose rates from the induced radioactivity. Models are also given for the activation of gases (air of the accelerator vault) and liquids (in particular cooling water), together with their transport front the activation region to the release point. (18 refs).

  2. Fractal analysis methods for solid alkane monolayer domains at SiO2/air interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knüfing, Lydia; Schollmeyer, Hauke; Riegler, Hans; Mecke, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    A systematic evaluation of various fractal analysis methods is essential for studying morphologies of finite and noisy experimental patterns such as domains of long chain alkanes at SiO(2)/air interfaces. The derivation of trustworthy fractal dimensions crucially relies on the definition of confidence intervals for the assumed scaling range. We demonstrate that the determination of the intervals can be improved largely by comparing the scaling behavior of different morphological measures (area, boundary, curvature). We show that the combination of area and boundary data from coarse-grained structures obtained with the box-counting method reveals clear confidence limits and thus credible morphological data. This also holds for the Minkowski density method. It also reveals the confidence range. Its main drawback, the larger swing-in period at the lower cutoff compared to the box-counting method, is compensated by more details on the scaling behavior of area, boundary, and curvature. The sandbox method is less recommendable. It essentially delivers the same data as box-counting, but it is more susceptible to finite size effects at the lower cutoff. It is found that the domain morphology depends on the surface coverage of alkanes. The individual domains at low surface coverage have a fractal dimension of approximately 1.7, whereas at coverages well above 50% the scaling dimension is 2 with a large margin of uncertainty at approximately 50% coverage. This change in morphology is attributed to a crossover from a growth regime dominated by diffusion-limited aggregation of individual domains to a regime where the growth is increasingly affected by annealing and the interaction of solid growth fronts which approach each other and thus compete for the alkane supply. PMID:15667180

  3. IVO/AIR-WATER-CCFL, Air/water countercurrent flow limitation experiments with full-scale fuel bundle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of test facility: The test facility consists of a vertical flow channel with different internals. The test section was principally made of transparent acrylic material to allow visual observations. One fuel bundle top area structure of the Soviet-type pressurized water reactors VVER-1000 and VVER-440 in full scale was the principal test section. In order to get experimental data on the effects of different parameters on the CCFL behaviour, various configurations of the principal test sections were studied. Plate 1 corresponds to the perforated upper tie plate in full scale of the reactor VVER-1000 and plate 12 to the upper tie plate in full scale of the reactor VVER-440. 2 - Description of test: The procedure of the model tests consisted of establishing the air inlet flow rate and then increasing the water flow rate so that the given liquid head above the perforated plate, or above the fuel rod bundle when the flow channel provided only with the bundle was reached. After the stationary conditions maintained for a prolonged period, the injected water and air flows, and the average height of the mixture level above the perforated plate were registered. All reported air and water flow rates are average values at each test point. The distance of the water inlet from the perforated plate was 2000 mm, and the water level in the water collection chamber was kept constant. Small-size plates were tested. Also the effect of the unheated fuel rod bundle and the size of the free flow channel on the CCFL behaviour were studied

  4. Evaporation heat flux from hot water to air flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate evaporation heat fluxes from coolant water in a spent fuel pit of a nuclear power plant to ventilation air during a shutdown of water purification and cooling systems, empirical correlations were derived. To derive correlations, the evaporation heat transfer databases at Shinshu University, which were obtained using test sections A and B with heat transfer lengths of 940 mm and 300 mm, were used. The temperatures of the hot water and air were 35-65°C and about 20°C, respectively, and air velocity was up to 2.08 m/s. In this study, a correlation including length scale was derived using the database under the outlet relative humidity less than 100% (Xout out = 1.0) in the test section A were corrected using the heat flux data with Xout < 1.0 in the test section B in order to obtain evaporation heat fluxes under 100% relative humidity (X = 1.0) conditions, which might be applied to a spent fuel pit with the length scale of about 10 m. Then, another correlation without the length scale was introduced from the heat fluxes corrected for conditions of X = 1.0. The heat fluxes for the length scale of 10 m calculated using the two correlations agreed each other. (author)

  5. New research on bioregenerative air/water purification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anne H.; Ellender, R. D.; Watkins, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, air and water purification systems have been developed and used. This technology is based on the combined activities of plants and microorganisms as they function in a natural environment. More recently, researchers have begun to address the problems associated with indoor air pollution. Various common houseplants are currently being evaluated for their abilities to reduce concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) such as formaldehyde and benzene. With development of the Space Exploration Initiative, missions will increase in duration, and problems with resupply necessitates implementation of regenerative technology. Aspects of bioregenerative technology have been included in a habitat known as the BioHome. The ultimate goal is to use this technology in conjunction with physicochemical systems for air and water purification within closed systems. This study continued the risk assessment of bioregenerative technology with emphasis on biological hazards. In an effort to evaluate the risk for human infection, analyses were directed at enumeration of fecal streptococci and enteric viruses with the BioHome waste water treatment system.

  6. Mechanism of temperature fluctuation phenomena below steam-water interface in a pressurizer spray pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a PWR plant, a steam-water two-phase flow may exist in the pressurizer spray pipe under a normal operating condition since the flow rate of the spray water is not sufficient to fill the horizontal section of the pipe completely. Initiation of high cycle fatigue cracks is suspected to occur under such thermally stratified two phase flow conditions. Experiments for a steam-water flow have been conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation phenomena. It has been shown that the wall temperature fluctuations were not caused by the waves on the water surface, but were caused by temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface. An experiment with visualization test section of rectangular pipe was conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation mechanism in water layer in this paper. The black stripe pattern was observed below the steam-water interface due to the density change. The water temperature fluctuations had the dominant frequency of about 1Hz. The Richardson number calculated with the measured temperature and velocity gradient was larger than 0.25. The dominant frequency of temperature fluctuations was nearly equal to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. It was shown that the temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface were caused by the internal gravity wave in the thermal stratified flow. (author)

  7. Energy and air emission effects of water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-04-15

    Life-cycle air emission effects of supplying water are explored using a hybrid life-cycle assessment For the typically sized U.S. utility analyzed, recycled water is preferable to desalination and comparable to importation. Seawater desalination has an energy and air emission footprint that is 1.5-2.4 times larger than that of imported water. However, some desalination modes fare better; brackish groundwater is 53-66% as environmentally intensive as seawater desalination. The annual water needs (326 m3) of a typical Californian that is met with imported water requires 5.8 GJ of energy and creates 360 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. With seawater desalination, energy use would increase to 14 GJ and 800 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. Meeting the water demand of California with desalination would consume 52% of the state's electricity. Supply options were reassessed using alternative electricity mixes, including the average mix of the United States and several renewable sources. Desalination using solar thermal energy has lower greenhouse gas emissions than that of imported and recycled water (using California's electricity mix), but using the U.S. mix increases the environmental footprint by 1.5 times. A comparison with a more energy-intensive international scenario shows that CO2 equivalent emissions for desalination in Dubai are 1.6 times larger than in California. The methods, decision support tool (WEST), and results of this study should persuade decision makers to make informed water policy choices by including energy consumption and material use effects in the decision-making process. PMID:19475934

  8. Adsorption and rheological behavior of an amphiphilic protein at oil/water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Marina J; Schulz, Alexander; Subkowski, Thomas; Böker, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Hydrophobins are highly surface active proteins which self-assemble at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces into amphipathic membranes. We investigate hydrophobin self-assembly at oil/water interfaces to deepen the understanding of protein behavior in order to improve our biomimetic synthesis. Therefore, we carried out pendant drop measurements of hydrophobin stabilized oil/water systems determining the time-dependent IFT and the dilatational rheology with additional adaptation to the Serrien protein model. We show that the class I hydrophobin H(∗)Protein B adsorbs at an oil/water interface where it forms a densely-packed interfacial protein layer, which dissipates energy during droplet oscillation. Furthermore, the interfacial protein layer exhibits shear thinning behavior. PMID:27388134

  9. Geochemical Insight from Nonlinear Optical Studies of Mineral-Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Paul A.; Hore, Dennis K.

    2016-05-01

    The physics and chemistry of mineral-water interfaces are complex, even in idealized systems. Our need to understand this complexity is driven by both pure and applied sciences, that is, by the need for basic understanding of earth systems and for the knowledge to mitigate our influences upon them. The second-order nonlinear optical techniques of second-harmonic generation and sum-frequency generation spectroscopy have proven adept at probing these types of interfaces. This review focuses on the contributions to geochemistry made by nonlinear optical methods. The types of questions probed have included a basic description of the structure adopted by water molecules at the mineral interface, how flow and porosity affect this structure, adsorption of trace metal and organic species, and dissolution mechanisms. We also discuss directions and challenges that lie ahead and the outlook for the continued use of nonlinear optical methods for studies of mineral-water boundaries.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Structure and Functions of Water-Membrane Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A large number of essential cellular processes occur at the interfaces between water and membranes. The selectivity and dynamics of these processes are largely determined by the structural and electrical properties of the water-membrane interface. We investigate these properties by the molecular dynamics method. Over the time scales of the simulations, the membrane undergoes fluctuations described by the capillary wave model. These fluctuations produce occasional thinning defects in the membrane which provide effective pathways for passive transport of ions and small molecules across the membrane. Ions moving through the membrane markedly disrupt its structure and allow for significant water penetration into the membrane interior. Selectivity of transport, with respect to ionic charge, is determined by the interfacial electrostatic potential. Many small molecules. of potential significance in catalysis, bioenergetics and pharmacology, are shown to bind to the interface. The energetics and dynamics of this process will be discussed.

  11. Molecular ordering and phase transitions in alkanol monolayers at the water-hexane interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interface between bulk water and bulk hexane solutions of n-alkanols (H(CH2)mOH, where m=20, 22, 24, or 30) is studied with x-ray reflectivity, x-ray off-specular diffuse scattering, and interfacial tension measurements. The alkanols adsorb to the interface to form a monolayer. The highest density, lowest temperature monolayers contain alkanol molecules with progressive disordering of the chain from the -CH2OH to the -CH3 group. In the terminal half of the chain that includes the -CH3 group the chain density is similar to that observed in bulk liquid alkanes just above their freezing temperature. The density in the alkanol headgroup region is 10% greater than either bulk water or the ordered headgroup region found in alkanol monolayers at the water-vapor interface. We conjecture that this higher density is a result of water penetration into the headgroup region of the disordered monolayer. A ratio of 1:3 water to alkanol molecules is consistent with our data. We also place an upper limit of one hexane to five or six alkanol molecules mixed into the alkyl chain region of the monolayer. In contrast, H(CH2)30OH at the water-vapor interface forms a close-packed, ordered phase of nearly rigid rods. Interfacial tension measurements as a function of temperature reveal a phase transition at the water-hexane interface with a significant change in interfacial excess entropy. This transition is between a low temperature interface that is nearly fully covered with alkanols to a higher temperature interface with a much lower density of alkanols. The transition for the shorter alkanols appears to be first order whereas the transition for the longer alkanols appears to be weakly first order or second order. The x-ray data are consistent with the presence of monolayer domains at the interface and determine the domain coverage (fraction of interface covered by alkanol domains) as a function of temperature. This temperature dependence is consistent with a theoretical model for a

  12. Water Adsorption in Wood Microfibril-Hemicellulose System: Role of the Crystalline-Amorphous Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasinski, Karol; Guyer, Robert; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2015-09-14

    A two-phase model of a wood microfibril consisting of crystalline cellulose and amorphous hemicellulose is investigated with molecular dynamics in full range of sorption to understand the molecular origin of swelling and weakening of wood. Water is adsorbed in hemicellulose, and an excess of sorption is found at the interface, while no sorption occurs within cellulose. Water molecules adsorbed on the interface push away polymer chains, forcing the two phases to separate and causing breaking of h-bonds, particularly pronounced on the interface. Existence of two different regions in moisture response is demonstrated. At low moisture content, water is uniformly adsorbed within hemicellulose, breaking a small amount of hydrogen bonds. Microfibril does not swell, and the porosity does not change. As moisture content increases, water is adsorbed preferentially at the interface, which leads to additional swelling and porosity increase at the interface. Young's and shear moduli decrease importantly due to breaking of h-bonds and screening of the long-range interactions. PMID:26313656

  13. Interfacial assembly of Graphene Oxide at oil/water and polymer/polymer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Feng, Tao; Russell, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Amphiphilic structure of graphene oxide makes it a candidate ``surfactant'' to preferentially segregate to the interface between different fluids. The affinity of graphene oxide towards different phases was tuned by grafting with polystyrene (PS-NH2) through hydrogen bonding, and its interfacial behavior, both in toluene/water and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate), was studied. The surface tension of the toluene/water interface decreases in the presence of PS-NH2 grafted graphene oxide, indicating that graphene oxide flakes can be forced to the toluene/water interface when grafted with PS-NH2. Transmission electron microscopy shows that graphene oxide can even be forced into a ``jammed'' state at the water/toluene interface. In addition, polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) were blended with graphene oxide, its morphology changes from island type to co-continuous structure, but the mechanism of this behavior is still not clear. These interfacial sheets may provide a model system to study buckling and crumpling behavior at interfaces.

  14. AirSWOT: An Airborne Platform for Surface Water Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.; Smith, L. C.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission, expected to launch in 2020, will provide global measurements of surface water extent and elevation from which storage change and discharge can be derived. SWOT-like measurements are not routinely used by the hydrology community, and their optimal use and associated errors are areas of active research. The purpose of AirSWOT, a system that has been proposed to NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, is to provide SWOT-like measurements to the hydrology and ocean community to be used to advance the understanding and use of SWOT data in the pre-launch phase. In the post-launch phase, AirSWOT will be used as the SWOT calibration/validation platform. The AirSWOT payload will consist of Kaspar, a multi-beam Ka-band radar interferometer able to produce elevations over a 5 km swath with centimetric precision. The absolute elevation accuracy of the AirSWOT system will be achieved with a combination of high precision Inertial Motion Units (IMUs), ground calibration points, and advanced calibration techniques utilizing a priori knowledge. It is expected that the accuracy of AirSWOT will exceed or match SWOT’s accuracy requirements. In addition to elevation measurements, the AirSWOT payload will include a near-infrared camera able to provide coincident high-resolution optical imagery of the water bodies imaged by the radar. In its initial hydrology deployments, AirSWOT will investigate four field sites: the Ohio-Mississippi confluence, the lower Atchafalaya River on the Mississippi River Delta, the Yukon River basin near Fairbanks, and the Sacramento River, California. The Ohio-Mississippi confluence is targeted for its large discharge, modest slope, and control structures that modulate Ohio but not Mississippi River slopes and elevations. The lower Atchafalaya River includes low slopes, wetlands with differing vegetation types, and some open lakes. Vegetation includes Cyprus forests, floating macrophytes, and grass marshes, all of which impact radar returns

  15. Optical Measurement of Surface Tension in a Miniaturized Air-Liquid Interface and its Application in Lung Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    C Bertocchi; Ravasio, A.; Bernet, S.; Putz, G; Dietl, P.; Haller, T.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that lamellar body-like particles, the form in which pulmonary surfactant is secreted, spontaneously disintegrate when they contact an air-liquid interface, eventually creating an interfacial film. Here, we combined these studies with a new technique enabling the simultaneous and non-invasive measurement of surface tension (γ). This method is a refinement of the pendant-drop principle. A sapphire cone with a 300-μm aperture keeps the experimental fluid by virtue of su...

  16. Ciprofloxacin Is Actively Transported across Bronchial Lung Epithelial Cells Using a Calu-3 Air Interface Cell Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Hui Xin; Traini, Daniela; Bebawy, Mary; Young, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a well-established broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic that penetrates well into the lung tissues; still, the mechanisms of its transepithelial transport are unknown. The contributions of specific transporters, including multidrug efflux transporters, organic cation transporters, and organic anion-transporting polypeptide transporters, to the uptake of ciprofloxacin were investigated in vitro using an air interface bronchial epithelial model. Our results demonstrate tha...

  17. The Silica-Water Interface from the Analysis of Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lardhi, Sheikha F.

    2013-05-01

    Surface chemistry is an emerging field that can give detailed insight about the elec- tronic properties and the interaction of complex material surfaces with their neigh- bors. This is for both solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Among the latter class, the silica-water interface plays a major role in nature. Silica is among the most abundant materials on earth, as well in advanced technological applications such as catalysis and nanotechnology. This immediately indicates the relevance of a detailed understanding of the silica-water interface. In this study, we investigate the details of this interaction at microscopic level by analyzing trajectories obtained with ab initio molecular dynamic simulations. The system we consider consists of bulk liquid water confined between two β-cristobalite silica surfaces. The molecular dynamics were generated with the CP2K, an ab initio molecular dynamic simulation tool. The simulations are 25 picoseconds long, and the CP2K program was run on 64 cores on a supercomputer cluster. During the simulations the program integrates Newton’s equations of motion for the system and generates the trajectory for analysis. For analysis, we focused on the following properties that characterize the silica water interface. We calculated the density profile of the water layers from the silica surface, and we also calculated the radial distribution function (RDF) of the hydrogen bond at the silanols on the silica surface. The main focus of this thesis is to write the programs for calculating the atom density profile and the RDF from the generated MD trajectories. The atomic probability density profile shows that water is strongly adsorbed on the (001) cristobalite surface, while the RDF indicates differently ad- sorbed water molecules in the first adsorption layer. As final remark, the protocol and the tools developed in this thesis can be applied to the study of basically any crystal-water interface.

  18. Air-sea heat exchange, an element of the water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and variation of water vapor, clouds and precipitation are examined. Principal driving forces for these distributions are energy exchange and evaporation at the air-sea interface, which are also important elements of air-sea interaction studies. The overall aim of air-sea interaction studies is to quantitatively determine mass, momentum and energy fluxes, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms controlling them. The results of general circulation simulations indicate that the atmosphere in mid-latitudes responds to changes in the oceanic surface conditions in the tropics. This correlation reflects the strong interaction between tropical and mid-latitude conditions caused by the transport of heat and momentum from the tropics. Studies of air-sea exchanges involve a large number of physica, chemical and dynamical processes including heat flux, radiation, sea-surface temperature, precipitation, winds and ocean currents. The fluxes of latent heat are studied and the potential use of satellite data in determining them evaluated. Alternative ways of inferring heat fluxes will be considered.

  19. Modeling Nitrogen Cycle at the Surface-Subsurface Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities, primarily food and energy production, have altered the global nitrogen cycle, increasing reactive dissolved inorganic nitrogen, Nr, chiefly ammonium NH4+ and nitrate NO3-, availability in many streams worldwide. Increased Nr promotes biological activity often with negative consequences such as water body eutrophication and emission of nitrous oxide gas, N2O, an important greenhouse gas as a by-product of denitrification. The hyporheic zone may play an important role in processing Nr and returning it to the atmosphere. Here, we present a process-based three-dimensional semi-analytical model, which couples hyporheic hydraulics with biogeochemical reactions and transport equations. Transport is solved by means of particle tracking with negligible local dispersion and biogeochemical reactions modeled by linearized Monod's kinetics with temperature dependant reaction rate coefficients. Comparison of measured and predicted N2O emissions from 7 natural stream shows a good match. We apply our model to gravel bed rivers with alternate bar morphology to investigate the role of hyporheic hydraulic, depth of alluvium, relative availability of stream concentration of NO3- and NH4+ and water temperature on nitrogen gradients within the sediment. Our model shows complex concentration dynamics, which depend on hyporheic residence time distribution and consequently on streambed morphology, within the hyporheic zone. Nitrogen gas emissions from the hyporheic zone increase with alluvium depth in large low-gradient streams but not in small steep streams. On the other hand, hyporheic water temperature influences nitrification/denitrification processes mainly in small-steep than large low-gradient streams, because of the long residence times, which offset the slow reaction rates induced by low temperatures in the latter stream. The overall conclusion of our analysis is that river morphology has a major impact on biogeochemical processes such as nitrification

  20. Hole localization, water dissociation mechanisms, and band alignment at aqueous-titania interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John L.

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising method for generating clean energy, but materials that can efficiently act as photocatalysts are scarce. This is in part due to the fact that exposure to water can strongly alter semiconductor surfaces and therefore photocatalyst performance. Many materials are not stable in aqueous environments; in other cases, local changes in structure may occur, affecting energy-level alignment. Even in the simplest case, dynamic fluctuations modify the organization of interface water. Accounting for such effects requires knowledge of the dominant local structural motifs and also accurate semiconductor band-edge positions, making quantitative prediction of energy-level alignments computationally challenging. Here we employ a combined theoretical approach to study the structure, energy alignment, and hole localization at aqueous-titania interfaces. We calculate the explicit aqueous-semiconductor interface using ab initio molecular dynamics, which provides the fluctuating atomic structure, the extent of water dissociation, and the resulting electrostatic potential. For both anatase and rutile TiO2 we observe spontaneous water dissociation and re-association events that occur via distinct mechanisms. We also find a higher-density water layer occurring on anatase. In both cases, we find that the second monolayer of water plays a crucial role in controlling the extent of water dissociation. Using hybrid functional calculations, we then investigate the propensity for dissociated waters to stabilize photo-excited carriers, and compare the results of rutile and anatase aqueous interfaces. Finally, we use the GW approach from many-body perturbation theory to obtain the position of semiconductor band edges relative to the occupied 1b1 level and thus the redox levels of water, and examine how local structural modifications affect these offsets. This work was performed in collaboration with N. Kharche, M. Z. Ertem, J. T. Muckerman, and M. S

  1. Determination of alpha dose rate profile at the HLW nuclear glass/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The nuclear glass/water interface is studied. • The way the energy of alpha particles is deposited is modeled using MCNPX code. • A model giving dose rate profiles at the interface using intrinsic data is proposed. • Bulk dose rate is a majoring estimation in alteration layer and in surrounding water. • Dose rate is high in small cracks; in larger ones irradiated volume is negligible. - Abstract: Alpha irradiation and radiolysis can affect the alteration behavior of High Level Waste (HLW) nuclear glasses. In this study, the way the energy of alpha particles, emitted by a typical HLW glass, is deposited in water at the glass/water interface is investigated, with the aim of better characterizing the dose deposition at the glass/water interface during water-induced leaching mechanisms. A simplified chemical composition was considered for the nuclear glass under study, wherein the dose rate is about 140 Gy/h. The MCNPX calculation code was used to calculate alpha dose rate and alpha particle flux profiles at the glass/water interface in different systems: a single glass grain in water, a glass powder in water and a water-filled ideal crack in a glass package. Dose rate decreases within glass and in water as distance to the center of the grain increases. A general model has been proposed to fit a dose rate profile in water and in glass from values for dose rate in glass bulk, alpha range in water and linear energy transfer considerations. The glass powder simulation showed that there was systematic overlapping of radiation fields for neighboring glass grains, but the water dose rate always remained lower than the bulk value. Finally, for typical ideal cracks in a glass matrix, an overlapping of irradiation fields was observed while the crack aperture was lower than twice the alpha range in water. This led to significant values for the alpha dose rate within the crack volume, as long as the aperture remained lower than 60 μm

  2. The exchange of SVOCs across the air-sea interface in Singapore's coastal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. He

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas are vulnerable to the accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds, such as PAHs, OCPs and PCBs from atmospheric inputs. Dry particulate and wet depositions, and air-water diffusive exchange in the Singapore's south coastal area, where most of chemical and oil refinery industries are situated in, were estimated. Based on a yearly dataset, the mean annual dry particulate deposition fluxes of ∑16-PAHs, ∑7 OCPs and ∑21 PCBs were 1328.8±961.1 μg m−2 y−1, 5421.4±3426.7 ng m−2 y−1 and 811.8±578.3 ng m−2 y−1, and the wet deposition of ∑16-PAHs and ∑7 OCPs were 6667.1±1745.2 and 115.4±98.3 μg m−2 y−1, respectively. Seasonal variation of atmospheric depositions was influenced by meteorological conditions. Air-water gas exchange fluxes were shown to be negative values for PAHs, HCHs and DDXs, indicating Singapore's south coast as a sink for the above-mentioned SVOCs. The relative contribution of each depositional process to the total atmospheric input was assessed by annual fluxes. The profile of dry particulate deposition, wet deposition and gas exchange fluxes seemed to be correlated with individual pollutant's properties such as molecular weight and Henry's law constant, etc. For the water column partitioning, the organic carbon-normalized partition coefficients between particulate and dissolved phases (KOC for both PAHs and OCPs were obtained. The relationships between KOC of PAHs and OCPs and their respective octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW were examined. In addition, both adsorption onto combustion-derived soot carbon and absorption into natural organic matter for PAHs in marine water column were investigated. Enrichment factors in the sea-surface microlayer (SML of the particulate phase were 1.2

  3. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-12-29

    Air-water interfacial monolayers of poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure-area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air-water monolayers formed by a PLGA-PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA-PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA-PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the "n-cluster" effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the "n-cluster" effects. PMID:26633595

  4. Protein Solvation in Membranes and at Water-Membrane Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Wilson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Different salvation properties of water and membranes mediate a host of biologically important processes, such as folding, insertion into a lipid bilayer, associations and functions of membrane proteins. These processes will be discussed in several examples involving synthetic and natural peptides. In particular, a mechanism by which a helical peptide becomes inserted into a model membrane will be described. Further, the molecular mechanism of recognition and association of protein helical segments in membranes will be discussed. These processes are crucial for proper functioning of a cell. A membrane-spanning domain of glycophorin A, which exists as a helical dimer, serves as the model system. For this system, the free energy of dissociation of the helices is being determined for both the wild type and a mutant, in which dimerization is disrupted.

  5. Determination of alpha dose rate profile at the HLW nuclear glass/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougnaud, S.; Tribet, M.; Rolland, S.; Renault, J.-P.; Jégou, C.

    2015-07-01

    Alpha irradiation and radiolysis can affect the alteration behavior of High Level Waste (HLW) nuclear glasses. In this study, the way the energy of alpha particles, emitted by a typical HLW glass, is deposited in water at the glass/water interface is investigated, with the aim of better characterizing the dose deposition at the glass/water interface during water-induced leaching mechanisms. A simplified chemical composition was considered for the nuclear glass under study, wherein the dose rate is about 140 Gy/h. The MCNPX calculation code was used to calculate alpha dose rate and alpha particle flux profiles at the glass/water interface in different systems: a single glass grain in water, a glass powder in water and a water-filled ideal crack in a glass package. Dose rate decreases within glass and in water as distance to the center of the grain increases. A general model has been proposed to fit a dose rate profile in water and in glass from values for dose rate in glass bulk, alpha range in water and linear energy transfer considerations. The glass powder simulation showed that there was systematic overlapping of radiation fields for neighboring glass grains, but the water dose rate always remained lower than the bulk value. Finally, for typical ideal cracks in a glass matrix, an overlapping of irradiation fields was observed while the crack aperture was lower than twice the alpha range in water. This led to significant values for the alpha dose rate within the crack volume, as long as the aperture remained lower than 60 μm.

  6. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  7. Experimental investigation of air bubble flows in a water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents experimental results on rising bubbles in the wetwell of a boiling water reactor (BWR) in a loss-of-coolant accident in the pressure suppression pool (PSP). This accident scenario includes three processes: blowdown and associated water slug phenomena, bubble dynamics and related water flow during continuous release of gases and development of a thermal stratification. The paper covers the middle phase where air is fed through a downcomer. The developments of bubble formation and bubble flow are investigated by means of high speed videos. Diameter, velocity, formation frequency and breakup distance of bubbles are evaluated using automated image evaluation procedures. The experiments have been performed in the cylindrical vessel of the THAI test facility with a height of 9.2 m and a diameter of 3.2 m. (author)

  8. Investigation of the mechanism of contaminant release through the sediment-overlying water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia-Hong; Zheng, Shu-Jun; Wang, Dao-Zeng; Environment Fluid Dynamics Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    After the external pollutant discharge has been reduced, the release of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water may cause the river and lake be contaminated again. On the condition that the overlying water flow does not lead to sediment suspension, numerical and experimental researches are carried out for the contaminant release mechanism through the sediment-overlying water interface. In the numerical simulation, the overlying water flow is calculated as turbulent flow. The sediment is regarded as isotropic homogeneous porous medium, therefore the seepage field in the porous sediment layer is obtained by solving Darcy's equations. Several coupled two dimensional steady and unsteady flows of the overlying water and the pore water in the sediment are calculated. Based on the flow fields obtained, the unsteady contaminant solute transportation process in the sediment and the overlying water is numerically simulated, as the shapes of the sediment-overlying water interface are flat or periodic triangular respectively. The numerical results agree with the experimental results quite well. The results show that the exchange of the pore water and the overlying water is an important factor which decides the release flux of the contaminant from the sediment to the overlying water. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11032007) and Shanghai Program for Innovative Research Team in Universities.

  9. [Calculating method for crop water requirement based on air temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guo-Tong; Wang, Jing-Lei; Nan, Ji-Qin; Gao, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Fang; Song, Ni

    2014-07-01

    The importance of accurately estimating crop water requirement for irrigation forecast and agricultural water management has been widely recognized. Although it has been broadly adopted to determine crop evapotranspiration (ETc) via meteorological data and crop coefficient, most of the data in whether forecast are qualitative rather than quantitative except air temperature. Therefore, in this study, how to estimate ETc precisely only using air temperature data in forecast was explored, the accuracy of estimation based on different time scales was also investigated, which was believed to be beneficial to local irrigation forecast as well as optimal management of water and soil resources. Three parameters of Hargreaves equation and two parameters of McClound equation were corrected by using meteorological data of Xinxiang from 1970 to 2010, and Hargreaves equation was selected to calculate reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growth period of winter wheat. A model of calculating crop water requirement was developed to predict ETc at time scales of 1, 3, and 7 d intervals through combining Hargreaves equation and crop coefficient model based on air temperature. Results showed that the correlation coefficients between measured and predicted values of ETc reached 0.883 (1 d), 0.933 (3 d), and 0.959 (7 d), respectively. The consistency indexes were 0.94, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively, which showed that forecast error decreased with the increasing time scales. Forecasted accuracy with an error less than 1 mm x d(-1) was more than 80%, and that less than 2 mm x d(-1) was greater than 90%. This study provided sound basis for irrigation forecast and agricultural management in irrigated areas since the forecasted accuracy at each time scale was relatively high. PMID:25345053

  10. Ion Transfer Voltammetry Associated with Two Polarizable Interfaces Within Water and Moderately Hydrophobic Ionic Liquid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Jingdong;

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical system composed of two polarizable interfaces (the metallic electrode|water and water|ionic liquid interfaces), namely two‐polarized‐interface (TPI) technique, has been proposed to explore the ion transfer processes between water and moderately hydrophobic ionic liquids (W......|mIL), typically 1‐octyl‐3‐methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (C8mimC1C1N) and 1‐hexyl‐3‐methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (C6mimC1C1N). Within the classic four‐electrode system, it is not likely that the ion transfer information at the W|mIL interface can be obtained due to an...... technique, the formal ion transfer potential differences between C1C1N− and Cnmim+ (n=6, 8) were accurately determined for 356 mV and 420 mV at a corresponding interface (W|C6mimC1C1N and W|C8mimC1C1N). Besides, this technique is used to monitor electrochemical polarization at the two W|mIL systems, which...

  11. Growth of gravity-capillary waves in countercurrent air/water turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Zonta, Francesco; Onorato, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    We use Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier Stokes equations to analyze the dynamics of the interface between air and water when both phases are driven by opposite pressure gradients (countercurrent configuration). The Reynolds number (Reτ), the Weber number (We) and the Froude number (Fr) fully describe the physical problem. We examine the problem of the transient growth of interface waves for different combinations of physical parameters. Keeping Reτ constant and varying We and Fr , we show that, in the initial stages of the wave generation process, the amplitude of the interface elevation η grows in time as η ~t 2 / 5 . Wavenumber spectra, E (kx) , of the surface elevation in the capillary range are in good agreement with the prediction of the Wave Turbulence Theory. Finally, the wave-induced modification of the average wind and current velocity profiles will be addressed. Support from Regione Autonoma Friuli Venezia Giulia under grant PAR FSC 2007/2013 is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Unintended consequences? Water molecules at biological and crystallographic protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mostafa H; Habtemariam, Mesay; Safo, Martin K; Scarsdale, J Neel; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Kellogg, Glen E

    2013-12-01

    The importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly appreciated, as these interactions lie at the core of virtually every biological process. Small molecule modulators that target PPIs are under exploration as new therapies. One of the greatest obstacles faced in crystallographically determining the 3D structures of proteins is coaxing the proteins to form "artificial" PPIs that lead to uniform crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction. This work compares interactions formed naturally, i.e., "biological", with those artificially formed under crystallization conditions or "non-biological". In particular, a detailed analysis of water molecules at the interfaces of high-resolution (≤2.30 Å) X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes, where 140 are biological protein-protein complex structures and 112 include non-biological protein-protein interfaces, was carried out using modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield. Surprisingly few and relatively subtle differences were observed between the two types of interfaces: (i) non-biological interfaces are more polar than biological interfaces, yet there is better organized hydrogen bonding at the latter; (ii) biological associations rely more on water-mediated interactions with backbone atoms compared to non-biological associations; (iii) aromatic/planar residues play a larger role in biological associations with respect to water, and (iv) Lys has a particularly large role at non-biological interfaces. A support vector machines (SVMs) classifier using descriptors from this study was devised that was able to correctly classify 84% of the two interface types. PMID:24076743

  13. Anomalous change in interfacial tension induced by collapses of AOT microemulsions at heptane/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Yui, Hiroharu; Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Sawada, Tsuguo

    2004-05-01

    Dynamic behavior of water-in-oil microemulsions at the oil/water interface was investigated using the quasi-elastic laser scattering method. We observed an anomalous rebound behavior of interfacial tension γ induced by collapses of microemulsions and adsorptions of AOT molecules at the interface. γ rapidly decreased and reached a minimum value (5.5 mN/m) at about 500 s after the preparation of the interface, and then increased gradually for about 2000 s to the equilibrium value (8.0 mN/m). We considered the mechanism of the rebound behavior in terms of transient change in interfacial thickness induced by the collapses of AOT microemulsions.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya, E-mail: ishiyama@eng.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Morita, Akihiro, E-mail: morita@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578, Japan and Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan); Tahara, Tahei [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN and Ultrafast Spectroscopy Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  15. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The ...

  16. Characterization of mineral-solution interface and its implications for water-rock interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivine-water interface under hydrothermal conditions (600-790degC, 1kb) are characterized by SEM, XPS and hydrogen depth profiling using nuclear reaction. The near surface region is rich in H and depleted with Mg. The chemical shift of XPS peaks indicates structural reconstruction at the near surface. The present results and the previous studied indicate the formation of the hydrogen rich surface layer depends on various factors including mineral structure, solution composition and temperature. It is correlated with dissolution rate. Probably, permeation of water into mineral through defects or micropore space and diffusion in the permeating water are important processes in water-rock interactions. (author)

  17. Structure and functions of water-membrane interfaces and their role in proto-biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Among the most important developments in proto-biological evolution was the emergence of membrane-like structures. These are formed by spontaneous association of relatively simple amphiphilic molecules that would have been readily available in the primordial environment. The resulting interfacial regions between water and nonpolar interior of the membrane have several properties which made them uniquely suitable for promoting subsequent evolution. They can (1) selectively attract organic material and mediate its transport, (2) serve as simple catalysts for chemical reactions, and (3) promote the formation of trans-membrane electrical and chemical gradients which could provide energy sources for proto-cells. Understanding the structure of interfaces, their interactions with organic molecules and molecular mechanisms of their functions is an essential step to understanding proto-biological evolution. In our computer simulation studies, we showed that the structure of water at interfaces with nonpolar media is significantly different from that in the bulk. In particular, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. As a result, negative ions can approach the interface more easily than positive ions. Amphiphilic molecules composed of hydrocarbon conjugated rings and polar substituents (e.g., phenol) assume at the interface rigid orientations in which polar groups are buried in water while hydrocarbon parts are located in the nonpolar environment. These orientational differences are of special interest in connection with the ability of some of these molecules to efficiently absorb photons. Flexible molecules with polar substituents often adopt at interfaces conformations different from those in the bulk aquaeous solution and in the gas phase. As a result, in many instances both specificity and kinetics of chemical reactions in which these molecules can participate is modified by the presence of surfaces. Of special interest is the mechanism by

  18. Adsorption of Polyether Block Copolymers at Silica-Water and Silica-Ethylammonium Nitrate Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengfei; Kobayashi, Yumi; Webber, Grant B; Ueno, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2015-06-30

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) force curves and images are used to characterize the adsorbed layer structure formed by a series of diblock copolymers with solvophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and solvophobic poly(ethyl glycidyl ether) (PEGE) blocks at silica-water and silica-ethylammoniun nitrate (EAN, a room temperature ionic liquid (IL)) interfaces. The diblock polyethers examined are EGE109EO54, EGE113EO115, and EGE104EO178. These experiments reveal how adsorbed layer structure varies as the length of the EO block varies while the EGE block length is kept approximately constant; water is a better solvent for PEO than EAN, so higher curvature structures are found at the interface of silica with water than with EAN. At silica-water interfaces, EGE109EO54 forms a bilayer and EGE113EO115 forms elongated aggregates, while a well-ordered array of spheres is present for EGE104EO178. EGE109EO54 does not adsorb at the silica-EAN interface because the EO chain is too short to compete with the ethylammonium cation for surface adsorption sites. However, EGE113EO115 and EGE104EO178 do adsorb and form a bilayer and elongated aggregates, respectively. PMID:26039658

  19. Modeling Nitrogen Fate and Transport at the Sediment-Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffusive mass transfer at media interfaces exerts control on the fate and transport of pollutants originating from agricultural and urban landscapes and affects the con-ditions of water bodies. Diffusion is essentially a physical process affecting the distribution and fate of va...

  20. A simplified physically-based model to calculate surface water temperature of lakes from air temperature in climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.

    2012-12-01

    Modifications of water temperature are crucial for the ecology of lakes, but long-term analyses are not usually able to provide reliable estimations. This is particularly true for climate change studies based on Global Circulation Models, whose mesh size is normally too coarse for explicitly including even some of the biggest lakes on Earth. On the other hand, modeled predictions of air temperature changes are more reliable, and long-term, high-resolution air temperature observational datasets are more available than water temperature measurements. For these reasons, air temperature series are often used to obtain some information about the surface temperature of water bodies. In order to do that, it is common to exploit regression models, but they are questionable especially when it is necessary to extrapolate current trends beyond maximum (or minimum) measured temperatures. Moreover, water temperature is influenced by a variety of processes of heat exchange across the lake surface and by the thermal inertia of the water mass, which also causes an annual hysteresis cycle between air and water temperatures that is hard to consider in regressions. In this work we propose a simplified, physically-based model for the estimation of the epilimnetic temperature in lakes. Starting from the zero-dimensional heat budget, we derive a simplified first-order differential equation for water temperature, primarily forced by a seasonally varying external term (mainly related to solar radiation) and an exchange term explicitly depending on the difference between air and water temperatures. Assuming annual sinusoidal cycles of the main heat flux components at the atmosphere-lake interface, eight parameters (some of them can be disregarded, though) are identified, which can be calibrated if two temporal series of air and water temperature are available. We note that such a calibration is supported by the physical interpretation of the parameters, which provide good initial

  1. Computer simulation of partitioning of ten pentapeptides Ace-WLXLL at the cyclohexane/water and phospholipid/water interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliste Marcela P

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide-membrane interactions play a key role in the binding, partitioning and folding of membrane proteins, the activity of antimicrobial and fusion peptides, and a number of other processes. To gain a better understanding of the thermodynamics of such interactions, White and Wimley created an interfacial hydrophobicity scale based of the transfer free energy from water to octanol or lipid bilayers of a series of synthetic peptapeptides (Ace-WLXLL, with X being any of the twenty natural amino acids (White and Wimley (1996 Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 842–848. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a representative set of ten of these peptides (X = D, K, R, N, A, T, S, I, F and W in two membrane mimetic interfaces: water-cyclohexane (10 ns and a fully solvated dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC bilayer (50 ns using both constant pressure and constant area ensembles. We focus on partitioning of the ten peptides at the cyclohexane/water and lipid/water interfaces. Results The peptides rapidly equilibrate (2 and simulations at constant pressure that approximately yield the same average area of 0.66 nm2. Conclusion These peptides were designed to assume extended conformations, which is confirmed by the simulations. The distribution of the X3 side chain depends on its nature, and can be determined from molecular dynamics simulations. The time scale of peptide motion at a phospholipids-water interface is too long to directly calculate the experimentally measured hydrophobicity scale to test and improve the simulation parameters. This should be possible at the water/cyclohexane interface and likely will become feasible in the future for the phospholipids/water case.

  2. Performance of a hydrostatic sampler for collecting samples at the water-sediment interface in lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando PEDROZO

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The water-sediment interface plays a significant role in the determination of the trophic degree of a waterbody. Numerous redox reactions take place there, resulting in the release of contaminants from the sediments to the water column. The aim of the present work was to develop an equipment for collecting samples from the water-sediment interface. Such equipment was to have a simple design, low construction cost, no depth limitations, and high levels of personal safety and to be reliable in the collection of samples. The performance of the hydrostatic sampler thus developed was tested against samples collected either remotely with a corer or directly with syringes by autonomous divers. The hydrostatic sampler permits access to depths where the costs of the traditional diving methodology are expensive, and where working conditions are dangerous for the diver. The hydrostatic sampler provides an additional means of collecting samples from the water-sediment interface, which together with pore-water samples, facilitates the investigation and understanding of chemical mechanisms in lakes, for instance, those that control the P release from sediment to the water column.

  3. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited monitoring tritiated water in air and water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current on-line methods of monitoring effluents for tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) measure concentrations in air above 250 nCi/m3 (approx. 10 kBq/m3) and in water above 1 uCi/kg (approx. 40 kBq/kg). Some of the problems encountered in such monitoring are the presence of fission and activation products in the effluents and, particularly in water monitoring, the often dirty quality of the sample. In a new design of monitor, HTO is collected directly from air by a flow of liquid scintillator (LS). For water monitoring a flow of air continuously samples the water and transports HTO to the LS. The key features of the new design are that the high detection efficiency of LS is realizable, that the rate of use of LS is only approx. 2 mm3/s, that the controlled evaporation and metering of air provides the low flow of HTO needed for mixing with LS, and that accurate metering of a dirty effluent is not needed. The sensitivities for detecing tritium on-line are improved by at least an order of magnitude

  4. Study of water/air countercurrent flow through perforated plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding countercurrent flow limitation or flooding phenomenon is of great concern in nuclear safety analysis. A program is underway at CDTN/CNEN on emergency cooling of PWRs. Currently experimental research is oriented to a better understanding of the fluid dynamic process in the fuel element top nozzle area during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper reports flooding experiments carried out with air and water flowing along a vertical square channel internals consisting of a 5 X 5 rod bundle and eleven interchangeable perforated plates. Some empirical flooding models available in the literature are used to verify the data consistency. (author)

  5. Radon transferred from drinking water into house air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to locate homes with high values of Rn-222 in the state of Maine. Forty Maine houses were selected with alleged Rn-222 in water concentrations higher than 5,000 pCi/L. Rn-222 measurements were performed during two periods in each residence from Oct 1986 to June 1987. During one period of approximately two hours duration, measurements were made while a series of simulated water use activities were conducted. Radon monitoring was performed over a second period of 24 hours, during which the residents used water according to their normal daily routine. Radon in water ranged up to 193,000 pCi/L. Water bursts ranged from 160-928 L. House volumes ranged from 190,000 to 2.2 million L. Air exchange was measured by both SF6 tracer diffusion and Rn-222 loss. The decay constant for SF6 ranged from 0.188 to 1.65 per hour, and the decay constant for Rn-222 ranged from 0.142 to 1.33 per hour. Emissivity ranged from 0.00 to 5.10, and Rn-222 transfer coefficients ranged from 0.00116 to 0.0000000301. The average value of the 24-hour transfer coefficient is 0.0000267 and is lower than the previous average of 0.00010. 20 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Molecular interactions at the hexadecane/water interface in the presence of surfactants studied with second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yajun; Yang, Fangyuan; Chen, Shunli; Xu, Hongbo; Zhang, Si; Yuan, Qunhui; Gan, Wei

    2015-06-01

    It is important to investigate the influence of surfactants on structures and physical/chemical properties of oil/water interfaces. This work reports a second harmonic generation study of the adsorption of malachite green (MG) on the surfaces of oil droplets in a hexadecane/water emulsion in the presence of surfactants including sodium dodecyl sulfate, polyoxyethylene-sorbitan monooleate (Tween80), and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide. It is revealed that surfactants with micromolar concentrations notably influence the adsorption of MG at the oil/water interface. Both competition adsorption and charge-charge interactions played very important roles in affecting the adsorption free energy and the surface density of MG at the oil/water interface. The sensitive detection of the changing oil/water interface with the adsorption of surfactants at such low concentrations provides more information for understanding the behavior of these surfactants at the oil/water interface.

  7. Hydroxynitrile lyase at the diisopropyl ether/water interface: Evidence for interfacial enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hichel, A.; Radke, C.J.; Blanch, H.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-11-20

    A novel recycle reactor has been designed to determine the interfacial activity of hydroxynitrile lyase in a diisopropyl ether (DIPE)/water two-phase system. The reactor provides a known interfacial area. Enzyme activity toward mandelonitrile cleavage is continuously measured in the reactor by following benzaldehyde product formation in the DIPE organic phase with an optical flow cell. For the first time, the authors establish that this enzymatic reaction is carried out by the hydroxynitrile lyase residing at the organic solvent/water interface and not in the aqueous bulk phase. Hydroxynitrile lyase adsorbs at the interface and exhibits extraordinary stability. Denaturation does not occur over several hours, although the surface pressure increases under the same conditions over this time span. Increases in surface pressure indicate enzyme penetration through the interface although no loss of enzyme activity is observed. Adsorption of p-Hnl at the interface is fit by the Langmuir equilibrium adsorption model with an adsorption equilibrium constant of 0.032 L mg{sup {minus}1}. For the mandelonitrile cleavage reaction at ambient temperature, p-Hnl follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics at the interface with a Michaelis constant of 14.4 mM and a specific activity close that for the bulk aqueous phase.

  8. Modeling the Assembly of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles at Oil-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xin

    2015-10-27

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), I model the interfacial adsorption and self-assembly of polymer-grafted nanoparticles at a planar oil-water interface. The amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles irreversibly adsorb to the interface and create a monolayer covering the interface. The polymer chains of the adsorbed nanoparticles are significantly deformed by surface tension to conform to the interface. I quantitatively characterize the properties of the particle-laden interface and the structure of the monolayer in detail at different surface coverages. I observe that the monolayer of particles grafted with long polymer chains undergoes an intriguing liquid-crystalline-amorphous phase transition in which the relationship between the monolayer structure and the surface tension/pressure of the interface is elucidated. Moreover, my results indicate that the amorphous state at high surface coverage is induced by the anisotropic distribution of the randomly grafted chains on each particle core, which leads to noncircular in-plane morphology formed under excluded volume effects. These studies provide a fundamental understanding of the interfacial behavior of polymer-grafted nanoparticles for achieving complete control of the adsorption and subsequent self-assembly. PMID:26439456

  9. Volume entrained in the wake of a disk intruding into an oil-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Madonia, Matteo; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2016-07-01

    An object moving through a plane interface into a fluid deforms the interface in such a way that fluid from one side of the interface is entrained into the other side, a phenomenon known as Darwin's drift. We investigate this phenomenon experimentally using a disk which is started exactly at the interface of two immiscible fluids, namely, oil and water. First, we observe that due to the density difference between the two fluids the deformation of the interface is influenced by gravity and show that there exists a time window of universal behavior. Second, we show by comparing with boundary integral simulations that, even though the deformation is universal, our results cannot be fully explained by potential flow solutions. We attribute this difference to the starting vortex, which is created in the wake of the disk. Besides contributing significantly to entrainment directly, the vortex also influences the interface deformation due to Darwin's drift. Universal behavior is preserved, however, because the size and strength of the vortex shows the same universality as the potential flow solution.

  10. Micrometeorological Measurement of Fetch- and Atmospheric Stability-Dependent Air- Water Exchange of Legacy Semivolatile Organic Contaminants in Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlinger, J. A.; Tobias, D. E.; Rowe, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Coastal waters including the Laurentian Great Lakes are particularly susceptible to local, regional, and long- range transport and deposition of semivolatile organic contaminants (SOCs) as gases and/or associated with particles. Recently-marketed SOCs can be expected to undergo net deposition in surface waters, whereas legacy SOCs such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are likely to be at equilibrium with respect to air-water exchange, or, if atmospheric concentrations decrease through, e.g., policy implementation, to undergo net gas emission. SOC air-water exchange flux is usually estimated using the two-film model. This model describes molecular diffusion through the air and water films adjacent to the air-water interface. Air-water exchange flux is estimated as the product of SOC fugacity, typically based on on-shore gaseous concentration measurements, and a transfer coefficient, the latter which is estimated from SOC properties and environmental conditions. The transfer coefficient formulation commonly applied neglects resistance to exchange in the internal boundary layer under atmospherically stable conditions, and the use of on-shore gaseous concentration neglects fetch-dependent equilibration, both of which will tend to cause overestimation of flux magnitude. Thus, for legacy chemicals or in any highly contaminated surface water, the rate at which the water is cleansed through gas emission tends to be over-predicted using this approach. Micrometeorological measurement of air-water exchange rates of legacy SOCs was carried out on ships during four transect experiments during off-shore flow in Lake Superior using novel multicapillary collection devices and thermal extraction technology to measure parts-per-quadrillion SOC levels. Employing sensible heat in the modified Bowen ratio, fluxes at three over-water stations along the transects were measured, along with up-wind, onshore gaseous concentration and aqueous concentration. The atmosphere was unstable for

  11. Impacts of air, water and soil contamination on forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The result of our literature search is presented; it deals with the measuring points and screens used in the former GDR to determine the stress of the forests by air pollution (immissions, depositions, soil contamination, stress of waters, biological monitoring). In the second part we present the results of our search regarding the research done in the former GDR on methods of forest damage survey, on material balance of forest ecosystems, on modifications in the forest soile caused by depositions, on the possible impacts on the quality of waters, and on the influence of liming and fertilizer application on the material balance of forest stands damaged by immissions. Proposals are made for further research. (orig.)

  12. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  13. Water corrosion of spent nuclear fuel:radiolysis driven dissolution at the UO2/water interface

    OpenAIRE

    Springell, Ross S; Rennie, Sophie L; COSTELLE Leila; Darnbrough, James E; Stitt, C A D; Cocklin, Elizabeth; Lucas, Chris; Burrows, Robbert; SIMS, Howard; Wermeille, Didier; RAWLE Jonathan; Nicklin, Chris; Nuttall , William; Scott, Thomas Bligh; Lander, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has been used to probe the radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide. Single crystal thin films of UO2 were exposed to an intense X-ray beam at a synchrotron source in the presence of water, in order to simultaneously provide radiation fields required to split the water into highly oxidising radiolytic products, and to probe the crystal structure and composition of the UO2 layer, and the morphology of the UO2/water interface. By modeling the electron density, surface roughness...

  14. Effect of focusing conditions on laser-induced shock waves at titanium-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial and temporal evolution of laser-induced shock waves at a titanium-water interface was analyzed using a beam deflection setup. The focusing conditions of the source laser were varied, and its effect onto the dynamics of shock waves was elucidated. For a tightly focused condition, the speed of the shock wave was ∼6.4 Km/s, whereas for a defocused condition the velocities reduced to <3 km/s at the vicinity of the titanium-water interface. When the laser is focused a few millimeters above the target, i.e., within the water, the emission of dual shock waves was observed toward the rear side of the focal volume. These shock waves originate from the titanium-water interface as well as from the pure water breakdown region, respectively. The shock wave pressure is estimated from the shock wave velocity using the Newton's second law across a shock wave discontinuity. The shock wave pressure for a tightly focused condition was 18 GPa, whereas under a defocused condition the pressure experienced was ≤1 GPa in the proximity of target.

  15. Adsorption dynamics of L-glutamic acid copolymers at a heptane/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverung, C J; Radke, C J; Blanch, H W

    1998-02-16

    Random copolymers of glutamic acid (glu-ala, glu-leu, glu-phe, glu-tyr) were employed to investigate the relationship between side chain structure and peptide charge on adsorption behavior at an oil/water boundary. Adsorption of a series of glutamate copolymers at a heptane/water interface was examined by the dynamic pendant-drop method to determine interfacial tension. Incorporation of leucine or phenylalanine into a glutamate copolymer results in greater tension reduction than incorporation of alanine or tyrosine. These effects are amplified at pH values near the isoelectric point of glutamate, where macroscopic adsorbed films of glu-leu and glu-phe exhibit gel-like properties in response to interfacial area compression. Differences in interfacial tension behavior of glu-tyr and glu-phe indicate the importance of the tyrosine p-hydroxyl group on adsorption and aggregation at the oil/water interface. PMID:9540205

  16. Environmental application of nanotechnology: air, soil, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rusul Khaleel; Hayyan, Maan; AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim; Hayyan, Adeeb; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2016-07-01

    Global deterioration of water, soil, and atmosphere by the release of toxic chemicals from the ongoing anthropogenic activities is becoming a serious problem throughout the world. This poses numerous issues relevant to ecosystem and human health that intensify the application challenges of conventional treatment technologies. Therefore, this review sheds the light on the recent progresses in nanotechnology and its vital role to encompass the imperative demand to monitor and treat the emerging hazardous wastes with lower cost, less energy, as well as higher efficiency. Essentially, the key aspects of this account are to briefly outline the advantages of nanotechnology over conventional treatment technologies and to relevantly highlight the treatment applications of some nanomaterials (e.g., carbon-based nanoparticles, antibacterial nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanoparticles) in the following environments: (1) air (treatment of greenhouse gases, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols via adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, thermal decomposition, and air filtration processes), (2) soil (application of nanomaterials as amendment agents for phytoremediation processes and utilization of stabilizers to enhance their performance), and (3) water (removal of organic pollutants, heavy metals, pathogens through adsorption, membrane processes, photocatalysis, and disinfection processes). PMID:27074929

  17. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in surface waters is controlled strongly by biogeochemical nutrient cycling processes at the soil-water interface. The mechanisms and rates of the iron oxidation process with associated binding of phosphate during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) bearing groundwater are among the key unknowns in P retention processes in surface waters in delta areas where the shallow groundwater is typically pH-neutral to slightly acid, anoxic, iron-rich. We developed an experimental field set-up to study the dynamics in Fe(II) oxidation and mechanisms of P immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. The exfiltrating groundwater was captured in in-stream reservoirs constructed in the ditch. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we quantified Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes across the seasons. This study showed that seasonal changes in climatic conditions affect the Fe(II) oxidation process. In winter time the dissolved iron concentrations in the in-stream reservoirs reached the levels of the anaerobic groundwater. In summer time, the dissolved iron concentrations of the water in the reservoirs are low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into the reservoirs. Higher discharges, lower temperatures and lower pH of the exfiltrated groundwater in winter compared to summer shifts the location of the redox transition zone

  18. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m -2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CFD code validation against stratified air-water flow experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) modelling has been identified as one of the most important industrial needs related to nuclear reactor safety. A severe PTS scenario limiting the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) lifetime is the cold water Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) injection into the cold leg during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Since it represents a big challenge for numerical simulations, this scenario was selected within the NURESIM (European Platform for Nuclear Reactor Simulations) Integrated Project as a reference two-phase problem for CFD code validation. This paper presents a CFD analysis of a stratified air-water flow experimental investigation performed at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse in 1985 [1], which shares some common physical features with the ECC injection in PWR cold leg. Numerical simulations have been carried out with two commercial codes (Fluent and Ansys CFX), and a research code NEPTUNECFD (developed by EDF and CEA). The aim of this work, carried out at the University of Pisa within the NURESIM IP, is to validate the free surface flow model implemented in the codes against the available experimental data, and to perform code to code benchmarking. Obtained results suggest the relevance of three-dimensional effects and stress the importance of a suitable interface drag coefficient modelling. A relevant improvement of results has been achieved with 3D simulations, even if the air velocity profile was still significantly underestimated. (author)

  20. Unsteady aspects of sodium-water-air reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One important issue for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) concept is the reactivity of metallic sodium and its exothermal reaction with water. In particular during equipments washing operations, sodium needs to be firstly converted ('destroyed') into non reactive species via a chemical reaction with water. Today, such operations are performed in tanks that confine the system and mitigate the consequences of any possible abnormal condition. Some data were obtained from experiments run by the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) and were used as a basis for modelling. Among the principal phenomena identified so far are rapid water vaporization, hydrogen emission and explosion in air. High explosive-like pressure waves are generated from which sodium fragmentation and dispersion in water may ensue increasing the overall reactivity. It is extremely important to clarify the phenomenology to allow realistic extrapolation to full scale plants. A state of the art is proposed in this paper, starting from available experimental data and present perception of the physics. A comparison with present modelling strategy is also performed, underlining the necessity to improve a different and more physical approach aimed to well represent dynamic aspects of reaction. (authors)

  1. Transport-limited water splitting at ion-selective interfaces during concentration polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Peder; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical model of salt- and water-ion transport across an ion-selective interface based on an assumption of local equilibrium of the water-dissociation reaction. The model yields current-voltage characteristics and curves of water-ion current versus salt-ion current, which are in...... solutions provide closed-form expressions for the current-voltage characteristics, which include the overlimiting current due to the development of an extended space-charge region. Finally, we discuss how the addition of an acid or a base affects the transport properties of the system and thus provide...

  2. Communication: Nanoscale electrostatic theory of epistructural fields at the protein-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2012-12-01

    Nanoscale solvent confinement at the protein-water interface promotes dipole orientations that are not aligned with the internal electrostatic field of a protein, yielding what we term epistructural polarization. To quantify this effect, an equation is derived from first principles relating epistructural polarization with the magnitude of local distortions in water coordination causative of interfacial tension. The equation defines a nanoscale electrostatic model of water and enables an estimation of protein denaturation free energies and the inference of hot spots for protein associations. The theoretical results are validated vis-à-vis calorimetric data, revealing the destabilizing effect of epistructural polarization and its molecular origin.

  3. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  4. FANTASTIC-5G: flexible air interface for scalable service delivery within wireless communication networks of the 5th generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaich, Frank; Sayrac, Berna; Elayoubi, Salaheddine;

    2016-01-01

    5th generation mobile networks will have to cope with a high degree of heterogeneity in terms of services, mobility, number of devices and so on. Thus, diverse and often contradicting key performance indicators need to be supported, but having multiple radio access technologies for multi-service...... support below 6 GHz will be too costly. FANTASTIC-5G will develop a new multi-service air interface through a modular design. To allow the system to adapt to the anticipated heterogeneity, some properties need to be pursued, like simplicity, flexibility, scalability, versatility, efficiency and future...

  5. Quantification of Water Content Across a Cement-clay Interface Using High Resolution Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafizadeh, A.; Gimmi, T.; Van Loon, L.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Maeder, U. K.; Churakov, S. V.

    In many designs for radioactive waste repositories, cement and clay will come into direct contact. The geochemical contrast between cement and clay will lead to mass fluxes across the interface, which consequently results in alteration of structural and transport properties of both materials that may affect the performance of the multi-barrier system. We present an experimental approach to study cement-clay interactions with a cell to accommodate small samples of cement and clay. The cell design allows both in situ measurement of water content across the sample using neutron radiography and measurement of transport parameters using through-diffusion tracer experiments. The aim of the high-resolution neutron radiography experiments was to monitor changes in water content (porosity) and their spatial extent. Neutron radiographs of several evolving cement-clay interfaces delivered quantitative data which allow resolving local water contents within the sample domain. In the present work we explored the uncertainties of the derived water contents with regard to various input parameters and with regard to the applied image correction procedures. Temporal variation of measurement conditions created absolute uncertainty of the water content in the order of ±0.1 (m3/m3), which could not be fully accounted for by correction procedures. Smaller relative changes in water content between two images can be derived by specific calibrations to two sample regions with different, invariant water contents.

  6. Comparison of phase behavior between water soluble and insoluble surfactants at the air-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface phase behavior of 2-hydroxyethyl myristate (2-HEM) has been studied in Langmuir monolayers by measuring surface pressure (π)-area (A) isotherms with a film balance and observing monolayer morphology with a Brewster angle microscope (BAM). These results are compared with the phase behavior of 2-hydroxyethyl laurate (2-HEL) in Gibbs monolayers studied by measuring π-time (t) curves and observing monolayer morphology. The π-A isotherms of 2-HEM show a first-order phase transition from a liquid expanded (LE) phase to a liquid condensed (LC) phase in the temperature range between 5 and 35 deg. C whereas the π-t curves of 2-HEL represent a similar phase transition in the temperature range between 2 and 25 deg. C. The critical surface pressure, πc necessary for the phase transitions increases with increasing temperature in both the cases. The LC domains formed in 2-HEM show circular shapes, which are independent of the temperature. In contrast, the circular domains having stripe texture formed at lower temperatures show a shape transition to fingering domains with uniform brightness at 15 deg. C. The amphiphile, 2-HEM having 13-carbon chain has higher line tension than 2-HEL that has 11-carbon chain as tail. Thus, for 2-HEM, this high line tension always dominates over other factors giving rise to circular domains at the all studied temperatures.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado

  8. Analysis of the Metals in Soil-Water Interface in a Manganese Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozhi Ren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the influence of the metals of soil-water interface in a manganese mine (Xiangtan, China, on local water environment, there are six kinds of metals (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb characterized by measuring their concentration, correlation, source, and special distribution using principal component analysis, single factor, and Nemero comprehensive pollution index. The results showed that the corresponding average concentration was 0.3358, 0.045, 0.0105, 0.0148, 0.0067, and 0.0389 mg/L. The logarithmic concentration of Mn, Zn, and Pb was normal distribution. The correlation coefficients (between Mn and Pb, Mn and Zn, Mn and Ni, Cu and Zn, Cu and Pb, and Zn and Cd were found to range from 0.5 to 0.6, and those between Cu and Ni and Cu and Cd were below 0.3. It was found that Zn and Mn pollution were caused primarily by ore mining, mineral waste transportation, tailing slag, and smelting plants, while Cu and Ni mainly originate from the mining industry activities and the traffic transportation in the mining area. In addition, the Cd was considered to be produced primarily from the agricultural or anthropogenic activities. The pollution indexes indicated that metal pollution degree was different in soil-water interface streams as listed in increasing order of pollution level as Zn > Ni > Cu > Pb > Mn > Cd. For all of the pollution of the soil-water interface streams, there was moderate metal pollution but along the eastern mine area the pollution seemed to get more serious. There was only a small amount of soil-water interface streams not contaminated by the metals.

  9. CLOUDS, AEROSOLS, RADIATION AND THE AIR-SEA INTERFACE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN: ESTABLISHING DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert [University of Washington; Bretherton, Chris [University of Washington; McFarquhar, Greg [University of Illinois - Urbana; Protat, Alain [Bureau of Meteorology - Melbourne; Quinn, Patricia [NOAA PMEL; Siems, Steven [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jakob, Christian [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Alexander, Simon [Australian Antarctic Division; Weller, Bob [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

    2014-09-29

    A workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy was convened at the University of Washington to discuss the state of knowledge of clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction over the Southern Ocean and to identify strategies for reducing uncertainties in their representation in global and regional models. The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the global climate system and is a unique pristine environment, yet other than from satellite, there have been sparse observations of clouds, aerosols, radiation and the air-sea interface in this region. Consequently, much is unknown about atmospheric and oceanographic processes and their linkage in this region. Approximately 60 scientists, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and senior researchers working in atmospheric and oceanic sciences at U.S. and foreign universities and government laboratories, attended the Southern Ocean Workshop. It began with a day of scientific talks, partly in plenary and partly in two parallel sessions, discussing the current state of the science for clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction in the Southern Ocean. After the talks, attendees broke into two working groups; one focused on clouds and meteorology, and one focused on aerosols and their interactions with clouds. This was followed by more plenary discussion to synthesize the two working group discussions and to consider possible plans for organized activities to study clouds, aerosols and the air-sea interface in the Southern Ocean. The agenda and talk slides, including short summaries of the highlights of the parallel session talks developed by the session chars, are available at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/socrates/presentations/SouthernOceanPresentations/.

  10. Interfacial rheometry of polymer at a water-oil interface by intra-pair magnetophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Stefano; de Jong, Arthur M; Baudry, Jean; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-07-01

    We describe an interfacial rheometry technique based on pairs of micrometer-sized magnetic particles at a fluid-fluid interface. The particles are repeatedly attracted and repelled by well-controlled magnetic dipole-dipole forces, so-called interfacial rheometry by intra-pair magnetophoresis (IPM). From the forces (∼pN), displacements (∼μm) and velocities (∼μm s(-1)) of the particles we are able to quantify the interfacial drag coefficient of particles within a few seconds and over very long timescales. The use of local dipole-dipole forces makes the system insensitive to fluid flow and suited for simultaneously recording many particles in parallel over a long period of time. We apply IPM to study the time-dependent adsorption of an oil-soluble amino-modified silicone polymer at a water-oil interface using carboxylated magnetic particles. At low polymer concentration the carboxylated particles remain on the water side of the water-oil interface, while at high polymer concentrations the particles transit into the oil phase. Both conditions show a drag coefficient that does not depend on time. However, at intermediate polymer concentrations data show an increase of the interfacial drag coefficient as a function of time, with an increase over more than three orders of magnitude (10(-7) to 10(-4) N s m(-1)), pointing to a strong polymer-polymer interaction at the interface. The time-dependence of the interfacial drag appears to be highly sensitive to the polymer concentration and to the ionic strength of the aqueous phase. We foresee that IPM will be a very convenient technique to study fluid-fluid interfaces for a broad range of materials systems. PMID:27253322

  11. Structural changes of soy proteins at the oil-water interface studied by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerati-u-rai, Maneephan; Miriani, Matteo; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Corredig, Milena

    2012-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to acquire information on the structural changes of proteins at the oil/water interface in emulsions prepared by using soy protein isolate, glycinin, and β-conglycinin rich fractions. Spectral changes occurring from differences in the exposure of tryptophan residues to the solvent were evaluated with respect to spectra of native, urea-denatured, and heat treated proteins. The fluorescence emission maxima of the emulsions showed a red shift with respect to those of native proteins, indicating that the tryptophan residues moved toward a more hydrophilic environment after adsorption at the interface. The heat-induced irreversible transitions were investigated using microcalorimetry. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies indicated that while the protein in solution underwent irreversible structural changes with heating at 75 and 95°C for 15 min, the interface-adsorbed proteins showed very little temperature-induced rearrangements. The smallest structural changes were observed in soy protein isolate, probably because of the higher extent of protein-protein interactions in this material, as compared to the β-conglycinin and to the glycinin fractions. This work brings new evidence of structural changes of soy proteins upon adsorption at the oil water interface, and provides some insights on the possible protein exchange events that may occur between adsorbed and unadsorbed proteins in the presence of oil droplets. PMID:22227018

  12. Mean-Field Approximation to the Hydrophobic Hydration in the Liquid-Vapor Interface of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kiharu; Sumi, Tomonari; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-03-01

    A mean-field approximation to the solvation of nonpolar solutes in the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous solutions is proposed. It is first remarked with a numerical illustration that the solvation of a methane-like solute in bulk liquid water is accurately described by the mean-field theory of liquids, the main idea of which is that the probability (Pcav) of finding a cavity in the solvent that can accommodate the solute molecule and the attractive interaction energy (uatt) that the solute would feel if it is inserted in such a cavity are both functions of the solvent density alone. It is then assumed that the basic idea is still valid in the liquid-vapor interface, but Pcav and uatt are separately functions of different coarse-grained local densities, not functions of a common local density. Validity of the assumptions is confirmed for the solvation of the methane-like particle in the interface of model water at temperatures between 253 and 613 K. With the mean-field approximation extended to the inhomogeneous system the local solubility profiles across the interface at various temperatures are calculated from Pcav and uatt obtained at a single temperature. The predicted profiles are in excellent agreement with those obtained by the direct calculation of the excess chemical potential over an interfacial region where the solvent local density varies most rapidly. PMID:26595441

  13. Molecular dynamics of phenol at the liquid-vapor interface of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Benjamin, Ilan

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations on phenol at the water liquid-vapor interface are presented. The density profile of the center of mass of phenol exhibits a maximum 1 A from the Gibbs surface toward the vapor phase, indicating that the molecule is surface-active. Changes in the profile caused by the interface extend 6 A from the Gibbs surface into the liquid, significantly more than change in the density profile of water. The most probable orientation of the solute at the surface is such that its symmetry axis is perpendicular to the interface with the OH substituent pointing toward the liquid. An additional simulation with benzene shows that this molecule at the surface most often adopts orientations parallel to the interface. Deeper in the liquid all the solutes are preferentially ordered perpendicular to the surface. In the interfacial region the orientational preferences of the solute are primarily determined by cavity formation needed to accommodate the hydrophobic portion of the dissolved molecule.

  14. THE ASSESSMENT OF AIR AND WATER QUALITY OF SHARRA LANDFILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The waste disposal site of Sharra represents the first landfill for the management of solid wastes in Albania designed in accordance to the European Union standards for the management and administration of solid wastes. The objective of this study was to realize a general assessment of the environmental state in the areas nearby Sharra, after the implementation of the landfill as a remediation method. Water and air samples have been periodically collected and analyzed before and after the remediation of the waste disposal site of Sharra, respectively on the years 2008 and 2009. Results show that the measured indicators used to assess the quality of air such as; solid particles, PM10, NO2, H2S, CH4 reach the respective average values of 372 μg m-3, 216 μg m-3, 97 μg m-3, 0.8 μg m-3, 350 μg m-3 in 2008 and 72 μg m-3, 30 μg m-3, 29 μg m-3, 0.22 μg m-3, 41 μg m-3, in the year 2009. Before the remediation, except H2S the concentrations of all the other components in air exceed the Albanian and European Union limits whereas in 2009 these values have dropped under the mentioned limits. The concentration of heavy metals (mg L-1 in the surface waters exceeds the allowed limits for Ni (0.002-0.08, Mn (0.6, Cr (0.19-0.33 and Fe (0.2-3.5. As regards to the quality of surface water; some of the indicators such as EC, Cl-, NO2- resulted to surpass the above mentioned limits even after the implementation of the landfill. Based on the obtained results, further actions should be considered to be carried out in order to assure the collection and remediation of the landfill leaching prior they join the Erzeni River.

  15. Influence of gold species (AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-)) on self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in solutions and morphology of composite thin films fabricated at the air/liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingjuan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaokai; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2016-01-21

    Composite thin films doped with Au species were fabricated at an air/liquid interface via a series of steps, including the mass transfer of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) across the liquid/liquid interface between a DMF/CHCl3 solution and an aqueous solution containing either AuCl4(-) or AuCl2(-), self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in a mixed DMF-water solution, and adsorption and further self-organization of the formed aggregates at the air/liquid interface. This is a new approach for fabricating composite polymer films and can be completed within a very short time. AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-) ions were found to significantly influence the self-assembly behavior of the block copolymer and the morphologies of the composite films, leading to the formation of nanowire arrays and a foam structure at the air/liquid interface, respectively, which originated from rod-like micelles and microcapsules that had formed in the respective solutions. The effect of the metal complex was analyzed based on the packing parameters of the amphiphilic polymer molecules in different microenvironments and the interactions between the pyridine groups and the metal chloride anions. In addition, these composite thin films exhibited stable and durable performance as heterogeneous catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroaromatics in aqueous solutions. PMID:26688280

  16. Influence of Cooling to Heating Load Ratio on Optimal Supply Water and Air Temperatures in an Air Conditioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Ryohei; Ito, Koichi

    In planning an air conditioning system, supply water and air temperatures are important factors from the viewpoint of energy saving and cost reduction. For example, lower temperature supply water and air for space cooling reduce the coefficient of performance of a refrigeration machine, and increase the thickness of heat insulation material. However, they enable larger temperature differences, and reduce equipment sizes and power demand. It is also an important subject to evaluate the effect of the supply water and air temperatures on energy saving and cost reduction on the annual basis by considering not only cooling but also heating loads. The purposes of this paper are to propose an optimal planning method for an air conditioning system with large temperature difference, and to analyze the effect of supply water and air temperatures on the long-term economics through a numerical study for an office building. As a result, it is shown that the proposed method effectively determines supply water and air temperatures, and the influence of the cooling to heating load ratio on the long-term economics is clarified.

  17. Ultrasonic Measurement of Water Layer Thickness by Flow Pattern Profile in a Horizontal Air Water Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic methods have the advantage, compared to other water layer thickness measurement techniques, of applicability to large volume objects, since most radiation techniques are limited by the thickness of the pipe and plate walls. The ultrasonic experiment was performed to do an analysis for cooling performance in a complete test channel by the investigation of the two phase flow that develops in an inclined gap with heating from the top. This ultrasonic technique for measuring water layer thickness measurement employ the higher relative acoustic impedance of air with respect to that of liquids. By this method it is possible to determine both liquid water distance, void fraction in a gas-liquid two-phase flow. Instantaneous measurement of the water layer thickness is useful in understanding heat and mass transfer characteristics in a two-phase separated flow. An ultrasonic measurement technique for determining water layer thickness in the wavy and slug flow regime of horizontal tube flow has been produced

  18. Tracking air and water: Technology drives oil patch environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumentation used in monitoring air and water quality in the oilpatch is discussed. One of these instruments is the oscillating micro-balance, a tool that enables continuous real-time measurement of potentially harmful particulates from gas plants. Similarly, testing for hydrogen sulfides is also done electronically: gas passes by an ultra violet light chamber which uses a calibrated filter to measure wavelengths of light that are specific to hydrogen sulfide. Fourier Transfer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), one of the recent technologies to hit the market, enables the identification of a range of gases with one instrument. It also permits measurement from a distance. Still other instruments involve sensors that are fitted with chemical chambers whose contents react with hydrogen sulfide to produce a micro-volt of electricity. Data from this is digitized, and a reading of hydrogen sulfide, measured in parts per million, is obtained from a laptop computer

  19. Interfacial structure in an air-water planar bubble jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States); The Ohio State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Vasavada, S.; Choi, S.W.; Ishii, M. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kim, S. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN (United States); University of Missouri-Rolla, Nuclear Engineering, Rolla, MO (United States); Beus, S.G. [Bechtel Bettis Inc., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The objective of the current study is to better understand the interfacial structure and its development in an air-water planar bubble jet, as well as to provide a unique benchmark data set for a 3D thermal-hydraulic analysis code. Both flow visualization and local measurements were performed in three characteristic flow conditions at four elevations along a test section with a cross section of 200 mm in width and 10 mm in gap. A high-speed digital video camera was applied in the flow visualization study to capture the flow structures and bubble interaction phenomena, while a miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probe was used to acquire the time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, and bubble number frequency. Also, the interfacial area concentration and the averaged bubble Sauter mean diameter were obtained from the local measurements. The lateral bubble transport and bubble interaction mechanisms were clearly demonstrated in the acquired data. (orig.)

  20. Study on high heat flux cooling by air-water flow driven by high speed air flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of air injection into a subcooled water flow on boiling heat transfer and a critical heat flux (CHF) was examined experimentally. Experiments were conducted in the range of subcooling of 50 K, a superficial velocity of water and air Ul = 0,17 3,4 and Ug= 0 15,2 m/s, respectively. A test heat transfer surface was a 5 mm wide, 40 mm long and 0,2 mm thick stainless steel sheet embedded on the bottom wall of a 10 mm high and 20 mm wide rectangular flow channel. Nine times enhancement of the heat transfer in the non-boiling region was attained at the most by introducing an air flow into a water single-phase flow. The heat transfer augmentation in the non-boiling region was attained by less power increase than that in the case that only the water flow rate was increased. From the aspect of the power consumption and the heat transfer enhancement, the small air introduction in the low water flow rate region seemed more profitable, although the air introduction in the high water flow rate region and also the large air introduction were still effective in the augmentation of the heat transfer in the non-boiling region. (author)

  1. Influence of storage time in water on the integrity of adhesive interface in resin composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathy Aparecida Xavier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When immersed in oral fluids, water absorption by the restorative resin composite material can occur, which is identified by some researchers as one of the causes of loss of aesthetic features and reduction of mechanical properties over time. On the other hand, some authors have suggested that the fluids sorption may contribute to the reduction of shrinkage stress generated at the adhesive interface and reduce the width of gaps. The aim of this study was verifying if the storage time in water of restorations carried out with different filling techniques could influence on the integrity of tooth-restoration adhesive interface. Eighteen cavities were built in bovine incisors and they were divided into 3 groups after the adhesive procedure: group B (“Bulk” received one single increment of light-cured resin composite; group I (“Increments” received the same composite in three oblique increments; and the group B+S (“Bulk + Self-cured resin composite”. The last one firstly received a flowable, self-cured resin composite, and then, it was inserted one single increment of light-cured composite. After 48 h of storage, the restorations were sliced, the first measurement was accomplished, and the analysis of the adhesive interface was made each 30 days over nine months of immersion in water. The results were subjected to a split-plot analysis of variance and Tukey’s test. It was not verified significant influence of immersion time in water on the gap width, or regular increase or decrease of percentage interface free of gaps over time for any of three filling techniques. Some hypothesis could explain this occurrence, such as gain of mass without significant increase in the volume; the expansion of restoration in directions that did not contributed to the gaps closure; and the simultaneous occurrence of hygroscopic expansion and hydrolytic degradation of the resin processes.

  2. Bacterial Enrichment at the Gas-Water Interface of a Laboratory Apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Powelson, D K; Mills, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    The gas-water interface (GWI) is likely to have important effects on bacterial adsorption and transport in unsaturated porous media. A glass apparatus that isolated GWIs in ports above a flowthrough suspension of a groundwater bacterial isolate was used to represent unsaturated porous media. The surface microlayer was collected by placing a polycarbonate filter on the GWI. The filter was stained, and the bacteria were enumerated by direct count. The significance of five independent variables ...

  3. Propensity of heavier halides for the water/vapor interface revisited using the Amoeba force field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tůma, L.; Jeníček, D.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 411, - (2005), s. 70-74. ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) CHE0431312; NSF(US) CHE0209719 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : halide anions * water/vapor interface * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.438, year: 2005

  4. Interfacial rheology and conformations of triblock copolymers adsorbed onto the water-oil interface

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Pablo; STOCCO, Antonio; Munoz, José; Miller, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    The conformation and the dilatational properties of three non-ionic triblock PEO-PPO-PEO (where PEO is polyethyleneoxide and PPO is polypropyleneoxide) copolymers of different hydrophobicity and molecular weight were investigated at the water-hexane interface. The interfacial behavior of the copolymers was studied by combining dilatational rheology using the oscillating drop method and ellipsometry. From the dilatational rheology measurements the limiting elasticity values, E_0, of the Pluron...

  5. Measurement System to Monitor Interface Level Between Oil and Water in a Rapidly Rotating System

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Mohsin

    2013-01-01

    Alfa Laval is a market leader in centrifugal separators that develops and sells separators for a wide range of uses. Clarification of beer, wine, water purification, drug production and purification of marine fuels are just a few of the hundreds of different uses for Alfa Laval separators. To further optimize their separator performance, Alfa Laval is interested in the development of a measurement system, which can find the interface position between the lighter and the heavier liquid phases ...

  6. MM-PBSA Captures Key Role of Intercalating Water Molecules at a Protein−Protein Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Sergio; Amaro, Rommie E.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The calculation of protein interaction energetics is of fundamental interest, yet accurate quantities are difficult to obtain due to the complex and dynamic nature of protein interfaces. This is further complicated by the presence of water molecules, which can exhibit transient interactions of variable duration and strength with the protein surface. The T-cell receptor (TCR) and its staphylococcal enterotoxin 3 (SEC3) binding partner are well-characterized examples of a protein−protein intera...

  7. Molecular simulation of water vapor–liquid phase interfaces using TIP4P/2005 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Planková Barbora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations for water were run using the TIP4P/2005 model for temperatures ranging from 250 K to 600 K. The density profile, the surface tension and the thickness of the phase interface were calculated as preliminary results. The surface tension values matched nicely with the IAPWS correlation over wide range of temperatures. As a partial result, DL_POLY Classis was successfully used for tests of the new computing cluster in our institute.

  8. Chapter 1 Surface Structure and Reactivity of Iron Oxide-Water Interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Petitto, S.C.; Tanwar, K.S.; Lo, C.S.; Eng, P.J.; Chaka, A.M.; Trainor, T.P. (Univ Alaska Fairbanks); (UofC)

    2008-04-29

    The surface structure and composition of the three distinct iron-(hydr)oxide systems, goethite (1 0 0), hematite (1{bar 1}02), and magnetite (1 1 1) were determined under hydrated conditions at room temperature using crystal truncation rod (CTR) analysis. The prediction of surface protonation states and the overall chemical plausibility of the experimental surface models are performed using a bond-valence (BV) analysis. Further analysis of the surface energetics is carried out using density functional theory (DFT). The analysis of three common iron-(hydr)oxide surface systems reveals the differences in interface structure and distribution of hydroxyl groups at substrate-water interfaces. The goethite (1 0 0) interface structure is determined to have a relaxed double hydroxyl termination with the presence of two semi-ordered water layers that expose a surface with A-type (Fe-OH{sub 2}) and B-type (Fe{sub 2}-OH) hydroxyl groups. The hydrated hematite (1{bar 1}02) interface structure has vacancies in the near surface metal sites, resulting in three types of surface functional groups: A type, B type, and C type (Fe{sub 3}-O). The interface structure of magnetite (1 1 1) shows two chemically nonequivalent oxygen surface terminations in the surface ratio of 70 O{sub 4}-Fe{sub oh}-O{sub 4}-Fe{sub td1-oh-td2}:30 O{sub 4}-Fe{sub td1-oh-td2}-O{sub 4}-Fe{sub oh} suggesting that the octahedral irons are the principal irons involved at the environmental interfaces. In the above three systems, there also is evidence for multiple domains with fractional ordered unit cell steps determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results obtained for the structure of the iron-(hydr)oxide-water interfaces from the CTR and DFT analyses are different from stoichiometric termination of the bulk structure or hydroxylation of the ultra high vacuum (UHV) determined surface structures.

  9. Environmental Regulations, Air and Water Pollution, and Infant Mortality in India

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Rema N.; Greenstone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using the most comprehensive developing country dataset ever compiled on air and water pollution and environmental regulations, the paper assesses India's environmental regulations with a difference-in-differences design. The air pollution regulations are associated with substantial improvements in air quality. The most successful air regulation resulted in a modest but statistically insignificant decline in infant mortality. In contrast, the water regulations had no measurable benefits. The ...

  10. A flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O fluxes at a lake-air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Liu, Shoudong; Li, Hanchao; Xiao, Qitao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Zhenghua; Hu, Cheng; Gao, Yunqiu; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mi; Lee, Xuhui

    2014-12-16

    Inland lakes play important roles in water and greenhouse gas cycling in the environment. This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake-air interface. The concentration gradients over the water surface were measured with an analyzer based on the wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy technology, and the eddy diffusivity was measured with a sonic anemometer. Results of a zero-gradient test indicate a flux measurement precision of 4.8 W m(-2) for water vapor, 0.010 mg m(-2) s(-1) for CO2, and 0.029 μg m(-2) s(-1) for CH4. During the 620 day measurement period, 97%, 69%, and 67% of H2O, CO2, and CH4 hourly fluxes were higher in magnitude than the measurement precision, which confirms that the flux-gradient system had adequate precision for the measurement of the lake-air exchanges. This study illustrates four strengths of the flux-gradient method: (1) the ability to simultaneously measure the flux of H2O, CO2, and CH4; (2) negligibly small density corrections; (3) the ability to resolve small CH4 gradient and flux; and (4) continuous and noninvasive operation. The annual mean CH4 flux (1.8 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)) at this hypereutrophic lake was close to the median value for inland lakes in the world (1.6 g CH4 m(-2) year(-1)). The system has adequate precision for CH4 flux for broad applications but requires further improvement to resolve small CO2 flux in many lakes. PMID:25377990

  11. Disponibilidad de agua-aire en sustratos para plantas Water-air availability in plant substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Beatriz Vence

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Las propiedades físicas de los sustratos especialmente las relacionadas con la disponibilidad de agua-aire para las raíces de las plantas son las más importantes dentro del estudio de estos materiales usados en cultivos en contenedores. Para un óptimo crecimiento de la planta un sustrato debe contener suficiente cantidad de agua y aire y ambos estar disponibles. A nivel mundial el estudio de las propiedades que determinan esta disponibilidad comenzó desde las ciencias del suelo y fue adaptándose a las características propias de la amplia gama de productos que pueden ser utilizados, surgiendo así variables y métodos de medida específicos para la caracterización física de sustratos. En la Argentina el estudio de sustratos para plantas constituye un área de conocimiento nueva y en desarrollo, por ello exige un trabajo interdisciplinario donde hay que concordar un lenguaje común de términos técnicos, la elección de los métodos analíticos de referencia específicos y una legislación actualizada para sustratos. Haciendo un estudio crítico de la gran cantidad de información al respecto que proviene de otros países se podrán adaptar a nuestra realidad y a nuestros materiales. En esta revisión se enumeran resumidamente los más importantes conceptos a tener en cuenta para la evaluación física de sustratos a fin de que puedan servir de base para una mejor comprensión y discusión del tema.The study of the physical properties of substrates for container plant production is very important because the water and air availability for plant roots is involved. A substrate must contain a sufficient amount of available water and air to produce an optimum plant growth and development. Worldwide, the study of the properties that determine the water and air availability started from soil sciences and has been evolving to the present existence of a great variety of products that can be used, concomitant with the identification of parameters

  12. On the Electronic Nature of the Surface Potential at the Vapor-Liquid Interface of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathmann, S M; Kuo, I; Mundy, C J

    2008-02-05

    The surface potential at the vapor-liquid interface of water is relevant to many areas of chemical physics. Measurement of the surface potential has been experimentally attempted many times, yet there has been little agreement as to its magnitude and sign (-1.1 to +0.5 mV). We present the first computation of the surface potential of water using ab initio molecular dynamics. We find that the surface potential {chi} = -18 mV with a maximum interfacial electric field = 8.9 x 10{sup 7} V/m. A comparison is made between our quantum mechanical results and those from previous molecular simulations. We find that explicit treatment of the electronic density makes a dramatic contribution to the electric properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water. The E-field can alter interfacial reactivity and transport while the surface potential can be used to determine the 'chemical' contribution to the real and electrochemical potentials for ionic transport through the vapor-liquid interface.

  13. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... Violating Facilities” published pursuant to 40 CFR 15.20. By acceptance of a cooperative agreement in...

  14. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  15. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  16. Relay cropping for improved air and water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, James S; Francis, Dennis D; Shanahan, John F

    2005-01-01

    Using plants to extract excess nitrate from soil is important in protecting against eutrophication of standing water, hypoxic conditions in lakes and oceans, or elevated nitrate concentrations in domestic water supplies Global climate change issues have raised new concerns about nitrogen (N) management as it relates to crop production even though there may not be an immediate threat to water quality. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are frequently considered the primary cause of global climate change, but under anaerobic conditions, animals can contribute by expelling methane (CH4) as do soil microbes. In terms of the potential for global climate change, CH4 is approximately 25 times more harmful than CO2. This differential effect is minuscule compared to when nitrous oxide (N2O) is released into the atmosphere because it is approximately 300 times more harmful than CO2. N2O losses from soil have been positively correlated with residual N (nitrate, NO3-) concentrations in soil. It stands to reason that phytoremediation via nitrate scavenger crops is one approach to help protect air quality, as well as soil and water quality. Winter wheat was inserted into a seed corn/soybean rotation to utilize soil nitrate and thereby reduce the potential for nitrate leaching and N2O emissions. The net effect of the 2001-2003 relay cropping sequence was to produce three crops in two years, scavenge 130 kg N/ha from the root zone, produce an extra 2 Mg residue/ha, and increase producer profitability by approximately 250 dollars/ha. PMID:15948582

  17. Evaluasi kehilangan air (WATER LOSSES) PDAM Tirtanadi Padangsidimpuan di Kecamatan Padangsidimpuan Selatan

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Nikmad Arsad

    2015-01-01

    Kebutuhan air bersih masyarakat semakin hari semakin meningkat dan kapasitas produksi sumber air bersih yang relatif menurun maka hal yang paling relefan untuk dilakukan yaitu dengan mengurangi atau meminimalkan tingkat kehilangan air. Untuk meminimalkan tingkat kehilangan air dapat dilakukan dengan program pengendalian Non Revenued Water (NRW). NRW dapat didefinisikan sebagai air yang hilang dapat diukur dan diketahui besarnya namun tidak dapat direkeningkan atau tidak dapat menjadi penghas...

  18. Theoretical ultrasonic reflection at a wave/composite laminate/water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes analysis for ultrasonic leaky plate wave propagation in multidirectional composite laminates. Specifically, the analytical reflection coefficient is derived for a water/composite laminate/water interface. Theoretical predictions of reflected beam amplitudes are also presented. Four different composite laminates are investigated: T300/5208 graphite/epoxy [0]31T [45/90/-45/0]3s [45/-45]2-s, and S-2 glass/epoxy [0/90]4s. The analytical dispersion curves for the unidirectional laminate and other three laminates can be obtained by searching for the minimum magnitude of the reflection coefficient.

  19. Production of a novel neuromelanin at the sevoflurane-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) occurs in the elderly following surgery that requires inhaled anesthetics. The molecular mechanism associated with this process is unknown. This study examined the possible role of serotonin, a neurotransmitter involved in cognition. We observed that sevoflurane, a common inhaled anesthetic, formed a separate phase in water similar to that of chloroform. Additionally, sevoflurane sequestered acrolein, which is a lipid peroxidation product associated with aging and is elevated in the elderly brain. The enhanced partitioning of acrolein increased the focal concentration and hence reactivity to serotonin which preferentially occurred at the sevoflurane-water interface. The resulting product exhibited unique properties similar to catecholamine-derived neuromelanin

  20. The adsorption behavior of octafluoropropane at the water/gas interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the adsorption behavior of the gas octafluoropropane at the water/gas interface as a function of different pressures. In a custom-made measurement cell, the gas pressure was varied in a range between 1 bar and close to the condensation pressure of octafluoropropane. The electron density profiles of the adsorption layers show that the layer thickness increases with pressure. The evolution of the layer electron density indicates that the bulk electron density is reached if a layer consisting of more than one monolayer of octafluoropropane is adsorbed on the water surface

  1. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC ACROSS WATER-SEDIMENT INTERFACE OF FALGU RIVER

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeeva Ranjan; Rekha Rani; Ashay Bavishi; Shivadhar Sharma; Madhusudan Choudhary

    2012-01-01

    Two predominant species of arsenic compounds, As(III) and As(V), are found in soils and natural water and they have been classified as carcinogens. The focus of the present study was to examine the speciation of Arsenic (As) across the water-sediment interface at the confluence of drainage for Gaya city and the Falgu River. Gas Chromatography (GC) coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to analyze the organic arsenic species while the inorganic arsenic specie...

  2. Analysis of the Metals in Soil-Water Interface in a Manganese Mine

    OpenAIRE

    Bozhi Ren; Qian Wang; Yangbo Chen; Wenjie Ding; Xie Zheng

    2015-01-01

    In order to reveal the influence of the metals of soil-water interface in a manganese mine (Xiangtan, China), on local water environment, there are six kinds of metals (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) characterized by measuring their concentration, correlation, source, and special distribution using principal component analysis, single factor, and Nemero comprehensive pollution index. The results showed that the corresponding average concentration was 0.3358, 0.045, 0.0105, 0.0148, 0.0067, and 0....

  3. Nutrient exchange and release experiment and its simulation study in lake water-sediment interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Lian-qing; HAO Zhen-chun

    2006-01-01

    The sediment distributed and insolated under lake was collected for experiments. The nutrient layer distribution conditions of sampled sediment and its physical and chemical characteristics were analyzed to simulate and assess the influence degree to lake water quality. Based on the dynamic water exchanging experiments the nutrient release process in sediment and influence mechanism to substance exchanging on water-sediment interface was studied, and the correlation between the changing content of total phosphors and total nitrogen in sediment and covered water were analyzed for setting up a simulation model. At the same time the influence degree is explained in detail. The experimental results indicated that even if clean water without nutrient contents was used for water exchangement so as to decrease pollution or prevent eutrophication, however owing to the vertical nutrient distribution in lake sediment, it will lead to the increasing release amount greatly especially when the organic nutrient contained in sediment turns into inorganic status because of isolation. Besides the release process of total phosphate (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were modeled and each nutrient's exchanging equation at interface caused by covered water nutrient concentration changing was set up. According to the simulating prediction, TP and TN content of cover water will also sustain a steady higher level in a long period. The nutrient release amount of sediment is not only affected by the covered water concentration but also connects with accumulative time. The experiments provide the fundamental theoretical and practical basis for taking ecological restoration project. And research is helpful to prevent or restore lake eutrophication.

  4. Adsorption kinetics of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles at the hexane–water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pendant drop technique was used to characterize the adsorption behavior of n-dodecane-1-thiol and n-hexane-1-thiol-capped gold nanoparticles at the hexane–water interface. The adsorption process was studied by analyzing the dynamic interfacial tension versus nanoparticle concentration, both at early times and at later stages (i.e., immediately after the interface between the fluids is made and once equilibrium has been established). A series of gold colloids were made using nanoparticles ranging in size from 1.60 to 2.85 nm dissolved in hexane for the interfacial tension analysis. Following free diffusion of nanoparticles from the bulk hexane phase, adsorption leads to ordering and rearrangement of the nanoparticles at the interface and formation of a dense monolayer. With increasing interfacial coverage, the diffusion-controlled adsorption for the nanoparticles at the interface was found to change to an interaction-controlled assembly and the presence of an adsorption barrier was experimentally verified. At the same bulk concentration, different sizes of n-dodecane-1-thiol nanoparticles showed different absorption behavior at the interface, in agreement with the findings of Kutuzov et al. (Phys Chem Chem Phys 9:6351–6358, 2007). The experiments additionally demonstrated the important role played by the capping agent. At the same concentration, gold nanoparticles stabilized by n-hexane-1-thiol exhibited greater surface activity than gold nanoparticles of the same size stabilized by n-dodecane-1-thiol. These findings contribute to the design of useful supra-colloidal structures by the self-assembly of alkane-thiol-capped gold nanoparticles at liquid–liquid interfaces.

  5. The Sensitivity of Dielectric and NMR Measurements to Sorption at the Solid/Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the real part of the relative dielectric permittivity (dielectric constant) and the NMR relaxation time constants (T1 and T2) of water-saturated geological materials, contain information about molecular-scale processes and are used to estimate pore-scale properties. While the measurements probe different aspects of the response of a porous medium, it is well-established that the measured dielectric and NMR parameters are sensitive to the size and state of the solid/water interface. Laboratory and theoretical studies have shown the dielectric constant and NMR relaxation rates (1/T1 and 1/T2) of water-saturated geological materials to be proportional to the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space. It is important to emphasize that the surface area, related to the magnitude of these measured parameters, is the water-wet surface area of a material. The fact that the sorption of chemical species (other than water) at the solid/water interface reduces the size of the water-wet surface area, raises the following question: Can dielectric and NMR measurements provide a sensitive, reliable tool for monitoring the sorption and desorption of contaminants in geological materials? Laboratory studies have explored the way in which changes in the wettability of a material affect the dielectric constant. In studies where the geological material was altered so as to be fully hydrophobic or oil-wet, a significant decrease was seen in the dielectric constant. Eliminating the solid/water interface appears to eliminate the contributions of surface processes to the dielectric response. In another study, as oil sorbed to the surfaces of water-saturated samples of sand and clay, a gradual decrease in dielectric constant was seen due to the decrease in water-wet surface area with increasing sorption. While this behavior is consistent with developed theoretical models, accurately predicting the magnitude of the effect remains a topic of research. Unlike the dielectric

  6. Effect of burrowing macrobenthos on the flux of dissolved substances across the water-sediment interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of burrowing activities of ghost shrimp (Neocallichirus limosus and Biffarius arenosus) and heart urchin (Echinocardium cordatum) on the flux of dissolved substances across the water-sediment interface was examined by comparing the transport of the tracer deuterium oxide (D2O) between sediments and overlying water in experimental laboratory tanks with and without fauna. This experiment was complemented by measurements of the diffusive flux of naturally occurring isotopes of radium (224Ra and 223Ra) from the sediments into the water column. Despite different burrowing habits, all three species enhanced flux of D2O and the Ra isotopes by similar amounts. In sandy sediments, both shrimps and urchins enhanced flux of D2O across the water-sediment interface 2.5 fold. In muddy sediments, however, results were inconclusive. There was little difference in flux of 224Ra and 223Ra between muddy and sandy sediments; flux was 2.3-3.9 times higher in the presence of the burrowing species than in their absence. These findings emphasize (i) the important role of burrowing macrofauna in the transport of dissolved substances between the sediment and water bodies and (ii) the dependence of various biogeochemical processes, including nutrient release, on the benthic macrofauna of Port Phillip Bay. Copyright (1997) CSIRO Publishing

  7. Reactivity of the calcite–water-interface, from molecular scale processes to geochemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The current state of some aspects of calcite–water-interface chemistry is reviewed. • The interface structure is characterized at a molecular scale. • Experimental and theoretical studies on contaminant sorption at calcite are presented. • The influence of phosphonates on calcite growth is investigated. • The effect of limestone on the workability of cement suspensions is addressed. - Abstract: Surface reactions on calcite play an important role in geochemical and environmental systems, as well as many areas of industry. In this review, we present investigations of calcite that were performed in the frame of the joint research project “RECAWA” (reactivity of calcite–water-interfaces: molecular process understanding for technical applications). As indicated by the project title, work within the project comprised a large range of length scales. The molecular scale structure of the calcite (1 0 4)–water-interface is refined based on surface diffraction data. Structural details are related to surface charging phenomena, and a simplified basic stern surface complexation model is proposed. As an example for trace metal interactions with calcite surfaces we review and present new spectroscopic and macroscopic experimental results on Selenium interactions with calcite. Results demonstrate that selenate (SeO42−) shows no significant interaction with calcite at our experimental conditions, while selenite (SeO32−) adsorbs at the calcite surface and can be incorporated into the calcite structure. Atomistic calculations are used to assess the thermodynamics of sulfate (SO42−), selenate (SeO42−), and selenite (SeO32−) partitioning in calcite and aragonite. The results show that incorporation of these oxo-anions into the calcite structure is so highly endothermic that incorporation is practically impossible at bulk equilibrium and standard conditions. This indicates that entrapment processes are involved when coprecipitation is observed

  8. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  9. The entrainment of air by water jet impinging on a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Wee King [University of Wollongong, School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, Northfields Ave, NSW (Australia); Khoo, Boo Cheong [National University of Singapore, Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent (Singapore); Yuen, W.Y. Daniel [BlueScope Steel Research, Port Kembla, NSW (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    High-speed cine and video photographs were used to capture the flow patterns of a column of water jet impinging into a pool of water. The impact results in air entrainment into water in the form of a void with no mixing between the water in the jet and the surrounding water. Conservation of fluid momentum shows that the rate of increase of the height of the air void depends on the drag coefficient of the jet front. By neglecting the frictional losses, the application of energy conservation yields an expression that relates the maximum height of the air void with the properties of the water jet. (orig.)

  10. Slug flooding in air-water countercurrent vertical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is to study slug flooding in the vertical air-water countercurrent flow loop with a porous liquid injector in the upper plenum. More water penetration into the bottom plenum in slug flooding is observed than the annular flooding because the flow regime changes from the slug flow regime or periodic slug/annular flow regime to annular flow regime due to the hysteresis between the onset of flooding and the bridging film. Experiments were made tubes of 0.995 cm, 2.07 cm, and 5.08 cm in diameter. A mechanistic model for the slug flooding with the solitary wave whose height is four time of the mean film thickness is developed to produce relations of the critical liquid flow rate and the mean film thickness. After fitting the critical liquid flow rate with the experimental data as a function of the Bond number, the gas flow rate for the slug flooding is obtained by substituting the critical liquid flow rate to the annular flooding criteria. The present experimental data evaluate the slug flooding condition developed here by substituting the correlations for mean film thickness models in the literature. The best prediction was made by the correlation for the mean film thickness of the present study which is same as Feind's correlation multiplied by 1.35. (author)

  11. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater. PMID:27056469

  12. Adsorption Kinetics of Alkyl Polyglucoside at the Air-Solution Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The air-solution equilibrium tension ye and dynamic surface tension ye, of nonionic surfactant alkyl polyglucoside have been studied. ye was measured by the Wilhelmy method with tension vs. concentration curve. The ye decays were measured in the range 0.2~20 s using a maximum bubble pressure instrument and analyzed with the Ward and Tordai cquation.

  13. Interfacial water structure at polymer gel/quartz interfaces investigated by sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hidenori; Hiroshi, Minowa; Tominaga, Taiki; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito; Uosaki, Kohei

    2008-08-28

    Interfacial structures of water at polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly(2-acrylamido-2-methypropane) sulfonic acid sodium salt (PNaAMPS)/quartz interfaces were investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Two broad peaks were observed in OH stretching region at 3200 and 3400 cm(-1), corresponding to the symmetric OH stretching of tetrahedrally coordinated, i.e., strongly hydrogen bonded "ice-like" water, and the asymmetric OH stretching of water in a more random arrangement, i.e., weakly hydrogen bonded "liquid-like" water, respectively, in both cases. The "liquid-like" water became dominant when the PVA gel was pressed against the quartz surface. The relative intensity of the SFG signal due to the "liquid-like" water to that due to the "ice-like water" at the quartz surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) became higher when the negatively charged PNaMPS gel was contacted to the APS modified quartz surface in a solution of pH = 12, where the surface was negatively charged and electrostatic repulsive interaction and low friction were present between the PNaMPS gel and the APS modified surface. It, however, did not change in a solution of pH = 2, where the surface was positively charged and electrostatic attractive interaction and very high friction were present between the PNaMPS gel and the APS modified surface. These results suggest the important role of water structure for small friction at the polymer gel/solid interface. PMID:18688544

  14. Macroscopic investigation of hydrate film growth at the hydrocarbon/water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.J.; Miller, K.T.; Koh, C.A.; Sloan, E.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates are ice-like crystalline compounds that form as thin porous crystalline films at the interface between the water phase and the hydrocarbon guest molecule phase. The growth characteristics of these hydrate films are important in seafloor carbon dioxide sequestration, gas hydrate transport, and flow assurance in oil and gas pipelines. This paper presented a study that employed digital video microscopy to investigate the hydrate film thickness as a function of time, as well as the propagation rate for methane and cyclopentane hydrate. The purpose of the study was to enhance past measurements of hydrate film growth by incorporating gas consumption measurements simultaneously with film thickness measurements to determine which phase supplied the hydrate former during hydrate formation. The study also advanced the physical knowledge of hydrate formation by relating film formation with the water droplet to hydrate shell conversion. The paper included a schematic of the hydrate film growth apparatus and image acquisition and analysis as well as an illustration of the nucleation of a water droplet immersed in cyclopentane. The results were presented for cyclopentane hydrate film growth; methane hydrate film growth; film growth in an oil/methane/ water system; film growth/development into water phase; and gas consumption for hydrate film growth. The paper also discussed the source of methane for hydrate formation; solubility of methane in water; growth rates; proposed mechanism of hydrate film growth at the hydrocarbon/water interface; and, transferability between hydrate formation for a pool of liquid versus a water droplet. It was concluded that gas consumption data during hydrate formation presented evidence of an aqueous phase supply of hydrate former to the initial hydrate growth, followed by a vapor phase supply of hydrate former in the thickening stage of hydrate film formation. 25 refs., 18 figs.,.

  15. Effects of air vessel on water hammer in high-head pumping station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of air vessel on water hammer process in a pumping station with high-head were analyzed by using the characteristics method. The results show that the air vessel volume is the key parameter that determines the protective effect on water hammer pressure. The maximum pressure in the system declines with increasing air vessel volume. For a fixed volume of air vessel, the shape of air vessel and mounting style, such as horizontal or vertical mounting, have little effect on the water hammer. In order to obtain good protection effects, the position of air vessel should be close to the outlet of the pump. Generally, once the volume of air vessel is guaranteed, the water hammer of a entire pipeline is effectively controlled

  16. Semiconductor-Electrocatalyst Interfaces: Theory, Experiment, and Applications in Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellist, Michael R; Laskowski, Forrest A L; Lin, Fuding; Mills, Thomas J; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2016-04-19

    Light-absorbing semiconductor electrodes coated with electrocatalysts are key components of photoelectrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. Efforts to optimize these systems have been slowed by an inadequate understanding of the semiconductor-electrocatalyst (sem|cat) interface. The sem|cat interface is important because it separates and collects photoexcited charge carriers from the semiconductor. The photovoltage generated by the interface drives "uphill" photochemical reactions, such as water splitting to form hydrogen fuel. Here we describe efforts to understand the microscopic processes and materials parameters governing interfacial electron transfer between light-absorbing semiconductors, electrocatalysts, and solution. We highlight the properties of transition-metal oxyhydroxide electrocatalysts, such as Ni(Fe)OOH, because they are the fastest oxygen-evolution catalysts known in alkaline media and are (typically) permeable to electrolyte. We describe the physics that govern the charge-transfer kinetics for different interface types, and show how numerical simulations can explain the response of composite systems. Emphasis is placed on "limiting" behavior. Electrocatalysts that are permeable to electrolyte form "adaptive" junctions where the interface energetics change during operation as charge accumulates in the catalyst, but is screened locally by electrolyte ions. Electrocatalysts that are dense, and thus impermeable to electrolyte, form buried junctions where the interface physics are unchanged during operation. Experiments to directly measure the interface behavior and test the theory/simulations are challenging because conventional photoelectrochemical techniques do not measure the electrocatalyst potential during operation. We developed dual-working-electrode (DWE) photoelectrochemistry to address this limitation. A second electrode is attached to the catalyst layer to sense or control current/voltage independent from that of the

  17. Time dependent FTIR spectra of mineral waters after contact with air

    CERN Document Server

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    FTIR spectra of mineral waters of Slavyanovskaya, Aqua Montana, Bad Harzburger and Christinen with time from first contact of water with open air were analysed. The kinetic of spectral changes of Slavyanovskaya mineral water in the regions of stretch, deformation and intermolecular vibrations was measured. The spectral changes do not correlate with chemical contamination of mineral water and degassing process. The observed spectral changes could be due to different structure of mineral water in liquid state, which is destroyed after air contact. The observed spectral behaviour of Slavyanovskaya is correlated with the catalytic activity of mineral water, which was saved without contact with air. The characteristic time of spectral dependence (669 seconds) is close to the characteristic time of catalytic activity loss (600 seconds) of mineral water at air contact. The spectra results support the medical studies that show the activity of mineral water near spring, and the loosing activity of water after long tim...

  18. Blocking and Blending: Different Assembly Models of Cyclodextrin and Sodium Caseinate at the Oil/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Neng; Liu, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Lianfu

    2015-08-25

    The stability of cyclodextrin (CD)-based emulsions is attributed to the formation of a solid film of oil-CD complexes at the oil/water interface. However, competitive interactions between CDs and other components at the interface still need to be understood. Here we develop two different routes that allow the incorporation of a model protein (sodium caseinate, SC) into emulsions based on β-CD. One route is the components adsorbed simultaneously from a mixed solution to the oil/water interface (route I), and the other is SC was added to a previously established CD-stabilized interface (route II). The adsorption mechanism of β-CD modified by SC at the oil/water interface is investigated by rheological and optical methods. Strong sensitivity of the rheological behavior to the routes is indicated by both steady-state and small-deformation oscillatory experiments. Possible β-CD/SC interaction models at the interface are proposed. In route I, the protein, due to its higher affinity for the interface, adsorbs strongly at the interface with blocking of the adsorption of β-CD and formation of oil-CD complexes. In route II, the protein penetrates and blends into the preadsorbed layer of oil-CD complexes already formed at the interface. The revelation of interfacial assembly is expected to help better understand CD-based emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications. PMID:26228663

  19. Countercurrent air/water and steam/water flow above a perforated plate. Report for October 1978-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perforated plate weeping phenomena have been studied in both air/water and steam/cold water systems. The air/water experiment is designed to investigate the effect of geometric factors of the perforated plate on the rate of weeping. A new dimensionless flow rate in the form of H star is suggested. The data obtained are successfully correlated by this H star scaling in the conventional flooding equation. The steam/cold water experiment is concentrated on locating the boundary between weeping and no weeping. The effects of water subcooling, water inlet flow rate, and position of water spray are investigated. Depending on the combination of these factors, several types of weeping were observed. The data obtained at high water spray position can be related to the air/water flooding correlation by replacing the stream flow rate to an effective stream flow rate, which is determined by the mixing efficiency above the plate

  20. Computer simulation study of water/hydrocarbon interfaces: Effects of hydrocarbon branching on interfacial properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review here the results of our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of water/hydrocarbon liquid/liquid interfaces. In order to examine the effects of chain length and branching on interfacial properties, we considered five different alkanes (n-pentane, 2-methyl pentane, 2,2,4-trimethyl pentane, 2-methyl heptane, and n-octane) as the hydrocarbon phase. We used a recently-proposed procedure to identify molecular surface sites and constructed intrinsic density profiles, in addition to the more familiar laboratory-frame profiles, in order to determine the effects of interface fluctuations on the structure and dynamics of the two phases. We found that interfacial properties of the aqueous phase are relatively insensitive to the molecular structure of the hydrocarbon, even though both branching and chain length have significant influence on the hydrocarbon interfacial properties. We found that translational and rotational mobilities of molecules of both phases are affected by the presence of the interface and that rotational relaxation of water molecules is significantly more anisotropic in the interfacial region than in the bulk.