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Sample records for air sample extract

  1. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method for extracting and preparing indoor and outdoor air samples for analysis of polar persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the preparation of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method is for extracting an indoor and outdoor air sample consisting of a quartz fiber filter and an XAD-2 cartridge for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass...

  3. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  4. Trace Analysis in End-Exhaled Air Using Direct Solvent Extraction in Gas Sampling Tubes: Tetrachloroethene in Workers as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris-Elmo Ziener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective analytical methods are required to overcome the barriers preventing the use of exhaled air in routine occupational biological monitoring. Against this background, a new method is proposed that simplifies the automation and calibration of the analytical measurements. End-exhaled air is sampled using valveless gas sampling tubes made of glass. Gaseous analytes are transferred to a liquid phase using a microscale solvent extraction performed directly inside the gas sampling tubes. The liquid extracts are analysed using a gas chromatograph equipped, as usual, with a liquid autosampler, and liquid standards are used for calibration. For demonstration purposes, the method’s concept was applied to the determination of tetrachloroethene in end-exhaled air, which is a biomarker for occupational tetrachloroethene exposure. The method’s performance was investigated in the concentration range 2 to 20 μg tetrachloroethene/L, which corresponds to today’s exposure levels. The calibration curve was linear, and the intra-assay repeatability and recovery rate were sufficient. Analysis of real samples from dry-cleaning workers occupationally exposed to tetrachloroethene and from nonexposed subjects demonstrated the method’s utility. In the case of tetrachloroethene, the method can be deployed quickly, requires no previous experiences in gas analysis, provides sufficient analytical reliability, and addresses typical end-exhaled air concentrations from exposed workers.

  5. Simultaneous analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air samples by using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography dual electron capture detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokbel, Haifaa; Al Dine, Enaam Jamal; Elmoll, Ahmad; Liaud, Céline; Millet, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    An analytical method associating accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) in immersion mode combined with gas chromatography dual electrons capture detectors (SPME-GC-2ECD) has been developed and studied for the simultaneous determination of 19 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 22 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in air samples (active and XAD-2 passive samplers). Samples were extracted with ASE with acetonitrile using the following conditions: temperature, 150 °C; pressure, 1500 psi; static, 15 min; cycles, 3; purge, 300 s; flush, 100 %. Extracts were reduced to 1 mL, and 500 μL of this extract, filled with deionised water, was subject to SPME extraction. Experimental results indicated that the proposed method attained the best extraction efficiency under the optimised conditions: extraction of PCB-OCP mixture using 100-μm PDMS fibre at 80 °C for 40 min with no addition of salt. The performance of the proposed ASE-SPME-GC-2ECD methodology with respect to linearity, limit of quantification and detection was evaluated by spiking of XAD-2 resin with target compounds. The regression coefficient (R (2)) of most compounds was found to be high of 0.99. limits of detection (LODs) are between 0.02 and 4.90 ng m(-3), and limits of quantification (LOQs) are between 0.05 and 9.12 ng m(-3) and between 0.2 and 49 ng/sampler and 0.52 and 91 ng/sampler, respectively, for XAD-2 passive samplers. Finally, a developed procedure was applied to determine selected PCBs and OCPs in the atmosphere.

  6. Application of response surface methodology for air assisted-dispersive liquid- liquid microextraction of deoxynivalenol in rice samples prior to HPLC-DAD analysis and comparison with solid phase extraction cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mashaallah; Ghasemi, Elham; Sasani, Mojtaba

    2017-04-01

    A fast, simple, and easy to operate air assisted-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (AA-DLLME) for preconcentration and extraction of deoxynivalenol (DON) from rice samples is proposed and compared with solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup. DON was determined using a high performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD). AA-DLLME was performed using a glass syringe and dispersion of extractant in the sample solution was achieved with help of air bubbles. Chloroform was used as the extractant solvent. To find out the optimized condition for the proposed method, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied for multivariate optimization of effecting parameters namely volume of extractant, number of extraction, pH, and rate of centrifugation. Under optimized condition the dynamic range of calibration graph was found to be 50-500μgL(-1) with detection limit of 23.6μgL(-1). Both methods were applied for extraction of DON from rice.

  7. 40 CFR 61.34 - Air sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air sampling. 61.34 Section 61.34... sampling. (a) Stationary sources subject to § 61.32(b) shall locate air sampling sites in accordance with a... concentrations calculated within 30 days after filters are collected. Records of concentrations at all...

  8. Comparison of air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction technique and conventional dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction for determination of triazole pesticides in aqueous samples by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza Afshar; Aghdam, Abdollah Abdollahi

    2013-07-26

    Two micro-extraction methods, air-agitated liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), have been compared with each other by applying them for the analysis of five triazole pesticides (penconazole, hexaconazole, diniconazole, tebuconazole and triticonazole) in aqueous samples by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). In the AALLME method, which excludes any disperser solvent, much less volume of organic solvent is used. In order to form fine and dispersed organic droplets in the aqueous phase, the mixture of aqueous sample solution and extraction solvent is repeatedly aspirated and dispensed with a syringe. In the DLLME method, an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent and disperser solvent is rapidly injected by a syringe into the aqueous sample. Effect of the pertinent experimental factors on DLLME (i.e. identity and volume of the extraction and disperser solvents and ionic strength) and on AALLME (identity and volume of the extraction solvent, number of agitations, and ionic strength) were investigated. Under optimal conditions, limits of detection for the five target pesticides obtained by AALLME-GC-FID and DLLME-GC-FID ranged from 0.20 to 1.1ngmL(-1) and 1.9 to 5.9ngmL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) were in the range of 1-4% and 3-5% with the enrichment factors of 449-504 and 79-143 for AALLME-GC-FID and DLLME-GC-FID, respectively. Both of the compared methods are simple, fast, efficient, inexpensive and can be applied to the analysis of the five pesticides in different aqueous samples in which penconazole and hexaconazole were found. For spiked samples, the recoveries were in the ranges of 92-105%, and 92-104% for AALLME and DLLME, respectively.

  9. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77μL of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1μgmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body.

  10. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  11. AirJump: Using Interfaces to Instantly Perform Simultaneous Extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; LaVanway, Alex J; Guckenberger, David J; Anderson, Meghan A; Beebe, David J

    2016-06-22

    Analyte isolation is an important process that spans a range of biomedical disciplines, including diagnostics, research, and forensics. While downstream analytical techniques have advanced in terms of both capability and throughput, analyte isolation technology has lagged behind, increasingly becoming the bottleneck in these processes. Thus, there exists a need for simple, fast, and easy to integrate analyte separation protocols to alleviate this bottleneck. Recently, a new class of technologies has emerged that leverages the movement of paramagnetic particle (PMP)-bound analytes through phase barriers to achieve a high efficiency separation in a single or a few steps. Specifically, the passage of a PMP/analyte aggregate through a phase interface (aqueous/air in this case) acts to efficiently "exclude" unbound (contaminant) material from PMP-bound analytes with higher efficiency than traditional washing-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) protocols (i.e., bind, wash several times, elute). Here, we describe for the first time a new type of "exclusion-based" sample preparation, which we term "AirJump". Upon realizing that much of the contaminant carryover stems from interactions with the sample vessel surface (e.g., pipetting residue, wetting), we aim to eliminate the influence of that factor. Thus, AirJump isolates PMP-bound analyte by "jumping" analyte directly out of a free liquid/air interface. Through careful characterization, we have demonstrated the validity of AirJump isolation through comparison to traditional washing-based isolations. Additionally, we have confirmed the suitability of AirJump in three important independent biological isolations, including protein immunoprecipitation, viral RNA isolation, and cell culture gene expression analysis. Taken together, these data sets demonstrate that AirJump performs efficiently, with high analyte yield, high purity, no cross contamination, rapid time-to-isolation, and excellent reproducibility.

  12. Phenolic-compound-extraction systems for fruit and vegetable samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Salas, Patricia; Morales-Soto, Aranzazu; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2010-12-03

    This paper reviews the phenolic-compound-extraction systems used to analyse fruit and vegetable samples over the last 10 years. Phenolic compounds are naturally occurring antioxidants, usually found in fruits and vegetables. Sample preparation for analytical studies is necessary to determine the polyphenolic composition in these matrices. The most widely used extraction system is liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), which is an inexpensive method since it involves the use of organic solvents, but it requires long extraction times, giving rise to possible extract degradation. Likewise, solid-phase extraction (SPE) can be used in liquid samples. Modern techniques, which have been replacing conventional ones, include: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). These alternative techniques reduce considerably the use of solvents and accelerate the extraction process.

  13. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD FOR PCR IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGAL INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following air sampling, fungal DNA needs to be extracted and purified to a state suitable for laboratory use. Our laboratory has developed a simple method of extraction and purification of fungal DNA appropriate for enzymatic manipulation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) appli...

  14. Antimicrobial potentials of different solvent extracted samples from Physalis ixocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wajid; Bakht, Jehan; Shafi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antimicrobial activities of different solvent extracted samples isolated from different parts of Physalis ixocarpa through disc diffusion assay using three different concentrations. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that different parts of the plant showed varying degree of inhibition against different bacteria at different concentrations. Different solvent extracted samples from the calyx showed inhibitory activity against most of the bacteria under study. Extracts from leaf and fruit samples showed activity against S. aureus and K. pneumoniae and extracts from the stem tissues were effective to control the growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Crude methanolic extract from the stem and n-butanol extracted samples from fruit exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae at highest concentrations. Antifungal activity was observed only in crude methanol extract from the leaf against Rhizopus stolinifer, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

  15. MEMBRANE-MEDIATED EXTRACTION AND BIODEGRADATION OF VOCS FROM AIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses a project designed to evaluate the feasibility of using a membrane-supported extraction and biotreatment process to meet the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for aircraft painting and depainting facilities. The proposed system...

  16. UNLABELED SELECTED SAMPLES IN FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR CLASSIFICATION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES WITH LIMITED TRAINING SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kianisarkaleh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction plays a key role in hyperspectral images classification. Using unlabeled samples, often unlimitedly available, unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction methods show better performance when limited number of training samples exists. This paper illustrates the importance of selecting appropriate unlabeled samples that used in feature extraction methods. Also proposes a new method for unlabeled samples selection using spectral and spatial information. The proposed method has four parts including: PCA, prior classification, posterior classification and sample selection. As hyperspectral image passes these parts, selected unlabeled samples can be used in arbitrary feature extraction methods. The effectiveness of the proposed unlabeled selected samples in unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction is demonstrated using two real hyperspectral datasets. Results show that through selecting appropriate unlabeled samples, the proposed method can improve the performance of feature extraction methods and increase classification accuracy.

  17. Solubility testing of actinides on breathing-zone and area air samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, R.L.; Jessop, B.H.; McDowell, B.L. [Radiation Safety Engineering, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)

    1996-02-01

    A solubility testing method for several common actinides has been developed with sufficient sensitivity to allow profiles to be determined from routine breathing zone and area air samples in the workplace. Air samples are covered with a clean filter to form a filter-sample-filter sandwich which is immersed in an extracellular lung serum simulant solution. The sample is moved to a fresh beaker of the lung fluid simulant each day for one week, and then weekly until the end of the 28 day test period. The soak solutions are wet ashed with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to destroy the organic components of the lung simulant solution prior to extraction of the nuclides of interest directly into an extractive scintillator for subsequent counting on a Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{reg_sign}) spectrometer. Solvent extraction methods utilizing the extractive scintillators have been developed for the isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and curium. The procedures normally produce an isotopic recovery greater than 95% and have been used to develop solubility profiles from air samples with 40 pCi or less of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Profiles developed for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples show good agreement with in vitro and in vivo tests performed by other investigators on samples from the same uranium mills.

  18. Air samplings in a Campylobacter jejuni positive laying hen flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marwa Fawzy El Metwaly; Schulz, Jochen; Hartung, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The air in laying hen houses contains high concentrations of airborne bacteria. The numbers of these bacteria can be influenced by the efficiency of the chosen sampling method. In the presented study, AGI-30 Impingers and the Coriolis(®)µ air Sampler were compared in terms of their efficiency in sampling aerobic mesophilic bacteria in a laying hen house. Measurements were conducted in a laying hen flock with high prevalences of C. jejuni in order to investigate if culturable cells of this organism can also be detected by the applied methods. Airborne dust was also analyzed for the presence of C. jejuni specific DNA to assess the possible occurrence of non-culturable C. jejuni in the hen house air. The numbers of mesophilic airborne bacteria ranged from 8 × 10(4) - 2 × 10(6) CFU/m(-3) when sampled using AGI-30 Impingers, and from 2 × 10(5) - 4 × 10(6) CFU/m -3 when sampled using a Coriolis(®)µ air Sampler. The concentrations detected simultaneously by both devices correlated well (rPearson = 0.755), but the Coriolis(®)µ air Sampler showed a significantly higher sampling efficiency (phen house air, and in future it should be verified whether sampling stress of the air sampling methods could induce the non-culturable state.

  19. Time lens assisted photonic sampling extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Keith Gordon

    optical sample and hold concept is demonstrated and analyzed as a resolution improvement to existing photonically assisted ADCs. Simulations indicate that the application of a continuously operating time lens to a photonically assisted sampling system can increase photonically sampled systems by an order of magnitude while acquiring properties similar to an optical sample and hold system.

  20. Preparation of protein samples for gel electrophoresis by sequential extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伯雄; 翁宏飚; 等

    2002-01-01

    Since preparation and solubilization of protein samples are crucial factors in proteome research,the authors established a sequential extraction technique to prepare protein samples from the body wall of the 5th instar larvae of silkworm.Bombyx mori.Two kinds of protein samples were obtained from the body wall using the method.Between the two types of samples only about 15% proteins were identical;the majority were different,indicating that more species of proteins could be obtained with the sequential extraction method;which will be useful for preparation of protein samples for proteome study.

  1. Preparation of protein samples for gel electrophoresis by sequential extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伯雄; 翁宏飚; 方维焕

    2002-01-01

    Since preparation and solubilization of protein samples are crucial factors in proteome research, the authors established a sequential extraction technique to prepare protein samples from the body wall of the 5th instar larvae of silkworm, Bombyx mori. Two kinds of protein samples were obtained from the body wall using the method. Between the two types of samples only about 15% proteins were identical; the majority were different, indicating that more species of proteins could be obtained with the sequential extraction method; which will be useful for preparation of protein samples for proteome study.

  2. Acid Release from an Acid Sulfate Soil Sample Under Successive Extractions with Different Extractants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An acid sulfate soil sample was successively extracted with deionized water, 1 mol L-1 KCI and 0.000 5 mol L-1 Ca(OH)2 solutions. The results showed that only very small amounts of acidity were extracted by deionized water, possibly through slow jarosite hydrolysis. Acid release through jarosite hydrolysis was greatly enhanced by Ca(OH)2 extraction at the expense of the added OH- being neutralized by the acid released. Successive extraction of the sample with KCI removed the largest amounts of acidity from the sample. However, it is likely that the major form of acidity released by KC1 extraction was exchangeable acidity. The results also show the occurrence of low or non charged A1 and Fe species in water and Ca(OH)2 extracts after first a few extractions. It appears that such a phenomenon was related to a decreasing EC value with increasing number of extractions.

  3. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1990--1993 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.; Kada, J.

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1990--1993, with the exception of April 1993, indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the sampling and analytical techniques that were used to collect and measure them. The occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. Following the April 6, 1993 accident and release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at a reprocessing plant in the Tomsk-7 military nuclear complex located 16 km north of the Siberian city of Tomsk, Russia, weekly air filter samples from Barrow, Alaska; Thule, Greenland and Moosonee, Canada were selected for special analyses. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that the authors measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. Variations in the annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites appear to result primarily from changes in the atmospheric production rate of this cosmogenic radionuclide. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. The monthly gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb measured at sampling sites in SASP during 1990--1993 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb for samples collected during 1990--1993 are given for 17 sites.

  4. Effect of sample pretreatment on the extraction of lemon (Citrus limon) components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D

    2016-06-01

    A study on the key role of lemon sample pretreatment on the analytical results is here presented. The objective of the study was to analyze the differences between extracts obtained from lyophilized and air-dried samples-the most common sample pretreatment in citrus studies-in comparison to extracts from fresh samples. All the extracts were obtained with ultrasound assistance and analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS. The dataset, constituted by 74 tentative identified metabolites, was first evaluated by ANOVA, which showed significant differences in the concentration of 44 out of 74 metabolites (p≤0.01). Also, the pairwise mean comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) revealed that the concentration of metabolites in the extracts from fresh and air-dried samples was quite similar and differed from that in lyophilized samples. On the other hand, application of principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination between pretreatments, explaining 86.20% of the total variability. The results of this study suggest that the main differences between extracts could be attributed to the effect of freezing or heating on metabolic pathways, and not only to thermolability of the compounds.

  5. [Ambient and enclosed space air sampling for determination of contaminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorogova, V B

    2010-01-01

    The paper touches upon the issues how to correctly and maximally take single and average daily samples of ambient, residential and public building, and enclosed space air for further tests for the content of hazardous substances. The paper is debated.

  6. Analysis of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances in air samples from Northwest Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jonathan L; Berger, Urs; Chaemfa, Chakra; Huber, Sandra; Jahnke, Annika; Temme, Christian; Jones, Kevin C

    2007-06-01

    Air samples were collected from 4 field sites in Europe: 2 sites from the UK, Hazelrigg (semi-rural) and Manchester (urban); 1 site from Ireland: Mace Head (rural); and 1 site from Norway: Kjeller (rural). Additionally, air samples were taken from indoor locations in Tromsø, Norway. Air samples were collected using high-volume air samplers employing sampling modules containing glass-fibre filters (GFFs, particle phase), and glass columns with a polyurethane foam (PUF)-XAD-2-PUF sandwich (gaseous phase). Typical outdoor air volumes required for the determination of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) ranged from 500-1800 m3. GFFs and PUF-XAD columns were analysed separately to obtain information on phase partitioning. All air samples were analysed for volatile, neutral PFAS, with selected GFF samples halved for analysis of both neutral and airborne particle-bound ionic PFAS. Volatile PFAS were extracted from air samples by cold-column immersion with ethyl acetate, and were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the positive chemical ionisation mode (GC-PCI-MS). Ionic PFAS were extracted from GFFs by sonication in methanol, and were analysed by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) using electrospray ionisation in the negative ion mode (ESI-). Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) was often the predominant analyte found in the particulate phase at concentrations ranging from 1-818 pg m(-3), and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) and 6:2 FTOH were the prevailing analytes found in the gas phase, at 5-243 pg m(-3) and 5-189 pg m(-3), respectively. These three PFAS were ubiquitous in air samples. Many other PFAS, both neutral and ionic, were also present, and levels of individual analytes were in the 1-125 pg m(-3) range. Levels of some PFAS exceeded those of traditional persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In this study, the presence of 12:2 FTOH and fluorotelomer olefins (FTolefins), and ionic PFAS other than perfluorooctane

  7. Solid waste transuranic storage and assay facility indoor air sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingel, L.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze samples of the indoor air at the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF), Westinghouse Hanford. A modified US EPA TO-14 methodology, using gas chromatography/mass spectrography, may be used for the collection and analysis of the samples. The information obtained will be used to estimate the total release of volatile organic compounds from TRUSAF to determine the need for air emmission permits.

  8. Microbial diversity in fecal samples depends on DNA extraction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi, Hengameh; Persson, Søren; Struve, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are challenges, when extracting bacterial DNA from specimens for molecular diagnostics, since fecal samples also contain DNA from human cells and many different substances derived from food, cell residues and medication that can inhibit downstream PCR. The purpose of the study...... was to evaluate two different DNA extraction methods in order to choose the most efficient method for studying intestinal bacterial diversity using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). FINDINGS: In this study, a semi-automatic DNA extraction system (easyMag®, BioMérieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France......) and a manual one (QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) were tested on stool samples collected from 3 patients with Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) and 5 healthy individuals. DNA extracts obtained by the QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit yield a higher amount of DNA compared to DNA extracts obtained...

  9. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). However, the regular collection of air samples from the stratosphere, for example using aircraft and balloons, is prohibitively expensive. Here we describe radiocarbon measurements in stratospheric CO2 collected by the AirCore sampling method. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which comprises a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and it has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ≈ 30 km) measurements of CH4 and CO2. In Europe, AirCore measurements have been being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä (northern Finland) since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of samples from two such AirCore flights made there in July 2014, for determining the radiocarbon concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore profiles were collected on consecutive days. The stratospheric part of the AirCore was divided into six sections, each containing ≈ 35 µg CO2 ( ≈ 9.6 µgC), and stored in a stratospheric air subsampler constructed from 1/4 in. coiled stainless steel tubing ( ≈ 3 m). A small-volume extraction system was constructed that enabled > 99.5 % CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples. Additionally, a new small-volume high-efficiency graphitization system was constructed for graphitization of these extracted CO2 samples, which were measured at the Groningen AMS facility. Since the stratospheric samples were very similar in mass, reference samples were also prepared in the same mass range for

  10. Microfabricated Devices for Sample Extraction, Concentrations, and Related Sample Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-12-01

    This is an invited book chapter. As with other analytical techniques, sample pretreatments, sample extraction, sample introduction, and related techniques are of extreme importance for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Bio-MEMS devices and systems start with a sampling step. The biological sample then usually undergoes some kinds of sample preparation steps before the actual analysis. These steps may involve extracting the target sample from its matrix, removing interferences from the sample, derivatizing the sample to detectable species, or performing a sample preconcentration step. The integration of the components for sample pretreatment into microfluidic devices represents one of the remaining the bottle-neck towards achieving true miniaturized total analysis systems (?TAS). This chapter provides a thorough state-of-art of the developments in this field to date.

  11. Group extraction of organic compounds present in liquid samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnsen, Vilhelm J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An extraction device is disclosed comprising a tube containing a substantially inert, chemically non-reactive packing material with a large surface area to volume ratio. A sample which consists of organic compounds dissolved in a liquid, is introduced into the tube. As the sample passes through the packing material it spreads over the material's large surface area to form a thin liquid film which is held on the packing material in a stationary state. A particular group or family of compounds is extractable from the sample by passing a particular solvent system consisting of a solvent and selected reagents through the packing material. The reagents cause optimum conditions to exist for the compounds of the particular family to pass through the phase boundary between the sample liquid and the solvent of the solvent system. Thus, the compounds of the particular family are separated from the sample liquid and become dissolved in the solvent of the solvent system. The particular family of compounds dissolved in the solvent, representing an extract, exits the tube together with the solvent through the tube's nozzle, while the rest of the sample remains on the packing material in a stationary state. Subsequently, a different solvent system may be passed through the packing material to extract another family of compounds from the remaining sample on the packing material.

  12. CARBONIZED FIBROUS RESIN AS A NEW SORBENT FOR SAMPLING POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) IN AMBIENT AIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new sampling method of ambient air analysis using carbonized fibrous resin as asorbent for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was reported.The physical and chemical properties of the carbonized fibrous resins were measured. Thesample pretreatment with ultrasonic extraction and subsequent clean-up ehition through a silica gelcolumn was optimized. The suitable ultrasonic extraction conditions were selected as follows: resinweight was 1.5 g, ultrasonic extraction time 20 min, volume of extraction solvent 100 mi andextraction operation times 2~3. The concentrated extractable organic matter was submitted to nextstep of clean-up procedure of adsorption chromatography on silica gel column/n-hexane and amixture of dichloromethene:n-hexane solution 2:3 (v/v). The PAHs fractions in the real samplesfrom Changzhou, China were particularly analyzed using GC-MS data system and the data of massspectra, retention times and scan numbers of the real samples were compared with that of thestandards of 16 PAHs listed by the US EPA as "priority pollutants" of the environment. Theanalysis of the real samples indicates that the carbonized fibrous resin is a good sorbent. Thepretreatment of samples of ambient air with carbonized fibrous resin as a sorbent for P,AHs isproved to be reliable and might be used for the procedure of the determination of PAHs inatmospheric environment.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air samples of meat smokehouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Olsen, I L; Poulsen, O M

    1992-01-01

    In a screening programme nine Danish meat smokehouses were randomly selected for measurements on concentration of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). A total of 23 stationary air samples were collected during the entire working period of the kiln either above the kiln doors or approx......In a screening programme nine Danish meat smokehouses were randomly selected for measurements on concentration of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). A total of 23 stationary air samples were collected during the entire working period of the kiln either above the kiln doors...

  14. Sampling density for the quantitative evaluation of air trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Center of Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Pulmonary Division, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Concerns have been expressed recently about the radiation burden on patient populations, especially children, undergoing serial radiological testing. To reduce the dose one can change the CT acquisition settings or decrease the sampling density. In this study we determined the minimum desirable sampling density to ascertain the degree of air trapping in children with cystic fibrosis. Ten children with cystic fibrosis in stable condition underwent a volumetric spiral CT scan. The degree of air trapping was determined by an automated algorithm for all slices in the volume, and then for 1/2, 1/4, to 1/128 of all slices, or a sampling density ranging from 100% to 1% of the total volume. The variation around the true value derived from 100% sampling was determined for all other sampling densities. The precision of the measurement remained stable down to a 10% sampling density, but decreased markedly below 3.4%. For a disease marker with the regional variability of air trapping in cystic fibrosis, regardless of observer variability, a sampling density below 10% and even more so, below 3.4%, apparently decreases the precision of the evaluation. (orig.)

  15. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, retrieved from AirCore sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Been, Henk A.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In this decade, understanding the impact of human activities on climate is one of the key issues of discussion globally. The continuous rise in the concentration of greenhouse gases, e.g., CO2, CH4, etc. in the atmosphere, predominantly due to human activities, is alarming and requires continuous monitoring to understand the dynamics. Radiocarbon is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4. Measurement of 14C (or radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 generally requires collection of large air samples (few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined. Currently, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most precise, reliable and widely used technique for atmospheric radiocarbon detection. However, the regular collection of air samples from troposphere and stratosphere, for example using aircraft, is prohibitively expensive. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, developed by NOAA. It comprises of a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ~ 30 km) measurements of CH4and CO2(Karion et al. 2010). In Europe, AirCore measurements are being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of two such AirCore samples collected in July 2014, Finland, for determining the 14C concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore samples were collected on consecutive days. Each stratospheric AirCore sample was divided into six fractions, each containing ~ 35 μg CO2 (~9.5 μg C). Each fraction was separately trapped in 1 /4 inch coiled stainless steel tubing for radiocarbon measurements. The procedure for CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples; the sample preparation, with samples containing < 10

  16. Pinpointing extractable oil reserves according to dynamics of samplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhnoy, N.I.; Dalinchuk, O.V.; Frolova, N.N.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for calculating the extractable oil reserves with deviation of the actual incident branch of the sampling model from the statistical. An example is presented of the calculation for the lower operating object of the Zapadno-Tebukskiy field which corresponds to the III type of model (according to G.I. Permyakov).

  17. Residual soil DNA extraction increases the discriminatory power between samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Clarke, Laurence J; Cooper, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Forensic soil analysis relies on capturing an accurate and reproducible representation of the diversity from limited quantities of soil; however, inefficient DNA extraction can markedly alter the taxonomic abundance. The performance of a standard commercial DNA extraction kit (MOBIO PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit) and three modified protocols of this kit: soil pellet re-extraction (RE); an additional 24-h lysis incubation step at room temperature (RT); and 24-h lysis incubation step at 55°C (55) were compared using high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer I ribosomal DNA. DNA yield was not correlated with fungal diversity and the four DNA extraction methods displayed distinct fungal community profiles for individual samples, with some phyla detected exclusively using the modified methods. Application of a 24 h lysis step will provide a more complete inventory of fungal biodiversity, and re-extraction of the residual soil pellet offers a novel tool for increasing discriminatory power between forensic soil samples.

  18. Development and calibration of real-time PCR for quantification of airborne microorganisms in air samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hey Reoun; Mainelis, Gediminas; White, Lori

    This manuscript describes the coupling of bioaerosol collection and the use of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) to quantify the airborne bacteria. The quantity of collected bacteria determined by RT-PCR is compared with conventional quantification techniques, such as culturing, microscopy and airborne microorganism counting by using optical particle counter (OPC). Our data show that an experimental approach used to develop standard curves for use with RT-PCR is critical for accurate sample quantification. Using universal primers we generated 12 different standard curves which were used to quantify model organism Escherichia coli (Migula) Catellani from air samples. Standard curves prepared using a traditional approach, where serially diluted genomic DNA extracted from pure cultured bacteria were used in PCR reaction as a template DNA yielded significant underestimation of sample quantities compared to airborne microorganism concentration as measured by an OPC. The underestimation was especially pronounced when standard curves were built using colony forming units (CFUs). In contrast, the estimate of cell concentration in an air sample by RT-PCR was more accurate (˜60% compared to the airborne microorganism concentration) when the standard curve was built using aerosolized E. coli. The accuracy improved even further (˜100%) when air samples used to build the standard curves were diluted first, then the DNA extracted from each dilution was amplified by the RT-PCR—to mimic the handling of air samples with unknown and possibly low concentration. Therefore, our data show that standard curves used for quantification by RT-PCR needs to be prepared using the same environmental matrix and procedures as handling of the environmental sample in question. Reliance on the standard curves generated with cultured bacterial suspension (a traditional approach) may lead to substantial underestimation of microorganism quantities in environmental samples.

  19. Methods for Sampling and Measurement of Compressed Air Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroem, L.

    1976-10-15

    In order to improve the technique for measuring oil and water entrained in a compressed air stream, a laboratory study has been made of some methods for sampling and measurement. For this purpose water or oil as artificial contaminants were injected in thin streams into a test loop, carrying dry compressed air. Sampling was performed in a vertical run, down-stream of the injection point. Wall attached liquid, coarse droplet flow, and fine droplet flow were sampled separately. The results were compared with two-phase flow theory and direct observation of liquid behaviour. In a study of sample transport through narrow tubes, it was observed that, below a certain liquid loading, the sample did not move, the liquid remaining stationary on the tubing wall. The basic analysis of the collected samples was made by gravimetric methods. Adsorption tubes were used with success to measure water vapour. A humidity meter with a sensor of the aluminium oxide type was found to be unreliable. Oil could be measured selectively by a flame ionization detector, the sample being pretreated in an evaporation- condensation unit

  20. Inter-laboratory comparison study on measuring semi-volatile organic chemicals in standards and air samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yushan; Hung, Hayley

    2010-11-01

    Measurements of semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) were compared among 21 laboratories from 7 countries through the analysis of standards, a blind sample, an air extract, and an atmospheric dust sample. Measurement accuracy strongly depended on analytes, laboratories, and types of standards and samples. Intra-laboratory precision was generally good with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of triplicate injections laboratory variability, measured by RSDs of all measurements, was in the range of 2.8-58% in analyzing standards, and 6.9-190% in analyzing blind sample and air extract. Inter-laboratory precision was poorer when samples were subject to cleanup processes, or when SVOCs were quantified at low concentrations. In general, inter-laboratory differences up to a factor of 2 can be expected to analyze atmospheric SVOCs. When comparing air measurements from different laboratories, caution should be exercised if the data variability is less than the inter-laboratory differences.

  1. Passive sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Mayer, Philipp

    two phases and comments from experts in the field of PCB containing construction materials, a kinetic sampler (petri dish with silicone) and a potential equilibrium sampler (silicone-coated paper) were tested in buildings. Calibration and validation were based on conventional active sampling, for both...... methods in their kinetic sampling phase. The methods were sensitive and precise, but tended to overestimate the concentration obtained by active sampling. More work will be needed to test the silicone-coated paper under equilibrium sampling conditions.......PCBs were widely used in construction materials in the 1906s and 1970s, a period of high building activity in Denmark. The objective of this study was therefore to use passive sampling techniques to develop a simple and cost-effective screening tool for PCBs in indoor air. The study proceeded...

  2. Air flow assisted ionization for remote sampling of ambient mass spectrometry and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuming; Tang, Fei; Luo, Zhigang; Chen, Yi; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Ruiping; Wang, Xiaohao; Abliz, Zeper

    2011-04-15

    Ambient ionization methods are an important research area in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Under ambient conditions, the gas flow and atmospheric pressure significantly affect the transfer and focusing of ions. The design and implementation of air flow assisted ionization (AFAI) as a novel and effective, remote sampling method for ambient mass spectrometry are described herein. AFAI benefits from a high extracting air flow rate. A systematic investigation of the extracting air flow in the AFAI system has been carried out, and it has been demonstrated not only that it plays a role in the effective capture and remote transport of charged droplets, but also that it promotes desolvation and ion formation, and even prevents ion fragmentation during the ionization process. Moreover, the sensitivity of remote sampling ambient MS analysis was improved significantly by the AFAI method. Highly polar and nonpolar molecules, including dyes, pharmaceutical samples, explosives, drugs of abuse, protein and volatile compounds, have been successfully analyzed using AFAI-MS. The successful application of the technique to residue detection on fingers, large object analysis and remote monitoring in real time indicates its potential for the analysis of a variety of samples, especially large objects. The ability to couple this technique with most commercially available MS instruments with an API interface further enhances its broad applicability.

  3. BMAA extraction of cyanobacteria samples: which method to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Sandra; Burian, Alfred; Rasmussen, Ulla; Costa, Pedro Reis; Annadotter, Heléne; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin reportedly produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, is proposed to be linked to the development of neurological diseases. BMAA has been found in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, both in its phytoplankton producers and in several invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that bioaccumulate it. LC-MS/MS is the most frequently used analytical technique in BMAA research due to its high selectivity, though consensus is lacking as to the best extraction method to apply. This study accordingly surveys the efficiency of three extraction methods regularly used in BMAA research to extract BMAA from cyanobacteria samples. The results obtained provide insights into possible reasons for the BMAA concentration discrepancies in previous publications. In addition and according to the method validation guidelines for analysing cyanotoxins, the TCA protein precipitation method, followed by AQC derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis, is now validated for extracting protein-bound (after protein hydrolysis) and free BMAA from cyanobacteria matrix. BMAA biological variability was also tested through the extraction of diatom and cyanobacteria species, revealing a high variance in BMAA levels (0.0080-2.5797 μg g(-1) DW).

  4. Sample extraction and injection with a microscale preconcentrator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Chan, Helena Kai Lun

    2007-09-01

    This report details the development of a microfabricated preconcentrator that functions as a fully integrated chemical extractor-injector for a microscale gas chromatograph (GC). The device enables parts-per-billion detection and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air with size and power advantages over macro-scale systems. The 44 mm{sup 3} preconcentrator extracts VOCs using highly adsorptive, granular forms of graphitized carbon black and carbon molecular sieves. The micron-sized silicon cavities have integrated heating and temperature sensing allowing low power, yet rapid heating to thermally desorb the collected VOCs (GC injection). The keys to device construction are a new adsorbent-solvent filling technique and solvent-tolerant wafer-level silicon-gold eutectic bonding technology. The product is the first granular adsorbent preconcentrator integrated at the wafer level. Other advantages include exhaustive VOC extraction and injection peak widths an order of magnitude narrower than predecessor prototypes. A mass transfer model, the first for any microscale preconcentrator, is developed to describe both adsorption and desorption behaviors. The physically intuitive model uses implicit and explicit finite differences to numerically solve the required partial differential equations. The model is applied to the adsorption and desorption of decane at various concentrations to extract Langmuir adsorption isotherm parameters from effluent curve measurements where properties are unknown a priori.

  5. Ground vibration test and flutter analysis of air sampling probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center conducted a ground vibration test and a flutter analysis of an air sampling probe that was to be mounted on a Convair 990 airplane. The probe was a steel, wing-shaped structure used to gather atmospheric data. The ground vibration test was conducted to update the finite-element model used in the flutter analysis. The analysis predicted flutter speeds well outside the operating flight envelope of the Convair 990 airplane.

  6. Extraction DNA from Activated Sludge-Comparing with Soil Sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冰; 奚旦立; 陈季华

    2003-01-01

    DNA directly extraction from activated sludge and soil sample with enzyme lyses methods was investigated in this paper. DNA yield from activated sludge was 3.0 mg/g. VLSS, and 28.2-43.8 μg/g soil respectively. The resulting DNA is suitable for PCR.By studied methods, higher quality and quantity of sludge DNA could be obtained rapidly and inexpensively from large number of samples, and the PCR product obtained from this protocol was not affected by contaminated higher concentration of heavy metals.

  7. How Laboratory Sampling Techniques and Extraction Methods Affect Reproducibility of PAH Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    Original Extraction Soxhlet US Army Corps of Engineers 4th Serial Extraction by Sonication US Army Corps of Engineers 654321 250000 200000 150000 100000...n z o ( a ) p y r e n e Scatterplot of Benzo (a) pyrene vs Extraction US Army Corps of Engineers Skeet Serial Extraction in mg/Kg Analyte...Army Corps of Engineers Field Sample Serial Extraction Analyte Sample A Sample B Benzo (a) pyrene 0.12% 0.03% Extraction Efficiency Extraction Method

  8. Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of

  9. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Ledesma-Escobar

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far.Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon.Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE, ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE were analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01. The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01 showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones.The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied conditions, liophilization provides

  10. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A.; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far. Objective Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon. Results Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE) were analyzed by LC–QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01). The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones. Conclusions The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied

  11. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from Air: Is It An Option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Klaus; Ziock, Hans-Joachim; Grimes, Patrick

    1999-02-01

    Controlling the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere without limiting access to fossil energy resources is only possible if carbon dioxide is collected and disposed of away from the atmosphere. While it may be cost-advantageous to collect the carbon dioxide at concentrated sources without ever letting it enter the atmosphere, this approach is not available for the many diffuse sources of carbon dioxide. Similarly, for many older plants a retrofit to collect the carbon dioxide is either impossible or prohibitively expensive. For these cases we investigate the possibility of collecting the carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. We conclude that there are no fundamental obstacles to this approach and that it deserves further investigation. Carbon dioxide extraction directly from atmosphere would allow carbon management without the need for a completely changed infrastructure. In addition it eliminates the need for a complex carbon dioxide transportation infrastructure, thus at least in part offsetting the higher cost of the extraction from air.

  12. Passive air sampling of gaseous elemental mercury: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLagan, David S.; Mazur, Maxwell E. E.; Mitchell, Carl P. J.; Wania, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Because gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is distributed globally through the atmosphere, reliable means of measuring its concentrations in air are important. Passive air samplers (PASs), designed to be cheap, simple to operate, and to work without electricity, could provide an alternative to established active sampling techniques in applications such as (1) long-term monitoring of atmospheric GEM levels in remote regions and in developing countries, (2) atmospheric mercury source identification and characterization through finely resolved spatial mapping, and (3) the recording of personal exposure to GEM. An effective GEM PAS requires a tightly constrained sampling rate, a large and stable uptake capacity, and a sensitive analytical technique. None of the GEM PASs developed to date achieve levels of accuracy and precision sufficient for the reliable determination of background concentrations over extended deployments. This is due to (1) sampling rates that vary due to meteorological factors and manufacturing inconsistencies, and/or (2) an often low, irreproducible and/or unstable uptake capacity of the employed sorbents. While we identify shortcomings of existing GEM PAS, we also reveal potential routes to overcome those difficulties. Activated carbon and nanostructured metal surfaces hold promise as effective sorbents. Sampler designs incorporating diffusive barriers should be able to notably reduce the influence of wind on sampling rates.

  13. Bioaerosol DNA Extraction Technique from Air Filters Collected from Marine and Freshwater Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, M.; Crandall, S. G.; Barnes, A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bioaerosols are composed of microorganisms suspended in air. Among these organisms include bacteria, fungi, virus, and protists. Microbes introduced into the atmosphere can drift, primarily by wind, into natural environments different from their point of origin. Although bioaerosols can impact atmospheric dynamics as well as the ecology and biogeochemistry of terrestrial systems, very little is known about the composition of bioaerosols collected from marine and freshwater environments. The first step to determine composition of airborne microbes is to successfully extract environmental DNA from air filters. We asked 1) can DNA be extracted from quartz (SiO2) air filters? and 2) how can we optimize the DNA yield for downstream metagenomic sequencing? Aerosol filters were collected and archived on a weekly basis from aquatic sites (USA, Bermuda, Israel) over the course of 10 years. We successfully extracted DNA from a subsample of ~ 20 filters. We modified a DNA extraction protocol (Qiagen) by adding a beadbeating step to mechanically shear cell walls in order to optimize our DNA product. We quantified our DNA yield using a spectrophotometer (Nanodrop 1000). Results indicate that DNA can indeed be extracted from quartz filters. The additional beadbeating step helped increase our yield - up to twice as much DNA product was obtained compared to when this step was omitted. Moreover, bioaerosol DNA content does vary across time. For instance, the DNA extracted from filters from Lake Tahoe, USA collected near the end of June decreased from 9.9 ng/μL in 2007 to 3.8 ng/μL in 2008. Further next-generation sequencing analysis of our extracted DNA will be performed to determine the composition of these microbes. We will also model the meteorological and chemical factors that are good predictors for microbial composition for our samples over time and space.

  14. Implementation of Fowler's method for end-tidal air sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, F; Loccioni, C; Fioravanti, M; Russo, A; Pioggia, G; Ferro, M; Roehrer, I; Tabucchi, S; Onor, M

    2008-09-01

    The design, realization and testing of a CO(2)-triggered breath sampler, capable of a separate collection of dead space and end-tidal air on multiple breaths, is presented. This sampling procedure has advantages in terms of the sample volume, insights regarding the origin of compounds, increased reproducibility and higher concentrations of compounds. The high quality of design and the speed of the components ensure a breath-by-breath estimate of dead volume, as well as the comfort and safety of the subject under test. The system represents a valid tool to contribute to the development of a standardized sampling protocol needed to compare results obtained by the various groups in this field.

  15. Using silver nano particles for sampling of toxic mercury vapors from industrial air sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Osanloo

    2014-05-01

    .Conclusion: The presented adsorbent is very useful for sampling of the trace amounts of mercury vapors from air. Moreover, it can be regenerated easily is suitable or sampling at 25 to 70 °C. Due to oxidation of silver and reduction in uptake of nanoparticles, oven temperature of 245 °C is used for the recovery of metallic silver. Low amount of adsorbent, high absorbency, high repeatability for sampling, low cost and high accuracy are of the advantages of the presented method.

  16. Determination of estrogenic potential in waste water without sample extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avberšek, Miha; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka; Uranjek-Ževart, Nataša; Heath, Ester

    2013-09-15

    This study describes the modification of the ER-Calux assay for testing water samples without sample extraction (NE-(ER-Calux) assay). The results are compared to those obtained with ER-Calux assay and a theoretical estrogenic potential obtained by GC-MSD. For spiked tap and waste water samples there was no statistical difference between estrogenic potentials obtained by the three methods. Application of NE-(ER-Calux) to "real" influent and effluents from municipal waste water treatment plants and receiving surface waters found that the NE-(ER-Calux) assay gave higher values compared to ER-Calux assay and GC-MSD. This is explained by the presence of water soluble endocrine agonists that are usually removed during extraction. Intraday dynamics of the estrogenic potential of a WWTP influent and effluent revealed an increase in the estrogenic potential of the influent from 12.9 ng(EEQ)/L in the morning to a peak value of 40.0 ng(EEQ)/L in the afternoon. The estrogenic potential of the effluent was

  17. ANALYSIS OF VAPORS FROM METHYLENE CHLORIDE EXTRACTS OF NUCLEAR GRADE HEPA FILTER FIBERGLASS SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYE JM; ANASTOS HL; GUTIERREZ FC

    2012-06-07

    While several organic compounds were detected in the vapor samples used in the reenactment of the preparation of mounts from the extracts of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filter fiberglass samples, the most significant species present in the samples were methylene chloride, phenol, phenol-d6, and 2-fluorophenol. These species were all known to be present in the extracts, but were expected to have evaporated during the preparation of the mounts, as the mounts appeared to be dry before any vapor was collected. These species were present at the following percentages of their respective occupational exposure limits: methylene chloride, 2%; phenol, 0.4%; and phenol-d6, 0.6%. However, there is no established limit for 2-fluorophenol. Several other compounds were detected at low levels for which, as in the case of 2-fluorophenol, there are no established permissible exposure limits. These compounds include 2-chlorophenol; N-nitroso-1-propanamine; 2-fluoro-1,1{prime}-biphenyl; 1,2-dihydroacenaphthylene; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione,2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); trimethyl oxirane; n-propylpropanamine; 2-(Propylamino)ethanol; 4-methoxy-1-butene; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; and 3,4-dimethylpyridine. Some of these were among those added as surrogates or spike standards as part ofthe Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. preparation ofthe extract of the HEPA filter media and are indicated as such in the data tables in Section 2, Results; other compounds found were not previously known to be present. The main inorganic species detected (sulfate, sodium, and sulfur) are also consistent with species added in the preparation of the methylene chloride extract of the high-efficiency particulate air sample.

  18. Automated Training Sample Extraction for Global Land Cover Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Radoux

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Land cover is one of the essential climate variables of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI. In this context, the Land Cover CCI (LC CCI project aims at building global land cover maps suitable for climate modeling based on Earth observation by satellite sensors.  The  challenge  is  to  generate  a  set  of  successive  maps  that  are  both  accurate and consistent over time. To do so, operational methods for the automated classification of optical images are investigated. The proposed approach consists of a locally trained classification using an automated selection of training samples from existing, but outdated land cover information. Combinations of local extraction (based on spatial criteria and self-cleaning of training samples (based on spectral criteria are quantitatively assessed. Two large study areas, one in Eurasia and the other in South America, are considered. The proposed morphological cleaning of the training samples leads to higher accuracies than the statistical outlier removal in the spectral domain. An optimal neighborhood has been identified for the local sample extraction. The results are coherent for the two test areas, showing an improvement of the overall accuracy compared with the original reference datasets and a significant reduction of macroscopic errors. More importantly, the proposed method partly controls the reliability of existing land cover maps as sources of training samples for supervised classification.

  19. Interferometrically stable, enclosed, spinning sample cell for spectroscopic experiments on air-sensitive samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Dmitry; Hill, Robert J.; Ryu, Jisu; Park, Samuel D.; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Carollo, Alexa R.; Jonas, David M.

    2017-01-01

    In experiments with high photon flux, it is necessary to rapidly remove the sample from the beam and to delay re-excitation until the sample has returned to equilibrium. Rapid and complete sample exchange has been a challenge for air-sensitive samples and for vibration-sensitive experiments. Here, a compact spinning sample cell for air and moisture sensitive liquid and thin film samples is described. The principal parts of the cell are a copper gasket sealed enclosure, a 2.5 in. hard disk drive motor, and a reusable, chemically inert glass sandwich cell. The enclosure provides an oxygen and water free environment at the 1 ppm level, as demonstrated by multi-day tests with sodium benzophenone ketyl radical. Inside the enclosure, the glass sandwich cell spins at ≈70 Hz to generate tangential speeds of 7-12 m/s that enable complete sample exchange at 100 kHz repetition rates. The spinning cell is acoustically silent and compatible with a ±1 nm rms displacement stability interferometer. In order to enable the use of the spinning cell, we discuss centrifugation and how to prevent it, introduce the cycle-averaged resampling rate to characterize repetitive excitation, and develop a figure of merit for a long-lived photoproduct buildup.

  20. Biomimetic air sampling for detection of low concentrations of molecules and bioagents : LDRD 52744 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Robert Clark

    2003-12-01

    Present methods of air sampling for low concentrations of chemicals like explosives and bioagents involve noisy and power hungry collectors with mechanical parts for moving large volumes of air. However there are biological systems that are capable of detecting very low concentrations of molecules with no mechanical moving parts. An example is the silkworm moth antenna which is a highly branched structure where each of 100 branches contains about 200 sensory 'hairs' which have dimensions of 2 microns wide by 100 microns long. The hairs contain about 3000 pores which is where the gas phase molecules enter the aqueous (lymph) phase for detection. Simulations of diffusion of molecules indicate that this 'forest' of hairs is 'designed' to maximize the extraction of the vapor phase molecules. Since typical molecules lose about 4 decades in diffusion constant upon entering the liquid phase, it is important to allow air diffusion to bring the molecule as close to the 'sensor' as possible. The moth acts on concentrations as low as 1000 molecules per cubic cm. (one part in 1e16). A 3-D collection system of these dimensions could be fabricated by micromachining techniques available at Sandia. This LDRD addresses the issues involved with extracting molecules from air onto micromachined structures and then delivering those molecules to microsensors for detection.

  1. Evaluation of Urban Air Quality By Passive Sampling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, T. V.; Miranda, A. I.; Duarte, S.; Lima, M. J.

    Aveiro is a flat small city in the centre of Portugal, close to the Atlantic coast. In the last two decades an intensive development of demographic, traffic and industry growth in the region was observed which was reflected on the air quality degrada- tion. In order to evaluate the urban air quality in Aveiro, a field-monitoring network by passive sampling with high space resolution was implemented. Twenty-four field places were distributed in a area of 3x3 Km2 and ozone and NO2 concentrations were measured. The site distribution density was higher in the centre, 250x250 m2 than in periphery where a 500x500 m2 grid was used. The selection of field places took into consideration the choice criteria recommendation by United Kingdom environmental authorities, and three tubes and a blank tube for each pollutant were used at each site. The sampling system was mounted at 3m from the ground usually profiting the street lampposts. Concerning NO2 acrylic tubes were used with 85 mm of length and an in- ternal diameter of 12mm, where in one of the extremities three steel grids impregnated with a solution of TEA were placed and fixed with a polyethylene end cup (Heal et al., 1999); PFA Teflon tube with 53 mm of length and 9 mm of internal diameter and three impregnated glass filters impregnated with DPE solution fixed by a teflon end cup was used for ozone sampling (Monn and Hargartner, 1990). The passive sampling method for ozone and nitrogen dioxide was compared with continuous measurements, but the amount of measurements wasnSt enough for an accurate calibration and validation of the method. Although this constraint the field observations (June to August 2001) for these two pollutants assign interesting information about the air quality in the urban area. A krigger method of interpolation (Surfer- Golden Software-2000) was applied to field data to obtain isolines distribution of NO2 and ozone concentration for the studied area. Even the used passive sampling method has many

  2. Oxygen Isotopic Analyses of Water Extracted from Lunar Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn Martinez, M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen exists in lunar materials in distinct phases having unique sources and equilibration histories. The oxygen isotopic composition (δ17O, δ18O) of various components of lunar materials has been studied extensively, but analyses of water in these samples are relatively sparse [1-3]. Samples collected on the lunar surface reflect not only the composition of their source reservoirs but also contributions from asteroidal and cometary impacts, interactions with solar wind and cosmic radiation, among other surface processes. Isotopic characterization of oxygen in lunar water could help resolve the major source of water in the Earth-Moon system by revealing if lunar water is primordial, asteroidal, or cometary in origin [1]. Methods: A lunar rock/soil sample is pumped to high vacuum to remove physisorbed water before heating step-wise to 50, 150, and 1000°C to extract extraterrestrial water without terrestrial contamination. The temperature at which water is evolved is proportional to the strength with which the water is bound in the sample and the relative difficulty of exchanging oxygen atoms in that water. This allows for the isolated extraction of water bound in different phases, which could have different source reservoirs and/or histories, as evidenced by the mass (in)dependence of oxygen compositions. A low blank procedure was developed to accommodate the low water content of lunar material [4]. Results: Oxygen isotopic analyses of lunar water extracted by stepwise heating lunar basalts and breccias with a range of compositions, petrologic types, and surface exposure ages will be presented. The cosmic ray exposure age of these samples varies by two orders of magnitude, and we will consider this in discussing the effects of solar wind and cosmic radiation on the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O). I will examine the implications of our water analyses for the composition of the oxygen-bearing reservoir from which that water formed, the effects of surface

  3. Evaluating the mutagenicity of the water-soluble fraction of air particulate matter: A comparison of two extraction strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Isabel C; Oliveira, Ivo F; Franklin, Robson L; Barros, Silvia B M; Roubicek, Deborah A

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have focused on assessing the genotoxic potential of the organic fraction of airborne particulate matter. However, the determination of water-soluble compounds, and the evaluation of the toxic effects of these elements can also provide valuable information for the development of novel strategies to control atmospheric air pollution. To determine an appropriate extraction method for assessing the mutagenicity of the water-soluble fraction of PM, we performed microwave assisted (MW) and ultrasonic bath (US) extractions, using water as solvent, in eight different air samples (TSP and PM10). Mutagenicity and extraction performances were evaluated using the Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA98 and TA100, followed by chemical determination of water-soluble metals. Additionally, we evaluated the chemical and biological stability of the extracts testing their mutagenic potential and chemically determining elements present in the samples along several periods after extraction. Reference material SRM 1648a was used. The comparison of MW and US extractions did not show differences on the metals concentrations, however positive mutagenic responses were detected with TA98 strain in all samples extracted using the MW method, but not with the US bath extraction. The recovery, using reference material was better in samples extracted with MW. We concluded that the MW extraction is more efficient to assess the mutagenic activity of the soluble fraction of airborne PM. We also observed that the extract freezing and storage over 60 days has a significant effect on the mutagenic and analytical results on PM samples, and should be avoided.

  4. Measurements of an ion beam diameter extracted into air through a glass capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Natsuko, E-mail: fujita.natsuko@jaea.go.jp [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women’s University, Nara, 630 8506 (Japan); Yamaki, Atsuko [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women’s University, Nara, 630 8506 (Japan); Ishii, Kunikazu; Ogawa, Hidemi [Department of Physics, Nara Women’s University, Nara, 630 8506 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    To establish techniques for in-air materials analysis using a glass capillary, we studied the beam distribution extracted in air as a function of the distance between the exit of the capillary and the target. We measured three-dimensional intensity distributions of the extracted beams, and compared the observed results with the model calculation. The comparison showed that the glass capillary technique is designed to reduce a divergence of the beam extracted into the air by a beam-focusing effect.

  5. Recent developments on field gas extraction and sample preparation methods for radiokrypton dating of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokochi, Reika

    2016-09-01

    Current and foreseen population growths will lead to an increased demand in freshwater, large quantities of which is stored as groundwater. The ventilation age is crucial to the assessment of groundwater resources, complementing the hydrological model approach based on hydrogeological parameters. Ultra-trace radioactive isotopes of Kr (81 Kr and 85 Kr) possess the ideal physical and chemical properties for groundwater dating. The recent advent of atom trap trace analyses (ATTA) has enabled determination of ultra-trace noble gas radioisotope abundances using 5-10 μ L of pure Kr. Anticipated developments will enable ATTA to analyze radiokrypton isotope abundances at high sample throughput, which necessitates simple and efficient sample preparation techniques that are adaptable to various sample chemistries. Recent developments of field gas extraction devices and simple and rapid Kr separation method at the University of Chicago are presented herein. Two field gas extraction devices optimized for different sampling conditions were recently designed and constructed, aiming at operational simplicity and portability. A newly developed Kr purification system enriches Kr by flowing a sample gas through a moderately cooled (138 K) activated charcoal column, followed by a gentle fractionating desorption. This simple process uses a single adsorbent and separates 99% of the bulk atmospheric gases from Kr without significant loss. The subsequent two stages of gas chromatographic separation and a hot Ti sponge getter further purify the Kr-enriched gas. Abundant CH4 necessitates multiple passages through one of the gas chromatographic separation columns. The presented Kr separation system has a demonstrated capability of extracting Kr with > 90% yield and 99% purity within 75 min from 1.2 to 26.8 L STP of atmospheric air with various concentrations of CH4. The apparatuses have successfully been deployed for sampling in the field and purification of groundwater samples.

  6. Extractive sampling and optical remote sensing of F100 aircraft engine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Kenneth; Goodwin, Bradley; Joseph, Darrell; Tefend, Matthew; Satola, Jan; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram; Spicer, Chester; Holdren, Michael; Mayfield, Howard

    2009-05-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) has initiated several programs to develop and evaluate techniques to characterize emissions from military aircraft to meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements. This paper describes the results of a recent field study using extractive and optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques to measure emissions from six F-15 fighter aircraft. Testing was performed between November 14 and 16, 2006 on the trim-pad facility at Tyndall Air Force Base in Panama City, FL. Measurements were made on eight different F100 engines, and the engines were tested on-wing of in-use aircraft. A total of 39 test runs were performed at engine power levels that ranged from idle to military power. The approach adopted for these tests involved extractive sampling with collocated ORS measurements at a distance of approximately 20-25 nozzle diameters downstream of the engine exit plane. The emission indices calculated for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and several volatile organic compounds showed very good agreement when comparing the extractive and ORS sampling methods.

  7. Phytochemical Screening of Aqueous Extract of Luffa aegyptiaca (Sponge gourd Leave Sample from Northern Nigeria: A Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhya DH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extract of the leaves of Luffa aegyptiaca was preliminary screened with the aim of assessing the availability of some biologically active compounds. Pulverized leaves sample of Luffa aegyptiaca was extracted with water; the filtrate was concentrated on water bath and then air-dried at 25oC. The prepared aqueous-extract was used for the phytochemical screening study which was carried out using standard methods. The phytochemicals screened from the aqueous extract of Luffa aegyptiaca showed positive result for flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and cardiac glycoside compounds. These compounds found in the aqueous extract of Luffa aegyptiaca leaves may have a wide range of biological activities which could of pharmaceutical importance.

  8. Rapid extraction of PCDD/Fs from soil and fly ash samples. Pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, P.; Fabrellas, B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    2004-09-15

    The main reference extraction method in the analysis of polychlorinated dibenzop- dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) is still the Soxhlet extraction. But it requires long extraction times (up to 24 hs), large volumes of hazardous organic solvents (100-300 ml) and its automation is limited. Pressurized Fluid Extraction (PFE) and Microwave-Assisted Extraction (MAE) are two relatively new extraction techniques that reduce the time and the volume of solvent required for extraction. However, very different PFE extraction conditions are found for the same enviromental matrices in the literature. MAE is not a extraction technique very applied for the analysis of PCDD/Fs yet, although it is used for the determination of other organic compounds, such as PCBs and PAHs. In this study, PFE and MAE extraction conditions were optimized to determine PCDDs y PCDFs in fly ash and soil/sediment samples. Conventional Soxhlet extraction with toluene was used to compare the extraction efficiency of both techniques.

  9. Are extracted materials truly representative of original samples? Impact of C18 extraction on CDOM optical and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO. Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4.C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission and quantum yield of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters.

  10. Low-cost monitoring of campylobacter in poultry houses by air sampling and quantitative PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mette Sofie Rousing; Josefsen, Mathilde Hasseldam; Löfström, Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the evaluation of a method for the quantification of Campylobacter by air sampling in poultry houses. Sampling was carried out in conventional chicken houses in Poland, in addition to a preliminary sampling in Denmark. Each measurement consisted of three air samples, two...

  11. Glyphosate-rich air samples induce IL-33, TSLP and generate IL-13 dependent airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Khodoun, Marat; Kettleson, Eric M; McKnight, Christopher; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin

    2014-11-01

    Several low weight molecules have often been implicated in the induction of occupational asthma. Glyphosate, a small molecule herbicide, is widely used in the world. There is a controversy regarding a role of glyphosate in developing asthma and rhinitis among farmers, the mechanism of which is unexplored. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of glyphosate induced pulmonary pathology by utilizing murine models and real environmental samples. C57BL/6, TLR4-/-, and IL-13-/- mice inhaled extracts of glyphosate-rich air samples collected on farms during spraying of herbicides or inhaled different doses of glyphosate and ovalbumin. The cellular response, humoral response, and lung function of exposed mice were evaluated. Exposure to glyphosate-rich air samples as well as glyphosate alone to the lungs increased: eosinophil and neutrophil counts, mast cell degranulation, and production of IL-33, TSLP, IL-13, and IL-5. In contrast, in vivo systemic IL-4 production was not increased. Co-administration of ovalbumin with glyphosate did not substantially change the inflammatory immune response. However, IL-13-deficiency resulted in diminished inflammatory response but did not have a significant effect on airway resistance upon methacholine challenge after 7 or 21 days of glyphosate exposure. Glyphosate-rich farm air samples as well as glyphosate alone were found to induce pulmonary IL-13-dependent inflammation and promote Th2 type cytokines, but not IL-4 for glyphosate alone. This study, for the first time, provides evidence for the mechanism of glyphosate-induced occupational lung disease.

  12. A new CF-IRMS system for quantifying stable isotopes of carbon monoxide from ice cores and small air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis technique for stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from ice core samples. The technique is an online cryogenic vacuum extraction followed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS; it can also be used with small air samples. The CO extraction system includes two multi-loop cryogenic cleanup traps, a chemical oxidant for oxidation to CO2, a cryogenic collection trap, a cryofocusing unit, gas chromatography purification, and subsequent injection into a Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS. Analytical precision of 0.2‰ (±1δ for δ13C and 0.6‰ (±1δ for δ18O can be obtained for 100 mL (STP air samples with CO mixing ratios ranging from 60 ppbv to 140 ppbv (~268–625 pmol CO. Six South Pole ice core samples from depths ranging from 133 m to 177 m were processed for CO isotope analysis after wet extraction. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of stable isotopes of CO in ice core air.

  13. Breakthrough of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin from 600 mg XAD-4 air sampling tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurately measuring air concentrations of agricultural fumigants is important for the regulation of air quality. Understanding the conditions under which sorbent tubes can effectively retain such fumigants during sampling is critical in mitigating chemical breakthrough from the tubes and facilitati...

  14. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  15. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lever, Mark; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate......'s oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular...... tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world...

  16. Extraction of nickel from nickel limonite ore using dissolved gaseous SO2 - air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandari, Winny; Soerawidjaja, Tatang Hernas; Joshua, Stephen; Isradi, Hashfi Rijal

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a method of extracting nickel from nickel limonite by using dissolved SO2-air in ambient pressure. This method has been reported in the literature to be having advantages of a high selectivity of nickel towards iron, and can be conducted at ambient condition. The purpose of this study is to determine the good condition of nickel extraction from limonite ore by conducting pre-treatment and varying temperature and pH. The experiments were carried out in a five-neck reactor and comprised of three steps: pre-treatment of sample by pre-heating at 650 °C, leaching of the pre-treated sample, and analysis. The leaching solution was analyzed by using AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectrometer) method to determine the concentration of nickel and iron in the solution. The operating parameters included the acidity pH level of 3, 4, or 5 and the temperature of 30, 55, and 80 °C. The leaching was carried out up to 180 min. The mineralogical analysis of the ore was conducted by using XRD (X-Ray Diffraction) analysis. It is found that the good condition was obtained at pH 3, temperature of 80 °C, and 180 min leaching time, with nickel leaching efficiency of 21% from original nickel content. The selectivity nickel towards iron, defined by the extracted nickel (%) divided by extracted iron (%), has been found up to 2743. This method shows that nickel extraction can be carried out at very mild condition, including low temperature, atmospheric pressure and low pH.

  17. Microbial air-sampling equipment, part 1: meeting United States pharmacopeia chapter 797 standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastango, Eric S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent changes to Chapter 797 of the United States Pharmcopeia-National Formulary initiated an intense controversy about the frequency of cleanroom air sampling that is required to prevent the contamination of sterile preparations. For compounders who must purchase an air sampler to use in the cleanroom, choices abound. Included in this article are a review of United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary requirements that pertain to air sampling, a discussion of how recent revision to Chapter 797 affect air sampling and patient safety, and, for easy reference, a table that features specifications for various models of microbial air samplers.

  18. CO2 isotope analyses using large air samples collected on intercontinental flights by the CARIBIC Boeing 767.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assonov, S S; Brenninkmeijer, C A M; Koeppel, C; Röckmann, T

    2009-03-01

    Analytical details for 13C and 18O isotope analyses of atmospheric CO2 in large air samples are given. The large air samples of nominally 300 L were collected during the passenger aircraft-based atmospheric chemistry research project CARIBIC and analyzed for a large number of trace gases and isotopic composition. In the laboratory, an ultra-pure and high efficiency extraction system and high-quality isotope ratio mass spectrometry were used. Because direct comparison with other laboratories was practically impossible, the extraction and measurement procedures were tested in considerable detail. Extracted CO2 was measured twice vs. two different working reference CO2 gases of different isotopic composition. The two data sets agree well and their distributions can be used to evaluate analytical errors due to isotope measurement, ion corrections, internal calibration consistency, etc. The calibration itself is based on NBS-19 and also verified using isotope analyses on pure CO2 gases (NIST Reference Materials (RMs) and NARCIS CO2 gases). The major problem encountered could be attributed to CO2-water exchange in the air sampling cylinders. This exchange decreased over the years. To exclude artefacts due to such isotopic exchange, the data were filtered to reject negative delta18O(CO2) values. Examples of the results are given.

  19. The effect of air temperature on the sappan wood extract drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaeni, M.; Triyastuti, M. S.; Asiah, N.; Annisa, A. N.; Novita, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The sappan wood extract contain natural colour called brazilin that can be used as a food colouring and antioxidant. The product is commonly found as a dry extract powder for consummer convenience. The spray dryer with air dehumidification can be an option to retain the colour and antioxidant agent. This paper discusses the effect of air temperature on sappan wood extract drying that was mixed with maltodextrin. As responses, the particle size, final moisture content, and extract solubility degradation were observed. In all cases, the process conducted in temperature ranging 90 - 110°C can retain the brazilin quality as seen in solubility and particle size. In addition, the sappan wood extract can be fully dried with moisture content below 2%. Moreover, with the increase of air temperature, the particle size of dry extract can be smaller.

  20. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass ...prescription bottles , and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author)

  1. A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

    2013-10-16

    The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

  2. A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Mak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/8" OD tube 150 m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

  3. A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Mak

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The emission and fate of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere–atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary layer has limited the availability of data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is an important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/8 in. OD (outer diameter tube 150 m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

  4. HCI Treatment Followed by Bligh and Dyer Extraction Extract More Fatty Acids than Stoldt Fat Extraction in Feed and Fecal Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Krogh; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    HCl Treatment Followed By Bligh and Dyer Extraction Extract More Fatty Acids than Stoldt Fat Extraction in Feed and Fecal Samples., S.K. Jensen, C. Lauridsen, Aarhus University, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Tjele, Denmark. The official EU method for fatty acid analysis in feed is based......-Bligh and Dyer method") has been developed, and compared with the traditional Stoldt fat extraction. The new method combines the HCl treatment of the sample with a Bligh and Dyer extraction (water-methanol-chloroform) of the lipid. Depending on the matrix (feed ?), the HCl-Bligh and Dyer extraction lead to 10...... on boiling of the feed sample in 3 M HCl followed by a filtration, drying, Soxhelet extraction of the fat with petrol ether, conversion of the fatty acids to their corresponding methyl esters and followed by GC separation. Besides being very time consuming, this method has several disadvantages, e...

  5. An evaluation of analytical methods, air sampling techniques, and airborne occupational exposure of metalworking fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dave K; Shaw, Don S; Shaw, M Lorraine; Julian, Jim A; McCollin, Shari-Ann; des Tombe, Karen

    2006-02-01

    This article summarizes an assessment of air sampling and analytical methods for both oil and water-based metalworking fluids (MWFs). Three hundred and seventy-four long-term area and personal airborne samples were collected at four plants using total (closed-face) aerosol samplers and thoracic samplers. A direct-reading device (DustTrak) was also used. The processes sampled include steel tube making, automotive component manufacturing, and small part manufacturing in a machine shop. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method PS42-97 of analysis was evaluated in the laboratory. This evaluation included sample recovery, determination of detection limits, and stability of samples during storage. Results of the laboratory validation showed (a) the sample recovery to be about 87%, (b) the detection limit to be 35 microg, and (c) sample stability during storage at room temperature to decline rapidly within a few days. To minimize sample loss, the samples should be stored in a freezer and analyzed within a week. The ASTM method should be the preferred method for assessing metalworking fluids (MWFs). The ratio of thoracic aerosol to total aerosol ranged from 0.6 to 0.7. A similar relationship was found between the thoracic extractable aerosol and total extractable aerosol. The DustTrak, with 10-microm sampling head, was useful in pinpointing the areas of potential exposure. MWF exposure at the four plants ranged from 0.04 to 3.84 mg/m3 with the geometric mean ranging between 0.22 to 0.59 mg/m3. Based on this data and the assumption of log normality, MWF exposures are expected to exceed the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended exposure limit of 0.5 mg/m3 as total mass and 0.4 mg/m3 as thoracic mass about 38% of the time. In addition to controlling airborne MWF exposure, full protection of workers would require the institution of programs for fluid management and dermal exposure prevention.

  6. Composite Sampling Approaches for Bacillus anthracis Surrogate Extracted from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Brian; Bell, William; Chang, Emily; Scholten, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Any release of anthrax spores in the U.S. would require action to decontaminate the site and restore its use and operations as rapidly as possible. The remediation activity would require environmental sampling, both initially to determine the extent of contamination (hazard mapping) and post-decon to determine that the site is free of contamination (clearance sampling). Whether the spore contamination is within a building or outdoors, collecting and analyzing what could be thousands of samples can become the factor that limits the pace of restoring operations. To address this sampling and analysis bottleneck and decrease the time needed to recover from an anthrax contamination event, this study investigates the use of composite sampling. Pooling or compositing of samples is an established technique to reduce the number of analyses required, and its use for anthrax spore sampling has recently been investigated. However, use of composite sampling in an anthrax spore remediation event will require well-documented and accepted methods. In particular, previous composite sampling studies have focused on sampling from hard surfaces; data on soil sampling are required to extend the procedure to outdoor use. Further, we must consider whether combining liquid samples, thus increasing the volume, lowers the sensitivity of detection and produces false negatives. In this study, methods to composite bacterial spore samples from soil are demonstrated. B. subtilis spore suspensions were used as a surrogate for anthrax spores. Two soils (Arizona Test Dust and sterilized potting soil) were contaminated and spore recovery with composites was shown to match individual sample performance. Results show that dilution can be overcome by concentrating bacterial spores using standard filtration methods. This study shows that composite sampling can be a viable method of pooling samples to reduce the number of analysis that must be performed during anthrax spore remediation. PMID:26714315

  7. Composite Sampling Approaches for Bacillus anthracis Surrogate Extracted from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Brian; Bell, William; Chang, Emily; Scholten, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Any release of anthrax spores in the U.S. would require action to decontaminate the site and restore its use and operations as rapidly as possible. The remediation activity would require environmental sampling, both initially to determine the extent of contamination (hazard mapping) and post-decon to determine that the site is free of contamination (clearance sampling). Whether the spore contamination is within a building or outdoors, collecting and analyzing what could be thousands of samples can become the factor that limits the pace of restoring operations. To address this sampling and analysis bottleneck and decrease the time needed to recover from an anthrax contamination event, this study investigates the use of composite sampling. Pooling or compositing of samples is an established technique to reduce the number of analyses required, and its use for anthrax spore sampling has recently been investigated. However, use of composite sampling in an anthrax spore remediation event will require well-documented and accepted methods. In particular, previous composite sampling studies have focused on sampling from hard surfaces; data on soil sampling are required to extend the procedure to outdoor use. Further, we must consider whether combining liquid samples, thus increasing the volume, lowers the sensitivity of detection and produces false negatives. In this study, methods to composite bacterial spore samples from soil are demonstrated. B. subtilis spore suspensions were used as a surrogate for anthrax spores. Two soils (Arizona Test Dust and sterilized potting soil) were contaminated and spore recovery with composites was shown to match individual sample performance. Results show that dilution can be overcome by concentrating bacterial spores using standard filtration methods. This study shows that composite sampling can be a viable method of pooling samples to reduce the number of analysis that must be performed during anthrax spore remediation.

  8. Composite Sampling Approaches for Bacillus anthracis Surrogate Extracted from Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian France

    Full Text Available Any release of anthrax spores in the U.S. would require action to decontaminate the site and restore its use and operations as rapidly as possible. The remediation activity would require environmental sampling, both initially to determine the extent of contamination (hazard mapping and post-decon to determine that the site is free of contamination (clearance sampling. Whether the spore contamination is within a building or outdoors, collecting and analyzing what could be thousands of samples can become the factor that limits the pace of restoring operations. To address this sampling and analysis bottleneck and decrease the time needed to recover from an anthrax contamination event, this study investigates the use of composite sampling. Pooling or compositing of samples is an established technique to reduce the number of analyses required, and its use for anthrax spore sampling has recently been investigated. However, use of composite sampling in an anthrax spore remediation event will require well-documented and accepted methods. In particular, previous composite sampling studies have focused on sampling from hard surfaces; data on soil sampling are required to extend the procedure to outdoor use. Further, we must consider whether combining liquid samples, thus increasing the volume, lowers the sensitivity of detection and produces false negatives. In this study, methods to composite bacterial spore samples from soil are demonstrated. B. subtilis spore suspensions were used as a surrogate for anthrax spores. Two soils (Arizona Test Dust and sterilized potting soil were contaminated and spore recovery with composites was shown to match individual sample performance. Results show that dilution can be overcome by concentrating bacterial spores using standard filtration methods. This study shows that composite sampling can be a viable method of pooling samples to reduce the number of analysis that must be performed during anthrax spore remediation.

  9. In-tube extraction of volatile organic compounds from aqueous samples: an economical alternative to purge and trap enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaks, Jens; Jochmann, Maik A; Schilling, Beat; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2010-09-15

    A novel in-tube extraction device (ITEX 2) for headspace sampling was evaluated for GC/MS analysis of aqueous samples. Twenty compounds of regulatory and drinking water quality importance were analyzed, including halogenated hydrocarbons, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes), fuel oxygenates, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol. Five commercially available sorbent traps were compared for their compound specific extraction yield. On the basis of the results, a mixed bed trap was prepared and evaluated. The extraction parameters were optimized to yield maximum sensitivity within the time of a GC run, to avoid unnecessary downtime of the system. Method detection limits of 1-10 ng L(-1) were achieved for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which is much lower than demands by regulatory limit values. The performance of the ITEX system is similar to that of purge and trap systems, but it requires lower sample volumes and is less prone to contamination, much simpler, more flexible, and affordable. Average relative standard deviations below 10% were achieved for all analytes, and recoveries from spiked tap water samples were between 90% and 103%, mostly. The extraction is nonexhaustive, removing a fraction of 7% to 55% of the target compounds, depending on the air-water partitioning coefficients. The method was also tested with nonsynthetic samples, including tap, pond, and reservoir water and different soft drinks.

  10. AFM fluid delivery/liquid extraction surface sampling/electrostatic spray cantilever probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-23

    An electrospray system comprises a liquid extraction surface sampling probe. The probe comprises a probe body having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, and having a liquid extraction tip. A solvent delivery conduit is provided for receiving solvent liquid from the liquid inlet and delivering the solvent liquid to the liquid extraction tip. An open liquid extraction channel extends across an exterior surface of the probe body from the liquid extraction tip to the liquid outlet. An electrospray emitter tip is in liquid communication with the liquid outlet of the liquid extraction surface sampling probe. A system for analyzing samples, a liquid junction surface sampling system, and a method of analyzing samples are also disclosed.

  11. THE LIBERATION OF ARSENOSUGARS FROM MATRIX COMPONENTS IN DIFFICULT TO EXTRACT SEAFOOD SAMPLES UTILIZING TMAOH/ACETIC ACID SEQUENTIALLY IN A TWO-STAGE EXTRACTION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample extraction is one of the most important steps in arsenic speciation analysis of solid dietary samples. One of the problem areas in this analysis is the partial extraction of arsenicals from seafood samples. The partial extraction allows the toxicity of the extracted arse...

  12. Microbial air-sampling equipment, part 2: experiences of compounding pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Bill; Cabaleiro, Joe; Latta, Kenneth S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent changes to Chapter 797 of the United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary initiated an intense controversy about the frequency of cleanroom air sampling that is required to prevent the contamination of sterile preparations. For compounders who must purchase an air sampler to use in the cleanroom, choices abound. This article summarizes discussions from compounding pharmacists and their experiences with air sampling devices.

  13. Electromembrane extraction as a rapid and selective miniaturized sample preparation technique for biological fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Seip, Knut Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    This special report discusses the sample preparation method electromembrane extraction, which was introduced in 2006 as a rapid and selective miniaturized extraction method. The extraction principle is based on isolation of charged analytes extracted from an aqueous sample, across a thin film...... of organic solvent, and into an aqueous receiver solution. The extraction is promoted by application of an electrical field, causing electrokinetic migration of the charged analytes. The method has shown to perform excellent clean-up and selectivity from complicated aqueous matrices like biological fluids....... Technical aspects of electromembrane extraction, important extraction parameters as well as a handful of examples of applications from different biological samples and bioanalytical areas are discussed in the paper....

  14. Low-cost monitoring of Campylobacter in poultry houses by air sampling and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, M S R; Josefsen, M H; Löfström, C; Christensen, L S; Wieczorek, K; Osek, J; Hoorfar, J

    2014-02-01

    The present study describes the evaluation of a method for the quantification of Campylobacter by air sampling in poultry houses. Sampling was carried out in conventional chicken houses in Poland, in addition to a preliminary sampling in Denmark. Each measurement consisted of three air samples, two standard boot swab fecal samples, and one airborne particle count. Sampling was conducted over an 8-week period in three flocks, assessing the presence and levels of Campylobacter in boot swabs and air samples using quantitative real-time PCR. The detection limit for air sampling was approximately 100 Campylobacter cell equivalents (CCE)/m3. Airborne particle counts were used to analyze the size distribution of airborne particles (0.3 to 10 μm) in the chicken houses in relation to the level of airborne Campylobacter. No correlation was found. Using air sampling, Campylobacter was detected in the flocks right away, while boot swab samples were positive after 2 weeks. All samples collected were positive for Campylobacter from week 2 through the rest of the rearing period for both sampling techniques, although levels 1- to 2-log CCE higher were found with air sampling. At week 8, the levels were approximately 10(4) and 10(5) CCE per sample for boot swabs and air, respectively. In conclusion, using air samples combined with quantitative real-time PCR, Campylobacter contamination could be detected earlier than by boot swabs and was found to be a more convenient technique for monitoring and/or to obtain enumeration data useful for quantitative risk assessment of Campylobacter.

  15. Extracting labeled topological patterns from samples of networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schmidt

    Full Text Available An advanced graph theoretical approach is introduced that enables a higher level of functional interpretation of samples of directed networks with identical fixed pairwise different vertex labels that are drawn from a particular population. Compared to the analysis of single networks, their investigation promises to yield more detailed information about the represented system. Often patterns of directed edges in sample element networks are too intractable for a direct evaluation and interpretation. The new approach addresses the problem of simplifying topological information and characterizes such a sample of networks by finding its locatable characteristic topological patterns. These patterns, essentially sample-specific network motifs with vertex labeling, might represent the essence of the intricate topological information contained in all sample element networks and provides as well a means of differentiating network samples. Central to the accurateness of this approach is the null model and its properties, which is needed to assign significance to topological patterns. As a proof of principle the proposed approach has been applied to the analysis of networks that represent brain connectivity before and during painful stimulation in patients with major depression and in healthy subjects. The accomplished reduction of topological information enables a cautious functional interpretation of the altered neuronal processing of pain in both groups.

  16. A rubric for extracting idea density from oral language samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Vineeta; Baynes, Kathleen; Bonnici, Lisa M; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski

    2012-01-01

    While past research has demonstrated that low idea density (ID) scores from natural language samples correlate with late life risk for cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease pathology, there are no published rubrics for collecting and analyzing language samples for idea density to verify or extend these findings into new settings. This unit outlines the history of ID research and findings, discusses issues with past rubrics, and then presents an operationalized method for the systematic measurement of ID in language samples, with an extensive manual available as a supplement to this unit (Analysis of Idea Density, AID). Finally, reliability statistics for this rubric in the context of dementia research on aging populations and verification that AID can replicate the significant association between ID and late-life cognition are presented.

  17. Microwave-assisted extraction and mild saponification for determination of organochlorine pesticides in oyster samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, N; García, I; Ignacio, M-C; Llompart, M; Yebra, M-C; Mouteira, A

    2002-10-01

    A sample-preparation procedure (extraction and saponification) using microwave energy is proposed for determination of organochlorine pesticides in oyster samples. A Plackett-Burman factorial design has been used to optimize the microwave-assisted extraction and mild saponification on a freeze dried sample spiked with a mixture of aldrin, endrin, dieldrin, heptachlor, heptachorepoxide, isodrin, transnonachlor, p, p'-DDE, and p, p'-DDD. Six variables: solvent volume, extraction time, extraction temperature, amount of acetone (%) in the extractant solvent, amount of sample, and volume of NaOH solution were considered in the optimization process. The results show that the amount of sample is statistically significant for dieldrin, aldrin, p, p'-DDE, heptachlor, and transnonachlor and solvent volume for dieldrin, aldrin, and p, p'-DDE. The volume of NaOH solution is statistically significant for aldrin and p, p'-DDE only. Extraction temperature and extraction time seem to be the main factors determining the efficiency of extraction process for isodrin and p, p'-DDE, respectively. The optimized procedure was compared with conventional Soxhlet extraction.

  18. Cloud point extraction and spectrophotometric determination of arsenic (III using Amaranth as an extraction agent in water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Nekouei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-point extraction (CPE method was applied to extraction of trace quantities ofAs(III from various water samples. In the proposed method, spectrophotometric determination has been developed. For this mixed-micelle mediated extraction, amaranth, cetyltrimethylammunium bromide (CTAB, Triton X-114, and NaCl were applied as chelating, sensitizing agent, extraction and co-extraction agents, respectively.A linear calibration curve in the range of 10-1000 µg L-1 of amaranth was acquired. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD was 2.8 µg L-11and the relative standard deviation (RSD for 200 and 600 µg L-1 was 2.23 and 1.73, respectively (n = 10. The LOD was 2.8 µg L-1.

  19. Comparison of stationary and personal air sampling with an air dispersion model for children's ambient exposure to manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulk, Florence; Haynes, Erin N; Hilbert, Timothy J; Brown, David; Petersen, Dan; Reponen, Tiina

    2016-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is ubiquitous in the environment and essential for normal growth and development, yet excessive exposure can lead to impairments in neurological function. This study modeled ambient Mn concentrations as an alternative to stationary and personal air sampling to assess exposure for children enrolled in the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study in Marietta, OH. Ambient air Mn concentration values were modeled using US Environmental Protection Agency's Air Dispersion Model AERMOD based on emissions from the ferromanganese refinery located in Marietta. Modeled Mn concentrations were compared with Mn concentrations from a nearby stationary air monitor. The Index of Agreement for modeled versus monitored data was 0.34 (48 h levels) and 0.79 (monthly levels). Fractional bias was 0.026 for 48 h levels and -0.019 for monthly levels. The ratio of modeled ambient air Mn to measured ambient air Mn at the annual time scale was 0.94. Modeled values were also time matched to personal air samples for 19 children. The modeled values explained a greater degree of variability in personal exposures compared with time-weighted distance from the emission source. Based on these results modeled Mn concentrations provided a suitable approach for assessing airborne Mn exposure in this cohort.

  20. Study of PCBs and PBDEs in King George Island, Antarctica, using PUF passive air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingming; Geng, Dawei; Liu, Fubin; Wang, Thanh; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2012-05-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF)-disk based passive air samplers were deployed in King George Island, Antarctica, during the austral summer of 2009-2010, to investigate levels, distributions and potential sources of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Antarctic air. The atmospheric levels of ∑ indicator PCBs and ∑14 PBDEs ranged from 1.66 to 6.50 pg m-3 and from 0.67 to 2.98 pg m-3, respectively. PCBs homologue profiles were dominated by di-PCBs, tri-PCBs and tetra-PCBs, whereas BDE-17 and BDE-28 were the predominant congeners of PBDEs, which could be explained by long-range atmospheric transport processes. However, the sampling sites close to the Antarctic research stations showed higher atmospheric concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs than the other sites, reflecting potential local sources from the Antarctic research stations. The non-Aroclor congener PCB-11 was found in all the air samples, with air concentrations of 3.60-31.4 pg m-3 (average 15.2 pg m-3). Comparison between the results derived from PUF-disk passive air sampling and high-volume air sampling validates the feasibility of using the passive air samplers in Antarctic air. To our knowledge, this study is the first employment of PUF-disk based passive air samplers in Antarctic atmosphere.

  1. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26

    Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble

  2. A standardized method for sampling and extraction methods for quantifying microplastics in beach sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, Aiken; Vijver, Martina G; Behrens, Paul; Bosker, Thijs

    2017-01-15

    Microplastics are ubiquitous in the environment, are frequently ingested by organisms, and may potentially cause harm. A range of studies have found significant levels of microplastics in beach sand. However, there is a considerable amount of methodological variability among these studies. Methodological variation currently limits comparisons as there is no standard procedure for sampling or extraction of microplastics. We identify key sampling and extraction procedures across the literature through a detailed review. We find that sampling depth, sampling location, number of repeat extractions, and settling times are the critical parameters of variation. Next, using a case-study we determine whether and to what extent these differences impact study outcomes. By investigating the common practices identified in the literature with the case-study, we provide a standard operating procedure for sampling and extracting microplastics from beach sand.

  3. Roseomonas aerilata sp. nov., isolated from an air sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Hee; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Noh, Hyung-Jun; Hong, Seung-Beom; Lee, Chang-Muk; Kim, Byung-Yong; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Go, Seung-Joo

    2008-06-01

    A polyphasic study was carried out to clarify the taxonomic position of a pink-coloured, Gram-negative bacterium isolated from air in the Suwon region of Korea. The novel strain, 5420S-30(T), grew in the temperature range of 5-35 degrees C (optimum 30 degrees C) and pH range of 5-9 (optimum pH 6-7). Growth did not occur in the presence of as little as 1 % (w/v) NaCl. It contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. The major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c, summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c/iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH) and C(16 : 0) (together representing 77.7 % of the total). The DNA G+C content was 72.1 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain 5420S-30(T) and members of the genus Roseomonas were in the range 91.6-95.1 %, with the highest sequence similarities (95.1 and 94.5 %, respectively) to Roseomonas aquatica TR53(T) and Roseomonas gilardii ATCC 49956(T). On the basis of its phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain 5420S-30(T) represents a novel species of the genus Roseomonas, for which the name Roseomonas aerilata sp. nov. is proposed, with 5420S-30(T) (=KACC 12521(T) =DSM 19363(T)) as the type strain.

  4. PRODUCTION OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL SAMPLER TUBES FOR SAMPLING AIR CONTAMINANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Nassiri

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the use of activated charcoal tubes for sampling gases and vapors is very well-known. For producing these tubes in the country, their production started in the laboratory of the department of occupation al health using activated charcoal, polyurethane foam and glass wool and consequently two types of foamed and foamless tubes were produced. To investigate the quality of the raw materials used, 186 tubes were exposed to various proportions of solutions of different volumes of known percentages of four compounds of benzene, toluene, O-xylene and P-xlene. The adsorption of various parts of sampler tubes was done by a chemical method using CS2 and the final analysis was done by gas chromatography. The results obtained show that the amount of the above named compounds adsorbed by glass wool and foam in comparison to the activated charcoal isn’t significant (respectively P<0.001 & P,0.05. Also the experiments don’s show any significant differences between the total amount of adsorbed chemicals by charcoal in the back-up layer and the sample layer of the foamed tube and the amount adsorbed in the foamless tube, when treated with various compounds (P,0.001. Considering the equal adsorption of both types of tubes and the advantage of foamed tubes in controlling the time duration and the flow rate of sampling, the foamed type was recommended for production and use.

  5. Quantitative extraction of nucleotides from frozen muscle samples of Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) and rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) : Effects of time taken to sample and extraction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, P.M.; Bremner, Allan; Pankhurst, N.W.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle excised from the dorsal flank of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout at death and up to 120 min postmortem (P.M.) was frozen in liquid N-2 and stored at -80C. Following acid extraction, on ice (method I), or dry ice (method 2) samples were analyzed for cyclic nucleotides to determine...

  6. Dispersion modeling of selected PAHs in urban air: A new approach combining dispersion model with GIS and passive air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáňka, Ondřej; Melymuk, Lisa; Čupr, Pavel; Dvorská, Alice; Klánová, Jana

    2014-10-01

    This study introduces a new combined air concentration measurement and modeling approach that we propose can be useful in medium and long term air quality assessment. A dispersion study was carried out for four high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban area with industrial, traffic and domestic heating sources. A geographic information system (GIS) was used both for processing of input data as well as visualization of the modeling results. The outcomes of the dispersion model were compared to the results of passive air sampling (PAS). Despite discrepancies between measured and modeled concentrations, an approach combining the two techniques is promising for future air quality assessment. Differences between measured and modeled concentrations, in particular when measured values exceed the modeled concentrations, are indicative of undocumented, sporadic pollutant sources. Thus, these differences can also be useful for assessing and refining emission inventories.

  7. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method from Fresh, Frozen, Dried and Clotted Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, with the tremendous potential of genomics and other recent advances in science, the role of science to improve reliable DNA extraction methods is more relevant than ever before. The ideal process for genomic DNA extraction demands high quantities of pure, integral and intact genomic DNA (gDNA from the sample with minimal co-extraction of inhibitors of downstream processes. Here, we report the development of a very rapid, less-hazardous, and high throughput protocol for extracting of high quality DNA from blood samples. Methods: Dried, clotted and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA treated fresh and frozen blood samples were extracted using this method in which the quality and integrity of the extracted DNA were corroborated by agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR reaction and DNA digestion using restricted enzyme. The UV spectrophotometric and gel electrophoresis analysis resulted in high A260/A280 ratio (>1.8 with high intactness of DNA. Results: PCR and DNA digestion experiments indicated that the final solutions of extracted DNA contained no inhibitory substances, which confirms that the isolated DNA is of good quality. Conclusion: The high quality and quantity of current method, no enzymatic processing and accordingly its low cost, make it appropriate for DNA extraction not only from human but also from animal blood samples in any molecular biology labs.

  8. MOLECULAR IMPRINTED SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION FOR DETERMINATION OF ATRAZINE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Koohpaei ، S. J. Shahtaheri ، M. R. Ganjali ، A. Rahimi Forushani

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Solid phase extraction is one of the major applications of molecularly imprinted polymers fields for clean-up of environmental and biological samples namely molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction. In this study, solid phase extraction using the imprinted polymer has been optimized with the experimental design approach for a triazine herbicide, named atrazine with regard to the critical factors which influence the molecular imprinted solid phase extraction efficiency such as sample pH, concentration, flow-rate, volume, elution solvent, washing solvent and sorbent mass. Optimization methods that involve changing one factor at a time can be laborious. A novel approach for the optimization of imprinted solid-phase extraction using chemometrics is described. The factors were evaluated statistically and also validated with spiked water samples and showed a good reproducibility over six consecutive days as well as six within-day experiments. Also, in order to the evaluate efficiency of the optimized molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction protocols, enrichment capacity, reusability and cross-reactivity of cartridges have been also evaluated. Finally, selective molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of atrazine was successfully demonstrated with a recovery above 90% for spiked drinking water samples. It was concluded that the chemometrics is frequently employed for analytical method optimization and based on the obtained results, it is believed that the central composite design could prove beneficial for aiding the molecularly imprinted polymer and molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction development.

  9. The NYC native air sampling pilot project: using HVAC filter data for urban biological incident characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackelsberg, Joel; Leykam, Frederic M; Hazi, Yair; Madsen, Larry C; West, Todd H; Faltesek, Anthony; Henderson, Gavin D; Henderson, Christopher L; Leighton, Terrance

    2011-09-01

    Native air sampling (NAS) is distinguished from dedicated air sampling (DAS) devices (eg, BioWatch) that are deployed to detect aerosol disseminations of biological threat agents. NAS uses filter samples from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial properties for environmental sampling after DAS detection of biological threat agent incidents. It represents an untapped, scientifically sound, efficient, widely distributed, and comparably inexpensive resource for postevent environmental sampling. Calculations predict that postevent NAS would be more efficient than environmental surface sampling by orders of magnitude. HVAC filter samples could be collected from pre-identified surrounding NAS facilities to corroborate the DAS alarm and delineate the path taken by the bioaerosol plume. The New York City (NYC) Native Air Sampling Pilot Project explored whether native air sampling would be acceptable to private sector stakeholders and could be implemented successfully in NYC. Building trade associations facilitated outreach to and discussions with property owners and managers, who expedited contact with building managers of candidate NAS properties that they managed or owned. Nominal NAS building requirements were determined; procedures to identify and evaluate candidate NAS facilities were developed; data collection tools and other resources were designed and used to expedite candidate NAS building selection and evaluation in Manhattan; and exemplar environmental sampling playbooks for emergency responders were completed. In this sample, modern buildings with single or few corporate tenants were the best NAS candidate facilities. The Pilot Project successfully demonstrated that in one urban setting a native air sampling strategy could be implemented with effective public-private collaboration.

  10. Direct Trace Element Analysis of Liquid Blood Samples by In-Air Ion Beam Analytical Techniques (PIXE-PIGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszank, Robert; Csedreki, László; Török, Zsófia

    2017-02-07

    There are various liquid materials whose elemental composition is of interest in various fields of science and technology. In many cases, sample preparation or the extraction can be complicated, or it would destroy the original environment before the analysis (for example, in the case of biological samples). However, multielement direct analysis of liquid samples can be realized by an external PIXE-PIGE measurement system. Particle-induced X-ray and gamma-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE, PIGE) techniques were applied in external (in-air) microbeam configuration for the trace and main element determination of liquid samples. The direct analysis of standard solutions of several metal salts and human blood samples (whole blood, blood serum, blood plasma, and formed elements) was realized. From the blood samples, Na, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Br elemental concentrations were determined. The focused and scanned ion beam creates an opportunity to analyze very small volume samples (∼10 μL). As the sample matrix consists of light elements, the analysis is possible at ppm level. Using this external beam setup, it was found that it is possible to determine elemental composition of small-volume liquid samples routinely, while the liquid samples do not require any preparation processes, and thus, they can be analyzed directly. In the case of lower concentrations, the method is also suitable for the analysis (down to even ∼1 ppm level) but with less accuracy and longer measurement times.

  11. Comparison of stationary and personal air sampling with an air dispersion model for children’s ambient exposure to manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is ubiquitous in the environment and essential for normal growth and development, yet excessive exposure can lead to impairments in neurological function. This study modeled ambient Mn concentrations as an alternative to stationary and personal air sampling to asse...

  12. DNA extraction methods and multiple sampling to improve molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräunig, Patrícia; Portella, Luiza Pires; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Libardoni, Felipe; Sangioni, Luis Antonio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias

    2016-10-01

    Molecular detection of Sarcocystis spp. in tissue samples can be useful for experimental and diagnostic purposes. However, the parasite spreads unevenly through tissues, forming tissue cysts, and the cystic wall is an obstacle in DNA extraction protocols. Therefore, adequate sampling and effective disruption of the cysts are essential to improve the accuracy of DNA detection by PCR. The aims of this study were to evaluate the suitability of four protocols for DNA extraction from cysts of Sarcocystis spp. present in bovine myocardium samples or after their harvest in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution as well as determine the effects of single or multiple sampling on the accuracy of molecular diagnosis of sarcocystosis in cattle hearts. Cysts and myocardium samples from nine bovine hearts were randomly distributed to four DNA extraction protocols: kit, kit with modification, DNAzol, and cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Samples were submitted to DNA extraction and PCR as replicates of each heart (simplicate, duplicate, and triplicate), and the probability of a true positive diagnostic was calculated. Among the protocols tested, the kit with modification was determined to be the most suitable for DNA extraction from cysts in PBS solution (92.6 % of DNA detection by PCR); DNAzol resulted in higher DNA detection frequency from bovine myocardium samples (48.1 %). Multiple sampling improved the molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. infection in cattle hearts, increasing at 22.2 % the rate of true positive diagnostic.

  13. Simultaneous sampling and analysis of indoor air infested with Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) by solid phase microextraction, thin film microextraction and needle trap device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, In-Yong; Risticevic, Sanja; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-02-24

    Air in a room infested by Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) was sampled simultaneously by three different sampling devices including solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coatings, thin film microextraction (TFME) devices, and needle trap devices (NTDs) and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main focus of this study was to fully characterize indoor air by identifying compounds extracted by three different microextraction formats and, therefore, perform both the device comparison and more complete characterization of C. lectularius pheromone. The NTD technique was capable of extracting both (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal, which were previously identified as alarm pheromones of bedbugs, and superior NTD recoveries for these two components allowed reliable identification based on mass spectral library searching and linear temperature programmed retention index (LTPRI) technique. While the use of DVB/CAR/PDMS SPME fiber coatings provided complementary sample fingerprinting and profiling results, TFME sampling devices provided discriminative extraction coverage toward highly volatile analytes. In addition to two alarm pheromones, relative abundances of all other analytes were recorded for all three devices and aligned across all examined samples, namely, highly infested area, less infested area, and control samples which were characterized by different bedbug populations. The results presented in the current study illustrate comprehensive characterization of infested indoor air samples through the use of three different non-invasive SPME formats and identification of novel components comprising C. lectularius pheromone, therefore, promising future alternatives for use of potential synthetic pheromones for detection of infestations.

  14. Comparison of Different Extraction Approaches for Heavy Metal Partitioning in Sediment Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.B.ARAIN1,; T.G.KAZI; M.K.JAMALI; J.A.BAIG; H.I.AFRIDI; N.JALBANI; R.A.SARFRAZ

    2009-01-01

    Three extraction methods,ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE),microwave assisted extraction (MSE),and conven tional single extraction (CSE),in conjunction with the modified three-stage BCR sequential extraction procedure (SEP)were applied to examine the contents of Cd,Cu,Cr,Ni,Pb and Zn from lake sediment samples,to know whether these techniques can reduce extraction time and improve reproducibility.The SEP and developed alternative single extraction methods were validated by the analysis of certified reference material BCR 601.By the use of optimized sonication and microwave conditions,steps 1,2 and 3 of the BCR sequential extraction methods (excluding the hydrogen peroxide digestion in step 3,which was not performed with sonication and microwave) could be completed in 15-30 min and 60150 s,respectively.The recoveries of total extractable metal contents in BCR 601,obtained by three single extractions ranged from 93.3%-102%,88.9%-104% and 81.2%-96.2% for CSE,USE and MSE,respectively.The precision of the single extraction methods was found in the range of 3.7%-9.4% for all metals (n=6).

  15. Ice nucleation active particles in continental air samples over Mainz, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pummer, Bernhard G.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles are of central importance for atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate and public health. Some of these particles possess ice nucleation activity (INA), which is highly relevant for cloud formation and precipitation. In 2010, air filter samples were collected with a high-volume filter sampler separating fine and coarse particles (aerodynamic cut-off diameter 3 μm) in Mainz, Germany. In this study, the INA of the atmospheric particles deposited on these filters was determined. Therefore,they were extracted with ultrapure water, which was then measured in a droplet freezing assay, as described in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2015). The determined concentration of ice nucleators (INs) was between 0.3 and 2per m³ at 266 K, and between5 and 75 per m³ at 260 K. The INs were further characterized by different treatments, like heating (308 K, 371 K), filtration (0.1 μm, 300 kDa), and digestion with papain (10 mg/ml). We further investigated, which atmospheric conditions (e.g. weather) and distinguished events (e.g. dust storms, volcanic eruptions, and pollen peaks) influenced the number and nature of these INs. Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., Hill, T. C. J., Pummer, B. G., Yordanova, P., Franc, G. D., and Pöschl, U.: Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina, Biogeosci., 12, 1057-1071, doi:10.5194/bg-12-1057-2015, 2015.

  16. Direct Sampling and Analysis from Solid Phase Extraction Cards using an Automated Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walworth, Matthew J [ORNL; ElNaggar, Mariam S [ORNL; Stankovich, Joseph J [ORNL; WitkowskiII, Charles E. [Protein Discovery, Inc.; Norris, Jeremy L [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Direct liquid extraction based surface sampling, a technique previously demonstrated with continuous flow and autonomous pipette liquid microjunction surface sampling probes, has recently been implemented as the Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA) mode on the commercially available Advion NanoMate chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system. In the present paper, the LESA mode was applied to the analysis of 96-well format custom solid phase extraction (SPE) cards, with each well consisting of either a 1 or 2 mm diameter monolithic hydrophobic stationary phase. These substrate wells were conditioned, loaded with either single or multi-component aqueous mixtures, and read out using the LESA mode of a TriVersa NanoMate or a Nanomate 100 coupled to an ABI/Sciex 4000QTRAPTM hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer and a Thermo LTQ XL linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Extraction conditions, including extraction/nanoESI solvent composition, volume, and dwell times, were optimized in the analysis of targeted compounds. Limit of detection and quantitation as well as analysis reproducibility figures of merit were measured. Calibration data was obtained for propranolol using a deuterated internal standard which demonstrated linearity and reproducibility. A 10x increase in signal and cleanup of micromolar Angiotensin II from a concentrated salt solution was demonstrated. Additionally, a multicomponent herbicide mixture at ppb concentration levels was analyzed using MS3 spectra for compound identification in the presence of isobaric interferences.

  17. Liquid Phase Micro-Extraction of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Anionic Surfactants in Aqueous Samples

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether as solvent for the supported liquid membrane (SLM). Effects of extraction time, acceptor buffer concentration, stirring speed, sample volume, NaCl and humic acids were studied. At 10–50 μg L−1 linear R2-coefficients were 0.99 for C10 and ...

  18. Herbal Extract Incorporated Nanofiber Fabricated by an Electrospinning Technique and its Application to Antimicrobial Air Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongan; Yang, Byeong Joon; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-18

    Recently, with the increased attention to indoor air quality, antimicrobial air filtration techniques have been studied widely to inactivate hazardous airborne microorganisms effectively. In this study, we demonstrate herbal extract incorporated (HEI) nanofibers synthesized by an electrospinning technique and their application to antimicrobial air filtration. As an antimicrobial herbal material, an ethanolic extract of Sophora flavescens, which exhibits great antibacterial activity against pathogens, was mixed with the polymer solution for the electrospinning process. We measured various characteristics of the synthesized HEI nanofibers, such as fiber morphology, fiber size distribution, and thermal stability. For application of the electrospun HEI nanofibers, we made highly effective air filters with 99.99% filtration efficiency and 99.98% antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis. The pressure drop across the HEI nanofiber air filter was 4.75 mmH2O at a face air velocity of 1.79 cm/s. These results will facilitate the implementation of electrospun HEI nanofiber techniques to control air quality and protect against hazardous airborne microorganisms.

  19. Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS) and its application to analysis of Δ17O(CO2) from small air samples collected with an AirCore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janina Mrozek, Dorota; van der Veen, Carina; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present the set-up and a scientific application of the Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS), a device to collect and to store the vertical profile of air collected with an AirCore (Karion et al., 2010) in numerous sub-samples for later analysis in the laboratory. The SAS described here is a 20 m long 1/4 inch stainless steel tubing that is separated by eleven valves to divide the tubing into 10 identical segments, but it can be easily adapted to collect smaller or larger samples. In the collection phase the SAS is directly connected to the outlet of an optical analyzer that measures the mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and CO from an AirCore sampler. The stratospheric part (or if desired any part of the AirCore air) is then directed through the SAS. When the SAS is filled with the selected air, the valves are closed and the vertical profile is maintained in the different segments of the SAS. The segments can later be analysed to retrieve vertical profiles of other trace gas signatures that require slower instrumentation. As an application, we describe the coupling of the SAS to an analytical system to determine the 17O excess of CO2, which is a tracer for photochemical processing of stratospheric air. For this purpose the analytical system described by Mrozek et al. (2015) was adapted for analysis of air directly from the SAS. The performance of the coupled system is demonstrated for a set of air samples from an AirCore flight in November 2014 near Sodankylä, Finland. The standard error for a 25 mL air sample at stratospheric CO2 mole fraction is 0.56 ‰ (1σ) for δ17O and 0.03 ‰ (1σ) for both δ18O and δ13C. Measured Δ17O(CO2) values show a clear correlation with N2O in agreement with already published data.

  20. Pre-concentration of uranium from water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Nemch, Tabandeh Karimi [Zabol Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple and rapid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for the determination of uranium in water samples prior to high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used as complexing agent. The effect of various parameters on the extraction step including type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, pH of solution, concentration of PAN, extraction time, sample volume and ionic strength were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) and preconcentration factor were 0.3 μg L{sup -1} and 194, respectively. Furthermore, the relative standard deviation of the ten replicate was <2.6%. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of uranium in the water samples.

  1. A salting out and resin procedure for extracting Schistosoma mansoni DNA from human urine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Nilton B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a simple and cheap salting out and resin (InstaGene matrix® resin - BioRad DNA extraction method from urine for PCR assays is introduced. The DNA of the fluke Schistosoma mansoni was chosen as the target since schistosomiasis lacks a suitable diagnostic tool which is sensitive enough to detect low worm burden. It is well known that the PCR technique provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA. Therefore it is of paramount importance to take advantage of its excellent performance by providing a simple to handle and reliable DNA extraction procedure, which permits the diagnosis of the disease in easily obtainable urine samples. Findings The description of the extraction procedure is given. This extraction procedure was tested for reproducibility and efficiency in artificially contaminated human urine samples. The reproducibility reached 100%, showing positive results in 5 assay repetitions of 5 tested samples each containing 20 ng DNA/5 ml. The efficiency of the extraction procedure was also evaluated in a serial dilution of the original 20 ng DNA/5 ml sample. Detectable DNA was extracted when it was at a concentration of 1.28 pg DNA/mL, revealing the high efficiency of this procedure. Conclusions This methodology represents a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnosis utilizing a bio-molecular technique in urine samples which is now ready to be tested under field conditions and may be applicable to the diagnosis of other parasitic diseases.

  2. A Centrifuge-Based Technique for Dry Extraction of Air for Ice Core Studies of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, A. M.; Brook, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution CO2 data from the Law Dome ice core document an abrupt ~10 ppm drop in CO2 at about 1600 AD (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res Lett., v. 33, L14810), which has been attributed to changes in human activities. CO2 measurements in ice cores are difficult, however, making verification of this feature an important task. We are undertaking a high-resolution study of CO2 between 1400 and 1800 AD in the WAIS Divide (Antarctica) ice core with a new dry extraction technique. The need for a dry extraction technique as opposed to a melt-refreeze technique in studies of CO2 from ice cores arises because of the well-documented artifacts in CO2 imposed by the presence of liquid water. Three dry-extraction methods have been employed by previous workers to measure CO2: needle-crushing method, ball-bearings method, and cheese-grater method (B. Stauffer, in: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, p. 1181, Elsevier 2007). Each has limitations, and we propose a simpler dry extraction technique, based on a large-capacity refrigerated centrifuge (the "centrifuge technique"), which eliminates the need to employ cryogenic temperatures to collect extracted gas and is more compatible with high sample throughput. The technique is now being tested on ~25-gram WAIS Divide samples in conjunction with CO2 measurements with a gas chromatograph. The technique employs a Beckman J- 6B centrifuge, in which evacuated stainless steel flask is placed: the flask has a weight inside positioned directly over a tall-standing piece of ice whose cross-section is small compared to that of the flask. Upon acceleration to 3000 rpm the weight moves down and presses the ice sample into a thin tablet covering flask's bottom, yielding the air extraction efficiency of ~80%. Preliminary tests suggest that precision and accuracy can be achieved at the level of ~1 ppm once the system is fine-tuned.

  3. Report on sampling and analysis of ambient air at the central waste complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    Over 160 ambient indoor air samples were collected from warehouses at the Central Waste Complex used for the storage of low- level radioactive and mixed wastes. These grab (SUMMA) samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a modified EPA TO-14 procedure. The data from this survey suggest that several buildings had elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds.

  4. Efficient and scalable serial extraction of DNA and RNA from frozen tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathot, Lucy; Lindman, Monica; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2011-01-07

    Advances in cancer genomics have created a demand for scalable sample processing. We here present a process for serial extraction of nucleic acids from the same frozen tissue sample based on magnetic silica particles. The process is automation friendly with high recoveries of pure DNA and RNA suitable for analysis.

  5. Application of hollow cylindrical wheat stem for electromembrane extraction of thorium in water samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Barkhordar, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1......, an enrichment factor of 50 and a limit of detection of 0.29 ng mL1 was obtained for thorium. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of thorium in water samples and in reference material....

  6. Blue Chitin columns for the extraction of heterocyclic amines from urine samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, J.; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Skog, K.

    2004-01-01

    During normal cooking of meat, a class of mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds called heterocyclic amines is formed. Heterocyclic amines are rapidly absorbed and metabolised in the human body, and for estimation of the intake of heterocyclic amines, it is useful to determinate their levels in the urine....... Blue Chitin columns were used for the extraction and purification of heterocyclic amines from urine samples spiked with 14 different heterocyclic amines. The samples were analysed using LC-MS. The results show that Blue Chitin columns provide a straightforward and rapid means of extracting heterocyclic...... amines from urine samples, and that Blue Chitin column are also useful in the purification of urinary metabolites....

  7. EXTRACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have the...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/....

  8. Extraction and enrichment of natural pigments from solid samples using ionic liquids and chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Jing; Li, Qin; Cao, Jun; Warner, Elisa; An, Mingrui; Tan, Zhijing; Wang, Shu-Ling; Peng, Li-Qing; Liu, Xun-Gao

    2016-09-09

    A green and economical method for the extraction and preconcentration of natural pigments (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin) was developed using ultrasound-assisted extraction combined with dispersive micro solid-phase extraction. In this work, Ionic liquids (ILs) were used for the pre-extraction of natural pigments. The pure chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) were then used as a sorbent for the microextraction mode. The method involves the use of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Operating parameters influencing the performance of extraction steps such as type and concentration of ILs, concentration of CS NPs, type of elution solvent, agitation time and pH of sample-extracting solution were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method exhibited a low detection limit in the range of 0.11-0.36ng/mL at S/N=3, and good linearities with coefficients of determination (R(2)) higher than 0.9990. The recoveries of turmeric samples were ranging from 90.45% to 105.04% for the three studied curcuminoids with SD of 3.27-6.58. The experimental results indicated that the ILs and CS NPs were the promising materials for the extraction and enrichment of target curcuminoids from complex solid samples.

  9. Determination of fluorine contents in plant samples by means of facilitated extraction with enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Yoon, Hye-On

    2015-01-01

    In this study, facilitated extraction with enzyme was employed for the first time to extract fluorine (F) from plants. Feasibility of the proposed method for F analysis was assessed by comparing with the alkali fusion-ion selective electrode (ISE) method. In the extraction procedure, 30 mg of a protease and 0.1 g of a plant sample were added in 10 mL of deionized water. In the absence of sonication, the solution was mechanically shaken for 10 s. A variety of parameters (i.e., the amounts of enzymes used, physical treatment conditions applied, extraction time, temperature, and pH) were optimized to enhance the extraction efficiency of the proposed method. The suitability of the proposed method for various plant samples (i.e., grass, perilla, peanut, hot pepper, and eggplant) was also evaluated. The proposed method involves decreased operation time, simplified extraction procedures, and minimal consumption of hazardous reagents and solvents in comparison with other existing methods. Experimental results demonstrated that facilitated extraction with enzyme is appropriate for the rapid determination of F content in plant samples.

  10. Determination of persistent organic pollutants in solid environmental samples using accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluid extraction. Exhaustive extraction and sorption/desorption studies of PCBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerklund, E.

    1998-10-01

    Human activity is constantly causing environmental problems due to production and release of numerous chemicals. A group of compounds of special concern is persistent organic pollutants (POP). These toxic, lipophilic chemicals have a high chemical and biological stability, and tend to accumulate in the lipid phase of living organisms. A major sink for POPs are sediments, and consequently these are important for the distribution of POPs in the aquatic environment. Traditionally, determination of POPs relay on exhaustive extraction using liquid extraction techniques (e.g. Soxhlet extraction developed in the late 19th century) followed by gas chromatographic analysis. Since liquid-solid extraction normally requires large volumes of organic solvents in combination with long extraction times and extract clean-up, there has been an increasing demand for improved technology. This should result in reduced organic solvent consumption and sample preparation time, at the same time improving the environment and cutting costs for POP monitoring. In this thesis two modern techniques with capability of fulfilling at least one of these goals have been investigated: (1) Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE), and (2) Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE). Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were chosen as model compounds in all experiments performed on environmental matrices, since they cover a relatively large range of physiochemical parameters. Important parameters influencing the overall extraction efficiency in ASE and SFE, are discussed and illustrated for a large number of sediments. It was demonstrated that, by careful consideration of the experimental parameters, both techniques are capable of replacing old methods such as Soxhlet extraction. ASE is somewhat faster than SFE, but the extracts generated in SFE are much cleaner and can be analyzed without sample clean-up. Consequently the overall sample preparation time may be substantially lower using SFE. However, ASE is important

  11. Ultra-trace determination of beryllium in occupational hygiene samples by ammonium bifluoride extraction and fluorescence detection using hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Kevin; Agrawal, Anoop; Cronin, John; Tonazzi, Juan; McCleskey, T Mark; Burrell, Anthony K; Ehler, Deborah S

    2007-02-19

    A highly sensitive molecular fluorescence method for measuring ultra-trace levels of beryllium has been previously described. The method entails extraction of beryllium workplace samples by 1% ammonium bifluoride (NH(4)HF(2), aqueous), followed by fluorescence detection using hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate (HBQS). In this work, modification of the existing procedure resulted in a significant improvement in detection power, thereby enabling ultra-trace determination of beryllium in air filter and surface wipe samples. Such low detection limits may be necessary in view of expected decreases in applicable occupational exposure limits (OELs) for beryllium. Attributes of the modified NH(4)HF(2) extraction/HBQS fluorescence method include method detection limits (MDLs) of <0.8 ng to approximately 2 ng Be per sample (depending on the fluorometer used), quantitative recoveries from beryllium oxide, a dynamic range of several orders of magnitude, and freedom from interferences. Other key advantages of the technique are field portability, relatively low cost, and high sample throughput. The method performance compares favorably with that of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

  12. Ultra-trace determination of beryllium in occupational hygiene samples by ammonium bifluoride extraction and fluorescence detection using hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Kevin [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, M.S. R-7, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1998 (United States)]. E-mail: kashley@cdc.gov; Agrawal, Anoop [Berylliant, Inc., 4541 E. Fort Lowell Road, Tucson, AZ 85712 (United States); Cronin, John [Berylliant, Inc., 4541 E. Fort Lowell Road, Tucson, AZ 85712 (United States); Tonazzi, Juan [Berylliant, Inc., 4541 E. Fort Lowell Road, Tucson, AZ 85712 (United States); McCleskey, T. Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Burrell, Anthony K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ehler, Deborah S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-02-19

    A highly sensitive molecular fluorescence method for measuring ultra-trace levels of beryllium has been previously described. The method entails extraction of beryllium workplace samples by 1% ammonium bifluoride (NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2}, aqueous), followed by fluorescence detection using hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate (HBQS). In this work, modification of the existing procedure resulted in a significant improvement in detection power, thereby enabling ultra-trace determination of beryllium in air filter and surface wipe samples. Such low detection limits may be necessary in view of expected decreases in applicable occupational exposure limits (OELs) for beryllium. Attributes of the modified NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2} extraction/HBQS fluorescence method include method detection limits (MDLs) of <0.8 ng to {approx}2 ng Be per sample (depending on the fluorometer used), quantitative recoveries from beryllium oxide, a dynamic range of several orders of magnitude, and freedom from interferences. Other key advantages of the technique are field portability, relatively low cost, and high sample throughput. The method performance compares favorably with that of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

  13. Comparison of Soxhlet and Shake Extraction of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Coal Tar Polluted Soils Sampled in the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Bo; Holst, Helle; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    This study compares three extraction methods for PAHs in coal tar polluted soil: 3-times repeated shaking of the soil with dichloromethane-methanol (1:1), Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane, and Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane followed by Soxhlet extraction with methanol....... The extraction efficiencies were determined for ten selected PAHs in triplicate samples of six soils sampled at former gasworks sites. The samples covered a wide range of PAH concentrations, from 0.6 to 397 mg/kg soil. Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane followed by Soxhlet extraction with methanol...

  14. Pesticide detection in air samples from contrasted houses and in their inhabitants' hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeppel, Caroline; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Millet, Maurice; Appenzeller, Brice M R

    2016-02-15

    In order to identify associations between indoor air contamination and human exposure to pesticides, hair samples from 14 persons (9 adults and 5 children below 12 years) were collected simultaneously with the air of their 5 contrasted houses. Three houses were situated in Alsace (France), one in Lorraine (France) and one in Luxembourg (Luxembourg). Houses were located in urban (n=3), semi-urban (n=1) and rural areas (n=1). Twenty five (25) pesticides were detected at least once in indoor air samples and 20 pesticides were detected at least once in hair samples. The comparison between hair and air samples for the same sampling periods shows that pesticides detected in the two matrices were not necessarily associated. Exposure profiles varied from one home to another but also between inhabitants of the same home, suggesting that exposure can be different between inhabitants of the same home. This study demonstrated the usefulness and the complementarity of hair analysis, for the personalized biomonitoring of people exposure to pesticides, and air analysis, for the identification of airborne exposure and house contamination.

  15. Air sampling for hepatitis B surface antigen in a dental operatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, N J; Bond, W W; Favero, M S

    1979-09-01

    Forty samples of air with a mean sample volume of 104 liters were collected during the treatment of patients whose blood was positive for HBsAG: no samples contained HBsAG and occult blood. These findings suggest that, if environmentally mediated transmission of hepatitis B occurs in the dental operatory, it is more likely to occur through contact with contaminated surfaces than through the airborne route.

  16. Determination of melamine in aquaculture feed samples based on molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ziru; Liang, Zhenlin; Wang, Jiangtao

    2015-10-01

    This research highlights the application of highly efficient molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration and analysis of melamine in aquaculture feed samples. Melamine-imprinted polymers were synthesized employing methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as functional monomer and cross-linker, respectively. The characteristics of obtained polymers were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and binding experiments. The imprinted polymers showed an excellent adsorption ability for melamine and were applied as special solid-phase extraction sorbents for the selective cleanup of melamine. An off-line molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was developed for the separation and enrichment of melamine from aquaculture feed samples prior to high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Optimum molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction conditions led to recoveries of the target in spiked feed samples in the range 84.6-96.6% and the relative standard deviation less than 3.38% (n = 3). The aquaculture feed sample was determined, and there was no melamine found. The results showed that the molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction protocols permitted the sensitive, uncomplicated and inexpensive separation and pre-treatment of melamine in aquaculture feed samples.

  17. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schindler@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-15

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO{sub 2} and reduced to graphite to determine {sup 14}C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  18. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  19. Determination of metals in air samples using X-Ray fluorescence associated the APDC preconcentration technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardes, Raysa C.; Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis A.C.R.A.; Gama Filho, Hamilton S.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: rc.nardes@gmail.com, E-mail: ramonziosp@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: francissanches@gmail.com, E-mail: hamiltongamafilho@hotmail.com, E-mail: davi.oliveira@uerj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica

    2015-07-01

    Air pollution has become one of the leading quality degradation factors of life for people in large urban centers. Studies indicate that the suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere is directly associated with risks to public health, in addition, it can cause damage to fauna, flora and public / cultural patrimonies. The inhalable particulate materials can cause the emergence and / or worsening of chronic diseases related to respiratory system and other diseases, such as reduced physical strength. In this study, we propose a new method to measure the concentration of total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in the air using an impinger as an air cleaning apparatus, preconcentration with APDC and Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique (TXRF) to analyze the heavy metals present in the air. The samples were collected from five random points in the city of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil. Analyses of TXRF were performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). The technique proved viable because it was able to detect five important metallic elements to environmental studies: Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. This technique presented substantial efficiency in determining the elementary concentration of air pollutants, in addition to low cost. It can be concluded that the metals analysis technique in air samples using an impinger as sample collection instrument associated with a complexing agent (APDC) was viable because it is a low-cost technique, moreover, it was possible the detection of five important metal elements in environmental studies associated with industrial emissions and urban traffic. (author)

  20. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria.

  1. Methodologies for the Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Environmental Samples: New Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Mahugo Santana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic derivatives are among the most important contaminants present in the environment. These compounds are used in several industrial processes to manufacture chemicals such as pesticides, explosives, drugs and dyes. They also are used in the bleaching process of paper manufacturing. Apart from these sources, phenolic compounds have substantial applications in agriculture as herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. However, phenolic compounds are not only generated by human activity, but they are also formed naturally, e.g., during the decomposition of leaves or wood. As a result of these applications, they are found in soils and sediments and this often leads to wastewater and ground water contamination. Owing to their high toxicity and persistence in the environment, both, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA and the European Union have included some of them in their lists of priority pollutants. Current standard methods of phenolic compounds analysis in water samples are based on liquid–liquid extraction (LLE while Soxhlet extraction is the most used technique for isolating phenols from solid matrices. However, these techniques require extensive cleanup procedures that are time-intensive and involve expensive and hazardous organic solvents, which are undesirable for health and disposal reasons. In the last years, the use of news methodologies such as solid-phase extraction (SPE and solid-phase microextraction (SPME have increased for the extraction of phenolic compounds from liquid samples. In the case of solid samples, microwave assisted extraction (MAE is demonstrated to be an efficient technique for the extraction of these compounds. In this work we review the developed methods in the extraction and determination of phenolic derivatives in different types of environmental matrices such as water, sediments and soils. Moreover, we present the new approach in the use of micellar media coupled with SPME process for the

  2. Ultimate detectability of volatile organic compounds: how much further can we reduce their ambient air sample volumes for analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2012-10-02

    To understand the ultimately lowest detection range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air, application of a high sensitivity analytical system was investigated by coupling thermal desorption (TD) technique with gas chromatography (GC) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The performance of the TD-GC/TOF MS system was evaluated using liquid standards of 19 target VOCs prepared in the range of 35 pg to 2.79 ng per μL. Studies were carried out using both total ion chromatogram (TIC) and extracted ion chromatogram (EIC) mode. EIC mode was used for calibration to reduce background and to improve signal-to-noise. The detectability of 19 target VOCs, if assessed in terms of method detection limit (MDL, per US EPA definition) and limit of detection (LOD), averaged 5.90 pg and 0.122 pg, respectively, with the mean coefficient of correlation (R(2)) of 0.9975. The minimum quantifiable mass of target analytes, when determined using real air samples by the TD-GC/TOF MS, is highly comparable to the detection limits determined experimentally by standard. In fact, volumes for the actual detection of the major aromatic VOCs like benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) in ambient air samples were as low as 1.0 mL in the 0.11-2.25 ppb range. It was thus possible to demonstrate that most target compounds including those in low abundance could be reliably quantified at concentrations down to 0.1 ppb at sample volumes of less than 10 mL. The unique sensitivity of this advanced analytical system can ultimately lead to a shift in field sampling strategy with smaller air sample volumes facilitating faster, simpler air sampling (e.g., use of gas syringes rather than the relative complexity of pumps or bags/canisters), with greatly reduced risk of analyte breakthrough and minimal interference, e.g., from atmospheric humidity. The improved detection limits offered by this system can also enhance accuracy and measurement precision.

  3. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239,240Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially...... designed extraction column. Plutonium in the fractions from the sequential extraction was separated by ion exchange chromatography and measured using alpha spectrometry. The analytical results show a higher mobility of plutonium in bio-shielding concrete, which means attention should be paid...

  4. Limitations and recommendations for successful DNA extraction from forensic soil samples: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer M; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Soil is commonly used in forensic casework to provide discriminatory power to link a suspect to a crime scene. Standard analyses examine the intrinsic properties of soils, including mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour; however, soils can also support a vast amount of organisms, which can be examined using DNA fingerprinting techniques. Many previous genetic analyses have relied on patterns of fragment length variation produced by amplification of unidentified taxa in the soil extract. In contrast, the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies now provides the ability to generate a detailed picture of soil microbial communities and the taxa present, allowing for improved discrimination between samples. However, DNA must be efficiently extracted from the complex soil matrix to achieve accurate and reproducible DNA sequencing results, and extraction efficacy is highly dependent on the soil type and method used. As a result, a consideration of soil properties is important when estimating the likelihood of successful DNA extraction. This would include a basic understanding of soil components, their interactions with DNA molecules and the factors that affect such interactions. This review highlights some important considerations required prior to DNA extraction and discusses the use of common chemical reagents in soil DNA extraction protocols to achieve maximum efficacy. Together, the information presented here is designed to facilitate informed decisions about the most appropriate sampling and extraction methodology, relevant both to the soil type and the details of a specific forensic case, to ensure sufficient DNA yield and enable successful analysis.

  5. New device for direct extraction of volatiles in solid samples using SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J; Ventanas, J; Cava, R

    2001-11-01

    A new device that allows extraction of volatiles from solid materials by SPME, avoiding preparation of the sample, was designed and tested in two different food products. Volatiles from dry-cured ham and canned liver sausage were analyzed by headspace SPME (HS SPME) and by using a new device that protects the SPME fiber in the core of the solid material. Volatile profiles generated by using both methods of extraction were very similar in both products. Compounds that have been previously highlighted as quality markers, such as products from oxidative degradation of lipids, products from Strecker degradation of amino acids, or terpenes, were satisfactorily extracted by SPME coupled to the device for direct extraction. In addition, by using this method no laboratory contaminants were extracted, whereas some major laboratory solvents were presented in the chromatogram using the HS SPME method. However, coefficients of variation were higher when performing the direct sampling procedure. This new device appears to have potential as a simple method for extracting volatiles in solid materials while at the same time avoiding taking samples.

  6. COMPARISONS OF SOXHLET EXTRACTION, PRESSURIZED LIQUID EXTRACTION, SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION, AND SUBCRITICAL WATER EXTRACTION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SOLIDS: RECOVERY, SELECTIVITY, AND EFFECTS ON SAMPLE MATRIX. (R825394)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extractions of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site were performed with a Soxhlet apparatus (18 h), by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) (50 min at 100°C), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) (1 h at 150°...

  7. Fluorometric quantification of polyphosphate in environmental plankton samples: extraction protocols, matrix effects, and nucleic acid interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2013-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a ubiquitous biochemical with many cellular functions and comprises an important environmental phosphorus pool. However, methodological challenges have hampered routine quantification of polyP in environmental samples. We tested 15 protocols to extract inorganic polyphosphate from natural marine samples and cultured cyanobacteria for fluorometric quantification with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without prior purification. A combination of brief boiling and digestion with proteinase K was superior to all other protocols, including other enzymatic digestions and neutral or alkaline leaches. However, three successive extractions were required to extract all polyP. Standard addition revealed matrix effects that differed between sample types, causing polyP to be over- or underestimated by up to 50% in the samples tested here. Although previous studies judged that the presence of DNA would not complicate fluorometric quantification of polyP with DAPI, we show that RNA can cause significant interference at the wavelengths used to measure polyP. Importantly, treating samples with DNase and RNase before proteinase K digestion reduced fluorescence by up to 57%. We measured particulate polyP along a North Pacific coastal-to-open ocean transect and show that particulate polyP concentrations increased toward the open ocean. While our final method is optimized for marine particulate matter, different environmental sample types may need to be assessed for matrix effects, extraction efficiency, and nucleic acid interference.

  8. Application of hollow cylindrical wheat stem for electromembrane extraction of thorium in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Barkhordar, Afsaneh; Bohlooli, Mousa

    2015-02-25

    In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1-octanol and 5%v/v Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEHP) immobilized in the pores of a porous stem, and into an acceptor phase solution present inside the lumen of the stem. The pH of donor and acceptor phases, extraction time, voltage, and stirring speed were optimized. At the optimum conditions, an enrichment factor of 50 and a limit of detection of 0.29 ng mL(-1) was obtained for thorium. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of thorium in water samples and in reference material.

  9. Supercritical fluid extraction of polyhalogenated pollutants from aquaculture and marine environmental samples: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Diego; Carro-Díaz, Antonia María; Lorenzo-Ferreira, Rosa Antonia

    2008-05-01

    This article focuses on the state-of-the-art in sample preparation using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), to monitor the content of polyhalogenated pollutants in aquaculture and marine environmental samples. Marine sediments and biological applications, including several types of samples matrices (fish, shellfish, seaweed and fish feed) and analyte groups (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD)/Fs and organochlorinated pesticide (OCPs)) are discussed with respect to SFE use and optimisation of conditions. We also discuss the great analytical potential of SFE, the integration of the extraction and clean-up steps for rapid sample processing justifying its use for routine work. The most recent SFE applications to the determination of these pollutants in marine environmental (biota and sediment) samples, published in the last 15 years, are reviewed.

  10. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling.

  11. Simultaneous separation of ergot alkaloids by capillary electrophoresis after cloud point extraction from cereal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Emiliano; Wang, Chien C; Fernández, Liliana P; Gomez, María R

    2015-01-01

    A new and sensitive analytical methodology for ergot alkaloids (EA) determination from cereal samples based on cloud point extraction (CPE) prior to CE-UV absorbance was developed. The methodology involves extraction under acid conditions and subsequent preconcentration by applying a simple, rapid and environmentally friendly low volume surfactant extraction procedure. After extraction, CE analysis was carried out by performing dilutions on preconcentrated surfactant rich phase, achieving a single peak or simultaneous alkaloids determination. A real preconcentration factor of 22 of total EA was obtained, demonstrating the efficiency of this methodology. The limits of detection were 2.6 and 2.2 μg/kg for ergotamine and ergonovine, respectively. Validation procedure revealed suitable linearity, accuracy and precision. The average extraction and clean-up recoveries were compared with the theoretical values and were better than 92%. This method was successfully applied to the determination of EA in different varieties of commercial flour samples, two grain samples and one of the leading brands cereal-based product for infant feeding. The high sensitivity achieved for EA determinations in real samples suggests CPE procedure as an interesting approach to improve CE-UV visible detection limits. Moreover, the whole process could be considered as a contribution to green chemistry because nonorganic solvents were involved, demonstrating its great potential over conventional techniques.

  12. Bioanalysis of dried saliva spot (DSS) samples using detergent-assisted sample extraction with UHPLC-MS/MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Naiyu; Zeng, Jianing; Ji, Qin C; Angeles, Aida; Aubry, Anne-Francoise; Basdeo, Shenita; Buzescu, Adela; Landry, Ishani Savant; Jariwala, Navin; Turley, Wesley; Burrell, Richard; Arnold, Mark E

    2016-08-31

    Dried saliva spot (DSS) sampling is a non-invasive sample collection technique for bioanalysis that can be potentially implemented at the patient's home. A UHPLC-MS/MS assay was developed using detergent-assisted sample extraction to quantify BMS-927711, a drug candidate in development for the treatment of migraines, in human DSS. By implementing DSS sampling at the patients' home, the bioanalytical sample collection for pharmacokinetic evaluation can be done at the time of the acute migraine attack without the need for clinical visits. DSS samples were prepared by spotting 15 μL of liquid saliva onto regular Whatman FTA™ DMPK-C cards and verified with a UV lamp (at λ 254 nm or 365 nm) during DSS punching. The 4-mm DSS punches in a 96-well plate were sonicated with 200 μL of [(13)C2, D4]-BMS-927711 internal standard (IS) solution in 20/80 MeOH/water for 10 min, followed by sonication with 50 μL of 100 mM NH4OAc with 1.0% Triton-X-100 (as detergent) prior to liquid-liquid extraction with 600 μL EtOAc/Hexane (90:10). UHPLC-MS/MS was performed with an Aquity(®) UPLC BEH C18 Column (2.1 × 50 mm, 1.7 μm) on a Triple Quad™ 5500 mass spectrometer. The assay was linear with a concentration range from 2.00 to 1000 ng mL(-1) for BMS-927711 in human saliva. The intra- and inter-assay precision was within 8.8% CV, and the accuracy was within ±6.7% Dev of the nominal concentration values. This UHPLC-MS/MS assay has been successfully applied to determine the drug's pharmacokinetics within a clinical study. For the first time, we observed BMS-927711 exposure in human DSS, confirming the suitability of this sampling technique for migraine patients to use at home. Detergent-assisted extraction with Triton-X-100 could be very useful in DSS or other dried matrix spot (DMS) assays to overcome low or inconsistent analyte recovery issues.

  13. Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A large research and development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes the ambient air sampling program for collection, analysis, and reporting of radioactive air contaminants in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Particulate matter and water vapor are sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These samples are collected every two weeks and then analyzed for tritium, and gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma ray radiation. The alpha, beta, and gamma measurements are used to detect unexpected radionuclide releases. Quarterly composites are analyzed for isotopes of uranium ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 239/249}Pu), and americium ({sup 241}Am). All of the data is stored in a relational database with hard copies as the official records. Data used to determine environmental concentrations are validated and verified before being used in any calculations. This evaluation demonstrates that the sampling and analysis process can detect tritium, uranium, plutonium, and americium at levels much less than one percent of the public dose limit of 10 millirems. The isotopic results also indicate that, except for tritium, off-site concentrations of radionuclides potentially released from LANL are similar to typical background measurements.

  14. Liquid Phase Micro-Extraction of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Anionic Surfactants in Aqueous Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Åke Jönsson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether as solvent for the supported liquid membrane (SLM. Effects of extraction time, acceptor buffer concentration, stirring speed, sample volume, NaCl and humic acids were studied. At 10–50 µg L−1 linear R2-coefficients were 0.99 for C10 and C11 and 0.96 for C12. RSD was typically ~15%. Three observations were especially made. Firstly, LPME for these analytes was unusually slow with maximum enrichment observed after 15–24 h (depending on sample volume. Secondly, the enrichment depended on LAS sample concentration with 35–150 times enrichment below ~150 µg L−1 and 1850–4400 times enrichment at 1 mg L−1. Thirdly, lower homologues were enriched more than higher homologues at low sample concentrations, with reversed conditions at higher concentrations. These observations may be due to the fact that LAS and the amine counter ion themselves influence the mass transfer at the water-SLM interface. The observations on LPME of LAS may aid in LPME application to other compounds with surfactant properties or in surfactant enhanced membrane extraction of other compounds.

  15. Liquid phase micro-extraction of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate anionic surfactants in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Niklas; Otrembska, Paulina; Villar, Mercedes; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-10-13

    Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether as solvent for the supported liquid membrane (SLM). Effects of extraction time, acceptor buffer concentration, stirring speed, sample volume, NaCl and humic acids were studied. At 10-50 µg L-1 linear R2-coefficients were 0.99 for C10 and C11 and 0.96 for C12. RSD was typically ~15%. Three observations were especially made. Firstly, LPME for these analytes was unusually slow with maximum enrichment observed after 15-24 h (depending on sample volume). Secondly, the enrichment depended on LAS sample concentration with 35-150 times enrichment below ~150 µg L-1 and 1850-4400 times enrichment at 1 mg L-1. Thirdly, lower homologues were enriched more than higher homologues at low sample concentrations, with reversed conditions at higher concentrations. These observations may be due to the fact that LAS and the amine counter ion themselves influence the mass transfer at the water-SLM interface. The observations on LPME of LAS may aid in LPME application to other compounds with surfactant properties or in surfactant enhanced membrane extraction of other compounds.

  16. Measurements of an ion beam diameter extracted into air through a large-bore metal capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Y.; Umigishi, M. [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women’s University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Ishii, K.; Ogawa, H. [Department of Physics, Nara Women’s University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    To extract an ion beam into air, the technique using a single macro-capillary has been paid attention. We have expanded the bore of the metal capillary up to 500 μm∅ inlet diameter to increase the beam intensity and have measured the intensity distributions of the extracted 3 MeV proton beam. Furthermore, we have tilted the capillary angle and measured the intensity distributions of the ion beam. In this article, we will present the experimental results together with the simulation which takes the tilt angles of the capillary into account.

  17. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples, however differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different...

  18. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-01-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six...

  19. Nonparametric feature extraction for classification of hyperspectral images with limited training samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianisarkaleh, Azadeh; Ghassemian, Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Feature extraction plays a crucial role in improvement of hyperspectral images classification. Nonparametric feature extraction methods show better performance compared to parametric ones when distribution of classes is non normal-like. Moreover, they can extract more features than parametric methods do. In this paper, a new nonparametric linear feature extraction method is introduced for classification of hyperspectral images. The proposed method has no free parameter and its novelty can be discussed in two parts. First, neighbor samples are specified by using Parzen window idea for determining local mean. Second, two new weighting functions are used. Samples close to class boundaries will have more weight in the between-class scatter matrix formation and samples close to class mean will have more weight in the within-class scatter matrix formation. The experimental results on three real hyperspectral data sets, Indian Pines, Salinas and Pavia University, demonstrate that the proposed method has better performance in comparison with some other nonparametric and parametric feature extraction methods.

  20. Extraction of pesticides in water samples using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunhong; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Jihua; Zhao, Ercheng; He, Min; Chen, Li; Yu, Pingzhong

    2010-09-10

    A simple solvent microextraction method termed vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) coupled with gas chromatography micro electron-capture detector (GC-microECD) has been developed and used for the pesticide residue analysis in water samples. In the VALLME method, aliquots of 30 microL toluene used as extraction solvent were directly injected into a 25 mL volumetric flask containing the water sample. The extraction solvent was dispersed into the water phase under vigorously shaking with the vortex. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed VALLME such as extraction solvent, vortex time, volumes of extraction solvent and salt addition were investigated. Under the optimum condition, enrichment factors (EFs) in a range of 835-1115 and limits of detection below 0.010 microg L(-1) were obtained for the determination of target pesticides in water. The calculated calibration curves provide high levels of linearity yielding correlation coefficients (r(2)) greater than 0.9958 with the concentration level ranged from 0.05 to 2.5 microg L(-1). Finally, the proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of pesticides from real water samples and acceptable recoveries over the range of 72-106.3% were obtained.

  1. THE STUDY OF BACTERIAL POPULATION IN AIR SAMPLES OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sarathi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The bacterial load in different air samples from environment of most hospitals remained undetermined. Any direct correlation between such bacterial load and the nosocomial infection are also lacking. Only higher bacterial load in air of a particular hospital environment may indicate higher risk of airborne cross infections. AIMS: The study is to determine the bacterial presence per unit volume of air, and the factors influencing the bioload. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The air samples were collected from different locations of our tertiary care hospital, during Jul 2011 to June 2012 with information like room space per patient, number of daily average visitors, system of air circulation and house-keeping quality. METHODS: A specific volume of air was impacted on a plastic strips containing nutrient agar by air sampler La200, Hi-Media. Following incubation for 24 hour bacterial colonies were counted and organisms were identified up to genus level. RESULTS: Mostly Gram positive cocci followed by Gram positive and a few Gram negative bacilli were detected. The highest bacterial load was found in general outdoor premises (2456 CFU/cm, followed by some extremely crowded general wards (573 CFU/cm. The lowest count of such was found in nursery area (94 CFU/cm, where special emphasis was given on cleanliness, room ventilation and visitor’s restriction. Similarly variations in bacterial loads were also noted in different times in a day and in different seasons in a year. The bioload in all tested samples were within permissible limits. CONCLUSIONS: By appropriate measures the aerobic bacterial load in hospital environment can be restricted within optimal level

  2. Extracting Point of Interest and Classifying Environment for Low Sampling Crowd Sensing Smartphone Sensor Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Billy Pik Lik; Hasala, Marakkalage Sumudu; Kadaba, Viswanath Sanjana; Thirunavukarasu, Balasubramaniam; Yuen, Chau; Yuen, Belinda; Nayak, Richi

    2017-01-01

    The advancement of smartphones with various type of sensors enabled us to harness diverse information with crowd sensing mobile application. However, traditional approaches have suffered drawbacks such as high battery consumption as a trade off to obtain high accuracy data using high sampling rate. To mitigate the battery consumption, we proposed low sampling point of interest (POI) extraction framework, which is built upon validation based stay points detection (VSPD) and sensor fusion based...

  3. Extreme 13C depletion of CCl2F2 in firn air samples from NEEM, Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderweg, A.T.; Holzinger, R.; Röckmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    A series of 12 high volume air samples collected from the S2 firn core during the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) 2009 campaign have been measured for mixing ratio and stable carbon isotope composition of the chlorofluorocarbon CFC- 12 (CCl2F2). While the mixing ratio measurements compare

  4. Development of a wireless air pollution sensor package for aerial-sampling of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  5. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon (C-14) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from w

  6. Automated Device for Asynchronous Extraction of RNA, DNA, or Protein Biomarkers from Surrogate Patient Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitting, Anna L; Bordelon, Hali; Baglia, Mark L; Davis, Keersten M; Creecy, Amy E; Short, Philip A; Albert, Laura E; Karhade, Aditya V; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Adams, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Many biomarker-based diagnostic methods are inhibited by nontarget molecules in patient samples, necessitating biomarker extraction before detection. We have developed a simple device that purifies RNA, DNA, or protein biomarkers from complex biological samples without robotics or fluid pumping. The device design is based on functionalized magnetic beads, which capture biomarkers and remove background biomolecules by magnetically transferring the beads through processing solutions arrayed within small-diameter tubing. The process was automated by wrapping the tubing around a disc-like cassette and rotating it past a magnet using a programmable motor. This device recovered biomarkers at ~80% of the operator-dependent extraction method published previously. The device was validated by extracting biomarkers from a panel of surrogate patient samples containing clinically relevant concentrations of (1) influenza A RNA in nasal swabs, (2) Escherichia coli DNA in urine, (3) Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum, and (4) Plasmodium falciparum protein and DNA in blood. The device successfully extracted each biomarker type from samples representing low levels of clinically relevant infectivity (i.e., 7.3 copies/µL of influenza A RNA, 405 copies/µL of E. coli DNA, 0.22 copies/µL of TB DNA, 167 copies/µL of malaria parasite DNA, and 2.7 pM of malaria parasite protein).

  7. Toxicological validation of a procedure for extracting organic micropollutants form water samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaal MA; Folkerts AJ; Kamp RE van de; Struijs J; ECO

    1999-01-01

    A procedure, developed to extract micropollutants from water samples into a concentrate that is suitable for the performance of aquatic toxicity tests, was toxicologically validated. Toxicity of known cocktail of toxicants concentrated to a level measurable in short-term toxicity tests was measured

  8. Liquid-solid extraction coupled with magnetic solid-phase extraction for determination of pyrethroid residues in vegetable samples by ultra fast liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunzhu; Sun, Ying; Yu, Xi; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yuanpeng; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2013-09-30

    In this study, liquid-solid extraction coupled with magnetic solid-phase extraction was successfully developed for the extraction of pyrethroid residues in vegetable samples. The analytes were determined by ultra fast liquid chromatography. The pyrethroids were extracted by liquid-solid extraction and then adsorbed onto magnetic adsorbent. Magnetic adsorbent, C18-functionalized ultrafine magnetic silica nanoparticles, was synthesized by chemical coprecipitation, silanization and alkylation. The analytes adsorbed onto the magnetic adsorbent can be simply and rapidly isolated from sample solution with a strong magnet on the bottom of the extraction vessel. The extraction parameters, such as liquid-solid extraction solvent, liquid-solid extraction time, the amount of magnetic adsorbent, magnetic solid-phase extraction time and magnetic solid-phase extraction desorption solvent, were optimized to improve the extraction efficiency. The analytical performances of this method, including linear range, detection limit, precision, and recovery were evaluated. The limits of detection for pyrethroid were between 0.63 and 1.2 ng g(-1). Recoveries obtained by analyzing the four spiked vegetable samples were between 76.0% and 99.5%. The results showed that the present method was a simple, accurate and high efficient approach for the determination of pyrethroids in the vegetable samples.

  9. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Zsofia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680 and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days, repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles, and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using

  10. Supercritical fluid extraction and gas chromatography or electroanalysis of metal chelates from different sample matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arancibia; Segura; Leiva; Contreras; Valderrama

    2000-01-01

    The supercritical fluid extraction of Pb(DDC)2 and MoO2(acac)2 complexes is performed. The previously formed complexes are used in order to simplify the extraction process. In the extraction cell, 9.0 mg of Pb(DDC)2 or 30.0 mg of MoO2(acac)2 is added. With these two complexes, a study of static and dynamic extraction as a function of pressure (1000-2500 psi), temperature (40-160 degrees C), and presence of modifier (methanol) is performed. Under the best conditions, 5.6 mg of Pb(DDC)2 (2.3 mg of Pb2+) is recovered. The parameters are 2500 psi of pressure, 160 degrees C of temperature, 0.5 mL methanol (placed in a 10-mL extraction cell), 60.0 min of static extraction, and 2.0 min of dynamic extraction. It is necessary to add 3.0 mL of methanol to enhance efficiency on the MoO2(acac)2 complex recovery. Quantitative extractions of MoO2(acac)2 (9.0 mg of MoVI) are obtained when the experiments are carried out under 1000-2500 psi of pressure, 140 degrees C, and times no longer than 10.0 min. Then, the study is carried out forming the in situ complexes. For this purpose, metallic ion and ligand are added. Under these conditions, the Pb2+ recovery decreases from 2.3 to 1.9 mg, and the MoVI recovery decreases from 9.0 to 1.0 mg. When 1.9 mg of Pb2+ and 1.0 mg of MoVI or less is placed in the extraction cell, the recoveries are always 100%. The Pb2+ extracts are directly accomplished using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID), and the MoVI extracts are analyzed using GC-FID and catalytic adsorption voltammetry. The quantitation of pure extracts is carried out by constructing calibration curves with complex solutions and sample solutions using the standard addition method. This method is applied by determination of Pb2+ in sodium alginate extracted from algae and blood, urine, and human milk from patients with diagnosed plumbunemy. MoVI is determined in irrigation water and pasture of animal intake.

  11. The effect of ultrasonic pretreatment and sample preparation on the extraction yield of antioxidant compounds and activity of black currant fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, Simona; Ghincevici, Daniela; Ketney, Otto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of an ultrasonic pretreatment at different amplitudes and extraction times, on the content of antioxidant compounds (phenolics, anthocyanins, ascorbic acid) and total antioxidant capacity of black currant fruits. Additionally, the influence of sample preparation (frozen storage/drying) was evaluated. Extraction was performed in 60% ethanol with 0.15% HCl at a solvent-to-sample ratio of 15/1. Our results show that the ultrasonic pretreatment proved particularly useful for the recovery of high amounts of total anthocyanins in freeze-dried samples, ascorbic acid in frozen and oven air-dried samples, and total antioxidant capacity in freeze-dried and oven air-dried samples. The total phenolics content was not significantly influenced by the ultrasonic pretreatment. Freeze-drying increased the content of targeted compounds, to a very high significant level (p Ultrasonication enhanced the extraction yield of black currant valuable compounds in strong relation to the operating conditions.

  12. Liquid Metering Centrifuge Sticks (LMCS): A Centrifugal Approach to Metering Known Sample Volumes for Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Clarke, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Phase separation is one of the most significant obstacles encountered during the development of analytical methods for water quality monitoring in spacecraft environments. Removing air bubbles from water samples prior to analysis is a routine task on earth; however, in the absence of gravity, this routine task becomes extremely difficult. This paper details the development and initial ground testing of liquid metering centrifuge sticks (LMCS), devices designed to collect and meter a known volume of bubble-free water in microgravity. The LMCS uses centrifugal force to eliminate entrapped air and reproducibly meter liquid sample volumes for analysis with Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE). C-SPE is a sorption-spectrophotometric platform that is being developed as a potential spacecraft water quality monitoring system. C-SPE utilizes solid phase extraction membranes impregnated with analyte-specific colorimetric reagents to concentrate and complex target analytes in spacecraft water samples. The mass of analyte extracted from the water sample is determined using diffuse reflectance (DR) data collected from the membrane surface and an analyte-specific calibration curve. The analyte concentration can then be calculated from the mass of extracted analyte and the volume of the sample analyzed. Previous flight experiments conducted in microgravity conditions aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft demonstrated that the inability to collect and meter a known volume of water using a syringe was a limiting factor in the accuracy of C-SPE measurements. Herein, results obtained from ground based C-SPE experiments using ionic silver as a test analyte and either the LMCS or syringes for sample metering are compared to evaluate the performance of the LMCS. These results indicate very good agreement between the two sample metering methods and clearly illustrate the potential of utilizing centrifugal forces to achieve phase separation and metering of water samples in microgravity.

  13. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

  14. A comparative evaluation of four DNA extraction protocols from whole blood sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaheri, M; Kahrizi, D; Yari, K; Babaie, A; Suthar, R S; Kazemi, E

    2016-03-31

    All organisms have Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) within their cells. DNA is a complex molecule that contains all of the information necessary to build and maintain an organism. DNA extraction is one of the most basic and essential techniques in the study of DNA that allow huge advances in molecular biology, biotechnology and bioinformatics laboratories. Whole blood samples are one of the main sources used to obtain DNA and there are many different protocols available in this issue. In current research, compared four DNA extraction protocols from blood samples; include modified phenol-chloroform protocol, two salting-out and enzyme free method and from commercial kit. The extracted DNAs by these protocols were analyzed according to their time demands, quality and quantity, toxicity and functionality in PCR method. Also the quality and quantity of the extracted DNA were surveyed by gel electrophoresis and Nanodrop spectrophotometry methods. It was observed that there are not significantly differences between these methods about DNA Purity (A260/A280), but the DNA yield (ng DNA/μl) of phenol/chloroform method was higher than other methods. In addition, phenol/chloroform was the most toxic method and it takes more time than other methods. Roche diagnostics GmbH kit was the most expensive among the four methods but the least extraction time was required and it was the safest method.

  15. Recyclable non-ligand dual cloud point extraction method for determination of lead in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Han, Juan; Liu, Yingying; Wang, Lei; Ni, Liang; Tang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    A new pH-mediated non-ligand dual cloud point extraction (NL-DCPE) was first developed for extraction Pb(II) from food samples. The NL-DCPE method includes two cloud point extraction (CPE) steps and the recycling of the copolymer. The first procedure was based on the forming of lead hydroxide at pH 9.5 and subsequent lead hydroxide was entrapped in a thermoseparating triblock copolymer [(PEO)10(PPO)23(PEO)10] (L44) phase. At second stage, the copolymer-rich phase was treated with the acidic solution, and Pb(II) was back extracted into the aqueous phase. So the problem emerging from the high viscosity of the copolymer-rich phase can be well solved. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction efficiency of 97.20% and detection limit of 1.9 μg L(-1) were obtained. Moreover, the copolymer L44 was successfully recycled and reused for more than two times. This method was successfully used for analyzing Pb(II) in food samples with satisfactory recoveries in the range of 94.01-101.19%.

  16. Micro-column solid phase extraction to determine uranium and thorium in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2008-08-01

    Extraction chromatographic separation techniques based on U/TEVA and TEVA resins were utilized to separate uranium and thorium isotopes in complex matrices from environmental samples. This approach has the advantages of ease of quantitative analysis, small sample size, an absence of mixed waste solvents, complete separation of U/Th isotopes, acceptable chemical yields and good energy resolution in the alpha spectrum. The procedure for analyzing alpha-emitting isotopes of uranium and thorium in geothermal water from Peito, Taiwan, is illustrated in detail. It involves sample pre-concentration, filtration and separation by highly selective extraction chromatographic resins, followed by electroplating and alpha-spectroscopy. The analytical results show a chemical recovery exceeding 55% for U and 65% for Th, respectively, under optimized conditions. The efficient and cost-effective use of recyclable columns makes the analytical methods simple, accurate, rapid, reliable and robust.

  17. Soyuz 22 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jams, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Three mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 22 because of concerns that new air pollutants were present in the air and these were getting into the water recovery system. The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer had been giving increasing readings of total organic carbon (TOC) in the potable water, and it was postulated that an increased load into the system was responsible. The toxicological assessment of 3 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown in Table 1. The recoveries of the 3 standards (as listed above) from the GSCs averaged 103, 95 and 76%, respectively. Recovery from formaldehyde control badges were 90 and 91%.

  18. A new CF-IRMS system for the quantification of the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide from ice cores and small air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new simultaneous analysis technique for stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from ice core samples and small air samples is presented, based on an on-line cryogenic vacuum extraction followed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS. The CO extraction system includes two multi-loop cryogenic cleanup traps, a chemical oxidant for oxidation to CO2, a cryogenic collection trap, a cryofocusing unit, purification by gas chromatography, and subsequent injection into a Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS. Analytical precision of 0.2‰(±1σ for δ13C and 0.6‰(±1σ for δ18O can be obtained for 100 mL (STP air sample with CO mixing ratio ranging from 60 to 140 ppbv (~268–625 pmol CO. Six South Pole ice core samples with depth ranging from 133 to 177 m are also processed for CO isotope analysis based on a wet extraction line attached to the above cryogenic vacuum system. This is the first report on measuring isotope ratios of CO in ice core samples.

  19. Sequential injection 90Sr determination in environmental samples using a wetting-film extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Manuel; Gómez, Enrique; Estela, José Manuel; Casas, Montserrat; Cerdà, Victor

    2002-02-15

    A sequential injection procedure involving a flow-reversal wetting-film extraction method for the determination of the radionuclide 90Sr has been developed. The methodology is based on the coating of the inner walls of an open tubular reactor with a film prepared from a 0.14 M 4,4'(5')-bis(tert-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (BCHC) solution in 1-octanol, which allows the selective isolation of strontium from the sample matrix. Selection of the optimum extractant diluent attending its physical properties, investigation of the extraction kinetics features, and choice of the proper elution procedure are discussed in detail in this paper. The noteworthy aspects of using a wetting-film phase instead of a solid-phase material described to date in the literature are the reduction of crown ether consumption and the simplification of both the operational sequence and the automation of the extractant-phase renewal between consecutive samples, which is of interest to avoid analyte carryover and reduction of the resin capacity factor caused by irreversible interferences. The proposed method has been successfully applied to different spiked environmental samples (water, milk, and soil), with 90Sr total activities ranging between 0.07 and 0.30 Bq, measured using a low-background proportional counter. The standard deviation of the automated analytical separation procedure is lower than 3% (n = 10), and the 90Sr isolation process under the studied conditions may be carried out with a yield up to 80%.

  20. Electromembrane extraction of tartrazine from food samples: Effects of nano-sorbents on membrane performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaripour, Saeid; Mohammadi, Ali; Nojavan, Saeed

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, for the first time electromembrane extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection was developed and validated for the determination of tartrazine in some food samples. The parameters influencing electromembrane extraction were evaluated and optimized. The membrane consists of 1-octanol immobilized in the pores of a hollow fiber. As a driving force, a 30 V electrical field was applied to make the analyte migrate from sample solution with pH 3, through the supported liquid membrane into an acceptor solution with pH 10. Best preconcentration (enrichment factor >21) was obtained in extraction duration of 15 min. Effects of some solid nano-sorbents like carbon nanotubes and molecularly imprinted polymers on membrane performance and electromembrane extraction efficiency were evaluated. The method provided the linearity in the range 25-1000 ng/mL for tartrazine (R(2) > 0.9996) with repeatability range (RSD) between 3.8 and 8.5% (n = 3). The limits of detection and quantitation were 7.5 and 25 ng/mL, respectively. Finally, the method was applied to the determination and quantification of tartrazine from some food samples with relative recoveries in the range between 90 and 98%.

  1. Determination of Technetium-99 in Environmental Samples by Solvent Extraction at Controlled Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of technetium and ruthenium are determined under different conditions with CCl4, cyclohexanone, and 5% tri-isooctylamine (TIOA)/xylene. A method for analyzing 99Tc in environmental samples has been developed by solvent extraction in which the valences of technetium...... are subsequently separated by solvent extraction with cyclohexanone and 5% TIOA/xylene. The decontamination of the procedure is 1.35 .cntdot. 105 for 103Ru and 1.66 .cntdot. 105 for 110mAg. The chemical yield of technetium-99 is 55%....

  2. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the

  3. Comparison of RNA extraction methods from biofilm samples of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    França Angela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial biofilms are communities of bacteria adhered to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric matrix. Biofilms have been associated with increased antibiotic resistance and tolerance to the immune system. Staphylococcus epidermidis is the major bacterial species found in biofilm-related infections on indwelling medical devices. Obtaining high quality mRNA from biofilms is crucial to validate the transcriptional measurements associated with the switching to the biofilm mode of growth. Therefore, we selected three commercially available RNA extraction kits with distinct characteristics, including those using silica membrane or organic extraction methods, and enzymatic or mechanical cell lysis, and evaluated the RNA quality obtained from two distinct S. epidermidis bacterial biofilms. Results RNA extracted using the different kits was evaluated for quantity, purity, integrity, and functionally. All kits were able to extract intact and functional total RNA from the biofilms generated from each S. epidermidis strain. The results demonstrated that the kit based on mechanical lysis and organic extraction (FastRNA® Pro Blue was the only one that was able to isolate pure and large quantities of RNA. Normalized expression of the icaA virulence gene showed that RNA extracted with PureLink™ had a significant lower concentration of icaA mRNA transcripts than the other kits tested. Conclusions When working with complex samples, such as biofilms, that contain a high content extracellular polysaccharide and proteins, special care should be taken when selecting the appropriate RNA extraction system, in order to obtain accurate, reproducible, and biologically significant results. Among the RNA extraction kits tested, FastRNA® Pro Blue was the best option for both S. epidermidis biofilms used.

  4. Trapping efficiency of 1,3-dichloropropene isomers by XAD-4 sorbent tubes for air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Pflaum, T.; Qin, R.

    2011-08-01

    Emission monitoring is necessary to evaluate the impact of air pollutants such as soil fumigants on the environment. Quantifying fumigant emissions often involves the use of air sampling tubes filled with sorbents to trap fumigants. 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) are being increasingly used in combination in soil fumigation since the phase-out of methyl bromide. Charcoal and XAD-4 resins are used for trapping 1,3-D and CP, respectively. If one sampling tube can trap both chemicals, the number of samples, the amount of work, and associated costs can be significantly reduced. The objective of this research was to determine the efficiency of XAD-4 sorbent tubes for trapping cis- and trans-1,3-D isomers as a function of flow rate (100-1000 ml min -1) and sampling time period (10-360 min). The results showed that XAD-4 could trap both 1,3-D isomers as efficiently as charcoal, but breakthrough occurred depending on the amount of sorbent materials in a tube, fumigant amount, flow rate and sampling time period. No significant breakthrough was observed from either small (120 mg) or large (600 mg) XAD-4 sorbent tubes over short sampling time periods (≤30 min) at any flow rate. Longer sampling period at low flow rates (100 ml min -1) resulted in ≥50% breakthrough from the small tubes during a 3 h sampling period; but no remarkable breakthrough from the large XAD-4 tubes up to 6 h sampling period when 3.0 mg 1,3-D isomers were tested. Field data showed agreement with laboratory tests. At high flow rates (1000 ml min -1), >40% breakthrough was observed from large XAD-4 sorbent tubes during 3 h trapping tests suggesting that short sampling time intervals are necessary to avoid potential breakthrough of fumigants from the sampling tubes.

  5. Removal of nitrogen compounds from Brazilian petroleum samples by oxidation followed by liquid-liquid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, L.; Pergher, S.B.C. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica], E-mail: pergher@uricer.edu.br; Oliveira, J.V. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia dos Alimentos; Souza, W.F. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2009-10-15

    This work reports liquid-liquid extraction of nitrogen compounds from oxidized and non-oxidized Brazilian petroleum samples. The experiments were accomplished in a laboratory-scale liquid-liquid apparatus in the temperature range of 303 K-323 K, using methanol, n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and N,Ndimethylformamide (DMF), and their mixtures as extraction solvents, employing solvent to sample volume ratios of 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1, exploring up to three separation stages. Results show that an increase in temperature, solvent to oil ratio, and number of equilibrium stages greatly improves the nitrogen removal from the oxidized sample (from 2600 to 200 ppm). The employed oxidation scheme is thus demonstrated to be an essential and efficient step of sample preparation for the selective liquid-liquid removal of nitrogen compounds. It is shown that the use of mixtures of DMF and NMP as well their use as co-solvents with methanol did not prove to be useful for selective nitrogen extraction since great oil losses were observed in the final process. (author)

  6. Influence of sampling filter type on the mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particulate extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R.; Truex, Timothy J.; Lee, Frank S. C.; Salmeen, Irving T.

    The effects of filter types on the mutagenicity and chemical characteristics of organic extracts of diesel engine particulate exhaust were studied by collecting exhaust particles in a dilution tube simultaneously on three different types of filters: Teflon membrane (Zefluor), Teflon impregnated glass fiber (Pallflex T60A20), and a quartz fiber (Pallflex 2500QAO). The particles were extracted with dichloromethane and subsequently with acetonitrile. The dichloromethane extracts were evaluated in the Salmonella reversion (Ames) assay using strains TA 98, TA 100 and TA 1538 and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. The filter loadings ranged from 0.3 to 0.7 mg cm -2, typical of loadings in studies of diesel engine particulate exhaust. No major differences in relative concentrations were observed in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, oxygenated or transition fractions for the three filter types. Furthermore, no differences in the mutagenicity of the samples could be detected.

  7. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H2O and BigBottle RAD-H2O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  8. Quantification of VX vapor in ambient air by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometric analysis of glass bead filled sampling tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald A; Smith, Wendy L; Nguyen, Nam-Phuong; Crouse, Kathy L; Crouse, Charles L; Norman, Steven D; Jakubowski, E Michael

    2011-02-15

    An analysis method has been developed for determining low parts-per-quadrillion by volume (ppqv) concentrations of nerve agent VX vapor actively sampled from ambient air. The method utilizes glass bead filled depot area air monitoring system (DAAMS) sampling tubes with isopropyl alcohol extraction and isotope dilution using liquid chromatography coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS) with positive ion electrospray ionization for quantitation. The dynamic range was from one-tenth of the worker population limit (WPL) to the short-term exposure limit (STEL) for a 24 L air sample taken over a 1 h period. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using liquid-spiked tubes, and the collection characteristics of the DAAMS tubes were assessed by collecting trace level vapor generated in a 1000 L continuous flow chamber. The method described here has significant improvements over currently employed thermal desorption techniques that utilize a silver fluoride pad during sampling to convert VX to a higher volatility G-analogue for gas chromatographic analysis. The benefits of this method are the ability to directly analyze VX with improved selectivity and sensitivity, the injection of a fraction of the extract, quantitation using an isotopically labeled internal standard, and a short instrument cycle time.

  9. A simultaneous extraction method for organophosphate, pyrethroid, and neonicotinoid insecticides in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Perre, Chloé; Whiting, Sara A; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A method was developed for the extraction and analysis of 2 organophosphate, 8 pyrethroid, and 5 neonicotinoid insecticides from the same water sample. A salted liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) was optimized with a solid-phase extraction (SPE) step that separated the organophosphates (OPs) and pyrethroids from the neonicotinoids. Factors that were optimized included volume of solvent and amount of salt used in the LLE, homogenization time for the LLE, and type and volume of eluting solvent used for the SPE. The OPs and pyrethroids were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the neonicotinoids were quantified using liquid chromatography-diode array detector. Results showed that the optimized method was accurate, precise, reproducible, and robust; recoveries in river water spiked with 100 ng L(-1) of each of the insecticides were all between 86 and 114 % with RSDs between 2 and 8 %. The method was also sensitive with method detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 27.2 ng L(-1) depending on compounds and matrices. The optimized method was thus appropriate for the simultaneous extraction of 15 widely applied insecticides from three different classes and was shown to provide valuable information on their environmental fate from field-collected aqueous samples.

  10. Ion-exchange molecularly imprinted polymer for the extraction of negatively charged acesulfame from wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarejousheghani, Mashaalah; Schrader, Steffi; Möder, Monika; Lorenz, Pierre; Borsdorf, Helko

    2015-09-11

    Acesulfame is a known indicator that is used to identify the introduction of domestic wastewater into water systems. It is negatively charged and highly water-soluble at environmental pH values. In this study, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized for negatively charged acesulfame and successfully applied for the selective solid phase extraction (SPE) of acesulfame from influent and effluent wastewater samples. (Vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride (VBTA) was used as a novel phase transfer reagent, which enhanced the solubility of negatively charged acesulfame in the organic solvent (porogen) and served as a functional monomer in MIP synthesis. Different molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized to optimize the extraction capability of acesulfame. The different materials were evaluated using equilibrium rebinding experiments, selectivity experiments and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The most efficient MIP was used in a molecularly imprinted-solid phase extraction (MISPE) protocol to extract acesulfame from wastewater samples. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) analysis, detection and quantification limits were achieved at 0.12μgL(-1) and 0.35μgL(-1), respectively. Certain cross selectivity for the chemical compounds containing negatively charged sulfonamide functional group was observed during selectivity experiments.

  11. Extraction recoveries and stability of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins in naturally contaminated samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S M; Vale, P; Botelho, M J; Gomes, S S

    2009-02-01

    During the last few years the occurrence of a high percentage of esters of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins has been observed in shellfish from the Portuguese coast. Most of the commercial bivalves contain DSP toxins in ester forms, either acyl derivatives of okadaic acid (OA) or of dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX-2). The stability of these toxins in shellfish tissues and in raw methanol extracts was investigated in two different naturally contaminated species, mussel and carpet shell, over a 4-week period. The results for both species revealed that DSP toxins were more stable in tissue than in raw methanol extracts. Losses of DSP toxins were seen in the first 2 weeks and were more than 30%, but after that a period of stabilization was observed. The decrease was due probably from losses of esters of OA and DTX-2, the free toxins were stable over the period studied. The extraction most commonly used for chemical and biochemical assays relied on methanolic extraction with aqueous 80% methanol. In this work we have tested the extraction solvent on the extractability of DSP toxins from several naturally contaminated species. A single dispersive extraction with methanol, with solvent ratios of 70%, 80%, 90% and 100%, were tested. After alkaline hydrolysis of esterified toxins and clean-up with hexane and dichloromethane, the samples were analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The recovery of DSP toxins increased with increasing percentages of methanol up to 90%. A decrease in recovery with 100% methanol was observed probably due to problems during the liquid-liquid partitioning.

  12. Sample pretreatment microfluidic chip for DNA extraction from rat peripheral blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xing; CUI Dafu; LIU Changchun; LI Hui; ZHAO Weixing

    2007-01-01

    A sample pretreatment microfluidic chip was described based on the principle of solid phase extraction and micro electro mechanical system technology.Oxidized porous silicon with the large surface area as the solid phase matrix for absorption of DNA from a biological sample can greatly improve the DNA yield.The factors that could affect the DNA yield were analyzed and the preparation technology and the experiment procedure were improved.The DNA purification process from the rat peripheral blood can be achieved and the DNA yield is 24 ng/(μL whole blood),which can reach the level of the commercial DNA purification kits.Furthermore,the DNA extracted from the whole blood can be amplified by polymerase chain reaction,which can achieve a high efficiency of the amplification.

  13. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Shokrollahi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple cloud point extraction procedure is presented for the preconcentration of copper in various samples. After complexation by 4-hydroxy-2-mercapto-6-propylpyrimidine (PTU, copper ions are quantitatively extracted into the phase rich in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.5 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Analytical parameters including concentrations for PTU, Triton X-114 and HNO3, bath temperature, centrifugation rate and time were optimized. The influences of the matrix ions on the recoveries of copper ions were investigated. The detection limits (3SDb/m, n=4 of 1.6 ng mL-1 along with enrichment factors of 30 for Cu were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of environmental samples.

  14. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of nickel in water samples using dimethylglyoxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and simple method for the preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of nickel was developed by cloud point extraction (CPE. In the proposed work, dimethylglyoxime (DMG was used as the chelating agent and Triton X-114 was selected as a non-ionic surfactant for CPE. The parameters affecting the cloud point extraction including the pH of sample solution, concentration of the chelating agent and surfactant, equilibration temperature and time were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 10-150 ng mL-1 with a detection limit of 4 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation for 9 replicates of 100 ng mL-1 Ni(II was 1.04%. The interference effect of some anions and cations was studied. The method was applied to the determination of Ni(II in water samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Automated Protein Biomarker Analysis: on-line extraction of clinical samples by Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Świtnicka-Plak, Magdalena A.; Grønhaug Halvorsen, Trine; Cormack, Peter A.G.; Sellergren, Börje; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-01-01

    Robust biomarker quantification is essential for the accurate diagnosis of diseases and is of great value in cancer management. In this paper, an innovative diagnostic platform is presented which provides automated molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for biomarker determination using ProGastrin Releasing Peptide (ProGRP), a highly sensitive biomarker for Small Cell Lung Cancer, as a model. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and analytical optimization of the most promising material led to the development of an automated quantification method for ProGRP. The method enabled analysis of patient serum samples with elevated ProGRP levels. Particularly low sample volumes were permitted using the automated extraction within a method which was time-efficient, thereby demonstrating the potential of such a strategy in a clinical setting. PMID:28303910

  16. Automated Protein Biomarker Analysis: on-line extraction of clinical samples by Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Świtnicka-Plak, Magdalena A.; Grønhaug Halvorsen, Trine; Cormack, Peter A. G.; Sellergren, Börje; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-03-01

    Robust biomarker quantification is essential for the accurate diagnosis of diseases and is of great value in cancer management. In this paper, an innovative diagnostic platform is presented which provides automated molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for biomarker determination using ProGastrin Releasing Peptide (ProGRP), a highly sensitive biomarker for Small Cell Lung Cancer, as a model. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and analytical optimization of the most promising material led to the development of an automated quantification method for ProGRP. The method enabled analysis of patient serum samples with elevated ProGRP levels. Particularly low sample volumes were permitted using the automated extraction within a method which was time-efficient, thereby demonstrating the potential of such a strategy in a clinical setting.

  17. Solid-Phase Extraction (SPE: Principles and Applications in Food Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Ötles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solid-Phase Extraction (SPE is a sample preparation method that is practised on numerous application fields due to its many advantages compared to other traditional methods. SPE was invented as an alternative to liquid/liquid extraction and eliminated multiple disadvantages, such as usage of large amount of solvent, extended operation time/procedure steps, potential sources of error, and high cost. Moreover, SPE can be ap- plied to the samples combined with other analytical methods and sample preparation techniques optionally. SPE technique is a useful tool for many purposes through its versatility. Isolation, concentration, purification and clean-up are the main approaches in the practices of this method. Food structures represent a complicated matrix and can be formed into different physical stages, such as solid, viscous or liquid. Therefore, sample preparation step particularly has an important role for the determination of specific compounds in foods. SPE offers many opportunities not only for analysis of a large diversity of food samples but also for optimization and advances. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on basic principles of SPE and its applications for many analytes in food matrix.

  18. 2017 Annual Terrestrial Sampling Plan for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico on Kirtland Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The 2017 Annual Terrestrial Sampling Plan for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico on Kirtland Air Force Base has been prepared in accordance with the “Letter of Agreement Between Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Field Office (DOE/NNSA/SFO) and 377th Air Base Wing (ABW), Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) for Terrestrial Sampling” (signed January 2017), Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The Letter of Agreement requires submittal of an annual terrestrial sampling plan.

  19. Machine learning based sample extraction for automatic speech recognition using dialectal Assamese speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwalla, Swapna; Sarma, Kandarpa Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Automatic Speaker Recognition (ASR) and related issues are continuously evolving as inseparable elements of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). With assimilation of emerging concepts like big data and Internet of Things (IoT) as extended elements of HCI, ASR techniques are found to be passing through a paradigm shift. Oflate, learning based techniques have started to receive greater attention from research communities related to ASR owing to the fact that former possess natural ability to mimic biological behavior and that way aids ASR modeling and processing. The current learning based ASR techniques are found to be evolving further with incorporation of big data, IoT like concepts. Here, in this paper, we report certain approaches based on machine learning (ML) used for extraction of relevant samples from big data space and apply them for ASR using certain soft computing techniques for Assamese speech with dialectal variations. A class of ML techniques comprising of the basic Artificial Neural Network (ANN) in feedforward (FF) and Deep Neural Network (DNN) forms using raw speech, extracted features and frequency domain forms are considered. The Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) is configured with inputs in several forms to learn class information obtained using clustering and manual labeling. DNNs are also used to extract specific sentence types. Initially, from a large storage, relevant samples are selected and assimilated. Next, a few conventional methods are used for feature extraction of a few selected types. The features comprise of both spectral and prosodic types. These are applied to Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) and Fully Focused Time Delay Neural Network (FFTDNN) structures to evaluate their performance in recognizing mood, dialect, speaker and gender variations in dialectal Assamese speech. The system is tested under several background noise conditions by considering the recognition rates (obtained using confusion matrices and manually) and computation time

  20. Analysis of sampling artifacts on the Granger causality analysis for topology extraction of neuronal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Douglas; Zhang, Yaoyu; Xiao, Yanyang; Cai, David

    2014-01-01

    Granger causality (GC) is a powerful method for causal inference for time series. In general, the GC value is computed using discrete time series sampled from continuous-time processes with a certain sampling interval length τ, i.e., the GC value is a function of τ. Using the GC analysis for the topology extraction of the simplest integrate-and-fire neuronal network of two neurons, we discuss behaviors of the GC value as a function of τ, which exhibits (i) oscillations, often vanishing at certain finite sampling interval lengths, (ii) the GC vanishes linearly as one uses finer and finer sampling. We show that these sampling effects can occur in both linear and non-linear dynamics: the GC value may vanish in the presence of true causal influence or become non-zero in the absence of causal influence. Without properly taking this issue into account, GC analysis may produce unreliable conclusions about causal influence when applied to empirical data. These sampling artifacts on the GC value greatly complicate the reliability of causal inference using the GC analysis, in general, and the validity of topology reconstruction for networks, in particular. We use idealized linear models to illustrate possible mechanisms underlying these phenomena and to gain insight into the general spectral structures that give rise to these sampling effects. Finally, we present an approach to circumvent these sampling artifacts to obtain reliable GC values.

  1. Analysis of Sampling Artifacts on the Granger Causality Analysis for Topology Extraction of Neuronal Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas eZhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Granger causality (GC is a powerful method for causal inference for time series. In general, the GC value is computed using discrete time series sampled from continuous-time processes with a certain sampling interval length $tau$, emph{i.e.}, the GC value is a function of $tau$. Using the GC analysis for the topology extraction of the simplest integrate-and-fire neuronal network of two neurons, we discuss behaviors of the GC value as a function of $tau$, which exhibits (i oscillations, often vanishing at certain finite sampling interval lengths, (ii the GC vanishes linearly as one uses finer and finer sampling. We show that these sampling effects can occur in both linear and nonlinear dynamics: the GC value may vanish in the presence of true causal influence or become nonzero in the absence of causal influence. Without properly taking this issue into account, GC analysis may produce unreliable conclusions about causal influence when applied to empirical data. These sampling artifacts on the GC value greatly complicate the reliability of causal inference using the GC analysis, in general, and the validity of topology reconstruction for networks, in particular. We use idealized linear models to illustrate possible mechanisms underlying these phenomena and to gain insight into the general spectral structures that give rise to these sampling effects. Finally, we present an approach to circumvent these sampling artifacts to obtain reliable GC values.

  2. Comparison of air samples, nasal swabs, ear-skin swabs and environmental dust samples for detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Vigre, Håkan; Cavaco, Lina;

    2014-01-01

    To identify a cost-effective and practical method for detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pig herds, the relative sensitivity of four sample types: nasal swabs, ear-skin (skin behind the ears) swabs, environmental dust swabs and air was compared. Moreover, dependency...... detection by air sampling is easy to perform, reduces costs and analytical time compared to existing methods, and is recommended for initial testing of herds. Ear-skin swab sampling may be more sensitive for MRSA detection than air sampling or nasal swab sampling.......-herd prevalence ⩾25%]. The results indicate that taking swabs of skin behind the ears (ten pools of five) was even more sensitive than taking nasal swabs (ten pools of five) at the herd level and detected significantly more positive samples. spa types t011, t034 and t4208 were observed. In conclusion, MRSA...

  3. Estimating fugitive methane emissions from oil sands mining using extractive core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew R.; Crosland, Brian M.; McEwen, James D.; Hager, Darcy B.; Armitage, Joshua R.; Karimi-Golpayegani, Mojgan; Picard, David J.

    2016-11-01

    Fugitive methane emissions from oil sands mining activities are a potentially important source of greenhouse gas emissions for which there are significant uncertainties and a lack of open data. This paper investigates the potential of a control-system approach to estimating fugitive methane emissions by analyzing releasable gas volumes in core samples extracted from undeveloped mine regions. Field experiments were performed by leveraging routine winter drilling activities that are a component of normal mine planning and development, and working in conjunction with an on-site drill crew using existing equipment. Core samples were extracted from two test holes, sealed at the surface, and transported for off-site lab analysis. Despite the challenges of the on-site sample collection and the limitations of the available drilling technology, notable quantities of residual methane (mean of 23.8 mgCH4/kg-core-sample (+41%/-35%) or 779 mgCH4/kg-bitumen (+69%/-34%) at 95% confidence) were measured in the collected core samples. If these factors are applied to the volumes of bitumen mined in Alberta in 2015, they imply fugitive methane emissions equivalent to 2.1 MtCO2e (as correlated with bitumen content) or 1.4 MtCO2e (as correlated with total mined material) evaluated on a 100-year time horizon. An additional ∼0.2 Mt of fugitive CO2 emissions could also be expected. Although additional measurements at a larger number of locations are warranted to determine whether these emissions should be considered as additive to, or inclusive of, current estimates based on flux chamber measurements at the mine face, these first-of-their-kind results demonstrate an intriguing alternate method for quantifying fugitive emissions from oil sands mining and extraction.

  4. Sampling artifacts in active air sampling of semivolatile organic contaminants: Comparing theoretical and measured artifacts and evaluating implications for monitoring networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Prokeš, Roman; Kukučka, Petr; Klánová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The effects of sampling artifacts are often not fully considered in the design of air monitoring with active air samplers. Semivolatile organic contaminants (SVOCs) are particularly vulnerable to a range of sampling artifacts because of their wide range of gas-particle partitioning and degradation rates, and these can lead to erroneous measurements of air concentrations and a lack of comparability between sites with different environmental and sampling conditions. This study used specially adapted filter-sorbent sampling trains in three types of active air samplers to investigate breakthrough of SVOCs, and the possibility of other sampling artifacts. Breakthrough volumes were experimentally determined for a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sampling volumes from 300 to 10,000 m(3), and sampling durations of 1-7 days. In parallel, breakthrough was estimated based on theoretical sorbent-vapor pressure relationships. The comparison of measured and theoretical determinations of breakthrough demonstrated good agreement between experimental and estimated breakthrough volumes, and showed that theoretical breakthrough estimates should be used when developing air monitoring protocols. Significant breakthrough in active air samplers occurred for compounds with vapor pressure >0.5 Pa at volumes Sample volumes between 700 and 10,000 m(3) may lead to breakthrough for compounds with vapor pressures between 0.005 and 0.5 Pa. Breakthrough is largely driven by sample volume and compound volatility (therefore indirectly by temperature) and is independent of sampler type. The presence of significant breakthrough at "typical" sampling conditions is relevant for air monitoring networks, and may lead to under-reporting of more volatile SVOCs.

  5. Analysis of non-methane hydrocarbons in air samples collected aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Baker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container is a long-term monitoring program making regular atmospheric measurements from an instrument container installed monthly aboard a passenger aircraft. Typical cruising altitudes of the aircraft allow for the study of the free troposphere and the extra-tropical upper troposphere as well as the lowermost stratosphere. CARIBIC measurements include a number of real time analyses as well as the collection of aerosol and whole air samples. These whole air samples are analyzed post-flight for a suite of trace gases, which includes non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC.

    The NMHC measurement system and its analytical performance are described here. Precision was found to vary slightly by compound, and is less than 2% for the C2–C6 alkanes and ethyne, and between 1 and 6% for C7–C8 alkanes and aromatic compounds. Preliminary results from participation in a Global Atmospheric Watch (WMO VOC audit indicate accuracies within the precision of the system. Limits of detection are 1 pptv for most compounds, and up to 3 pptv for some aromatics. These are sufficiently low to measure mixing ratios typically observed in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere for the longer-lived NMHC, however, in air samples from these regions many of the compounds with shorter lifetimes (<5 d were frequently below the detection limit. Observed NMHC concentrations span many orders of magnitude, dependent on atmospheric region and air mass history, with concentrations typically decreasing with shorter chemical lifetimes.

  6. Urban air quality assessment using monitoring data of fractionized aerosol samples, chemometrics and meteorological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotova, Galina I; Tsitouridou, Roxani; Tsakovski, Stefan L; Simeonov, Vasil D

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with assessment of urban air by using monitoring data for 10 different aerosol fractions (0.015-16 μm) collected at a typical urban site in City of Thessaloniki, Greece. The data set was subject to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) and, additionally, to HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling in order to assess in a better way the impact of the weather conditions on the pollution sources identified. A specific element of the study is the effort to clarify the role of outliers in the data set. The reason for the appearance of outliers is strongly related to the atmospheric condition on the particular sampling days leading to enhanced concentration of pollutants (secondary emissions, sea sprays, road and soil dust, combustion processes) especially for ultra fine and coarse particles. It is also shown that three major sources affect the urban air quality of the location studied-sea sprays, mineral dust and anthropogenic influences (agricultural activity, combustion processes, and industrial sources). The level of impact is related to certain extent to the aerosol fraction size. The assessment of the meteorological conditions leads to defining of four downwind patterns affecting the air quality (Pelagic, Western and Central Europe, Eastern and Northeastern Europe and Africa and Southern Europe). Thus, the present study offers a complete urban air assessment taking into account the weather conditions, pollution sources and aerosol fractioning.

  7. Effect of DNA extraction methods and sampling techniques on the apparent structure of cow and sheep rumen microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Kittelmann, Sandra; Miri, Vahideh Heidarian; Zethof, Michael; Noel, Samantha J; Waghorn, Garry C; Janssen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Molecular microbial ecology techniques are widely used to study the composition of the rumen microbiota and to increase understanding of the roles they play. Therefore, sampling and DNA extraction methods that result in adequate yields of microbial DNA that also accurately represents the microbial community are crucial. Fifteen different methods were used to extract DNA from cow and sheep rumen samples. The DNA yield and quality, and its suitability for downstream PCR amplifications varied considerably, depending on the DNA extraction method used. DNA extracts from nine extraction methods that passed these first quality criteria were evaluated further by quantitative PCR enumeration of microbial marker loci. Absolute microbial numbers, determined on the same rumen samples, differed by more than 100-fold, depending on the DNA extraction method used. The apparent compositions of the archaeal, bacterial, ciliate protozoal, and fungal communities in identical rumen samples were assessed using 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. Significant differences in microbial community composition were observed between extraction methods, for example in the relative abundances of members of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Microbial communities in parallel samples collected from cows by oral stomach-tubing or through a rumen fistula, and in liquid and solid rumen digesta fractions, were compared using one of the DNA extraction methods. Community representations were generally similar, regardless of the rumen sampling technique used, but significant differences in the abundances of some microbial taxa such as the Clostridiales and the Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade were observed. The apparent microbial community composition differed between rumen sample fractions, and Prevotellaceae were most abundant in the liquid fraction. DNA extraction methods that involved phenol-chloroform extraction and mechanical lysis steps tended to be more comparable. However, comparison of data

  8. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Rodriguez, I. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)], E-mail: qnisaac@usc.es; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2007-09-05

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 {mu}L. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L{sup -1}, depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated.

  9. Vibration Frequencies Extraction of the Forth Road Bridge Using High Sampling GPS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a scheme for vibration frequencies extraction of the Forth Road Bridge in Scotland from high sampling GPS data. The interaction between the dynamic response and the ambient loadings is carefully analysed. A bilinear Chebyshev high-pass filter is designed to isolate the quasistatic movements, the FFT algorithm and peak-picking approach are applied to extract the vibration frequencies, and a GPS data accumulation counter is suggested for real-time monitoring applications. To understand the change in the structural characteristics under different loadings, the deformation results from three different loading conditions are presented, that is, the ambient circulation loading, the strong wind under abrupt wind speed change, and the specific trial with two 40 t lorries passing the bridge. The results show that GPS not only can capture absolute 3D deflections reliably, but also can be used to extract the frequency response accurately. It is evident that the frequencies detected using the filtered deflection time series in different direction show quite different characteristics, and more stable results can be obtained from the height displacement time series. The frequency responses of 0.105 and 0.269 Hz extracted from the lateral displacement time series correlate well with the data using height displacement time series.

  10. Accelerating sample preparation through enzyme-assisted microfiltration of Salmonella in chicken extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibbert, Hunter B; Ku, Seockmo; Li, Xuan; Liu, Xingya; Ximenes, Eduardo; Kreke, Thomas; Ladisch, Michael R; Deering, Amanda J; Gehring, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Microfiltration of chicken extracts has the potential to significantly decrease the time required to detect Salmonella, as long as the extract can be efficiently filtered and the pathogenic microorganisms kept in a viable state during this process. We present conditions that enable microfiltration by adding endopeptidase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to chicken extracts or chicken rinse, prior to microfiltration with fluid flow on both retentate and permeate sides of 0.2 μm cutoff polysulfone and polyethersulfone hollow fiber membranes. After treatment with this protease, the distribution of micron, submicron, and nanometer particles in chicken extracts changes so that the size of the remaining particles corresponds to 0.4-1 μm. Together with alteration of dissolved proteins, this change helps to explain how membrane fouling might be minimized because the potential foulants are significantly smaller or larger than the membrane pore size. At the same time, we found that the presence of protein protects Salmonella from protease action, thus maintaining cell viability. Concentration and recovery of 1-10 CFU Salmonella/mL from 400 mL chicken rinse is possible in less than 4 h, with the microfiltration step requiring less than 25 min at fluxes of 0.028-0.32 mL/cm(2) min. The entire procedure-from sample processing to detection by polymerase chain reaction-is completed in 8 h.

  11. A Simple, Inexpensive and Safe Method for DNA Extraction of Frigid and Clotted Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Mohammadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extraction of blood genomicDNAis one of the main approaches for clinical and molecular biology studies. Although several methods have been developed for extraction of blood genomic DNA, most of these methods consume long time and use expensive chemicals such as proteinase K and toxic organic solvent such as phenol and chloroform. The objective of this study was to developed easy and safe method forDNAextraction from clotted and frozen whole blood. This method has many advantages: time reducing, using inexpensive materials, without phenol and chloroform, achieving of high molecular weight and good quality genomicDNA.Materials and Methods: DNA extraction was performed by two methods (new and phenol-chloroform method. Then quantity and quality parameters were evaluated by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis, Nano drop analysis and efficiency of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.Results: Extracted DNA from 500μL of blood samples were 457.7ng/μl and 212ng/μL and their purity (OD260/OD280 were 1.8 and 1.81 for new recommended and phenol–chloroform methods respectively. The PCR results indicated that D16S539 and CSF1PO loci were amplified.Conclusion: These results shown that this method is simple, fast, safe and most economical.

  12. Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air using combined laser ionization and ambient metastable ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X. N.; Xie, Z. Q.; Gao, Y.; Hu, W.; Guo, L. B.; Jiang, L.; Lu, Y. F.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air was carried out using combined laser ionization and metastable ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-MI-TOFMS) in ambient environment for qualitative and semiquantitative (relative analyte information, not absolute information) analysis. Ambient metastable ionization using a direct analysis in realtime (DART) ion source was combined with laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-TOFMS) to study the effects of combining metastable and laser ionization. A series of metallic samples from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST 494, 495, 498, 499, and 500) and a pure carbon target were characterized using LI-TOFMS in open air. LI-MI-TOFMS was found to be superior to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Laser pulse energies between 10 and 200 mJ at the second harmonic (532 nm) of an Nd:YAG laser were applied in the experiment to obtain a high degree of ionization in plasmas. Higher laser pulse energy improves signal intensities of trace elements (such as Fe, Cr, Mn, Ni, Ca, Al, and Ag). Data were analyzed by numerically calculating relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) and limit of detections (LODs) from mass spectrometry (MS) and LIBS spectra. Different parameters, such as boiling point, ionization potential, RSC, LOD, and atomic weight, were shown to analyze the ionization and MS detection processes in open air.

  13. A Framework for Bus Trajectory Extraction and Missing Data Recovery for Data Sampled from the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Changfei; Chen, Huiling; Xuan, Qi; Yang, Xuhua

    2017-02-10

    This paper presents a novel framework for trajectories' extraction and missing data recovery for bus traveling data sampled from the Internet. The trajectory extraction procedure is composed of three main parts: trajectory clustering, trajectory cleaning and trajectory connecting. In the clustering procedure, we focus on feature construction and parameter selection for the fuzzy C-means clustering method. Following the clustering procedure, the trajectory cleaning algorithm is implemented based on a new introduced fuzzy connecting matrix, which evaluates the possibility of data belonging to the same trajectory and helps detect the anomalies in a ranked context-related order. Finally, the trajectory connecting algorithm is proposed to solve the issue that occurs in some cases when a route trajectory is incorrectly partitioned into several clusters. In the missing data recovery procedure, we developed the contextual linear interpolation for the cases of missing data occurring inside the trajectory and the median value interpolation for the cases of missing data outside the trajectory. Extensive experiments are conducted to demonstrate that the proposed framework offers a powerful ability to extract and recovery bus trajectories sampled from the Internet.

  14. A Framework for Bus Trajectory Extraction and Missing Data Recovery for Data Sampled from the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Changfei; Chen, Huiling; Xuan, Qi; Yang, Xuhua

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for trajectories’ extraction and missing data recovery for bus traveling data sampled from the Internet. The trajectory extraction procedure is composed of three main parts: trajectory clustering, trajectory cleaning and trajectory connecting. In the clustering procedure, we focus on feature construction and parameter selection for the fuzzy C-means clustering method. Following the clustering procedure, the trajectory cleaning algorithm is implemented based on a new introduced fuzzy connecting matrix, which evaluates the possibility of data belonging to the same trajectory and helps detect the anomalies in a ranked context-related order. Finally, the trajectory connecting algorithm is proposed to solve the issue that occurs in some cases when a route trajectory is incorrectly partitioned into several clusters. In the missing data recovery procedure, we developed the contextual linear interpolation for the cases of missing data occurring inside the trajectory and the median value interpolation for the cases of missing data outside the trajectory. Extensive experiments are conducted to demonstrate that the proposed framework offers a powerful ability to extract and recovery bus trajectories sampled from the Internet. PMID:28208621

  15. Selective extraction of triazine herbicides from food samples based on a combination of a liquid membrane and molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaka, Byron; Cukrowska, Ewa; Bui, Bernadette Tse Sum; Ramström, Olof; Haupt, Karsten; Tutu, Hlanganani; Chimuka, Luke

    2009-10-02

    A selective extraction technique based on the combination of liquid membrane (microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) was applied to triazines herbicides in food samples. Simazine, atrazine and propazine were extracted from aqueous food samples through the hydrophobic porous membrane that was impregnated with toluene, which also formed part of the acceptor phase. In the acceptor phase, the compounds were re-extracted onto MIP particles. The extraction technique was optimised for the amount of molecularly imprinted polymers particles in the organic acceptor phase, extraction time, and type of organic acceptor solvent and desorption solvent. An extraction time of 90 min and 50mg of MIP were found to be optimum parameters. Toluene as the acceptor phase was found to give higher triazines binding onto MIP particles compared to hexane and combinations of diethyl ether and hexane. 90% methanol in water was found to be the best desorption solvent compared to acetonitrile, methanol and water. The selectivity of the technique was demonstrated by extracting spiked lettuce and apple extracts where clean chromatograms were obtained compared to liquid membrane extraction alone or to the microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction - non-imprinted polymer combination. The MIP showed a certain degree of group specificity and the extraction efficiency in lettuce extract was 79% (0.72) for simazine, 98% (1.55) for atrazine and 86% (3.08) for propazine.

  16. Optimal sample storage and extraction procotols for reliable multilocus genotyping of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, F; Geldof, S; Polman, K; Volckaert, F A M; Huyse, T

    2011-08-01

    Genotyping individual larval stages and eggs of natural parasite populations is complicated by the difficulty of obtaining reliable genotypes from low quantity DNA template. A suitable storage and extraction protocol, together with a thorough quantification of genotyping errors are therefore crucial for molecular epidemiological studies. Here we test the robustness, handling time, ease of use, cost effectiveness and success rate of various fixation (Whatman FTA(®) Classic and Elute Cards, 70% EtOH and RNAlater(®)) and subsequent DNA extraction methods (commercial kits and proteinase K protocol). None of these methods require a cooling chain and are therefore suitable for field collection. Based on a multiplex microsatellite PCR with nine loci the success and reliability of each technique is evaluated by the proportion of samples with at least eight scored loci and the proportion of genotyping errors. If only the former is taken into account, FTA(®) Elute is recommended (83% success; 44% genotyping error; 0.2 €/sample; 1h 20 m handling time). However, when also considering the genotyping errors, handling time and ease of use, we opt for 70% EtOH with the 96-well plate technology followed by a simple proteinase K extraction (73% success; 0% genotyping error; 0.2 €/sample; 15m handling time). For eggs we suggest (1) to pool all eggs per person in 1.5 ml tubes filled with 70% EtOH for transport and (2) to identify each egg to species level prior to genotyping. To this end we extended the Rapid diagnostic PCR developed by Webster et al. (2010) with a S. mansoni-specific primer to discriminate between S. mansoni, S. haematobium and S. bovis in a single PCR reaction. The success rate of genotyping eggs was 75% (0% genotyping error). This is the first study to incorporate genotyping errors through re-amplification for the evaluation of schistosome sampling protocols and the identification of error-prone loci.

  17. Extraction, separation, and intramolecular carbon isotope characterization of athabasca oil sands acids in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Jason M E; Pakdel, Hooshang; Savard, Martine M; Simard, Marie-Christine; Smirnoff, Anna

    2012-12-04

    Here we report a novel approach to extract, isolate, and characterize high molecular weight organic acids found in the Athabasca oil sands region using preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) followed by thermal conversion/elemental analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TC/EA-IRMS). A number of different "naphthenic acids" surrogate standards were analyzed as were samples from the bitumen-rich unprocessed McMurray Formation, oil sands process water, groundwater from monitoring wells, and surface water from the Athabasca River. The intramolecular carbon isotope signature generated by online pyrolysis (δ(13)C(pyr)) showed little variation (±0.6‰) within any given sample across a large range of mass fractions separated by PCGC. Oil sand, tailings ponds, and deep McMurray Formation groundwater were significantly heavier (up to ∼9‰) compared to surface water and shallow groundwater samples, demonstrating the potential use of this technique in source apportionment studies.

  18. Size selective isocyanate aerosols personal air sampling using porous plastic foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong Khanh Huynh; Trinh Vu Duc, E-mail: chuynh@hospvd.c [Institut Universitaire Romand de Sante au Travail (IST), 21 rue du Bugnon - CH-1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-02-01

    As part of a European project (SMT4-CT96-2137), various European institutions specialized in occupational hygiene (BGIA, HSL, IOM, INRS, IST, Ambiente e Lavoro) have established a program of scientific collaboration to develop one or more prototypes of European personal samplers for the collection of simultaneous three dust fractions: inhalable, thoracic and respirable. These samplers based on existing sampling heads (IOM, GSP and cassettes) use Polyurethane Plastic Foam (PUF) according to their porosity to support sampling and separator size of the particles. In this study, the authors present an original application of size selective personal air sampling using chemical impregnated PUF to perform isocyanate aerosols capturing and derivatizing in industrial spray-painting shops.

  19. Soyuz 23 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 23 because of concerns that new air pollutants had been present in the air and these were getting into the water recovery system. The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer had been giving increasing readings of total organic carbon (TOC) in the potable water, and it was postulated that an increased load into the system was responsible. The TOC began to decline in late October, 2010. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown in Table 1. The recoveries of 13C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene from the GSCs averaged 73, 82, and 59%, respectively. We are working to understand the sub-optimal recovery of chlorobenzene.

  20. Trace Level Arsenic Quantification through Cloud Point Extraction: Application to Biological and Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempahanumakkagari Suresh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive solvent-free extraction protocol for the quantification of arsenic at trace level has been described. It is based on the reaction of arsenic (V with molybdate in acidic medium in presence of antimony (III and ascorbic acid as a reducing agent to form a blue-colored arsenomolybdenum blue complex. The complex has been extracted into surfactant phase using Triton X-114, and its absorbance was measured at 690 nm. The detection limit, working range, and the relative standard deviation were found to be 1 ng mL−1, 10–200 ng mL−1, and 1.2%, respectively. The effect of common ions was studied, and the method has been applied to determine trace levels of As(III and As(V from a variety of samples like environmental, biological, and commercially procured chemicals.

  1. Improved extraction procedures for polychlorinated biphenyls in solid samples with aqueous sodium hydroxide under autoclave conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Y; Inouye, Y

    2000-03-01

    The efficacy of the extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from varnish-infiltrated insulating papers as a model of solid materials with an aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH) by autoclaving at 121 degrees C for 30 min was compared with those for the conventional procedures, i.e., saponification with 1 N ethanolic NaOH in a boiling water bath for 60 min and extraction with benzene in a Soxhlet apparatus. The newly invented autoclaving method was found to be superior to the conventional ones, yielding approximately 5- to 6-fold cumulative PCB congeners without being accompanied by extended decomposition. Therefore, the autoclave-based sample treatment is recommended for more accurate determination of PCBs in the case of PCB-impregnated solid materials such as hardened oils and resin-coated or -infiltrated papers instead of being treated conventionally.

  2. Evaluation of passive air sampler calibrations: Selection of sampling rates and implications for the measurement of persistent organic pollutants in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Robson, Matthew; Helm, Paul A.; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2011-04-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers (PAS) are a common and highly useful method of sampling persistent organic pollutants (POP) concentrations in air. PAS calibration is necessary to obtain reasonable and comparable semi-quantitative measures of air concentrations. Various methods are found in the literature concerning PAS calibration. 35 studies on PAS use and calibration are examined here, in conjunction with a study involving 10 PAS deployed concurrently in outdoor air with a low-volume air sampler in order to measure the sampling rates of PUF-PAS for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic musks (PCMs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Based on this analysis it is recommended that (1) PAS should be assumed to represent bulk rather than gas-phase compound concentrations due to the sampling of particle-bound compounds, (2) calibration of PAS sampling rates is more accurately achieved using an active low-volume air sampler rather than depuration compounds since the former measures gas- and particle-phase compounds and does so continuously over the deployment period of the PAS, and (3) homolog-specific sampling rates based on KOA groupings be used in preference to compound/congener-specific or single sampling rates.

  3. Emissions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Natural Gas Extraction into Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulik, L Blair; Donald, Carey E; Smith, Brian W; Tidwell, Lane G; Hobbie, Kevin A; Kincl, Laurel; Haynes, Erin N; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-07-19

    Natural gas extraction, often referred to as "fracking", has increased rapidly in the United States in recent years. To address potential health impacts, passive air samplers were deployed in a rural community heavily affected by the natural gas boom. Samplers were analyzed for 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results were grouped based on distance from each sampler to the nearest active well. Levels of benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene, and carcinogenic potency of PAH mixtures were highest when samplers were closest to active wells. PAH levels closest to natural gas activity were comparable to levels previously reported in rural areas in winter. Sourcing ratios indicated that PAHs were predominantly petrogenic, suggesting that PAH levels were influenced by direct releases from the earth. Quantitative human health risk assessment estimated the excess lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to the measured PAHs. At sites closest to active wells, the risk estimated for maximum residential exposure was 0.04 in a million, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acceptable risk level. Overall, risk estimates decreased 30% when comparing results from samplers closest to active wells to those farthest from them. This work suggests that natural gas extraction is contributing PAHs to the air, at levels that would not be expected to increase cancer risk.

  4. Effect of onion extract on corneal haze suppression after air assisted lamellar keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyun; Park, Young Woo; Lee, Euiri; Park, Sang Wan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Kim, Jong Whi; Seong, Je Kyung; Seo, Kangmoon

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of onion extract on corneal haze suppression after applying the air assisted lamellar keratectomy. The air assisted lamellar keratectomy was performed on 24 canine eyes. They were treated with an artificial tear (group C), prednisolone acetate (group P), onion extract (group O) and TGF-β1 (group T) three times per day from 7 to 28 days after the surgery. Corneal haze occurred on the all eyes and was observed beginning 7 days after the surgery. The haze was significantly decreased in groups P and O from day 14 compared with the group C using the clinical (group P; P=0.021, group O; P=0.037) and objective evaluation method (group P; P=0.021, group O; P=0.039). In contrast, it was significantly increased in group T from day 14 compared with group C based on the clinical (P=0.002) and objective evaluation method (Phaze development by suppressing the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

  5. Impact of natural gas extraction on Pah levels in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulik, L. Blair; Donald, Carey E.; Smith, Brian W.; Tidwell, Lane G.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Kincl, Laurel; Haynes, Erin N.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural gas extraction, often referred to as “fracking,” has increased rapidly in the U.S. in recent years. To address potential health impacts, passive air samplers were deployed in a rural community heavily affected by the natural gas boom. Samplers were analyzed for 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results were grouped based on distance from each sampler to the nearest active well. PAH levels were highest when samplers were closest to active wells. Additionally, PAH levels closest to natural gas activity were an order of magnitude higher than levels previously reported in rural areas. Sourcing ratios indicate that PAHs were predominantly petrogenic, suggesting that elevated PAH levels were influenced by direct releases from the earth. Quantitative human health risk assessment estimated the excess lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to the measured PAHs. Closest to active wells, the risk estimated for maximum residential exposure was 2.9 in 10,000, which is above the U.S. EPA's acceptable risk level. Overall, risk estimates decreased 30% when comparing results from samplers closest to active wells to those farthest. This work suggests that natural gas extraction may be contributing significantly to PAHs in air, at levels that are relevant to human health. PMID:25810398

  6. Desorption of Herbicides from Atmospheric Particulates During High-Volume Air Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwight V. Quiring

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides can be present in the atmosphere either as vapours and/or in association with suspended particles. High-volume air sampling, in which air is aspirated first through a glass fibre filter to capture pesticides associated with atmospheric particulates and then polyurethane foam (PUF, often in combination with an adsorbent resin such as XAD-2, to capture pesticides present as vapours, is generally employed during atmospheric monitoring for pesticides. However, the particulate fraction may be underestimated because some pesticides may be stripped or desorbed from captured particulates due to the pressure drop created by the high flow of air through the filter. This possibility was investigated with ten herbicide active ingredients commonly used on the Canadian prairies (dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba, 2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester, bromoxynil octanoate, diclofop methyl ester, fenoxaprop ethyl ester, trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin and seven hydrolysis products (2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, bromoxynil, diclofop, clopyralid and mecoprop. Finely ground heavy clay soil fortified with active ingredients/hydrolysis products was evenly distributed on the glass fibre filters of high-volume air samplers and air aspirated through the samplers at a flow rate of 12.5 m3/h for a 7-day period. The proportion desorbed as vapour from the fortified soil was determined by analysis of the PUF/XAD-2 resin composite cartridges. The extent of desorption from the fortified soil applied to the filters varied from 0% for each of the dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba to approximately 50% for trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin.

  7. Results of Self-Absorption Study on the Versapor 3000 Filters for Radioactive Particulate Air Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Barnett, Debra S.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Bliss, Mary; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-02-17

    Since the mid-1980s, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has used a value of 0.85 as the correction factor for self absorption of activity for particulate radioactive air samples collected from building exhaust for environmental monitoring. This value accounts for activity that cannot be detected by direct counting of alpha and beta particles. Emissions can be degraded or blocked by filter fibers for particles buried in the filter material or by inactive dust particles collected with the radioactive particles. These filters are used for monitoring air emissions from PNNL stacks for radioactive particles. This paper describes an effort to re-evaluate self-absorption effects in particulate radioactive air sample filters (Versapor® 3000, 47 mm diameter) used at PNNL. There were two methods used to characterize the samples. Sixty samples were selected from the archive for acid digestion to compare the radioactivity measured by direct gas-flow proportional counting of filters to the results obtained after acid digestion of the filter and counting again by gas-flow proportional detection. Thirty different sample filters were selected for visible light microscopy to evaluate filter loading and particulate characteristics. Mass-loading effects were also considered. Filter ratios were calculated by dividing the initial counts by the post-digestion counts with the expectation that post-digestion counts would be higher because digestion would expose radioactivity embedded in the filter in addition to that on top of the filter. Contrary to expectations, the post digestion readings were almost always lower than initial readings and averaged approximately half the initial readings for both alpha and beta activity. Before and after digestion readings appeared to be related to each other, but with a low coefficient of determination (R^2) value. The ratios had a wide range of values indicating that this method did not provide sufficient precision to quantify self

  8. Electromembrane extraction and spectrophotometric determination of As(V) in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyabi, Mohammad Ali; Aghaei, Ali

    2016-12-01

    In this study, for the first time electromembrane extraction (EME) was used as a highly efficient sample pre-treatment method for the UV-VIS spectrophotometric determination of As(V) in water samples. The influences of experimental parameters during EME were investigated and optimized using one-variable-at-a-time methodology as follows: organic solvent: 1-octanol+2.5% (V/V) di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate, applied voltage: 70V, extraction time: 15min, pH of acceptor: 13, stirring rate: 750rpm. The method allowed the determination of As(V) in the range of 5-300ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was found to be within the range of 3.4-7.6%. The limit of detection, corresponding to a signal to noise ratio of three, was 1.5ngmL(-1). The proposed method was finally applied to the determination of As(V) in water samples and relative recoveries ranging from 95 to 102% were obtained.

  9. New developments in the extraction and determination of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaña-González, Juan Antonio; Villar-Navarro, Mercedes [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain); Ramos-Payán, María [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Lineberguer Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Fernández-Torres, Rut [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain); Research Centre of Health and Environment (CYSMA), University of Huelva (Spain); Bello-López, Miguel Angel, E-mail: mabello@us.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Prof. García González, s/n. 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2015-02-09

    Highlights: • The analysis of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples is reviewed. • Literature in this field from 1980 to 2003 is briefly discussed. • Determination and extraction methods in the last decade are discussed in-depth. - Abstract: Parabens are a family of synthetic esters of p-hydroxibenzoic acid widely used as preservatives in cosmetics and health-care products, among other daily-use commodities. Recently, their potential endocrine disrupting effects have raised concerns about their safety and their potential effects as emerging pollutants, leading to the regulation of the presence of parabens in commercial products by national and trans-national organizations. Also, this has led to an interest in developing sensible and reliable methods for their determination in environmental samples, cosmetics and health-care products. This paper is a comprehensive up-to-date review of the literature concerning the determination of parabens in environmental samples and cosmetic and health-care products. A brief revision of the literature concerning the traditional determination of parabens (1980–2003) is included, followed by an in-depth revision of the recent developments in both measurement and extraction methods for parabens in the last years (2003–2013). Finally, possible future perspectives in this field are proposed.

  10. Ultrasonic Techniques for Air Void Size Distribution and Property Evaluation in Both Early-Age and Hardened Concrete Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaicheng Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Entrained air voids can improve the freeze-thaw durability of concrete, and also affect its mechanical and transport properties. Therefore, it is important to measure the air void structure and understand its influence on concrete performance for quality control. This paper aims to measure air void structure evolution at both early-age and hardened stages with the ultrasonic technique, and evaluates its influence on concrete properties. Three samples with different air entrainment agent content were specially prepared. The air void structure was determined with optimized inverse analysis by achieving the minimum error between experimental and theoretical attenuation. The early-age sample measurement showed that the air void content with the whole size range slightly decreases with curing time. The air void size distribution of hardened samples (at Day 28 was compared with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM C457 test results. The air void size distribution with different amount of air entrainment agent was also favorably compared. In addition, the transport property, compressive strength, and dynamic modulus of concrete samples were also evaluated. The concrete transport decreased with the curing age, which is in accordance with the air void shrinkage. The correlation between the early-age strength development and hardened dynamic modulus with the ultrasonic parameters was also evaluated. The existence of clustered air voids in the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ area was found to cause severe compressive strength loss. The results indicated that this developed ultrasonic technique has potential in air void size distribution measurement, and demonstrated the influence of air void structure evolution on concrete properties during both early-age and hardened stages.

  11. Occupational exposure to complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds in ambient air: desorption from activated charcoal using accelerated solvent extraction can replace carbon disulfide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Giovanni; Fioretti, Marzia; Rocca, Lucia Mainero

    2013-01-01

    A desorption study of 57 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been conducted by use of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Different solvents were tested to extract activated charcoal tubes with the objective of replacing carbon disulfide, used in official methods, because of its highly toxic health and environmental effects. Extraction conditions, for example temperature and number of cycles, were investigated and optimized. The definitive extraction procedure selected was use of acetone at 150 °C and two consecutive extraction cycles at a pressure of 1,500 psi. Considering a sample volume of 0.005 Nm(3), corresponding to a sampling time of 8 h at a flow rate of 0.01 L min(-1), the method was validated over the concentration range 65-26,300 μg Nm(-3). The lowest limit of quantification was 6 μg Nm(-3), and recovery for the 93 % of analytes ranged from 65 to 102 %. For most of the compounds, relative standard deviations were less than 15 % for inter and intra-day precision. Uncertainty of measurement was also determined: the relative expanded uncertainty was always below 29.6 %, except for dichlorodifluoromethane. This work shows that use of friendlier solvent, for example acetone, coupled with use of ASE, can replace use of CS(2) for chemical removal of VOCs from activated charcoal. ASE has several advantages over traditional solvent-extraction methods, including shorter extraction time, minimum sample manipulation, high reproducibility, and less extraction discrimination. No loss of sensitivity occurs and there is also a salutary effect on bench workers' health and on the smell of laboratory air.

  12. MPLEx: a method for simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of samples for multi-omics profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Gonzalez, Juan F.; Habyarimana, Fabien; Negretti, Nicholas M.; Sims, Amy C.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Thackray, Larissa B.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ahmer, Brian; Konkel, Michael E.; Motin, Vladimir; Baric, Ralph S.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-01-01

    The continued emergence and spread of infectious agents is of increasing concern due to increased population growth and the associated increased livestock production to meet food demands, increased urbanization and land-use changes, and greater travel. A systems biology approach to infectious disease research can significantly advance our understanding of host-pathogen relationships and facilitate the development of new therapies and vaccines. Molecular characterization of infectious samples outside of appropriate biosafety containment can only take place subsequent to pathogen inactivation. Herein, we describe a modified Folch extraction using chloroform/methanol that facilitates the molecular characterization of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of proteins, metabolites, and lipids for subsequent mass spectrometry-based multi-omics measurements. This metabolite, protein and lipid extraction (MPLEx) method resulted in complete inactivation of bacterial and viral pathogens with exposed lipid membranes, including Yersinia pestis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni in pure culture, and Yersinia pestis, Campylobacter jejuni, West Nile, MERS-CoV, Ebola, and influenza H7N9 viruses in infection studies. Partial inactivation was observed for pathogens without exposed lipid membranes including 99.99% inactivation of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 99.6% and >99% inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores and vegetative cells, respectively, and 50% inactivation of adenovirus type 5. To demonstrate that MPLEx yields biomaterial of sufficient quality for subsequent multi-omics analyses, we highlight select proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics data from human epithelial lung cells infected with wild-type and mutant forms of influenza H7N9. We believe that MPLEx will facilitate systems biology studies of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and multi

  13. Zirconium(IV) functionalized magnetic nanocomposites for extraction of organophosphorus pesticides from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Huang, Tengjun; Feng, Shun; Wang, Jide

    2016-07-22

    The widespread use of organophosphate pesticides (OPPs) in agriculture leads to residue accumulation in the environment which is dangerous to human health and disrupts the ecological balance. In this work, one nanocomposite immobilized zirconium (Zr, IV) was prepared and used as the affinity probes to quickly and selectively extract organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from water samples. The Fe3O4-ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)@Zr(IV) nanocomposites (NPs) were prepared by simply mixing Zr(IV) ions with Fe3O4-EDTA NPs synthesized by one-pot chemical co-precipitation method. The immobilized Zr(IV) ions were further utilized to capture OPPs based on their high affinity for the phosphate moiety in OPPs. Coupled with GC-MS, four OPPs were used as models to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Under the optimum conditions, the limits of detection for target OPPs were in the range of 0.10-10.30ngmL(-1) with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.61-4.40% (n=3), respectively. The linear ranges were over three orders of magnitudes (correlation coefficients, R(2)>0.9995). The Fe3O4-EDTA@Zr(IV) NPs were successfully applied to extract OPPs samples with recoveries of 86.95-112.60% and RSDs of 1.20-10.42% (n=3) from two spiked real water. By the proposed method, the matrix interference could be effectively eliminated. We hope our finding can provide a promising alternative for the fast extraction of OPPs from complex real samples.

  14. Determination of colloidal and dissolved silver in water samples using colorimetric solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, April A; Lipert, Robert J; Porter, Marc D

    2010-03-15

    The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to resurgence in the use of silver as a biocidal agent in applications ranging from washing machine additives to the drinking water treatment system on the International Space Station (ISS). However, growing concerns about the possible toxicity of colloidal silver to bacteria, aquatic organisms and humans have led to recently issued regulations by the US EPA and FDA regarding the usage of silver. As part of an ongoing project, we have developed a rapid, simple method for determining total silver, both ionic (silver(I)) and colloidal, in 0.1-1mg/L aqueous samples, which spans the ISS potable water target of 0.3-0.5mg/L (total silver) and meets the US EPA limit of 0.1mg/L in drinking water. The method is based on colorimetric solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) and involves the extraction of silver(I) from water samples by passage through a solid-phase membrane impregnated with the colorimetric reagent DMABR (5-[4-(dimethylamino)benzylidene]rhodanine). Silver(I) exhaustively reacts with impregnated DMABR to form a colored compound, which is quantified using a handheld diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Total silver is determined by first passing the sample through a cartridge containing Oxone, which exhaustively oxidizes colloidal silver to dissolved silver(I). The method, which takes less than 2 min to complete and requires only approximately 1 mL of sample, has been validated through a series of tests, including a comparison with the ICP-MS analysis of a water sample from ISS that contained both silver(I) and colloidal silver. Potential earth-bound applications are also briefly discussed.

  15. Extractive Spectrophotometric determination of Dimethoate in Environmental Samples with Azure-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Reddy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A new simple and selective spectrophotometric method is developed for the determination of dimethoate by using Azure-B is described. The method was based on the alkaline hydrolysis of dimethoate in presence of sodium ethoxide to form sodium dimethyl dithiophosphate (Na-DMDTP. The Na-DMDTP was formed as an ion-pair complex with cationic dye, azure-B. The ion-pair complex was extracted into chloroform. The color of the organic layer was measured at 535 nm. The method was applied to the determination of dimethoate residues in water, grain and soil samples.

  16. Ultrasound-air-assisted demulsified liquid-liquid microextraction by solidification of a floating organic droplet for determination of three antifungal drugs in water and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoddin, Maryam; Shojaie, Mehran; Abdi, Khosrou; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-03-01

    A novel ultrasound-air-assisted demulsified liquid-liquid microextraction by solidification of a floating organic droplet (UAAD-LLM-SFO) followed by HPLC-UV detection was developed for the analysis of three antifungal drugs in water and biological samples. In this method, 1-dodecanol was used as the extraction solvent. The emulsion was rapidly formed by pulling in and pushing out the mixture of sample solution and extraction solvent for 5 times repeatedly using a 10-mL glass syringe while sonication was performed. Therefore, an organic dispersive solvent required in common microextraction methods was not used in the proposed method. After dispersing, an aliquot of acetonitrile was introduced as a demulsifier solvent into the sample solution to separate two phases. Therefore, some additional steps, such as the centrifugation, ultrasonication, or agitation of the sample solution, are not needed. Parameters influencing the extraction recovery were investigated. The proposed method showed a good linearity for the three antifungal drugs studied with the correlation coefficients (R (2) > 0.9995). The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were between 0.01-0.03 μg L(-1) and 0.03-0.08 μg L(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factors (PFs) were in the range of 107-116, respectively. The precisions, as the relative standard deviations (RSDs) (n = 5), for inter-day and intra-day analysis were in the range of 2.1-4.5% and 6.5-8.5%, respectively. This method was successfully applied to determine the three antifungal drugs in tap water and biological samples. The recoveries of antifungal drugs in these samples were 92.4-98.5%. Graphical abstract Ultrasound-air-assisted demulsified liquid-liquid microextraction by solidification of a floating organic droplet for the analysis of three antifungal drugs prior HPLC-UV.

  17. Solid phase extraction and determination of carbamate pesticides in water samples by reverse-phase HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Tovar, J.; Santos-Delgado, M.J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    Solid phase extraction. SPE. using C{sub 1}8 bonded silica cartridges for trace amounts determination of carbaryl, propoxur, thiram, propham and methiocarb in water samples was studied and the breakthrough volume of the cartridges was established. The high enrichment factor and large injection volume admissible in the isocratic reverse-phase HPLC system allows pesticides determination with UV detection at 22o nm even at a concentration lower than 0.05 mug/L. Purified tap natural and underground water samples were spiked with carbamate pesticides in the concentration range 0.16-16.0 mug/L. Large volumes of samples (up to 2L) were passed through available C{sub 1}8, cartridges and eluted with acetonitrile. The preconcentrated samples were analyzed by HPLC using a Spherisorb ODS column with a 42.58 acetonitrile-water mobile phase. From replicate samples, recovery for the pesticides ranged from 79.0 to 103.7% except for thiran which is not retained. Tehe relative standard deviation (n=4 at 0.16 to 1.61 mug/L concetration level) range from 1.1 to 6.8%. (Author) 14 refs.

  18. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, R; Philippe, M; Wera, L; Fagnard, J F; Vanderheyden, B; Dennis, A; Shi, Y; Cardwell, D A; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm(3)) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m(2) (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  19. The Single Training Sample Extraction of Visual Evoked Potentials Based on Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fang; ZHANG Zhen; CHEN Wen-chao; QIN Bing

    2007-01-01

    Abstract.Based on the good localization characteristic of the wavelet transform both in time and frequency domain, a de-noising method based on wavelet transform is presented, which can make the extraction of visual evoked potentials in single training sample from the EEG background noise in favor of studying the changes between the single sample response happen. The information is probably related with the different function, appearance and pathologies of the brain. At the same time this method can also be used to remove those signal' s artifacts that do not appear with EP within the same scope of time or frequency. The traditional Fourier filter can hardly attain the similar result. This method is different from other wavelet de-noising methods in which different criteria are employed in choosing wavelet coefficient. It has a biggest virtue of noting the differences among the single training sample and making use of the characteristics of high time frequency resolution to reduce the effect of interference factors to a maximum extent within the time scope that EP appear. The experiment result proves that this method is not restricted by the signal-tonoise ratio of evoked potential and electroencephalograph (EEG) and even can recognize instantaneous event under the condition of lower signal-to-noise ratio, as well as recognize the samples which evoked evident response more easily. Therefore, more evident average evoked response could be achieved by de-nosing the signals obtained through averaging out the samples that can evoke evident responses than de-nosing the average of original signals. In addition, averaging methodology can dramatically reduce the number of record samples needed, thus avoiding the effect of behavior change during the recording process.This methodology pays attention to the differences among single training sample and also accomplishes the extraction of visual evoked potentials from single trainings sample. As a result, system speed and

  20. Extraction method enhancement techniques for the analysis of PCDDS and PCDFS in meat sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Tae-Uk [Gyeonsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea). Division of Applied Life Science]|[National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service (Korea). Busan Regional Office; Kwon, Jin-Wook [National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service (Korea). Anyang city

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins are the most concerned persistent organic pollutants(POPs) to human beings and being fat soluble tend to accumulate in higher animals including humans. Dioxins has 75 congeners of PCDD and 135 congeners of PCDF, but generally only 7 congeners of PCDD and 10 congeners of PCDF are analyzed because of their toxicity, stability and so on. Since dioxins contamination is regarded as a global issue, a large amount of samples have been analyzed, and various methods for measuring dioxins have been developed and improved. Dioxins analysis needs very complicated analytical procedure including extraction, cleanup and instrument analysis. Because analytical procedure is very complicated and needs many steps, conventional analytical procedure are very time consuming and use large volumes of solvents. So current methods are time consuming and very expensive. In this study, speedy and cost reducing methods without reducing recovery and stability should be focused. So to present the new extraction method to simplify and stabilize of extraction method, the recovery and stability of 7 congeners of PCDD and 10 congeners of PCDF using soxhlet, forced convection dry oven and microwave oven were compared.

  1. Determination of Orange II in food samples after cloud point extraction using mixed micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreza, N; Zareian, M

    2009-06-15

    In this paper, a cloud point extraction method for the determination of trace amounts of Orange II by spectrophotometry is described. The method is based on the extraction of Orange II from aqueous solution using mixed micelles of non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100 and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) in acidic media. The extracted surfactant rich phase is diluted with water and its absorbance is measured at 484 nm by a spectrophotometer. The effects of surfactant, acid and salt concentration, incubation time and temperature were investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 2.1-420 ng mL(-1) of Orange II in the initial solution with r=0.9991 (n=12). Detection limit based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3S(b)) was 0.67 ng mL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 35 and 105 ng mL(-1) of Orange II was 1.20% and 1.49% (n=10), respectively. The method was applied to the determination of Orange II in different food samples.

  2. Local surface sampling step estimation for extracting boundaries of planar point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brie, David; Bombardier, Vincent; Baeteman, Grégory; Bennis, Abdelhamid

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate the surface sampling step of planar point clouds acquired by Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) which is varying with the distance to the surface and the angular positions. The local surface sampling step is obtained by doing a first order Taylor expansion of planar point coordinates. Then, it is shown how to use it in Delaunay-based boundary point extraction. The resulting approach, which is implemented in the ModiBuilding software, is applied to two facade point clouds of a building. The first is acquired with a single station and the second with two stations. In both cases, the proposed approach performs very accurately and appears to be robust to the variations of the point cloud density.

  3. Determination of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane in air using commercial solid phase extraction cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S

    2010-05-21

    Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D(5)), a high production volume chemical used in personal care products, has been designated for regulation in Canada and is under review in the EU because of concerns about its persistence and potential for bioaccumulation in the environment. D(5) is a volatile compound expected to be found primarily in air, but there is little information on atmospheric concentrations due to the lack of sensitive analytical methods. Here a simple and sensitive method to determine D(5) in ambient air is presented. The challenge in the environmental analysis of D(5) is avoiding contamination. Our method is based on the high trapping efficiency of the sorbent Isolute ENV+, combined with a comparably high sampling rate. A small amount of sorbent (10 mg) is eluted in a small volume of n-hexane (0.1-0.6 mL), which is injected onto a GC/MS system without further processing. The simplicity of the method enables the use of a field blank for every sample to trace contamination. The method provides low limits of quantification (approximately 0.3 ng/m(3)), good repeatability and limited breakthrough (approximately 1%). By lowering the limit of quantification compared to published work by almost two orders of magnitude, it became possible to quantify D(5) in ambient air at locations remote from strong point sources. The concentrations at a rural Swedish site ranged from 0.7 to 8 ng/m(3) over a period of 4 months.

  4. Evaluation of sampling and analytical methods for nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon in indoor air. Final report, 1 February 1987-30 March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, J.C.; Kuhlman, M.R.; Hannan, S.W.; Bridges, C.

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate a potential collection medium, XAD-4 resin, for collecting nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and to determine whether one collection system and one analytical method will allow quantification of both compound classes in air. The extraction efficiency study was to determine the extraction method to quantitatively remove nicotine and PAH from XAD-4 resin. The results showed that a two-step Soxhlet extraction consisting of dichloromethane followed by ethyl acetate resulted in the best recoveries for both nicotine and PAH. In the sampling efficiency study, XAD-2 and XAD-4 resin were compared, in parallel, for collection of PAH and nicotine. Quartz fiber filters were placed upstream of both adsorbents to collect particles. Prior to sampling, both XAD-2 and XAD-4 traps were spiked with known amounts (2 microgram) of perdeuterated PAH and D3-nicotine. The experiments were performed with cigarette smoking and nonsmoking conditions. The spiked PAH were retained well in both adsorbents after exposure to more than 300 cu. m. of indoor air. The spiked XAD-4 resin gave higher recoveries for D3-nicotine than did the spiked XAD-2 resin. The collection efficiency for PAH for both adsorbents is very similar but higher levels of nicotine were collected on XAD-4 resin.

  5. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples.

  6. Ram-air sample collection device for a chemical warfare agent sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megerle, Clifford A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    In a surface acoustic wave sensor mounted within a body, the sensor having a surface acoustic wave array detector and a micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator exposed on a surface of the body, an apparatus for collecting air for the sensor, comprising a housing operatively arranged to mount atop the body, the housing including a multi-stage channel having an inlet and an outlet, the channel having a first stage having a first height and width proximate the inlet, a second stage having a second lower height and width proximate the micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator, a third stage having a still lower third height and width proximate the surface acoustic wave array detector, and a fourth stage having a fourth height and width proximate the outlet, where the fourth height and width are substantially the same as the first height and width.

  7. BIBLE A whole-air sampling as a window on Asian biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Scott; Blake, Donald R.; Blake, Nicola J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Sive, Barkley C.; Smith, Felisa A.

    2003-02-01

    Asian trace gas and aerosol emissions into carbon, nitrogen, and other elemental cycles will figure prominently in near term Earth system evolution. Atmospheric hydrocarbon measurements resolve numerous chemical species and can be used to investigate sourcing for key geocarriers. A recent aircraft study of biomass burning and lightning (BIBLE A) explored the East Asian atmosphere and was unique in centering on the Indonesian archipelago. Samples of volatile organics taken over/between the islands of Japan, Saipan, Java, and Borneo are here examined as a guide to whole-air-based studies of future Asian biogeochemistry. The midlatitude onshore/offshore pulse and tropical convection strongly influence concentration distributions. As species of increasing molecular weight are considered, rural, combustion, and industrial source regimes emerge. Methane-rich inputs such as waste treatment and rice cultivation are evidenced in the geostrophic outflow. The Indonesian atmosphere is rich in biomass burning markers and also those of vehicular activity. Complexity of air chemistry in the archipelago is a direct reflection of diverse topography, land use, and local economies in a rapidly developing nation. Conspicuous in its absence is the fingerprint for liquefied petroleum gas leakage, but it can be expected to appear as demand for clean fossil fuels rises along with per capita incomes. Combustion tracers indicate high nitrogen mobilization rates, linking regional terrestrial geocycles with open marine ecosystems. Sea to air fluxes are superimposed on continental and marine backgrounds for the methyl halides. However, ocean hot spots are not coordinated and suggest an intricate subsurface kinetics. Levels of long-lived anthropogenic halocarbons attest to the success of international environmental treaties while reactive chlorine containing species track industrial air masses. The dozens of hydrocarbons resolvable by gas chromatographic methods will enable monitoring of

  8. Evaluation of physical sampling efficiency for cyclone-based personal bioaerosol samplers in moving air environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Chen, Bean T; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2012-09-01

    The need to determine occupational exposure to bioaerosols has notably increased in the past decade, especially for microbiology-related workplaces and laboratories. Recently, two new cyclone-based personal bioaerosol samplers were developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the USA and the Research Center for Toxicology and Hygienic Regulation of Biopreparations (RCT & HRB) in Russia to monitor bioaerosol exposure in the workplace. Here, a series of wind tunnel experiments were carried out to evaluate the physical sampling performance of these two samplers in moving air conditions, which could provide information for personal biological monitoring in a moving air environment. The experiments were conducted in a small wind tunnel facility using three wind speeds (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m s(-1)) and three sampling orientations (0°, 90°, and 180°) with respect to the wind direction. Monodispersed particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm were employed as the test aerosols. The evaluation of the physical sampling performance was focused on the aspiration efficiency and capture efficiency of the two samplers. The test results showed that the orientation-averaged aspiration efficiencies of the two samplers closely agreed with the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) inhalable convention within the particle sizes used in the evaluation tests, and the effect of the wind speed on the aspiration efficiency was found negligible. The capture efficiencies of these two samplers ranged from 70% to 80%. These data offer important information on the insight into the physical sampling characteristics of the two test samplers.

  9. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of Cobalt(II) in synthetic and pharmaceutical samples using Cyanex 923.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B Ramachandra; Radhika, P; Kumar, J Rajesh; Priya, D Neela; Rajgopal, K

    2004-02-01

    Cyanex 923 has been proposed as a sensitive analytical reagent for the direct extractive spectrophotometric determination of cobalt(II). Cobalt(II) forms a blue-colored complex with Cyanex 923 in the organic phase. The maximum absorbance of the complex is measured at 635 nm. Beer's law was obeyed in the range 58.9 - 589.0 microg of cobalt. The molar absorptivitiy and Sandell's sensitivity of the complex was calculated to be 6.79 x 10920 l mol(-1) cm(-1) and 0.088 microg cm(-2), respectively. The nature of the extracted species was found to be Co(SCN)2 x 2S. An excellent linearity with a correlation coefficient value of 0.999 was obtained for the Co(II)-Cyanex 923 complex. Stability and regeneration of the reagent (Cyanex 923) for reuse is the main advantage of the present method. The method was successfully applied to the determination of cobalt in synthetic mixtures and pharmaceutical samples was found to give values close to the actual ones. Standard alloy samples, such as high-speed tool BCS 484 and 485, have been tested for the determination of cobalt for the purpose of validating the present method. The results of the proposed method are comparable with atomic absorption spectrometry and were found to be in good agreement.

  10. Development of a cloud-point extraction method for copper and nickel determination in food samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo Lemos, Valfredo [Nucleo de Quimica Analitica da Bahia (NQA), Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica (LQA), Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Campus de Jequie, 45206-190 Jequie, BA (Brazil)], E-mail: vlemos@uesb.br; Selis Santos, Moacy; Teixeira David, Graciete; Vasconcelos Maciel, Mardson; Almeida Bezerra, Marcos de [Nucleo de Quimica Analitica da Bahia (NQA), Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica (LQA), Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Campus de Jequie, 45206-190 Jequie, BA (Brazil)

    2008-11-30

    A new, simple and versatile cloud-point extraction (CPE) methodology has been developed for the separation and preconcentration of copper and nickel. The metals in the initial aqueous solution were complexed with 2-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-5-(N,N-diethyl)aminophenol (BDAP) and Triton X-114 was added as surfactant. Dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with acidified methanol was performed after phase separation, and the copper and nickel contents were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The variables affecting the cloud-point extraction were optimized using a Box-Behnken design. Under the optimum experimental conditions, enrichment factors of 29 and 25 were achieved for copper and nickel, respectively. The accuracy of the method was evaluated and confirmed by analysis of the followings certified reference materials: Apple Leaves, Spinach Leaves and Tomato Leaves. The limits of detection expressed to solid sample analysis were 0.1 {mu}g g{sup -1} (Cu) and 0.4 {mu}g g{sup -1} (Ni). The precision for 10 replicate measurements of 75 {mu}g L{sup -1} Cu or Ni was 6.4 and 1.0, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of food samples.

  11. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporty, Jennifer L; Kabir, Md Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2008-10-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH(3)CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures.

  12. Evaluation of bioaerosol sampling techniques for the detection of Chlamydophila psittaci in contaminated air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Droogenbroeck, Caroline; Van Risseghem, Marleen; Braeckman, Lutgart; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2009-03-16

    Chlamydophila (C.) psittaci, a category B bioterrorism agent, causes respiratory disease in birds and psittacosis or parrot fever in man. The disease spreads aerogenically and no vaccines are available for either birds or man. Highly sensitive C. psittaci bioaerosol monitoring methods are unavailable. We evaluated: (1) dry filtration for collecting C. psittaci from contaminated air using different samplers and membrane filters, (2) impingement into different liquid collection media by use of the AGI-30 impinger and the BioSampler and (3) impaction into newly designed C. psittaci media utilizing the MAS-100 aerosol impactor. For personal bioaerosol sampling, we recommend the use of a gelatin filter in combination with the IOM inhalable dust sampler at an airflow rate of 2L/min. This allowed the detection of 10 organisms of C. psittaci by both PCR and culture. For stationary bioaerosol monitoring, sampling 1000L of air in 10min with the MAS-100 impactor and ChlamyTrap 1 impaction medium was most efficient and made it possible to detect 1 and 10 C. psittaci organisms by PCR and culture, respectively. ChlamyTrap 1 in combination with the MAS-100 impactor might also be applicable for bioaerosol monitoring of viruses.

  13. Evaluating spatial distribution and seasonal variation of phthalates using passive air sampling in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Srimurali; Selvaraj, Krishna Kumar; Shanmugam, Govindaraj; Krishnamoorthy, Vimalkumar; Chakraborty, Paromita; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran

    2017-02-01

    Usage of phthalates as plasticizers has resulted in worldwide occurrence and is becoming a serious concern to human health and environment. However, studies on phthalates in Indian atmosphere are lacking. Therefore, we studied the spatio-temporal trends of six major phthalates in Tamil Nadu, southern India, using passive air samplers. Phthalates were ubiquitously detected in all the samples and the average total phthalates found in decreasing order is pre-monsoon (61 ng m(-3)) > summer (52 ng m(-3)) > monsoon (17 ng m(-3)). Largely used phthalates, dibutylphthalate (DBP) and diethylhexlphthalate (DEHP) were predominantly found in all the seasons with contribution of 11-31% and 59-68%, respectively. The highest total phthalates was observed in summer at an urban location (836 ng m(-3)). Furthermore, through principal component analysis, potential sources were identified as emissions from additives of plasticizers in the polymer industry and the productions of adhesives, building materials and vinyl flooring. Although inhalation exposure of infants was higher than other population segments (toddlers, children and adults), exposure levels were found to be safe for people belonging to all ages based on reference dose (RfD) and tolerable daily intake (TDI) values. This study first attempted to report seasonal trend based on atmospheric monitoring using passive air sampling technique and exposure risk together.

  14. Preparation and examination of monolithic in-needle extraction (MINE) device for the direct analysis of liquid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzyńska, Monika, E-mail: monikapietrzynska@gmail.com; Voelkel, Adam; Bielicka-Daszkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2013-05-07

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •MINE device for isolation of analytes from water samples. •Nine polymer poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monoliths prepared in stainless steel needles. •High efficiency of in-needle extraction systems based on monolithic materials. •New possibilities in sample preparation area. -- Abstract: Combination of extraction and chromatographic techniques opens NEW possibilities in sample preparation area. Macroporous poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) monoliths were prepared by in situ polymerization in stainless steel needles. The surface of stainless steel needle was modified earlier by the silane coupling agent. Monolithic materials located inside needles were used as the in-needle extraction device. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were obtained for nine monoliths. Spectra of prepared materials were also performed with the use of two techniques: Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The new monolithic in-needle extraction (MINE) devices were used in the preparation of a series of test water samples for chromatographic analysis. The extraction of phenolic compounds from water samples was carried out by pumping liquid samples through the MINE device. Obtained results indicate a high efficiency of in-needle extraction systems based on monolithic materials. Breakthrough volume and the sorption efficiency of prepared monolithic in-needle extraction devices were determined experimentally. The achieved recovery was close to 90%, and determined LOQ values varied between 0.4 and 6 μg.

  15. Calibration of Polyurethane Foam (PUF Disk Passive Air Samplers for Quantitative Sampling of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs in Indoor Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hazrati

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to employ PUF disk passive air sampler (140 mm diameter, 12 mm thickness as a quantitative sampling device a set of calibration experiments were carried out. Time integrated indoor air concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were obtained from a low volume air sampler. The low volume active sampler was run alongside the passive samplers throughout the calibration period in an office microenvironment. Sampling rates of routinely employed passive sampler design were determined for 51 PCB and 6 PBDE congeners detected in all calibration samples. PUF disk R-values varied from 0.63 to 1.54 m3 day-1 for individual PCBs and from 1.1 to 1.9 m3 day-1 for PBDE congeners. The theory of passive sampling is also discussed and mass transfer coefficients (kA of PCB and PBDE congeners provided.

  16. Apparatus and method for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-11

    A dilution apparatus for diluting a gas sample. The apparatus includes a sample gas conduit having a sample gas inlet end and a diluted sample gas outlet end, and a sample gas flow restricting orifice disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end connected with the sample gas conduit and providing fluid communication between the exterior and the interior of the sample gas conduit. A diluted sample gas conduit is provided within the sample gas conduit having a mixing end with a mixing space inlet opening disposed proximate the sample gas inlet end, thereby forming an annular space between the sample gas conduit and the diluted sample gas conduit. The mixing end of the diluted sample gas conduit is disposed at a distance from the sample gas flow restricting orifice. A dilution gas source connected with the sample gas inlet end of the sample gas conduit is provided for introducing a dilution gas into the annular space, and a filter is provided for filtering the sample gas. The apparatus is particularly suited for diluting heated sample gases containing one or more condensable components.

  17. Determination of Organic Pollutants in Small Samples of Groundwaters by Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary Gas Chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, I.; Leader, R.U.; Higgo, J.J.W.;

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of 22 organic compounds in polluted groundwaters. The method includes liquid-liquid extraction of the base/neutral organics from small, alkaline groundwater samples, followed by derivatisation and liquid-liquid extraction of phenolic compounds after...... neutralisation. The extracts were analysed by capillary gas chromatography. Dual detection by flame Ionisation and electron capture was used to reduce analysis time....

  18. Curtailment of soil vapor extraction systems at McClellan Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, T.E. [BDM Federal, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Mook, P.H. Jr.; Wong, K.B. [SM-ALC/EMR, McClellan AFB, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    McClellan Air Force Base (AFB), located near Sacramento, California, is one of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program`s National Environmental Technology Test Sites. McClellan AFB has implemented soil vapor extraction (SVE) as an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) non-time-critical remedial action for volatile organic compounds in soil. Operation and maintenance costs for SVE systems are increasingly becoming a major component of the environmental clean-up budget. In an effort to reduce costs, while assuring the protection of public health and the environment, a risk-based strategy has been developed for the curtailment and eventual shut-down of SVE systems at McClellan AFB. This paper presents an overview of the SVE EE/CA process and a detailed description of the development and implementation of the curtailment strategy. Included in the discussion are details of the public and regulatory involvement in the process.

  19. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings.

  20. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-12-10

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples.

  1. Air-assisted liquid–liquid microextraction by solidifying the floating organic droplets for the rapid determination of seven fungicide residues in juice samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Xiangwei [Tobacco Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Xing, Zhuokan [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Liu, Fengmao, E-mail: liufengmao@cau.edu.cn [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Zhang, Xu [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • A novel AALLME-SFO method was firstly reported for pesticide residue analysis. • Solvent with low density and proper melting point was used as extraction solvent. • The formation of “cloudy solvent” with a syringe only. • The new method avoided the use of organic dispersive solvent. - Abstract: A novel air assisted liquid–liquid microextraction using the solidification of a floating organic droplet method (AALLME-SFO) was developed for the rapid and simple determination of seven fungicide residues in juice samples, using the gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). This method combines the advantages of AALLME and dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) for the first time. In this method, a low-density solvent with a melting point near room temperature was used as the extraction solvent, and the emulsion was rapidly formed by pulling in and pushing out the mixture of aqueous sample solution and extraction solvent for ten times repeatedly using a 10-mL glass syringe. After centrifugation, the extractant droplet could be easily collected from the top of the aqueous samples by solidifying it at a temperature lower than the melting point. Under the optimized conditions, good linearities with the correlation coefficients (γ) higher than 0.9959 were obtained and the limits of detection (LOD) varied between 0.02 and 0.25 μg L{sup −1}. The proposed method was applied to determine the target fungicides in juice samples and acceptable recoveries ranged from 72.6% to 114.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.3–13.0% were achieved. Compared with the conventional DLLME method, the newly proposed method will neither require a highly toxic chlorinated solvent for extraction nor an organic dispersive solvent in the application process; hence, it is more environmentally friendly.

  2. In vitro effects of pollutants from particulate and volatile fractions of air samples-day and night variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Jiří; Giesy, John P; Klánová, Jana; Hilscherová, Klára

    2013-09-01

    Chemicals in air were characterized for potential interference with signaling of estrogen, androgen, and arylhydrocarbon (AhR) receptors, which are known to play an important role in endocrine-disruptive changes in vivo. Previously, effects of this type have been studied mainly in particulate matter in the ambient air from various localities. In this study, both volatile and particulate fractions of air from three sites in Banja Luka region (Bosnia and Herzegovina) were investigated to describe the distribution of endocrine-disrupting contaminants on a small spatial scale. Circadian variability of air pollution was investigated by collecting samples during both day and night. Air samples collected from urban localities at night were more potent in producing the AhR-mediated effects than those collected during daytime. This trend was not observed at the reference rural location. None of the samples showed significant estrogenic or androgenic activity. On the other hand, anti-androgenicity was detected in both particulate and vapor phases, while anti-estrogenicity was detected only in the particulate fraction of air from all localities. The AhR-mediated potencies of samples were associated primarily with non-persistent compounds. Based on the concentrations of 28 individual compounds, PAHs accounted for approximately 30 % of the AhR-mediated potency determined by the bioassay. The results show that there can be a significant difference between levels of bioactive compounds in air between daytime and nighttime.

  3. Analytical performance of two miniaturised extraction methods for triclosan and methyltriclosan, in fish roe and surimi samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Lumbreras, R; Sanz-Landaluze, J; Cámara, C

    2014-03-01

    A new and reliable miniaturised QuEChERS-based extraction method combined with a dispersive SPE cleanup procedure for extracting triclosan and methyltriclosan from fish roe and surimi samples was proposed. The effectiveness of different extraction/partition conditions for QuEChERS method was systematically investigated, and the use of acetonitrile extraction solvent and MgSO4, PSA, C18 and Florisil as cleanup reagents was recommended in the final method. Other method based on ultrasonic extraction with ethylacetate and clean-up with SPE was also evaluated for these samples. Different polymeric and silica sorbents for clean up were tested and the combination of Florisil and PSA was finally selected. The performance of these miniaturised sample preparation methods combined with GC-MS with quadrupole detection were compared. Extraction efficiency as well as cleaning effectiveness, laboriousness and speed were taken as criteria for method evaluation. Satisfactory validation parameters, such as linearity, recovery, precision and LODs and LOQs for both developed analytical methods were obtained from fish roe and surimi samples. Finally, both methods were applied to real samples. The sensitivity of the proposed methods was good enough to ensure reliable determination of target analytes at concentration levels commonly found in this kind of samples.

  4. Preparation and characterization of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for the extraction of hexamethylenetetramine in milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-15

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (M-MIPs) were synthesized as the sorbents for extracting hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) from milk samples. Molecular simulations were used to calculate the interaction energies of the template monomers. The physical properties of M-MIPs were characterized. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. Gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was applied to determine the amount of HMT residue in milk samples. In the optimized method, a linear calibration curve was obtained using a matrix-matched standard in the range of 1.0-50.0μgL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.3μgkg(-1) and 1.0μgkg(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the intra-day assay ranged from 2.6% to 5.2%, while that of the inter-day assay ranged from 3.6% to 11.5%. The recovery of HMT in milk samples ranged from 88.7% to 111.4%.

  5. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination.

  6. Selective determination of total vanadium in water samples by cloud point extraction of its ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filik, Hayati [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: filik@istanbul.edu.tr; Yanaz, Zeynep; Apak, Resat [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-07-14

    A highly sensitive micelle-mediated extraction methodology for the preconcentration of trace levels of vanadium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Vanadium was complexed with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium (0.2 mol L{sup -1} phosphoric acid) using Triton X-100 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The color reaction of vanadium ions with hydrogen peroxide and PAN in phosphoric acid medium is highly selective. The chemical variables affecting cloud point extraction (CPE) were evaluated and optimized. The R.S.D. for 5 replicate determinations at the 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} V level was 3.6%. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The method has good sensitivity and selectivity and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of vanadium in water samples with satisfactory result. The proposed method is a rare application of CPE-atomic spectrometry to vanadium assay, and is superior to most other similar methods, because its useful pH range is in the moderately acidic range achieved with phosphoric acid. At this pH, many potential interferents are not chelated with PAN, and iron(III) as the major interferent is bound in a stable phosphate complex.

  7. Carbon coated magnetic nanoparticles as a novel magnetic solid phase extraction adsorbent for simultaneous extraction of methamphetamine and ephedrine from urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvimi, Arezou; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-01-15

    This paper develops a highly selective, specific and efficient method for simultaneous determination of ephedrine and methamphetamine by a new carbon coated magnetic nanoparticles (C/MNPs) as a magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) adsorbent in biological urine medium. The characterization of synthesized magnetic nano adsorbent was completely carried out by various characterization techniques like Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Nine important parameters influencing extraction efficiency including amount of adsorbent, amounts of sample volume, pH, type and amount of extraction organic solvent, time of extraction and desorption, agitation rate and ionic strength of extraction medium, were studied and optimized. Under optimized extraction conditions, a good linearity was observed in the concentration range of 100-2000ng/mL for ephedrine and 100-2500ng/mL for methamphetamine. Analysis of positive urine samples was carried out by proposed method with the recovery of 98.71 and 97.87% for ephedrine and methamphetamine, respectively. The results indicated that carbon coated magnetic nanoparticles could be applied in clinical and forensic laboratories for simultaneous determination of abused drugs in urine media.

  8. The usage of micellar extraction for analysis of fluvastatin in water and wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniewicka, Marta; Starczewska, Barbara

    2015-03-15

    This work illustrates the development of new procedures for the isolation and preconcentration of fluvastatin (FLU) from aqueous solutions. Micellar extraction (ME) combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV) has been successfully applied for this purpose. It was found that the analyte created micelle with anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and/or with the binary mixture of surfactants nonionic triton X114 (TX114) and cationic tetra-n-butyloammonium bromide (TBAB). The optimal analytical conditions for the proposed extraction procedures (solution pH, concentration of surfactants, centrifugation time and electrolyte type) were ascertained. The calibration curves were recorded. The linearity ranges for FLU, isolated by SDS and the mixture of TX114/TBAB, were 0.21-28.79 μg mL(-1) and 0.21-16.45 μg mL(-1) with limit of detection (LOD) 0.19 μg mL(-1) and 0.14 μg mL(-1), respectively. The recoveries afforded by the proposed methods were high, approximately 97%. These preconcentration procedures were applied for the isolation of the statin from water and wastewater samples taken from the local rivers and wastewater treatment plants.

  9. Magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the extraction and rapid determination of six fluoroquinolones in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Yuan, Qiuxiang; Liang, Guoxi; Shi, Longbiao; Zhan, Qian

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a mixed hemimicelle solid-phase extraction method based on Fe3 O4 nanoparticles coated with sodium dodecyl sulfate was applied for the preconcentration and fast isolation of six fluoroquinolones in environmental water samples before high-performance liquid chromatography determination. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency of the analytes, such as amount of surfactant, amount of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles, extraction time, sample volume, sample pH, ionic strength, and desorption conditions, were investigated and optimized. The method has detection limits from 0.05 to 0.1 ng/mL and good linearity (r ≥ 09948) in the range 0.1-200 ng/mL depending on the fluoroquinolone. The enrichment factor is ∼200. The recoveries (at spiked levels of 1, 5, and 50 ng/mL) are in the range of 79-120%.

  10. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, A.; Abdollahi, H.; Hormozi Nezhad, M. R.; Kamali, R.

    2004-10-01

    Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt after the formation of a complex with 2-amino-cyclopentene-1-dithiocarboxylic acid (ACDA), and latter analysis by spectrophotometer using Triton X-114 as surfactant. The parameters affecting the separation phase and detection process were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions (i.e. pH=5, 0.07 mM ACDA, Triton X-114 = 0.25% (w/v)), calibration graphs were linear in the range of 20-500 and 20-200 μg l -1 with detection limits of 10 and 7.5 μg l -1 for Ni and Co, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of Ni and Co in natural and waste water samples with satisfactory results.

  11. Agarose- and alginate-based biopolymers for sample preparation: Excellent green extraction tools for this century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Loh, Saw Hong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Nazihah; Pourmand, Neda; Salisu, Ahmed; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran

    2016-03-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of miniaturized sample preparation techniques before the chromatographic monitoring of the analytes in unknown complex compositions. The use of biopolymer-based sorbents in solid-phase microextraction techniques has achieved a good reputation. A great variety of polysaccharides can be extracted from marine plants or microorganisms. Seaweeds are the major sources of polysaccharides such as alginate, agar, agarose, as well as carrageenans. Agarose and alginate (green biopolymers) have been manipulated for different microextraction approaches. The present review is focused on the classification of biopolymer and their applications in multidisciplinary research. Besides, efforts have been made to discuss the state-of-the-art of the new microextraction techniques that utilize commercial biopolymer interfaces such as agarose in liquid-phase microextraction and solid-phase microextraction.

  12. Assessment of respiratory effect of air pollution: study design on general population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacci, S; Carrozzi, L; Viegi, G; Giuntini, C

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe an epidemiological model to investigate the relationship between respiratory diseases and environmental air pollution. In the Po Delta prospective study, subjects were investigated before and after a large thermoelectric power plant began operating, in 1980 to 1982 and in 1988 to 1991, respectively. The Pisa prospective study was performed in 1986 to 1988 and in 1991 to 1993, before and after the construction of a new expressway that encircles the city from the North to the Southeast. In each survey, subjects completed the interviewer-administered standardized CNR questionnaire on respiratory symptoms/diseases and risk factors, and performed lung function tests. In the second survey of each study, skin prick tests, total serum IgE determination, methacholine challenge test and biomarkers (such as sister chromatide exchanges, micronuclei, chromosomal abnormalities, DNA and hemoglobin adducts) were also performed. Concentrations of total suspended particulate and SO2 in both surveys were higher in urban than in rural areas, as well as symptom/disease prevalences and bronchial reactivity. Subgroups of subjects from the two samples were enrolled to perform a specific study on the acute respiratory effects of indoor pollution; the daily presence of symptoms and measurements of peak expiratory flow (PEF), daily activity pattern, and assessment of the indoor air quality (particulates particulates, especially asthmatics. In conclusion, these studies represent a basis for further analyses to better define the relationship between respiratory health and indoor/outdoor pollutant levels.

  13. Accelerated solvent extraction followed by on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to ion trap LC/MS/MS for analysis of benzalkonium chlorides in sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I.; Furlong, E.T.

    2002-01-01

    Benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) were successfully extracted from sediment samples using a new methodology based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by an on-line cleanup step. The BACs were detected by liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS) or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using an electrospray interface operated in the positive ion mode. This methodology combines the high efficiency of extraction provided by a pressurized fluid and the high sensitivity offered by the ion trap MS/MS. The effects of solvent type and ASE operational variables, such as temperature and pressure, were evaluated. After optimization, a mixture of acetonitrile/water (6:4 or 7:3) was found to be most efficient for extracting BACs from the sediment samples. Extraction recoveries ranged from 95 to 105% for C12 and C14 homologues, respectively. Total method recoveries from fortified sediment samples, using a cleanup step followed by ASE, were 85% for C12BAC and 79% for C14-BAC. The methodology developed in this work provides detection limits in the subnanogram per gram range. Concentrations of BAC homologues ranged from 22 to 206 ??g/kg in sediment samples from different river sites downstream from wastewater treatment plants. The high affinity of BACs for soil suggests that BACs preferentially concentrate in sediment rather than in water.

  14. Magnetic nano graphene oxide as solid phase extraction adsorbent coupled with liquid chromatography to determine pseudoephedrine in urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvimi, Arezou; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on a method based on magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) for the determination of pseudoephedrine. Magnetic nanographene oxide (MNGO) was applied as a new adsorbent for the extraction of pseudoephedrine from urine samples. Synthesis of MNGO was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The main factors influencing extraction efficiency, including the amounts of sample volume, amount of adsorbent, type and amount of extraction organic solvent, time of extraction and desorption, pH, ionic strength of extraction medium, and agitation rate, were investigated and optimized. Under optimized extraction conditions, a good linearity was observed in the range of 100-2000ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9908 (r(2)). Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 25 and 82.7ng/mL, respectively. Inter-day and intra-day precision and accuracy were 6.01 and 0.34 (%), and 8.70 and 0.29 (%), respectively. The method was applied for the determination of pseudoephedrine in urine samples of volunteers receiving pseudoephedrine with the recovery of 96.42. It was concluded that the proposed method can be applied in diagnostic clinics.

  15. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Topical report for Phases 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-21

    Under contract with the US Department of Energy (DE-AC22-92PCO0367), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Radian Corporation has conducted a test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPS). Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical charactization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions.

  16. A comprehensive factorial design study of variables affecting protein extraction from formalin-fixed kidney tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, J E; Oliveira, E; Otero-Glez, A; Santos Nores, J; Igrejas, G; Lodeiro, C; Capelo, J L; Santos, H M

    2014-02-01

    Formalin-fixed tissues are an important source of biological samples for biomedical research. However, proteomics analysis of formalin-fixed tissues has been set aside by formalin-induced protein modifications, which reduce protein extraction efficiency. In this study, a two level full factorial experimental design (2(4)) was used to determine the effects of the extracting conditions in the efficiency of protein recovery from formalin-fixed kidney samples. The following variables were assessed: temperature of extraction, pH of extraction, composition of the extracting buffer and the use ultrasonic energy applied with probe. It is clearly demonstrated that when hating and ultrasonic energy are used in conjunction, a 7-fold increase (p protein extraction is obtained if compared to extracting conditions for which neither heating nor ultrasonic energy are used. The optimization study was done following the amount of protein extracted by UV (Nanodrop(®) technology, protein ABS at 280 nm) and by 1D SDS-PAGE. Extracts obtained with the optimized conditions were subjected to LC-MALDI MS/MS. A total of 112 proteins were identified.

  17. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1g cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  18. Optimal protein extraction methods from diverse sample types for protein profiling by using Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2DE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A A; Azman, S N; Abdul Rani, N R; Kua, B C; Sasidharan, S; Kiew, L V; Othman, N; Noordin, R; Chen, Y

    2011-12-01

    There is a great diversity of protein samples types and origins, therefore the optimal procedure for each sample type must be determined empirically. In order to obtain a reproducible and complete sample presentation which view as many proteins as possible on the desired 2DE gel, it is critical to perform additional sample preparation steps to improve the quality of the final results, yet without selectively losing the proteins. To address this, we developed a general method that is suitable for diverse sample types based on phenolchloroform extraction method (represented by TRI reagent). This method was found to yield good results when used to analyze human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), Vibrio cholerae, Cryptocaryon irritans cyst and liver abscess fat tissue. These types represent cell line, bacteria, parasite cyst and pus respectively. For each type of samples, several attempts were made to methodically compare protein isolation methods using TRI-reagent Kit, EasyBlue Kit, PRO-PREP™ Protein Extraction Solution and lysis buffer. The most useful protocol allows the extraction and separation of a wide diversity of protein samples that is reproducible among repeated experiments. Our results demonstrated that the modified TRI-reagent Kit had the highest protein yield as well as the greatest number of total proteins spots count for all type of samples. Distinctive differences in spot patterns were also observed in the 2DE gel of different extraction methods used for each type of sample.

  19. Comparison of sample preparation methods for reliable plutonium and neptunium urinalysis using automatic extraction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jixin; Xu, Yihong; Hou, Xiaolin; Miró, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes improvement and comparison of analytical methods for simultaneous determination of trace-level plutonium and neptunium in urine samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Four sample pre-concentration techniques, including calcium phosphate, iron hydroxide and manganese dioxide co-precipitation and evaporation were compared and the applicability of different techniques was discussed in order to evaluate and establish the optimal method for in vivo radioassay program. The analytical results indicate that the various sample pre-concentration approaches afford dissimilar method performances and care should be taken for specific experimental parameters for improving chemical yields. The best analytical performances in terms of turnaround time (6h) and chemical yields for plutonium (88.7 ± 11.6%) and neptunium (94.2 ± 2.0%) were achieved by manganese dioxide co-precipitation. The need of drying ashing (≥ 7h) for calcium phosphate co-precipitation and long-term aging (5d) for iron hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively, rendered time-consuming analytical protocols. Despite the fact that evaporation is also somewhat time-consuming (1.5d), it endows urinalysis methods with better reliability and repeatability compared with co-precipitation techniques. In view of the applicability of different pre-concentration techniques proposed previously in the literature, the main challenge behind relevant method development is pointed to be the release of plutonium and neptunium associated with organic compounds in real urine assays. In this work, different protocols for decomposing organic matter in urine were investigated, of which potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) treatment provided the highest chemical yield of neptunium in the iron hydroxide co-precipitation step, yet, the occurrence of sulfur compounds in the processed sample deteriorated the analytical performance of the ensuing extraction chromatographic separation with chemical

  20. Continuous-flow fractionation of selenium in contaminated sediment and soil samples using rotating coiled column and microcolumn extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonina, Elena Yu; Fedotov, Petr S; Wennrich, Rainer

    2012-01-15

    Dynamic fractionation is considered to be an attractive alternative to conventional batch sequential extraction procedures for partitioning of trace metals and metalloids in environmental solid samples. This paper reports the first results on the continuous-flow dynamic fractionation of selenium using two different extraction systems, a microcolumn (MC) packed with the solid sample and a rotating coiled column (RCC) in which the particulate matter is retained under the action of centrifugal forces. The eluents (leachants) were applied in correspondence with a four-step sequential extraction scheme for selenium addressing "soluble", "adsorbed", "organically bound", and "elemental" Se fractions extractable by distilled water, phosphate buffer, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and sodium sulphite solutions, respectively. Selenium was determined in the effluent by using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Contaminated creek sediment and dumped waste (soil) samples from the abandoned mining area were used to evaluate resemblances and discrepancies of two continuous-flow methods for Se fractionation. In general, similar trends were found for Se distribution between extractable and residual fractions. However, for the dumped waste sample which is rich in organic matter, the extraction in RCC provided more effective recovery of environmentally relevant Se forms (the first three leachable fractions). The most evident deviation was observed for "adsorbed" Se (recoveries by RCC and MC are 43 and 7 mg kg(-1), respectively). The data obtained were correlated with peculiarities of samples under investigation and operational principles of RCC and MC.

  1. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DRINKING WATER SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP 5.23)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method for extracting and preparing a drinking water sample for analysis of atrazine is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry.

  3. Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

  4. Selective ligandless cloud point extraction of palladium from water and dust samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Sayed Zia; Mohammadnezhad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants was used for separation and preconcentration of Pd(II). The cloud point extraction (CPE) method is based on the formation of PdI2 which is then entrapped in the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114. Ethanol acidified with 0.5 M HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, such as sample solution pH, concentration of iodide ion and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time, were all investigated and optimized. At optimum conditions, a calibration curve was constructed for the determination of palladium according to the ligandless CPE procedure. Linearity was maintained between 1.0 to 500.0 ng/mL. The LOD based on three times the SD of the blank divided by the slope of analytical curve, (3Sb/m) was 0.3 ng/mL. Seven replicate determinations of a solution containing of 4.0 μg palladium gave a mean absorbance of 0.359 with RSD±1.85%. The high efficiency of CPE to carry out the determination of palladium in complex matrixes was demonstrated. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of palladium in a platinum-iridium alloy, water, and dust samples, with satisfactory results.

  5. New developments in the extraction and determination of parabens in cosmetics and environmental samples. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-González, Juan Antonio; Villar-Navarro, Mercedes; Ramos-Payán, María; Fernández-Torres, Rut; Bello-López, Miguel Angel

    2015-02-09

    Parabens are a family of synthetic esters of p-hydroxibenzoic acid widely used as preservatives in cosmetics and health-care products, among other daily-use commodities. Recently, their potential endocrine disrupting effects have raised concerns about their safety and their potential effects as emerging pollutants, leading to the regulation of the presence of parabens in commercial products by national and trans-national organizations. Also, this has led to an interest in developing sensible and reliable methods for their determination in environmental samples, cosmetics and health-care products. This paper is a comprehensive up-to-date review of the literature concerning the determination of parabens in environmental samples and cosmetic and health-care products. A brief revision of the literature concerning the traditional determination of parabens (1980-2003) is included, followed by an in-depth revision of the recent developments in both measurement and extraction methods for parabens in the last years (2003-2013). Finally, possible future perspectives in this field are proposed.

  6. Selective extraction of dimethoate from cucumber samples by use of molecularly imprinted microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Jiao Du

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymers for dimethoate recognition were synthesized by the precipitation polymerization technique using methyl methacrylate (MMA as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA as the cross-linker. The morphology, adsorption and recognition properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, static adsorption test, and competitive adsorption test. To obtain the best selectivity and binding performance, the synthesis and adsorption conditions of MIPs were optimized through single factor experiments. Under the optimized conditions, the resultant polymers exhibited uniform size, satisfactory binding capacity and significant selectivity. Furthermore, the imprinted polymers were successfully applied as a specific solid-phase extractants combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC for determination of dimethoate residues in the cucumber samples. The average recoveries of three spiked samples ranged from 78.5% to 87.9% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs less than 4.4% and the limit of detection (LOD obtained for dimethoate as low as 2.3 μg/mL.

  7. Selective extraction of dimethoate from cucumber samples by use of molecularly imprinted microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-Jiao Du; Rui-Xia Gao; Hu Yu; Xiao-Jing Li; Hui Mu

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers for dimethoate recognition were synthesized by the precipitation polymerization technique using methyl methacrylate (MMA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker. The morphology, adsorption and recognition properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), static adsorption test, and competitive adsorption test. To obtain the best selectivity and binding performance, the synthesis and adsorption conditions of MIPs were optimized through single factor experiments. Under the optimized conditions, the resultant polymers exhibited uniform size, satisfactory binding capacity and significant selectivity. Furthermore, the imprinted polymers were successfully applied as a specific solid-phase extractants combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for determination of dimethoate residues in the cucumber samples. The average recoveries of three spiked samples ranged from 78.5% to 87.9% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 4.4% and the limit of detection (LOD) obtained for dimethoate as low as 2.3μg/mL.

  8. Microwave assisted aqua regia extraction of thallium from sediment and coal fly ash samples and interference free determination by continuum source ETAAS after cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeravali, Noorbasha N; Madhavi, K; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2013-01-30

    A simple cloud point extraction method is described for the separation and pre-concentration of thallium from the microwave assisted aqua regia extracts of sediment and coal fly ash samples. The method is based on the formation of extractable species of thallium and its interaction with hydrophobic solubilizing sites of Triton X-114 micelles in the presence of aqua regia and electrolyte NaCl. These interactions of micelles are used for extraction of thallium from a bulk aqueous phase into a small micelles-rich phase. The potential chloride interferences are eliminated effectively, which enabled interference free determination of thallium from aqua regia extracts using continuum source ETAAS. The parameters affecting the extraction process are optimized. Under the optimized conditions, pre-concentration factor and limit of detection are 40 and 0.2 ng g(-1), respectively. The recoveries are in the range of 95-102%. A characteristic mass, 13 pg was obtained. The accuracy of the method is verified by analyzing certified reference materials such as NIST 1633b coal fly ash, NIST 1944 marine sediment and GBW 07312 stream sediments. The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified values and method is also applied to real samples.

  9. Sample preparation of sewage sludge and soil samples for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on one-pot microwave-assisted saponification and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, M.T.; Pensado, Luis; Casais, M.C.; Mejuto, M.C.; Cela, Rafael [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    A microwave-assisted sample preparation (MASP) procedure was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge and soil samples. The procedure involved the simultaneous microwave-assisted extraction of PAHs with n-hexane and the hydrolysis of samples with methanolic potassium hydroxide. Because of the complex nature of the samples, the extracts were submitted to further cleaning with silica and Florisil solid-phase extraction cartridges connected in series. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, were considered in the study. Quantification limits obtained for all of these compounds (between 0.4 and 14.8 {mu}g kg{sup -1} dry mass) were well below of the limits recommended in the USA and EU. Overall recovery values ranged from 60 to 100%, with most losses being due to evaporation in the solvent exchange stages of the procedure, although excellent extraction recoveries were obtained. Validation of the accuracy was carried out with BCR-088 (sewage sludge) and BCR-524 (contaminated industrial soil) reference materials. (orig.)

  10. Sample preparation of sewage sludge and soil samples for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on one-pot microwave-assisted saponification and extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, M Teresa; Pensado, Luis; Casais, M Carmen; Mejuto, M Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2007-04-01

    A microwave-assisted sample preparation (MASP) procedure was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge and soil samples. The procedure involved the simultaneous microwave-assisted extraction of PAHs with n-hexane and the hydrolysis of samples with methanolic potassium hydroxide. Because of the complex nature of the samples, the extracts were submitted to further cleaning with silica and Florisil solid-phase extraction cartridges connected in series. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, were considered in the study. Quantification limits obtained for all of these compounds (between 0.4 and 14.8 microg kg(-1) dry mass) were well below of the limits recommended in the USA and EU. Overall recovery values ranged from 60 to 100%, with most losses being due to evaporation in the solvent exchange stages of the procedure, although excellent extraction recoveries were obtained. Validation of the accuracy was carried out with BCR-088 (sewage sludge) and BCR-524 (contaminated industrial soil) reference materials.

  11. Preparation and evaluation of molecularly imprinted solid-phase micro-extraction fibers for selective extraction of phthalates in an aqueous sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Juan; Lv, Ruihe; Zhan, Haijun; Wang, Huizhi; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Kui; Wang, Fengcheng

    2010-07-26

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) that was applied to a solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) device, which could be coupled directly to gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC/MS), was prepared using dibutyl phthalate (DBP) as the template molecule. The characteristics and application of this fiber were investigated. Electron microscope images indicated that the MIP-coated solid-phase micro-extraction (MI-SPME) fibers were homogeneous and porous. The extraction yield of DBP with the MI-SPME fibers was higher than that of the non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-coated SPME (NI-SPME) fibers. The MI-SPME fibers had a higher selectivity to other phthalates that had similar structures as DBP. A method was developed for the determination of phthalates using MI-SPME fibers coupled with GC/MS. The extraction conditions were optimized. Detection limits for the phthalate samples were within the range of 2.17-20.84 ng L(-1). The method was applied to five kinds of phthalates dissolved in spiked aqueous samples and resulted in recoveries of up to 94.54-105.34%, respectively. Thus, the MI-SPME fibers are suitable for the extraction of trace phthalates in complicated samples.

  12. Preparation and evaluation of molecularly imprinted solid-phase micro-extraction fibers for selective extraction of phthalates in an aqueous sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Juan, E-mail: juanhe@haut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University of, Technology, LianHua Road, Zhengzhou 450051 (China); Lv Ruihe; Zhan Haijun; Wang Huizhi; Cheng Jie; Lu Kui; Wang Fengcheng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University of, Technology, LianHua Road, Zhengzhou 450051 (China)

    2010-07-26

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) that was applied to a solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) device, which could be coupled directly to gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC/MS), was prepared using dibutyl phthalate (DBP) as the template molecule. The characteristics and application of this fiber were investigated. Electron microscope images indicated that the MIP-coated solid-phase micro-extraction (MI-SPME) fibers were homogeneous and porous. The extraction yield of DBP with the MI-SPME fibers was higher than that of the non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-coated SPME (NI-SPME) fibers. The MI-SPME fibers had a higher selectivity to other phthalates that had similar structures as DBP. A method was developed for the determination of phthalates using MI-SPME fibers coupled with GC/MS. The extraction conditions were optimized. Detection limits for the phthalate samples were within the range of 2.17-20.84 ng L{sup -1}. The method was applied to five kinds of phthalates dissolved in spiked aqueous samples and resulted in recoveries of up to 94.54-105.34%, respectively. Thus, the MI-SPME fibers are suitable for the extraction of trace phthalates in complicated samples.

  13. Preparation of magnetic graphene @polydopamine @Zr-MOF material for the extraction and analysis of bisphenols in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianying; Deng, Chunhui

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a simple method for the extraction and analysis of bisphenols in environmental samples was presented. And the prepared zirconium-based magnetic MOFs (magG@PDA@Zr-MOF) were used as the sorbents for the magnetic solid-phase extraction. With the simple solvothermal reaction and sol-gel method, the prepared material showed great characteristics of large surface area, homogeneous pore size, good magnetic responsivity and super-hydrophilicity. The large surface area provided abundant sites to extract target compounds; the magnetic property could simplify the whole extraction procedure; and the hydrophilicity improved the dispersibility of the material in matrix. Here, various extraction parameters were optimized, including amounts of sorbents, adsorption time, species of elution solvents and desorption time. The whole extraction procedure could be accomplished in 30 min. And under the optimized conditions, method validations were also studied, such as linearity, the limit of detection and recovery. Finally, the prepared material was used in real water samples. The results showed this material had good potential as the sorbent for the extraction of targets in environmental water samples.

  14. Hollow-fiber micro-extraction combined with HPLC for the determination of sitagliptin in urine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaee Raheme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study successfully developed a three-phase hollow-fiber liquid phase micro extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography for determination of trace levels of an anti-diabetic drug, sitagliptin (STG, in urine samples. Sitagliptin was extracted from 15 mL of the basic sample solution with a pH of 8.5 into an organic extracting solvent (n-octanol impregnated in the pores of a hollow fiber and then back extracted into an acidified aqueous solution in the lumen of the hollow fiber with a pH of 3. After extraction, 20 µL of the acceptor phase was injected into HPLC. In order to obtain high extraction efficiency, the parameters affecting the HF-LPME including pH of the source and receiving phases, type of organic phase, ionic strength, stirring rate, extraction time, the volume ratio of donor phase to acceptor phase and temperature were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, enrichment factors up to 88 were achieved and the relative standard deviation of the method was in the range of 3 % to 6%. The results indicated that HF-LPME method has an excellent clean-up capacity and a high preconcentration factor and can serve as a simple and sensitive method for monitoring the drug in the urine samples.

  15. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  16. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Final report for Phases 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-28

    A test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) was conducted . Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical characterization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions. Field testing was conducted in two phases. The Phase I field program was performed over the period of August 24 through September 20, 1992, at the Tennessee Valley Authority Widows Creek Unit 8 Power Station, located near Stevenson (Jackson County), Alabama, on the Tennessee River. Sampling activities for Phase II were conducted from September 11 through October 14, 1993. Widows Creek Unit 8 is a 575-megawatt plant that uses bituminous coal averaging 3.7% sulfur and 13% ash. Downstream of the boiler, a venture wet scrubbing system is used for control of both sulfur dioxide and particulate emissions. There is no electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in this system. This system is atypical and represents only about 5% of the US utility industry. However, this site was chosen for this study because of the lack of information available for this particulate emission control system.

  17. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water and soil samples by cloud point extraction-ultrasound-assisted back-extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Ariel R; Silva, María F; Martínez, Luis D; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2009-05-15

    A novel and efficient analytical methodology is proposed for extracting and preconcentrating polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from samples of environmental interest prior gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. It is based on the induction of micellar organized medium by using a non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) to extract the target PBDEs. To enable coupling the efficient extracting technique with GC analysis, ultrasound-assisted back-extraction (UABE) into an organic solvent was required. Several factors, including surfactant type and concentration, equilibration temperature and time, ionic strength, pH and buffers nature and concentration were studied and optimized over the extraction efficiency of the proposed technique. Under optimal experimental conditions, the target analytes were quantitatively extracted achieving an enrichment factor of 250 when 10mL aliquot of ultrapure water spiked with PBDE-standard mixture (10pgmL(-1) each PBDE) was extracted. Method detection limits (MDLs) calculated with aqueous PBDEs solutions as three times the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), ranged from 1 to 2pgmL(-1) with RSDs values /=0.9987 and linear range of all PBDEs was 4-150pgmL(-1). The proposed methodology was validated by carrying out a recovery study by spiking the samples at two different concentration levels of PBDEs (10 and 50pgmL(-1) for waters samples). Recoveries values in the range of 96-106% for water samples were obtained showing satisfactory robustness of the method for analyzing PBDEs in water samples. The proposed methodology was applied for the analysis of PBDEs: 2,2',4,4'-tetraBDE (BDE-47), 2,2',4,4,5-pentaBDE (BDE-99), 2,2',4,4,6-pentaBDE (BDE-100) and 2,2,4,4',5,5'-hexaBDE (BDE-153) in water samples, including drinking, lake, river water and soil samples. Significant quantities of PBDEs were not found in the analyzed samples.

  18. Characterization of citrus pectin samples extracted under different conditions: influence of acid type and pH of extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaya, Merve; Sousa, Antonio G.; Crepeau, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    on fruit peel, a waste product from the juicing industry, in which thousands of tons of citrus are processed worldwide every year. This study examines how pectin components vary in relation to the plant source (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit) and considers the influence of extraction conditions...

  19. Comparison of four commercial DNA extraction kits for the recovery of Bacillus spp. spore DNA from spiked powder samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölsä, Markos; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Tonteri, Elina; Hemmilä, Heidi; Nikkari, Simo

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus spp. include human pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a biothreat agent. Bacillus spp. form spores that are physically highly resistant and may remain active over sample handling. We tested four commercial DNA extraction kits (QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, RTP Pathogen Kit, ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kit) for sample inactivation and DNA recovery from two powders (icing sugar and potato flour) spiked with Bacillus thuringiensis spores. The DNA was analysed using a B. thuringiensis-specific real-time PCR assay. The detection limit was 3×10(1)CFU of spiked B. thuringiensis spores with the QIAamp DNA Mini, RTP Pathogen, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kits, and 3×10(3)CFU with the ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep kit. The results showed that manual extraction kits are effective and safe for fast and easy DNA extraction from powder samples even in field conditions. Adding a DNA filtration step to the extraction protocol ensures the removal of Bacillus spp. spores from DNA samples without affecting sensitivity.

  20. A nanoparticle-based solid-phase extraction procedure followed by spectrofluorimetry to determine carbaryl in different water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabrizi, Ahad Bavili, E-mail: a.bavili@tbzmed.ac.ir, E-mail: abavilitabrizia@gmail.com [Biotechnology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad Reza [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ostadi, Hadi [Department of Chemistry, Payam-e-noor University, Ardabil Branch, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, a new method based on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) has been developed for the extraction, preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of carbaryl from environmental water samples. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNPs were synthesized and modified by the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), then successfully applied for the extraction of carbaryl and its determination by spectrofluorimetry. Main factors affecting the adsolubilization of carbaryl such as the amount of SDS, pH value, standing time, desorption solvent and maximal extraction volume were optimized. Under the selected conditions, carbaryl could be quantitatively extracted. Acceptable recoveries (84.5-91.9%) and relative standard deviations (6.2%) were achieved in analyzing spiked water samples. A concentration factor of 20 was achieved by the extraction of 100 mL of environmental water samples. The limit of detection and quantification were found to be 2.1 and 6.9 μg L{sup -1}, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of carbaryl in environmental water samples. (author)

  1. Indoor Air Quality in Selected Samples of Primary Schools in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Studies have found out that indoor air quality affects human especially children and the elderly more compared to ambient atmospheric air. This study aims to investigate indoor air pollutants concentration in selected vernacular schools with different surrounding human activities in Kuala Terengganu, the administrative and commercial center of Terengganu state. Failure to identify and establish indoor air pollution status can increase the chance of long-term and short-term health problems for...

  2. Summertime PAH assembly in Mediterranean air: the Herceg Novi sampling station as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR Z. JOVANOVIC

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of an analysis of the total suspended particles (TSP, total solvent organic extracts (TSOE, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in aerosol samples collected from the atmosphere of Herceg Novi from 17th June to 15th September in 1998 and 1999 are presented. The TSP and TSOE concentrations were determined by the standard gravimetric method, whereas the PAHs from the organic part of the aerosol were analysed by the GC-MS method. The difference found in the TSP and TSOE contents between the two consecutive years (before and after the bombing of Yugoslavia was attributed to changes in the intensity and origin of emissions from dominant sources, specific to the summer period of this region. The content and nature of the PAHs identified in the samples of 1998 and 1999 were also different, indicating the significance of traffic as the source of PAHs, which was of significantly lower intensity in 1999 (immediately after the war due to the lower influx of tourists. Factor analysis showed that the PAH distribution at the measuring site in 1999 was largely determined by meteorological parameters, mainly by the average daily temperature and wind direction. In 1998, the dominant impact on the PAH distribution was attributed to traffic, both local and from a wider region, without an explicit impact of meteorological parameters.

  3. Occurrence and quantitative microbial risk assessment of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in soil and air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paola Balderrama-Carmona

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Soil and air inhalation and/or ingestion are important vehicles for these parasites. To our knowledge, the results obtained in the present study represent the first QMRAs for cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis due to soil and air inhalation/ingestion in Mexico. In addition, this is the first evidence of the microbial air quality around these parasites in rural zones.

  4. Use of alpha spectroscopy for conducting rapid surveys of transuranic activity on air sample filters and smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robert B; Peña, Adan M; Goff, Thomas E

    2005-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the utility of a portable alpha Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) as a bench top scalar counter for multiple sample types. These include using the CAM to count fixed air sample filters and radiological smears. In counting radiological smears, the CAM is used very much like a gas flow proportional counter (GFPC), albeit with a lower efficiency. Due to the typically low background in this configuration, the minimum detectable activity for a 5-min count should be in the range of about 10 dpm which is acceptably below the 20 dpm limit for transuranic isotopes. When counting fixed air sample filters, the CAM algorithm along with other measurable characteristics can be used to identify and quantify the presence of transuranic isotopes in the samples. When the radiological control technician wants to take some credit from naturally occurring radioactive material contributions due to radon progeny producing higher energy peaks (as in the case with a fixed air sample filter), then more elaborate techniques are required. The techniques presented here will generate a decision level of about 43 dpm for such applications. The calibration for this application should alternatively be done using the default values of channels 92-126 for region of interest 1. This can be done within 10 to 15 min resulting in a method to rapidly evaluate air filters for transuranic activity. When compared to the 1-h count technique described by , the technique presented in the present work demonstrates a technique whereby more than two thirds of samples can be rapidly shown (within 10 to 15 min) to be within regulatory compliant limits. In both cases, however, spectral quality checks are required to insure sample self attenuation is not a significant bias in the activity estimates. This will allow the same level of confidence when using these techniques for activity quantification as is presently available for air monitoring activity quantification using CAMs.

  5. Feasibility of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct analysis of samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Riahi, Farhad

    2014-05-23

    The capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) for direct analysis of the samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was investigated and evaluated, for the first time. To that end, an appropriate new injection port was designed and constructed, resulting in possibility of direct injection of the known sample volume, without tedious sample preparation steps (e.g. derivatization, solvent evaporation, and re-solving in another solvent…). Malathion as a test compound was extracted from different matrices by a rapid and convenient DLLME method. The positive ion mobility spectra of the extracted malathion were obtained after direct injection of carbon tetrachloride or methanol solutions. The analyte responses were compared and the statistical results revealed the feasibility of direct analysis of the extracted samples in carbon tetrachloride, resulting in a convenient methodology. The coupled method of DLLME-CD-IMS was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, recovery, and enrichment factor. Finally, various real samples of apple, river and underground water were analyzed, all verifying the feasibility and success of the proposed method for the easy extraction of the analyte using DLLME separation before the direct analysis by CD-IMS.

  6. Rational design and chromatographic evaluation of histamine imprinted polymers optimised for solid-phase extraction of wine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basozabal, Itsaso; Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Guerreiro, António; Gilby, Stuart; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2013-09-20

    This article reports on the computational design, development and application of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with specific affinity towards histamine. Computational modelling was used to screen a monomer library in order to select the monomers able to form the strongest complex with the target analyte. These were subsequently used for MIP synthesis by radical polymerisation initiated by UV. MIPs were then evaluated by liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction (SPE) and best MIP behaviour was observed when itaconic acid was used as functional monomer. Finally, after optimisation of the polymer composition, MIPs were used as adsorbents for SPE and clean-up of histamine in wine samples. The proposed histamine extraction method with the MIP-SPE cartridge was found to be reproducible (wine extracts. The described methodology is simple and fast and is suitable for the selective histamine extraction and its subsequent quantification by HPLC-DAD from complex matrices such as wine samples.

  7. Liquid-liquid extraction assisted by a carbon nanoparticles interface. Electrophoretic determination of atrazine in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Díaz, Encarnación; Simonet, Bartolomé; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2013-10-21

    A novel method for the determination of atrazine, using liquid-liquid extraction assisted by a nanoparticles film formed in situ and composed of organic solvent stabilized-carbon nanoparticles, is described. The presence of nanoparticles located at the liquid-liquid interface reinforced the extraction of analyte from matrix prior to capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. Some influential experimental variables were optimized in order to enhance the extraction efficiency. The developed procedure confirmed that carbon nanoparticles, especially multi-walled carbon nanotubes, are suitable to be used in sample treatment processes introducing new mechanisms of interaction with the analyte. The application of the proposed preconcentration method followed by CE detection enabled the determination of atrazine in spiked river water providing acceptable RSD values (11.6%) and good recoveries (about 87.0-92.0%). Additionally, a similar extraction scheme was tested in soil matrices with a view to further applications in real soil samples.

  8. Detection of Bacillus anthracis DNA in complex soil and air samples using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Be

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the potentially lethal etiologic agent of anthrax disease, and is a significant concern in the realm of biodefense. One of the cornerstones of an effective biodefense strategy is the ability to detect infectious agents with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in the context of a complex sample background. The nature of the B. anthracis genome, however, renders specific detection difficult, due to close homology with B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. We therefore elected to determine the efficacy of next-generation sequencing analysis and microarrays for detection of B. anthracis in an environmental background. We applied next-generation sequencing to titrated genome copy numbers of B. anthracis in the presence of background nucleic acid extracted from aerosol and soil samples. We found next-generation sequencing to be capable of detecting as few as 10 genomic equivalents of B. anthracis DNA per nanogram of background nucleic acid. Detection was accomplished by mapping reads to either a defined subset of reference genomes or to the full GenBank database. Moreover, sequence data obtained from B. anthracis could be reliably distinguished from sequence data mapping to either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis. We also demonstrated the efficacy of a microbial census microarray in detecting B. anthracis in the same samples, representing a cost-effective and high-throughput approach, complementary to next-generation sequencing. Our results, in combination with the capacity of sequencing for providing insights into the genomic characteristics of complex and novel organisms, suggest that these platforms should be considered important components of a biosurveillance strategy.

  9. Design of a new cartridge for selective solid phase extraction using molecularly imprinted polymers: selective extraction of theophylline from human serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Afshin Rajabi; Rashidpur, Amene

    2009-11-15

    This paper describes design of a new cartridge for selective solid phase extraction (SPE) using molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The apparatus which is termed solvent extraction-MISPE (SE-MISPE) cartridge, consisted of a modified conventional micro test tube and has been developed to perform simultaneous forward-extraction of analyte from aqueous sample solution to an organic phase and back-extraction to MIP solid phase. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, extraction of theophylline (THP) from human serum sample was investigated. An appropriate amount of THP-imprinted polymer was placed in the bottom of the micro tube and an organic solvent pipetted onto it and left to swell the polymer completely. A polyethylene frit to secure MIP particles was positioned by two Teflon rings such that it was fixed below the level of the organic layer. Then, aqueous sample solution containing THP was layered over the organic phase and the lid was closed. After completion of extraction, the organic and aqueous phases were removed and the adsorbed analyte was desorbed using a polar organic solvent. In order to reach the highest recovery, the experimental parameters such as the type of organic solvent, pH and ionic strength of aqueous phase, organic to aqueous volume ratio, time of extraction, type and amount of desorbent solvent were optimized. Under the experimental conditions, a plot of HPLC peak areas vs. initial concentrations of THP in the concentration interval of 0.5-30 microg ml(-1) showed a good linearity (r=0.9974). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) based on three and ten times of the noise of HPLC profile were 0.09 and 0.3 microg ml(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the proposed method for the extraction and determination of 5 microg THP from 200 microl standard sample solution for 3 replicate measurements was 3.5%. The results showed that by means of the proposed cartridge, THP could

  10. Solid-phase extraction of flavonoids in honey samples using carbamate-embedded triacontyl-modified silica sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Houmei; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Yong; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-08-01

    In this study, carbamate-embedded triacontyl-modified silica (Sil-CBM-C30) is successfully prepared and used as an efficient sorbent for solid-phase extraction. The extraction performance of the resultant sorbent is evaluated with five flavonoids including myricetin, quercetin, luteolin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin. Main parameters, which affect extraction efficiencies, are carefully investigated and optimized. Comparative experiments between Sil-CBM-C30 and commercial C18 sorbents indicate that the extraction efficiencies of the former one surpass the latter one. The modification of carbamate-embedded triacontyl group on surface of silica causes analytes extracted by hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions. Under optimal conditions, good linearities and satisfied LODs and LOQs are achieved. The SPE-HPLC-DAD method is successfully developed and applied for the honey sample analysis.

  11. Embryotoxicity of organic extracts from airborne particulates in ambient air in the chicken embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, H.; Kashimoto, T.

    1986-07-01

    A fraction containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), prepared from an organic extract of airborne particulate matter, was separated into nine subfractions by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The embryotoxicity of each of these fractions was investigated and analysis for PAHs by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was performed. The ninth subfraction, with coronene as its main component, had the strongest toxic effects on chicken embryos per m/sup 3/ of air. Of the remaining eight subfractions, three had the greatest toxicity: the second fraction with benzofluoranthenes and benzo(e)pyrene as the main components, the fourth fraction having PAH-estimated compounds in small amounts, and the fifth fraction with indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene and benzo(ghi)perylene as the main ingredients had the greatest toxicity. These findings indicate PAHs to be responsible for embryotoxicity but the total amounts were not necessarily proportional to it. For further characterization of toxicity, the effects of each PAH and/or quantification of other embryotoxic compounds possibly present in small amounts should be investigated.

  12. Detection of Campylobacter Bacteria in Air Samples for Continuous Real-Time Monitoring of Campylobacter Colonization in Broiler Flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Katja Nyholm; Lund, Marianne; Skov, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Improved monitoring tools are important for the control of Campylobacter bacteria in broiler production. In this study, we compare the sensitivities of detection of Campylobacter by PCR with feces, dust, and air samples during the lifetimes of broilers in two poultry houses and conclude...... that the sensitivity of detection of Campylobacter in air is comparable to that in other sample materials. Profiling of airborne particles in six poultry houses revealed that the aerodynamic conditions were dependent on the age of the chickens and very comparable among different poultry houses, with low proportions...... of particles in the 0.5- to 2-mu m-diameter range and high proportions in the 2- to 5-mu m-diameter range. Campylobacter could also be detected by PCR in air samples collected at the hanging stage during the slaughter process but not at the other stages tested at the slaughterhouse. The exploitation...

  13. Arsenic species extraction of biological marine samples (Periwinkles, Littorina littorea) from a highly contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Koch, I; Reimer, K J

    2012-01-15

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the tissues of marine organisms and in uncontaminated environments it is dominantly present as the highly soluble and easily extractable non-toxic arsenical, arsenobetaine. However in contaminated environments, higher proportions of inorganic arsenic, which is much less soluble, are accumulated into the tissues of marine organisms, resulting in lower extraction efficiencies (defined as the percent extracted arsenic of the total arsenic). This study carried out a comparative analysis between three different two-step arsenic extraction methods based on Foster et al. [27] from highly contaminated tissue of the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea. The first extraction step used 100% water, 1:1 methanol-water, or a 9:1 methanol-water as the extraction solvent and the second step consisted of a gently heated dilute nitric acid extraction. The optimized two step extraction method was 1:1 methanol-water extraction followed by a 2% HNO(3) extraction, based on maximum amounts of extracted species, including organoarsenic species.

  14. Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farthing, William Earl (Pinson, AL); Felix, Larry Gordon (Pelham, AL); Snyder, Todd Robert (Birmingham, AL)

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

  15. 空气取水技术的研究进展%A review on water extraction from air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿浩清; 石成君; 苏亚欣

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the current research of water extraction from air.The progress and future trends of different absorbents for absorption of water from air,including solid,liquid,composite water absorbents and other new absorbing water technologies are discussed.The energy utilization patterns for two major methods of water extraction from air,condensation method and absorption/desorption method are summarized and compared.Forecast of water extraction from air is presented on the basis of absorption /desorption method and reasonable use of solar energy or waste heat.%综述了空气取水的基本研究现状,对可用于空气取水的固体吸附剂、液体吸收剂、复合吸湿材料以及新型吸湿技术等各类吸湿材料的研究现状和发展趋势进行了详细的讨论,并对冷却结露式取水方法与吸湿/解吸式取水方法的能源利用方式进行了讨论和比较。在此基础上,对采用吸湿/解吸方法同时合理利用太阳能和余热来取水的研究前景进行了展望。

  16. Pressurized liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography with atomic emission detection for the determination of fenbutatin oxide in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa, P; Montes, R; Lamas, J P; García-López, M; Orriols, I; Rodríguez, I

    2009-08-15

    A novel method for the determination of the miticide bis[tris(2-methyl-2-phenylpropyl)tin] oxide, also known as fenbutatin oxide (FBTO), in agricultural soils is presented. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by analyte derivatization and extraction into isooctane was the used sample preparation approach. Selective determination was achieved by gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Influence of different parameters on the performance of the extraction process is thoroughly discussed; moreover, some relevant aspects related to derivatization, determination and quantification steps are also presented. As regards PLE, the type of solvent and the temperature were the most relevant variables. Under optimized conditions, acetone, without any acidic modifier, was employed as extractant at 80 degrees C. Cells were pressurized at 1500 psi, and 2 static cycles of 1 min each were applied. Acetone extracts (ca. 25 mL) were concentrated to 1 mL, derivatized with sodium tetraethyl borate (NaBEt(4)) and the FBTO derivative, resulting from cleavage of the Sn-O-Sn bond followed by ethylation of the hydroxyl fragments, extracted into isooctane and determined by GC-AED. Under final working conditions, the proposed method provided recoveries from 76 to 99% for spiked soil samples, a limit of quantification of 2 ng g(-1) and an acceptable precision. Analysis of samples from vineyards sprayed with FBTO, confirmed the persistence of the miticide in soil for more than 1 year after being applied.

  17. Air sampling procedures to evaluate microbial contamination: a comparison between active and passive methods in operating theatres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoli Christian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since air can play a central role as a reservoir for microorganisms, in controlled environments such as operating theatres regular microbial monitoring is useful to measure air quality and identify critical situations. The aim of this study is to assess microbial contamination levels in operating theatres using both an active and a passive sampling method and then to assess if there is a correlation between the results of the two different sampling methods. Methods The study was performed in 32 turbulent air flow operating theatres of a University Hospital in Southern Italy. Active sampling was carried out using the Surface Air System and passive sampling with settle plates, in accordance with ISO 14698. The Total Viable Count (TVC was evaluated at rest (in the morning before the beginning of surgical activity and in operational (during surgery. Results The mean TVC at rest was 12.4 CFU/m3 and 722.5 CFU/m2/h for active and passive samplings respectively. The mean in operational TVC was 93.8 CFU/m3 (SD = 52.69; range = 22-256 and 10496.5 CFU/m2/h (SD = 7460.5; range = 1415.5-25479.7 for active and passive samplings respectively. Statistical analysis confirmed that the two methods correlate in a comparable way with the quality of air. Conclusion It is possible to conclude that both methods can be used for general monitoring of air contamination, such as routine surveillance programs. However, the choice must be made between one or the other to obtain specific information.

  18. Development of a Cloud-Point Extraction Method for Cobalt Determination in Natural Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Jamali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, and versatile cloud-point extraction (CPE methodology has been developed for the separation and preconcentration of cobalt. The cobalt ions in the initial aqueous solution were complexed with 4-Benzylpiperidinedithiocarbamate, and Triton X-114 was added as surfactant. Dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with acidified ethanol was performed after phase separation, and the cobalt content was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main factors affecting CPE procedure, such as pH, concentration of ligand, amount of Triton X-114, equilibrium temperature, and incubation time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD for cobalt was 0.5 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF of 67. Calibration curve was linear in the range of 2–150 μg L-1, and relative standard deviation was 3.2% (c=100 μg L-1; n=10. The proposed method was applied to the determination of trace cobalt in real water samples with satisfactory analytical results.

  19. Solvent effects on extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosol samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flasch Mira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in the ambient particulate matter pose one of the most important issues in the focus of environmental management. The concentration of their representative, Benzo(apyrene (BaP, undergoes limitations according to European Union directive. However, a successful control over the pollution levels and their sources is limited by the high uncertainty of analytical and statistical approaches used for their characterization. Here we compare differences in PAH concentrations related to the use of different solvents in the course of ultrasonic extraction of a certified reference material (PM10-like PAH mixture and filter samples of ambient particulate matter collected in Austria for the CG-MS PAH analysis. Using solvents of increasing polarity: Cyclohexane (0,006, Toluene (0,099, Dichloromethane (0,309, Acetone (0,43 and Acetonitrile (0,460, as well as mixtures of those, filters representing high and low concentrations of particulate matter were investigated. Although some scatter of the obtained concentrations was observed no trend related to the polarity of the solvent became visible. Regarding the reproducibility, which can be expected of PAH analysis no significant difference between the different solvents was determined. This result is valid for all compounds under investigation.

  20. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium and nickel in drinking and wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem G; Shah, Faheem; Afridi, Hassan I; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Soomro, Abdul Sattar

    2013-01-01

    A simple method for the preconcentration of cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) in drinking and wastewater samples was developed. Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration of both metals, after formation of complexes with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and extraction with the surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114). Dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with acidified ethanol was performed after phase separation, and the Cd and Ni contents were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The experimental variables, such as pH, amounts of reagents (8-HQ and Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume, were optimized. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions, enhancement factors of 80 and 61, with LOD values of 0.22 and 0.52 microg/L, were obtained for Cd and Ni, respectively. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the determination of both elements in drinking and wastewater samples.

  1. Fluorometric determination of nonylphenol in water samples enriched with zirconium doped titanium dioxide nanotubes solid phase extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Fa Su; Xin Ning Zhao; Guo Hong Xie; Qing Xiang Zhou

    2012-01-01

    This paper developed a fluorometric method for the sensitive determination of nonylphenol in water samples by preconcentration with zirconium doped titanium dioxide nanotubes solid phase extraction.The parameters on extraction that would influence the enrichment performance such as the kind and volume of eluent,sample pH,sample flow rate,and sample volume were optimized in detail.Under the optimal conditions,the proposed method provided an excellent linear range of 1-150 μg/L and good LOD of 0.076 μg/L.The relative standard deviation (RSD,n =6) was 2.8%.Proposed method was also used for the analysis of real water samples and the spiked recoveries were satisfied in the range of 98.7-103%.

  2. Analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in atmospheric deposition and snow samples by solid-phase disk extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Roberto; Arellano, Lourdes; Grimalt, Joan O; Fernández, Pilar

    2008-05-23

    An extraction method for the quantitative analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aqueous samples has been evaluated. The analytical methodology includes the sample filtration through glass fiber filter and subsequent extraction of dissolved phase compounds by C18 solid-phase disk extraction. Dependence of extraction efficiency on factors such as pollutant concentrations, sample volume, and stability during storage has been investigated. Mean extraction efficiencies of 97% for total PBDEs (13 tri- to heptabrominated congeners at spiking levels in the range of 15-90pg) with a RSD between 9 and 20% were achieved. Higher recoveries were observed for the more volatile PBDEs (112%) in relation to more brominated congeners (88%). The developed methodology was successfully applied to the analysis of these compounds in atmospheric deposition and snow samples from remote sites in Europe with method detection and quantitation limits in the range of 2.1-10pgL(-1) for almost all congeners, which allow the determination of PBDEs in remote areas with levels in the range of low to medium pgL(-1) for SigmaPBDEs.

  3. Fast and robust 2D-shape extraction using discrete-point sampling and centerline grouping in complex images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongxiao; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo; Chen, Zhong

    2013-12-01

    This paper initially develops the discrete-point sampling operator's concept, model, and parameters that we have previously proposed, and makes its belt-shaped regions in a discrete-point sampling map more salient and appropriate for centerline extraction. The cross-sectional features of these belt-shaped regions are then analyzed and seven types of feature points are defined to facilitate descriptions of such features. Based on these feature points, a three-level detection system is proposed, including feature points, line segments, and centerlines, to extract centerlines from the belt-shaped regions. Eight basic types of centerlines and five types of relationships among the centerlines are defined by computational geometry algorithms, and Gestalt laws are used to cluster them into groupings. If some prior information about a desired shape is available, retrieval grouping may be carried out by a discrete-point sampling map, the purpose of which is to find centerlines by best matching with prior information. Discrete-point sampling effectually overcomes the influences of interference from noise, textures, and uneven illumination, and greatly reduces the difficulty of centerline extraction. Centerline clustered groupings and retrieval grouping can offer a strong anti-interference ability with nonlinear deformations such as articulation and occlusion. This method can extract large-scale complex shapes combined of lines and planes from complex images. The wheel location results of noise test and other shape extraction experiments show that our method has a strong capability to persist with nonlinear deformations.

  4. Comparison of halocarbon measurements in an atmospheric dry whole air sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Rhoderick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing awareness of climate change/global warming, and continuing concerns regarding stratospheric ozone depletion, will require continued measurements and standards for many compounds, in particular halocarbons that are linked to these issues. In order to track atmospheric mole fractions and assess the impact of policy on emission rates, it is necessary to demonstrate measurement equivalence at the highest levels of accuracy for assigned values of standards. Precise measurements of these species aid in determining small changes in their atmospheric abundance. A common source of standards/scales and/or well-documented agreement of different scales used to calibrate the measurement instrumentation are key to understanding many sets of data reported by researchers. This report describes the results of a comparison study among National Metrology Institutes and atmospheric research laboratories for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12, trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11, and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (CFC-113; the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22 and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b; and the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a, all in a dried whole air sample. The objective of this study is to compare calibration standards/scales and the measurement capabilities of the participants for these halocarbons at trace atmospheric levels. The results of this study show agreement among four independent calibration scales to better than 2.5% in almost all cases, with many of the reported agreements being better than 1.0%.

  5. Sequential extraction of platinum, cisplatin and carboplatin from environmental samples and pre-concentration/separation using vesicular coacervative extraction and determination by continuum source ETAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeravali, Noorbasha N; Madhavi, K; Manjusha, R; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2014-01-01

    A sequential extraction procedure is developed for the separation of trace levels of hexachloroplatinate, cisplatin and carboplatin from soil, which are then, pre-concentrated using a vesicular coacervative cloud point extraction method prior to their determination as platinum by continuum source ETAAS. Sequential extraction of carboplatin, cisplatin and hexachloroplatinate from a specific red soil is achieved by using the 20% HCl, aqua regia at room temperature and by combination of aqua regia and HF with microwave digestion, respectively. The pre-concentration of these species from the extracted solutions is based on the formation of extractable hydrophobic complexes of PtCl₆(2-) anionic species with free cationic head groups solubilizing sites of the Triton X-114 co-surfactant stabilized TOMAC (tri-octyl methyl ammonium chloride) vesicles through electrostatic attraction. This process separates the platinum from bulk aqueous solution into a small vesicular rich phase. The parameters affecting the extraction procedures are optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the achieved pre-concentration factor is 20 and detection limit is 0.5 ng g(-1) for soil and 0.02 ng mL(-1) for water samples. The spiked recoveries of hexachloroplatinate, cisplatin and carboplatin in water and soil extracts in the vesicular coacervative extraction are in the range of 96-102% at 0.5-1 ng mL(-1) with relative standard deviation of 1-3%. The accuracy of the method for platinum determination is evaluated by analyzing CCRMP PTC-1a copper-nickel sulfide concentrate and BCR 723 road dust certified reference materials and the obtained results agreed with the certified values with 95% confidence level of student t-test. The results were also compared to mixed-micelle (MM)-CPE method reported in the literature.

  6. Comparison of different methods for extraction and purification of human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from serum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, N.; Hashim, U.; Nadzirah, Sh.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2017-03-01

    The affectability and unwavering quality of PCR for indicative and research purposes require effective fair systems of extraction and sanitization of nucleic acids. One of the real impediments of PCR-based tests is the hindrance of the enhancement procedure by substances exhibit in clinical examples. This examination considers distinctive techniques for extraction and cleaning of viral DNA from serum tests in view of recuperation productivity as far as yield of DNA and rate recouped immaculateness of removed DNA, and rate of restraint. The best extraction strategies were the phenol/chloroform strategy and the silica gel extraction methodology for serum tests, individually. Considering DNA immaculateness, extraction technique by utilizing the phenol/chloroform strategy delivered the most tasteful results in serum tests contrasted with the silica gel, separately. The nearness of inhibitors was overcome by all DNA extraction strategies in serum tests, as confirm by semiquantitative PCR enhancement.

  7. Improved detection of multiple environmental antibiotics through an optimized sample extraction strategy in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xinzhu; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C; Li, Xu; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was optimized in this study for sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple antibiotics in urban surface waters and soils. Among the seven classes of tested antibiotics, extraction efficiencies of macrolides, lincosamide, chloramphenicol, and polyether antibiotics were significantly improved under optimized sample extraction pH. Instead of only using acidic extraction in many existing studies, the results indicated that antibiotics with low pK a values (antibiotics with high pK a values (>7) were extracted more efficiently under neutral conditions. The effects of pH were more obvious on polar compounds than those on non-polar compounds. Optimization of extraction pH resulted in significantly improved sample recovery and better detection limits. Compared with reported values in the literature, the average reduction of minimal detection limits obtained in this study was 87.6% in surface waters (0.06-2.28 ng/L) and 67.1% in soils (0.01-18.16 ng/g dry wt). This method was subsequently applied to detect antibiotics in environmental samples in a heavily populated urban city, and macrolides, sulfonamides, and lincomycin were frequently detected. Antibiotics with highest detected concentrations were sulfamethazine (82.5 ng/L) in surface waters and erythromycin (6.6 ng/g dry wt) in soils. The optimized sample extraction strategy can be used to improve the detection of a variety of antibiotics in environmental surface waters and soils.

  8. Development of a sample preparation procedure of sewage sludge samples for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on selective pressurized liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Maria Teresa; Casais, Maria Carmen; Mejuto, Maria Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2010-01-22

    An automated, simple and sensitive method based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sewage sludge samples. The new sample preparation procedure consists of on-line clean-up by inclusion of sorbents in the extraction cell, and combines elevated temperatures and pressures with liquid solvents to achieve fast and efficient removal of target analytes from complex sewage sludge matrices. The effects of various operational parameters (e.g. sample pretreatment, extraction solvent, temperature, pressure, static time, etc.) on the performance of SPLE procedure were carefully investigated, obtaining the best results when SPLE conditions were fixed at 140 degrees C, 1500 psi, static time of 5 min and n-hexane as extraction solvent. A new programmed temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method based on large volume injection (PTV-LVI-GC-MS/MS) was also developed and analytical determinations were performed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and GC-MS/MS. The extraction yields for the different compounds obtained by SPLE ranged from 84.8% to 106.6%. Quantification limits obtained for all of these studied compounds (between 0.0001 and 0.005 microg g(-1), dry mass) were well below the regulatory limits for all compounds considered. To test the accuracy of the SPLE technique, the optimized methodology was applied to the analysis of a certified reference material (sewage sludge (BCR088)) and a reference material (sewage sludge (RTC-CNS312-04)), with excellent results.

  9. Sources of pre-analytical variations in yield of DNA extracted from blood samples: analysis of 50,000 DNA samples in EPIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Caboux

    Full Text Available The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88% performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies.

  10. Development of a mild mercaptoethanol extraction method for determination of mercury species in biological samples by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Feng, Weiyue; Shi, Junwen; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Motao; Li, Bai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2007-03-30

    A mild, efficient and convenient extraction method of using 2-mercaptoethanol contained extractant solution combined with an incubator shaker for determination of mercury species in biological samples by HPLC-ICP-MS has been developed. The effects of the concentration of 2-mercaptoethanol, the composition of the extractant solution and the shaking time on the efficiency of mercury extraction were evaluated. The optimization experiments indicated that the quantitative extraction of mercury species from biological samples could be achieved by using 0.1% (v/v) HCl, 0.1% (v/v) 2-mercapoethanol and 0.15% (m/v) KCl extractant solution in an incubator shaker for shaking overnight (about 12h) at room temperature. The established method was validated by analysis of various biological certified reference materials, including NRCC DOLT-3 (dogfish liver), IAEA 436 (tuna fish), IAEA MA-B-3/TM (garfish filet), IAEA MA-M-2/TM (mussel tissue), GBW 08193 (bovine liver) and GBW 08572 (prawn). The analytical results of the reference materials were in good agreement with the certified or reference values of both methyl and total mercury, indicating that no distinguishable transformation between mercury species had occurred during the extraction and determination procedures. The limit of detection (LOD) for methyl (CH(3)Hg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) by the method are both as 0.2microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+) are 3.0% and 5.8%, respectively. The advantages of the developed extraction method are that (1) it is easy to operate in HPLC-ICP-MS for mercury species determination since the extracted solution can be directly injected into the HPLC column without pH adjustment and (2) the memory effect of mercury in the ICP-MS measurement system can be reduced.

  11. Graphene oxide as a micro-solid-phase extraction sorbent for the enrichment of parabens from water and vinegar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zang, Xiaohuan; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2014-07-01

    A simple hydrophilic polyamide organic membrane protected micro-solid-phase extraction method with graphene oxide as the sorbent was developed for the enrichment of some parabens from water and vinegar samples prior to gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. The main experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiencies, such as the type and amount of the sorbent, extraction time, stirring rate, salt addition, sample solution pH and desorption conditions, were investigated. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the method showed a good linearity in the range of 0.1-100.0 ng/mL for water samples and 0.5-100.0 ng/mL for vinegar samples, with the correlation coefficients varying from 0.9978 to 0.9997. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) of the method were in the range of 0.005-0.010 ng/mL for water samples and 0.01-0.05 ng/mL for vinegar samples, respectively. The recoveries of the method for the analytes at spiking levels of 5.0 and 70.0 ng/mL were between 84.6 and 106.4% with the relative standard deviations varying from 4.2 to 9.5%. The results indicated that the developed method could be a practical approach for the determination of paraben residues in water and vinegar samples.

  12. Evidence for a Global Sampling Process in Extraction of Summary Statistics of Item Sizes in a Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Midori; Ueda, Sachiyo; Ishiguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that our visual system may construct a "summary statistical representation" over groups of visual objects. Although there is a general understanding that human observers can accurately represent sets of a variety of features, many questions on how summary statistics, such as an average, are computed remain unanswered. This study investigated sampling properties of visual information used by human observers to extract two types of summary statistics of item sets, average and variance. We presented three models of ideal observers to extract the summary statistics: a global sampling model without sampling noise, global sampling model with sampling noise, and limited sampling model. We compared the performance of an ideal observer of each model with that of human observers using statistical efficiency analysis. Results suggest that summary statistics of items in a set may be computed without representing individual items, which makes it possible to discard the limited sampling account. Moreover, the extraction of summary statistics may not necessarily require the representation of individual objects with focused attention when the sets of items are larger than 4.

  13. FINAL REPORT: MEMBRANE-MEDIATED EXTRACTION AND BIODEGRADATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM AIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes feasibility tests of a two-step strategy for air pollution control applicable to exhaust air contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from painting aircraft. In the first step, the VOC-contaminated air passes over coated, polypropylene, hollow-fibe...

  14. Microwave-assisted extraction and ultrasonic slurry sampling procedures for cobalt determination in geological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Carlosena, A; Fernández, E; López-Mahía, P; Muniategui, S; Prada, D

    2004-06-17

    Slurry sampling is compared to microwave-assisted acid digestion for cobalt determination in soil/sediment samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Furnace temperature programs and appropriate amounts of three chemical modifiers were optimised in order to get the highest signals and good separations between the atomic and background signals. Using nitric acid (0.5% (v/v)) as liquid medium, no chemical modifier was needed. The detection limit, based on integrated absorbance, was 0.04mugg(-1) for digests and slurries. Within-batch precision and analytical recoveries were satisfactory for both procedures. Accuracy was tested by analysing a reference soil and a sediment from IRMM. The methods were further compared employing a set of roadside soils and estuarine sediments. As no significant differences (95% confidence) were found, practical analytical properties were suggested in order to select one of them.

  15. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction with saponification (MAES) for the determination of polybrominated flame retardants in aquaculture samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajar, N M; Carro, A M; Lorenzo, R A; Fernandez, F; Cela, R

    2008-08-01

    The efficiency of microwave-assisted extraction with saponification (MAES) for the determination of seven polybrominated flame retardants (polybrominated biphenyls, PBBs; and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs) in aquaculture samples is described and compared with microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). Chemometric techniques based on experimental designs and desirability functions were used for simultaneous optimization of the operational parameters used in both MAES and MAE processes. Application of MAES to this group of contaminants in aquaculture samples, which had not been previously applied to this type of analytes, was shown to be superior to MAE in terms of extraction efficiency, extraction time and lipid content extracted from complex matrices (0.7% as against 18.0% for MAE extracts). PBBs and PBDEs were determined by gas chromatography with micro-electron capture detection (GC-muECD). The quantification limits for the analytes were 40-750 pg g(-1) (except for BB-15, which was 1.43 ng g(-1)). Precision for MAES-GC-muECD (%RSD < 11%) was significantly better than for MAE-GC-muECD (%RSD < 20%). The accuracy of both optimized methods was satisfactorily demonstrated by analysis of appropriate certified reference material (CRM), WMF-01.

  16. Electro-driven extraction of inorganic anions from water samples and water miscible organic solvents and analysis by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojavan, Saeed; Bidarmanesh, Tina; Memarzadeh, Farkhondeh; Chalavi, Soheila

    2014-09-01

    A simple electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure combined with ion chromatography (IC) was developed to quantify inorganic anions in different pure water samples and water miscible organic solvents. The parameters affecting extraction performance, such as supported liquid membrane (SLM) solvent, extraction time, pH of donor and acceptor solutions, and extraction voltage were optimized. The optimized EME conditions were as follows: 1-heptanol was used as the SLM solvent, the extraction time was 10 min, pHs of the acceptor and donor solutions were 10 and 7, respectively, and the extraction voltage was 15 V. The mobile phase used for IC was a combination of 1.8 mM sodium carbonate and 1.7 mM sodium bicarbonate. Under these optimized conditions, all anions had enrichment factors ranging from 67 to 117 with RSDs between 7.3 and 13.5% (n = 5). Good linearity values ranging from 2 to 1200 ng/mL with coefficients of determination (R(2) ) between 0.987 and 0.999 were obtained. The LODs of the EME-IC method ranged from 0.6 to 7.5 ng/mL. The developed method was applied to different samples to evaluate the feasibility of the method for real applications.

  17. MICROBIOLOGICAL SURVEILLANCE OF AIR QUALITY IN OPE RATION THEATRES - COMPARISON OF THE CONVENTIONAL SETTLE PL ATE TECHNIQUES VS USE OF AN AIR SAMPLING DEVICE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathab

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Air as a means of nosocomial transmission has alw ays remained as a cause of concern for health care providers and especially personnel involved in infection control activities. Although there are no uniform c onsensus on either the standards for surveillance, methodology for monitoring or the lev els of acceptable contamination, it still remains a fact that we need to have some criteria t o monitor air quality in atleast the critical care areas like the operation theatres. METHODOLOGY: Air quality surveillance in the operation theatres was performed simultaneously usin g the settle plate technique and an air sampling device. A total of 9 operation theatres were subjected to 4 surveillance cycles with a minimum of 2 recordings in each theatre following standard protocols and accepted method used to calculate bioburden. RESULTS: A comparison was made between the two methods using the data available with 72 recordings . In th e settle plate technique, the mean cfu /mm3 was found to be 17.11 and 22cfu/mm3 at less than 30 cm and at a point more than 30cms of the operating table where as the corresponding means usi ng the air sampler was137.83 and 164.11cfu/mm3 respectively which showed considerable statistical significance . CONCLUSION : The use of an air sampler would be more appropriate in monitoring the air quality in critical care areas ensuring a more stringent method of qual ity check without compromising on the the standard accepted norms and addressing the issue of patient safety with reference to infection prevention

  18. Development of air sampling strategies for monitoring common air pollutants in a mission area at Camp Victoria in Kosovo--stationary vs. personal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfors, Håkan; Hägglund, Lars; Magnusson, Roger; Höjer, Karin

    2009-06-01

    It can be problematic to collect representative samples in the occupational environment of deployed soldiers using personal samplers. In this study, several air sampling strategies were examined to identify the most efficient method for collecting air samples that were representative of the soldiers' exposure profiles at the Swedish KFOR Camp Victoria outside Pristina, Kosovo. Stationary monitoring was performed during two 5-day sampling campaigns, one in summer and one in winter. The acquired data were related to measurements obtained by personal monitoring of three and four subgroups, respectively. Patrolling soldiers, mechanics, and indoor workers were selected to represent groups with different exposure profiles, and the particles, metals associated with particles, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and volatile organic compounds that they were exposed to were measured. Generally, low concentrations of the analytes were found in both sampling periods, but the variability was greater in the winter campaign. Samples collected by stationary samplers captured most of the variation in the personnel's exposure, according to principal component analysis (PCA). However, the results also indicate that personal exposure to most potential pollutants would be underestimated if a single outdoor station was used to monitor them. Nevertheless, combined data from stations located outdoors and in relevant microenvironments (workshop, office, and guard station) provided substantially better representation. Thus, it may be possible to obtain monitoring data without using personal samplers in these inherently problematic situations.

  19. 3D Air Quality and the Clean Air Interstate Rule: Lagrangian Sampling of CMAQ Model Results to Aid Regional Accountability Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Szykman, Jim; Pierce, Robert B.; Gilliland, A. B.; Engel-Cox, Jill; Weber, Stephanie; Kittaka, Chieko; Al-Saadi, Jassim A.; Scheffe, Rich; Dimmick, Fred; Tikvart, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) is expected to reduce transport of air pollutants (e.g. fine sulfate particles) in nonattainment areas in the Eastern United States. CAIR highlights the need for an integrated air quality observational and modeling system to understand sulfate as it moves in multiple dimensions, both spatially and temporally. Here, we demonstrate how results from an air quality model can be combined with a 3d monitoring network to provide decision makers with a tool to help quantify the impact of CAIR reductions in SO2 emissions on regional transport contributions to sulfate concentrations at surface monitors in the Baltimore, MD area, and help improve decision making for strategic implementation plans (SIPs). We sample results from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model using ensemble back trajectories computed with the NASA Langley Research Center trajectory model to provide Lagrangian time series and vertical profile information, that can be compared with NASA satellite (MODIS), EPA surface, and lidar measurements. Results are used to assess the regional transport contribution to surface SO4 measurements in the Baltimore MSA, and to characterize the dominant source regions for low, medium, and high SO4 episodes.

  20. Double-salting out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) HPLC method for estimation of temozolomide from biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Darshana; Athawale, Rajani; Bajaj, Amrita; Shrikhande, Shruti

    2014-11-01

    The role of temozolomide (TMZ) in treatment of high grade gliomas, melanomas and other malignancies is being defined by the current clinical developmental trials. Temozolomide belongs to the group of alkylating agents and is prescribed to patients suffering from most aggressive forms of brain tumors. The estimation techniques for temozolomide from the extracted plasma or biological samples includes high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV), micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MKEC) and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). These methods suffer from disadvantages like low resolution, low sensitivity, low recovery or cost involvement. An analytical method possessing capacity to estimate low quantities of TMZ in plasma samples with high extraction efficiency (%) and high resolution with cost effectiveness needs to be developed. Cost effective, robust and low plasma component interfering HPLC method using salting out liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) technique was developed and validated for estimation of drug from plasma samples. The extraction efficiency (%) with conventional LLE technique with methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetonitrile was found to be 5.99±2.45, 45.39±4.56, 46.04±1.14 and 46.23±3.67 respectively. Extraction efficiency (%) improved with SALLE where sodium chloride was used as an electrolyte and was found to be 6.80±5.56, 52.01±3.13, 62.69±2.11 and 69.20±1.18 with methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetonitrile as organic solvent. Upon utilization of two salts for extraction (double salting liquid-liquid extraction) the extraction efficiency (%) was further improved and was twice of LLE. It was found that double salting liquid-liquid extraction technique yielded extraction efficiency (%) of 11.71±5.66, 55.62±3.44, 77.28±2.89 and 87.75±0.89. Hence a method based on double SALLE was developed for quantification of TMZ demonstrating linearity in the range of

  1. Evaluation of sample extraction methods for proteomics analysis of green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-05-01

    Many protein extraction methods have been developed for plant proteome analysis but information is limited on the optimal protein extraction method from algae species. This study evaluated four protein extraction methods, i.e. direct lysis buffer method, TCA-acetone method, phenol method, and phenol/TCA-acetone method, using green algae Chlorella vulgaris for proteome analysis. The data presented showed that phenol/TCA-acetone method was superior to the other three tested methods with regards to shotgun proteomics. Proteins identified using shotgun proteomics were validated using sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) technique. Additionally, SWATH provides protein quantitation information from different methods and protein abundance using different protein extraction methods was evaluated. These results highlight the importance of green algae protein extraction method for subsequent MS analysis and identification.

  2. Dispersive solid-phase extraction as a simplified clean-up technique for biological sample extracts. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Ariel R; Camargo, Alejandra; Martinez, Luis D; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2011-05-06

    Dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE) is proposed for the first time as a simplified, fast and low cost clean-up technique of biological sample extracts for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determination. The combination of a traditional extraction technique, such as ultrasound-assisted leaching (USAL) with DSPE was successfully applied for sample preparation prior to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) analysis. The analytes were first extracted from 1g homogenized sample in n-hexane:dichloromethane (8:2) by applying USAL technique and further cleaned-up using DSPE with 0.20 g C(18)-silica as sorbent material. Different solvent mixtures, sorbent type and amount, and lipid digestion procedures were evaluated in terms of clean-up and extraction efficiency. Under optimum conditions, the method detection limits (MDLs) for PBDEs, calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) were within the range 9-44 pg g(-1) wet weight. The calibration graphs were linear within the concentration range of 53-500,000 pg g(-1), 66-500,000 pg g(-1), 89-500,000 pg g(-1) and 151-500,000 pg g(-1) for BDE-47, BDE-100, BDE-99 and BDE-153, respectively; and the coefficient of determination (r(2)) exceeded 0.9992 for all analytes. The proposed methodology was compared with a reference solid-phase extraction technique. The applicability of the methodology for the screening of PBDEs has been demonstrated by analyzing spiked and real samples of biological nature (fish, egg and chicken) with different lipid content as well as reference material (WELL-WMF-01). Recovery values ranged between 75% and 114% and the measured concentrations in certified material showed a reasonable agreement with the certified ones. BDE-47, BDE-100 and BDE-99 were quantified in three of the seven analyzed samples and the concentrations ranged between 91 and 140 pg g(-1). In addition, this work is the first description of PBDEs detected in fish of Argentinean environment.

  3. Early detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected cattle using a dry filter air sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious livestock disease of high economic impact. Early detection of FMD virus (FMDV) is fundamental for rapid outbreak control. Air sampling collection has been demonstrated as a useful technique for detection of FMDV RNA in infected animals, related to ...

  4. Determination of Ergot Alkaloids: Purity and Stability Assessment of Standards and Optimization of Extraction Conditions for Cereal Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krska, R.; Berthiller, F.; Schuhmacher, R.

    2008-01-01

    Results obtained from a purity study on standards of the 6 major ergot alkaloids ergometrine, ergotamine, ergosine, ergocristine, ergocryptine, and ergocornine and their corresponding epimers are discussed. The 6 ergot alkaloids studied have been defined by the European Food Safety Authority...... considerably above 98% apart from ergocristinine (94%), ergosine (96%), and ergosinine (95%). Also discussed is the optimization of extraction conditions presented in a recently published method for the quantitation of ergot alkaloids in food samples using solid-phase extraction with primary secondary amine...... (PSA) before LC/MS/MS. Based on the results obtained from these optimization studies, a mixture of acetonitrile with ammonium carbonate buffer was used as extraction solvent, as recoveries for all analyzed ergot alkaloids were significantly higher than those with the other solvents. Different sample...

  5. Cloud point extraction coupled with HPLC-UV for the determination of phthalate esters in environmental water samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling; JIANG Gui-bin; CAI Ya-qi; HE Bin; WANG Ya-wei; SHEN Da-zhong

    2007-01-01

    A method based on cloud point extraction was developed to determine phthalate esters including di-ethyl-phthalate (DEP), di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and di-cyclohexyl- phthalate (DCP) in environmental water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography separation and ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 was chosen as extraction solvent. The parameters affecting extraction efficiency, such as concentrations of Triton X-114 and Na2SO4, equilibration temperature, equilibration time and centrifugation time were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the method can achieve preconcentration factors of 35, 88, 111 and detection of limits of 2.0, 3.8, 1.0 ng/ml for DEP, DEHP and DCP in 10-ml water sample respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amount of phathalate esters in effluent water of the wastewater treatment plant and the lixivium of plastic fragments.

  6. Investigation of reagent distributions on glass fiber membrane filters used in air sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Samuel P

    2007-10-01

    This project has arisen from the need to produce GFFs (glass fiber filters) bearing a thin and evenly distributed coating of a selected reagent in the equatorial plane for breakthrough studies. However, it has been discovered that today's two general techniques for coating GFFs (total immersion and application of reagent solution to GFFs) have usually produced unevenly distributed coatings of reagent in the equatorial plane. In addition, quantities of reagent on GFFs from commercial sources may vary widely in the same lot of coated GFFs. Consequences are variability in capacity of coated filters at the point of breakthrough and, perhaps, wasted reagent. Although today's reagent-coated filters may be satisfactory for routine air sampling, such filters may be unacceptable for precise breakthrough studies. Research has been conducted successfully to produce nearly evenly distributed coatings of reagents in the equatorial plane of GFFs by application of reagent solutions to the centers of GFFs which are resting on crisscrossing, fine, stainless-steel wire. Distributions of coatings have been determined by punching out twenty-one 5-mm circles from each GFF and analyzing each circle by flow-injection with a UV detector. Lowest achievable relative standard deviations of measurement (RSDs) for reagents in 5-mm circles have been 5 to 7%. Reagents studied have included 1-(2-pyridyl)piperazine (1-2PP), 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), and 1-(9-anthracenylmethyl)piperazine (MAP). Factors affecting the distribution of such coatings include choice of reagent and choice of solvent for the reagent solution.

  7. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in th...

  8. Determination of parabens in environmental solid samples by ultrasonic-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, L; Tadeo, J L; García-Valcárcel, A I; Turiel, E

    2008-12-19

    Analysis of various p-hydroxybenzoic esters (methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, propyl, benzyl, and butylparaben) in environmental solid samples was carried out by sonication-assisted extraction in small columns (SAESC) followed by liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Solid samples were placed in small glass columns and extraction performed assisted by sonication in two consecutive steps of 15 min using acetonitrile as extraction solvent. Sample extracts were evaporated under nitrogen stream to 1 ml and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained ranging from 83% to 110% depending on the analyte. Good limits of quantification (LOQs), between 0.11 and 0.49 ng g(-1) were obtained for LC-MS/MS, making this technique suitable for the determination of parabens in environmental solid samples, particularly at trace level. The developed method was applied to the determination of target analytes in different types of soil and sediments, finding levels between LOD and 6.35 ng g(-1).

  9. Evaluation of micro-colorimetric lipid determination method with samples prepared using sonication and accelerated solvent extraction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two common laboratory extraction techniques were evaluated for routine use with the micro-colorimetric lipid determination method developed by Van Handel (1985) [E. Van Handel, J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc. 1(1985) 302] and recently validated for small samples by Inouye and Lotufo ...

  10. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-05

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces).

  11. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography of Respiratory Quinones for Microbial Community Analysis in Environmental and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Fujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ and menaquinones (MK without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces.

  12. Iron oxide functionalized graphene nano-composite for dispersive solid phase extraction of chemical warfare agents from aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Tak, Vijay; Goud, D Raghavender; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2015-05-15

    Present study deals with the preparation and evaluation of graphene based magnetic nano-composite for dispersive solid phase extraction of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) relevant chemicals from aqueous samples. Nano-composite, Fe3O4@SiO2-G was synthesized by covalently bonding silica coated Fe3O4 onto the graphene sheets. Nerve agents (NA), Sulfur mustard (SM) and their non-toxic environmental markers were the target analytes. Extraction parameters like amount of sorbent, extraction time and desorption conditions were optimized. Dispersion of 20 milligram of sorbent in 200mL of water sample for 20min. followed by methanol/chloroform extraction produced average to good recoveries (27-94%) of targeted analytes. Recoveries of real agents exhibited great dependency upon sample pH and ionic strength. Sarin produced maximum recovery under mild acidic conditions (56% at pH 5) while VX demanded alkaline media (83% at pH 9). Salts presence in the aqueous samples was found to be advantageous, raising the recoveries to as high as 94% for SM. Excellent limits of detection (LOD) for sulphur mustard and VX (0.11ngmL(-1) and 0.19ngmL(-1) respectively) proved the utility of the developed method for the off-site analysis of CWC relevant chemicals.

  13. Development of hyperbranched polymers with non-covalent interactions for extraction and determination of aflatoxins in cereal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Huihui; Xu, Zhigang; Peng, Jialin; Zhu, Shuqiang; Zhang, Haixia

    2013-10-01

    A novel approach for assembling homogeneous hyperbranched polymers based on non-covalent interactions with aflatoxins was developed; the polymers were used to evaluate the extraction of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2) in simulant solutions. The results showed that the extraction efficiencies of three kinds of synthesized polymers for the investigated analytes were not statistically different; as a consequence, one of the representative polymers (polymer I) was used as the solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent to evaluate the influences of various parameters, such as desorption conditions, pH, ionic strength, concentration of methanol in sample solutions, and the mass of the sorbent on the extraction efficiency. In addition, the extraction efficiencies for these aflatoxins were compared between the investigated polymer and the traditional sorbent C18. The results showed that the investigated polymer had superior extraction efficiencies. Subsequently, the proposed polymer for the SPE packing material was employed to enrich and analyze four aflatoxins in the cereal powder samples. The limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3 were in the range of 0.012-0.120 ng g(-1) for four aflatoxins, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) calculated at S/N=10 were from 0.04 to 0.40 ng g(-1) for four aflatoxins. The recoveries of four aflatoxins from cereal powder samples were in the range of 82.7-103% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 10%. The results demonstrate the suitability of the SPE approach for the analysis of trace aflatoxins in cereal powder samples.

  14. A one-step extraction procedure for the screening of cocaine, amphetamines and cannabinoids in postmortem blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelição, Fabrício Souza; Peres, Mariana Dadalto; Pissinate, Jauber Fornaciari; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous detection and quantification in postmortem whole blood samples of cocaine (COC), amphetamines (AMPs) and cannabis; the main drugs involved in cases of impaired driving in Brazil. The analytes were extracted by solid-phase extraction by means of Bond-Elute Certify cartridges, derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide at 80°C for 30 min and analyzed by GC-MS. Linearity ranged from 10 to 500 ng/mL, except for ecgonine methyl ester, for which linearity ranged from 10 to 100 ng/mL. Inter- and intra-day imprecision ranged from 2.8 to 18.4% and from 1.5 to 14.9%, respectively. Accuracy values lay between 86.9 and 104.4%. The limit of quantitation for all drugs was 10 ng/mL and recoveries were >74% for all analytes, except for cannabinoids, which showed poor recovery (∼30%). The developed method was applied to real samples collected from deceased victims due to traffic accidents. These samples were selected according to the results obtained in immunoassay screening on collected urine samples. Five samples were positive for the presence of COC and metabolites, four samples were positive for cannabinoids, six samples were positive for AMPs and two samples were drug negative. Some samples were positive for more than one class of drug. Results obtained from whole blood samples showed good agreement with urine screening. The developed method proved capable of quantifying all three classes of drugs of abuse proposed in this study, through a one-step extraction procedure.

  15. Use of depuration compounds in passive air samplers: results from active sampling-supported field deployment, potential uses, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeckel, Claudia; Harner, Tom; Nizzetto, Luca; Strandberg, Bo; Lindroth, Anders; Jones, Kevin C

    2009-05-01

    Depuration compounds (DCs) are added to passive air samplers (PAS) prior to deployment to account for the wind-dependency of the sampling rate for gas-phase compounds. This correction is particularly useful for providing comparable data for samplers that are deployed in different environments and subject to different meteorological conditions such as wind speeds. Two types of PAS--the polyurethane foam (PUF) disk sampler and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)--were deployed at eight heights on a 100 m tower to test whether the DC approach could yield air concentrations profiles for PCBs and organochlorine pesticides and account for the wind speed gradient with height. Average wind speeds ranged from 0.3 to 4.5 m s(-1) over the 40 day deployment, increasing with height Two low volume active air samples (AAS), one collected at 25 m and one at 73 m over the 40 day deployment showed no significant concentration differences for target compounds. As expected, the target compounds taken up by PAS reflected the wind profile with height This wind-dependency of the PAS was also reflected in the results of the DCs. A correction based on the DC approach successfully accounted for the effect of wind on PAS sampling rates, yielding a profile consistent with the AAS. Interestingly, in terms of absolute air concentrations, there were differences between the AAS and PAS-derived values for some target compounds. These were attributed to different sampling characteristics of the two approaches that may have resulted in slightly different air masses being sampled. Based on the results of this study, guidelines are presented for the use of DCs and for the calibration of PAS using AAS.

  16. Indoor Air Quality in Selected Samples of Primary Schools in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzuki Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found out that indoor air quality affects human especially children and the elderly more compared to ambient atmospheric air. This study aims to investigate indoor air pollutants concentration in selected vernacular schools with different surrounding human activities in Kuala Terengganu, the administrative and commercial center of Terengganu state. Failure to identify and establish indoor air pollution status can increase the chance of long-term and short-term health problems for these young students and staff; reduction in productivity of teachers; and degrade the youngsters learning environment and comfort. Indoor air quality (IAQ parameters in three primary schools were conducted during the monsoon season of November 2008 for the purposes of assessing ventilation rates, levels of particulate matter (PM10 and air quality differences between schools. In each classroom, carbon monoxide (CO, CO2, air velocity, relative humidity and temperature were performed during school hours, and a complete walkthrough survey was completed. Results show a statistically significant difference for the five IAQ parameters between the three schools at the 95.0% confidence level. We conclude our findings by confirming the important influence of surrounding human activities on indoor concentrations of pollutants in selected vernacular schools in Kuala Terengganu.

  17. Extraction of HCV-RNA from Plasma Samples: Development towards Semiautomation

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Amin; Tania Jabbar; Fawad Niazi; Muhammad Saeed Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    A semiautomated extraction protocol of HCV-RNA using Favorgen RNA extraction kit has been developed. The kit provided protocol was modified by replacing manual spin steps with vacuum filtration. The assay performance was evaluated by real-time qPCR based on Taqman technology. Assay linearity was confirmed with the serial dilutions of RTA (Turkey) containing 1 × (106, 105, 104, and 103) IU mL−1. Comparison of test results obtained by two extraction methods showed a good correlation (r = 0.95, ...

  18. Contributions from the data samples in NOC technique on the extracting of the Sq variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingyan; Xu, Wenyao

    2015-04-01

    The solar quiet daily variation, Sq, a rather regular variation is usually observed at mid-low latitudes on magnetic quiet days or less-disturbed days. It is mainly resulted from the dynamo currents in the ionospheric E region, which are driven by the atmospheric tidal wind and different processes and flow as two current whorls in each of the northern and southern hemispheres[1]. The Sq exhibits a conspicuous day-to-day (DTD) variability in daily range (or strength), shape (or phase) and its current focus. This variability is mainly attributed to changes in the ionospheric conductivity and tidal winds, varying with solar radiation and ionospheric conditions. Furthermore, it presents a seasonal variation and solar cycle variation[2-4]. In generally, Sq is expressed with the average value of the five international magnetic quiet days. Using data from global magnetic stations, equivalent current system of daily variation can be constructed to reveal characteristics of the currents[5]. In addition, using the differences of H component at two stations on north and south side of the Sq currents of focus, Sq is extracted much better[6]. Recently, the method of Natural Orthoganal Components (NOC) is used to decompose the magnetic daily variation and express it as the summation of eigenmodes, and indicate the first NOC eigenmode as the solar quiet daily variation, the second as the disturbance daily variation[7-9]. As we know, the NOC technique can help reveal simpler patterns within a complex set of variables, without designed basic-functions such as FFT technique. But the physical explanation of the NOC eigenmodes is greatly depends on the number of data samples and data regular-quality. Using the NOC method, we focus our present study on the analysis of the hourly means of the H component at BMT observatory in China from 2001 to 2008. The contributions of the number and the regular-quality of the data samples on which eigenmode corresponds to the Sq are analyzed, by

  19. Effective removal of co-purified inhibitors from extracted DNA samples using synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah; Marshall, Pamela; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    Various types of biological samples present challenges for extraction of DNA suitable for subsequent molecular analyses. Commonly used extraction methods, such as silica membrane columns and phenol-chloroform, while highly successful may still fail to provide a sufficiently pure DNA extract with some samples. Synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA), implemented in Boreal Genomics' Aurora Nucleic Acid Extraction System (Boreal Genomics, Vancouver, BC), is a new technology that offers the potential to remove inhibitors effectively while simultaneously concentrating DNA. In this initial study, SCODA was tested for its ability to remove various concentrations of forensically and medically relevant polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors naturally found in tissue, hair, blood, plant, and soil samples. SCODA was used to purify and concentrate DNA from intentionally contaminated DNA samples containing known concentrations of hematin, humic acid, melanin, and tannic acid. The internal positive control (IPC) provided in the Quantifiler™ Human DNA Quantification Kit (Life Technologies, Foster City, CA) and short tandem repeat (STR) profiling (AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit; Life Technologies, Foster City, CA) were used to measure inhibition effects and hence purification. SCODA methodology yielded overall higher efficiency of purification of highly contaminated samples compared with the QIAquick® PCR Purification Kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). SCODA-purified DNA yielded no cycle shift of the IPC for each sample and yielded greater allele percentage recovery and relative fluorescence unit values compared with the QIAquick® purification method. The Aurora provided an automated, minimal-step approach to successfully remove inhibitors and concentrate DNA from challenged samples.

  20. A spatial multicriteria model for determining air pollution at sample locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réquia Júnior, Weeberb João; Roig, Henrique Llacer; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric pollution in urban centers has been one of the main causes of human illness related to the respiratory and circulatory system. Efficient monitoring of air quality is a source of information for environmental management and public health. This study investigates the spatial patterns of atmospheric pollution using a spatial multicriteria model that helps target locations for air pollution monitoring sites. The main objective was to identify high-priority areas for measuring human exposures to air pollutants as they relate to emission sources. The method proved to be viable and flexible in its application to various areas.

  1. Determination of higher carboxylic acids in snow samples using solid-phase extraction and LC/MS-TOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenberger, Matthias; Winterhalter, Richard; Moortgat, Geert K

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a method to determine the concentrations of higher organic acids in snow samples. The target species are the homologous aliphatic alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids from C(5) to C(13), pinonic acid, pinic acid and phthalic acid. A preconcentration procedure utilizing solid phase extraction was developed and optimized using solutions of authentic standards. The influences of different parameters such as flow rate during extraction and the concentration of the eluent on the efficiency of the extraction procedure were investigated. The compounds of interest were separated by HPLC and detected by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (qTOF-MS). The recovery rate (extraction efficiency) of the extraction procedure was found to vary between 41% for tridecanedioic acid and 102% for adipic acid. The limits of detection were determined for all compounds and were between 0.9 nmol/L (dodecanedioic acid) and 29.5 nmol/L (pinonic acid). An exception is pinic acid, for which a considerably higher detection limit of 103.9 nmol/L was calculated. Snow samples were collected in December 2006 and January 2007 at the Fee glacier (Switzerland) from locations at heights from 3056 to 3580 m asl and from different depths within the snow layer. In total, the analysis of 61 single snow samples was performed, and the following compounds could be quantified: homologous aliphatic alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids with 5-12 carbon atoms and phthalic acid. Tridecanedioic acid, pinonic and pinic acid were identified in the samples but were not quantified due to their low concentrations. The three most abundant acids found in the molten snow samples were glutaric acid (C(5)-di; 3.90 nmol/L), adipic acid (C(6)-di; 3.35 nmol/L) and phthalic acid (Ph; 3.04 nmol/L).

  2. Selective cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum (VI) ion in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filik, Hayati, E-mail: filik@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey); Cengel, Tayfun; Apak, Resat [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract molybdenum from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of Mo(VI) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarine: QA) and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, incubation and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Mo(VI) was 7.0 ng L{sup -1} with an preconcentration factor of {approx}25 when 10 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.4 mL. The proposed method (with extraction) showed linear calibration within the range 0.03-0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 3.7% (C{sub Mo(VI)} = 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1}, n = 5) for pure standard solutions, whereas RSD for the recoveries from real samples ranged between 2 and 8% (mean RSD = 3.9%). The method was applied to the determination of Mo(VI) in seawater and tap water samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-103%. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values.

  3. Automated on-line liquid–liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Urban, Pawel L. [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid–liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053–2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h{sup −1}). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. - Highlights: • Mass spectrometric analysis normally requires sample preparation. • Liquid–liquid extraction can isolate analytes from complex matrices. • The proposed system automates

  4. Supercritical fluid extraction for some carbamate insecticides in potatoes samples, with HPLC/fluorescence determination and HPLC/mass spectrometry confirmation

    OpenAIRE

    Gilvanda Silva Nunes; Teresa Cristina R. Santos; Damiá Barceló; Alexandre Santos Pimenta; Maria Lúcia Ribeiro

    2002-01-01

    Six supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) methods were tested, by varying the following operational parameters: CO2 pressure, time and temperature of extraction, type and proportion of static modifier, and Hydromatrix®/sample rate into cell. Firstly, insecticide carbamates were extracted from spiked potatoes samples (fortification level of 0,5 mg.Kg-1) by using SPE procedures, and then final extracts were analyzed HPLC/fluorescence. Good performance was observed with SFE methods that operated ...

  5. An improved protocol for DNA extraction from alkaline soil and sediment samples for constructing metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Digvijay; Satyanarayana, T

    2011-09-01

    An improved single-step protocol has been developed for extracting pure community humic substance-free DNA from alkaline soils and sediments. The method is based on direct cell lysis in the presence of powdered activated charcoal and polyvinylpolypyrrolidone followed by precipitation with polyethyleneglycol and isopropanol. The strategy allows simultaneous isolation and purification of DNA while minimizing the loss of DNA with respect to other available protocols for metagenomic DNA extraction. Moreover, the purity levels are significant, which are difficult to attain with any of the methods reported in the literature for DNA extraction from soils. The DNA thus extracted was free from humic substances and, therefore, could be processed for restriction digestion, PCR amplification as well as for the construction of metagenomic libraries.

  6. Micro-Lid For Sealing Sample Reservoirs of micro-Extraction Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed µLid system is in effect an attempt to miniaturize an extraction system to a chip-cup system with integrated heaters capable extremley hot...

  7. Sample preparation for an optimized extraction of localized metabolites in lichens: Application to Pseudevernia furfuracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaty, Sarah; Letertre, Marine; Dang, Huyen Duong; Jungnickel, Harald; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas; Carrié, Daniel; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre; Gauffre, Fabienne; Tomasi, Sophie; Paquin, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms known for producing unique secondary metabolites with attractive cosmetic and pharmacological properties. In this paper, we investigated three standard methods of preparation of Pseudevernia furfuracea (blender grinding, ball milling, pestle and mortar). The materials obtained were characterized by electronic microscopy, nitrogen adsorption and compared from the point of view of extraction. Their microscopic structure is related to extraction efficiency. In addition, it is shown using thalline reactions and mass spectrometry mapping (TOF-SIMS) that these metabolites are not evenly distributed throughout the organism. Particularly, atranorin (a secondary metabolite of interest) is mainly present in the cortex of P. furfuracea. Finally, using microwave assisted extraction (MAE) we obtained evidence that an appropriate preparation can increase the extraction efficiency of atranorin by a factor of five.

  8. Scheduling whole-air samples above the Trade Wind Inversion from SUAS using real-time sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, J. E.; Greatwood, C.; Thomas, R.; Richardson, T.; Brownlow, R.; Lowry, D.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Small Unmanned Air Systems (SUAS) are increasingly being used in science applications for a range of applications. Here we explore their use to schedule the sampling of air masses up to 2.5km above ground using computer controlled bespoked Octocopter platforms. Whole-air sampling is targeted above, within and below the Trade Wind Inversion (TWI). On-board sensors profiled the TWI characteristics in real time on ascent and, hence, guided the altitudes at which samples were taken on descent. The science driver for this research is investigation of the Southern Methane Anomaly and, more broadly, the hemispheric-scale transport of long-lived atmospheric tracers in the remote troposphere. Here we focus on the practical application of SUAS for this purpose. Highlighting the need for mission planning, computer control, onboard sensors and logistics in deploying such technologies for out of line-of-sight applications. We show how such a platform can be deployed successfully, resulting in some 60 sampling flights within a 10 day period. Challenges remain regarding the deployment of such platforms routinely and cost-effectively, particularly regarding training and support. We present some initial results from the methane sampling and its implication for exploring and understanding the Southern Methane Anomaly.

  9. Alternatives for Benzene in the Extraction of Bitumen Fume from Exposure Sample Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Benjamin; Ravera, Christel; Hussard, Caroline; Langlois, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is frequently used to extract collected bitumen fumes from personal sampler substrates. However, this solvent is particularly dangerous because of its carcinogenicity (group 1 of the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification). Therefore, to prevent the exposure of laboratory technicians to benzene during the fume extraction step from samplers, a compromise had to be found to identify a less toxic solvent with the same extraction capacity. To compare the extraction capacities of selected solvents, bitumen fumes were generated in the laboratory from three different batches of road surfacing bitumen collected on dedicated bitumen fume samplers. The samplers were then extracted by benzene and the solvents tested. Of 11 selected solvents less toxic than benzene and used in studies on bitumen and bitumen fume analyses, n-hexane and n-heptane were identified as alternatives to benzene. In particular, the results demonstrated that n-heptane was the best candidate solvent for benzene replacement, due to its extraction efficiency comparable to benzene for the three bitumen fumes tested and its low toxicity, which is highly compatible with benzene replacement.

  10. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for polymerase chain reaction amplification of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) fecal DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, M I; Bertin, A; Squeo, F A; Cortés, A; Gouin, N

    2015-01-23

    Feces-based population genetic studies have become increasingly popular. However, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification rates from fecal material vary depending on the species, populations, loci, and extraction protocols. Here, we assessed the PCR amplification success of three microsatellite markers and a segment of the mitochondrial control region of DNA extracted from field-collected feces of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) using two protocols - Qiagen DNA Stool Kit and 2 cetyltrimethylammonium bromide/phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (2CTAB/PCI) method. Chelex resin treatment to remove inhibitors was also tested. Our results show that the mitochondrial locus was the most difficult to amplify. PCR success rates improved for all markers after Chelex treatment of extracted DNA, and 2CTAB/PCI method (95.83%) appeared to perform slightly better than stool kit (91.67%) for the nuclear markers. Amplification success was significantly influenced by the extraction method, Chelex treatment, and locus (P 0.89), but they decreased slightly after treatment for amplification of nuclear markers and markedly after treatment for amplification of the mitochondrial control region. Thus, we showed that Chelex treatment gives high PCR success, especially for nuclear markers, and adequate DNA extraction rates can be achieved from L. guanicoe feces even from non-fresh fecal material. Although not significant, 2CTAB/PCI method tended to provide higher successful amplification rates on a whole set of samples, suggesting that the method could be particularly useful when using small sample sizes.

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymers based on SBA-15 for selective solid-phase extraction of baicalein from plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Gu, Xiaoli; Shi, Liying; Hong, Junli; Zhang, Hongjuan; Gao, Yankun; Du, Shuhu; Chen, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective molecularly imprinted mesoporous silica polymer (SBA-15@MIP) for baicalein (BAI) extraction was synthesized using a surface molecular imprinting technique on the SBA-15 supporter. Computational simulation was used to predict the optimal functional monomer for the rational design of SBA-15@MIP. Meanwhile, high adsorption capacity was obtained when a suitable yield of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) layer was grafted onto the surface of SBA-15. Characterization and performance tests of the obtained polymer revealed that SBA-15@MIP possessed a highly ordered mesoporous structure, reached saturated adsorption within 60 min, and exhibited higher sorption capacity to the target molecule BAI compared with non-imprinted mesoporous silica polymer (SBA-15@NIP) and SBA-15. Finally, SBA-15@MIP was successfully applied to solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) for the determination of trace BAI in plasma samples. Mean recoveries of BAI through the molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) sorbent, non-imprinted solid-phase extraction (NISPE) sorbent, and SBA-15 solid-phase extraction (SBA-15-SPE) sorbent were 94.4, 22.7, and 10.7 %, respectively, and the relative standard deviations were 2.9, 2.6, and 3.6 %, respectively. These results reveal that SBA-15@MIP as a SPE sorbent has good applicability to selectively separate and enrich trace BAI from complex samples.

  12. Selective extraction and determination of fluoroquinolones in bovine milk samples with montmorillonite magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwu; Liu, Yanqing; Wei, Shoulian; Yao, Su; Zhang, Jiali; Huang, Huichang

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method for separating fluoroquinolones (FQs) from bovine milk samples was successfully developed using montmorillonite magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMMIPs) as adsorbents. MMMIPs were prepared using montmorillonite as carrier, fleroxacin (FLE) as template molecule, and Fe3O4 magnetite as magnetic component. MMMIPs possessed high adsorption capacity of 46.3 mg g(-1) for FLE. A rapid and convenient magnetic solid-phase extraction procedure coupled with capillary electrophoresis was established with MMMIPs as adsorbents for simultaneous and selective extraction of four FQs in bovine milk samples. Limits of detection ranged between 12.9 and 18.8 μg L(-1), and the RSDs were between 1.8% and 8.6%. The proposed method was successfully applied to spike bovine milk samples with recoveries of 92.7%-108.6%.

  13. Radiostrontium separation and measurement in a single step using plastic scintillators plus selective extractants. Application to aqueous sample analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagan, H.; Tarancon, A.; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F., E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.edu [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-02-07

    This study describes a new protocol for {sup 90}Sr determination in water samples based on the use of a selective extractant (DtBuCH18C6) and plastic scintillator microspheres. The proposed procedure unifies chemical separation and sample measurement preparation in a single step to reduce the effort, time and reagents required for analysis. In addition, the final measurement does not produce mixed waste. The minimum activity detectable for 10 mL of sample solution is 0.46 Bq L{sup -1}. Relative errors for the determination of {sup 90}Sr activity in drinking, sea and river waters are less than 4%.

  14. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  15. Evaluation of DNA extraction techniques for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in Asian elephant trunk wash samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Meagan K; Linke, Lyndsey; Triantis, Joni; Salman, M D; Larsen, R Scott

    2011-02-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic assays for the detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in elephants are lacking. DNA extraction with PCR analysis is useful for tuberculosis screening in many species but has not been validated on elephant trunk wash samples. We estimated the analytical sensitivity and specificity of three DNA extraction methods to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in trunk wash specimens. A ZR soil microbe DNA kit (ZR) and a traditional salt and ethanol precipitation (TSEP) approach were evaluated under three different treatment conditions: heat treatment, phenol treatment, and contamination with Mycobacterium avium. A third approach, using a column filtration method, was evaluated for samples contaminated with soil. Trunk wash samples from uninfected elephants were spiked with various concentrations of M. bovis cells and subjected to the described treatment conditions prior to DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was amplified using IS6110-targeted PCR analysis. The ZR and TSEP methods detected as low as 1 to 5 M. bovis cells and 10 M. bovis cells, respectively, per 1.5 ml of trunk wash under all three conditions. Depending on the amount of soil present, the column filtration method detected as low as 5 to 50 M. bovis cells per 1.5 ml of trunk wash. Analytical specificity was assessed by DNA extraction from species of nontuberculous mycobacteria and amplification using the same PCR technique. Only M. bovis DNA was amplified, indicating 100% analytical specificity of this PCR technique. Our results indicate that these DNA extraction techniques offer promise as useful tests for detection of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in elephant trunk wash specimens.

  16. A new polymeric ionic liquid-based magnetic adsorbent for the extraction of inorganic anions in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Xiaojia; Zhang, Yong; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-07-17

    In this work, a novel type of polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based magnetic adsorbent was successfully synthesized and applied for the extraction and determination of seven inorganic anions in water samples by coupling with ion chromatography. The new adsorbent was synthesized by simple free radical copolymerization of 1-ally-3-vinylimidazolium chloride, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and silica-coated magnetite. The adsorbent exhibited well-defined core-shell structure and good magnetic response ability. Furthermore, due to the presence of abundant anion-exchange groups in the PIL, the adsorbent displayed expected extraction performance for anions including F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO2(-), NO3(-), PO4(3-) and SO4(2-). Various experimental parameters that could affect the extraction performance, such as the amount of adsorbent, desorption solvent, extraction and desorption time, the pH value of sample solution were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, low limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) of the proposed method for the target anions were achieved within the range of 0.061-0.73μg/L and 0.19-2.41μg/L, respectively. The repeatability was investigated by evaluating the intra-day, inter-day precisions and batch-to-batch reproducibility with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 11%. At the same time, the method also showed high extraction speed, simplicity, practicality and low cost for the extraction inorganic anions. Finally, the proposed method was used to detect anions in different water samples successfully. The recoveries were in the range of 71.0-111%, and the RSDs were below 12% in the all cases.

  17. Nonwoven polypropylene as a novel extractant phase holder for the determination of insecticides in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lu; Li, Songqing; Zhang, Panjie; Yang, Xiaoling; Yang, Miyi; Lu, Runhua; Gao, Haixiang

    2014-09-01

    In this work, a novel liquid-phase microextraction approach using nonwoven polypropylene as the extraction solvent holder was developed. Nonwoven polypropylene, a hydrophobic material, is widely used in the cleanup of oil spills. Due to its large surface area, efficient, and full extraction can be achieved. Nonwoven polypropylene containing an ionic liquid was used to extract benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron, teflubenzuron, flufenoxuron, and chlorfluazuron) through vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction. The parameters that affected the extraction efficiency included the type and volume of the extractant, the extraction time, the time and solvent volume for desorption and the mass and surface area of the nonwoven polypropylene. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity was obtained, with coefficients of determination greater than 0.9996, and the limit of detections of these compounds, calculated at S/N = 3, were in the range of 0.73-5.0 ng/mL. The recoveries of the four insecticides at two spiked levels ranged from 93.3 to 102.0%, with relative standard deviations of less than 4.0%. The proposed method was then successfully used for the rapid determination of benzoylurea insecticides in spiked real water samples before liquid chromatographic analysis. The procedure is simple, inexpensive, easy to execute, and can be widely used.

  18. Determination of noble metals in biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, following cloud point extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreia Mesquita da Silva, Márcia; Lúcia Azzolin Frescura, Vera; José Curtius, Adilson

    2001-10-01

    A simple separation procedure for noble metals based on cloud point extraction is proposed. The analyte ions in aqueous acidic solution, obtained by the acid digestion of the samples, were complexed with O, O-diethyl-dithiophosphate and Triton X-114 was added as a non-ionic surfactant. By increasing the temperature up to the cloud point, a phase separation occurs, resulting in an aqueous phase and a surfactant-rich phase containing most of the analytes that were complexed. The metals in the surfactant-rich phase were determined by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The extraction conditions as well as the instrumental parameters were optimized. Enrichment factors ranging from 7 (Rh) to 60 (Pt) and limits of detection from 0.6 (Pt) to 3.0 ng l -1 (Rh) were obtained in the digested samples. The extraction was not efficient for Ir. Among the reference materials analyzed in this work, only one (SRM 2670, urine) presented recommended values for Au and Pt. Due to the non-availability of adequate CRMs, accuracy was assessed by spiking known analyte amounts to the acid digests. Recoveries close to 100% were observed for all the studied elements but Ru. Poor agreement between found and recommended values was observed for non-digested urine sample, probably due to the carrier effect of co-extracted residual matrix components. However, good agreement was reached after urine acid mineralization.

  19. Effectiveness of Winkler Litter Extraction and Pitfall Traps in Sampling Ant Communities and Functional Groups in a Temperate Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Michael B; Campbell, Kaitlin U; Crist, Thomas O

    2017-03-20

    Selection of proper sampling methods for measuring a community of interest is essential whether the study goals are to conduct a species inventory, environmental monitoring, or a manipulative experiment. Insect diversity studies often employ multiple collection methods at the expense of researcher time and funding. Ants (Formicidae) are widely used in environmental monitoring owing to their sensitivity to ecosystem changes. When sampling ant communities, two passive techniques are recommended in combination: pitfall traps and Winkler litter extraction. These recommendations are often based on studies from highly diverse tropical regions or when a species inventory is the goal. Studies in temperate regions often focus on measuring consistent community response along gradients of disturbance or among management regimes; therefore, multiple sampling methods may be unnecessary. We compared the effectiveness of pitfalls and Winkler litter extraction in an eastern temperate forest for measuring ant species richness, composition, and occurrence of ant functional groups in response to experimental manipulations of two key forest ecosystem drivers, white-tailed deer and an invasive shrub (Amur honeysuckle). We found no significant effect of sampling method on the outcome of the ecological experiment; however, we found differences between the two sampling methods in the resulting ant species richness and functional group occurrence. Litter samples approximated the overall combined species richness and composition, but pitfalls were better at sampling large-bodied (Camponotus) species. We conclude that employing both methods is essential only for species inventories or monitoring ants in the Cold-climate Specialists functional group.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of TetracyclinesResidues in Bovine Milk Samples by Solid Phase Extraction and HPLC-FL Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehra Mesgari Abbasi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Tetracyclines (TCs are widely used in animal husbandry and their residues in milk may resultinharmful effects on human. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of TCs residues in various bovine milk samples from local markets of Ardabil, Iran. Methods:One hundred and fourteen pasteurized, sterilized and raw milk samples were collected from markets of Ardabil. Tetracycline, Oxytetracycline and Chlortetracycline (TCs residues extraction carried out by Solid Phase Extraction method. Determination of TCs residues were performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method using Fluorescence detector.Results: The mean of total TCs residues in all samples (114 samples was 97.6 ±16.9ng/g and that of pasteurized, sterilized and raw milk samples were 87.1 ± 17.7, 112.0 ± 57.3 and 154.0 ± 66.3ng/g respectively. Twenty five point four percent of the all samples, and24.4%, 30% and 28.6% of the pasteurized, sterilized and raw milk samples, respectively had higher TCs residues than the recommended maximum levels (100ng/g. Conclusion:This study indicates the presence of tetracycline residues more than allowed amount. Regulatory authorities should ensure proper withdrawal period before milking the animals and definite supervisions are necessary on application of these drugs.

  1. In-port derivatization coupled to different extraction techniques for the determination of alkylphenols in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, J; Monperrus, M; Amouroux, D; Preud'Homme, H; Prieto, A; Zuloaga, O

    2014-05-01

    Large volume injection (LVI)-in port silylation coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the determination of alkylphenols (APs) in water samples applying four different extraction approaches was evaluated. Among the variables studied for in-port derivatization, vent time, cryo-focusing temperature and the ratio solvent volume/N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) volume were optimized using an experimental design approach. Regarding the extraction techniques, different approaches previously optimized in the research group were tested. On the one hand different polymeric materials were tested: silicon rod (SR), polyethersulfone (PES) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the latter in the stir-bar sorptive extraction format (SBSE-PDMS). PES was chosen among the polymeric materials due to the higher recoveries (compared with SR) and lower price (compared to PDMS in the stir-bar sorptive extraction, SBSE-PDMS). Both MASE and PES protocols were selected at this point for further method validation and application to real samples. Finally, the developed methods were validated and applied to the determination of target analytes in various aqueous environmental matrices, including estuarine water and wastewater. Acceptable repeatability in the case of MASE (5-17%) and PES (7-21%) procedures and method detection limits (MDLs, 5-123 and 28-328 ng L(-1) for PES and MASE, respectively) were obtained for most analytes. In terms of apparent recoveries in the presence of matrix, estuarine and effluent samples showed no significant matrix effect (apparent recoveries in the 73-121% for PES and 74-128% for MASE), while a stronger matrix effect was observed for influent wastewater samples (98-132% for PES and 65-156% for MASE). Both MASE and PES extractions combined with LVI-in-port derivatization-GC-MS were applied to the determination of APs in the estuary of Bilbao (Gulf of Biscay, Spain).

  2. Whole air canister sampling coupled with preconcentration GC/MS analysis of part-per-trillion levels of trimethylsilanol in semiconductor cleanroom air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Jason S

    2013-08-20

    The costly damage airborne trimethylsilanol (TMS) exacts on optics in the semiconductor industry has resulted in the demand for accurate and reliable methods for measuring TMS at trace levels (i.e., parts per trillion, volume per volume of air [ppt(v)] [~ng/m(3)]). In this study I developed a whole air canister-based approach for field sampling trimethylsilanol in air, as well as a preconcentration gas chromatography/mass spectrometry laboratory method for analysis. The results demonstrate clean canister blanks (0.06 ppt(v) [0.24 ng/m(3)], which is below the detection limit), excellent linearity (a calibration relative response factor relative standard deviation [RSD] of 9.8%) over a wide dynamic mass range (1-100 ppt(v)), recovery/accuracy of 93%, a low selected ion monitoring method detection limit of 0.12 ppt(v) (0.48 ng/m(3)), replicate precision of 6.8% RSD, and stability (84% recovery) out to four days of storage at room temperature. Samples collected at two silicon wafer fabrication facilities ranged from 10.0 to 9120 ppt(v) TMS and appear to be associated with the use of hexamethyldisilazane priming agent. This method will enable semiconductor cleanroom managers to monitor and control for trace levels of trimethylsilanol.

  3. Perfluoroalkyl acids and their precursors in indoor air sampled in children's bedrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkens, Kerstin; Koponen, Jani; Schuster, Jasmin; Shoeib, Mahiba; Vestergren, Robin; Berger, Urs; Karvonen, Anne M; Pekkanen, Juha; Kiviranta, Hannu; Cousins, Ian T

    2017-03-01

    The contamination levels and patterns of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and their precursors in indoor air of children's bedrooms in Finland, Northern Europe, were investigated. Our study is among the most comprehensive indoor air monitoring studies (n = 57) and to our knowledge the first one to analyse air in children's bedrooms for PFASs (17 PFAAs and 9 precursors, including two acrylates, 6:2 FTAC and 6:2 FTMAC). The most frequently detected compound was 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2 FTOH) with the highest median concentration (3570 pg/m(3)). FTOH concentrations were generally similar to previous studies, indicating that in 2014/2015 the impact of the industrial transition had been minor on FTOH levels in indoor air. However, in contrast to earlier studies (with one exception), median concentrations of 6:2 FTOH were higher than 10:2 FTOH. The C8 PFAAs are still the most abundant acids, even though they have now been phased out by major manufacturers. The mean concentrations of FOSE/As, especially MeFOSE (89.9 pg/m(3)), were at least an order of magnitude lower compared to previous studies. Collectively the comparison of FTOHs, PFAAs and FOSE/FOSAs with previous studies indicates that indoor air levels of PFASs display a time lag to changes in production of several years. This is the first indoor air study investigating 6:2 FTMAC, which was frequently detected (58%) and displayed some of the highest maximum concentrations (13 000 pg/m(3)). There were several statistically significant correlations between particular house and room characteristics and PFAS concentrations, most interestingly higher EtFOSE air concentrations in rooms with plastic floors compared to wood or laminate.

  4. Detection of Campylobacter bacteria in air samples for continuous real-time monitoring of Campylobacter colonization in broiler flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Katja N; Lund, Marianne; Skov, Julia; Christensen, Laurids S; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2009-04-01

    Improved monitoring tools are important for the control of Campylobacter bacteria in broiler production. In this study, we compare the sensitivities of detection of Campylobacter by PCR with feces, dust, and air samples during the lifetimes of broilers in two poultry houses and conclude that the sensitivity of detection of Campylobacter in air is comparable to that in other sample materials. Profiling of airborne particles in six poultry houses revealed that the aerodynamic conditions were dependent on the age of the chickens and very comparable among different poultry houses, with low proportions of particles in the 0.5- to 2-microm-diameter range and high proportions in the 2- to 5-microm-diameter range. Campylobacter could also be detected by PCR in air samples collected at the hanging stage during the slaughter process but not at the other stages tested at the slaughterhouse. The exploitation of airborne dust in poultry houses as a sample material for the detection of Campylobacter and other pathogens provides an intriguing possibility, in conjunction with new detection technologies, for allowing continuous or semicontinuous monitoring of colonization status.

  5. The lung cancer breath signature: a comparative analysis of exhaled breath and air sampled from inside the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Santonico, Marco; Pennazza, Giorgio; Ghezzi, Silvia; Martinelli, Eugenio; Roscioni, Claudio; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Galluccio, Giovanni; Paolesse, Roberto; di Natale, Corrado; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2015-11-01

    Results collected in more than 20 years of studies suggest a relationship between the volatile organic compounds exhaled in breath and lung cancer. However, the origin of these compounds is still not completely elucidated. In spite of the simplistic vision that cancerous tissues in lungs directly emit the volatile metabolites into the airways, some papers point out that metabolites are collected by the blood and then exchanged at the air-blood interface in the lung. To shed light on this subject we performed an experiment collecting both the breath and the air inside both the lungs with a modified bronchoscopic probe. The samples were measured with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and an electronic nose. We found that the diagnostic capability of the electronic nose does not depend on the presence of cancer in the sampled lung, reaching in both cases an above 90% correct classification rate between cancer and non-cancer samples. On the other hand, multivariate analysis of GC-MS achieved a correct classification rate between the two lungs of only 76%. GC-MS analysis of breath and air sampled from the lungs demonstrates a substantial preservation of the VOCs pattern from inside the lung to the exhaled breath.

  6. An Improved Method for High Quality Metagenomics DNA Extraction from Human and Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bag, Satyabrata; Saha, Bipasa; Mehta, Ojasvi

    2016-01-01

    To explore the natural microbial community of any ecosystems by high-resolution molecular approaches including next generation sequencing, it is extremely important to develop a sensitive and reproducible DNA extraction method that facilitate isolation of microbial DNA of sufficient purity...... and quantity from culturable and uncultured microbial species living in that environment. Proper lysis of heterogeneous community microbial cells without damaging their genomes is a major challenge. In this study, we have developed an improved method for extraction of community DNA from different environmental...... methodologies and the supremacy of our method was confirmed. Maximum recovery of genomic DNA in the absence of substantial amount of impurities made the method convenient for nucleic acid extraction. The nucleic acids obtained using this method are suitable for different downstream applications. This improved...

  7. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction.

  8. DNA extraction of ancient animal hard tissue samples via adsorption to silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohland, Nadin

    2012-01-01

    A large number of subfossil and more recent skeletal remains, many of which are stored in museums and private collections, are potentially accessible for DNA sequence analysis. In order to extract the small amount of DNA preserved in these specimens, an efficient DNA release and purification method is required. In this chapter, I describe an efficient and straightforward purification and concentration method that uses DNA adsorption to a solid surface of silica particles. Comparative analysis of extraction methods has shown that this method works reliably for ancient as well as younger, museum-preserved specimens.

  9. Inverse supercritical fluid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of the nanoparticle content in sunscreen agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Vries, Tjerk; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Antonio, Diana C; Cascio, Claudia; Calzolai, Luigi; Gilliland, Douglas; de Mello, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of inverse supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extraction as a novel method of sample preparation for the analysis of complex nanoparticle-containing samples, in our case a model sunscreen agent with titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The sample was prepared for analysis in a simplified process using a lab scale supercritical fluid extraction system. The residual material was easily dispersed in an aqueous solution and analyzed by Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) hyphenated with UV- and Multi-Angle Light Scattering detection. The obtained results allowed an unambiguous determination of the presence of nanoparticles within the sample, with almost no background from the matrix itself, and showed that the size distribution of the nanoparticles is essentially maintained. These results are especially relevant in view of recently introduced regulatory requirements concerning the labeling of nanoparticle-containing products. The novel sample preparation method is potentially applicable to commercial sunscreens or other emulsion-based cosmetic products and has important ecological advantages over currently used sample preparation techniques involving organic solvents.

  10. Selective extraction of emerging contaminants from water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using functionalized ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cong; Li, Tianhao; Twu, Pamela; Pitner, William R; Anderson, Jared L

    2011-03-25

    Functionalized ionic liquids containing the tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (FAP) anion were used as extraction solvents in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) for the extraction of 14 emerging contaminants from water samples. The extraction efficiencies and selectivities were compared to those of an in situ IL DLLME method which uses an in situ metathesis reaction to exchange 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM-Cl) to 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (BMIM-NTf(2)). Compounds containing tertiary amine functionality were extracted with high selectivity and sensitivity by the 1-(6-amino-hexyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (HNH(2)MPL-FAP) IL compared to other FAP-based ILs and the BMIM-NTf(2) IL. On the other hand, polar or acidic compounds without amine groups exhibited higher enrichment factors using the BMIM-NTf(2) IL. The detection limits for the studied analytes varied from 0.1 to 55.1 μg/L using the traditional IL DLLME method with the HNH(2)MPL-FAP IL as extraction solvent, and from 0.1 to 55.8 μg/L using in situ IL DLLME method with BMIM-Cl+LiNTf(2) as extraction solvent. A 93-fold decrease in the detection limit of caffeine was observed when using the HNH(2)MPL-FAP IL compared to that obtained using in situ IL DLLME method. Real water samples including tap water and creek water were analyzed with both IL DLLME methods and yielded recoveries ranging from 91% to 110%.

  11. Extraction chromatographic methods in the sample preparation sequence for thermal ionization mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W; O'Hara, Matthew J; Farawila, Anne F; Douglas, Matthew; Haney, Morgan M; Petersen, Steven L; Maiti, Tapas C; Aardahl, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    A sample preparation sequence for actinide isotopic analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is described that includes column-based extraction chromatography as the first separation step, followed by anion-exchange column separations. The sequence is designed to include a wet ashing step after the extraction chromatography to prevent any leached extractant or oxalic acid eluent reagents from interfering with subsequent separations, source preparation, or TIMS ionization. TEVA resin and DGA resin materials, containing extractants that consist only of C, N, O, and H atoms, were investigated for isolation of plutonium. Radiotracer level studies confirmed expected high yields from column-based separation procedures. Femtogram-level studies were carried out with TIMS detection, using multiple monoisotopic spikes applied sequentially throughout the separation sequence. Pu recoveries were 87% and 86% for TEVA and DGA resin separations, respectively. The Pu recoveries from 400 μL anion-exchange column separation sequences were 89% and 93% for trial sequences incorporating TEVA and DGA resin. Thus, a prior extraction chromatography step in the sequence did not interfere with the subsequent anion-exchange separation when a simple wet ash step was carried out in between these column separations. The average measurement efficiency for Pu, encompassing the chemical separation recoveries and the TIMS ionization efficiency, was 2.73% ± 0.77% (2σ) for the DGA resin trials and 2.67% ± 0.54% for the TEVA resin trials, compared to 3.41% and 2.37% (average 2.89%) for two control trials. These compare with an average measurement efficiency of 2.78% ± 1.70%, n = 33 from process benchmark analyses using Pu spikes processed through a sequence of oxalate precipitation, wet ash, iron hydroxide precipitation, and anion-exchange column separations. We conclude that extraction chromatography can be a viable separation procedure as part of a multistep sequence for TIMS

  12. Development of a Solid Phase Extraction Method for Agricultural Pesticides in Large-Volume Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analytical method using solid phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the trace determination of a variety of agricultural pesticides and selected transformation products in large-volume high-elevation lake water sa...

  13. A simple method for determination of carmine in food samples based on cloud point extraction and spectrophotometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Hosseini, Mohammad; Zarabi, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a simple and cost effective method was developed for extraction and pre-concentration of carmine in food samples by using cloud point extraction (CPE) prior to its spectrophotometric determination. Carmine was extracted from aqueous solution using Triton X-100 as extracting solvent. The effects of main parameters such as solution pH, surfactant and salt concentrations, incubation time and temperature were investigated and optimized. Calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.04-5.0 μg mL(-1) of carmine in the initial solution with regression coefficient of 0.9995. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification were 0.012 and 0.04 μg mL(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) at low concentration level (0.05 μg mL(-1)) of carmine was 4.8% (n=7). Recovery values in different concentration levels were in the range of 93.7-105.8%. The obtained results demonstrate the proposed method can be applied satisfactory to determine the carmine in food samples.

  14. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of Co(II) using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction method in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, Foroozan; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Taei, Masoumeh; Nekouei, Mohsen; Mozafari, Elmira

    2016-05-01

    Analytical performance of conventional spectrophotometer was developed by coupling of effective dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction method with spectrophotometric determination for ultra-trace determination of cobalt. The method was based on the formation of Co(II)-alpha-benzoin oxime complex and its extraction using a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction technique. During the present work, several important variables such as pH, ligand concentration, amount and type of dispersive, and extracting solvent were optimized. It was found that the crucial factor for the Co(II)-alpha benzoin oxime complex formation is the pH of the alkaline alcoholic medium. Under the optimized condition, the calibration graph was linear in the ranges of 1.0-110 μg L(-1) with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.5 μg L(-1). The preconcentration operation of 25 mL of sample gave enhancement factor of 75. The proposed method was applied for determination of Co(II) in soil samples.

  15. Nanostructured conducting molecularly imprinted polymer for selective extraction of salicylate from urine and serum samples by electrochemically controlled solid-phase micro-extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameli, Akram [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alizadeh, Naader, E-mail: alizaden@modares.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overoxidized polypyrrole templated with salicylate has been utilized as conducting molecular imprinted polymer for EC-SPME. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This first study reported on conducting molecular imprinted polymer was used to EC-SPME of salicylate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposed method, is particularly effective in sample clean-up and selective monitoring of salicylate in physiological samples. - Abstract: Overoxidized polypyrrole (OPPy) films templated with salicylate (SA) have been utilized as conducting molecular imprinted polymers (CMIPs) for potential-induced selective solid-phase micro-extraction processes. Various important fabrication factors for controlling the performance of the OPPy films have been investigated using fluorescence spectrometry. Several key parameters such as applied potential for uptake, release, pH of uptake and release solution were varied to achieve the optimum micro-extraction procedure. The film template with SA exhibited excellent selectivity over some interference. The calibration graphs were linear in the ranges of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mol mL{sup -1} and the detection limit was 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1}. The OPPy film as the solid-phase micro-extraction absorbent has been applied for the selective clean-up and quantification of trace amounts of SA from physiological samples. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have confirmed the nano-structure morphologies of the films.

  16. Cloud point extraction-atomic absorption spectrometry for pre-concentration and determination of cadmium in cigarette samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Boustani, Fazlollah; Yazdandoust, Mozhdeh; Aalaei, Mehdi; Tabandeh, Mahboobeh

    2013-05-01

    A new complexing agent, 2-((2-((1H-benzo[d]imidazole-2yl)methoxy)phenoxy)methyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole (BIMPI), was used in cloud point extraction and applied for selective pre-concentration of trace amounts of cadmium in cigarette samples. Cadmium was complexed with BIMPI in a buffer solution (pH = 10) using Triton X-114 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. Under optimized conditions (pH = 10.0, 0.8 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) BIMPI and 0.08 % (w/v) Triton X-114), calibration graph was linear in the range of 34.0-1,670.0 μg L(-1). The proposed method was applied to the determination of Cd in various cigarette (tobacco) samples which gave satisfactory results.

  17. Determination of trace amount of lead in industrial and municipal effluent water samples based on dispersive liquid-liquid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirkhanloo, H. [Iranian Petroleum Industry Health Research Institute, Occupational and Environmental Health Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sedighi, K.; Mousavi, H. Z., E-mail: hzmousavi@semnan.ac.ir [Semnan University, College of Science, Department of Chemistry, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate method was developed for the determination of lead ion by combining ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid extraction (Il-DLL E) with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Tetraethyl thiuram disulfide (Tetd), acetone and 1-octyl-3m ethylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [(C{sub 8}MIM) (PF{sub 6})] were used as the chelating agent, dispersive and extraction solvent, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 5-190 μg L{sup -1} of lead and the detection limit was 0.8 μg L{sup -1} with a sample volume of 200 ml. The proposed method was validated by the analysis of one certified reference material and applied successfully to the determination of lead in real water samples. (Author)

  18. Determination of trace inorganic mercury species in water samples by cloud point extraction and UV-vis spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Halil Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A new micelle-mediated extraction method was developed for preconcentration of ultratrace Hg(II) ions prior to spectrophotometric determination. 2-(2'-Thiazolylazo)-p-cresol (TAC) and Ponpe 7.5 were used as the chelating agent and nonionic surfactant, respectively. Hg(II) ions form a hydrophobic complex with TAC in a micelle medium. The main factors affecting cloud point extraction efficiency, such as pH of the medium, concentrations of TAC and Ponpe 7.5, and equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An overall preconcentration factor of 33.3 was obtained upon preconcentration of a 50 mL sample. The LOD obtained under the optimal conditions was 0.86 microg/L, and the RSD for five replicate measurements of 100 microg/L Hg(II) was 3.12%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in environmental water samples.

  19. Automated extraction of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid from urine samples using the ASPEC XL solid-phase extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, M C; de Bijl, G A; Egberts, A C

    2000-09-01

    The analysis of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid (THCCOOH, the major metabolite of cannabis) in urine with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample preparation is well documented. Automated SPE sample preparation of THCCOOH in urine, although potentially advantageous, is to our knowledge poorly investigated. The objective of the present study was to develop and validate an automated SPE sample-preparation step using ASPEC XL suited for GC-MS confirmation analysis of THCCOOH in urine drug control. The recoveries showed that it was not possible to transfer the protocol for the manual SPE procedure with the vacuum manifold to the ASPEC XL without loss of recovery. Making the sample more lipophilic by adding 1 mL 2-propanol after hydrolysis to the urine sample in order to overcome the problem of surface adsorption of THCCOOH led to an extraction efficiency (77%) comparable to that reached with the vacuum manifold (84%). The reproducibility of the automated SPE procedure was better (coefficient of variation 5%) than that of the manual procedure (coefficient of variation 12%). The limit of detection was 1 ng/mL, and the limit of quantitation was 4 ng/mL. Precision at the 12.5-ng/mL level was as follows: mean, 12.4 and coefficient of variation, 3.0%. Potential carryover was evaluated, but a carryover effect could not be detected. It was concluded that the proposed method is suited for GC-MS confirmation urinalysis of THCCOOH for prisons and detoxification centers.

  20. Integrating silicon nanowire field effect transistor, microfluidics and air sampling techniques for real-time monitoring biological aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fangxia; Tan, Miaomiao; Wang, Zhenxing; Yao, Maosheng; Xu, Zhenqiang; Wu, Yan; Wang, Jindong; Guo, Xuefeng; Zhu, Tong

    2011-09-01

    Numerous threats from biological aerosol exposures, such as those from H1N1 influenza, SARS, bird flu, and bioterrorism activities necessitate the development of a real-time bioaerosol sensing system, which however is a long-standing challenge in the field. Here, we developed a real-time monitoring system for airborne influenza H3N2 viruses by integrating electronically addressable silicon nanowire (SiNW) sensor devices, microfluidics and bioaerosol-to-hydrosol air sampling techniques. When airborne influenza H3N2 virus samples were collected and delivered to antibody-modified SiNW devices, discrete nanowire conductance changes were observed within seconds. In contrast, the conductance levels remained relatively unchanged when indoor air or clean air samples were delivered. A 10-fold increase in virus concentration was found to give rise to about 20-30% increase in the sensor response. The selectivity of the sensing device was successfully demonstrated using H1N1 viruses and house dust allergens. From the simulated aerosol release to the detection, we observed a time scale of 1-2 min. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests revealed that higher virus concentrations in the air samples generally corresponded to higher conductance levels in the SiNW devices. In addition, the display of detection data on remote platforms such as cell phone and computer was also successfully demonstrated with a wireless module. The work here is expected to lead to innovative methods for biological aerosol monitoring, and further improvements in each of the integrated elements could extend the system to real world applications.

  1. Evaluation of sorbent materials for the sampling and analysis of phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, R; Rittfeldt, L; Åstot, C

    2015-01-02

    Phosphine (PH3), sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) are highly toxic chemical substances commonly used for fumigation, i.e., pest control with gaseous pesticides. Residues of fumigation agents constitute a health risk for workers affected, and therefore accurate methods for air sampling and analysis are needed. In this study, three commercial adsorbent tubes; Carbosieve SIII™, Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, were evaluated for sampling these highly volatile chemicals in air and their subsequent analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The breakthrough volume (BTV) of each fumigant was experimentally determined on the different adsorbents at concentrations at or above their permissible exposure limits, using a method based on frontal chromatography of generated fumigant atmospheres. Carbosieve SIII™, a molecular sieve possessing a very high specific area, proved to be a better adsorbent than both Air Toxics™ and Tenax TA™, resulting in at least a 4-fold increase of the BTV50%. BTV50% for Carbosieve SIII™ at 20°C was measured as 4.7L/g, 5.5L/g and 126L/g for phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride and methyl bromide, respectively, implying safe sampling volumes of 1.9L, 2.2L and 50L, respectively, for a commercial tube packed with 800mg Carbosieve SIII™. The temperature dependence of BTV was strong for Carbosieve SIII™, showing a reduction of 3-5%/°C in breakthrough volume within the range -20 to 40°C. Furthermore, although Carbosieve SIII™ reportedly has a higher affinity for water than most other adsorbents, relative humidity had only a moderate influence on the retention capacity of phosphine. Overall, the applicability of Carbosieve SIII™ adsorbent sampling in combination with TD-GC-MS analysis was demonstrated for highly volatile fumigants.

  2. The sampling of hydrogen sulfide in air with impregnated filter paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, C.

    1964-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative collection of hydrogen sulfide in air on impregnated filter paper. An aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, potassium zincate and glycerol is used as impregnating fluid. The stability of the collected sulfide and the efficiency of collection at different

  3. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  4. Air pollution sampling of particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the techniques of sampling particles in the Earth`s atmosphere. Sampling procedures, sampler design and performance, site selection, sampling networks, and meteorological effects are discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid-liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R. M.; Herrero Latorre, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L- 1, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L- 1. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96-102% obtained for Cd and 97-101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE-SS-ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained.

  6. Solid-phase extraction and field-amplified sample injection-capillary zone electrophoresis for the analysis of benzophenone UV filters in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrà, Miquel; Cinca, Roser; Legaz, Jessica; Núñez, Oscar

    2014-10-01

    A field-amplified sample injection-capillary zone electrophoresis (FASI-CZE) method for the analysis of benzophenone (BP) UV filters in environmental water samples was developed, allowing the separation of all compounds in less than 8 min. A 9- to 25-fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained with FASI-CZE, achieving limits of detection down to 21-59 μg/L for most of the analyzed BPs, with acceptable run-to-run and day-to-day precisions (relative standard deviations lower than 17%). In order to remove water sample salinity and to enhance FASI sensitivity, an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure using a Strata X polymeric reversed-phase sorbent was used and afforded recoveries up to 72-90% for most BPs. With the combination of off-line SPE and FASI-CZE, limits of detection in the range 0.06-0.6 μg/L in a river water matrix, representing a 2,400- to 6,500-fold enhancement, were obtained. Method performance was evaluated by quantifying a blank river water sample spiked at 1 μg/L. For a 95% confidence level, no statistical differences were observed between found concentrations and spiked concentrations (probability at the confidence level, p value, of 0.60), showing that the proposed off-line SPE-FASI-CZE method is suitable for the analysis of BP UV filters in environmental water samples at low microgram per liter levels. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of BPs in river water samples collected up- and downstream of industrialized and urban areas, and in some drinking water samples.

  7. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry method for preconcentration and determination of trace cadmium in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jinyan; Jiao, Yang; Zhao, Jiao; Meng, Lifen; Yang, Yaling

    2014-01-01

    A method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration of trace cadmium (Cd) as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. Cadmium reacted with 8-hydroxyquinoline to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of nonionic surfactant oligoethylene glycol monoalkyl ether (Genapol X-080) in an alkaline medium. Octanol was used to depress the cloud point of Genapol X-080 in the extraction process. The chemical variables that affect the CPE, such as pH of complexation reaction, amount of chelating agent, Genapol X-080 and octanol were evaluated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, linearity was obeyed in the range of 10-500 μg/L, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9993. For 5 mL of sample solution, the enhancement factor was about 20. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the method were 0.21 and 0.63 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) was 3.2% for a solution containing 100 μg/L of Cd. The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. Recoveries of spiked samples varied in the range of 94.1-103.8%.

  8. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine samples after dispersive solid–liquid extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez Méndez, J.; Barciela García, J.; García Martín, S.; Peña Crecente, R.M.; Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es

    2015-04-01

    A new method for the determination of Cd and Pb in urine samples has been developed. The method involves dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE), slurry sampling (SS), and subsequent electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the sorbent material. The isolated MWCNT/analyte aggregates were treated with nitric acid to form a slurry and both metals were determined directly by injecting the slurry into the ETAAS-atomizer. The parameters that influence the adsorption of the metals on MWCNTs in the DSPE process, the formation and extraction of the slurry, and the ETAAS conditions were studied by different factorial design strategies. The detection and quantification limits obtained for Cd under optimized conditions were 9.7 and 32.3 ng L{sup −1}, respectively, and for Pb these limits were 0.13 and 0.43 μg L{sup −1}. The preconcentration factors achieved were 3.9 and 5.4. The RSD values (n = 10) were less than 4.1% and 5.9% for Cd and Pb, respectively. The accuracy of the method was assessed in recovery studies, with values in the range 96–102% obtained for Cd and 97–101% for Pb. In addition, the analysis of certified reference materials gave consistent results. The DSPE–SS–ETAAS method is a novel and useful strategy for the determination of Pb and Cd at low levels in human urine samples. The method is sensitive, fast, and free of matrix interferences, and it avoids the tedious and time-consuming on-column adsorption and elution steps associated with commonly used SPE procedures. The proposed method was used to determine Cd and Pb in urine samples of unexposed healthy people and satisfactory results were obtained. - Highlights: • Cd and Pb determination based on the combination of DSP, SS and ETAAS • Urine matrix was eliminated using DSPE based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. • Slurry sampling technique permitted the direct injection of sample into the ETAAS atomizer.

  9. Magnesium, Iron and Aluminum in LLNL Air Particulate and Rain Samples with Reference to Magnesium in Industrial Storm Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bibby, Richard K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, Craig [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Storm water runoff from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) main site and Site 300 periodically exceeds the Discharge Permit Numeric Action Level (NAL) for Magnesium (Mg) under the Industrial General Permit (IGP) Order No. 2014-0057-DWQ. Of particular interest is the source of magnesium in storm water runoff from the site. This special study compares new metals data from air particulate and precipitation samples from the LLNL main site and Site 300 to previous metals data for storm water from the main site and Site 300 and alluvial sediment from the main site to investigate the potential source of elevated Mg in storm water runoff. Data for three metals (Mg, Iron {Fe}, and Aluminum {Al}) were available from all media; data for additional metals, such as Europium (Eu), were available from rain, air particulates, and alluvial sediment. To attribute source, this study compared metals concentration data (for Mg, Al, and Fe) in storm water and rain; metal-metal correlations (Mg with Fe, Mg with Al, Al with Fe, Mg with Eu, Eu with Fe, and Eu with Al) in storm water, rain, air particulates, and sediments; and metal-metal ratios ((Mg/Fe, Mg/Al, Al/Fe, Mg/Eu, Eu/Fe, and Eu/Al) in storm water, rain, air particulates and sediments. The results presented in this study are consistent with a simple conceptual model where the source of Mg in storm water runoff is air particulate matter that has dry-deposited on impervious surfaces and subsequently entrained in runoff during precipitation events. Such a conceptual model is consistent with 1) higher concentrations of metals in storm water runoff than in precipitation, 2) the strong correlation of Mg with Aluminum (Al) and Iron (Fe) in both storm water and air particulates, and 3) the similarity in metal mass ratios between storm water and air particulates in contrast to the dissimilarity of metal mass ratios between storm water and precipitation or alluvial sediment. The strong correlation of Mg with Fe and Al

  10. Development of Methods for Sampling and Analysis of Polychlorinated Naphthalenes in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mitchell D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The procedure and sampler described permits detection of less than 50pg of one polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) isomer. The method uses gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The PCNs are collected on a glass fiber filter and two polyurethane foam plugs and extracted with toluene at 25 degrees Celsius. (BB)

  11. Nanostructured conducting molecularly imprinted polymer for selective extraction of salicylate from urine and serum samples by electrochemically controlled solid-phase micro-extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Akram; Alizadeh, Naader

    2011-11-30

    Overoxidized polypyrrole (OPPy) films templated with salicylate (SA) have been utilized as conducting molecular imprinted polymers (CMIPs) for potential-induced selective solid-phase micro-extraction processes. Various important fabrication factors for controlling the performance of the OPPy films have been investigated using fluorescence spectrometry. Several key parameters such as applied potential for uptake, release, pH of uptake and release solution were varied to achieve the optimum micro-extraction procedure. The film template with SA exhibited excellent selectivity over some interference. The calibration graphs were linear in the ranges of 5×10(-8) to 5×10(-4) and 1.2×10(-6) to 5×10(-4)mol mL(-1) and the detection limit was 4×10(-8) mol L(-1). The OPPy film as the solid-phase micro-extraction absorbent has been applied for the selective clean-up and quantification of trace amounts of SA from physiological samples. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have confirmed the nano-structure morphologies of the films.

  12. Analysis of Mars Analogue Soil Samples Using Solid-Phase Microextraction, Organic Solvent Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowska, G. E.; Kidd, R. D.; Foing, B. H.; Kanik, I.; Stoker, C.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are robust and abundant molecules in extraterrestrial environments. They are found ubiquitously in the interstellar medium and have been identified in extracts of meteorites collected on Earth. PAHs are important target molecules for planetary exploration missions that investigate the organic inventory of planets, moons and small bodies. This study is part of an interdisciplinary preparation phase to search for organic molecules and life on Mars. We have investigated PAH compounds in desert soils to determine their composition, distribution and stability. Soil samples (Mars analogue soils) were collected at desert areas of Utah in the vicinity of the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), in the Arequipa region in Peru and from the Jutland region of Denmark. The aim of this study was to optimize the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method for fast screening and determination of PAHs in soil samples. This method minimizes sample handling and preserves the chemical integrity of the sample. Complementary liquid extraction was used to obtain information on five- and six-ring PAH compounds. The measured concentrations of PAHs are, in general, very low, ranging from 1 to 60 ng g(sup -1). The texture of soils is mostly sandy loam with few samples being 100% silt. Collected soils are moderately basic with pH values of 8-9 except for the Salten Skov soil, which is slightly acidic. Although the diverse and variable microbial populations of the samples at the sample sites might have affected the levels and variety of PAHs detected, SPME appears to be a rapid, viable field sampling technique with implications for use on planetary missions.

  13. Bioprocess considerations for expanded-bed chromatography of crude canola extract: sample preparation and adsorbent reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Glatz, Charles E

    2003-03-30

    Compared to the conventional microbial and mammalian systems, transgenic plants produce proteins in a different matrix. This provides opportunities and challenges for downstream processing. In the context of the plant host Brassica napus (canola), this work addresses the bioprocessing challenges of solid fractionation, resin fouling by native plant components (e.g., oil, phenolics, etc.), hydrodynamic stability, and resin reuse for expanded bed adsorption for product capture. Plant tissue processing and subsequent protein extraction typically result in an extract with a high content of solids containing a wide particle-size distribution. Without removal of larger particles, the column inlet distributor plugged. The larger particles (> 50 microm) were easily removed through centrifugal settling comparable to that attainable with a scroll decanter. The remaining solids did not affect the column performance. Less than 4% of the lipids and phenolics in the fed extract bound to STREAMLINE trade mark DEAE resin, and this small proportion could be satisfactorily removed using recommended clean-in-place (CIP) procedures. Hydrodynamic expansion and adsorption kinetics of the STREAMLINE trade mark DEAE resin were maintained throughout 10 cycles of reuse, as was the structural integrity of the resin beads. No significant accumulation of N-rich (e.g., proteins) and C/O-rich components (e.g., oil and phenolics) occurred over the same period.

  14. The quantification of hydroquinone, catechol, phenol, 3-methylcatechol, scopoletin, m+p-cresol and o-cresol in indoor air samples by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risner, C.H. (R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem, NC (United States). Bowman Gray Technical Center)

    1993-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the quantification of the phenolic compounds hydroquinone, catechol, phenol, 3-methylcatechol, scopoletin, m+p-cresol and o-cresol in indoor air samples. Samples are collected on an 0.8 [mu]m pore size mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM) followed by a silica gel Sep-Pak. The MCEM is extracted and the SiOHSP is eluted with 1% acetic acid. The phenolic compounds were analyzed on a reverse-phase column with fluorescence detection at selected excitation and emission wavelengths specific to the compounds of interest. A mobile phase gradient of 1% HAc and 99% acetonitrile + 1% HAc is used. The method is reproducible with percent relative standard deviations ranging from 2.0 to 9.2 for the seven phenolic compounds. Percent recoveries are acceptable with the exception of scopoletin and p-cresol. A comparison of tobacco versus wood smoke show that amounts of these seven phenolic compounds vary widely with their source. A relatively short sampling time is required and the procedure is capable of detecting <0.3 [mu]g m[sup [minus]3] for all compounds with the exception of 3-methylcatechol with a detection limit of < 4.0 [mu]g m[sup [minus]3].

  15. Mezcla génica en una muestra poblacional de la ciudad de Buenos Aires Gene mixture in a population sample from Buenos Aires City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Avena

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio tiene como objetivo estimar la mezcla génica en la población de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, a partir de muestras de dadores de sangre provenientes de un centro público de salud (Hospital de Clínicas. Los estudios se realizaron sobre 218 personas no emparentadas que donaron su sangre durante el año 2002. Se analizaron 8 sistemas genéticos eritrocitarios y los alotipos GM/KM. Se realizó una encuesta con la finalidad de obtener información sobre lugar de nacimiento, residencia actual y datos genealógicos de los dadores. Las frecuencias génicas se determinaron empleando métodos de máxima verosimilitud. Para calcular la mezcla génica se aplicó el programa ADMIX (trihíbrido. Se registró un 15.8% de aporte indígena (AI y 4.3% de africano (AA. Estos datos se compararon con un estudio previo realizado en un centro privado (Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, no observándose diferencias significativas salvo en el sistema Km. Los resultados obtenidos se corresponden con la información histórica y demográfica de la ciudad de Buenos Aires.The aim of this study is to estimate the gene admixture in the population of Buenos Aires City from samples of blood donors, which come from a public health centre (Hospital de Clínicas. These studies were performed on 218 unrelated people, who donated blood during the year 2002. Eight erythrocyte genetic systems and GM/KM allotypes were analysed. A survey to obtain information about place of birth, present residence and genealogical data of the donors was performed. The gene frequencies were determined using a method of maximum likelihood. The genetic admixture was calculated through the ADMIX program (trihibride. The Amerindian and African contributions were 15.8% and 4.3% respectively. These data were compared with those obtained in a previous study performed in a private centre (Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires and significant differences were observed, except in the KM system. The

  16. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  17. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranhao, Tatiane de A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: daniel@qmc.ufsc.br; Veiga, Marcia A.M.S. da [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05513-970, CP 26077, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curtius, Adilson J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-06-30

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 deg. C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 deg. C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3{sigma} {sub B}) of 6 and 40 ng g{sup -1}, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3}. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  18. Final work plan : indoor air and ambient air sampling near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-05-24

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at the western edge of Everest, Kansas, from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. Sampling by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1997 resulted in the detection of carbon tetrachloride in one domestic well (the Nigh well) northwest of the former facility. On behalf of the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory subsequently conducted a series of investigations to characterize the contamination (Argonne 2003, 2006a,b,c). Automatic, continuous monitoring of groundwater levels began in 2002 and is ongoing at six locations. The results have consistently indicated groundwater flow toward the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA property to the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property to the intermittent creek. Sitewide periodic groundwater and surface water sampling with analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) began in 2008. Argonne's combined data indicate no significant downgradient extension of contamination since 2000. At present, the sampling is annual, as approved by the KDHE (2009) in response to a plan developed for the CCC/USDA (Argonne 2009). This document presents a plan for collecting indoor air samples in homes located along and adjacent to the defined extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The plan was requested by the KDHE. Ambient air samples to represent the conditions along this pathway will also be taken. The purpose of the proposed work is to satisfy KDHE requirements and to collect additional data for assessing the risk to human health due to the potential upward migration of carbon tetrachloride and its primary degradation product (chloroform) into homes located in close proximity to the former grain storage facility, as well as along and within 100 ft laterally from the currently defined plume emanating from the former Everest facility. Investigation of the indoor air

  19. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented.

  20. Passive air sampling of organochlorine pesticides in a northeastern state of India, Manipur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ningombam Linthoingambi Devi; Shihua Qi; Paromita Chakraborty; Gan Zhang; Ishwar Chandra Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-six polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers (PUF-PAS) were deployed over a year during January to December, 2009 at three locations, i.e., Imphal (urban site), Thoubal (rural site) and Waithou (alpine site) of Manipur, to assess the seasonal local atrnospheric emission of selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs).The average concentration of HCHs monitored at mountain site during hot season (Mar, Apr, and May) and rainy seasons (Jun, Jul, Aug, and Sep) were 403 and 349 pg/m3, respectively.DDTs had a high concentration with 384 pg/m3 at rural site and 379 pg/m3 at urban site during hot seasons.Endosulfans and chlordane were found high in concentration during hot seasons (260 pg/m3) and low during retreating monsoon seasons (44 pg/m3) at rural site.Most of the OCPs concentrations were high during cultivation period.The OCP concentrations of rainy season were highly correlated (p < 0.01) with OCPs of hot seasons.Further, positive correlation (p < 0.05) was also obtained between cold seasons and retreating monsoon.Principal component analysis showed a significant correlation among the four seasons and distribution pattern of OCPs in air.Back trajectory analysis by using HYPSLIT model showed a long range air transport of OCPs to the present study area.Present OCP levels at Manipur is an outcome of both local emission and also movement of air mass by long range atmospheric transport.

  1. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of synthetic dyes in food samples after cloud point extraction using multiple response optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarizadi, Elham; Tabaraki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive cloud point extraction method for simultaneous determination of trace amounts of sunset yellow (SY), allura red (AR) and brilliant blue (BB) by spectrophotometry was developed. Experimental parameters such as Triton X-100 concentration, KCl concentration and initial pH on extraction efficiency of dyes were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) with a Doehlert design. Experimental data were evaluated by applying RSM integrating a desirability function approach. The optimum condition for extraction efficiency of SY, AR and BB simultaneously were: Triton X-100 concentration 0.0635 mol L(-1), KCl concentration 0.11 mol L(-1) and pH 4 with maximum overall desirability D of 0.95. Correspondingly, the maximum extraction efficiency of SY, AR and BB were 100%, 92.23% and 95.69%, respectively. At optimal conditions, extraction efficiencies were 99.8%, 92.48% and 95.96% for SY, AR and BB, respectively. These values were only 0.2%, 0.25% and 0.27% different from the predicted values, suggesting that the desirability function approach with RSM was a useful technique for simultaneously dye extraction. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.02-4 for SY, 0.025-2.5 for AR and 0.02-4 μg mL(-1) for BB under optimum condition. Detection limit based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3Sb) was 0.009, 0.01 and 0.007 μg mL(-1) (n=10) for SY, AR and BB, respectively. The method was successfully used for the simultaneous determination of the dyes in different food samples.

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING SOLID FOOD SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.28)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP describes the extraction and preparation of a solid food sample for analysis of acidic persistent organic pollutants such as acid herbicides, pentachlorphenol, and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-phenol. It covers the extraction, concentration and derivatization of samples that are to...

  3. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING LIQUID FOOD SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.29)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP describes the extraction and preparation of a liquid food sample for analysis of acidic persistent organic pollutants such as acid herbicides, pentachlorphenol, and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-phenol. It covers the extraction, concentration and derivatization of samples that are t...

  4. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method for extracting and preparing a dermal (hand) wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  5. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DERMAL WIPE AND SURFACE WIPE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.27)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method for extracting and preparing a dermal or surface wipe sample for analysis of acidic persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this standard operating procedure. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mas...

  6. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for analysis of polar persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction, concentration, and derivatization of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  7. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING URINE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF HYDROXY POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS, PENTACHLOROPHENOL AND 2,4-D (SOP-5.21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The method for extracting and preparing urine samples for analysis of hydroxy-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol and 2,4-D is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction, concentration and methylation of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/...

  8. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amount of manganese(II) in water and food samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Ayman A.

    2014-10-01

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract manganese(II) from aqueous solution was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of manganese(II) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarin) in the presence of borate buffer at pH 8.5 and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by spectrophotometry at 528 nm. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection (LOD), linear range, preconcentration and improvement factors) were obtained. The proposed CPE method showed linear calibration within the range 5.0-200 ng mL-1 of manganese(II) and the limit of detection of the method was 0.8 ng mL-1 with an preconcentration factor of ∼50 when 25 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.5 mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and relative error were found to be 1.35% and 1.42%, respectively (CMn(II) = 150 ng mL-1, n = 6) for pure standard solutions. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. The method was applied to the determination of manganese(II) in water and food samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 95.87-102.5%.

  9. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amount of manganese(II) in water and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Ayman A

    2014-10-15

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract manganese(II) from aqueous solution was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of manganese(II) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarin) in the presence of borate buffer at pH 8.5 and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by spectrophotometry at 528nm. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection (LOD), linear range, preconcentration and improvement factors) were obtained. The proposed CPE method showed linear calibration within the range 5.0-200ngmL(-1) of manganese(II) and the limit of detection of the method was 0.8ngmL(-1) with an preconcentration factor of ∼50 when 25mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.5mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and relative error were found to be 1.35% and 1.42%, respectively (CMn(II)=150ngmL(-1), n=6) for pure standard solutions. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. The method was applied to the determination of manganese(II) in water and food samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 95.87-102.5%.

  10. Novel dummy molecularly imprinted polymers for matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction of eight fluoroquinolones from fish samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Jincheng; Li, Yun; Yang, Jiajia; Jin, Jing; Shah, Syed Mazhar; Chen, Jiping

    2014-09-12

    A series of novel dummy molecularly imprinted polymers (DMIPs) were prepared as highly class-selective sorbents for fluoroquinolones. A non-poisonous dummy template, daidzein, was used for the first time to create specific molecular recognition sites for fluoroquinolones in the synthesized polymers. The influence of porogen polarity on dummy molecular imprinting effect was studied. The DMIP prepared using dimethylsulfoxide-acetonitrile (1:1.8, v/v) as porogen achieved the highest imprinting factors (IF) for fluoroquinolones over a range of IF 13.4-84.0. This DMIP was then used for selective extraction of eight fluoroquinolones (fleroxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, enrofloxacin and gatifloxacin) from fish samples based on dummy molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion (DMI-MSPD). The extracted fluoroquinolones were subsequently analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a fluorescence detector (FLD). The developed method had acceptable recoveries (64.4-102.7%) and precision (RSDs: 1.7-8.5%, n=5) for determination of fluoroquinolones in fish samples fortified at levels of 10 and 100ngg(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) for identification of eight fluoroquinolones ranged between 0.06 and 0.22ngg(-1). The results demonstrated great potential of the optimized method for sample preparation in routine analysis of trace fluoroquinolones in fish samples.

  11. A solid phase extraction-ion chromatography with conductivity detection procedure for determining cationic surfactants in surface water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkowska, Ewa; Polkowska, Żaneta; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2013-11-15

    A new analytical procedure for the simultaneous determination of individual cationic surfactants (alkyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides) in surface water samples has been developed. We describe this methodology for the first time: it involves the application of solid phase extraction (SPE-for sample preparation) coupled with ion chromatography-conductivity detection (IC-CD-for the final determination). Mean recoveries of analytes between 79% and 93%, and overall method quantification limits in the range from 0.0018 to 0.038 μg/mL for surface water and CRM samples were achieved. The methodology was applied to the determination of individual alkyl benzyl quaternary ammonium compounds in environmental samples (reservoir water) and enables their presence in such types of waters to be confirmed. In addition, it is a simpler, less time-consuming, labour-intensive, avoiding use of toxic chloroform and significantly less expensive methodology than previously described approaches (liquid-liquid extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry).

  12. [Determination of trace silver in water samples by solid phase extraction portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guang-yu; Jiang, Xiao-ming; Zheng, Cheng-bin; Hou, Xian-deng; Xu, Kai-lai

    2011-07-01

    A simple method has been developed for the determination of silver in environmental water samples using solid phase extraction with tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Silica gel was used as an adsorbent and packed into a syringe barrel for solid phase extraction of silver prior to its determination by using a portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. Optimum conditions for adsorption and desorption of silver ion, as well as interferences from co-existing ions, were investigated. A sample pH value of 6.0, a sample loading flow rate of 4.0 mL x min(-1), and the mixture of 4% (m/v) thiourea and 2% (phi) nitrate acid with the eluent flow rate of 0.5 mL x min(-1) for desorption were selected for further studies. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.20-4.00 ng x mL(-1), a limit of detection (3sigma) of 0.03 ng x mL(-1) and a preconcentration factor of 94 were achieved. The proposed method was validated by testing three environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  13. STS 134, 135 and 26S Return Samples: Air Quality aboard Shuttle (STS-134) and International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    This is a very limited set of samples on which to perform an air quality assessment. However, based on these samples, we have no reason to believe that nominal ISS air is unsafe to breathe. We must continue to be vigilant when dealing with nominal atmospheres in ISS. New, unmanned modules require special attention when the crew first enters. Carbon Monoxide Accumulation aboard ISS: Beginning in late 2008 the nominal concentrations of CO began increasing gradually (Figure 1). The results from samples returned on this flight indicate that the CO concentrations, after dropping in late 2009, have cycled upward and then settled back to concentrations near 2 mg/m3. In any case, these changes are well below the 180-day SMAC for CO, which is17 mg/m3. There is no threat to crew health. Carbon Dioxide: This anthropogenic compound has drawn much attention recently because of the possibility that it could contribute to the effects of intracranial hypertension experienced because of spaceflight-induced fluid shifts. From now on we will maintain a plot (Figure 2) of carbon dioxide concentrations ( SD) by averaging the values found in the 3-5 mini-GSC samples taken each month in diverse locations of the ISS. This will enable us to estimate the average exposure of crewmembers to carbon dioxide during their stay aboard the ISS. In general, concentrations are being maintained below 3.5 mmHg. Figure 1

  14. As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb pressurized liquid extraction with acetic acid from marine sediment and soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: jmoreda@udc.es; Alonso-Rodriguez, Elia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); University Institute of Environment, University of A Coruna, Pazo de Longora, Lians, E-15179. Oleiros (Spain); Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); Prada-Rodriguez, Dario [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); University Institute of Environment, University of A Coruna, Pazo de Longora, Lians, E-15179. Oleiros (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bermejo-Barrera, Adela [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    Rapid leaching procedures by Pressurized Liquid Extraction (PLE) have been developed for As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb leaching from environmental matrices (marine sediment and soil samples). The Pressurized Liquid Extraction is completed after 16 min. The released elements by acetic acid Pressurized Liquid Extraction have been evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The optimum multi-element leaching conditions when using 5.0 ml stainless steel extraction cells, were: acetic acid concentration 8.0 M, extraction temperature 100 deg. C, pressure 1500 psi, static time 5 min, flush solvent 60%, two extraction steps and 0.50 g of diatomaceous earth as dispersing agent (diatomaceous earth mass/sample mass ratio of 2). Results have showed that high acetic acid concentrations and high extraction temperatures increase the metal leaching efficiency. Limits of detection (between 0.12 and 0.5 {mu}g g{sup -1}) and repeatability of the over-all procedure (around 6.0%) were assessed. Finally, accuracy was studied by analyzing PACS-2 (marine sediment), GBW-07409 (soil), IRANT-12-1-07 (cambisol soil) and IRANT-12-1-08 (luvisol soil) certified reference materials (CRMs). These certified reference materials offer certified concentrations ranges between 2.9 and 26.2 {mu}g g{sup -1} for As, from 0.068 to 2.85 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Cd, between 26.4 and 90.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Cr, from 9.3 to 40.0 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Ni and between 16.3 and 183.0 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Pb. Recoveries after analysis were between 95.7 and 105.1% for As, 96.2% for Cd, 95.2 and 100.6% for Cr, 95.7 and 103% for Ni and 94.2 and 105.5% for Pb.

  15. Sorption of a diverse set of organic chemical vapors onto XAD-2 resin: Measurement, prediction and implications for air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Stephen J.; Lei, Ying D.; Wania, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The wide-spread use of styrene-divinylbenzene-copolymeric resin (XAD-2) in air sampling necessitates a quantitative understanding of its sorption characteristics for organic chemicals. Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) was used to measure the sorption of a diverse set of 52 organic chemicals to XAD-2 at temperatures between 40 °C and 100 °C and at relative humidities between 0 and 87%. Even though relative humidity has been shown to influence sorption to other sorbents, it did not significantly influence most chemicals' sorption to XAD-2, indicating that water does not form a strong physical barrier to sorption on XAD-2 at high relative humidity. The resin-air partition coefficients ( KXAD) determined by IGC and the enthalpies of sorption derived from them were regressed against solute descriptors to derive poly-parameter Linear Free Energy Relationships (ppLFERs) which allow the estimation of KXAD for chemicals which are not sufficiently volatile to be amenable to IGC and for temperatures outside the experimental range. KXAD values at 20 °C estimated for a set of 296 chemicals for which solute descriptors are available, including polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides, indicate that for many of the substances commonly found in the atmosphere sorption is higher to XAD-2 than to poly-urethane foam, another popular air sampling sorbent.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of uranium(VI) in water samples after mixed micelle-mediated extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Mousavi, Afrouz

    2007-02-15

    A cloud point extraction process using mixed micelle of the cationic surfactant CTAB and non-ionic surfactant TritonX-114 to extract uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the color reaction of uranium with pyrocatechol violet in the presence of potassium iodide in hexamethylenetetramine buffer media and mixed micelle-mediated extraction of complex. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. surfactant concentration, reagent concentration, effect of time) were studied and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g. limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 0.20-10.00ng mL(-1) of uranium(VI) ion and the detection limit of the method is 0.06ng mL(-1). The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of uranium(VI) in tap water, waste-water and well water samples.

  17. Microfluidic filtration and extraction of pathogens from food samples by hydrodynamic focusing and inertial lateral migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clime, Liviu; Hoa, Xuyen D; Corneau, Nathalie; Morton, Keith J; Luebbert, Christian; Mounier, Maxence; Brassard, Daniel; Geissler, Matthias; Bidawid, Sabah; Farber, Jeff; Veres, Teodor

    2015-02-01

    Detecting pathogenic bacteria in food or other biological samples with lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices requires several sample preparation steps prior to analysis which commonly involves cleaning complex sample matrices of large debris. This often underestimated step is important to prevent these larger particles from clogging devices and to preserve initial concentrations when LOC techniques are used to concentrate or isolate smaller target microorganisms for downstream analysis. In this context, we developed a novel microfluidic system for membrane-free cleaning of biological samples from debris particles by combining hydrodynamic focusing and inertial lateral migration effects. The microfluidic device is fabricated using thermoplastic elastomers being compatible with thermoforming fabrication techniques leading to low-cost single-use devices. Microfluidic chip design and pumping protocols are optimized by investigating diffusive losses numerically with coupled Navier-Stokes and convective-diffusion theoretical models. Stability of inertial lateral migration and separation of debris is assessed through fluorescence microscopy measurements with labelled particles serving as a model system. Efficiency of debris cleaning is experimentally investigated by monitoring microchip outlets with in situ optical turbidity sensors, while retention of targeted pathogens (i.e., Listeria monocytogenes) within the sample stream is assessed through bacterial culture techniques. Optimized pumping protocols can remove up to 50 % of debris from ground beef samples while percentage for preserved microorganisms can account for 95 % in relatively clean samples. However, comparison between inoculated turbid and clean samples (i.e., with and without ground beef debris) indicate some degree of interference between debris inertial lateral migration and hydrodynamic focusing of small microorganisms. Although this interference can lead to significant decrease in chip performance through loss of

  18. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedi, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Yasouj, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Shokrollahi, A.; Ahmadi, F.; Rajabi, H.R. [Chemistry Department, University of Yasouj, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-02-11

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in various samples. After complexation with methyl-2-pyridylketone oxime (MPKO) in basic medium, analyte ions are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation. 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} nitric acid in methanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The adopted concentrations for MPKO, Triton X-114 and HNO{sub 3}, bath temperature, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} along with preconcentration factors of 30 and for these ions and enrichment factor of 65, 58 and 67 for Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}, respectively. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of analytes in complex matrices was demonstrated. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of biological, natural and wastewater, soil and blood samples.

  19. The alternative use of layered double hydroxides as extraction medium coupled with microcomplexation for determination of phosphate in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissawong, Netsirin; Sansuk, Sira; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2017-02-01

    A simple, rapid, in situ, and green extraction combined with a microcomplexation has been developed for the spectrophotometric determination of phosphate in water samples. Through their formation, layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were employed as the extraction medium, instantly commenced by a rapid addition of a mixed solution of Mg2 + and Al3 + ions into alkaline phosphate solution. After the extraction, LDH precipitate containing phosphate was dissolved by sulfuric acid and the released phosphate was subsequently detected via its complexation with molybdate in the presence of antimonyl and ascorbic acid. Under optimum conditions, the linearity in the range of 5-200 μg L- 1, with the correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.9969, and the enrichment factor (EF) of 14 were obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) of 5 μg L- 1 and good precision, with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 8.16%, were achieved. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine phosphate in water samples and the relative recoveries of 72.97-115.32% were obtained.

  20. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Shokrollahi, A; Ahmadi, F; Rajabi, H R; Soylak, M

    2008-02-11

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in various samples. After complexation with methyl-2-pyridylketone oxime (MPKO) in basic medium, analyte ions are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation. 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO(3) nitric acid in methanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The adopted concentrations for MPKO, Triton X-114 and HNO(3), bath temperature, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 ng mL(-1) for Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) along with preconcentration factors of 30 and for these ions and enrichment factor of 65, 58 and 67 for Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+), respectively. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of analytes in complex matrices was demonstrated. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of biological, natural and wastewater, soil and blood samples.

  1. Aluminium sensitized spectrofluorimetric determination of fluoroquinolones in milk samples coupled with salting-out assisted liquid-liquid ultrasonic extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qinghai; Yang, Yaling; Liu, Mousheng

    2012-10-01

    An aluminium sensitized spectrofluorimetric method coupled with salting-out assisted liquid-liquid ultrasonic extraction for the determination of four widely used fluoroquinolones (FQs) namely norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and gatifloxacin (GAT) in bovine raw milk was described. The analytical procedure involves the fluorescence sensitization of aluminium (Al3+) by complexation with FQs, salting-out assisted liquid-liquid ultrasonic extraction (SALLUE), followed by spectrofluorometry. The influence of several parameters on the extraction (the salt species, the amount of salt, pH, temperature and phase volume ratio) was investigated. Under optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of the method in milk varied from 0.009 μg/mL for NOR to 0.016 μg/mL for GAT (signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3). The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were found to be relatively low (0.54-2.48% for four compounds). The calibration graph was linear from 0.015 to 2.25 μg/mL with coefficient of determinations not less than 0.9974. The methodology developed was applied to the determination of FQs in bovine raw milk samples. The main advantage of this method is simple, accurate and green. The method showed promising applications for analyzing polar analytes especially polar drugs in various sample matrices.

  2. Automated Large Scale Parameter Extraction of Road-Side Trees Sampled by a Laser Mobile Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbergh, R. C.; Berthold, D.; Sirmacek, B.; Herrero-Huerta, M.; Wang, J.; Ebersbach, D.

    2015-08-01

    In urbanized Western Europe trees are considered an important component of the built-up environment. This also means that there is an increasing demand for tree inventories. Laser mobile mapping systems provide an efficient and accurate way to sample the 3D road surrounding including notable roadside trees. Indeed, at, say, 50 km/h such systems collect point clouds consisting of half a million points per 100m. Method exists that extract tree parameters from relatively small patches of such data, but a remaining challenge is to operationally extract roadside tree parameters at regional level. For this purpose a workflow is presented as follows: The input point clouds are consecutively downsampled, retiled, classified, segmented into individual trees and upsampled to enable automated extraction of tree location, tree height, canopy diameter and trunk diameter at breast height (DBH). The workflow is implemented to work on a laser mobile mapping data set sampling 100 km of road in Sachsen, Germany and is tested on a stretch of road of 7km long. Along this road, the method detected 315 trees that were considered well detected and 56 clusters of tree points were no individual trees could be identified. Using voxels, the data volume could be reduced by about 97 % in a default scenario. Processing the results of this scenario took ~2500 seconds, corresponding to about 10 km/h, which is getting close to but is still below the acquisition rate which is estimated at 50 km/h.

  3. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction and liquid chromatographic separation with electrochemical detection of methylmercury from biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Using the coupled methods presented in this paper, methylmercury can be accurately and rapidly extracted from biological samples by modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and quantitated using liquid chromatography with reductive electrochemical detection. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide modified with methanol effectively extracts underivatized methylmercury from certified reference materials Dorm-1 (dogfish muscle) and Dolt-2 (dogfish liver). Calcium chloride and water, with a ratio of 5:2 (by weight), provide the acid environment required for extracting methylmercury from sample matrices. Methylmercury chloride is separated from other organomercury chloride compounds using HPLC. The acidic eluent, containing 0.06 mol L-1 NaCl, insures the presence of methylmercury chloride and facilitates the reduction of mercury on a glassy carbon electrode. If dual glassy carbon electrodes are used, a positive peak is observed at -0.65 to -0.70 V and a negative peak is observed at -0.90V with the organomercury compounds that were tested. The practical detection limit for methylmercury is 5 X 10-8 mol L-1 (1 X 10-12 tool injected) when a 20 ??L injection loop is used.

  4. Selective mixed-bed solid phase extraction of atrazine herbicide from environmental water samples using molecularly imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarejousheghani, Mashaalah; Fiedler, Petra; Möder, Monika; Borsdorf, Helko

    2014-11-01

    A novel approach for the selective extraction of organic target compounds from water samples has been developed using a mixed-bed solid phase extraction (mixed-bed SPE) technique. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) particles are embedded in a network of silica gel to form a stable uniform porous bed. The capabilities of this method are demonstrated using atrazine as a model compound. In comparison to conventional molecularly imprinted-solid phase extraction (MISPE), the proposed mixed-bed MISPE method in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis enables more reproducible and efficient extraction performance. After optimization of operational parameters (polymerization conditions, bed matrix ingredients, polymer to silica gel ratio, pH of the sample solution, breakthrough volume plus washing and elution conditions), improved LODs (1.34 µg L(-1) in comparison to 2.25 µg L(-1) obtained using MISPE) and limits of quantification (4.5 µg L(-1) for mixed-bed MISPE and 7.5 µg L(-1) for MISPE) were observed for the analysis of atrazine. Furthermore, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for atrazine at concentrations between 5 and 200 µg L(-1) ranged between 1.8% and 6.3% compared to MISPE (3.5-12.1%). Additionally, the column-to-column reproducibility for the mixed-bed MISPE was significantly improved to 16.1%, compared with 53% that was observed for MISPE. Due to the reduced bed-mass sorbent and at optimized conditions, the total amount of organic solvents required for conditioning, washing and elution steps reduced from more than 25 mL for conventional MISPE to less than 2 mL for mixed-bed MISPE. Besides reduced organic solvent consumption, total sample preparation time of the mixed-bed MISPE method relative to the conventional MISPE was reduced from more than 20 min to less than 10 min. The amount of organic solvent required for complete elution diminished from 3 mL (conventional MISPE) to less than 0.4 mL with the mixed

  5. Highly sensitive determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air dust by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after molecularly imprinted polymer extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupadam, Reddithota J.; Bhagat, Bhagyashree; Khan, Muntazir S. [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India)

    2010-08-15

    A method based on solid-phase extraction with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) has been developed to determine five probable human carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air dust by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Molecularly imprinted poly(vinylpyridine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) was chosen as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material for PAHs. The conditions affecting extraction efficiency, for example surface properties, concentration of PAHs, and equilibration times were evaluated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, pre-concentration factors for MIP-SPE ranged between 80 and 93 for 10 mL ambient air dust leachate. PAHs recoveries from MIP-SPE after extraction from air dust were between 85% and 97% and calibration graphs of the PAHs showed a good linearity between 10 and 1000 ng L{sup -1} (r=0.99). The extraction efficiency of MIP for PAHs was compared with that of commercially available SPE materials - powdered activated carbon (PAC) and polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin (XAD) - and it was shown that the extraction capacity of the MIP was better than that of the other two SPE materials. Organic matter in air dust had no effect on MIP extraction, which produced a clean extract for GC-MS analysis. The detection limit of the method proposed in this article is 0.15 ng L{sup -1} for benzo[a]pyrene, which is a marker molecule of air pollution. The method has been applied to the determination of probable carcinogenic PAHs in air dust of industrial zones and satisfactory results were obtained. (orig.)

  6. Highly sensitive determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air dust by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after molecularly imprinted polymer extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupadam, Reddithota J; Bhagat, Bhagyashree; Khan, Muntazir S

    2010-08-01

    A method based on solid--phase extraction with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) has been developed to determine five probable human carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air dust by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Molecularly imprinted poly(vinylpyridine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) was chosen as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material for PAHs. The conditions affecting extraction efficiency, for example surface properties, concentration of PAHs, and equilibration times were evaluated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, pre-concentration factors for MIP-SPE ranged between 80 and 93 for 10 mL ambient air dust leachate. PAHs recoveries from MIP-SPE after extraction from air dust were between 85% and 97% and calibration graphs of the PAHs showed a good linearity between 10 and 1000 ng L(-1) (r = 0.99). The extraction efficiency of MIP for PAHs was compared with that of commercially available SPE materials--powdered activated carbon (PAC) and polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin (XAD)--and it was shown that the extraction capacity of the MIP was better than that of the other two SPE materials. Organic matter in air dust had no effect on MIP extraction, which produced a clean extract for GC-MS analysis. The detection limit of the method proposed in this article is 0.15 ng L(-1) for benzo[a]pyrene, which is a marker molecule of air pollution. The method has been applied to the determination of probable carcinogenic PAHs in air dust of industrial zones and satisfactory results were obtained.

  7. Section curve reconstruction and mean-camber curve extraction of a point-sampled blade surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-long Li

    Full Text Available The blade is one of the most critical parts of an aviation engine, and a small change in the blade geometry may significantly affect the dynamics performance of the aviation engine. Rapid advancements in 3D scanning techniques have enabled the inspection of the blade shape using a dense and accurate point cloud. This paper proposes a new method to achieving two common tasks in blade inspection: section curve reconstruction and mean-camber curve extraction with the representation of a point cloud. The mathematical morphology is expanded and applied to restrain the effect of the measuring defects and generate an ordered sequence of 2D measured points in the section plane. Then, the energy and distance are minimized to iteratively smoothen the measured points, approximate the section curve and extract the mean-camber curve. In addition, a turbine blade is machined and scanned to observe the curvature variation, energy variation and approximation error, which demonstrates the availability of the proposed method. The proposed method is simple to implement and can be applied in aviation casting-blade finish inspection, large forging-blade allowance inspection and visual-guided robot grinding localization.

  8. Phytoestrogens in milk: Overestimations caused by contamination of the hydrolytic enzyme used during sample extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bláhová, L; Kohoutek, J; Procházková, T; Prudíková, M; Bláha, L

    2016-09-01

    Isoflavones are natural phytoestrogens with antioxidant and endocrine-disrupting potencies. Monitoring of their levels is important to ensure the high quality and safety of food, milk, and dairy products. The efficiency and accuracy of phytoestrogen analyses in complex matrices such as milk depend on the extraction procedure, which often uses hydrolysis by means of the β-glucuronidase/sulfatase enzyme originating from Helix pomatia. The present study reveals that the commercially available hydrolytic enzyme is contaminated by several phytoestrogen isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, formononetin, and biochanin A) and their metabolite equol, as well as flavones (naringenin and apigenin) and coumestrol. We show that the concentrations of daidzein and genistein in the enzyme could have impaired the results of analyses of the main isoflavones in several previously published studies. Of 8 analyzed compounds, only equol was confirmed in the present study and it serves as a reliable marker of phytoestrogens originating from cow feed. Critical reassessment of phytoestrogen concentrations in milk is needed because several previously published studies might have overestimated the concentrations depending on the extraction procedure used.

  9. Determination of diniconazole in agricultural samples by sol-gel immunoaffinity extraction procedure coupled with HPLC and ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the European Union (EU, the use of diniconazole-M is no longer authorized. However, residues of diniconazole-M occur in various plant commodities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A selective and simple analytical method for the trace level determination of diniconazole in soil, fruit, vegetables and water samples was developed based on immunoaffinity extraction followed by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis. The ELISA was based on monoclonal antibodies highly specific to diniconazole and was a fast, cost-effective, and selective screening method for the detection of diniconazole. The results of the ELISA correlated well with gas chromatography (GC results, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9879 (n = 19. A simple gel permeation chromato- graphy clean-up method was developed to purify extracts from matrices containing high amounts of fat and natural pigments, without the need for a large dilution of the sample. The immunoaffinity column (IAC capacity was 0.180 mg g(-1. The columns could be re-used approximately 20 times with no significant alteration in capacity. The recoveries from complex samples were in the range of 89.2% to 96.1% with a relative standard deviation (RSD of 0.770%-6.11% by ELISA. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC method. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The IAC extraction procedure coupled with HPLC and ELISA analysis could be also used as alternative effective analytical methods for the determination of diniconazole concentrations in complex samples.

  10. Determination of Pt from coke samples by ICP-MS after microwave assisted digestion and microwave assisted cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemela, M.; Huttunen, S.M.; Gornostayev, S.S.; Peramaki, P. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-09-15

    Platinum in coke samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave-assisted sample digestion and temperature controlled microwave assisted cloud point extraction (MW-CPE). Interferences due to hafnium were successfully eliminated using MW-CPE with 2-MBT prior to the determination of platinum by ICP-MS. The validity of the method was studied by spike recovery tests and by analyzing certified reference material (BCR-723 street dust). The results obtained for platinum in the BCR-723 were generally in good agreement with the certified values. Furthermore, the preliminary platinum results obtained for coke sample by ICP-MS after MW-CPE were compared to those obtained by a reference method (NiS-Fire Assay preconcentration/Te coprecipitation and ICP-MS determination).

  11. Solid phase extraction using silica gel modified with murexide for preconcentration of uranium (VI) ions from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ssadeghi@birjand.ac.ir; Sheikhzadeh, E. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-04-30

    Murexide was chemically bonded to silica gel surface immobilized 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APMS) to produce the new sorbent. A solid phase extraction method using the new sorbent has been developed to separate and concentrate trace amount of uranium (VI) from aqueous samples for the measurement by spectrophotometry method using Arsenazo III reagent. The influences of some analytical parameters on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte were investigated both in batch and column methods. Quantitative recovery of U(VI) was achieved by stripping with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl. The maximum sorption capacity of the modified silica gel was 1.13 mmol g{sup -1} U(VI). A high preconcentration factor value of 400 with a lower limit of detection of 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} was obtained for U(VI). The practical applicability of the developed sorbent was examined using synthetic and real samples such as sea/ground water samples.

  12. Solid phase extraction using silica gel modified with murexide for preconcentration of uranium (VI) ions from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S; Sheikhzadeh, E

    2009-04-30

    Murexide was chemically bonded to silica gel surface immobilized 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APMS) to produce the new sorbent. A solid phase extraction method using the new sorbent has been developed to separate and concentrate trace amount of uranium (VI) from aqueous samples for the measurement by spectrophotometry method using Arsenazo III reagent. The influences of some analytical parameters on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte were investigated both in batch and column methods. Quantitative recovery of U(VI) was achieved by stripping with 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl. The maximum sorption capacity of the modified silica gel was 1.13 mmol g(-1) U(VI). A high preconcentration factor value of 400 with a lower limit of detection of 1 microg L(-1) was obtained for U(VI). The practical applicability of the developed sorbent was examined using synthetic and real samples such as sea/ground water samples.

  13. Determination of ultra trace arsenic species in water samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulusoy, Halil Ibrahim, E-mail: hiulusoy@yahoo.com [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey); Akcay, Mehmet; Ulusoy, Songuel; Guerkan, Ramazan [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey)

    2011-10-10

    Graphical abstract: The possible complex formation mechanism for ultra-trace As determination. Highlights: {yields} CPE/HGAAS system for arsenic determination and speciation in real samples has been applied first time until now. {yields} The proposed method has the lowest detection limit when compared with those of similar CPE studies present in literature. {yields} The linear range of the method is highly wide and suitable for its application to real samples. - Abstract: Cloud point extraction (CPE) methodology has successfully been employed for the preconcentration of ultra-trace arsenic species in aqueous samples prior to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). As(III) has formed an ion-pairing complex with Pyronine B in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 10.0 and extracted into the non-ionic surfactant, polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114). After phase separation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 2 mL of 1 M HCl and 0.5 mL of 3.0% (w/v) Antifoam A. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 60 and a detection limit of 0.008 {mu}g L{sup -1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.9918 was obtained with a calibration curve in the range of 0.03-4.00 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The proposed preconcentration procedure was successfully applied to the determination of As(III) ions in certified standard water samples (TMDA-53.3 and NIST 1643e, a low level fortified standard for trace elements) and some real samples including natural drinking water and tap water samples.

  14. Use of respondent driven sampling (RDS generates a very diverse sample of men who have sex with men (MSM in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Carballo-Diéguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior research focusing on men who have sex with men (MSM conducted in Buenos Aires, Argentina, used convenience samples that included mainly gay identified men. To increase MSM sample representativeness, we used Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS for the first time in Argentina. Using RDS, under certain specified conditions, the observed estimates for the percentage of the population with a specific trait are asymptotically unbiased. We describe, the diversity of the recruited sample, from the point of view of sexual orientation, and contrast the different subgroups in terms of their HIV sexual risk behavior. METHODOLOGY: 500 MSM were recruited using RDS. Behavioral data were collected through face-to-face interviews and Web-based CASI. CONCLUSION: In contrast with prior studies, RDS generated a very diverse sample of MSM from a sexual identity perspective. Only 24.5% of participants identified as gay; 36.2% identified as bisexual, 21.9% as heterosexual, and 17.4% were grouped as "other." Gay and non-gay identified MSM differed significantly in their sexual behavior, the former having higher numbers of partners, more frequent sexual contacts and less frequency of condom use. One third of the men (gay, 3%; bisexual, 34%, heterosexual, 51%; other, 49% reported having had sex with men, women and transvestites in the two months prior to the interview. This population requires further study and, potentially, HIV prevention strategies tailored to such diversity of partnerships. Our results highlight the potential effectiveness of using RDS to reach non-gay identified MSM. They also present lessons learned in the implementation of RDS to recruit MSM concerning both the importance and limitations of formative work, the need to tailor incentives to circumstances of the less affluent potential participants, the need to prevent masking, and the challenge of assessing network size.

  15. VLSI architecture of NEO spike detection with noise shaping filter and feature extraction using informative samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Linh; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Wentai

    2009-01-01

    An emerging class of multi-channel neural recording systems aims to simultaneously monitor the activity of many neurons by miniaturizing and increasing the number of recording channels. Vast volume of data from the recording systems, however, presents a challenge for processing and transmitting wirelessly. An on-chip neural signal processor is needed for filtering uninterested recording samples and performing spike sorting. This paper presents a VLSI architecture of a neural signal processor that can reliably detect spike via a nonlinear energy operator, enhance spike signal over noise ratio by a noise shaping filter, and select meaningful recording samples for clustering by using informative samples. The architecture is implemented in 90-nm CMOS process, occupies 0.2 mm(2), and consumes 0.5 mW of power.

  16. Development of a method to detect and quantify Aspergillus fumigatus conidia by quantitative PCR for environmental air samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, James J; Lees, Peter S J; Merz, William G; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2004-10-01

    Exposure to Aspergillus fumigatus is linked with respiratory diseases such as asthma, invasive aspergillosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Molecular methods using quantitative PCR (qPCR) offer advantages over culture and optical methods for estimating human exposures to microbiological agents such as fungi. We describe an assay that uses lyticase to digest A. fumigatus conidia followed by TaqMan qPCR to quantify released DNA. This method will allow analysis of airborne A. fumigatus samples collected over extended time periods and provide a more representative assessment of chronic exposure. The method was optimized for environmental samples and incorporates: single tube sample preparation to reduce sample loss, maintain simplicity, and avoid contamination; hot start amplification to reduce non-specific primer/probe annealing; and uracil-N-glycosylase to prevent carryover contamination. An A. fumigatus internal standard was developed and used to detect PCR inhibitors potentially found in air samples. The assay detected fewer than 10 A. fumigatus conidia per qPCR reaction and quantified conidia over a 4-log10 range with high linearity (R2 >0.99) and low variability among replicate standards (CV=2.0%) in less than 4 h. The sensitivity and linearity of qPCR for conidia deposit