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Sample records for air engine coolant

  1. Corrosion of magnesium alloys in commercial engine coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.; StJohn, D.H. [CRC for Cast Metals Manufacturing (CAST), Division of Materials, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    A number of magnesium alloys show promise as engine block materials. However, a critical issue for the automotive industry is corrosion of the engine block by the coolant and this could limit the use of magnesium engine blocks. This work assesses the corrosion performance of conventional magnesium alloy AZ91D and a recently developed engine block magnesium alloy AM-SC1 in several commercial coolants. Immersion testing, hydrogen evolution measurement, galvanic current monitoring and the standard ASTM D1384 test were employed to reveal the corrosion performance of the magnesium alloys subjected to the coolants. The results show that the tested commercial coolants are corrosive to the magnesium alloys in terms of general and galvanic corrosion. The two magnesium alloys exhibited slightly different corrosion resistance to the coolants with AZ91D being more corrosion resistant than AM-SC1. The corrosivity varied from coolant to coolant. Generally speaking, an organic-acid based long life coolant was less corrosive to the magnesium alloys than a traditional coolant. Among the studied commercial coolants, Toyota long life coolant appeared to be the most promising one. In addition, it was found that potassium fluoride effectively inhibited corrosion of the magnesium alloys in the studied commercial coolants. Both general and galvanic corrosion rates were significantly decreased by addition of KF, and there were no evident side effects on the other engine block materials, such as copper, solder, brass, steel and aluminium alloys, in terms of their corrosion performance. The ASTM D 1384 test further confirmed these results and suggested that Toyota long life coolant with 1%wt KF addition is a promising coolant for magnesium engine blocks. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY DISTILLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants for a facility such as the New Jersey Department of Transportation garage in Ewing, New Jersey. he specific recycling evaluated is b...

  3. System and method for conditioning intake air to an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellnau, Mark C.

    2015-08-04

    A system for conditioning the intake air to an internal combustion engine includes a means to boost the pressure of the intake air to the engine and a liquid cooled charge air cooler disposed between the output of the boost means and the charge air intake of the engine. Valves in the coolant system can be actuated so as to define a first configuration in which engine cooling is performed by coolant circulating in a first coolant loop at one temperature, and charge air cooling is performed by coolant flowing in a second coolant loop at a lower temperature. The valves can be actuated so as to define a second configuration in which coolant that has flowed through the engine can be routed through the charge air cooler. The temperature of intake air to the engine can be controlled over a wide range of engine operation.

  4. Diesel engine coolant analysis, new application for established instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.P.; Lukas, M.; Lynch, B.K. [Spectro Incorporated, Littleton, MA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Rotating disk electrode (RDE) arc emission spectrometers are user` many commercial, industrial and military laboratories throughout the world to analyze millions of oil and fuel samples each year. In fact, RDE spectrometers have been used exclusively for oil and fuel analysis for so long that it has nearly been forgotten by most practitioners that when RDE spectrometers were first introduced more than 40 years ago, they were routinely used for aqueous samples as well. This presentation reviews early methods of aqueous sample analysis using RDE technology. This presentation also describes recent work to calibrate an RDE spectrometer for both water samples and for engine coolant samples which are a mixture of approximately 50 % water and 50 % ethylene or propylene glycol. Limits of detection determined for aqueous standards are comparable to limits of detection for oil standards. Repeatability of aqueous samples is comparable to the repeatability achieved for oil samples. A comparison of results for coolant samples measured by both inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) spectrometers is presented. Not surprisingly, RDE results are significantly higher for samples containing particles larger than a few micrometers. Although limits of detection for aqueous samples are not as low as can be achieved using the more modern ICP spectrometric method or the more cumbersome atomic absorption (AA) method, this presentation suggests that RDE spectrometers may be appropriate for certain types of aqueous samples in situations where the more sensitive ICP or AA spectrometers and the laboratory environment and skilled personnel needed for them to operate are not conveniently available. (orig.) 4 refs.

  5. An approach for IC engine coolant energy recovery based on low-temperature organic Rankine cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付建勤; 刘敬平; 徐政欣; 邓帮林; 刘琦

    2015-01-01

    To promote the fuel utilization efficiency of IC engine, an approach was proposed for IC engine coolant energy recovery based on low-temperature organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC system uses IC engine coolant as heat source, and it is coupled to the IC engine cooling system. After various kinds of organic working media were compared, R124 was selected as the ORC working medium. According to IC engine operating conditions and coolant energy characteristics, the major parameters of ORC system were preliminary designed. Then, the effects of various parameters on cycle performance and recovery potential of coolant energy were analyzed via cycle process calculation. The results indicate that cycle efficiency is mainly influenced by the working pressure of ORC, while the maximum working pressure is limited by IC engine coolant temperature. At the same working pressure, cycle efficiency is hardly affected by both the mass flow rate and temperature of working medium. When the bottom cycle working pressure arrives at the maximum allowable value of 1.6 MPa, the fuel utilization efficiency of IC engine could be improved by 12.1%. All these demonstrate that this low-temperature ORC is a useful energy-saving technology for IC engine.

  6. An Improved Design for Air Removal from Aerospace Fluid Loop Coolant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.; Holladay, Jon B.; Holt, J. Mike; Clark, Dallas W.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace applications with requirements for large capacity heat removal (launch vehicles, platforms, payloads, etc.) typically utilize a liquid coolant fluid as a transport media to increase efficiency and flexibility in the vehicle design. An issue with these systems however, is susceptibility to the presence of noncondensable gas (NCG) or air. The presence of air in a coolant loop can have numerous negative consequences, including loss of centrifugal pump prime, interference with sensor readings, inhibition of heat transfer, and coolant blockage to remote systems. Hardware ground processing to remove this air is also cumbersome and time consuming which continuously drives recurring costs. Current systems for maintaining the system free of air are tailored and have demonstrated only moderate success. An obvious solution to these problems is the development and advancement of a passive gas removal device, or gas trap, that would be installed in the flight cooling system simplifying the initial coolant fill procedure and also maintaining the system during operations. The proposed device would utilize commercially available membranes thus increasing reliability and reducing cost while also addressing both current and anticipated applications. In addition, it maintains current pressure drop, water loss, and size restrictions while increasing tolerance for pressure increases due to gas build-up in the trap.

  7. PIV measurements of coolant flow field in a diesel engine cylinder head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhenyang; Xue, Cheng; Huang, Yunlong

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents experimental measurements of coolant flow field in the water jacket of a diesel engine cylinder head. The test was conducted at three different flow rates using a 2-D PIV system. Appropriate tracing particles were selected and delivery device was designed and manufactured before the test. The flow parameters, such as velocity, vorticity and turbulence, were used to analyze the flow field. The effects of vortex which was located between the intake valve and the exhaust valve were discussed. The experimental results showed an asymmetric distribution of velocity in the water jacket. This led to an asymmetric thermal distribution, which would shorten the service life of the cylinder head. The structure optimization to the water jacket of cylinder head was proposed in this paper. The experimental system, especially the 2-D PIV system, is a great help to study the coolant flow structure and analyze cooling mechanism in the diesel engine cylinder head.

  8. Hot Air Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stouffs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Invented in 1816, the hot-air engines have known significant commercial success in the nineteenth century, before falling into disuse. Nowadays they enjoy a renewed interest for some specific applications. The "hot-air engines" family is made up of two groups: Stirling engines and Ericsson engines. The operating principle of Stirling and Ericsson engines, their troubled history, their advantages and their niche applications are briefly presented, especially in the field of micro-combined heat and power, solar energy conversion and biomass energy conversion. The design of an open cycle Ericsson engine for solar application is proposed. A first prototype of the hot part of the engine has been built and tested. Experimental results are presented.

  9. Modern coolant additives. Environmental friendly and light metal compatible coolant additives for modern combustion engines; Moderne Kuehlmittelzusaetze. Umwelt- und leichtmetallvertraegliche Kuehlmittelzusaetze fuer moderne Verbrennungskraftmaschinen. Abschlussbericht. Vorhaben Nr. 777

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gugau, M.; Kaiser, M.

    2004-01-31

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on the influence of the enhanced thermal stress on the impact of environmental friendly and light metal compatible coolant additives. The application and advancement of new research methods under mechanism-oriented objective led to a validation of a new guideline to the examination of the suitability of coolant additives for the coolant of internal combustion engines. Moreover, the authors create a knowledge base, on which a purposeful development can take place from suitable formulations of inhibitor for magnesium. For aluminium with silicate containing corrosion anti-freezes a close relationship between the surface temperature and the impoverishment of silicate exists. During the excess of limit temperatures, cooling agent-specific damage features arise reproducibly. The comparison of the different methods for the investigation of cavitation showed that one cannot dispense with both methods in order to evaluate a demand of insulating cavitation and a cavitative / corrosive complex regarding to the development of a test guideline. By the comprehensive electro-chemical and cavitative investigations for the magnesium alloy AZ91hp, a broad knowledge base could be formed, on which a purposeful development and evaluation of inhibitors under the use can take place from different glycols.

  10. Surface Waviness in Grinding of Thin Mould Insert Using Chilled Air as Coolant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeo; S; H; K; Ramesh

    2002-01-01

    On going trend of miniaturization in electronic rel at ed parts, which is an average of two times in every 5~7 years introduce grindin g challenges. In grinding process, the surface waviness control of thin parts is an ardent task due to its warpage, induced by the high specific grinding energy (2~10 J/mm 3). Therefore, coolant is often used to avoid thermal damage, obtai n better surface integrity and to prolong wheel life. However coolant, the incomp ressibility media introduce high forces at the gri...

  11. UO2 and PuO2 utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-03-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO2 fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO2 and PuO2 in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of 235U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  12. Electronically Controlling the System of Preheating Intake Air by Flame for Diesel Engine Cold-Start

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜巍; 赵福堂

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve the cold-start performance of heavy duty diesel engine, electronically controlling the preheating of intake air by flame was researched. According to simulation and thermodynamic analysis about the partial working processes of the diesel engine, the amount of heat energy, enough to make the fuel self-ignite at the end of compression process at different temperatures of coolant and intake-air, was calculated. Several HY20 preheating plugs were used to heat up the intake air. Meanwhile, an electronic control system based on 8 bit micro-controller unit (MCS-8031) was designed to automatically control the process of heating intake air. According to the various temperatures of coolant and ambient air, one plug or two plugs can automatically be selected to heat intake air. The demo experiment validated that the total system could operate successfully and achieve the scheduled function.

  13. The high-temperature sodium coolant technology in nuclear power installations for hydrogen power engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Alekseev, V. V.; Konovalov, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In the case of using high-temperature sodium-cooled nuclear power installations for obtaining hydrogen and for other innovative applications (gasification and fluidization of coal, deep petroleum refining, conversion of biomass into liquid fuel, in the chemical industry, metallurgy, food industry, etc.), the sources of hydrogen that enters from the reactor plant tertiary coolant circuit into its secondary coolant circuit have intensity two or three orders of magnitude higher than that of hydrogen sources at a nuclear power plant (NPP) equipped with a BN-600 reactor. Fundamentally new process solutions are proposed for such conditions. The main prerequisite for implementing them is that the hydrogen concentration in sodium coolant is a factor of 100-1000 higher than it is in modern NPPs taken in combination with removal of hydrogen from sodium by subjecting it to vacuum through membranes made of vanadium or niobium. Numerical investigations carried out using a diffusion model showed that, by varying such parameters as fuel rod cladding material, its thickness, and time of operation in developing the fuel rods for high-temperature nuclear power installations (HT NPIs) it is possible to exclude ingress of cesium into sodium through the sealed fuel rod cladding. However, if the fuel rod cladding loses its tightness, operation of the HT NPI with cesium in the sodium will be unavoidable. Under such conditions, measures must be taken for deeply purifying sodium from cesium in order to minimize the diffusion of cesium into the structural materials.

  14. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  15. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  16. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  17. Thermal modeling in an engine cooling system to control coolant flow for fuel consumption improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangki; Woo, Seungchul; Kim, Minho; Lee, Kihyung

    2016-09-01

    The design and evaluation of engine cooling and lubrication systems is generally based on real vehicle tests. Our goal here was to establish an engine heat balance model based on mathematical and interpretive analysis of each element of a passenger diesel engine cooling system using a 1-D numerical model. The purpose of this model is to determine ways of optimizing the cooling and lubrication components of an engine and then to apply these methods to actual cooling and lubrication systems of engines that will be developed in the future. Our model was operated under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) mode conditions, which represent the fuel economy evaluation mode in Europe. The flow rate of the cooling system was controlled using a control valve. Our results showed that the fuel efficiency was improved by as much as 1.23 %, cooling loss by 1.35 %, and friction loss by 2.21 % throughout NEDC modes by modification of control conditions.

  18. Fundamentals of air pollution engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis and abatement of air pollution involve a variety of technical disciplines. Formation of the most prevalent pollutants occurs during the combustion process, a tightly coupled system involving fluid flow, mass and energy transport, and chemical kinetics. Its complexity is exemplified by the fact that, in many respects, the simplest hydrocarbon combustion, the methane-oxygen flame, has been quantitatively modeled only within the last several years. Nonetheless, the development of combus...

  19. Stirling engine with air working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

  20. Machine coolant waste reduction by optimizing coolant life. Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallansch, J.

    1995-08-01

    The project was designed to study the following: A specific water-soluble coolant (Blasocut 2000 Universal) in use with a variety of machines, tools, and materials; Coolant maintenance practices associated with three types of machines; Health effects of use and handling of recycled coolant; Handling practices for chips and waste coolant; Chip/coolant separation; and Oil/water separation.

  1. Internal combustion engine with compound air compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, M.A.; Paul, A.

    1991-10-15

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine in combination with a compound air compression system. It comprises: a reciprocator with at least one cylinder, at least one piston reciprocal in the cylinder and a combustion chamber formed in substantial part by portions of the piston and cylinder, the reciprocator having a drive shaft; a rotary compressor having a drive shaft mechanically coupled to the drive shaft of the reciprocator, the rotary compressor having a Wankel-type, three-lobe, epitrochiodal configuration sides having a conduit conjected to the reciprocator for supplying compressed air to the reciprocator; a turbocharged with a gas turbine and a turbocompressor, the turbocompressor having an air conduit connected to the expander side of the rotary compressor; and a bypass conduit with a valve means connecting the turbocharger to the reciprocator for supplying compressed air directly to the reciprocator wherein the drive shaft of the reciprocator and the drive shaft of the compressor have connecting means for transmitting mechanical energy to the reciprocator at mid to high operating speeds of the engine when the turbocharge supplies compressed air to the rotary compressor and, at least in part, drives the rotary compressor.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.125 - Engine intake air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air. 1065.125 Section 1065.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.125 Engine intake air. (a) Use the...

  3. Air Force Engineering Research Initiation Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-21

    Wisconsin "Investigation of the Role of Structure in the Dynamic Response of Electrorheological Suspensions" RI-B-92-08 Prof. Yozo Mikata Old Dominion...on a direct output feedback control law. In this study, piezoelectric ceramic elements were used as both actuator and sensor. The rod vibration was... ELECTRORHEOLOGICAL SUSPENSIONS FINAL REPORT Air Force Engineering Research Initiation Grant RI-B-92-07 D. J. Klingenberg Department of Chemical

  4. Air supply system for an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eftink, A.

    1992-06-11

    The present invention describes a system for supplying the primary combustion air to a reciprocating piston internal combustion engine including a trochoidal chamber air pump having a pair of pumping chambers interposed between an air intake and each of the cylinders of the engine. Each pumping chamber has an air inlet connected to an air intake, and an air outlet that is connected to the cylinders. In a two-cycle mode of operation, each pumping chamber outlet is connected to one engine cylinder. In a four-cycle mode of operation, each pumping chamber outlet is connected to a pair of cylinders to supply air during the intake stroke. The input shaft of the trochoidal chamber air pump is driven by, and may be connected to, the crankshaft of the engine so as to rate on a 1:1 ratio. (author)

  5. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc, proposes an SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane mechanism to switch...

  6. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes a Phase II SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane...

  7. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Qihui Yu; Yan Shi; Maolin Cai

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design c...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.122 - Engine cooling and lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine cooling and lubrication. 1065.122 Section 1065.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... lubrication. (a) Engine cooling. Cool the engine during testing so its intake-air, oil, coolant, block,...

  9. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihui Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  10. Working characteristics of variable intake valve in compressed air engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  11. Environmentally Friendly Coolant System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Jackson Principal Investigator

    2011-11-08

    Energy reduction through the use of the EFCS is most improved by increasing machining productivity. Throughout testing, nearly all machining operations demonstrated less land wear on the tooling when using the EFCS which results in increased tool life. These increases in tool life advance into increased productivity. Increasing productivity reduces cycle times and therefore reduces energy consumption. The average energy savings by using the EFCS in these machining operations with these materials is 9%. The advantage for end milling stays with flood coolant by about 6.6% due to its use of a low pressure pump. Face milling and drilling are both about 17.5% less energy consumption with the EFCS than flood coolant. One additional result of using the EFCS is improved surface finish. Certain machining operations using the EFCS result in a smoother surface finish. Applications where finishing operations are required will be able to take advantage of the improved finish by reducing the time or possibly eliminating completely one or more finishing steps and thereby reduce their energy consumption. Some machining operations on specific materials do not show advantages for the EFCS when compared to flood coolants. More information about these processes will be presented later in the report. A key point to remember though, is that even with equivalent results, the EFCS is replacing petroleum based coolants whose production produces GHG emissions and create unsafe work environments.

  12. Computational and experimental study of air hybrid engine concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Cho-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University The air hybrid engine absorbs the vehicle kinetic energy during braking, stores it in an air tank in the form of compressed air, and reuses it to start the engine and to propel a vehicle during cruising and acceleration. Capturing, storing and reusing this braking energy to achieve stop-start operation and to give additional power can therefore improve fuel economy, particularly in cities and ...

  13. Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air Insulation Redesign Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell; Carroll, Paul; Head, Kenneth; Fasheh, John; Stuart, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air Insulation redesign was required to prevent the reoccurance of the STS-111 High Pressure Speed Sensor In-Flight Anomaly. The STS-111 In-Flight Anomaly Failure Investigation Team's initial redesign of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Pump End Ball Bearing Liquid Air Insulation failed the certification test by producing Liquid Air. The certification test failure indicated not only the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Liquid Air Insulation, but all other Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air Insulation. This paper will document the original Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Air STS-111 In-Flight Anomaly investigation, the heritage Space Shuttle Main Engine Insulation certification testing faults, the techniques and instrumentation used to accurately test the Liquid Air Insulation systems on the Stennis Space Center SSME test stand, the analysis techniques used to identify the Liquid Air Insulation problem areas and the analytical verification of the redesign before entering certification testing, Trade study down selected to three potential design solutions, the results of the development testing which down selected the final Liquid Air Redesign are also documented within this paper.

  14. Hydrogen-air mixing evaluation in reciprocating engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, L; Naegeli, D [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the results of a computational study of fuel-air mixing in a hydrogen jet using a spark-ignited, hydrogen-fueled engine. The computational results were compared with experimental measurement being conducted at the Musashi Institute of Technology in Tokyo, Japan. The hydrogen-air mixing work was directed at understanding the extreme sensitivity of ignition to spark plug location and spark timing in direct-injected, hydrogen-fueled engines.

  15. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  16. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  17. Acoustic resonance phenomena in air bleed channels in aviation engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksentsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of axial-radial acoustic resonance oscillations of the basic air flow in bleed channels of aviation engines is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the frequency of acoustic resonance oscillations for the lowest modes of open and closed bleed channels of the PS-90A engine. Experimental investigations reveal new acoustic resonance phenomena arising in the air flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of this engine owing to instability of the basic air flow. The results of numerical, analytical, and experimental studies of the resonance frequencies reached in the flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of the PS-90A engine are found to be in reasonable agreement. As a result, various types of resonance oscillations in bleed channels can be accurately described.

  18. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines; however there is practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wenhua [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Singh, Dileep [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); France, David M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  20. Eliminating air pollution from petrol engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gujral, I.S.; Dave, R.K.; Shende, S.; Saxena, L.M.

    1976-03-01

    A review is given of various methods of controlling nitrogen oxides emissions from automobile spark ignition engines. Methods discussed include exhaust gas recirculation, catalytic conversion, afterburning, burning of non-stoichiometric mixtures, and water injection. It is concluded that the combined use of a catalytic converter and an afterburner is the most feasible option for meeting pollution standards. (PMA)

  1. A hot air driven thermoacoustic-Stirling engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijani, M.E.H.; Spoelstra, S. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    Significant energy savings can be obtained by implementing a thermally driven heat pump into industrial or domestic applications. Such a thermally driven heat pump uses heat from a high-temperature source to drive the system which upgrades an abundantly available heat source (industrial waste heat, air, water, geothermal). A way to do this is by coupling a thermoacoustic engine with a thermoacoustic heat pump. The engine is driven by a burner and produces acoustic power and heat at the required temperature. The acoustic power is used to pump heat in the heat pump to the required temperature. This system is attractive since it uses a noble gas as working medium and has no moving mechanical parts. This paper deals with the first part of this system: the engine. In this study, hot air is used to simulate the flue gases originating from a gas burner. This is in contrast with a lot of other studies of thermoacoustic engines that use an electrical heater as heat source. Using hot air resembles to a larger extent the real world application. The engine produces about 300W of acoustic power with a performance of 41% of the Carnot efficiency at a hot air temperature of 620C.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF LOCAL HYDRODYNAMICS AND MASS EXCHANGE PROCESSES OF COOLANT IN FUEL ASSEMBLIES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Dmitriev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental studies of local hydrodynamics and mass exchange of coolant flow behind spacer and mixing grids of different structural versions that were developed for fuel assemblies of domestic and foreign nuclear reactors are presented in the article. In order to carry out the study the models of the following fuel assemblies have been fabricated: FA for VVER and VBER, FA-KVADRAT for PWR-reactor and FA for KLT-40C reactor. All the models have been fabricated with a full geometrical similarity with full-scale fuel assemblies. The study was carried out by simulating the flow of coolant in a core by air on an aerodynamic test rig. In order to measure local hydrodynamic characteristics of coolant flow five-channel Pitot probes were used that enable to measure the velocity vector in a point by its three components. The tracerpropane method was used for studying mass transfer processes. Flow hydrodynamics was studied by measuring cross-section velocities of coolant flow and coolant rates according to the model cells. The investigation of mass exchange processes consisted of a study of concentration distribution for tracer in experimental model, in determination of attenuation lengths of mass transfer processes behind mixing grids, in calculating of inter-cellar mass exchange coefficient. The database on coolant flow in fuel assemblies for different types of reactors had been accumulated that formed the basis of the engineering substantiation of reactor cores designs. The recommendations on choice of optimal versions of mixing grids have been taken into consideration by implementers of the JSC “OKBM Afrikantov” when creating commissioned fuel assemblies. The results of the study are used for verification of CFD-codes and CFD programs of detailed cell-by-cell calculation of reactor cores in order to decrease conservatism for substantiation of thermal-mechanical reliability.

  3. Performance of Air-cooled Engine Cylinders Using Blower Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schey, Oscar W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1936-01-01

    An investigation was made to obtain information on the minimum quantity of air and power required to cool conventional air cooled cylinders at various operating conditions when using a blower. The results of these tests show that the minimum power required for satisfactory cooling with an overall blower efficiency of 100 percent varied from 2 to 6 percent of the engine power depending on the operating conditions. The shape of the jacket had a large effect on the cylinder temperatures. Increasing the air speed over the front of the cylinder by keeping the greater part of the circumference of the cylinder covered by the jacket reduced the temperatures over the entire cylinder.

  4. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  5. Simulation of 3D Flow in Turbine Blade Rows including the Effects of Coolant Ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jun LIU; Bai-Tao AN; Yun-Tao ZENG

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the numerical simulation of three-dimensional viscous flows in air-cooled turbine blade rows with the effects of coolant ejection. A TVD Navier-Stokes flow solver incorporated with Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and multi-grid convergence acceleration algorithm are used for the simulation. The influences of coolant ejection on the main flow are accounted by volumetric coolant source terms. Numerical results for a four-stage turbine are presented and discussed.

  6. Influence of intake air temperature on internal combustion engine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Raţiu, S.; Hepuţ, T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents three methods for reduce thermal losses in the intake system with improvement of airflow and thermal protection. In the experiment are involved two patented devices conceived by the author and one PhD theme device: 1- Dynamic device for air transfer, 2-Integrated thermal deflector, and, 3-Advanced thermal protection. The tests were carried on different vehicle running in real traffic and in the Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, within the specialization “Road vehicle” belonging to the Faculty of Engineering Hunedoara, component of Politehnica University of Timişoara. The results have been processed and compared whit the ones obtained without these devices.

  7. Engine-driven hybrid air-conditioning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaokui QIN; Hongmei LU; Xiong LIU; Gerhard SCHMITZ

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid air-conditioning system that com-bines an engine-driven chiller with desiccant dehumidifi-cation was configured and experimentally tested to provide reliable data for energy consumption and operation cost. The engine performance and the desiccant wheel perfor-mance were measured and a numeric model previously set up for dehumidification capacity prediction was validated. For a reference building, the results based upon measured data show that under present electricity/gas price ratio, more than 40% of operation cost can be saved by the hybrid system.

  8. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  9. EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. The specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtrat...

  10. Performance Investigation of Automobile Radiator Operated with ZnFe2O4 Nano Fluid based Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cooling system of an Automobile plays an important role in its performance, consists of two main parts, known as radiator and fan. Improving thermal efficiency of engine leads to increase the engine's performance, decline the fuel consumption and decrease the pollution emissions. Water and ethylene glycol as conventional coolants have been widely used in radiators of an automotive industry for many years. These heat transfer fluids offer low thermal conductivity. With the advancement of nanotechnology, the new generation of heat transfer fluids called, “nanofluids” have been developed and researchers found that these fluids offer higher thermal conductivity compared to that of conventional coolants. This study focused on the preparation of Zinc based nanofluids (ZnFe2O4 using chemical co-precipitation method and its application in an automotive cooling system along with mixture of ethylene glycol and water (50:50. Relevant input data, nanofluids properties and empirical correlations were obtained from literatures to investigate the heat transfer enhancement of an automotive car radiator operated with nano fluid-based coolants. It was observed that, overall heat transfer coefficient and heat transfer rate in engine cooling system increased with the usage of nanofluids (with ethylene glycol the base-fluid compared to ethylene glycol (i.e. base-fluid alone. It is observed that, about 78% of heat transfer enhancement could be achieved with the addition of 1% ZnFe2O4 particles in a base fluid at the Reynolds number of 84.4x103 and 39.5x103 for air and coolant respectively

  11. Modelling internal air systems in gas turbine engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J Michael Owen

    2007-01-01

    Rotating-disc systems can be used to model,experimentally and computationally,the flow and heat transfer that occur inside the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbine engines.These rotating-disc systems have been used successfully to simplify and understand some of the complex flows that occur in internal-air systems,and designers have used this insight to improve the cooling effectiveness,thereby increasing the engine efficiency and reducing the emissions.In this review paper,three important cases are considered:hot-gas ingress;the pre-swirl system;and buoyancy-induced flow.Ingress,or ingestion,occurs when hot gas from the mainstream gas path is ingested into the wheel-space between the turbine disc and its adjacent casing.Rim seals are fitted at the periphery of the system,and sealing flow is used to reduce or prevent ingress.However,too much sealing air reduces the engine efficiency,and too little can cause serious overheating,resulting in damage to the turbine rim and blade roots.Although the flow is three-dimensional and unsteady,there are encouraging signs that simple 'orifice models' could be used to estimate the amount of ingress into the wheel-space.In a pre-swirl system,the cooling air for the gas-turbine blades is swirled by stationary nozzles,and the air is delivered to the blades via receiver holes in the rotating turbine disc.Swirling the air reduces its temperature relative to the rotating blades,and the designer needs to calculate the air temperature and pressure drop in the system.The designer also needs to calculate the effect of this swirling flow on the heat transfer from the turbine disc to the air,as this has a significant effect on the temperature distribution and stresses in the disc.Recent experimental and computational studies have given a better understanding of the flow and heat transfer in these systems.Buoyancy-induced flow occurs in the cavity between two co-rotating compressor discs when the temperature of the discs is higher

  12. Data center coolant switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  13. A Time Study of Scientists & Engineers (S&Es) in the Air Vehicles Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A TIME STUDY OF SCIENTISTS & ENGINEERS (S&Es) IN THE AIR VEHICLES DIRECTORATE JoAnn McCabe and Col John Wissler, USAF The Air Vehicles...Defense Acquisition University www.dau.mil Keywords: Time Study of Scientists and Engineers, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Research, Air...Force Research Laboratory Time Study , How Scientists and Engineers Spend Their Time, Technology-Focused Research Organizations, Value and Non-Value

  14. Evaluation of air pollution modelling tools as environmental engineering courseware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto González, J A; Bello Bugallo, P M; Casares Long, J J

    2004-01-01

    The study of phenomena related to the dispersion of pollutants usually takes advantage of the use of mathematical models based on the description of the different processes involved. This educational approach is especially important in air pollution dispersion, when the processes follow a non-linear behaviour so it is difficult to understand the relationships between inputs and outputs, and in a 3D context where it becomes hard to analyze alphanumeric results. In this work, three different software tools, as computer solvers for typical air pollution dispersion phenomena, are presented. Each software tool developed to be implemented on PCs, follows approaches that represent three generations of programming languages (Fortran 77, VisualBasic and Java), applied over three different environments: MS-DOS, MS-Windows and the world wide web. The software tools were tested by students of environmental engineering (undergraduate) and chemical engineering (postgraduate), in order to evaluate the ability of these software tools to improve both theoretical and practical knowledge of the air pollution dispersion problem, and the impact of the different environment in the learning process in terms of content, ease of use and visualization of results.

  15. The aerodynamic effects of wheelspace coolant injection into the mainstream flow of a high pressure gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Christopher Elliot

    Modern gas turbine engines operate with mainstream gas temperatures exceeding 1450°C in the high-pressure turbine stage. Unlike turbine blades, rotor disks and other internal components are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures found in mainstream flow. In modern gas turbines, cooling air is pumped into the wheelspace cavities to prevent mainstream gas ingestion and then exits through a seal between the rotor and the nozzle guide vane (NGV) thereby mixing with the mainstream flow. The primary purpose for the wheelspace cooling air is the cooling of the turbine wheelspace. However, secondary effects arise from the mixing of the spent cooling air with the mainstream flow. The exiting cooling air is mixed with the hot mainstream flow effecting the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of the turbine stage. The physics underlying this mixing process and its effects on stage performance are not yet fully understood. The relative aerodynamic and performance effects associated with rotor - NGV gap coolant injections were investigated in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) of the Center for Gas Turbines and Power of The Pennsylvania State University. This study quantifies the secondary effects of the coolant injection on the aerodynamic and performance character of the turbines main stream flow for root injection, radial cooling, and impingement cooling. Measurement and analysis of the cooling effects were performed in both stationary and rotational frames of reference. The AFTRF is unique in its ability to perform long duration cooling measurements in the stationary and rotating frames. The effects of wheelspace coolant mixing with the mainstream flow on total-to-total efficiency, energy transport, three dimensional velocity field, and loading coefficient were investigated. Overall, it was found that a small quantity (1%) of cooling air can have significant effects on the performance character and exit conditions of the high pressure stage

  16. Coolant and ambient temperature control for chillerless liquid cooled data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2016-02-02

    Cooling control methods include measuring a temperature of air provided to a plurality of nodes by an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, measuring a temperature of at least one component of the plurality of nodes and finding a maximum component temperature across all such nodes, comparing the maximum component temperature to a first and second component threshold and comparing the air temperature to a first and second air threshold, and controlling a proportion of coolant flow and a coolant flow rate to the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the plurality of nodes based on the comparisons.

  17. Exergy Analysis of the Revolving Vane Compressed Air Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Subiantoro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exergy analysis was applied to a revolving vane compressed air engine. The engine had a swept volume of 30 cm3. At the benchmark conditions, the suction pressure was 8 bar, the discharge pressure was 1 bar, and the operating speed was 3,000 rev·min−1. It was found that the engine had a second-law efficiency of 29.6% at the benchmark conditions. The contributors of exergy loss were friction (49%, throttling (38%, heat transfer (12%, and fluid mixing (1%. A parametric study was also conducted. The parameters to be examined were suction reservoir pressure (4 to 12 bar, operating speed (2,400 to 3,600 rev·min−1, and rotational cylinder inertia (0.94 to 2.81 g·mm2. The study found that a higher suction reservoir pressure initially increased the second-law efficiency but then plateaued at about 30%. With a higher operating speed and a higher cylinder inertia, second-law efficiency decreased. As compared to suction pressure and operating speed, cylinder inertia is the most practical and significant to be modified.

  18. Always at the correct temperature. Thermal management with electric coolant pump; Immer richtig temperiert. Thermomanagement mit elektrischer Kuehlmittelpumpe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genster, A.; Stephan, W. [Pierburg GmbH, Neuss (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    Through the use of the electric coolant pump it has become possible for the first time to attain a cooling performance which is adapted precisely to the engine load and which is independent of engine speed. For cooling the new BMW six cylinder in-line Otto engine with an engine power rating of 190 kW, the electric coolant pump by Pierburg requires only 200 W of electrical power from the onboard electrical system. (orig.)

  19. Computation of Space Shuttle high-pressure cryogenic turbopump ball bearing two-phase coolant flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Sen

    1990-01-01

    A homogeneous two-phase fluid flow model, implemented in a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver using computational fluid dynamics methodology is described. The application of the model to the analysis of the pump-end bearing coolant flow of the high-pressure oxygen turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine is studied. Results indicate large boiling zones and hot spots near the ball/race contact points. The extent of the phase change of the liquid oxygen coolant flow due to the frictional and viscous heat fluxes near the contact areas has been investigated for the given inlet conditions of the coolant.

  20. A Delphi Study of Additive Manufacturing Applicability for United States Air Force Civil Engineer Contingency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    A DELPHI STUDY OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING APPLICABILITY FOR UNITED STATES AIR FORCE CIVIL ENGINEER CONTINGENCY...subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-161 A DELPHI STUDY OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING APPLICABILITY FOR UNITED STATES... ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING APPLICABILITY FOR UNITED STATES AIR FORCE CIVIL ENGINEER CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS Seth N. Poulsen, BS Captain, USAF

  1. Study on diesel cylinder-head cooling using nanofluid coolant with jet impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhong-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the heat-transfer performance of a diesel-engine cylinder head, nanofluid coolant as a new fluid was investigated, and jet impingement technology was then used to study on how to better improve heat-transfer coefficient at the nose bridge area in the diesel-engine cylinder head. Computational fluid dynamic simulation and experiments results demonstrated that using the same jet impingement parameters, the different volume shares of nanofluids showed better cooling effect than traditional coolant, but the good effect of the new cooling method was unsuitable for high volume share of nanofluid. At the same volume share of nanofluid, different jet impingement parameters such as jet angles showed different heat-transfer performance. This result implies that a strong association exists between jet impingement parameters and heat-transfer coefficient. The increase in coolant viscosity of the nanofluid coolant using jet impingement requires the expense of more drive-power cost.

  2. Lithium as a blanket coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Recent re-assessment of tokamak reactors which move towards smaller size and lower required field strength (higher beta)/sup 2/ change the picture as regards the magnitude of MHD effects on flow resistance for lithium coolant. Perhaps the most important consequence of this as regards use of this coolant is that of clear acceptability of such effects when the flow is predominantly transverse to the magnetic field. This permits defining a blanket that consists entirely of round tubes containing the circulated lithium with voids between the tubes. Required thermal-hydraulic calculations are then on bases which are well established, especially in view of recent results dealing with perturbations of ducts and magnetic fields. Mitigation of MHD effects is feasible through tapering of tube wall thickness or use of insulated layers, but their use was not mandatory for the assumed conditions. Blanket configurations utilizing flowing lithium in round tubes immersed in static lithium may be suitable, but calculational methods do not now exist for this situation. Use of boiling potassium or cesium appears to be prohibitive in terms of vapor flow area when temperature levels are consistent with stainless steel. Liquid sodium, in addition to not being a breeding material, requires higher velocity than lithium for the same heat removal.

  3. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song Kyu [Korea Power Engineering Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation.

  4. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

  5. Air Force Civil Engineer Center Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    generated a database of trained Air Force personnel. Air Force Energy Office officials stated that they did not reach out to DOE-FEMP to track Air Force...completed, and terminated Air Force energy -savings performance-contract projects. The database should include, but not be limited to, appropriate...Force Civil Engineer Center Management of Energy Savings Performance Contracts Needs Improvement M A Y 4 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-087 Mission

  6. Transient Air-Fuel Ratio Control in a CNG Engine Using Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-xiu; ZHANG Xin

    2005-01-01

    The fuzzy neural networks has been used as means of precisely controlling the air-fuel ratio of a lean-burn compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. A control algorithm, without based on engine model, has been utilized to construct a feedforward/feedback control scheme to regulate the air-fuel ratio. Using fuzzy neural networks, a fuzzy neural hybrid controller is obtained based on PI controller. The new controller, which can adjust parameters online, has been tested in transient air-fuel ratio control of a CNG engine.

  7. Steam as coolant and lubricant in turning of metal matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raviraj SHETTY; Raghuvir PAI; Vasanth KAMATH; Shrikanth S.RAO

    2008-01-01

    Green cutting has become focus of attention in ecological and environmental protection.Steam is cheap.pollution-free and eco-friendly,and then is a good and economical coolant and lubricant.Steam generator and steam feeding system were developed to generate and feed steam.Comparative experiments were carried out in cutting AA6061-15 v0l.%SiC(25 μm particle size),with cubic boron nitride(CBN)insert KB-90 grade under the conditions of compressed air,oil water emulsion,steam as coolant and lubricant,and dry cutting,respectively.The experimental results show that,with steam as coolant and lubricant,gradual reduction in the cutting force,friction coefficient,surface roughness and cutting temperature values were observed.Further,there was reduction in built up edge formation.1t is proved that use of water steam as coolant and lubricant is environmentally friendly.

  8. Optimization Study on a Single-cylinder Compressed Air Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qihui; CAI Maolin; SHI Yan; XU Qiyue

    2015-01-01

    The current research of compressed air engine (CAE) mainly focused on simulations and system integrations. However, energy efficiency and output torque of the CAE is limited, which restricts its application and popularization. In this paper, the working principles of CAE are briefly introduced. To set a foundation for the study on the optimization of the CAE, the basic mathematical model of working processes is set up. A pressure-compensated valve which can reduce the inertia force of the valve is proposed. To verify the mathematical model, the prototype with the newly designed pressure-compensated intake valve is built and the experiment is carried out, simulation and experimental results of the CAE are conducted, and pressures inside the cylinder and output torque of the CAE are obtained. Orthogonal design and grey relation analysis are utilized to optimize structural parameters. The experimental and optimized results show that, first of all, pressure inside the cylinder has the same changing tendency in both simulation curve and experimental curve. Secondly, the highest average output torque is obtained at the highest intake pressure and the lowest rotate speed. Thirdly, the optimization of the single-cylinder CAE can improve the working efficiency from an original 21.95% to 50.1%, an overall increase of 28.15%, and the average output torque increases also increases from 22.047 5 N • m to 22.439 N • m. This research designs a single-cylinder CAE with pressure-compensated intake valve, and proposes a structural parameters design method which improves the single-cylinder CAE performance.

  9. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 9, Number 1, Spring 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    I had to convince people of.� Young, a heavy equipment operator who has worked snow removal at Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D.; Osan Air Base, Korea...storage tanks at Spangdahlem AB, Germany. Geer is a 2000 Lance P. Sijan Air Force Leadership Award recipient. (Photo by SrA Esperanza Berrios) 31 CE

  10. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H. [comp.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 86 - Vehicle and Engine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle and Engine Components VI Appendix VI to Part 86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS.... (2) Cooling system. a. Coolant. b. Thermostat. c. Filter. (3) Lubrication. a. Oil filter....

  12. A Study of Performance Output of a Multivane Air Engine Applying Optimal Injection and Vane Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Raj Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new concept of the air engine using compressed air as the potential power source for motorbikes, in place of an internal combustion engine. The motorbike is proposed to be equipped with an air engine, which transforms the energy of the compressed air into mechanical motion energy. A mathematical model is presented here, and performance evaluation is carried out on an air-powered novel air turbine engine. The maximum power output is obtained as 3.977 kW (5.50 HP at the different rotor to casing diameter ratios, optimal injection angle 60°, vane angle 45° for linear expansion (i.e., at minimum air consumption when the casing diameter is kept 100 mm, at injection pressure 6 bar (90 psi and speed of rotation 2500 rpm. A prototype air engine is built and tested in the laboratory. The experimental results are also seen much closer to the analytical values, and the performance efficiencies are recorded around 70% to 95% at the speed of rotation 2500–3000 rpm.

  13. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  14. Computing Flows Of Coolants In Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant Passage Flow (CPF) computer code developed to predict accurately coolant flow and heat transfer inside turbomachinery cooling passages (either radial or axial blading). Computes flow in one-inlet/one-outlet passage of any shape. Calculates rate of flow of coolant, temperature, pressure, velocity, and heat-transfer coefficients along passage. Integrates one-dimensional momentum and energy equations along defined flow path, taking into account change in area, addition or subtraction of mass, pumping, friction, and transfer of heat. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  15. Military Adaptation of Commercial Items: Laboratory Evaluation of the Code E-436 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    Coolant, engine outlet 120-250 + 2 (13) Combustion air at meter ( Meriam 30-160 ± 2 flow meter) (14) Cooling water, tower inlet * 35-100 (15) Cooling...2) Air, before turbo (in.H 2 0)-S 0 to -25 ± 1 (3) Air, after turbo (in. hg) 0 to +60 +.2 (4) Air across Meriam flow meter 0 to -28 +.1 (in. H 20) (5...meter for measuring engine blowby. (8) Temperature reference bath (Maintain at 2000 F). (9) Meriam air flow meter. e. The folloing monitors vill be

  16. Development of an Engine Air-Brake for Quiet Drag Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel quiet engine air-brake (EAB) is proposed in response to NASA's solicitation for active and passive noise control concepts for conventional and advanced...

  17. Development of an Engine Air-Brake for Quiet Drag Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel quiet engine air-brake is proposed in response to NASA's solicitation for concepts for active and passive control of noise sources for conventional and...

  18. Restart of theory of air-breathing engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rester, Austin

    1992-07-01

    Expansion and compression ratios are treated as independent variables in the derivation of new equations for thermal efficiencies. A conceptual process of isentropic compression of exhaust gases to ambient conditions simplifies the equations for piston engines. Expansion is shown to govern thermal efficiency. A variable-process piston engine is introduced in this paper. Relative to 1/2 load conditions, this new engine is 25 percent more efficient than an Otto engine. Relative to full load, the new engine is 35 percent more powerful than a naturally-aspirated Otto engine. New energy-efficient gas turbines and turbo-jets which utilize pulse-combustion to maximize expansion of combustion gases are also introduced.

  19. Experimental Investigation on the Performance of a Compressed-Air Driven Piston Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jie Yu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental investigation of a piston engine driven by compressed air. The compressed air engine was a modified 100 cm3 internal combustion engine obtained from a motorcycle manufacturer. The experiments in this study used a test bench to examine the power performance and pressure/temperature variations of the compressed air engine at pressures ranging from 5 to 9 bar (absolute pressure. The engine was modified from a 4-stroke to a 2-stroke engine using a cam system driven by a crankshaft and the intake and exhaust valves have a small lift due to this modification. The highest power output of 0.95 kW was obtained at 9 bar and 1320 rpm. The highest torque of 9.99 N·m occurred at the same pressure, but at 465 rpm. The pressure-volume (P-V diagram shows that cylinder pressure gradually increases after the intake valve opens because of the limited lift movement of the intake valve. Similar situations occurred during the exhaust process, restricting the power output of the compressed air engine. The pressure and temperature variation of the air at engine inlet and outlet were recorded during the experiment. The outlet pressure increased from 1.5 bar at 500 rpm to 2.25 bar at 2000 rpm, showing the potential of recycling the compressed air energy by attaching additional cylinders (split-cycle engine. A temperature decrease (from room temperature to 17 °C inside the cylinder was observed. It should be noted that pressures higher than that currently employed can result in lower temperatures and this can cause poor lubrication and sealing issues. The current design of a compressed air engine, which uses a conventional cam mechanism for intake and exhaust, has limited lift movement during operation, and has a restricted flow rate and power output. Fast valve actuation and a large lift are essential for improving the performance of the current compressed air engine. This study presents a power output examination with the pressure

  20. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  1. Air Force Institute of Technology, Civil Engineering School: Environmental Protection Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Inst. of Tech., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. School of Engineering.

    This document contains information assembled by the Civil Engineering School to meet the initial requirements of NEPA 1969 and Executive Orders which required the Air Force to implement an effective environmental protection program. This course presents the various aspects of Air Force environmental protection problems which military personnel…

  2. Problem of fuel losses owing to evaporation during operation of air engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Бойченко

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Considered is the problem of irrevocable losses of air fuel which happen owing to evaporation in conditions of operation of air engineering, particularly in flight time of airplane. Composed is generalized performance of fuel losses from evaporation in conditions of flight of airplane

  3. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  4. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  5. Power Output and Air Requirements of a Two-stroke Cycle Engine for Aeronautical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, C R; Kemper, Carlton

    1927-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the pressure and amount of air necessary for satisfactory high-speed, two-stroke cycle operation and thus permit the power requirements of the air pump or blower to be determined. Based on power output and air requirement here obtained the two-stroke cycle engine would seem to be favorable for aeronautical use. No attempts were made to secure satisfactory operation at idling speeds.

  6. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion...

  7. Compatibility of structural materials with fusion reactor coolant and breeder fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVan, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion reactors are characterized by a lithium-containing blanket, a heat transfer medium that is integral with the blanket and first wall, and a heat engine that couples to the heat transfer medium. A variety of lithium-containing substances have been identified as potential blanket materials, including molten lithium metal, molten LiF--BeF/sub 2/, Pb--Li alloys, and solid ceramic compounds such as Li/sub 2/O. Potential heat transfer media include liquid lithium, liquid sodium, molten nitrates, water, and helium. Each of these coolants and blankets requires a particular set of chemical and mechanical properties with respect to the associated reactor and heat engine structural materials. This paper discusses the materials factors that underlie the selection of workable combinations of blankets and coolants. It also addresses the materials compatibility problems generic to those blanket-coolant combinations currently being considered in reactor design studies.

  8. Engineering issue: Indoor Air Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Engineering Issues are a new series of technology transfer documents that summarize the latest available information on selected treatment and site remeediation technologies and related issues. They are designed to help remedial projec...

  9. International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines (5th)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-29

    favorably received by specialists in that area while also having some morsels of interest to the research community. US papers covered the status of power...plant controls, turbine-diagnostics effectiveness, life-cycle cost considerations, and a review and status of environmental effects of aircraft...04 Diagnostic and Monitoring of Turboprop Engines Ingg. 0. Natale and V.P. Riviello , Alfa Romeo, Italy 05 The Engineering Basis for the Application of

  10. Alternative Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Poulsen, Jannik; Olsen, Mads Bruun

    1996-01-01

    In earlier work it has been shown that a nonlinear observer based on the use of the manifold pressure state equation and a nonlinear fuel film compensator can maintain accurate A/F ratio control during both steady state and transient operation. This observer may be called a manifold absolute pres...... engine control system designer with a variety of robust control systems which can easily be made redundant in order to satisfy newer engine emissions and diagnosis requirements and legislation...

  11. Water coolant supply in relation to different ultrasonic scaler systems, tips and coolant settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, T.J.G.; Timmerman, M.F.; Feilzer, A.J.; van der Velden, U.; van der Weijden, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated "in vitro" the consistency of the water coolant supply for five ultrasonic scaler systems in relation to the tip type and different coolant settings. Material and Methods: The systems were: EMS PM-400, EMS PM-600, Satelec P-max, Dürr Vector and Dentsply Cavitron. For

  12. Design and dynamic characteristic prediction of air-powered twin-rotor piston engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海军; 张雷; 潘存云; 张湘

    2015-01-01

    A novel air-powered twin-rotor piston engine (ATPE) utilizing a differential velocity driving mechanism to achieve a high output torque was proposed. The ATPE had eight separated rotary cylinders which can dynamically enlarge the engine displacement as a result of the special driving mechanism, which was named dynamic volume expansion. The mathematical model of ATPE comprising a dynamic model and a thermodynamic model was established under the assumption of no mechanical friction. The model was numerically simulated in Matlab. The results show that shortage of low output torque confusing traditional air-powered engines can be overcome. The average output torque sharply increases to 100 N·m, which is about three times that of traditional air-powered engines with equal cylinder displacement under the pressure of 0.6 MPa at 480 r/min. ATPE can be used to drive vehicles directly without transmission box, therefore the energy transfer efficiency of ATPE can be increased. Furthermore, benefitting from the novel gas distribution system, the engine shows an ability in self-adjusting under different loads. The arrangements of air ports automatically adjust the open interval of air ports according to the load, which may simplify the speed control system.

  13. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 14, Number 3, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Preparatory School. SrA Jeremiah Celis, TSgt Harold Ackett and then-A1C Lee set up the Trimble 5700 Base Station and Trimble Trimark III Radio receiver...U.S. Air Forces in Europe is working dili- gently to ensure that all civil works are completed on time. MSgt John Lasky Air Force Print News...MSgt Harold Hailer, 27th FW EOD Flight Chief. “Capt Evans’ comrades will always remember the big smile he had on his face since setting off his

  14. Development of Air-cooled Engines with Blower Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Kurt

    1933-01-01

    With the aid of a heating device, the heat transfer to cylinders with conical fins of various forms is determined both for shrouded and exposed cylinders. Simultaneously the pressure drop for overcoming the resistance to the motion of air between the fins of the enclosed cylinder is measured. Thus the relations between the heat transfer and the energy required for cooling are discovered. The investigations show that the heat transfer in a conducted air flow is much greater than in a free current and that further improvement, as compared with free exposure, is possible through narrower spaces between the fins.

  15. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 11, Number 4, Winter 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    and MSgt Paul Fazzini, AMC/PA, Scott AFB, Ill. Above: Members of the 615th Air Mobility Squadron, Travis AFB, Calif., erect tents on Naval Air...Col Jeffrey Pitchford , commander of the 16th CES, at Aviano AB, Italy. Both were members of the advance on-site team sent to Diyarbakir to do initial...joined Lt Col Pitchford and SMSgt Dewar in Diyarbakir. They were the first CE forces at the Diyarbakir site, arriving in mid-February to begin their

  16. Development Study on a Precooler for the HypersonicAir-Breathing Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Tanatsugu, Nobuhiro; Harada, Kenya; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Tomike, Jun'Ichiro

    Here is presented an experimental and analytical study on a precooler for hypersonic air-breathing engines. Precooling of the incoming air breathed by an air-inlet gives extension of the flight envelope and improvement of the thrust and specific impulse. Three precooler models were installed into an air-turbo ramjet engine and tested under the sea level static condition. When the fan inlet temperature was down to 180K, the engine thrust and specific impulse increased by 2.0 and 1.2 times respectively. Thick frost formed on the tube surfaces at the entrance part of the precooler blocked the air-flow passage. On the other hand, very thin frost formed at the exit part because the water vapor included in the air was changed to mist particles due to the low temperature of the air in this part. Parametric studies on the precooler design values and a sizing analysis were also performed. Decrease of tube outer diameters on the precooler is only way to increase heat exchange rates without increase of its weight and pressure loss.

  17. How Can Air Force Civil Engineers Use Expert Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    knowledge base is a database or static data plus relational information. The inference engine actually manipulates the knowledge base using analyses...soil permeability, soil stratification, groundwater flow, and gradient. The system produces a HRS score for site permeability and groundwater flow...solutions?have tedded befor? bein lot __ _ _ _ AND) __ __ OR ) _ __ __ AND] 2. Isthetaskina 5. Istoexperise [9. Are xperts better volatile knowledge

  18. The Feasibility of Oil Analysis for Air Force Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    analyses conducted by Mobil include automated Brookfield viscosity, membrane filtration in pentane for insolubles, and differential infrared analysis for...considered, such as microfiltration for particle size distribution and infrared (for oxida- tion and possibly nitration). Because of the limited...military (AOAP) sectors , it may be inferred that a large segment of those organizations concerned with diesel engine maintenance and utilization is

  19. Application of Computer Model to Estimate the Consistency of Air Conditioning Systems Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal El-Berry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliability engineering is utilized to predict the performance and optimization of the design and maintenance of air conditioning systems. There are a number of failures associated with the conditioning systems. The failures of an air conditioner such as turn on, loss of air conditioner cooling capacity, reduced air conditioning output temperatures, loss of cool air supply and loss of air flow entirely are mainly due to a variety of problems with one or more components of an air conditioner or air conditioning system. To maintain the system forecasting for system failure rates are very important. The focus of this paper is the reliability of the air conditioning systems. The most common applied statistical distributions in reliability settings are the standard (2 parameter Weibull and Gamma distributions. Reliability estimations and predictions are used to evaluate, when the estimation of distributionsparameters is done. To estimate good operating condition in a building, the reliability of the air conditioning system that supplies conditioned air to the several companies’ departments is checked. This air conditioning system is divided into two systems, namely the main chilled water system and the ten air handling systems that serves the ten departments. In a chilled-water system the air conditioner cools water down to 40 - 45oF (4 - 7oC. The chilled water is distributed throughout the building in a piping system and connected to air condition cooling units wherever needed. Data analysis has been done with support a computer aided reliability software, with the application of the Weibull and Gamma distributions it is indicated that the reliability for the systems equal to 86.012% and 77.7% respectively . A comparison between the two important families of distribution functions, namely, the Weibull and Gamma families is studied. It is found that Weibull method has performed well for decision making .

  20. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using intake air heating for a GDCI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Gregory T.; Sellnau, Mark C.

    2016-08-09

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of heaters, at least one heater per cylinder, with each heater configured to heat air introduced into a cylinder. Independent control of the heaters is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the heater for that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in a cylinder of the engine and controlling a heater configured to heat air introduced into that cylinder, is also provided.

  1. Probable Impacts of Space Operations on Air Force Civil Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    University, Air Command and Staff College, Research Report). Bierling , James R ., Space Operations Professional Development Guide, Maxwell AFB, Alabama, April...basing containerized payloads self ferry Table S. NASP Technical Challenges and Confidence Factors4 1986 1988 1990 Airframe Structures and Materials R ...Y B Thermal Management Y G B Flight Vehicle Integration R G G Inlet/Nozzle Performane R Y 6 Slush Hydrogen Y Y 6 Propulsion Ramjet Y 6 B Scramjet

  2. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 16, Number 2, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Information Modeling “Red Bulls” at Gitmo Green Roofs Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...reduce their energy cost, increase the life span of their roofs, and improve the quality of their environment. The Air Force and Green Roofs There...plants mature and become fully established. Pros & Cons of Green Roofs Vegetative roofs are not cheap; there is a large initial investment. Life

  3. Operationalizing Offensive Social Engineering for the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    for the Air Force Bryan E. Skarda, B.S. Major, USAF Approved: /signed/ 5 Mar 2008 Dr. Robert Mills (Chairman) date /signed/ 5 Mar 2008 Dr. Dennis...advisor, Dr. Robert Mills, for his patience and subtle course corrections that kept me going down the right path. Also, to Maj Paul Williams for his...Jan 2005. 12. Borgatti, Steve. “Introduction to Grounded Theory”. 13. Cialdini , R. B. and B. J. Sagarin. Persuasion: Psychological Insights and Per

  4. The Sensitivity of Precooled Air-Breathing Engine Performance to Heat Exchanger Design Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, H.; Bond, A.; Hempsell, M.

    The issues relevant to propulsion design for Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) vehicles are considered. In particular two air- breathing engine concepts involving precooling are compared; SABRE (Synergetic Air-Breathing and Rocket Engine) as designed for the Skylon SSTO launch vehicle, and a LACE (Liquid Air Cycle Engine) considered in the 1960's by the Americans for an early generation spaceplane. It is shown that through entropy minimisation the SABRE has made substantial gains in performance over the traditional LACE precooled engine concept, and has shown itself as the basis of a viable means of realising a SSTO vehicle. Further, it is demonstrated that the precooler is a major source of thermodynamic irreversibility within the engine cycle and that further reduction in entropy can be realised by increasing the heat transfer coefficient on the air side of the precooler. If this were to be achieved, it would improve the payload mass delivered to orbit by the Skylon launch vehicle by between 5 and 10%.

  5. Grain Boundary Engineering of Lithium-Ion-Conducting Lithium Lanthanum Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries by Victoria L Blair, Claire V Weiss Brennan, and Joseph M Marsico Approved for public...TR-7584 ● JAN 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Grain Boundary Engineering of Lithium-Ion- Conducting Lithium Lanthanum Titanate for Lithium... Titanate for Lithium-Air Batteries 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Victoria L Blair, Claire V

  6. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 11, Number 2, Summer 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    which we pride ourselves, and it has been a truly rewarding tour to witness the bottomless potential of our troops fully realized.� Meeting the...and SMSgt James Ferrell were in charge of the excavation phase of the project. They requested every shop in the 384th ECES offer up troops to help run...and Marketing Office. CMSgt Glenn Deese is the opera- tions manager for the Civil Engineer Maintenance, Inspection and Repair Team, Tyndall AFB, FL

  7. Fuzzy logic speed control for the engine of an air-powered vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihui Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the condition of air and eliminate exhaust gas pollution, this article proposes a compressed air power system. Instead of an internal combustion engine, the automobile is equipped with a compressed air engine, which transforms the energy of compressed air into mechanical motion energy. A prototype was built, and the compressed air engine was tested on an experimental platform. The output torque and energy efficiency were obtained from experimental results. When the supply pressure was set at 2 MPa and the speed was 420 r min−1, the output torque, the output power, and the energy efficiency were 56 N m, 1.93 kW, and 25%, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the system, a fuzzy logic speed control strategy is proposed and simulated. The experimental study verified that the theoretical evaluation of the system was reasonable, and this research can be referred to as the design and control of air-powered vehicles.

  8. NGNP Reactor Coolant Chemistry Control Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Castle

    2010-11-01

    The main focus of this paper is to identify the most desirable ranges of impurity levels in the primary coolant to optimize component life in the primary circuit of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which will either be a prismatic block or pebble bed reactor.

  9. Ambient air cooling arrangement having a pre-swirler for gas turbine engine blade cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J

    2015-01-06

    A gas turbine engine including: an ambient-air cooling circuit (10) having a cooling channel (26) disposed in a turbine blade (22) and in fluid communication with a source (12) of ambient air: and an pre-swirler (18), the pre-swirler having: an inner shroud (38); an outer shroud (56); and a plurality of guide vanes (42), each spanning from the inner shroud to the outer shroud. Circumferentially adjacent guide vanes (46, 48) define respective nozzles (44) there between. Forces created by a rotation of the turbine blade motivate ambient air through the cooling circuit. The pre-swirler is configured to impart swirl to ambient air drawn through the nozzles and to direct the swirled ambient air toward a base of the turbine blade. The end walls (50, 54) of the pre-swirler may be contoured.

  10. Mathematical model of a closed hot air engine cycle using MATLAB Simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oršanský, Pavol; Ftorek, Branislav; Durčanský, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In our work we present a model of a closed hot air engine, which we simulate in MATLAB®Simulink® environment. That gives us many opportunities of investigating the influence of extreme demanding conditions on the stability and functionality of the device. We were also able to try the conditions that would real device cannot resist as high temperature or pressure.

  11. Urban air quality improvement by using a CNG lean burn engine for city buses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merétei, T.; Ling, J.A.N. van; Havenith, C.

    1998-01-01

    The use of compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled lean-burn city bus engines has a significant potential for air quality improvement in urban areas. Particularly important is the reduction of NO, as well as particulate and non regulated HC-emissions. For this reason, a CNG-fuelled, lean-burn, turbocha

  12. Simulation and experimental study of electro-pneumatic valve used in air-powered engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-lu CHEN; Xiao-li YU; Lin LIU

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of newly designed electro-pneumatic valves (EPVs) for the air-powered engine (APE) and study laws of parameters affecting them, a simulation model was established based on the thermodynamics and mechanics theories. Experiments were set up to determine the instantaneous effective orifice area of solenoid valve by the constant volume discharge method. The simulation model was also validated by comparing the measured displacement curve with the simulated displacement curve of the valve in the pressure of 0.16 and 0.49 MPa. Simulation and experimental results showed that maximum working frequency of the designed EPV could reach 30 Hz corresponding to 2000 r/rain of engine rotating speed. Based on simulation results, impacts of temperature and pressure of control air on delay time, full opening/closing time and seating velocity of EPV were analyzed. The simulation model could also act as EPV simulation prototype in designing the air exchange control system of APE.

  13. The influence of air-fuel ratio on mixture parameters in port fuel injection engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Irimescu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, research in the internal combustion engine field is focusing on detailed understanding of the processes that take place in certain parts of the aggregate, and can have a great influence on the engine’s performance and pollution levels. Such research is developed in this paper, in which using a numerical method based on the i-x air-fuel diagram, one can simulate a series of values for pressure, temperature and intake air humidity before and after mixture formation takes place in a spark ignition engine inlet port. The aim is to evaluate the final temperature of the air-fuel mixture near the inlet valve and evaluating the main factors of influence on the homogeneity of the mixture.

  14. Computation of air and fuel droplet flows in S.I. engine manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. Y. P.; Behnia, M.; Milton, B. E.

    The flow of air and fuel mixture similar to that in the induction systems of an Sl engine has been studied. A standard, general purpose single phase CFD code was used with some modifications to account for momentum, mass and heat transfers between the air stream and fuel droplets. Based on a Lagrangian approach, the movement from an assumed spray distribution model of fuel droplets were individually tracked. Models using different assumed coupling between the two phases have been investigated. Under typical engine operating conditions, it was found that a fully coupled treatment for momentum is not required. For estimation of fuel evaporation, a computing time saving one-dimensional treatment was found to be adequate. Fuel film formation on various surfaces of a duct and butterfly valve simulating an engine manifold is reported.

  15. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, J. D.; Baldwin, C. E.

    1977-04-27

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products.

  16. Enhancing resistance to burnout via coolant chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Theofanous, T. G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Boiling Crisis (BC) on horizontal, upwards-facing copper and steel surfaces under the influence of various coolant chemistries relevant to reactor containment waters is considered. In addition to Boric Acid (BA) and TriSodium Phosphate (TSP), pure De-Ionized Water (DIW) and Tap Water (TW) are included in experiments carried out in the BETA facility. The results are related to a companion paper on the large scale ULPU facility.

  17. Simulation studies of diesel engine performance with oxygen enriched air and water emulsified fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, D.N.; Baker, D. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Sekar, R.R.; Siambekos, C.T.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation code of a turbocharged, turbocompound diesel engine was modified to study the effects of using oxygen-enriched combustion air and water-emulsified diesel fuels. Oxygen levels of 21 percent to 40 percent by volume in the combustion air were studied. Water content in the fuel was varied from 0 percent to 50 percent mass. Simulation studies and a review and analysis of previous work in this area led to the following conclusions about expected engine performance and emissions: the power density of the engine is significantly increased by oxygen enrichment. Ignition delay and particulate emissions are reduced. Combustion temperatures and No{sub x} emissions are increased with oxygen enrichment but could be brought back to the base levels by introducing water in the fuel. The peak cylinder pressure which increases with the power output level might result in mechanical problems with engine components. Oxygen enrichment also provides an opportunity to use cheaper fuel such as No. 6 diesel fuel. Overall, the adverse effects of oxygen enrichment could be countered by the addition of water and it appears that an optimum combination of water content, oxygen level, and base diesel fuel quality may exist. This could yield improved performance and emissions characteristics compared to a state-of-the-art diesel engine. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Exploring new coolants for nuclear breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A., E-mail: anlafuente@etsii.upm.e [ETSII-UPM, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Piera, M. [ETSII:UNED, c/Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Breeder reactors are considered a unique tool for fully exploiting natural nuclear resources. In current Light Water Reactors (LWR), only 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from a mine is converted into useful heat. The rest remains in the depleted uranium or spent fuel. The need to improve resource-efficiency has stimulated interest in Fast-Reactor-based fuel cycles, which can exploit a much higher fraction of the energy content of mined uranium by burning U-238, mainly after conversion into Pu-239. Thorium fuel cycles also offer several potential advantages over a uranium fuel cycle. The coolant initially selected for most of the FBR programs launched in the 1960s was sodium, which is still considered the best candidate for these reactors. However, Na-cooled FBRs have a positive void reactivity coefficient. Among other factors, this fundamental drawback has resulted in the canceled deployment of these reactors. Therefore, it seems reasonable to explore new options for breeder coolants. In this paper, a proposal is presented for a new molten salt (F{sub 2}Be) coolant that could overcome the safety issues related to the positive void reactivity coefficient of molten metal coolants. Although it is a very innovative proposal that would require an extensive R and D program, this paper presents the very appealing properties of this salt when using a specific type of fuel that is similar to that of pebble bed reactors. The F{sub 2}Be concept was studied over a typical MOX composition and extended to a thorium-based cycle. The general analysis took into account the requirements for criticality (opening the option of hybrid subcritical systems); the requirements for breeding; and the safety requirement of having a negative coolant void reactivity coefficient. A design window was found in the definition of a F{sub 2}Be cooled reactor where the safety requirement was met, unlike for molten metal-cooled reactors, which always have positive void

  19. Exploring new coolants for nuclear breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A. [ETSI Industriales-Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Breeder reactors are considered the unique tool for fully exploiting the natural nuclear resources. In current LWR, only a 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from the mine is converted into useful heat, with the rest remaining in the depleted uranium or in the spent fuel. The objective of resource-efficiency stimulated the interest in Fast- Reactor-based fuel cycles which can exploit a much higher fraction of the energy content of the mined uranium by burning U-238, mainly after conversion into Pu-239. Thorium fuel cycles would also offers several potential advantages over a uranium fuel cycle. The coolant initially chosen for most of the FBR programs launched in the 60's was sodium, which still is considered the best candidate for these reactors. However, Na-cooled FBR have a positive void reactivity coefficient, which has been among others, a fundamental drawback that has cancelled the deployment of these reactors. Therefore, it seems reasonable to explore totally new options on coolants for breeders. In this paper, a proposal is presented on a new molten salt (F{sub 2}Be) coolant that could overcome the safety issues related to the positive void reactivity coefficient of molten metal coolants. Although it is a very innovative proposal that would need an extensive R and D programme, this paper presents the very appealing properties of this salt, in the case of using a specific type of fuel, similar to that of pebble bed reactors. The concept will be studied over a typical MOX composition and extended to a Thorium-based cycle. The general analysis takes into account requirements for criticality (opening the option of hybrid subcritical systems); requirements for breeding; and the safety requirement of having a negative coolant void reactivity coefficient. A design window is found in the definition of a F{sub 2}Be cooled reactor where the safety requirement is met, unlike for molten metal cooled reactors which always have positive void

  20. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  1. Non-self-sustained microwave discharge and the concept of a microwave air jet engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batanov, G M; Gritsinin, S I; Kossyi, I A [General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991, Vavilov Street 38, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-10-21

    A new type of microwave discharge - near-surface non-self-sustained discharge (NSND) - has been realized and investigated. A physical model of this discharge is presented. For the first time NSND application for microwave air jet engines has been proposed. Measurements under laboratory conditions modelling the microwave air jet engine operation shows the qualitative agreement between the model of NSND and actual processes near the target irradiated by a powerful microwave beam. Characteristic dependences of recoil momentum of target on the background pressure and microwave pulse duration obtained in experiments are presented. Measured cost of thrust produced by the NSND is no more than 3.0 kW N{sup -1}, which is close to the predicted values.

  2. Model Predictive Engine Air-Ratio Control Using Online Sequential Relevance Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-cheong Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine power, brake-specific fuel consumption, and emissions relate closely to air ratio (i.e., lambda among all the engine variables. An accurate and adaptive model for lambda prediction is essential to effective lambda control for long term. This paper utilizes an emerging technique, relevance vector machine (RVM, to build a reliable time-dependent lambda model which can be continually updated whenever a sample is added to, or removed from, the estimated lambda model. The paper also presents a new model predictive control (MPC algorithm for air-ratio regulation based on RVM. This study shows that the accuracy, training, and updating time of the RVM model are superior to the latest modelling methods, such as diagonal recurrent neural network (DRNN and decremental least-squares support vector machine (DLSSVM. Moreover, the control algorithm has been implemented on a real car to test. Experimental results reveal that the control performance of the proposed relevance vector machine model predictive controller (RVMMPC is also superior to DRNNMPC, support vector machine-based MPC, and conventional proportional-integral (PI controller in production cars. Therefore, the proposed RVMMPC is a promising scheme to replace conventional PI controller for engine air-ratio control.

  3. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  4. Contingency power for small turboshaft engines using water injection into turbine cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of one engine inoperative requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot day, high altitude takeoff situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stresses is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  5. Contingency power for a small turboshaft engine by using water injection into turbine cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Klann, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Because of one-engine-inoperative (OEI) requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot-day, high-altitude take-off situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation by using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stress is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  6. Hydraulic fluids and jet engine oil: pyrolysis and aircraft air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, C; Leung, V

    2001-01-01

    Incidents of smoke in aircraft cabins often result from jet engine oil and/or hydraulic fluid that leaks into ventilation air, which can be subjected to temperatures that exceed 500 degrees C. Exposed flight-crew members have reported symptoms, including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision, and tingling in the legs and arms. In this study, the authors investigated pyrolysis products of one jet engine oil and two hydraulic fluids at 525 degrees C. Engine oil was an important source of carbon monoxide. Volatile agents and organophosphate constituents were released from all the agents tested; however, the neurotoxin trimethyl propane phosphate was not found. The authors hypothesized that localized condensation of pyrolysis products in ventilation ducts, followed by mobilization when cabin heat demand was high, accounted for mid-flight incidents. The authors recommended that carbon monoxide data be logged continuously to capture levels during future incidents.

  7. Support of the launching of motor car air conditioning systems with the coolant CO{sub 2} (R744). Test bench measurements and practical trials; Unterstuetzung der Markteinfuehrung von Pkw-Klimaanlagen mit dem Kaeltemittel CO{sub 2} (R744). Pruefstandsmessungen und Praxistest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, Nicholas; Mildenberger, Julia [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany); Graz, Martin [Obrist Engineering GmbH, Lustenau (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    In the research project two passenger car air-conditioning systems were analyzed with regard to cooling capacity and efficiency. The results were compared with one another. The first system was a standard air-conditioning unit using R134a as a refrigerant. As a second system a CO{sub 2} (R744) prototype HVAC unit was used. Both units were investigated on one hand installed in a car on a dynamometer by Obrist Engineering GmbH and on the other hand installed in a calorimetric test rig by Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institut fuer Thermodynamik. While the tests in the calorimetric test rig showed comparable efficiencies and cooling capacities for both setups, consumption advantages were determined for the R744- air-conditioning unit installed in the vehicle by the company Obrist. With CO{sub 2} (R744) as a refrigerant for mobile air-conditioning systems an environmental friendly solution is available. (orig.)

  8. Rotor dynamic analysis of main coolant pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chong Won; Seo, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Choong Hwan; Shin, Jae Chul; Wang, Lei Tian [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    A rotor dynamic analysis program DARBS/MCP, for the main coolant pump of the integral reactor, has been developed. The dynamic analysis model of the main coolant pump includes a vertical shaft, three grooved radial journal bearings and gaps that represent the structure-fluid interaction effects between the rotor and the lubricant fluid. The electromagnetic force from the motor and the hydro-dynamic force induced by impeller are the major sources of vibration that may affect the rotor system stability. DARBS/MCP is a software that is developed to effectively analyze the dynamics of MCP rotor systems effectively by applying powerful numerical algorithms such as FEM with modal truncation and {lambda}-matrix method for harmonic analysis. Main design control parameters, that have much influence to the dynamic stability, have been found by Taguchi's sensitivity analysis method. Design suggestions to improve the stability of MCP rotor system have been documented. The dynamic bearing parameters of the journal bearings used for main coolant pump have been determined by directly solving the Reynolds equation using FDM method. Fluid-structure interaction effect that occurs at the small gaps between the rotor and the stator were modeled as equivalent seals, the electromagnetic force effect was regarded as a linear negative radial spring and the impeller was modeled as a rigid disk with hydrodynamic and static radial force. Although there exist critical speeds in the range of operational speeds for type I and II rotor systems, the amplitude of vibration appears to be less than the vibration limit set by the API standards. Further more, it has been verified that the main design parameters such as the clearance and length of journal bearings, and the static radial force of impeller should be properly adjusted, in order to the improve dynamic stability of the rotor system. (author). 39 refs., 81 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Cryogenic-coolant He-4-superconductor interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, S.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic and thermal interaction between a type 2 composite alloy and cryo-coolant He4 was studied with emphasis on post quench phenomena of formvar coated conductors. The latter were investigated using a heater simulation technique. Overall heat transfer coefficients were evaluated for the quench onset point. Heat flux densities were determined for phenomena of thermal switching between a peak and a recovery value. The study covered near saturated liquid, pressurized He4, both above and below the lambda transition, and above and below the thermodynamic critical pressure. In addition, friction coefficients for relative motion between formvar insulated conductors were determined.

  10. The impact of air-fuel mixture composition on SI engine performance during natural gas and producer gas combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyła, G.; Postrzednik, S.; Żmudka, Z.

    2016-09-01

    The paper summarizers results of experimental tests of SI engine fuelled with gaseous fuels such as, natural gas and three mixtures of producer gas substitute that simulated real producer gas composition. The engine was operated under full open throttle and charged with different air-fuel mixture composition (changed value of air excess ratio). The spark timing was adjusted to obtain maximum brake torque (MBT) for each fuel and air-fuel mixture. This paper reports engine indicated performance based on in-cylinder, cycle resolved pressure measurements. The engine performance utilizing producer gas in terms of indicated efficiency is increased by about 2 percentage points when compared to fuelling with natural gas. The engine power de-rating when producer gas is utilized instead the natural gas, varies from 24% to 28,6% under stoichiometric combustion conditions. For lean burn (λ=1.5) the difference are lower and varies from 22% to 24.5%.

  11. Direct Air Capture of CO2 - an Overview of Carbon Engineering's Technology and Pilot Plant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, G.; Corless, A.

    2014-12-01

    At Carbon Engineering, we are developing and commercializing technology to scrub CO2 directly from atmospheric air at industrial scale. By providing atmospheric CO2 for use in fuel production, we can enable production of transportation fuels with ultra-low carbon intensities, which command price premiums in the growing set of constrained fuels markets such as California's LCFS. We are a Calgary based startup founded in 2009 with 10 employees, and we are considered a global leader in the direct air capture (DAC) field. We will review CE's DAC technology, based on a wet-scrubbing "air contactor" which absorbs CO2 into aqueous solution, and a chemical looping "regeneration" component, which liberates pure CO2 from this aqueous solution while re-making the original absorption chemical. CE's DAC tecnology exports purified atmospheric CO2, combined with the combustion CO2 from plant energy usage, as the end product. We will also discuss CE's 2014-2015 end-to-end Pilot Demonstration Unit. This is a $7M technology demonstration plant that CE is building with the help of key industrial partners and equipment vendors. Vendor design and engineering requirements have been used to specify the pilot air contactor, pellet reactor, calciner, and slaker modules, as well as auxiliary systems. These modules will be run for several months to obtain the engineering and performance data needed for subsequent commercial plant design, as well as to test the residual integration risks associated with CE's process. By the time of the AGU conference, the pilot is expected to be in late stages of fabrication or early stages of site installation.

  12. Permeability and compression of fibrous porous media generated from dilute suspensions of fiberglass debris during a loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saya, E-mail: sayalee@tamu.edu; Abdulsattar, Suhaeb S.; Vaghetto, Rodolfo; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Experimental investigation on fibrous debris buildup was conducted. • Head loss through fibrous media was recorded at different approach velocities. • A head loss model through fibrous media was proposed for high porosity (>0.99). • A compression model of fibrous media was developed. - Abstract: Permeability of fibrous porous media has been studied for decades in various engineering applications, including liquid purifications, air filters, and textiles. In nuclear engineering, fiberglass has been found to be a hazard during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident. The high energy steam jet from a break impinges on surrounding fiberglass insulation materials, producing a large amount of fibrous debris. The fibrous debris is then transported through the reactor containment and reaches the sump strainers. Accumulation of such debris on the surface of the strainers produces a fibrous bed, which is a fibrous porous medium that can undermine reactor core cooling. The present study investigated the buildup of fibrous porous media on two types of perforated plate and the pressure drop through the fibrous porous media without chemical effect. The development of the fibrous bed was visually recorded in order to correlate the pressure drop, the approach velocity, and the thickness of the fibrous porous media. The experimental results were compared to semi-theoretical models and theoretical models proposed by other researchers. Additionally, a compression model was developed to predict the thickness and the local porosity of a fibrous bed as a function of pressure.

  13. Modeling of melt-coolant mixing by bottom injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkov, I.V.; Paladino, D.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics during the coolant injection, with submerged nozzles, at the bottom of a molten pool are studied. The flow pattern developed by the rising coolant is considered for the case of complete coolant vaporization, and the pool-coolant phase distributions are assessed by a modeling approach delivered from literature for a heterogeneous turbulent jet. To calculate the basic characteristics of such flow, integral relationships are proposed for the two-phase boundary layer. The results of numerical computations and approximate solution are compared with the experimental data obtained in the low temperature experiments, conducted in the DECOBI (debris coolability by bottom injection) facility. (authors)

  14. STUDY OF FLOW IN AIR-INTAKE SYSTEM FOR A SINGLE-CYLINDER GO-KART ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sulaiman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intake-air manifolds have a major effect on a vehicle’s engine performance and emission of noise and pollutants. Differences in engine outputs and applications require different designs of intake-air manifolds in order to achieve the best volumetric efficiency and thus the best engine performance. In the present work, the flow characteristics of air flowing in various designs of air-intake manifold of a 200-cc four-stroke Go-Kart engine are studied. The study is done by three dimensional simulations of the flow of air within six designs of air-intake manifold into the combustion chamber by using commercial CFD software, Fluent version 6.2. The simulation results are validated by an experimental study performed using a flow bench. The study reveals that the variations in the geometry of the air-intake system can result in a difference of up to 20% in the mass flow rate of air entering the combustion chamber.

  15. Effect of Volatility on Air-Fuel Ratio Distribution and Torque Output of a Carbureted Light Aircraft Piston Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Positive displacement fuel flow sensor Burette type volumetric fuel flowmeter(2) Meriam laminar airflow meter Lamdascan air-fuel ratio meter Lebow inline...therefore the resulting data was not utilized. The volumetric flowrate of engine intake air was calculated from the pressure drop across a Meriam Model 50MC2

  16. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, Robert H [ORNL; Hsu, John S [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2006-09-01

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from

  17. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

    2006-09-30

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from

  18. Aircraft engine exhaust emissions and other airport-related contributions to ambient air pollution: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-10-01

    Civil aviation is fast-growing (about +5% every year), mainly driven by the developing economies and globalisation. Its impact on the environment is heavily debated, particularly in relation to climate forcing attributed to emissions at cruising altitudes and the noise and the deterioration of air quality at ground-level due to airport operations. This latter environmental issue is of particular interest to the scientific community and policymakers, especially in relation to the breach of limit and target values for many air pollutants, mainly nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, near the busiest airports and the resulting consequences for public health. Despite the increased attention given to aircraft emissions at ground-level and air pollution in the vicinity of airports, many research gaps remain. Sources relevant to air quality include not only engine exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from aircraft, but also emissions from the units providing power to the aircraft on the ground, the traffic due to the airport ground service, maintenance work, heating facilities, fugitive vapours from refuelling operations, kitchens and restaurants for passengers and operators, intermodal transportation systems, and road traffic for transporting people and goods in and out to the airport. Many of these sources have received inadequate attention, despite their high potential for impact on air quality. This review aims to summarise the state-of-the-art research on aircraft and airport emissions and attempts to synthesise the results of studies that have addressed this issue. It also aims to describe the key characteristics of pollution, the impacts upon global and local air quality and to address the future potential of research by highlighting research needs.

  19. Engineering an in vitro air-blood barrier by 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Lenke; Umehara, Yuki; Jud, Corinne; Blank, Fabian; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-01-22

    Intensive efforts in recent years to develop and commercialize in vitro alternatives in the field of risk assessment have yielded new promising two- and three dimensional (3D) cell culture models. Nevertheless, a realistic 3D in vitro alveolar model is not available yet. Here we report on the biofabrication of the human air-blood tissue barrier analogue composed of an endothelial cell, basement membrane and epithelial cell layer by using a bioprinting technology. In contrary to the manual method, we demonstrate that this technique enables automatized and reproducible creation of thinner and more homogeneous cell layers, which is required for an optimal air-blood tissue barrier. This bioprinting platform will offer an excellent tool to engineer an advanced 3D lung model for high-throughput screening for safety assessment and drug efficacy testing.

  20. Measurement of horizontal air showers with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kambeitz, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA), at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, measures the radio emission of extensive air showers in the 30-80 MHz frequency range. AERA consists of more than 150 antenna stations distributed over 17 km$^2$. Together with the Auger surface detector, the fluorescence detector and the under-ground muon detector (AMIGA), AERA is able to measure cosmic rays with energies above 10$^{17}$ eV in a hybrid detection mode. AERA is optimized for the detection of air showers up to 60$^{\\circ}$ zenith angle, however, using the reconstruction of horizontal air showers with the Auger surface array, very inclined showers can also be measured. In this contribution an analysis of the AERA data in the zenith angle range from 62$^{\\circ}$ to 80$^{\\circ}$ will be presented. CoREAS simulations predict radio emission footprints of several km$^2$ for horizontal air showers, which are now confirmed by AERA measurements. This can lead to radio-based composition measurements and energy determi...

  1. CFD simulation analysis and research based on engine air intake system of automotive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Yan, Hua Jin; Tian, Ning; Zhao, GuoQi

    2017-01-01

    Traditional method for the design of automotive engine intake system has many issues, such as period, high costs, energy consumption and so on. The paper utilized one kind of CFD numerical simulation analysis based on the basic theory of CFD. It use the three-dimensional geometry modal grid, computational modeling and model analysis to identify the turbulence due to unreasonable design of air filter inlet position, and then through the test to verify the correctness of the results of CFD calculations. It provide a theoretical basis for the intake system structural optimization.

  2. EFFECT OF GASOLINE - ETHANOL BLENDS ON PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A SINGLE CYLINDER AIR COOLED MOTOR BIKE SI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SAMUEL RAJA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of using gasoline-ethanol (GE blends on performance and exhaust emission of a four stroke 150 cc single cylinder air cooled spark ignition (SI engine, without any modifications. Experiments were conducted at part load and different engine speeds ranging from 3000 to 5000 rpm, without and with catalytic converter. Ethanol content was varied from 5 percentage to 20 percentage by volume and four different blends (E5, E10, E15 and E20 were tested. Fuel consumption, engine speed, air fuel ratio, exhaust gas temperature and exhaust emissions were measured during each experiment. Brake thermal efficiency (ηb,th, volumetric efficiency (ηvol, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC and excess air factor were calculated for each test run. Brake specific fuel consumption, volumetric efficiency and excess air factor increased with ethanol percentage in the blend. Carbon monoxide (CO, hydrocarbon (HC and oxides of nitrogen (NOx emissions decreased with blends.

  3. High pressure air spray assistant power supply control strategies and their effects on diesel engine under transient operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yongqiang; LIU Zhongchang; WANG Zhongshu; ZHU Ruoqun

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce smoke from direct-injection (DI) turbo-charged and after-cooled (TCA) diesel engines under transient operations,the real-time controlling and measuring system of a high pressure air spray assistant power supply (HPAS) was developed.Effects of HPAS on a DI TCA diesel engine under constant engine speed and increased torque (CSIT) transient operations were studied by using different control strategies.Pre-spray (PS) strategy,which means supplying highly pressurized air into the exhaust manifold two seconds before the accelerating-graph begins to rise and stopping spraying air when the acceleratinggraph stops rising.Two other strategies-full-time-spray(FTS) and middle-time-spray (MTS)-were used to fully exploit HPAS potential.With the FTS and MTS strategies,the HPAS system can remarkably decrease smoke from DI TCA diesel engines under transient operations.

  4. The influence of fuel type on the cooling system heat exchanger parameters in heavy-duty engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsztynowicz, B.

    2016-09-01

    The paper discuses the problem of selection of cooling systems for heavy-duty engines fitted in city buses. Aside from diesel engines, engine manufacturers also have in their portfolio engines fueled with natural gas, whose design is based on that of a conventional diesel engine. Based on the parameters of the engines from this type-series (the same displacement and rated power) an analysis has been performed of the influence of the applied fuel on the heat flows directed to the radiators and charge air coolers, hence, their size and space necessary for their proper installation. A replacement of a diesel engine with a natural gas fueled engine of the same operating parameters results in an increased amount of heat released to the coolant and a reduced heat from the engine charging system. This forces a selection of different heat exchangers that require more space for installation. A universal cooling module for different engines is not an optimal solution.

  5. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  6. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  7. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  8. Heat transfer performance characteristics of hybrid nanofluids as coolant in louvered fin automotive radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Rashmi R.; Sarkar, Jahar

    2016-12-01

    Present study deals with the enhancement of convective heat transfer performance of EG brine based various hybrid nanofluids i.e. Ag, Cu, SiC, CuO and TiO2 in 0-1% volume fraction of Al2O3 nanofluid, as coolants for louvered fin automobile radiator. The effects of nanoparticles combination and operating parameters on thermo physical properties, heat transfer, effectiveness, pumping power and performance index of hybrid nanofluids have been evaluated. Comparison of studied hybrid nanofluids based on radiator size and pumping power has been made as well. Among all studied hybrid nanofluids, 1% Ag hybrid nanofluid (0.5% Ag and 0.5% Al2O3) yields highest effectiveness and heat transfer rate as well as pumping power. However, SiC + Al2O3 dispersed hybrid nanofluid yields maximum performance index and hence this can be recommended for best coolant. For the same radiator size and heat transfer rate, pumping power increases by using Ag hybrid nanofluids leading to increase in engine thermal efficiency and hence reduction in engine fuel consumption. For same coolant flow rate and heat transfer rate, the radiator size reduces and pumping power increases by using Ag hybrid nanofluids leading to reduction in radiator size, weight and cost.

  9. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  10. Methodology for determining of the weighted mean coolant temperature in the primary circuit hot legs of WWER-1000 reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunin, Yuri V.; Dobrotvorski, Alexander N.; Semenikhin, Alexander V. [JSC ' Atomtechenergo' , Filial ' Novovoronezhatomtechenergo' , Novovorenezh (Russian Federation); Ryasny, Sergei I. [JSC ' Atomtechenergo' , Mytishi (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    At WWER-1000 NPPs, as well as at PWR NPPs, there is a problem of determining the correct weighted mean coolant temperature in the primary circuit hot legs based on the measuring channels information. The problem is caused by the coolant temperature stratification. The technical documentation for engineering support and maintenance of I and C systems does not provide any regulatory guidelines to consider this effect. Therefore, it is very important to represent a new methodology for determining the weighted mean coolant temperature in the primary circuit hot legs of the WWER-1000 reactor plants. The given paper presents the basic preconditions and approaches applied during the methodology development. They were worked out on the basis of the executed numerical and experimental research taking into account the analysis of the extensive material obtained by the authors from full-scale tests during the commissioning of WWER-1000 power units, as well as operational data obtained from several power units with different fuel loadings.

  11. Commissioning and Performance Analysis of WhisperGen Stirling Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradip, Prashant Kaliram

    Stirling engine based cogeneration systems have potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission, due to their high cogeneration efficiency and emission control due to steady external combustion. To date, most studies on this unit have focused on performance based on both experimentation and computer models, and lack experimental data for diversified operating ranges. This thesis starts with the commissioning of a WhisperGen Stirling engine with components and instrumentation to evaluate power and thermal performance of the system. Next, a parametric study on primary engine variables, including air, diesel, and coolant flowrate and temperature were carried out to further understand their effect on engine power and efficiency. Then, this trend was validated with the thermodynamic model developed for the energy analysis of a Stirling cycle. Finally, the energy balance of the Stirling engine was compared without and with heat recovery from the engine block and the combustion chamber exhaust.

  12. Molten Fuel-Coolant Interactions induced by coolant injection into molten fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Yamano, Norihiko; Maruyama, Yu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Yang, Y.; Sugimoto, Jun [Severe Accident Research Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To investigate Molten Fuel-Coolant Interactions (MFCIs) in various contact geometries, an experimental program, called MUSE (MUlti-configurations in Steam Explosions), has been initiated under the ALPHA program at JAERI in Japan. The first series of MUSE test has been focused on the coolant injection (CI) and stratified modes of FCIs using water as coolant and molten thermite as molten fuel. The effects of water jet subcooling, jet dynamics, jet shape and system constraint on FCIs energetic in these modes were experimentally investigated by precisely measuring their mechanical energy release in the MUSE facility. It was observed that measured mechanical energy increased with increasing of jet subcooling in a weakly constraint system but decreased in a strongly constraint system. FCI energetic also increased with increasing of water jet velocity. These results suggested that the penetration and dispersion phenomena of a water jet inside a melt determined the mixing conditions of FCIs in these contact modes and consequently played important roles on FCI energetics. To understand fundamental physics of these phenomena and possible mixing conditions in the MUSE tests, a set of visualization tests with several pairs of jet-pool liquids in non-boiling and isothermal conditions were carried out. Numerical simulations of a water jet penetrating into a water pool at non-boiling conditions showed similar behaviors to those observed in the visualization tests. (author)

  13. Study on a Closed-Loop Air-Fuel Control System of Gasoline Engines by Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张付军; 赵长禄; 黄英; 郝利军

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the factors that influence the air-fuel ratio(A/F), the amplitude and frequency of A/F fluctuation, to reform the control strategy, and to improve the efficiency of three-way catalyst(TWC), a model of closed-loop control system including the engine, air-fuel mixing and transportation, oxygen sensor and controller, etc., is developed. Various factors that influence the A/F control are studied by simulation. The simulation results show that the reference voltage of oxygen sensor will influence the mean value of A/F ratio, the controller parameters will influence the amplitude of A/F fluctuation, and the operating conditions of the engine determine the frequency of A/F fluctuations, the amplitude of A/F fluctuation can be reduced to within demanded values by logical selection of the signal acquisition method and controller parameters. Higher A/F fluctuation frequency under high speed and load can be reduced through software delay in the controller. The A/F closed-loop control system based on the simulation results, accompanied with a rare-earth element TWC, gives a better efficiency of conversion against harmful emissions.

  14. System Design and Analysis of a Directly Air-Assisted Turbocharged SI Engine with Camshaft Driven Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino Guzzella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The availability of compressed air in combination with downsizing and turbocharging is a promising approach to improve the fuel economy and the driveability of internal combustion engines. The compressed air is used to boost and start the engine. It is generated during deceleration phases by running the engine as a piston compressor. In this paper, a camshaft-driven valve is considered for the control of the air exchange between the tank and the combustion chamber. Such a valve system is cost-effective and robust. Each pneumatic engine mode is realized by a separate cam. The air mass transfer in each mode is analyzed. Special attention is paid to the tank pressure dependence. The air demand in the boost mode is found to increase with the tank pressure. However, the dependence on the tank pressure is small in the most relevant operating region. The air demand of the pneumatic start shows a piecewise continuous dependence on the tank pressure. Finally, a tank sizing method is proposed which uses a quasi-static simulation. It is applied to a compact class vehicle, for which a tank volume of less than 10 L is sufficient. A further reduction of the tank volume is limited by the specifications imposed on the pneumatic start.

  15. System Design and Analysis of a Directly Air-Assisted Turbocharged SI Engine with Camshaft Driven Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voser, Christoph; Onder, Christopher; Guzzella, Lino [Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    The availability of compressed air in combination with downsizing and turbocharging is a promising approach to improve the fuel economy and the driveability of internal combustion engines. The compressed air is used to boost and start the engine. It is generated during deceleration phases by running the engine as a piston compressor. In this paper, a camshaft-driven valve is considered for the control of the air exchange between the tank and the combustion chamber. Such a valve system is cost-effective and robust. Each pneumatic engine mode is realized by a separate cam. The air mass transfer in each mode is analyzed. Special attention is paid to the tank pressure dependence. The air demand in the boost mode is found to increase with the tank pressure. However, the dependence on the tank pressure is small in the most relevant operating region. The air demand of the pneumatic start shows a piecewise continuous dependence on the tank pressure. Finally, a tank sizing method is proposed which uses a quasi-static simulation. It is applied to a compact class vehicle, for which a tank volume of less than 10 L is sufficient. A further reduction of the tank volume is limited by the specifications imposed on the pneumatic start.

  16. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birmania Heredia Rivera

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX. The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74–10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt, metallic (mainly Fe, and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris. The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city.

  17. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia Rivera, Birmania; Gerardo Rodriguez, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74–10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt), metallic (mainly Fe), and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris). The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city. PMID:27706087

  18. Potentiometric surfaces of the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Area, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, May and September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, Connor J.; Robinson, John A.

    2016-01-29

    Arnold Air Force Base occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The primary mission of Arnold Air Force Base is to provide risk-reduction information in the development of aerospace products through test and evaluation. This mission is achieved in part through test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC), which occupies about 4,000 acres in the center of Arnold Air Force Base. Arnold Air Force Base is underlain by gravel and limestone aquifers, the most productive of which is the Manchester aquifer. Several volatile organic compounds, primarily chlorinated solvents, have been identified in the groundwater at Arnold Air Force Base. In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Air Force Base, completed a study of groundwater flow focused on the Arnold Engineering Development Complex area. The Arnold Engineering Development Complex area is of particular concern because within this area (1) chlorinated solvents have been identified in the groundwater, (2) the aquifers are dewatered around below-grade test facilities, and (3) there is a regional groundwater divide.

  19. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  20. Increasing reliability of gas-air systems of piston and combined internal combustion engines by improving thermal and mechanic flow characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodov, Yu. M.; Grigor'ev, N. I.; Zhilkin, B. P.; Plotnikov, L. V.; Shestakov, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Results of experimental study of thermal and mechanical characteristics of gas exchange flow in piston and combined engines are presented. Ways for improving intake and exhaust processes to increase reliability of gas-air engine systems are proposed.

  1. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  2. Lubricant-coolant fluid for machining metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, A.A.; Epshtein, V.R.; Pastunov, V.A.; Sherle, A.I.; Shpin' kov, V.A.; Sladkova, T.A.

    1981-03-10

    For improving the antiwear and anticorrosion properties, the lubricant-coolant fluid (LCF) based on water, triethanolamine, and NaNO/sub 2/ contains additionally the sodium salt of an acid ester of maleic acid and substituted oligooxyethylenes (NMO) with the following proportions of the components: triethanolamine 0.3-0.5%, NaNO/sub 2/ 0.3-0.5%, NMO 0.5-2.0%, and water the remainder. In the case of using the proposed LCF on high-speed machine tools, it can contain additionally a foam suppressor in an amount of 0.005-0.1%. For preventing microbiological contamination of the LCF, bactericides of the type furacillin, formalin, vazin (transliteration), and others in an amount of 0.005-0.1% can be added to its composition. Introduction of the NMO additive ensures high wetting and lubricating characteristics in the LCF, which is characterized by stability during storage and service and good anticorrosion properties. Use of the proposed LCF makes it possible to increase the life of the cutting tool by a factor of 2.2 in machining Steel 40Kh and by a factor of 1.3 in machining corroding steel by comparison with the prototype; at the same time the service life of the LCF is increased twofold. The LCF can be used in machining parts of alloyed construction and corrosionresistant steels with cutting-edge and abrasive tools.

  3. Integration of Carbon Fiber Composite Materials into Air-Cooled Reciprocating Piston Engines for UA V Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    Composite MMC: …………………...………..Metal Matrix Composite OHC: …………………...………...Overhead Camshaft ...chosen as the test platform because it is inexpensive, air-cooled (similar to UAV engines), and uses an overhead camshaft (OHC) design which...facilitated the design of the crankcase. An OHC design avoids the necessity to align the camshaft as well as. Extending this study to a diesel engine would

  4. MATLAB/Simulink Framework for Modeling Complex Coolant Flow Configurations of Advanced Automotive Thermal Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, Gene; Lustbader, Jason; Leighton, Daniel; Kiss, Tibor

    2016-04-05

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) CoolSim MATLAB/Simulink modeling framework was extended by including a newly developed coolant loop solution method aimed at reducing the simulation effort for arbitrarily complex thermal management systems. The new approach does not require the user to identify specific coolant loops and their flow. The user only needs to connect the fluid network elements in a manner consistent with the desired schematic. Using the new solution method, a model of NREL's advanced combined coolant loop system for electric vehicles was created that reflected the test system architecture. This system was built using components provided by the MAHLE Group and included both air conditioning and heat pump modes. Validation with test bench data and verification with the previous solution method were performed for 10 operating points spanning a range of ambient temperatures between -2 degrees C and 43 degrees C. The largest root mean square difference between pressure, temperature, energy and mass flow rate data and simulation results was less than 7%.

  5. Cooling system in a rotary piston internal combustion engine. Kuehlsystem einer Rotationskolbenbrennkraftmaschine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiermann, D.; Nuber, R.

    1991-05-23

    Cooling system of a trochoid-type rotary piston internal combustion engine with a liquid-cooled casing. First the coolant is conducted isochronically and in parallel through cooling chambers of the jacket and a side part of the casing from where it is transported by a cooling pump through the cooling chambers of the other side part, on past a thermostat and into a cooler positioned on this other side part. The cooler consists of a parallel connected pipe bundle whose finned pipes follow the radial outer contours of the casing of the machine. From the cooler the coolant is conducted back into the cooling chambers of the first side part and the jacket. A blower fitted on the eccentric shaft of the internal combustion engine inside the cooler takes in fresh air axially and discharges it radially through the finned pipes.

  6. Multi-dimensional modelling of spray, in-cylinder air motion and fuel–air mixing in a direct-injection engine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Abani; S Bakshi; R V Ravikrishna

    2007-10-01

    In this work, three-dimensional fuel–air mixing inside a conventional spark ignition engine cylinder is simulated under direct injection conditions. The motivation is to explore retrofitting of conventional engines for direct injection to take advantage of low emissions and high thermal efficiency of the direct injection concept. Fuel–air mixing is studied at different loads by developing and applying a model based on the Lagrangian-drop and Eulerian-fluid (LDEF) procedure for modelling the two-phase flow. The Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for modelling the hollow cone spray and appropriate models for droplet impingement, drag and evaporation are used. Moving boundary algorithm and two-way interaction between both phases are implemented. Fuel injection timing and quantity is varied with load. Results show that near-stoichiometric fuel–air ratio region is observed at different locations depending on the load. The model developed serves to predict the fuel–air mixing spatially and temporally, and hence is a useful tool in design and optimization of direct injection engines with regards to injector and spark plug locations. Simulations over a range of speed and load indicate the need for a novel ignition strategy involving dual spark plugs and also provide guidelines in deciding spark plug locations.

  7. An engineering procedure for air side performance evaluation of flat tube heat exchangers with louvered fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Dragi

    2013-01-01

    An accurate evaluation of possible air side heat transfer surface geometries is a prerequisite for optimal heat exchanger design. Aiming for practical engineering applicability a simplified and transparent analytical procedure for the assessment of louvered fin and flat tube heat exchanger geometries and the calculation of fin parameters that enable maximal performance for given boundary conditions has been developed. The proposed method comprises determining fins temperature profiles and effective heat transfer temperature difference, introduction of a relative heat transfer surface area, as well as the utilization of recent experimentally obtained heat transfer correlations confirmed for the observed range of boundary conditions. The proposed methodology is validated through comparison with experimental and numerical results of other authors.

  8. Numerical analyses of a rocket engine turbine and comparison with air test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ken; Chan, Daniel C.; Hudson, Susan T.; Gaddis, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    The study presents cold air test data on the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump turbine recently collected at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Overall performance data, static pressures on the first- and second-stage nozzles, and static pressures along with the gas path at the hub and tip are gathered and compared with various (1D, quasi-3D, and 3D viscous) analysis procedures. The results of each level of analysis are compared to test data to demonstrate the range of applicability for each step in the design process of a turbine. One-dimensional performance prediction, quasi-3D loading prediction, 3D wall pressure distribution prediction, and 3D viscous wall pressure distribution prediction are illustrated.

  9. METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATION OF HEAT-STRESSED STATE FOR CYLINDER HEAD OF DIESEL ENGINE WITH AIR COOLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Avramenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance tuning improvement of modern diesel engines exerts an influence on technical and economic, ecological and resource indices of an internal combustion engine (ICE. In its turn, that requires a complex estimation and improvement of engine indices. As is known, working process and thermal intensity of combustion chamber parts are interconnected between themselves. Changes in design, operating and adjustment parameters of systems and structural elements of internal combustion engines that enable air-fuel mixing and combustions processes stressed state of combustion chamber parts. Joint estimation of operating cycle parameters and strength indices of ICE parts makes it possible to solve a number of problems originating in the process of designing new engine models and further development of the existing ones. The paper provides results of comparative estimation on heat-stressed state of a cylinder head for a high-speed diesel engine Д21A (2Ч10,5/12 while operating a rated power mode. In order to simulate and specify a heat-stressed state for description of boundary heat conductivity conditions the following adjoint “gas – wall” problems have been solved: the first one – for combustion chamber of a diesel engine (an internal problem – simulation of a working cycle for a diesel engine; the second one – for cooling edges while blowing over them by air flow (an external problem. Calculations have been made in three-dimensional non-stationary presentation within the Cartesian coordinates. In order to simulate a working cycle of the diesel engine a computational grid describing combustion chamber configuration, inlet and outlet channels has been used in the paper. Solution of the external problem for cooling edge surface in case of blowing over them by air flow has permitted to specify temperatures and heat-transfer coefficient and later to improve an accuracy while estimating level of temperatures and stresses of the cylinder head.

  10. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  11. Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump Chiller for Air-Conditioning and Hot Water Supply Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshihiko; Mita, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tadashi; Hoshino, Norimasa; Kimura, Yoshihisa

    In Part 1 of this study, the performance characteristics of a 457kW gas engine-driven heat pump (GHP) chiller have been obtained from a simulation model analysis for both cooling and heating modes and it has been found that the part-load characteristics of the GHP chiller are fairly well. On the back of Part 1, a computer simulation program has been developed for the evaluation of GHP chiller systems to compare with the other types of heat source systems for air-conditioning and hot water supply applications. The simulation program can be used to estimate annual energy consumption, annual CO2 emission, etc. of the systems with the data of monthly and hourly thermal loads on various buildings, outdoor air conditions, and characteristics of various components comprising the systems. By applying this to some cases of medium-scale hotel, office, shop, and hospital buildings, it has been found that the GHP chiller systems have advantages particularly in the cases of hotels and hospitals where a lot of hot water demand exists. It has also been found that the combination of a GHP chiller and a direct-fired absorption water chiller boiler (hot and chilled water generator) appears promising.

  12. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    1992) PFR UK 250 MWe - 14 Shut Down (1994) Rapsodie France 40 MWe - 40 Shut Down (1983) Phenix France 233 MWe - 22 In Operation BOR-60 Russia...107years.98 • Problems with radioactive waste management and coolant disposal during decommissioning .99 O th er • Lead is abundantly available in...is high due to Bi-210, half-life 3.6 106years.102 • Problems with radioactive waste management and coolant disposal during decommissioning . 103 O

  13. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  14. A MultiAir®/MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Ronald [Chrysler Group LLC., Auburn Hills, MI (United States)

    2015-05-20

    FCA US LLC (formally known as Chrysler Group LLC, and hereinafter “Chrysler”) was awarded an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded project by the Department of Energy (DOE) titled “A MultiAir®/MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency” (hereinafter “project”). This award was issued after Chrysler submitted a proposal for Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA- 0000079, “Systems Level Technology Development, Integration, and Demonstration for Efficient Class 8 Trucks (SuperTruck) and Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD).” Chrysler started work on this project on June 01, 2010 and completed testing activities on August 30, 2014. Overall objectives of this project were; Demonstrate a 25% improvement in combined Federal Test Procedure (FTP) City and Highway fuel economy over a 2009 Chrysler minivan; Accelerate the development of highly efficient engine and powertrain systems for light-duty vehicles, while meeting future emissions standards; and Create and retain jobs in accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

  15. Impact of Emissions of Marine Diesel Engines to Air Pollution on the Example of the Yugoslav River Shipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Ljevaja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the impact which marine diesel engines have on air pollution. The combustion of fossil fuels for marine diesel engines produces emission of various greenhouse gases; including carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, carbon monoxide (CO, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs, and sulphur dioxide (SO2. Gas emission calculation is shown on the example of the Yugoslav river shipping with two methods for calculating harmful emissions of the marine diesel engines. Technologies for reduction of harmful emissions of marine diesel engines and other engines are also presented, as well as the implementation of those technologies, using the example of the Yugoslav river shipping. One of the objectives of this paper is to determine the actual condition of the fleet, as well as the impact it has on air pollution in Serbia, as a country which plans to become a member of the European Union. A measurement on diesel engines of different production date was done with a special device, in order to get the results that represent reality (about harmful emissions in Serbia. Final task of this paper is to collect information in order to reduce harmful emissions of the marine diesel engines, along with preservation of the environment.

  16. The development of Sn-Li coolant/breeding material for APEX/ALPS applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, D.-K.

    1999-07-08

    A Sn-Li alloy has been identified to be a coolant/breeding material for D-T fusion applications. The key feature of this material is its very low vapor pressure, which will be very useful for free surface concepts employed in APEX, ALPS and inertial confinement fission. The vapor is dominated by lithium, which has very low Z. Initial assessment of the material indicates acceptable tritium breeding capability, high thermal conductivity, expected low tritium volubility, and expected low chemical reactivities with water and air. Some key concerns are the high activation and material compatibility issues. The initial assessment of this material, for fission applications, is presented in this paper.

  17. 77 FR 65823 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 87 RIN 2060-AO70 Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures Correction In rule document 2012-13828 appearing on pages...

  18. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  19. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  20. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT XXI, I--MAINTAINING THE AIR SYSTEM--CATERPILLAR DIESEL ENGINE, II--UNDERSTANDING REAR END SUSPENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE AIR SYSTEM AND REAR AXLE SUSPENSION USED ON DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE (1) AIR INDUCTION AND EXHAUST SYSTEM, (2) VALVE MECHANISM, (3) TROUBLESHOOTING THE AIR SYSTEM, (4) PURPOSE OF VEHICLE SUSPENSION, (5) TANDEM…

  1. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorji-Bandpy Mofid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  2. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  3. Effect of air-entry angle on performance of a 2-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Sherod L; Dutee, Francis J

    1937-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effect of variations in the horizontal and vertical air-entry angles on the performance characteristics of a single-cylinder 2-stroke-cycle compression-ignition test engine. Performance data were obtained over a wide range of engine speed, scavenging pressure, fuel quantity, and injection advance angle with the optimum guide vanes. Friction and blower-power curves are included for calculating the indicated and net performances. The optimum horizontal air-entry angle was found to be 60 degrees from the radial and the optimum vertical angle to be zero, under which conditions a maximum power output of 77 gross brake horsepower for a specific fuel consumption of 0.52 pound per brake horsepower-hour was obtained at 1,800 r.p.m. and 16-1/2 inches of Hg scavenging pressure. The corresponding specific output was 0.65 gross brake horsepower per cubic inch of piston displacement. Tests revealed that the optimum scavenging pressure increased linearly with engine speed. The brake mean effective pressure increased uniformly with air quantity per cycle for any given vane angle and was independent of engine speed and scavenging pressure.

  4. COGENERATION OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY OF MICRO HEAT POWER PLANTS BASED ON AIR COOLED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Shchinnikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of operation of electric generators based on internal combustion engines with air cooling under conditions of cogeneration, when, along with the electricity, heat release in different embodiments is provided. Such facilities are usually realized on the basis of gasoline internal combustion engines (i.e. gasoline is used as a fuel. They can be used in the household, by professional builders, geologists, the military and rescuers in the area of emergencies and in areas with a lack of infrastructure. The basis of the facility is the gasoline generator Hitachi-2400 with an air-cooled power of 2.4 kW. The basic methodology for the study of microthermal power plants based on an air-cooled internal combustion engine which is based on balance equations is presented. The facility operation ensures the measurement of all temperatures and expenses of operating environments for determining heat flow in accordance with the proposed methodology. The specifications of heat exchangers for utilizing the heat of exhaust flue gases are presented. The energy diagram illustrating the useful effect of the application of various heat exchangers are plotted. Cogeneration possibilities of the facility are provided, firstly, by the release of heat with the air that cools a cylinder of the internal combustion engine, and, secondly, by the release of heat of hot water heated by utilizing the heat of the leaving flue gases, and, thirdly, in the calculated version, by the release of heat with air that is sequentially heated due to the cooling of the cylinder head and then by utilizing the heat of exhaust gases. It is demonstrated that the fuel heat utilization factor can be increased from 0.22 to 0.50–0.60, depending on the adopted technical solutions.

  5. Validation of Three-Dimensional Simulation of Flow through Hypersonic Air-breathing Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangadurai Murugan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow path of a conceptual hypersonic air-breathing scramjet engine integrated with the vehicle (without combustion has been simulated numerically using ANSYS CFX software with the SST turbulence model. The computations were performed for the free stream Mach number of 6 and angle-of-attack of 5°. A strong separation bubble was observed on the bodyside wall in the internal compression region where the reflected cowl shock impinges on body which in turn increases the static pressure substantially. The external-internal flow field of the hypersonic mixed compression intake, shock-boundary layer interactions, and the shock-shock interactions present in the internal compression region have qualitatively been obtained and analysed. The variation of centreline pressure along the bodyside wall close to the symmetry plane obtained from numerical simulation centreline has been compared with the experimentally measured data. It has been observed that the computed wall pressure matches fairly well with the measured values in the external ramp compression region, internal compression region and in the combustion chamber. The flow patterns and the pressure variations near the middle wall and the fuel injecting strut locations have also been analysed.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 4, July 2015, pp. 272-278, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.6979

  6. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  7. Drag and Cooling with Various Forms of Cowling for a "Whirlwind" Radial Air-Cooled Engine I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Fred E

    1930-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation undertaken in the 20-foot Propeller Research Tunnel at Langley Field on the cowling of radial air-cooled engines. A portion of the investigation has been completed, in which several forms and degrees of cowling were tested on Wright "Whirlwind" J-5 engine mounted in the nose of a cabin fuselage. The cowlings varied from the one extreme of an entirely exposed engine to the other in which the engine was entirely inclosed. Cooling tests were made and each cowling modified, if necessary, until the engine cooled approximately as satisfactorily as when it was entirely exposed. Drag tests were then made with each form of cowling, and the effect of the cowling on the propulsive efficiency determined with a metal propeller. The propulsive efficiency was found to be practically the same with all forms of cowling. The drag of the cabin fuselage with uncowled engine was found to be more than three times as great as the drag of the fuselage with engine removed and nose rounded. The conventional forms of cowling, in which at least the tops of the cylinder heads and valve gear are exposed, reduce the drag somewhat, but the cowling entirely covering the engine reduces it 2.6 times as much as the best conventional one. The decrease in drag due to the use of spinners proved to be almost negligible. The use of the cowling completely covering the engine seems entirely practical as regards both cooling and maintenance under service conditions. It must be carefully designed, however, to cool properly. With cabin fuselages its use should result in a substantial increase in high speed over that obtained with present forms of cowling on engines similar in contour to the J-5. (author)

  8. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  9. Experimental study of high temperature particle dropping in coolant liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianshu; YANG Yanhua; LI Xiaoyan; HU Zhihua

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments of the premixing stage of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI), namely the particles falling into water, were carried out. The force on the particles during the course of falling has been studied. The dropping character of hot particle was influenced by three main parameters, i.e., particle temperature, particle diameter and coolant subcooling that varied over a wide range. A high-speed camera recorded the falling speed of the particle and the moving curves were obtained. The experimental results showed that for the film boiling on the surface of particle and water, the temperature increase of either particle or coolant would slow down the particle falling velocity. The falling velocity of particle in small diameter is lower than that of the bigger particle. The present work can provide an experimental foundation for further investigation of high-speed transient evaporation heat transfer.

  10. Influence of coolant motion on structure of hardened steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper is focused on volumetric hardening process using liquid low melting point metal as a coolant. Effect of convective motion of the coolant on material structure after hardening is investigated. Comparison with results obtained for model neglecting motion of liquid is executed. Mathematical and numerical model based on Finite Element Metod is described. Characteristic Based Split (CBS method is used to uncouple velocities and pressure and finally to solve Navier-Stokes equation. Petrov-Galerkin formulation is employed to stabilize convective term in heat transport equation. Phase transformations model is created on the basis of Johnson-Mehl and Avrami laws. Continuous cooling diagram (CTPc for C45 steel is exploited in presented model of phase transformations. Temporary temperatures, phases participation, thermal and structural strains in hardening element and coolant velocities are shown and discussed.

  11. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT PROPERTIES OF THE COOLANT RECOVERY SYSTEM HEAT LOSSES OF COMBINED COMPRESSOR-POWER PLANT ON ITS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusha V.L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of theoretical analysis of the effectiveness of an ideal thermodynamic cycle internal combustion engine combined with an external utilization of exhaust heat. The influence of the properties of the coolant circuit of utilization on its operational parameters and characteristics of the power plant.

  13. Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis Methodology for SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, K. H.; Lee, G. H.; Yang, S. H.; Yoon, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, H. C

    2006-02-15

    The analysis methodology on the Loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) for SMART-P is described in this report. SMART-P is an advanced integral type PWR producing a maximum thermal power of 65.5 MW with metallic fuel. LOCA's are hypothetical accidents that would result from the loss of reactor coolant, at a rate in excess of the capability of the reactor coolant makeup system, from breaks in pipes in the reactor coolant pressure boundary up to and including a break equivalent in size to the double-ended rupture of the largest pipe in the reactor coolant system. Since SMART-P contains the major primary circuit components in a single Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), the possibility of a large break LOCA (LBLOCA) is inherently eliminated and only the small break LOCA is postulated. This report describes the outline and acceptance criteria of small break LOCA (SBLOCA) for SMART-P and documents the conservative analytical model and method and the analysis results using the TASS/SMR code. This analysis method is applied in the SBLOCA analysis performed for the ECCS performance evaluation which is described in the section 6.3.3 of the safety analysis report. The prediction results of SBLOCA analysis model of SMART-P for the break flow, system's pressure and temperature distributions, reactor coolant distribution, single and two-phase natural circulation phenomena, and the time of major sequence of events, etc. should be compared and verified with the applicable separate and integral effects test results. Also, it is required to set-up the feasible acceptance criteria applicable to the metallic fueled integral reactor of SMART-P. The analysis methodology for the SBLOCA described in this report will be further developed and validated as the design and licensing status of SMART-P evolves.

  14. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during blackout conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mings, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has classified the problem of reactor coolant pump seal failures as an unresolved safety issue. This decision was made in large part due to experimental results obtained from a research program developed to study shaft seal performance during station blackout and reported in this paper. Testing and analysis indicated a potential for pump seal failure under postulated blackout conditions leading to a loss of primary coolant with a concomitant danger of core uncovery. The work to date has not answered all the concerns regarding shaft seal failure but it has helped scope the problem and focus future research needed to completely resolve this issue.

  15. Research into the formation process of hydrogen-air mixture in hydrogen fueled engines based on CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenzhong, Yang; Aiguo, Si; Fei, Wang; Nan, Guo [School of Mechanical Engineering, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, 20 Zhenghua Road, Zhengzhou 450011 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The density of hydrogen is much smaller than that of air, so it is hard for hydrogen and air to form high grade mixture. Furthermore, the diffusing speed of hydrogen is so high that the formation state of mixture changes rapidly. Therefore it will become more difficult to carry through the further research of mixture space-time distributing rule. In order to investigate the formation rule of hydrogen-air mixture and improve the mixture quality, in this paper, computation fluid dynamics (CFD) mode is adopted to carry through three-dimensional numerical simulation research of flow field in hydrogen fueled engine cylinder. The numerical simulation is done in a two-stroke hydrogen fueled engine, and the mixture forming state at different hydrogen-injecting time is contrasted. The evolvement rule of flow field in cylinder and mixture forming state is shown in the result. The simulation results show that, when hydrogen-injecting begins at 260 CA, the forming quality of the mixture is better than other two states, this is the same as the experimental results. It indicates that CFD is one of the effective methods to analyze the formation of mixture in hydrogen fueled engine. (author)

  16. A New Family of Nonlinear Observers for SI Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P. B.; Olsen, M. B.; Poulsen, J.;

    1997-01-01

    The paper treats a newly developed set of nonlinear observers for advanced spark ignition engine control.......The paper treats a newly developed set of nonlinear observers for advanced spark ignition engine control....

  17. Improving the Air Force’s Computation of Spares Requirements: The Effects of Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    11jIn addition to quantifying the effects of engines, this report suggests specific ways in which engines can be included in the availabilty -based...consideration is accurate portrayal of the indenture structure for engine components. Despite their physical attachment to the engine, some - notably fuel ...prorated fractions (based on usage factors) of the demands and assets applicable to the weapon systems of interest. Nondemand-based requirements, such as

  18. Experimental investigation on performance characteristics of a diesel engine using diesel-water emulsion with oxygen enriched air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baskar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engines occupy a crucial position in automobile industry due to their high thermal efficiency and high power to weight ratio. However, they lag behind in controlling air polluting components coming out of the engine exhaust. Therefore, diesel consumption should be analyzed for future energy consumption and this can be primarily controlled by the petroleum fuel substitution techniques for existing diesel engines, which include biodiesel, alcohol-diesel emulsions and diesel water emulsions. Among them the diesel water emulsion is found to be most suitable fuel due to reduction in particulate matter and NOx emission, besides that it also improves the brake thermal efficiency. But the major problem associated with emulsions is the ignition delay, since this is responsible for the power and torque loss. A reduction in NOx emission was observed due to reduction in combustion chamber temperature as the water concentration increases. However the side effect of emulsified diesel is a reduction in power which can be compensated by oxygen enrichment. The present study investigates the effects of oxygen concentration on the performance characteristics of a diesel engine when the intake air is enriched to 27% of oxygen and fueled by 10% of water diesel emulsion. It was found that the brake thermal efficiency was enhanced, combustion characteristics improved and there is also a reduction in HC emissions.

  19. Robust Control of the Air to Fuel Ratio in Spark Ignition Engines with Delayed Measurements from a UEGO Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Espinoza-Jurado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A precise control of the normalized air to fuel ratio in spark ignition engines is an essential task. To achieve this goal, in this work we take into consideration the time delay measurement presented by the universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor along with uncertainties in the volumetric efficiency. For that purpose, observers are designed by means of a super-twisting sliding mode estimation scheme. Also two control schemes based on a general nonlinear model and a similar nonlinear affine representation for the dynamics of the normalized air to fuel ratio were designed in this work by using the super-twisting sliding mode methodology. Such dynamics depends on the control input, that is, the injected fuel mass flow, its time derivative, and its reciprocal. The two latter terms are estimated by means of a robust sliding mode differentiator. The observers and controllers are designed based on an isothermal mean value engine model. Numeric and hardware in the loop simulations were carried out with such model, where parameters were taken from a real engine. The obtained results show a good output tracking and rejection of disturbances when the engine is closed loop with proposed control methods.

  20. Virtual design and performance prediction of a silencing air cleaner used in an I.C. engine intake system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports results of the authors' studies on the virtual design method used in the development of low noise intake system of I.C. engine. The resulting high pass-by noise at level above the legislative target at full throttle when engine speed was around 5200 r/min necessitated a BEM-aided redesign task, following the typical process of design and development of an intake system. During the initial design, based on the acoustic theory and the requirements (1. The air flux of the redesigned should equal to or exceed the value of the original flux; 2. The filtering area must not be degraded), and considering the constraint of space in the engine compartment, total volume and rough internal dimensions were determined. During the detailed design, the exact internal dimensions of the air cleaner were determined, and an effective method was applied to improve the acoustic performance at low frequency. The predicted sound power of the intake system indicated that the objective of reducing the overall engine noise by minimizing intake system noise was achieved.

  1. More than Just Hot Air: How Hairdryers and Role Models Inspire Girls in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekelis, Linda; Larkin, Molly; Gomes, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a reverse-engineering project where female students take a part a hair dryer--giving them an opportunity to see the many different kinds of engineering disciplines involved in making a hairdryer and that they work together. Mechanical Engineer, Lyn Gome, describes her experience leading a group of middle school girls through…

  2. Air toxics evaluation of ABB Combustion Engineering Low-Emission Boiler Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesnor, J.D. [ABB/Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)

    1993-10-26

    The specific goals of the program are to identify air toxic compounds that might be emmitted from the new boiler with its various Air Pollution Control device for APCD alternatives in levels of regulatory concern. For the compounds thought to be of concern, potential air toxic control methodologies will be suggested and a Test Protocol will be written to be used in the Proof of Concept and full scale tests. The following task was defined: Define Replations and Standards; Identify Air Toxic Pollutants of Interest to Interest to Utility Boilers; Assesment of Air Toxic By-Products; State of the Art Assessment of Toxic By-Product Control Technologies; and Test Protocol Definition.

  3. Investigating hydrodynamic characteristics and peculiarities of the coolant flow behind a spacer grid of a fuel rod assembly of the floating nuclear power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, S. M.; Doronkov, D. V.; Legchanov, M. A.; Pronin, A. N.; Solncev, D. N.; Sorokin, V. D.; Hrobostov, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The results of experimental investigations of local hydrodynamics of a coolant flow in fuel rod assembly (FA) of KLT-40C reactor behind a plate spacer grid have been presented. The investigations were carried out on an aerodynamic rig using the gas-phase diffusive tracer test. An analysis of spatial distribution of absolute flow velocity projections and distribution of tracer concentration allowed specifying a coolant flow pattern behind the plate spacer grid of the FA. On the basis of obtained experimental data the recommendations were provided to specify procedures for determining the coolant flow rates for the programs of cell-wise calculation of a core zone of KLT-40C reactor. Investigation results were accepted for the practical use in JSC "OKBM Afrikantov" to assess heat engineering reliability of cores of KLT-40C reactor and were included in a database for verification of CFD programs (CFD-codes).

  4. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  5. Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on fuels, lubricants, and coolants is one of a series of power mechanics tests and visual aids on automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials present basic information with illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. Focusing on fuels, the first of…

  6. Failure Analysis and Prevention for the Air Logistics Center Engineer: CAStLE Course Development Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    also, as structure Enginer this class has a lot of information that will keep us up todate and we can apply to problems that we deal on daily basis...CAStLE course was directly on target with the current needs of the ALC engineer. This specialized course was delivered on-site with up -to-date...programs, the Engineering Directorate seeks to ensure their engineers are up to date in topics which are relevant to the ALC engineer. To this end, they

  7. Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyungsuk Kang; Chun Tai

    2010-05-01

    The first phase of the project consists of four months of applied research, starting from September 1, 2005 and was completed by December 31, 2005. During this time, the project team heavily relied on highly detailed numerical modeling techniques to evaluate the feasibility of the APA technology. Specifically, (i) A GT-Power{sup TM}engine simulation model was constructed to predict engine efficiency at various operating conditions. Efficiency was defined based on the second-law thermodynamic availability. (ii) The engine efficiency map generated by the engine simulation was then fed into a simplified vehicle model, which was constructed in the Matlab/Simulink environment, to predict fuel consumption of a refuse truck on a simple collection cycle. (iii) Design and analysis work supporting the concept of retrofitting an existing Sturman Industries Hydraulic Valve Actuation (HVA) system with the modifications that are required to run the HVA system with Air Power Assist functionality. A Matlab/Simulink model was used to calculate the dynamic response of the HVA system. Computer aided design (CAD) was done in Solidworks for mechanical design and hydraulic layout. At the end of Phase I, 11% fuel economy improvement was predicted. During Phase II, the engine simulation group completed the engine mapping work. The air handling group made substantial progress in identifying suppliers and conducting 3D modelling design. Sturman Industries completed design modification of the HVA system, which was reviewed and accepted by Volvo Powertrain. In Phase II, the possibility of 15% fuel economy improvement was shown with new EGR cooler design by reducing EGR cooler outlet temperature with APA engine technology from Air Handling Group. In addition, Vehicle Simulation with APA technology estimated 4 -21% fuel economy improvement over a wide range of driving cycles. During Phase III, the engine experimental setup was initiated at VPTNA, Hagerstown, MD. Air Handling system and HVA

  8. Experimental study on thermal balance performance of naturally aspirated diesel engine at high altitude (low air pressure)%自然吸气柴油机高海拔(低气压)热平衡试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素荣; 许翔; 任晓江; 关立哲; 郑智; 刘瑞林

    2011-01-01

    基于内燃机高海拔(低气压)热平衡模拟试验台,对某型内燃叉车自然吸气柴油机进行了热平衡高原模拟试验,研究了柴油机燃烧放热量分配、冷却液温度以及排气温度等随海拔高度(大气压力)的变化规律.结果表明:随着海拔的升高,转化为有效功的热量、冷却水散热量以及排气带走的热量均不断下降,柴油机不完全燃烧造成的热损失、机体散失的热量以及其他热损失所占比重不断增加;与平原相比,海拔5 000 m时,转化为有效功的热量平均下降了13.79%,冷却水散热量平均下降了2.27%,排气带走的热量平均下降了14.4%,发动机的热平衡性能与平原相比发生了较大的变化.%The thermal balance performance of naturally aspirated forklift diesel engine at different altitudes was studied on the engine thermal balance test bed for simulating with high altitude (low air pressure). Influence of atmospheric pressure on the heat distribution, coolant temperature and exhaust gas temperature were analyzed. Results show that thermal changed into usable power, thermal carried by cooling water and exhaust gas decreased with the increase of altitude. On the contrary, the heat loss due to incomplete combustion increased with the increase of altitude. Compared with that at 5 000 m altitude, thermal changed into usable power decreased by 13. 79%; thermal carried by cooling water decreased by 2. 27%; thermal carried by exhaust air decreased by 14.4%. The thermal balance performance at high altitude is different from the performance at sea level.

  9. A methodology for the evaluation of the turbine jet engine fragment threat to generic air transportable containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, D.C.; Pierce, J.D.

    1993-06-01

    Uncontained, high-energy gas turbine engine fragments are a potential threat to air-transportable containers carried aboard jet aircraft. The threat to a generic example container is evaluated by probability analyses and penetration testing to demonstrate the methodology to be used in the evaluation of a specific container/aircraft/engine combination. Fragment/container impact probability is the product of the uncontained fragment release rate and the geometric probability that a container is in the path of this fragment. The probability of a high-energy rotor burst fragment from four generic aircraft engines striking one of the containment vessels aboard a transport aircraft is approximately 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} strikes/hour. Finite element penetration analyses and tests can be performed to identify specific fragments which have the potential to penetrate a generic or specific containment vessel. The relatively low probability of engine fragment/container impacts is primarily due to the low release rate of uncontained, hazardous jet engine fragments.

  10. Effect of internal coolant crossflow orientation on the discharge coefficient of shaped film-cooling holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsch, M.; Saumweber, C.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.; Sharp, E.

    2000-01-01

    Discharge coefficients of three film-cooling hole geometries are presented over a wide range of engine like conditions. The hole geometries comprise a cylindrical hole and two holes with a diffuser-shaped exit portion (a fanshaped and a laidback fanshaped hole). For all three hole geometries the hole axis was inclined 30 deg with respect to the direction of the external (hot gas) flow. The flow conditions considered were the hot gas crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6), the coolant crossflow Mach number (up to 0.6) and the pressure ratio across the hole (up to 2). The effect of internal crossflow approach direction, perpendicular or parallel to the main flow direction, is particularly addressed in the present study. Comparison is made of the results for a parallel and perpendicular orientation, showing that the coolant crossflow orientation has a strong impact on the discharge behavior of the different hole geometries. The discharge coefficients were found to strongly depend on both hole geometry and crossflow conditions. Furthermore, the effects of internal and external crossflow on the discharge coefficients were described by means of correlations used to derive a predicting scheme for discharge coefficients. A comparison between predictions and measurements reveals the capability of the method proposed.

  11. Improvements of primary coolant shutdown chemistry and reactor coolant system cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudard, G.; Gilles, B.; Mesnage, F. [EDF/GDL (France); Cattant, F. [EDF R and D (France)

    2002-07-01

    In the framework of a radiation exposure management program entitled <>, EDF aims at decreasing the mass dosimetry of nuclear power plants workers. So, the annual dose per unit, which has improved from 2.44 m.Sv in 1991 to 1.08 in 2000, should target 0.8 mSv in the year 2005 term in order to meet the results of the best nuclear operators. One of the guidelines for irradiation source term reduction is the optimization of operation parameters, including reactor coolant system (RCS) chemistry in operation, RCS shutdown chemistry and RCS cleanup improvement. This paper presents the EDF strategy for the shutdown and start up RCS chemistry optimization. All the shutdown modes have been reviewed and for each of them, the chemical specifications will be fine tuned. A survey of some US PWRs shutdown practices has been conducted for an acid and reducing shutdown chemistry implementation test at one EDF unit. This survey shows that deviating from the EPRI recommended practice for acid and reducing shutdown chemistry is possible and that critical path impact can be minimized. The paper also presents some investigations about soluble and insoluble species behavior and characterization; the study focuses here on {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 122}Sb, {sup 124}Sb and iodine contamination. Concerning RCS cleanup improvement, the paper presents two studies. The first one highlights some limited design modifications that are either underway or planned, for an increased flow rate during the most critical periods of the shutdown. The second one focuses on the strategy EDF envisions for filters and resins selection criteria. Matching the study on contaminants behavior with the study of filters and resins selection criteria should allow improving the cleanup efficiency. (authors)

  12. Development and Testing of a Rotating Detonation Engine Run on Hydrogen and Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    increasing fuel prices have highlighted a need to reduce the Air Force’s petroleum consumption. Subsequently, the Air Force has launched a two...pairing a radial flow with a transverse detonation wave.2 Acetylene and oxygen flowed radially into the combustion chamber through small slits. As

  13. Hot air engines: Study of a Stirling engine and of an Ericsson engine; Moteurs thermiques a apport de chaleur externe: etude d'un moteur stirling et d'un moteur ericsson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, S.

    2005-11-15

    In the current energy context, we attend the development of technologies of production of 'clean' energy. Thus, news prospects like thermodynamic solar energy conversion or waste energy conversion are offered to research on 'renewable energies'. Within this framework, we are interested in hot air engines: Stirling and Ericsson engines. First of all, this thesis concerns the study of a small Stirling engine on which we measured the fluid instantaneous temperature and pressure in various points. The original results obtained are compared to results from two different analyses. We conclude that these models are not suitable to explain the experimental results. Then, we study a micro-cogeneration system based on an Ericsson engine coupled with a system of natural gas combustion. An Ericsson engine is a reciprocating engine working on a JOULE cycle. The objective of this plant is to produce 11 kW of electric output as well as useful heat. In order to design this system, we carried out energetic, exergetic and exergo-economic studies. (author)

  14. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven split-system cooling equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Schmelzer, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    DOE`s Federal Energy Management Program supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenditures within the federal sector; one such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP)(formerly the Test Bed Demonstration program), seeks to evaluate new energy saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the federal government. This report describes the field evaluation conducted to examine the performance of a 15-ton natural-gas-engine- driven, split-system, air-conditioning unit. The unit was installed at a multiple-use building at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, a regular and reserve training facility north of Philadelphia, and its performance was monitored under the NTDP.

  15. A Soft Sensor-Based Fault-Tolerant Control on the Air Fuel Ratio of Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air/fuel ratio (AFR regulation for spark-ignition (SI engines has been an essential and challenging control problem for engineers in the automotive industry. The feed-forward and feedback scheme has been investigated in both academic research and industrial application. The aging effect can often cause an AFR sensor fault in the feedback loop, and the AFR control performance will degrade consequently. In this research, a new control scheme on AFR with fault-tolerance is proposed by using an artificial neural network model based on fault detection and compensation, which can provide the satisfactory AFR regulation performance at the stoichiometric value for the combustion process, given a certain level of misreading of the AFR sensor.

  16. Analysis of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident in a Konvoi type NPP by GASFLOW and COCOSYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, Stefan; Royl, Peter [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Band, Sebastian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The 3D computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW and the German containment code system COCOSYS, which is based on a lumped-parameter approach, are used to simulate the hydrogen-air-steam distribution and hydrogen mitigation in a Konvoi type nuclear power plant in a postulated hypothetical core melt accident. A break in a coolant loop and the subsequent loss of the coolant causes a strong heat-up of the core. As a consequence hydrogen is produced by oxidation of cladding tubes. The residual steam and the produced hydrogen are released into the containment through the break in the coolant loop. Without suitable counter measures, sensitive mixtures can build up with a combustion potential which could threaten the integrity of the containment. A model of a Konvoi type nuclear power plant which is equipped with passive autocatalytic recombiners is used to simulate such accident scenario. COCOSYS allows comprehensive simulation of all relevant processes of severe accidents, whereas GASFLOW is primarily designed to simulate the distribution of steam and hydrogen within the containment. This paper presents the comparison of GASFLOW and COCOSYS simulation results for the in-vessel phase of the selected accident. (orig.)

  17. MATLAB/Simulink Framework for Modeling Complex Coolant Flow Configurations of Advanced Automotive Thermal Management Systems: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, Eugene; Lustbader, Jason; Leighton, Daniel; Kiss, Tibor

    2016-03-22

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) CoolSim MATLAB/Simulink modeling framework was extended by including a newly developed coolant loop solution method aimed at reducing the simulation effort for arbitrarily complex thermal management systems. The new approach does not require the user to identify specific coolant loops and their flow. The user only needs to connect the fluid network elements in a manner consistent with the desired schematic. Using the new solution method, a model of NREL's advanced combined coolant loop system for electric vehicles was created that reflected the test system architecture. This system was built using components provided by the MAHLE Group and included both air conditioning and heat pump modes. Validation with test bench data and verification with the previous solution method were performed for 10 operating points spanning a range of ambient temperatures between -2 degrees C and 43 degrees C. The largest root mean square difference between pressure, temperature, energy and mass flow rate data and simulation results was less than 7%.

  18. Toyota's heat management system - coolant heat storage for mass production today, new technologies for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichinose, Hiroki; Takaoka, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Hideo [Toyota Motor Corporation (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    There has been pressing needs for the protection of metropolitan environment and the challenge of global warming. A heat management system prevails to meet such requirements. In actual driving condition, only about 30% of the total fuel energy is consumed for propulsion and air conditioner. At the same time 60% of fuel energy is wasted as exhaust gas, thermal loss and warm up loss. It is important to manage total thermal energy as a whole vehicle to improve thermal efficiency. The principle is to reduce heat loss in order to increase exhaust gas temperature and recover heat energy for pre-heating at the next cold start. Further developed versions may include thermal management strategies including turbocharger and thermal exchanger using exhaust gas heat energy. Toyota has developed the Coolant Heat Storage system (CHSS) for one of heat management systems to reduce cold emission and improve cabin comfort. The system enables to store hot coolant at the warmed up condition in a heat storage tank. At the next cold start, it is possible for CHSS to reduce unburned hydrocarbon by preheating intake port quickly with the hot coolant in the tank. CHSS was adopted in hybrid vehicle Prius for the US model in 2003. This vehicle achieved to meet the ATPZEV,the most stringent emission regulation in the US. This paper describes a total heat management focusing on the newly developed CHSS.

  19. Hybrid method for numerical modelling of LWR coolant chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatla-Wojcik, Dorota

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive approach is proposed to model radiation chemistry of the cooling water under exposure to neutron and gamma radiation at 300 °C. It covers diffusion-kinetic processes in radiation tracks and secondary reactions in the bulk coolant. Steady-state concentrations of the radiolytic products have been assessed based on the simulated time dependent concentration profiles. The principal reactions contributing to the formation of H2, O2 and H2O2 were indicated. Simulation was carried out depending on the amount of extra hydrogen dissolved in the coolant to reduce concentration of corrosive agents. High sensitivity to the rate of reaction H+H2O=OH+H2 is shown and discussed.

  20. The conference of Russian Association of Engineers for Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning, Heat Supply and Building Thermal Physics (ABOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Yakubson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available On April, 11th, in Lenexpo the XVI conference of Russian Association of Engineers for Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning, Heat Supply and Building Thermal Physics (ABOK “Effective HVAC and Heat Supply Systems” took place. There were a lot of presentations of new equipment for building systems and networks. All these reports were dedicated to the ways to make buildings more comfortable for people, to increase the energy efficiency, to reduce expenses and to improve the production efficiency. But besides the specific equipment, there were some reports dedicated to more general problems in design, installation and maintenance of building systems and networks

  1. The main technical progress directions in air-jet engine design branch, which are worked out by the “Single theory of continuous flow propulsions”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Борис Шамшадович Мамедов

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main technical progress directions in air-jet engine design branch, which are worked out by the “Single theory of continuous flow propulsions” are highlighted. They are connected with providing the fly security by air-jet engines gas-dynamic work steady increasing with full elimination zone of rigid (spring stroke in the cross section B-B of the air-jet engines, with bypass turbojet engine’s thrust increasing with simultaneously fuel consumption lowering, with inlet and outlet decibel characteristic and radial dementias lowering, with high pressure compressor’s last working wheels blades increasing, with regulating law air-jet engine’s introduction to provide maximum thrust with the purpose of flying (thrust efficiency increasing

  2. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  3. Nonlinear torque and air-to-fuel ratio control of spark ignition engines using neuro-sliding mode techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting; Javaherian, Hossein; Liu, Derong

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the calibration and control of spark ignition engines using a combination of neural networks and sliding mode control technique. Two parallel neural networks are utilized to realize a neuro-sliding mode control (NSLMC) for self-learning control of automotive engines. The equivalent control and the corrective control terms are the outputs of the neural networks. Instead of using error backpropagation algorithm, the network weights of equivalent control are updated using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Moreover, a new approach is utilized to update the gain of corrective control. Both modifications of the NSLMC are aimed at improving the transient performance and speed of convergence. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we built neural network models for the engine torque (TRQ) and the air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) dynamics and developed NSLMC controllers to achieve tracking control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values under various operating conditions. From simulation studies, the feasibility and efficiency of the approach are illustrated. For both control problems, excellent tracking performance has been achieved.

  4. Air cargo: An Integrated Systems View. 1978 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program in Engineering Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaton, A. (Editor); Eastman, R. (Editor); Hargrove, A. (Editor); Rabiega, W. (Editor); Olsen, R. (Editor); Soberick, M. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The national air cargo system is analyzed and how it should be in 1990 is prescribed in order to operate successfully through 2015; that is through one equipment cycle. Elements of the system which are largely under control of the airlines and the aircraft manufacturers are discussed. The discussion deals with aircraft, networks, facilities, and procedures. The regulations which govern the movement of air freight are considered. The larger public policy interests which must be served by the kind of system proposed, the air cargo integrated system (ACIS), are addressed. The possible social, economical, political, and environment impacts of the system are considered. Recommendations are also given.

  5. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes an expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  6. Effect of coolant inhibitors on AZ91D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.M. Baghni; WU Yinshun; ZHANG Wei; LI Jiuqing

    2004-01-01

    The inhibition effects of sodium vanadate along with inorganic coolant inhibitors were examined on corrosion of AZ91D in ASTM D1384-80 corrosive water by polarization measurements. The galvanic corrosion of AZ91D coupled to 3003, 6063, and 356 Al alloys were also tested. An effective combination of inhibitors containing (but not limited to) sodium vanadate, silicate, and nitrate was proposed for inhibition of AZ91D and prevention of galvanic corrosion.

  7. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  8. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station. Final report (revised October 21, 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Katipamula, S.

    1996-10-01

    The performance was evaluated of a new US cooling technology that has been installed for the first time at a federal facility. The technology is a 15-ton natural gas-engine-driven rooftop air conditioning unit made by Thermo King. Two units were installed to serve the Navy Exchange at Willow Grove. The savings potential at Willow Grove is described and that in the federal sector estimated. Conditions for implementation are discussed. In summary, the new technology is generally cost-effective at sites where marginal electricity cost (per MBtu at the meter) is more than 4 times the marginal gas cost (per MBtu at the meter) and annual full-load-equivalent cooling hours exceed 2,000.

  9. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  10. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    The advent of an era of abundant natural gas is making it an increasingly economical fuel source against incumbents such as crude oil and coal, in end-use sectors such as power generation, transportation and industrial chemical production, while also offering significant environmental benefits over these incumbents. Equipment manufacturers, in turn, are responding to widespread demand for power plants optimized for operation with natural gas. In several applications such as distributed power generation, gas transmission, and water pumping, stationary, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) are the power plant of choice (over turbines) owing to their lower equipment and operational costs, higher thermal efficiencies across a wide load range, and the flexibility afforded to end-users when building fine-resolution horsepower topologies: modular size increments ranging from 100 kW -- 2 MW per ICE power plant compared to 2 -- 5 MW per turbine power plant. Under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (RICE NESHAP) air quality regulations, these natural gas power plants are required to comply with stringent emission limits, with several states mandating even stricter emissions norms. In the case of rich-burn or stoichiometric natural gas ICEs, very high levels of sustained emissions reduction can be achieved through exhaust after-treatment that utilizes Non Selective Catalyst Reduction (NSCR) systems. The primary operational constraint with these systems is the tight air-fuel ratio (AFR) window of operation that needs to be maintained if the NSCR system is to achieve simultaneous reduction of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH 2O). Most commercially available AFR controllers utilizing lambda (oxygen

  11. Environmental Assessment for Installation of a New Jet Engine Test Cell, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    airflow noise generated as the airframe passes through the air. The same noise sources are present with supersonic flights, but the aircraft are... ditches and retention ponds. Additionally, during construction of new facilities, Edwards AFB requires contractors to implement construction

  12. Affordable High Power Density Engine Designs for Personal Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Next generation General Aviation (GA) Sport Class air vehicles limited to 1200lbs, represent the first opportunity to overhaul the FAA certification process...

  13. An Integrated Heavy Fuel Piston Engine Ducted Fan Propulsion Unit for Personal Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed PAVE propulsion system technology demonstration combines an innovative high-speed aero-diesel engine with a novel ducted fan assembly resulting in a low...

  14. Correlation of Cooling Data from an Air-Cooled Cylinder and Several Multicylinder Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1940-01-01

    The theory of engine-cylinder cooling developed in a previous report was further substantiated by data obtained on a cylinder from a Wright r-1820-g engine. Equations are presented for the average head and barrel temperatures of this cylinder as functions of the engine and the cooling conditions. These equations are utilized to calculate the variation in cylinder temperature with altitude for level flight and climb. A method is presented for correlating average head and barrel temperatures and temperatures at individual points on the head and the barrel obtained on the test stand and in flight. The method is applied to the correlation and the comparison of data obtained on a number of service engines. Data are presented showing the variation of cylinder temperature with time when the power and the cooling pressure drop are suddenly changed.

  15. An Integrated Heavy Fuel Piston Engine Ducted Fan Propulsion Unit for Personal Air Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed PAVE propulsion system technology demonstration combines an innovative high-speed aero-diesel engine with a novel ducted fan assembly resulting in a...

  16. Source Term Analysis for Reactor Coolant System with Consideration of Fuel Burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Jong; Ahn, Joon Gi; Hwang, Hae Ryong [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The radiation source terms in reactor coolant system (RCS) of pressurized water reactor (PWR) are basic design information for ALARA design such as radiation protection and shielding. Usually engineering companies own self-developed computer codes to estimate the source terms in RCS. DAMSAM and FIPCO are the codes developed by engineering companies. KEPCO E and C has developed computer code, RadSTAR, for use in the Radiation Source Term Analysis for Reactor coolant system during normal operation. The characteristics of RadSTAR are as follows. (1) RadSTAR uses fuel inventory data calculated by ORIGEN, such as ORIGEN2 or ORIGEN-S to consider effects of the fuel burnup. (2) RadSTAR estimates fission products by using finite differential method and analytic method to minimize numerical error. (3) RadSTAR enhances flexibility by adding the function to build the nuclide data library (production pathway library) for user-defined nuclides from ORIGEN data library. (4) RadSTAR consists of two modules. RadSTAR-BL is to build the nuclide data library. RadSTAR-ST is to perform numerical analysis on source terms. This paper includes descriptions on the numerical model, the buildup of nuclide data library, and the sensitivity analysis and verification of RadSTAR. KEPCO E and C developed RadSTAR to calculate source terms in RCS during normal operation. Sensitivity analysis and accuracy verification showed that RadSTAR keeps stability at Δt of 0.1 day and gives more accurate results in comparison with DAMSAM. After development, RadSTAR will replace DAMSAM. The areas, necessary to further development of RadSTAR, are addition of source term calculations for activation products and for shutdown operation.

  17. [Microbiological quality of indoor air at the School of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butarewicz, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of microbiological rate of indoor air pollution on Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology were made by sedimentation method in accordance with Polish standards (PN-89/Z-04111/01,02,03). Six series of measurements were carried out from autumn 2002 to spring 2003. The results show bad microbiological quality of indoor air on Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering at Białystok University of Technology. It was found that the number of Staphylococcus, Actinomycetales as well as the total count of bacteria were too high and broke the Polish regulations of the clear air. Because of the students' and other workers' safety, monitoring of microbiological pollution of the indoor air must be done and existing emergency to improve the quality of the air must be lead.

  18. Variable cooling circuit for thermoelectric generator and engine and method of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Gregory P

    2012-10-30

    An apparatus is provided that includes an engine, an exhaust system, and a thermoelectric generator (TEG) operatively connected to the exhaust system and configured to allow exhaust gas flow therethrough. A first radiator is operatively connected to the engine. An openable and closable engine valve is configured to open to permit coolant to circulate through the engine and the first radiator when coolant temperature is greater than a predetermined minimum coolant temperature. A first and a second valve are controllable to route cooling fluid from the TEG to the engine through coolant passages under a first set of operating conditions to establish a first cooling circuit, and from the TEG to a second radiator through at least some other coolant passages under a second set of operating conditions to establish a second cooling circuit. A method of controlling a cooling circuit is also provided.

  19. Groundwater remediation engineering--Study on the flow distribution of air sparging using acetylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan-mei; ZHANG Ying; HUANG Guo-qiang; JIANG Bin; LI Xin-gang

    2005-01-01

    Air sparging(AS) is an emerging method to remove VOCs from saturated soils and groundwater. Air sparging performance highly depends on the air distribution resulting in the aquifer. In order to study gas flow characterization, a two-dimensional experimental chamber was designed and installed. In addition, the method by using acetylene as the tracer to directly image the gas distribution results of AS process has been put forward. Experiments were performed with different injected gas flow rates. The gas flow patterns were found to depend significantly on the injected gas flow rate, and the characterization of gas flow distributions in porous media was very different from the acetylene tracing study. Lower and higher gas flow rates generally yield more irregular in shape and less effective gas distributions.

  20. Corrosion fatigue studies on F82H mod. martensitic steel in reducing water coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maday, M.F.; Masci, A. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia

    1998-03-01

    Load-controlled low cycle fatigue tests have been carried out on F82H martensitic steel in 240degC oxygen-free water with and without dissolved hydrogen, in order to simulate realistic coolant boundary conditions to be approached in DEMO. It was found that water independently of its hydrogen content, determined the same fatigue life reduction compared to the base-line air results. Water cracks exhibited in their first propagation stages similar fracture morphologies which were completely missing on the air cracks, and were attributed to the action of an environment related component. Lowering frequency gave rise to an increase in F82H fatigue lifetimes without any change in cracking mode in air, and to fatigue life reduction by microvoid coalescence alone in water. The data were discussed in terms of (i) frequency dependent concurrent processes for crack initiation and (ii) frequency-dependent competitive mechanisms for crack propagation induced by cathodic hydrogen from F82H corrosion. (author)

  1. High-Altitude Flight Cooling Investigation of a Radial Air-Cooled Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-08-01

    The charge-air weight flow was measured during flight by venturi meters installed in the two parallel lines between tileintercooler and car?nmetor...pressure was measured by a shrouded total-head tubo installed on a streamline loom on the right wi~ tip. A swiveling static tube, which was calibrated in a

  2. Scientist and Engineer Career Patterns for Air Force Civilians and Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Wendy Campbell, Colonel T. Jan Cerveny, Mr. John Miner, and Mr. Scott Petroski . vii AU/ACSC/029/1999-04 Abstract Technology will play a critical role in...Commanding General of the Army Air Forces (AAF), General of the Army Henry Harley “Hap” Arnold, was integral in his decision to activate the AAF Scientific

  3. An Analysis of Turnover Intentions: A Reexamination of Air Force Civil Engineering Company Grade Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), shopping privileges at the commissary (military grocery store), and free access to gym facilities. Mitchell et al...of sex on intent and actual job changes. Human Relations, 46, 987-1006. Werbel, J. D., & Bedeian, A. G. (1989). Intended turnover as a function of

  4. A Systems Engineering Approach to Analyzing Weather Input Sensitivities of the Joint Precision Air Drop System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    British airborne troops “watched in despair as thirty-five Stirling bomber-cargo planes dropped supplies everywhere but on the [drop] zones. Of eighty...must fly the aircraft to a specific point in the sky , known as the Computed Air Release Point (CARP). The CARP is calculated using variables such as

  5. Turnover Intentions: A Qualitative Analysis of Comments from Air Force Civil Engineering Company Grade Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Numbered AF, and MAJCOM CCs. Our inputs as engineers seem to hold little weight beyond our doors. As a result, we’re running like chickens with our...and was given antibiotics . The symptoms cleared up within a week. I spent a month dealing with being sick for nothing essentially. At my last base, I

  6. Under actuated air path control of diesel engines for low emissions and high efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Criens, C.; Willems, F.P.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for feedback control using the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve and Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT) of a diesel engine. The controller effectively counteracts disturbances in NOx and PM emissions while maintaining the fuel efficiency. It is shown that by using a

  7. Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

    1991-11-01

    The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

  8. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  9. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998–2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  10. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal stability during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, D B; Hill, R C; Wensel, R G

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from an investigation into the behavior of Reactor Coolant Pump shaft seals during a potential station blackout (loss of all ac power) at a nuclear power plant. The investigation assumes loss of cooling to the seals and focuses on the effect of high temperature on polymer seals located in the shaft seal assemblies, and the identification of parameters having the most influence on overall hydraulic seal performance. Predicted seal failure thresholds are presented for a range of station blackout conditions and shaft seal geometries.

  11. Effects of diluent admissions and intake air temperature in exhaust gas recirculation on the emissions of an indirect injection dual fuel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-Alla, G.H.; Soliman, H.A.; Badr, O.A.; Abd-Rabbo, M.F. [Zagazig University, Cairo (Egypt). Shoubra Faculty of Engineering

    2001-05-01

    The operation of Diesel engines on gaseous fuels, commonly known as dual fuel engines, uses Diesel fuel as the pilot fuel and gaseous fuel (methane and sometimes propane in the present work) as the main fuel. The gaseous fuel was inducted in the intake manifold to mix with the intake air. The investigation was conducted on a high speed indirect injection (Ricardo-E6) dual fuel engine and was concerned with the effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the dual fuel engine combustion and emissions, in particular, the effects of intake air temperature and diluent admissions (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) on combustion and emissions. The use of diluents to displace oxygen (O{sub 2}) in the intake air resulted in a reduction in the O{sub 2} supplied to the engine, increased the inlet charge thermal capacity (thermal effect) and, potentially, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} participated in the combustion process (chemical effect). In a separate series of tests, the temperature of the engine inlet charge was raised gradually in order to simulate the effect of mixing hot EGR with the engine inlet gaseous fuel air mixture. It was found that the admission of diluents resulted in reductions in the exhaust oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}). Higher inlet charge temperature increases the exhaust NO{sub x} but reduces the unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Finally, when carbon dioxide was added to the inlet gaseous fuel air charge, large reductions in NO{sub x} were observed. (author)

  12. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  13. Engineering an in vitro air-blood barrier by 3D bioprinting

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Intensive efforts in recent years to develop and commercialize in vitro alternatives in the field of risk assessment have yielded new promising two- and three dimensional (3D) cell culture models. Nevertheless, a realistic 3D in vitro alveolar model is not available yet. Here we report on the biofabrication of the human air-blood tissue barrier analogue composed of an endothelial cell, basement membrane and epithelial cell layer by using a bioprinting technology. In contrary to the manual met...

  14. Assessment of Current and Future Air Pollutant Emission Reduction Technologies for Marine Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ship (MARPOL 73/78) Annex VI regulate management of air pollutant emissions, namely Nitrogen Oxides ( NOx ...of these technologies are designed to control emissions of Nitrogen Oxides ( NOx ) and Sulphur Oxides (SOx) that are regulated internationally and...undergoes ultra-low frequency electrolysis to increase NOx absorption capability and then is pumped through the exhaust stack to scrub emissions of SOx

  15. Improvement of emissions and performance by using of air jet, exhaust gas re-circulation and insulation methods in a direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarmadara S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the improvement of operation characteristics and emissions reduction by means of creating an air-cell inside the piston body, exhaust gases recirculating and insulating combustion chamber in a direct injection diesel engine simultaneously. The engine considered is a caterpillar 3401 which was modeled with an air-cell included as part of the piston geometry. This air-cell demonstrates that air injection in late combustion period can be effective in a significant reduction of Soot emission while cold EGR can be effective in reduction of NOx emission. Also for increasing of performance parameters, combustion chamber with air-cell is insulated. The analyses are carried out at part (75% of full load and full load conditions at the same engine speed 1600 rpm. The obtained results indicate that creating the air-cell has a slight effect on improvement of performance parameters and it has significantly effect on Soot reduction. The air-cell decreases the Soot pollutant as a factor of two at both part and full load conditions. Also, the adding 5% of cold EGR in inlet air decreases NOx by about half and insulating the engine increases the power and IMEP by about 7.7% and 8.5% and decreases the ISFC by about 7.5% at part load and increases power and IMEP by 8.5%, 8.5% and decreases ISFC by 8% at full load condition, respectively. Using this method, it was possible to control emissions formation and increase performance parameters simultaneously. The predicted results for mean in-cylinder pressure and emissions are compared to the corresponding experimental results and show good agreements.

  16. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a radial air flow discharged from the compressor section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, David A.; McQuiggan, Gerard; Wasdell, David L.

    2016-10-25

    A midframe portion (213) of a gas turbine engine (210) is presented, and includes a compressor section (212) configured to discharge an air flow (211) directed in a radial direction from an outlet of the compressor section (212). Additionally, the midframe portion (213) includes a manifold (214) to directly couple the air flow (211) from the compressor section (212) outlet to an inlet of a respective combustor head (218) of the midframe portion (213).

  17. Decision Support Model to Evaluate Methods for Reducing Air Pollution Emissions during Jet Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Enine Control O&M CT o RD Modifications Technoloy R&D EM R&D CT Ac aEM Cost O CT Cst Cost Cost Costo (Baseli nmoe) No Change No Change High High High...intelligent person who wants to think hard and systematically about an important real problem (Kenney and Raiffa, 1993: xv). Some additional discussion of...Programs, Langley AFB VA. Personal interview. 13 April 1995. Canfield, Alan. Environmental Engineer, Applied Research Associates, Inc, Tyndall AFB FL

  18. A Computer Engineering Curriculum for the Air Force Academy: An Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    engineerinq is needed as a r ul of the findings? 5. What is the impact of this study’s rocommendat ion to pursue the Electrico I Engineering deqree with onpt...stepper motor 9 S35 LAB 36 Serial 10 S37 GR #3 - 38 8251 10 chip ) 39 LAB serial 10 10 * 40 LAB " 1)41 LAB S 42 Course review - S FINAL EXAM 00 % 80 0

  19. Effects of fuel and air mixing on WOT output in direct injection gasoline engine; Chokufun gasoline kikan ni okeru nenryo to kuki no kongo to shutsuryoku seino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, T.; Iriya, Y.; Naito, K.; Mitsumoto, H.; Iiyama, A. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The effects of in-cylinder charge motion and the characteristics of the fuel spray and piston crown shape on WOT output in a direct injection gasoline engine are investigated. The fuel and air mixing process in a cylinder is analyzed by computer simulation and LIF method visualization. As a result, the technical factors to achieve enough mixing in a DI gasoline engine equipped with bowl in piston optimized for stratified combustion are clarified. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  1. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

  2. Numerical simulation of nanosecond pulsed DBD in lean methane-air mixture for typical conditions in internal engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takana, Hidemasa; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2014-06-01

    Detailed two-dimensional numerical simulations of a high energy loading nanosecond dc pulse DBD in a lean methane-air mixture were conducted for plasma-assisted combustion by integrating individual models of plasma chemistry, photoionization and energy loading. The DBD streamer propagation process with radical productions was clarified at 10 atm and 600 K as under the condition of actual internal engines at ignition. Energy is loaded to the streamer first by the formation of plasma channel and then ceased due to the self-shielding effect. Because of the inversed electric field in a discharge space during decrease in applied voltage, energy is loaded to the discharge again. It was found that higher energy is loaded to the DBD streamer for larger dielectric constant even at lower applied voltage, and higher number density of oxygen radical is produced at almost the same radical production efficiency.

  3. Aqueous Nanofluid as a Two-Phase Coolant for PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel N. Alekseev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Density fluctuations in liquid water consist of two topological kinds of instant molecular clusters. The dense ones have helical hydrogen bonds and the nondense ones are tetrahedral clusters with ice-like hydrogen bonds of water molecules. Helical ordering of protons in the dense water clusters can participate in coherent vibrations. The ramified interface of such incompatible structural elements induces clustering impurities in any aqueous solution. These additives can enhance a heat transfer of water as a two-phase coolant for PWR due to natural forming of nanoparticles with a thermal conductivity higher than water. The aqueous nanofluid as a new condensed matter has a great potential for cooling applications. It is a mixture of liquid water and dispersed phase of extremely fine quasi-solid particles usually less than 50 nm in size with the high thermal conductivity. An alternative approach is the formation of gaseous (oxygen or hydrogen nanoparticles in density fluctuations of water. It is possible to obtain stable nanobubbles that can considerably exceed the molecular solubility of oxygen (hydrogen in water. Such a nanofluid can convert the liquid water in the nonstoichiometric state and change its reduction-oxidation (RedOx potential similarly to adding oxidants (or antioxidants for applying 2D water chemistry to aqueous coolant.

  4. Station blackout with reactor coolant pump seal leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evinay, A. (Southern California Edison, Irvine, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended its regulations in 10CFR50 with the addition of a new section, 50.63, [open quotes]Loss of All Alternating Current Power.[close quotes] The objective of these requirements is to ensure that all nuclear plants have the capability to withstand a station blackout (SBO) and maintain adequate reactor core cooling and containment integrity for a specified period of time. The NRC also issued Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.155, [open quotes]Station Blackout,[close quotes] to provide guidance for meeting the requirements of 10CFR50.63. Concurrent with RG-1.155, the Nuclear Utility Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) has developed NUMARC 87-00 to address SBO-coping duration and capabilities at light water reactors. Licensees are required to submit a topical report based on NUMARC 87-00 guidelines, to demonstrate compliance with the SBO rule. One of the key compliance criteria is the ability of the plant to maintain adequate reactor coolant system (RCS) inventory to ensure core cooling for the required coping duration, assuming a leak rate of 25 gal/min per reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal in addition to technical specification (TS) leak rate.

  5. Fitness for service assessment of coolant channels of Indian PHWRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, R. K.; Sinha, S. K.; Madhusoodanan, K.

    2008-12-01

    A typical coolant channel assembly of pressurised heavy water reactors mainly consists of pressure tube, calandria tube, garter spring spacers, all made of zirconium alloys and end fittings made of SS 403. The pressure tube is rolled at both its ends to the end fittings and is located concentrically inside the calandria tube with the help of garter spring spacers. Pressure tube houses the fuel bundles, which are cooled by means of pressurised heavy water. It, thus, operates under the environment of high pressure and temperature (typically 10 MPa and 573 K), and fast neutron flux (typically 3 × 10 17 n/m 2 s, E > 1 MeV neutrons). Under this operating environment, the material of the pressure tube undergoes degradation over a period of time, and eventually needs to be assessed for fitness for continued operation, without jeopardising the safety of the reactor. The other components of the coolant channel assembly, which are inaccessible for any in-service inspection, are assessed for their fitness, whenever a pressure tube is removed for either surveillance purpose or any other reasons. This paper, while describing the latest developments taking place to address the issue of fitness for service of the Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tubes, also dwells briefly upon the developments taken place, to address the issues of life management and extension of zircaloy-2 pressure tubes in the earlier generation of Indian pressurised heavy water reactors.

  6. Fitness for service assessment of coolant channels of Indian PHWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R.K.; Sinha, S.K. [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Madhusoodanan, K. [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: kmadhu@barc.gov.in

    2008-12-15

    A typical coolant channel assembly of pressurised heavy water reactors mainly consists of pressure tube, calandria tube, garter spring spacers, all made of zirconium alloys and end fittings made of SS 403. The pressure tube is rolled at both its ends to the end fittings and is located concentrically inside the calandria tube with the help of garter spring spacers. Pressure tube houses the fuel bundles, which are cooled by means of pressurised heavy water. It, thus, operates under the environment of high pressure and temperature (typically 10 MPa and 573 K), and fast neutron flux (typically 3 x 10{sup 17} n/m{sup 2} s, E > 1 MeV neutrons). Under this operating environment, the material of the pressure tube undergoes degradation over a period of time, and eventually needs to be assessed for fitness for continued operation, without jeopardising the safety of the reactor. The other components of the coolant channel assembly, which are inaccessible for any in-service inspection, are assessed for their fitness, whenever a pressure tube is removed for either surveillance purpose or any other reasons. This paper, while describing the latest developments taking place to address the issue of fitness for service of the Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tubes, also dwells briefly upon the developments taken place, to address the issues of life management and extension of zircaloy-2 pressure tubes in the earlier generation of Indian pressurised heavy water reactors.

  7. Cold neutron tomography of annular coolant flow in a double subchannel model of a boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhofel, J. L.; Zboray, R.; Damsohn, M.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E. H.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2011-09-01

    Dryout of the liquid coolant film on fuel pins at the top of boiling water reactor (BWR) cores constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is a limiting factor in the thermal power, and therefore the economy, of BWRs. Ongoing research on multiphase annular flow, specifically the liquid film thickness, is fundamental not only to nuclear reactor safety and operation but also to that of evaporators, condensers, and pipelines in a general industrial context. We have performed cold neutron tomography of adiabatic air water annular flow in a scaled up model of the subchannel geometry found in BWR fuel assemblies today. All imaging has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Neutron tomography is shown to excel in investigating the interactions of air water two phase flows with spacer vanes of different geometry. The high resolution, high contrast measurements provide spatial distributions of the coolant on top of the surfaces of the spacer, including the vanes, and in the subchannel downstream of the spacers.

  8. Adsorption onto activated carbons in environmental engineering: some trends in water and air treatment processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Cloirec, P. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, 44 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Adsorption is commonly used in environmental protection processes and particularly in water and air treatment systems. Organic pollutants in aqueous or gaseous phases are transferred and adsorbed onto porous materials. Activated carbon (powder, grains) treatment is usually carried out and filters are used to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC), odors or micropollutants. The main objectives of this paper are to present examples of classical or new activated carbon processes used in drinking water production, wastewater purification or in air treatment in terms of processes, performances and modeling. - Water treatment: Micropollutants such as pesticides, herbicides... are classically removed by activated carbon granular systems in drinking water treatment plants. In order to get a good water quality and to safe money, the breakthrough time has to be accurately determined. Models with mass balance and transfer equations are proposed. However, some difficulties are found especially for complex solutions to get good agreement between experimental data and calculated values. A statistical approach using neural networks is proposed to simulate breakthrough curves. Examples are presented and compared to deterministic models. In order to intensify processes, a combination of ultrafiltration and activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) is presented to remove the large spectra of particles and organic molecules present in water. Systems (UF/ACFC) for surface water and industrial colored wastewater are applied and performances are determined as a function of operating conditions. - Air treatment: Activated carbon grain filters are used to control VOC emissions. Due to an exothermic reaction, an increase of local temperature in the reactor is noted and some fire accidents have been reported. For safety technologies, this temperature has to be previously determined. A model is proposed to simulate the breakthrough curves and temperatures

  9. Seconds Before Disaster. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 14, Number 1, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    drill. The light cans were then installed in PVC liners and encased in concrete. This gave a very clean result that didn’t require patching around...anti-personnel mine, designed to blow up not when weight is put on it, but when it is removed. As he stepped off the mine, it exploded, blowing off...young NCO develop and practice those quality Air Force traits. Those traits molded my son into an outstanding NCO with a bright future,” CMSgt

  10. Indoor test for thermal performance evaluation on life sciences engineering (air) solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The test procedure used and the results obtained from an evaluation test program conducted to obtain thermal performance data on a life sciences double-glazed air solar collector under simulated conditions is discussed. These tests were made using the Marshall Space Flight Center's solar simulator. A time constant test and incident angle modifier test were also conducted to determine the transient effect and the incident angle effect on the collector. These results and the results of the collector load test are also discussed.

  11. Research on laser melting-alloying combined strengthening of the camshaft of air-cooled diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin; Zhao, Haiyun; Zhang, Hongjun; Zhang, Weimin; Huang, Guoqing

    1996-04-01

    This paper reported the research results on 3 kw cw CO2 laser melting-alloying combined strengthening of the camshaft of air-cooled diesel engine used in the desert oil field. The 45 steel camshaft was pretreated with the conventional quenching and high temperature tempering. A focused laser beam with power density 1.5 - 1.7 X 104 w/cm2 was used to alloy the cam lobe area, while the other area of the cam was treated by laser melting using a focused 12 X 1.5 mm rectangular beam (power density 1.1 X 104 w/cm2) produced by a newly developed binary optics. The microstructure of the laser alloyed region is fine Fe-Cr-Si-B multi-element hypereutectic structure with hardness HRC 63 - 64. The melted layer consists of fine needle-shaped martensite and residual austenite structure with hardness HRC 58 - 61. The strengthened layer is 1.0 - 1.3 mm in thickness with pore-free and crack-free and good surface quality. Under the same condition, the Ring-block (SiN ceramic) wear test proves that the wear of the laser alloyed 45 steel ring is only 29 percent of that of induction quenching 45 steel ring. And a 500 hours test engine experiment demonstrates that the average wear of the laser alloyed cam is only 20 percent of that of induction quenched one.

  12. Analysis and Design of a Dish/Stirling System for Solar Electric Generation with a 2.7 kW Air-Cooled Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán-Chacón R.; Velázquez-Limón N.; Sauceda-Carvajal D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical modeling, simulation and design of a solar power system of a parabolic dish with an air-cooled Stirling engine of 2.7 kW. The model used for the solar concentrator, the cavity and the Stirling engine were successfully validated against experimental data. Based on a parametric study, the design of the components of the engine is carried out. The study shows that as system capacity increases, the overall efficiency is limited by the power required by the fan, ...

  13. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with an improved rotation of air flow from the compressor to the turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, David A.; Schilp, Reinhard; Ross, Christopher W.

    2016-03-22

    A midframe portion (313) of a gas turbine engine (310) is presented and includes a compressor section with a last stage blade to orient an air flow (311) at a first angle (372). The midframe portion (313) further includes a turbine section with a first stage blade to receive the air flow (311) oriented at a second angle (374). The midframe portion (313) further includes a manifold (314) to directly couple the air flow (311) from the compressor section to a combustor head (318) upstream of the turbine section. The combustor head (318) introduces an offset angle in the air flow (311) from the first angle (372) to the second angle (374) to discharge the air flow (311) from the combustor head (318) at the second angle (374). While introducing the offset angle, the combustor head (318) at least maintains or augments the first angle (372).

  14. SIMMER-III Analyses of Local Fuel-Coolant Interactions in a Simulated Molten Fuel Pool: Effect of Coolant Quantity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songbai Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on local fuel-coolant interactions (FCI in a molten pool are important for the analyses of severe accidents that could occur for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs. To clarify the mechanisms underlying this interaction, in recent years, several experimental tests, with comparatively larger difference in coolant volumes, were conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency by delivering a given quantity of water into a molten pool formed with a low-melting-point alloy. In this study, to further understand this interaction, interaction characteristics including the pressure buildup as well as mechanical energy release and its conversion efficiency are investigated using the SIMMER-III, an advanced fast reactor safety analysis code. It is found that the SIMMER-III code not only reasonably simulates the transient pressure and temperature variations during local FCIs, but also supports the limited tendency of pressurization and resultant mechanical energy release as observed from experiments when the volume of water delivered into the pool increases. The performed analyses also suggest that the most probable reason leading to such limited tendency should be primarily due to an isolation effect of vapor bubbles generated at the water-melt interface.

  15. Air and blood fluid dynamics: at the interface between engineering and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, A.; Secretain, F.; Milne, B.

    2014-08-01

    The flows in the human upper airway and human heart during open heart surgery are considered. Beginning with idealized models of the human upper airway, current methods to extract realistic airway geometries using a novel implementation of optical coherent tomography modality are introduced. Complementary direct numerical simulations are considered that will assist in pre-surgery planning for obstructive sleep apnea. Cardiac air bubbles often arise during open heart surgery. These bubbles are potential emboli that can cause neurological impairment and even death. An experimental programme is outlined that uses acoustic sound to instil bubble surface oscillations that result in bubble breakup. A novel algorithm is introduced that enables a surgical team to obtain real-time in-vivo bubble data to aid cardiac de-airation procedures.

  16. Engineering characteristics of Ankara Greywacke under the foundation of the Beytepe open air theatre, Ankara, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, H.; Gurkan, B.; Sonmez, B.

    2008-08-01

    The construction of a large open air theatre having with an audience capacity of 7,000 is planned at the Beytepe Campus of Hacettepe University located near Ankara, Turkey, in the heart of Anatolia. The foundation of the open air theatre is composed of weak and heavily jointed Ankara Greywacke. An estimation of the strength and deformation of the Ankara Greywacke was required for assessments of short- and long-term stability. Accordingly, rock mass characterization of the Ankara Greywacke was investigated in detail by scan-line surveys and back-analyses of in situ tests performed on the excavated surface of the rock mass. The final version of the Hoek and Brown Criterion (Hoek et al., In: Proceedings of the north American rock mechanics society meeting, Toronto, Canada, pp 1 6, 2002) together with and improvements proposed by Sonmez and Gokceoglu (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci, 43:671 676, 2006) were considered together for the back analyses of small slope benches subjected to plate loading test loaded to failure. In addition, the plate loading test data were used with some well-known empirical equations for predicting of deformation modulus of rock masses to calculate ranges of values of the Geological Strength Index (GSI) The static and pseudostatic slope stabilities of the audience seating structures to be supported by benches excavated into the rock were also analyzed. The stability assessments revealed the unlikelihood of large rock mass failures for the short-term construction stages or for the long-term, as-constructed conditions under static or pseudo-static conditions. Additionally, the analyses showed that there was no need for anchors between the concrete seating structures and greywacke rock mass.

  17. Improvement of Measurement Accuracy of Coolant Flow in a Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Kim, Jong-Bum; Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seoyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, to improve the measurement accuracy of coolant flow in a coolant flow simulator, elimination of external noise are enhanced by adding ground pattern in the control panel and earth around signal cables. In addition, a heating unit is added to strengthen the fluctuation signal by heating the coolant because the source of signals are heat energy. Experimental results using the improved system shows good agreement with the reference flow rate. The measurement error is reduced dramatically compared with the previous measurement accuracy and it will help to analyze the performance of nuclear fuels. For further works, out of pile test will be carried out by fabricating a test rig mockup and inspect the feasibility of the developed system. To verify the performance of a newly developed nuclear fuel, irradiation test needs to be carried out in the research reactor and measure the irradiation behavior such as fuel temperature, fission gas release, neutron dose, coolant temperature, and coolant flow rate. In particular, the heat generation rate of nuclear fuels can be measured indirectly by measuring temperature variation of coolant which passes by the fuel rod and its flow rate. However, it is very difficult to measure the flow rate of coolant at the fuel rod owing to the narrow gap between components of the test rig. In nuclear fields, noise analysis using thermocouples in the test rig has been applied to measure the flow velocity of coolant which circulates through the test loop.

  18. Dynamic Analysis of Coolant Channel and Its Internals of Indian 540 MWe PHWR Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dharmaraju

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal coolant channel is one of the important parts of primary heat transport system in PHWR type of reactors. There are in all 392 channels in the core of Indian 540 MWe reactor. Each channel houses 13 natural uranium fuel bundles and shielding and sealing plugs one each on either side of the channel. The heavy water coolant flows through the coolant channel and carries the nuclear heat to outside the core for steam generation and power production in the turbo-generator. India has commissioned one 540 MWe PHWR reactor in September 2005 and another similar unit will be going into operation very shortly. For a complete dynamic study of the channel and its internals under the influence of high coolant flow, experimental and modeling studies have been carried out. A good correlation has been achieved between the results of experimental and analytical models. The operating life of a typical coolant channel typically ranges from 10 to 15 full-power years. Towards the end of its operating life, its health monitoring becomes an important activity. Vibration diagnosis plays an important role as a tool for life management of coolant. Through the study of dynamic characteristics of the coolant channel under simulated loading condition, an attempt has been made to develop a diagnostics to monitor the health of the coolant channel over its operating life. A study has been also carried out to characterize the fuel vibration under different flow condition.

  19. Cycle-by-cycle Variations in a Direct Injection Hydrogen Enriched Compressed Natural Gas Engine Employing EGR at Relative Air-Fuel Ratios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan Wasiu Saheed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the pressure development in a combustion chamber is uniquely related to the combustion process, substantial variations in the combustion process on a cycle-by-cycle basis are occurring. To this end, an experimental study of cycle-by-cycle variation in a direct injection spark ignition engine fueled with natural gas-hydrogen blends combined with exhaust gas recirculation at relative air-fuel ratios was conducted. The impacts of relative air-fuel ratios (i.e. λ = 1.0, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4 which represent stoichiometric, moderately lean, lean and very lean mixtures respectively, hydrogen fractions and EGR rates were studied. The results showed that increasing the relative air-fuel ratio increases the COVIMEP. The behavior is more pronounced at the larger relative air-fuel ratios. More so, for a specified EGR rate; increasing the hydrogen fractions decreases the maximum COVIMEP value just as increasing in EGR rates increases the maximum COVIMEP value. (i.e. When percentage EGR rates is increased from 0% to 17% and 20% respectively. The maximum COVIMEP value increases from 6.25% to 6.56% and 8.30% respectively. Since the introduction of hydrogen gas reduces the cycle-by-cycle combustion variation in engine cylinder; thus it can be concluded that addition of hydrogen into direct injection compressed natural gas engine employing EGR at various relative air-fuel ratios is a viable approach to obtain an improved combustion quality which correspond to lower coefficient of variation in imep, (COVIMEP in a direct injection compressed natural gas engine employing EGR at relative air-fuel ratios.

  20. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  1. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. SIMMER-III applications to fuel-coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Kondo, Sa.; Tobita, Y.; Brear, D.J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the SIMMER-III code is to provide a numerical simulation of complex multiphase, multicomponent flow problems essential to investigate core disruptive accidents in liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). However, the code is designed to be sufficiently flexible to be applied to a variety of multiphase flows, in addition to LMFR safety issues. In the present study, some typical experiments relating to fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs) have been analyzed by SIMMER-III to demonstrate that the code is applicable to such complex and highly transient multiphase flow situations. It is shown that SIMMER-III can reproduce the premixing phase both in water and sodium systems as well as the propagation of steam explosion. It is thus demonstrated the code is basically capable of simulating integral multiphase thermal-hydraulic problems included in FCI experiments. (author)

  3. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meier, W. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jolodosky, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frantoni, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reyes, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  4. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittmer, C.A.; Wensel, R.G.; Rhodes, D.B.; Metcalfe, R.; Cotnam, B.M.; Gentili, H.; Mings, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    A testing program designed to provide fundamental information pertaining to the behavior of reactor coolant pump (RCP) shaft seals during a postulated nuclear power plant station blackout has been completed. One seal assembly, utilizing both hydrodynamic and hydrostatic types of seals, was modeled and tested. Extrusion tests were conducted to determine if seal materials could withstand predicted temperatures and pressures. A taper-face seal model was tested for seal stability under conditions when leaking water flashes to steam across the seal face. Test information was then used as the basis for a station blackout analysis. Test results indicate a potential problem with an elastomer material used for O-rings by a pump vendor; that vendor is considering a change in material specification. Test results also indicate a need for further research on the generic issue of RCP seal integrity and its possible consideration for designation as an unresolved safety issue.

  5. An introduction to the engineering of fast nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Anthony M

    2014-01-01

    An invaluable resource for both graduate-level engineering students and practising nuclear engineers who want to expand their knowledge of fast nuclear reactors, the reactors of the future! This book is a concise yet comprehensive introduction to all aspects of fast reactor engineering. It covers topics including neutron physics; neutron flux spectra; flux distribution; Doppler and coolant temperature coefficients; the performance of ceramic and metal fuels under irradiation, structural changes, and fission-product migration; the effects of irradiation and corrosion on structural materials, irradiation swelling; heat transfer in the reactor core and its effect on core design; coolants including sodium and lead-bismuth alloy; coolant circuits; pumps; heat exchangers and steam generators; and plant control. The book includes new discussions on lead-alloy and gas coolants, metal fuel, the use of reactors to consume radioactive waste, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems.

  6. Design and characteristics of electric supercharger for diesel engine acceleration by additional rapid air injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Chun-de; ZHOU Hong-xiu

    2006-01-01

    The ES (electric supercharger) driven by a high-speed brushless motor was developed to solve the problem of smoke caused by the turbocharger's sluggish response during acceleration.Its rotation speed was from 6 000 r/min to 24 000 r/min,and the maximum flux was 0.1 kg/s.The structural design of the electric supercharger is novel,which makes it easier to set the lubricating installation and to assemble.The velocity distribution at the outlet of the electric supercharger is determined by hot-wire anemometry under various rotation speeds in steady state.Furthermore,the trends of the flux and charge rate with various speeds were analyzed.In addition,the transient response was detected from the motor setup to smooth running within 10 s,15 s,20 s and 25 s respectively,and the characteristic of the transient flux is under pilot study.Research results indicate that the electric supercharger can respond rapidly with the great flux,and it is independent of the operating conditions of a diesel engine.Therefore,it is a feasible way to reduce smoke emission and improve the acceleration performance.

  7. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, M.F., E-mail: mfchiang@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Lungtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Young, M.C.; Huang, J.Y. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Lungtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  8. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, M. F.; Young, M. C.; Huang, J. Y.

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  9. Tip-to-tail numerical simulation of a hypersonic air-breathing engine with ethylene fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharavath, Malsur; Manna, P.; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-11-01

    End to end CFD simulations of external and internal flow paths of an ethylene fueled hypersonic airbreathing vehicle with including forebody, horizontal fins, vertical fins, intake, combustor, single expansion ramp nozzle are carried out. The performance of the scramjet combustor and vehicle net thrust-drag is calculated for hypersonic cruise condition. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with SST-k-ω turbulence model using the commercial CFD software CFX-14. Single step chemical reaction based on fast chemistry assumption is used for combustion of gaseous ethylene fuel. Simulations captured complex shock structures including the shocks generated from the vehicle nose and compression ramps, impingement of cowl-shock on vehicle undersurface and its reflection in the intake and combustor etc. Various thermochemical parameters are analyzed and performance parameters are evaluated for nonreacting and reacting cases. Very good mixing ( 98%) of fuel with incoming air stream is observed. Positive thrust-drag margins are obtained for fuel equivalence ratio of 0.6 and computed combustion efficiency is observed to be 94 %. Effect of equivalence ratio on the vehicle performance is studied parametrically. Though the combustion efficiency has come down by 8% for fuel equivalence ratio of 0.8, net vehicle thrust is increased by 44%. Heat flux distribution on the various walls of the whole vehicle including combustor is estimated for the isothermal wall condition of 1000 K in reacting flow. Higher local heat flux values are observed at all the leading edges of the vehicle (i.e., nose, wing, fin and cowl leading edges) and strut regions of the combustor.

  10. Analysis and Design of a Dish/Stirling System for Solar Electric Generation with a 2.7 kW Air-Cooled Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán-Chacón R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical modeling, simulation and design of a solar power system of a parabolic dish with an air-cooled Stirling engine of 2.7 kW. The model used for the solar concentrator, the cavity and the Stirling engine were successfully validated against experimental data. Based on a parametric study, the design of the components of the engine is carried out. The study shows that as system capacity increases, the overall efficiency is limited by the power required by the fan, since the design of the cooler needs greater amounts of heat removal by increasing the air flow without affecting the internal conditions of the process (mass flow of working gas and internal dimensions of the same. The system was optimized and achieves an overall efficiency of solar to electric energy conversion of 26.7%. This study shows that the use of an air-cooled Stirling engine is potentially attractive for power generation at low capacities.

  11. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  12. Jet engine test stand and soil stockpile. 107th fighter-interceptor group Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve Station, New York Air National Guard, Niagara Falls, New York. Final site assessment addendum report, 9-12 February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    THis report outlines additional site assessment activities which were conducted at the Jet Engine Test Stand (JETS), Building No. 852 located at the 197th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Niagara Falls Air National Guard Station (NFANGS), Air Force Reserve Facility (AFRF) approximately 6 miles northeast of Niagara Falls, New York (Figure 1.1). The additional site assessment activities were performed in response to requests, dated February 9 and 12, 1993, by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to further investigate contaminated soil and groundwater conditions at the JETS and at an existing soil stockpile (Appendix A).

  13. Hydrodynamics of heavy liquid metal coolant processes and filtering apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert K Papovyants; Yuri I Orlov; Pyotr N Martynov; Yuri D Boltoev [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after A.I. Leypunsky Bondarenko sq. 1, 249033, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: To optimize the design of filters for cleaning heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) from suspended impurities and choose appropriate filter material, the contribution is considered of different mechanisms of delivery and retention of these impurities from the coolant flow, which is governed by its specificity as a thermodynamically instable disperse system to a large extent. It is shown that the buildup of deposits in the filter is favored by the hydrodynamic regime with minimum filtration rates being due to the predominance in the suspension of the fine-dispersed solid phase (oxides Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and so on). With concentrating the last mentioned phase in filter material pores or stagnant zones, coagulation structuration is possible, which is accompanied by sharp local increase in the viscosity and strength of the solid phase medium being built from liquid metal, i.e. slag sedimentary deposits. In rather extended pores, disintegration of such structures is possible, which is accompanied by sedimentation of large particles produced due to sticking together at coagulation. The analytical solution of the problem of particle sedimentation due to diffusion indicated that in the case under consideration, this mechanism takes place for particles less than {approx} 0,05 {mu}m in size, which is specified by the fact that the time of their delivery to the filter material surface is longer than that of the coolant being in the filter. The London-Van-der-Waals molecular forces play a crucial role in the stage of retention of a separate particle. The constant of the molecular interaction between a spherical particle and the flat surface has been estimated for the chosen value of the gap between the contacting bodies, being dependent on the wetting angle. The sufficient condition for d{sub p}-diameter particle capture by the adhesion force field (with a gap of H {approx_equal} 30 nm) is that it be brought by the appropriate

  14. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY

  15. Jet model for slot film cooling with effect of free-stream and coolant turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frederick F.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was performed utilizing the model of a wall jet for obtaining equations that will predict slot film-cooling efficiency under conditions of variable turbulence intensity, flow, and temperature. The analysis, in addition to assessing the effects of the above variables, makes a distinction between an initial region and a fully developed region. Such a distinction is important in determining the role that the turbulence intensity of the coolant plays in effecting film-cooling effectiveness in the area of the slot exit. The results of the analysis were used in the correlation of the results of a well-designed film-cooling experiment. The result of the analysis and experiment was equations that predicted film-cooling efficiency within + or - 4% average deviation for lateral free-stream turbulence intensities up to 24% and blowing rates up to 1.9. These equations should be useful in determining the optimum quantity of cooling air requried for protecting the wall of a combustor.

  16. Performance and emission characteristics of a low heat rejection engine with different air gap thicknesses with Jatropha oil based bio-diesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali Krishna, M V S; Sarita, G; Seshagiri Rao, V V R; Chowdary, R P; Ramana Reddy, Ch V

    2010-04-01

    The research work on alternate fuels has been the topic of wider interest in the context of depletion of fossil fuels and increasing of pollution levels of the engines with conventional fossil fuels. Alcohols and vegetable oils are considered to replace diesel fuels as they are renewable in nature. However, use of alcohols in internal combustion engines is limited in India, as these fuels are diverted to PetroChemical industries and hence much emphasis is given to the non-edible vegetable oils as alternate fuels in internal combustion engines. However, the drawbacks of low volatility and high viscosity associated with non-edible vegetable oils call for hot combustion chamber, provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. Investigations are carried out on a LHR diesel engine with varied air gap thicknesses and injection pressures with jatropha oil based bio-diesel at normal temperature. Performance is improved with high degree of insulation with LHR engine with vegetable oil in comparison with conventional engine (CE) with pure diesel operation.

  17. Balancing mechanical strength with bioactivity in chitosan-calcium phosphate 3D microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: air- vs. freeze-drying processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D T; McCanless, J D; Mecwan, M M; Noblett, A P; Haggard, W O; Smith, R A; Bumgardner, J D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential benefit of 3D composite scaffolds composed of chitosan and calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering. Additionally, incorporation of mechanically weak lyophilized microspheres within those air-dried (AD) was considered for enhanced bioactivity. AD microsphere, alone, and air- and freeze-dried microsphere (FDAD) 3D scaffolds were evaluated in vitro using a 28-day osteogenic culture model with the Saos-2 cell line. Mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and lysozyme-driven enzymatic degradation of the scaffolds were also studied. FDAD scaffold showed a higher concentration (p mechanical strength was sacrificed through introduction of the less stiff, porous FD spheres.

  18. Purification of liquid metal systems with sodium coolant from oxygen using getters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Konovalov, M. A.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    For increasing the safety and economic parameters of nuclear power stations (NPSs) with sodium coolant, it was decided to install all systems contacting radioactive sodium, including purification systems of circuit I, in the reactor vessel. The performance and capacity of cold traps (CTs) (conventional element of coolant purification systems) in these conditions are limited by their volume. It was proposed to use hot traps (HTs) in circuit I for coolant purification from oxygen. It was demonstrated that, at rated parameters of the installation when the temperature of the coolant streamlining the getter (gas absorber) is equal to 550°C, the hot trap can provide the required coolant purity. In shutdown modes at 250-300°C, the performance of the hot trap is reduced by four orders of magnitude. Possible HT operation regimes for shutdown modes and while reaching rated parameters were proposed and analyzed. Basic attention was paid to purification modes at power rise after commissioning and accidental contamination of the coolant when the initial oxygen concentration in it reached 25 mln-1. It was demonstrated that the efficiency of purification systems can be increased using HTs with the getter in the form of a foil or granules. The possibility of implementing the "fast purification" mode in which the coolant is purified simultaneously with passing over from the shutdown mode to the rated parameters was substantiated.

  19. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  20. NONUNIFORMITIES OF TWO-PHASE COOLANT DISTRIBUTION IN A HEAT GENERATING PARTICLES BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sorokin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient atomic power generation safety increase may be done with microfuel adapting to reactor plants with water coolant. Microfuel particle is a millimeter size grain containing fission material core in a protecting coverage. The coverage protects fuel contact with coolant and provides isolation of fission products inside. Well thermophysical properties of microfuel bed in a direct contact with water coolant excludes fuel overheating when accidents. Microfuel use was suggested for a VVER, а direct flow reactor for superheat steam generation, a reactor with neutron spectra adjustment by the steam partial content varying in the coolant.Nonuniformities of two-phase coolant distribution in a heat generating particles bed are predicted by calculations in this text. The one is due to multiple-valuedness of pressure drop across the bed on the steam quality dependency. The nonuniformity decreases with flow rate and particle size growths absolute pressure diminishing while porosity effect is weak. The worse case is for pressure quality of order of one. Some pure steam filled pores appears parallel to steam water mixture filled pores, latter steam quality is less than the mean of the bed. Considering this regime for the direct flow reactor for superheat steam generation we predict some water drops at the exit flow. The two-phase coolant filtration with subcooled water feed is unstable to strong disturbance effects are found. Uniformity of two-phase coolant distribution is worse than for one-phase in the same radial type reactor.

  1. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  2. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paark, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Ad a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  3. Performance of Helical Coil Heat Recovery Exchanger using Nanofluid as Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Bozorgan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant condidate in chemical processes for heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on reducing the number of turns in a helical coil heat recovery exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity in a biomass heating plant using γ-Al2O3/n-decane nanofluid as coolant. The nanofluid flows through the tubes and the hot n-hexane flows through the shell. The numerical results show that using nanofluid as coolant in a helical coil heat exchanger can reduce the manufacturing cost of the heat exchanger and pumping power by reducing the number of turns of the coil.

  4. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find...... the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The threedimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat...... heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system....

  5. Behavior of primary coolant pump shaft seals during station blackout conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.C.; Rhodes, D.B.

    1986-09-12

    An assessment is made of the ability of typical Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) Shaft Seals to withstand the conditions predicted for a station blackout (loss of all alternating current power) at a nuclear power station. Several factors are identified that are key to seal stability including inlet fluid conditions, pressure downstream of the seal, and geometrical details of the seal rings. Limits for stable seal operation are determined for various combinations of these factors, and the conclusion is drawn that some RPC seals would be near the threshold of instability during a station blackout. If the threshold were exceeded, significant leakage of coolant from the primary coolant system could be expected.

  6. Parameters important to reactor coolant pump seal stability during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.C.; Rhodes, D.B.

    1986-10-24

    An assessment is made of the ability of typical Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) Shaft Seals to withstand the conditions predicted for a station blackout (loss of all alternating current power) at a nuclear power station. Several factors are identified that are key to seal stability including inlet fluid conditions, pressure downstream of the seal, and geometrical details of the seal rings. Limits for stable seal operation are determined for various combinations of these factors, and the conclusion is drawn that some RPC seals would be near or over the threshold of instability during a station blackout. If the threshold were exceeded, significant leakage of coolant from the primary coolant system could be expected.

  7. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  8. FILM-30: A Heat Transfer Properties Code for Water Coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARSHALL, THERON D.

    2001-02-01

    A FORTRAN computer code has been written to calculate the heat transfer properties at the wetted perimeter of a coolant channel when provided the bulk water conditions. This computer code is titled FILM-30 and the code calculates its heat transfer properties by using the following correlations: (1) Sieder-Tate: forced convection, (2) Bergles-Rohsenow: onset to nucleate boiling, (3) Bergles-Rohsenow: partially developed nucleate boiling, (4) Araki: fully developed nucleate boiling, (5) Tong-75: critical heat flux (CHF), and (6) Marshall-98: transition boiling. FILM-30 produces output files that provide the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the wetted perimeter as a function of temperature. To validate FILM-30, the calculated heat transfer properties were used in finite element analyses to predict internal temperatures for a water-cooled copper mockup under one-sided heating from a rastered electron beam. These predicted temperatures were compared with the measured temperatures from the author's 1994 and 1998 heat transfer experiments. There was excellent agreement between the predicted and experimentally measured temperatures, which confirmed the accuracy of FILM-30 within the experimental range of the tests. FILM-30 can accurately predict the CHF and transition boiling regimes, which is an important advantage over current heat transfer codes. Consequently, FILM-30 is ideal for predicting heat transfer properties for applications that feature high heat fluxes produced by one-sided heating.

  9. A study on safety measure of LMR coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Tai; Choi, Y. D.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Jeong, K. C.; Kwon, S. W.; Kim, B. H.; Jeong, J. Y.; Park, J. H.; Kim, K. R.; Jo, B. R.

    1997-08-01

    A study on safety measures of LMR coolant showed the results as follows: 1. Sodium fire characteristics. A. Sodium pool temp., gas temp., oxygen concentration calculated by flame combustion model were generally higher than those calculated by surface combustion model. B. Basic and detail designs for medium sodium fire test facility were carried out and medium sodium fire test facility was constructed. 2. Sodium/Cover gas purification technology. A. Construction and operation of calibration loop. B. Purification analysis and conceptual design of the packing for a cold trap. 3. Analysis of sodium-water reaction characteristics. We have investigated the characteristics analysis for micro and small leaks phenomena, development of the computer code for analysis of initial and quasi steady-state spike pressures to analyze large leak accident. Also, water mock-up test facility for the analysis of large leak accident phenomena was designed and manufactured. 4. Development of water leak detection technology. Detection signals were appeared when the hydrogen detector is operated to Ar-H{sub 2} gas system. The technology for the passive acoustic detection with respect to large leakage of water into sodium media was reviewed. And water mock-up test equipment and instrument system were designed and constructed. (author). 19 refs., 45 tabs., 52 figs.

  10. Design of heat exchanger for Ericsson-Brayton piston engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcansky, Peter; Papucik, Stefan; Jandacka, Jozef; Holubcik, Michal; Nosek, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Combined power generation or cogeneration is a highly effective technology that produces heat and electricity in one device more efficiently than separate production. Overall effectiveness is growing by use of combined technologies of energy extraction, taking heat from flue gases and coolants of machines. Another problem is the dependence of such devices on fossil fuels as fuel. For the combustion turbine is mostly used as fuel natural gas, kerosene and as fuel for heating power plants is mostly used coal. It is therefore necessary to seek for compensation today, which confirms the assumption in the future. At first glance, the obvious efforts are to restrict the use of largely oil and change the type of energy used in transport. Another significant change is the increase in renewable energy--energy that is produced from renewable sources. Among machines gaining energy by unconventional way belong mainly the steam engine, Stirling engine, and Ericsson engine. In these machines, the energy is obtained by external combustion and engine performs work in a medium that receives and transmits energy from combustion or flue gases indirectly. The paper deals with the principle of hot-air engines, and their use in combined heat and electricity production from biomass and with heat exchangers as primary energy transforming element.

  11. Design of Heat Exchanger for Ericsson-Brayton Piston Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Durcansky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined power generation or cogeneration is a highly effective technology that produces heat and electricity in one device more efficiently than separate production. Overall effectiveness is growing by use of combined technologies of energy extraction, taking heat from flue gases and coolants of machines. Another problem is the dependence of such devices on fossil fuels as fuel. For the combustion turbine is mostly used as fuel natural gas, kerosene and as fuel for heating power plants is mostly used coal. It is therefore necessary to seek for compensation today, which confirms the assumption in the future. At first glance, the obvious efforts are to restrict the use of largely oil and change the type of energy used in transport. Another significant change is the increase in renewable energy—energy that is produced from renewable sources. Among machines gaining energy by unconventional way belong mainly the steam engine, Stirling engine, and Ericsson engine. In these machines, the energy is obtained by external combustion and engine performs work in a medium that receives and transmits energy from combustion or flue gases indirectly. The paper deals with the principle of hot-air engines, and their use in combined heat and electricity production from biomass and with heat exchangers as primary energy transforming element.

  12. 76 FR 45011 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Proposed Emission Standards and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... procedures. EPA actively participated in the United Nation's International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO... Regulation of Aircraft Engine Emissions E. Brief History of ICAO Regulation of Aircraft Engine Emissions II... under consideration by the United Nation's International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)....

  13. Air Force is Developing Risk-Mitigation Strategies to Manage Potential Loss of the RD-180 Engine (REDACTED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-05

    Mitigation Study; however, they developed risk -mitigation strategies to manage the potential loss of the RD-180 engine. Therefore, we are not making...Force is Developing Risk -Mitigation Strategies to Manage Potential Loss of the RD-180 Engine (Report No. DODIG-2015-086) We are providing the enclosed...for liquid oxygenihydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine technology risk reduction. Partially ~) SAF/AQ slated il was premature to choose aspecific engine

  14. Heat transfer and fluid flow aspects of fuel--coolant interactions. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M L

    1978-09-01

    A major portion of the safety analysis effort for the LMFBR is involved in assessing the consequences of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA). The thermal interaction of the hot fuel and the sodium coolant during the HCDA is investigated in two areas. A postulated loss of flow transient may produce a two-phase fuel at high pressures. The thermal interaction phenomena between fuel and coolant as the fuel is ejected into the upper plenum are investigated. A postulated transient overpower accident may produce molten fuel being released into sodium coolant in the core region. An energetic coolant vapor explosion for these reactor materials does not seem likely. However, experiments using other materials (e.g., Freon/water, tin/water) have demonstrated the possibility of this phenomenon.

  15. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  16. A Feasibility Study of Life-Extending Controls for Aircraft Turbine Engines Using a Generic Air Force Model (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    damage (FOD), bird strikes; inertial and gyroscopic forces during strenuous maneuvers, and material composition or chemistry effects, such as...engine model is a detailed, physics-based engine model of a two-spool, non-augmented, low bypass ratio engine developed using MATLAB/ Simulink ® [9]. The

  17. Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-18

    configuration due to the large amounts of turning in the test section geometry and measurement techniques such as hot wire anemometry or temperature probe...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade The...reviewed journals: Final Report: Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant and Hot Streaks in a Turbine Vane Cascade Report Title Magnetic resonance

  18. Power Module Cooling for Future Electric Vehicle Applications: A Coolant Comparison of Oil and PGW

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    POWER MODULE COOLING FOR FUTURE ELECTRIC VEHICLE APPLICATIONS: A COOLANT COMPARISON OF OIL AND PGW T. E. Salem U. S. Naval Academy 105...and efficient power converters are being developed to support the needs of future ground vehicle systems. This progress is being driven by...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Power Module Cooling For Future Electric Vehicle Applications: A Coolant

  19. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project -2006 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. This paper presents a status of the coolant stability over the past year as well as results from destructive analyses of hardware removed from the on-orbit system and the current approach to coolant remediation.

  20. Elevated-pressure mixed-coolants Joule Thomson cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, B.-Z.; Nellis, G. F.; Klein, S. A.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of mixed coolants at elevated pressures for Joule-Thomson cryocooling. A numerical model of a Joule-Thomson cryocooler is developed that is capable of simulating operation with mixtures of up to 9 components consisting of hydrocarbons, non-flammable halogenated refrigerants, and inert gases. The numerical model is integrated with a genetic optimization algorithm, which has a high capability for convergence in an environment of discontinuities, constraints and local optima. The genetic optimization algorithm is used to select the optimal mixture compositions that separately maximizes following two objective functions at each elevated pressure for 80, 90 and 95 K cryocooling: the molar specific cooling capacity (the highest attainable is 3200 J/mol) and the produced cooling capacity per thermal conductance which is a measure of the compactness of the recuperator. The optimized cooling capacity for a non-flammable halogenated refrigerant mixture is smaller than for a hydrocarbon mixture; however, the cooling capacity of the two types of mixtures approach one another as pressure becomes higher. The coefficient of performance, the required heat transfer area and the effect of the number of components in the mixture is investigated as a function of the pressure. It is shown that mixtures with more components provide a higher cooling capacity but require larger recuperative heat exchangers. Optimized mixtures for 90 K cryocooling have similar cooling capacity as those for 80 K. Optimized compactness for 80 K is about 50% higher than can be achieved by pure nitrogen. For 90 K, no mixture provides a more compact recuperator than can be achieved using pure argon. The results are discussed in the context of potential applications for closed and open cycle cryocoolers.

  1. Correct numerical simulation of a two-phase coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshilin, A. E.; Kroshilin, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Different models used in calculating flows of a two-phase coolant are analyzed. A system of differential equations describing the flow is presented; the hyperbolicity and stability of stationary solutions of the system is studied. The correctness of the Cauchy problem is considered. The models' ability to describe the following flows is analyzed: stable bubble and gas-droplet flows; stable flow with a level such that the bubble and gas-droplet flows are observed under and above it, respectively; and propagation of a perturbation of the phase concentration for the bubble and gas-droplet media. The solution of the problem about the breakdown of an arbitrary discontinuity has been constructed. Characteristic times of the development of an instability at different parameters of the flow are presented. Conditions at which the instability does not make it possible to perform the calculation are determined. The Riemann invariants for the nonlinear problem under consideration have been constructed. Numerical calculations have been performed for different conditions. The influence of viscosity on the structure of the discontinuity front is studied. Advantages of divergent equations are demonstrated. It is proven that a model used in almost all known investigating thermohydraulic programs, both in Russia and abroad, has significant disadvantages; in particular, it can lead to unstable solutions, which makes it necessary to introduce smoothing mechanisms and a very small step for describing regimes with a level. This does not allow one to use efficient numerical schemes for calculating the flow of two-phase currents. A possible model free from the abovementioned disadvantages is proposed.

  2. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  3. Reactor coolant pump testing using motor current signatures analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, N.; Bellamy, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes reactor coolant pump motor testing carried out at Florida Power Corporation`s Crystal River plant using Framatome Technologies` new EMPATH (Electric Motor Performance Analysis and Trending Hardware) system. EMPATH{trademark} uses an improved form of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, for detecting deterioration in the rotors of AC induction motors. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) is a monitoring tool for motor driven equipment that provides a non-intrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment. The base technology was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the affects of aging and service wear specifically on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of electric machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current variations, resulting from changes in load caused by gears, pulleys, friction, bearings, and other conditions that may change over the life of the motor, are carried by the electrical cables powering the motor and are extracted at any convenient location along the motor lead. These variations modulate the 60 Hz carrier frequency and appear as sidebands in the spectral plot.

  4. Fuel-Coolant Interaction visualization in TROI test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Young Su; Hong, Seong-Ho; Song, Jin Ho; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is necessary to observe the FCI (Fuel-Coolant Interaction) phenomena at the condition of vessel failure to IVR. We carried out a visualization test on the interaction of a corium melt and water to observe the premixing phase without a free fall of a melt jet in a gas phase before contacting the cooling water. This paper is based on the previous study presented at Ninth Korea-Japan Symposium on Nuclear Hydraulics and Safety, we added the results on sieved debris distribution. The visualization test on the FCI without a free fall of a corium melt jet in a gas phase was conducted carefully in the TROI test facility. A prototypic corium consisting of uranium oxide and zirconium oxide with a weight ratio of UO{sub 2} to ZrO{sub 2} of 80 to 20, respectively, was heated up using the induction heating method. It was observed that a corium melt jet penetrated into water with 1000 mm in depth, and it took about 0.6 seconds from opening the releasing valve, which was confirmed by the sequential variation of the temperature measured by the sacrificial thermocouples installed in the direction of a falling melt jet. The cumulative mass fraction of the debris smaller than 1.0 mm was 15%, and the mass mean diameter of the debris was 2.9 mm. This visualization test can generate the valuable information such as the behavior of the corium melt jet and the size of mixing zone for validating the computer code.

  5. Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NBSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek J. S.; Cheng L.; Diamond, D.

    2014-05-23

    This report documents calculations of the fuel cladding temperature during loss-of-coolant accidents in the NBSR. The probability of a pipe failure is small and procedures exist to minimize the loss of water and assure emergency cooling water flows into the reactor core during such an event. Analysis in the past has shown that the emergency cooling water would provide adequate cooling if the water filled the flow channels within the fuel elements. The present analysis is to determine if there is adequate cooling if the water drains from the flow channels. Based on photographs of how the emergency water flows into the fuel elements from the distribution pan, it can be assumed that this water does not distribute uniformly across the flow channels but rather results in a liquid film flowing downward on the inside of one of the side plates in each fuel element and only wets the edges of the fuel plates. An analysis of guillotine breaks shows the cladding temperature remains below the blister temperature in fuel plates in the upper section of the fuel element. In the lower section, the fuel plates are also cooled by water outside the element that is present due to the hold-up pan and temperatures are lower than in the upper section. For small breaks, the simulation results show that the fuel elements are always cooled on the outside even in the upper section and the cladding temperature cannot be higher than the blister temperature. The above results are predicated on assumptions that are examined in the study to see their influence on fuel temperature.

  6. The electrochemistry of IGSCC mitigation in BWR coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A brief review is presented of the electrochemical mitigation of IGSCC in water-cooled reactor heat transport circuit structural materials. Electrochemical control and mitigation is possible, because of the existence of a critical potential for IGSCC and by the feasibility of modifying the environment to displace the corrosion potential (ECP) to a value that is more negative than the critical value. However, even in cases where the ECP cannot be displaced sufficiently in the negative direction to become more negative than the critical potential, considerable advantage is accrued, because of the roughly exponential dependence of crack growth rate on potential. The most important parameters in affecting electrochemical control over the ECP and crack growth rate are the kinetic parameters (exchange current densities and Tafel constants) for the redox reactions involving the principal radiolysis products of water (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), external solution composition (concentrations of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}), flow velocity, and the conductivity of the bulk environment. The kinetic parameters for the redox reactions essentially determine the charge transfer impedance of the steel surface, which is shown to be one of the key parameters in affecting the magnitude of the coupling current and hence the crack growth rate. The exchange current densities, in particular, are amenable to control by catalysis or inhibition, with the result that surface modification techniques are highly effective in controlling and mitigating IGSCC in reactor coolant circuit materials. (authors)

  7. 航空发动机空气系统验算标定%Calibration of Calculation for Aero-Engine Air System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    呼艳丽; 徐连强; 赵维维

    2014-01-01

    利用流量特性试验得到的相关流路元件的流阻计算模型,和旋转状态下阶梯齿风阻温升计算方法,通过调节封严篦齿间隙等参数,对航空发动机空气系统的压力、温度进行验算标定,并根据验算结果分析发现后续试验中存在和需要注意的问题。验算标定结果表明:通过对发动机试验工况的验算标定,可发现试验中存在的问题,较准确地模拟出后续试验中的问题和试验风险,确保发动机的工作安全,并为空气系统的进一步改进和优化提供依据。%A calibration method for aero-engine air system was presented, with the air system throttle ele-ments flow loss coefficient experiment data and the rotating step labyrinth seal windage temperature rise cal-culation method. The pressure and temperature of air system were calibrated by adjusting the labyrinth seal clearance. Some possible and noteworthy problems in the following tests were found out according to the cal-ibrated results. The results show that through the calibration of experimental conditions, the problems could be revealed and the risk of the following tests can be simulated perfectly to ensure the safety of engine work-ing which could be referential for the further improvements of engine's air system.

  8. Single-Cylinder Engine Tests of Porous Chrome-Plated Cylinder Barrels with Special Bore Coatings for Radial Air-Cooled Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    sulphamate solution at room temperature having a hydrogen-ion concentration of 1.5. The cylinder was plated for 2 minutes with a current density of 40...for any metal combination (reference 3), engine friction may be reduced somewhat by the use of a silver overplate as a bearing material on the...Cooled Engines. NACA ARR No. E5L18, 1945. 3. Hoyt, Samuel L.: Metals and Alloys Data Book. Reinhold Pub. Corp., 1943, p. 281. 4. Downing, B. F

  9. Effects of Scavenging System Configuration on In-Cylinder Air Flow Organization of an Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukang Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In-cylinder air flow is very important from the point of view of mixture formation and combustion. In this direction, intake chamber structure and piston crown shape play a very crucial role for in-cylinder air pattern of opposed-piston two-stroke (OP2S engines. This study is concerned with the three-dimensional (3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis of in-cylinder air motion coupled with the comparison of predicted results with the zero-dimensional (0D parametric model. Three configurations viz., a flat piston uniform scavenging chamber, a flat piston non-uniform scavenging chamber and a pit piston non-uniform scavenging chamber have been studied. 0D model analysis of in-cylinder air flow is consistent with 3D CFD simulation. It is concluded that a pit piston non-uniform scavenging chamber is the best design from the point of view of tumble ratio, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent intensity, which play very important roles in imparting proper air motion. Meanwhile a flat piston uniform scavenging chamber can organize a higher swirl ratio and lower tumble ratio which is important to improve the scavenging process.

  10. Line focus by the ellipsoidal and hyperbolic mirrors, and the fabrication of the new type`s heated air engine. 1; Daenmenkyo to sokyokumenkyo ni yoru line focus to shingata netsu kuki engine no shisaku. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishido, K.; Kazimierski, Z.; Shoji, T. [Tohoku Gakuin University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sugiura, M. [Tohoku Gakuin Tsutsujigaoka High School, Sendai (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Tokyo Special Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Line focusing by ellipsoidal and hyperbolic mirrors was devised for solar heat collection, and the new prototype heated air engine is under fabrication based on such focusing. Ellipse is a locus of the point at which the distance from the 2nd focus is equal to that from the circle with the 1st focus as a center and the major axis as a radius. Hyperbola can be also figured under similar geometric conditions. The link mechanism possible to machine quadratic surfaces based on the above principle has been developed. High-precision quadratic surface mirrors can be fabricated by the link mechanism for convergent solar heat power generation, achieving line focusing of light. The new prototype heated air engine is also proposed which is composed of the heating part by line focusing, cylinder, piston and cooling column. This engine is featured by simple function, light weight, compact body, high efficiency and safety, and is under fabrication. Although conventional converging mirrors use all the mirror surface, the new line focusing uses only the upper part of the mirror, and the lower part is turned over for protection of the mirror from strong wind. 9 figs.

  11. Multi-Dimensional Modeling of the Effects of Air Jet and Split Injection on Combustion and Emission of DirectInjection Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mansury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems in reducing the emissions of diesel engines is to exchange between the oxides of nitrogen and soot emissions. Fuel multiple injection and air injection into combustion chamber are among the most powerful tools to concurrent reduction of these two emissions. In this research, the effect of multiple injection and air injection on combustion and emission parameters has been studied by AVL fire computational fluid dynamic software. Six states of base and modified combustion chamber have been studied in two different injection patterns including 90 (25 10 and 75 (25 25 mods. Results show that concurrent applying of both multiple injection and air injection methods has resulted in simultaneous reduction of oxide nitrogen and soot pollutants and a negligible loss is seen in the operational parameters of engine. Compression between six studied cases show that the 90 (25 10 mode of injection with modified combustion chamber is the optimum mode by decreasing of soot and oxides of nitrogen emissions about 29% and 20% respectively and 6% indicated power loss in compression to the base combustion chamber and single injection mode. The obtained results from the computational fluid dynamic code have been compared with the existing results in the technical literature and show acceptable behavior.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF COMBUSTION, PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH BUTHANOL – GASOLINE MIXTURE AND A HYDROGEN ENRICHED AIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredas Rimkus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, spark ignition engine fuelled with buthanol-gasoline mixture and a hydrogen-enriched air was investigated. Engine performance, emissions and combustion characteristics were investigated with different buthanol (10% and 20% by volume gasoline mixtures and additionally supplied oxygen and hydrogen (HHO gas mixture (3.6 l/min in the sucked air. Hydrogen, which is in the HHO gas, improves gasoline and gasoline-buthanol mixture combustion, increases indicated pressure during combustion phase and decreases effective specific fuel consumption. Buthanol addition decreases the rate of heat release, the combustion temperature and pressure are lower which have an influence on lower nitrous oxide (NOx emission in exhaust gases. Buthanol lowers hydrocarbon (HC formation, but it increases carbon monoxide (CO concentration and fuel consumption. Combustion process analysis was carried out using AVL BOOST software. Experimental research and combustion process numerical simulation showed that using balanced buthanol and hydrogen addition, optimal efficient and ecological parameters could be achieved when engine is working with optimal spark timing, as it would work on gasoline fuel.

  13. Use of Distribution Devices for Hydraulic Profiling of Coolant Flow in Core Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Satin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In setting up a reactor plant for the transportation-power module of the megawatt class an important task is to optimize the path of flow, i.e. providing moderate hydraulic resistance, uniform distribution of the coolant. Significant contribution to the hydraulic losses makes one selected design of the coolant supplies. It is, in particular, hemispherical or semi-elliptical shape of the supply reservoir, which is selected to reduce its mass, resulting in the formation of torusshaped vortex in the inlet manifold, that leads to uneven coolant velocity at the inlet into the core, the flow pulsations, hydraulic losses.To control the flow redistribution in the core according to the level of energy are used the switchgear - deflectors installed in a hemispherical reservoir supplying coolant to the fuel elements (FE of the core of gas-cooled reactor. This design solution has an effect on the structure of the flow, rate in the cooling duct, and the flow resistance of the collector.In this paper we present the results of experiments carried out on the gas dynamic model of coolant paths, deflectors, and core, comprising 55 fuel rod simulators. Numerical simulation of flow in two-parameter model, using the k-ε turbulence model, and the software package ANSYS CFX v14.0 is performed. The paper demonstrates that experimental results are in compliance with calculated ones.The results obtained suggest that the use of switchgear ensures a coolant flow balance directly at the core inlet, thereby providing temperature reduction of fuel rods with a uniform power release in the cross-section. Considered options to find constructive solutions for deflectors give an idea to solve the problem of reducing hydraulic losses in the coolant paths, to decrease pulsation components of flow in the core and length of initial section of flow stabilization.

  14. Effects of Engine Cooling Water Temperature on Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Ci Engine Operated with Biofuel Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Hossain

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of the coolant is known to have significant influence on engine performance and emissions. Whereas existing literature describes the effects of coolant temperature in engines using fossil derived fuels, very few studies have investigated these effects when biofuel is used. In this study, Jatropha oil was blended separately with ethanol and butanol. It was found that the 80% jatropha oil + 20% butanol blend was the most suitable alternative, as its properties were closest to that of fossil diesel. The coolant temperature was varied between 50°C and 95°C. The combustion process enhanced for both diesel and biofuel blend, when the coolant temperature was increased. The carbon dioxide emissions for both diesel and biofuel blend were observed to increase with temperature. The carbon monoxide, oxygen and lambda values were observed to decrease with temperature. When the engine was operated using diesel, nitrogen oxides emissions correlated in an opposite manner to smoke opacity; however, nitrogen oxides emissions and smoke opacity correlated in an identical manner for biofuel blend. Brake specific fuel consumption was observed to decrease as the temperature was increased and was higher on average when the biofuel was used. The study concludes that both biofuel blend and fossil diesel produced identical correlations between coolant temperature and engine performance. The trends of nitrogen oxides and smoke emissions with cooling temperatures were not identical to fossil diesel when biofuel blend was used in the engine.

  15. Robust, Cost-Optimal and Compliant Engine and Aftertreatment Operation using Air-path Control and Tailpipe Emission Feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandran, S.N.; Hommen, G.; Mentink, P.; Seykens, X.; Willems, F.; Kupper, F.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy-duty diesel engines are used in a wide range of applications. For varying operating environments, the engine and aftertreatment system must comply with the real-world emission legislation limits. Simultaneously, minimal fuel consumption and good drivability are crucial for economic competitive

  16. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of lateral heat conduction, coolant azimuthal mixing and heat transfer predictions in a BR2 fuel assembly geometry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanos, C. P.; Dionne, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    To support the analyses related to the conversion of the BR2 core from highly-enriched (HEU) to low-enriched (LEU) fuel, the thermal-hydraulics codes PLTEMP and RELAP-3D are used to evaluate the safety margins during steady-state operation (PLTEMP), as well as after a loss-of-flow, loss-of-pressure, or a loss of coolant event (RELAP). In the 1-D PLTEMP and RELAP simulations, conduction in the azimuthal and axial directions is not accounted. The very good thermal conductivity of the cladding and the fuel meat and significant temperature gradients in the lateral directions (axial and azimuthal directions) could lead to a heat flux distribution that is significantly different than the power distribution. To evaluate the significance of the lateral heat conduction, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, using the CFD code STAR-CD, were performed. Safety margin calculations are typically performed for a hot stripe, i.e., an azimuthal region of the fuel plates/coolant channel containing the power peak. In a RELAP model, for example, a channel between two plates could be divided into a number of RELAP channels (stripes) in the azimuthal direction. In a PLTEMP model, the effect of azimuthal power peaking could be taken into account by using engineering factors. However, if the thermal mixing in the azimuthal direction of a coolant channel is significant, a stripping approach could be overly conservative by not taking into account this mixing. STAR-CD simulations were also performed to study the thermal mixing in the coolant. Section II of this document presents the results of the analyses of the lateral heat conduction and azimuthal thermal mixing in a coolant channel. Finally, PLTEMP and RELAP simulations rely on the use of correlations to determine heat transfer coefficients. Previous analyses showed that the Dittus-Boelter correlation gives significantly more conservative (lower) predictions than the correlations of Sieder-Tate and Petukhov. STAR-CD 3-D

  17. The influence of thermal regime on gasoline direct injection engine performance and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahu, C. I.; Tarulescu, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental research regarding to the effects of a low thermal regime on fuel consumption and pollutant emissions from a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine. During the experimental researches, the temperature of the coolant and oil used by the engine were modified 4 times (55, 65, 75 and 85 oC), monitoring the effects over the fuel consumption and emissions (CO2, CO and NOx). The variations in temperature of the coolant and oil have been achieved through AVL coolant and oil conditioning unit, integrated in the test bed. The obtained experimental results reveals the poor quality of exhaust gases and increases of fuel consumption for the gasoline direct injection engines that runs outside the optimal ranges for coolant and oil temperatures.

  18. Flatness Control Using Roll Coolant Based on Predicted Flatness Variation in Cold Rolling Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmae, Yukihiro; Okamura, Yoshihide

    Flatness control for cold rolling mills is one of the important technologies for improving of product quality and productivity. In particular, poor flatness leads to strip tearing in the extreme case and, moreover, it significantly reduces productivity. Therefore, various flatness control system has been developed. The main actuators for flatness control are classified into two types; one is mechanical equipment such as roll bender, the other is roll coolant, which controls thermal expansion of roll. Flatness variation such as center buckle or edge wave is mainly controlled by mechanical actuator which has high response characteristics. On another front, flatness variation of local zone can be controlled by roll coolant although one's response is lower than the response of mechanical actuator. For accomplishing good flatness accuracy in cold rolling mills, it is important to improve the performance of coolant control moreover. In this paper, a new coolant control method based on flatness variation model is described. In proposed method, the state of coolant spray on or off is selected to minimize the flatness deviation by using predicted flatness variation. The effectiveness of developed system has been demonstrated by application in actual plant.

  19. Effects of staggered blades on the hydraulic characteristics of a 1400-MW canned nuclear coolant pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Ming Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A canned nuclear coolant pump is used in an advanced third-generation pressurized water reactor. Impeller is a key component of a canned nuclear coolant pump. Usually, the blade is installed between the hub and the shroud as an entire part. The blade is divided into two parts and is staggered in the circumferential direction is an approach of blade design. To understand the effects of staggered blades on a canned nuclear coolant pump, this article numerically investigated different types of staggering. The validity of the numerical simulation was confirmed by comparing the numerical and experimental results. The performance change of a canned nuclear coolant pump with staggered blades was acquired. Hydraulic performance curves, axial force curves, static pressure distributions at the impeller outlet, and static pressure pulsations were performed to investigate the performance changes caused by the staggered blades. The results show that the staggered blade has an important influence on the performance of canned nuclear coolant pumps. A staggered blade does not improve hydraulic performance but does improve the axial force and pressure pulsation. Specifically, the staggered blades can significantly reduce the pressure pulsation amplitude on the impeller pass frequency.

  20. Heat Reduction FromIc Engine By Using Al2o3Nanofluid In Engine Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Sharma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cooling system plays important roles to control the temperature of car‟s engine. One of the important elements in the car cooling system is cooling fluid. The usage of wrong cooling fluid can give negatives impact to the car‟s engine and shorten engine life. An efficient cooling system can prevent engine from overheating and assists the vehicle running at its optimal performance. With the development of new technology in the fields of „nano-materials‟ and „nano-fluids‟, it seems very promising to use this technology as a coolant in the internal combustion engines. In this study, a nano-fluid (Al2O3-Water/Ethylene Glycol (EG is used as an engine coolant along with an optimized heat exchanger to reduce the warm-up timing. The effect of nano-fluid concentration is considered here by using their corresponding governing equations, such as momentum and energy. The engine coolant thermal behaviour calculation is carried out based on the lumped method. The obtained results indicated that using different percentage of nano-fluid mixtures (by volume, such as Al2O3-Water/EG as engine coolant enhances the heat transfer coefficient and reduces the warm-up timing which, in turn, results in reduced emissions and fuel consumption.

  1. The effects of engine speed and injection characteristics on the flow field and fuel/air mixing in motored two-stroke diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Carpenter, M. H.; Ramos, J. I.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented on the effects of the engine speed, injection angle, droplet distribution function, and spray cone angle on the flow field, spray penetration and vaporization, and turbulence in a turbocharged motored two-stroke diesel engine. The results indicate that the spray penetration and vaporization, velocity, and turbulence kinetic energy increase with the intake swirl angle. Good spray penetration, vaporization, and mixing can be achieved by injecting droplets of diameters between 50 and 100 microns along a 120-deg cone at about 315 deg before top-dead-center for an intake swirl angle of 30 deg. The spray penetration and vaporization were found to be insensitive to the turbulence levels within the cylinder. The results have also indicated that squish is necessary in order to increase the fuel vaporization rate and mixing.

  2. Selection of sodium coolant for fast reactors in the US, France and Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sakamoto.yoshihiko@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan); Garnier, Jean-Claude; Rouault, Jacques [CEA, DEN, DER, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Grandy, Christopher; Fanning, Thomas; Hill, Robert [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Kotake, Shoji [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    mitigation means to manage severe core degradation. The main LFR merit is the lack of chemical reactivity of the lead coolant with air and water. The main challenges are the development of corrosion resistant structural and cladding materials, the implementation of mitigation means to manage severe core degradation, the density of the lead, and the comparably large core size. The selection of a reference fast reactor concept in view of possible industrialization is made on a national base, taking into account the each countries' strategic objectives, existing technology base, the proven or expected technical performance, the R and D challenges and technical means to conduct that R and D, the possibility to share development costs and risks, etc. It is important to note that in different contexts, the U.S., French, and Japanese organizations have selected the SFR as their reference fast reactor concept.

  3. An Analysis of Air Force Acquisition Engineering Officer’s Perceptions of the Adequacy of Their Preparation for Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    conducted at AT&T from 1956 to 1983. These findings indicate engineers are promoted more slowly than those who majored in humanities and social ...26 percent of the engineers were considered to have potential, compared to 46 percent of humanities/ social science majors and 31 percent of business...completing the survey, please put the respvac sheet Ond any commint sheets in the solf-adCde"d envelope provided, 0e1 and put into base distribution

  4. Measurement of Coolant in a Flat Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Kei; Saito, Yasushi; Goshima, Takashi; Tsutsui, Toshio

    A newly developed flat heat pipe FGHPTM (Morex Kiire Co.) was experimentally investigated by using neutron radiography. The test sample of the FGHP heat spreader was 65 × 65 × 2 mm3 composed of several etched copper plates and pure water was used as the coolant. Neutron radiography was performed at the E-2 port of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The coolant distributions in the wick area of the FGHP and its heat transfer characteristics were measured at heating conditions. Experimental results show that the coolant distributions depend slightly on its installation posture and that the liquid thickness in the wick region remains constant with increasing heat input to the FGHP. In addition, it is found that the wick surface does not dry out even in the vertical posture at present experimental conditions.

  5. Simulating the corrosion of zirconium alloys in the water coolant of VVER reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Motkova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    A model for predicting the corrosion of cladding zirconium alloys depending on their composition and operating conditions is proposed. Laws of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics of the reactions through which the multicomponent zirconium alloy is oxidized in the reactor coolant constitute the physicochemical heart of the model. The developed version of the model is verified against the results obtained from tests of fuel rod claddings made of commercial-grade and experimental zirconium alloys carried out by different researchers under autoclave and reactor conditions. It is shown that the proposed model adequately describes the corrosion of alloys in coolants used at nuclear power stations. It is determined that, owing to boiling of coolant and its acidification in a VVER-1200 reactor, Zr-1% Nb alloys with additions of iron and oxygen must be more resistant to corrosion than the commercial-grade alloy E110.

  6. Engineering Strategies and Methods for Avoiding Air-Quality Externalities: Dispersion Modeling, Home Energy Conservation, and Scenario Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Andrew James

    Energy conservation can improve air quality by reducing emissions from fuel combustion. The human health value retained through better air quality can then offset the cost of energy conservation. Through this thesis' innovative yet widely-accessible combination of air pollution dispersion modeling and atmospheric chemistry, it is estimated that the health value retained by avoiding emissions from Ontario's former coal-fired generating stations is 5.74/MWh (using an upper-bound value of 265,000 per year of life lost). This value is combined with energy modeling of homes in the first-ever assessment of the air-quality health benefits of low-energy buildings. It is shown that avoided health damages can equal 7% of additional construction costs of energy efficient buildings in Ontario. At 7%, health savings are a significant item in the cost analysis of efficient buildings. Looking to energy efficiency in the context of likely future low-resource natural gas scenarios, building efficient buildings today is shown to be more economically efficient than any building retrofit option. Considering future natural gas scarcity in the context of Ontario's Long-Term Energy Plan reveals that Ontario may be forced to return to coal-fired electricity. Projected coal use would result in externalities greater than $600 million/year; 80% more than air-quality externalities from Ontario's electricity in 1985. Radically aggressive investment in electricity conservation (75% reduction per capita by 2075) is one promising path forward that keeps air-quality externalities below 1985 levels. Non-health externalities are an additional concern, the quantification, and ultimately monetization, of which could be practical using emerging air pollution monitoring technologies. Energy, conservation, energy planning, and energy's externalities form a complex situation in which today's decisions are critical to a successful future. It is clear that reducing the demand for energy is essential and

  7. Design and verification on air inflow correction system of FSAE engine%FSAE发动机进气量修正系统的设计与验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴新烨; 罗树友; 黄红武

    2014-01-01

    针对限制器引起的进气管内压力损失会增加赛车实际油耗的问题,该文以单缸四冲程赛车发动机为研究对象,从混合气体空燃比控制、喷油量的控制和进气量测量3个方面分析了电喷系统,结合电喷系统的特点建立了进气量修正方案,在此基础进行了控制单元的硬件和软件设计。通过对发动机喷油脉宽的检测验证了进气量修正控制单元满足设计要求,达到了降低油耗、提高赛车竞争力的目的。%In view of that the pressure loss in the air inflow pipe caused by the resrtictor makes the actual fuel consumption relatively increaseing, the four-stroke engine of the formula SAE car is investigated here. The electronic fuel injection( EFI) system is analyzed from three aspects of the air-fuel ratio control of the mixed gas,the control of fuel injection quantity,and the measurement of air inflow. According to the characteristics of the EFI system, the air inflow correction scheme is designed,and the hardware and software of the control unit are accomplished. The test of pulse-width of EFI system shows that the control unit of air inflow correction can meet the design requirements, reduce the fuel consumption,and improve the competitiveness of the FSAE.

  8. Membrane systems and their use in nuclear power plants. Treatment of primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kus, Pavel; Bartova, Sarka; Skala, Martin; Vonkova, Katerina [Research Centre Rez, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic). Technological Circuits Innovation Dept.; Zach, Vaclav; Kopa, Roman [CEZ a.s., Temelin (Czech Republic). Nuclear Power Plant Temelin

    2016-03-15

    In nuclear power plants, drained primary coolant containing boric acid is currently treated in the system of evaporators and by ion exchangers. Replacement of the system of evaporators by membrane system (MS) will result in lower operating cost mainly due to lower operation temperature. In membrane systems the feed primary coolant is separated into two output streams: retentate and permeate. Retentate stream consists of the concentrated boric acid solution together with other components, while permeate stream consists of purified water. Results are presented achieved by testing a pilot-plant unit of reverse osmosis in nuclear power plant (NPP) Temelin.

  9. Experimental investigation of thermoelectric power generation versus coolant pumping power in a microchannel heat sink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania; Rosendahl, Lasse; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2012-01-01

    The coolant heat sinks in thermoelectric generators (TEG) play an important role in order to power generation in the energy systems. This paper explores the effective pumping power required for the TEGs cooling at five temperature difference of the hot and cold sides of the TEG. In addition......, the temperature distribution and the pressure drop in sample microchannels are considered at four sample coolant flow rates. The heat sink contains twenty plate-fin microchannels with hydraulic diameter equal to 0.93 mm. The experimental results show that there is a unique flow rate that gives maximum net...

  10. The state of the art on zinc addition effect in the nuclear reactor coolant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Kim, K. R.; Paek, S.; Maeng, W. Y

    1999-12-01

    Zinc addition to the primary coolant appears promising with regard to reducing radiation dose rate, and is being used in several plants. Zinc acts to inhibit the corrosion of stainless steel by forming a thin protective film. This oxide film, with no associated increase in cobalt concentration within the film, thereby lowers the dose rate. This report on the state of art presents an overview of the zinc addition to the reactor coolant to reduce the primary system dose rate. This report discusses the effect of zinc addition for BWRs and PWRs, the thermodynamic of zinc chemistry, and the effect of zinc addition on material corrosion. (author)

  11. Effects of molten material temperatures and coolant temperatures on vapor explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianshu; YANG Yanhua; YUAN Minghao; HU Zhihua

    2007-01-01

    An observable experiment facility for low-temperature molten materials to be dropped into water was set up in this study to investigate the mechanism of the vapor explosion. The effect of the fuel and coolant interaction(FCI) on the vapor explosion during the severe accidents of a fission nuclear reactor has been studied. The experiment results showed that the molten material temperature has an important effect on the vapor explosion behavior and pressure. The increase of the coolant temperature would decrease the pressure of the vapor explosion.

  12. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 7.0) Code User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Michael F.

    1999-05-01

    The integrated fuel-coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, three-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a description of IFCI 7.0. The user's manual describes the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 7.0. Appendix A is an input manual provided for the creation of working decks.

  13. Estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio of an internal combustion engine by the use of pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunestaal, Per

    2000-03-01

    This thesis investigates the use of cylinder pressure measurements for estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio in a spark ignited internal combustion engine. An estimation model which uses the net heat release profile for estimating the cylinder air/fuel ratio of a spark ignition engine is developed. The net heat release profile is computed from the cylinder pressure trace and quantifies the conversion of chemical energy of the reactants in the charge into thermal energy. The net heat release profile does not take heat- or mass transfer into account. Cycle-averaged air/fuel ratio estimates over a range of engine speeds and loads show an RMS error of 4.1% compared to measurements in the exhaust. A thermochemical model of the combustion process in an internal combustion engine is developed. It uses a simple chemical combustion reaction, polynominal fits of internal energy as function of temperature, and the first law of thermodynamics to derive a relationship between measured cylinder pressure and the progress of the combustion process. Simplifying assumptions are made to arrive at an equation which relates the net heat release to the cylinder pressure. Two methods for estimating the sensor offset of a cylinder pressure transducer are developed. Both methods fit the pressure data during the pre-combustion phase of the compression stroke to a polytropic curve. The first method assumes a known polytropic exponent, and the other estimates the polytropic exponent. The first method results in a linear least-squares problem, and the second method results in a nonlinear least-squares problem. The nonlinear least-squares problem is solved by separating out the nonlinear dependence and solving the single-variable minimization problem. For this, a finite difference Newton method is derived. Using this method, the cost of solving the nonlinear least-squares problem is only slightly higher than solving the linear least-squares problem. Both methods show good statistical

  14. Specific Properties of Air Flow Field Within the Grinding Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Junyi; JIANG Zhengfeng; ZHAO Liang

    2006-01-01

    Air barrier of grinding means a boundary layer of air existing at the circumference of the rotating wheel, which hinders coolant from entry. This paper makes a research on air flow field of the grinding zone through experiments and numerical simulations, focusing on acquainting with the specific properties of the air flow field. Finite volume method is applied to analyze air flow field within grinding wheel in the course of numerical calculations. The test devices such as Hot-wire anemometer and Betz manometer are used during the experiments of testing the pressure and velocity within grinding zone. Results of experiments agree by and large with numerical results of calculations. The conclusions obtained in this paper, the distribution of wall pressure and the distribution of air flow velocity, are important and useful to navigate the delivery of coolant into the grinding zone. In conclusion, some recommendations are made for further study and practical applications in such field.

  15. Cooling water pump of a rotary piston internal combustion engine. Kuehlwasserpumpe einer Rotationskolbenbrennkraftmaschine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiermann, D.; Nuber, R.

    1991-05-23

    Spatial arrangement of a cooling pump of a trochoid-type rotary piston internal combustion engine with a liquid-cooled casing. First the coolant is conducted isochronically and in parallel through cooling chambers of the jacket and a side part into a common hollow space from where it is transported by the cooling pump into the other side part, on past a thermostat to a cooler located in the other side part and back into the cooling loop in the casing. The cooling pump is located in the jacket and its impeller is positioned in a cooling chamber of the other side part. Its shaft can be fitted with a speed controller for the fresh air supply and a lubricating pump.

  16. Feasibility of water injection into the turbine coolant to permit gas turbine contingency power for helicopter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A system which would allow a substantially increased output from a turboshaft engine for brief periods in emergency situations with little or no loss of turbine stress rupture life is proposed and studied analytically. The increased engine output is obtained by overtemperaturing the turbine; however, the temperature of the compressor bleed air used for hot section cooling is lowered by injecting and evaporating water. This decrease in cooling air temperature can offset the effect of increased gas temperature and increased shaft speed and thus keep turbine blade stress rupture life constant. The analysis utilized the NASA-Navy-Engine-Program or NNEP computer code to model the turboshaft engine in both design and off-design modes. This report is concerned with the effect of the proposed method of power augmentation on the engine cycle and turbine components. A simple cycle turboshaft engine with a 16:1 pressure ratio and a 1533 K (2760 R) turbine inlet temperature operating at sea level static conditions was studied to determine the possible power increase and the effect on turbine stress rupture life that could be expected using the proposed emergency cooling scheme. The analysis showed a 54 percent increse in output power can be achieved with no loss in gas generator turbine stress rupture life. A 231 K (415 F) rise in turbine inlet temperature is required for this level of augmentation. The required water flow rate was found to be .0109 kg water per kg of engine air flow.

  17. Improved Traps for Removing Gases From Coolant Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, John; Ritchie, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Two documents discuss improvements in traps for removing noncondensable gases (e.g., air) from heat-transfer liquids (e.g., water) in spacecraft cooling systems. Noncondensable gases must be removed because they can interfere with operation. A typical trap includes a cylindrical hydrophobic membrane inside a cylindrical hydrophilic membrane, all surrounded by an outer cylindrical impermeable shell. The input mixture of gas bubbles and liquid flows into the annular volume between the membranes. Bubbles pass into the central hollow of the hydrophobic membrane and are vented. The liquid flows outward through the hydrophilic membrane and is recirculated.

  18. U.S. Air Force Spent Billions on F117 Engine Sustainment Without Knowing What a Fair Price Was

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    item was sold, leased , licensed, or offered for sale (either the specific product or service, or the product or service from which the item evolved...059 Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Acquisition) (cont’d) Note: Attachment 2, Security Classifications Review Form is not included in the

  19. Which Air Force Civil Engineer Capabilities Can Complement USNORTHCOM’s Role in Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    BASED AND/OR PORTLAND CEMENT BASED PAVEMENTS WITH SEMI-PERMANENT MATERIALS TO INCLUDE LIMITED JOINT SEALING. KIT CONSIST OF (5) 8’X 20’ ISO CONTAINERS... techniques , and procedures (TTPs). Additionally, the intent of this thesis is not to advocate for additional DSCA mission taskings for the Air Force...

  20. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked & influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs.

  1. 77 FR 36341 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Organization (ICAO) proceedings in which most of these requirements were first developed. These regulatory... E. Brief History of ICAO Regulation of Aircraft Engine Emissions III. Why is EPA taking this action.... This rule will allow us to enforce in the U.S. the emission standards adopted by ICAO, and will...

  2. Multi-elemental analysis of jet engine lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids and their implication in aircraft air quality incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, C

    1999-05-07

    The flight crews of aircraft often report symptoms including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision and tingling in legs and arms. Many of these incidents have been traced to contamination of cabin air with lubricating oil, as well as hydraulic fluid, constituents. Considering that these air contaminants are often subjected to temperatures in excess of 500 degrees C, a large number of different exposures can be expected. Although the reported symptoms are most consistent with exposures to volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and the organophosphate constituents in these oils and fluids, the involvement of these agents has not been clearly demonstrated. Possible exposure to toxic elements, such as lead, mercury, thallium and others, have not been ruled out. In order to assess the potential of exposure to toxic elements a multi-elemental analysis was done on two hydraulic fluids and three lubricating oils which have been implicated in a number of air quality incidents. A secondary objective was to establish if the multi-elemental concentrations of the fluids tested are different enough to allow such an analysis to be used as a possible method of identifying the source of exposure that might have been present during aircraft air quality incidents. No significant concentrations of toxic elements were identified in any of the oils or hydraulic fluids. The elemental compositions of the samples were different enough to be used for identification purposes and the measurement of only three elements was able to achieve this. Whether these findings have an application, in aircraft air quality incident investigations, needs to be established with further studies.

  3. Performance of air breathing combined cycle engines with a turbofan; Leistungsverhalten luftatmender Kombinationstriebwerke mit Zweistrom-Turboteil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, H.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper the influence of the design and control parameters on the performance characteristic of a combined cycle engine consisting of a turbofan engine with a reheat system and a convergent-divergent nozzle is investigated. The studies are not based on a special mission but the two sections of a mission dominating the fuel consumption of the propulsion system - the acceleration flight and the cruise segment - are considered seperately. By that it is shown which design of the turbo engine is suitable for each section of the mission and how far these designs differ from each other. The studies start with the so-called baseline engine. Applying a performance calculation program the performance characteristic of the engine is calculated for given flight conditions and engine control parameter settings. The particularly for high speed propulsion systems important interaction between the engine and the aircraft is considered, iteratively adjusting the angle of attack of the aircraft given for the performance calculation to the one fulfilling the equations of motion of the aircraft. Based on the results of the baseline engine the design parameters of the turbo engine, namely (a) the turbine inlet temperature T{sub t4,A}, (b) the overall pressure ratio {pi}{sub tV,A} and (c) the bypass ratio {mu}{sub A} are varied systematically and the effect of these changes on the performance of the engine along the flight Mach Number is investigated. First the studies are carried out for the acceleration flight and afterwards they are being extended to the cruise flight segment. The valuation criteria for the engine performance in the acceleration section is the so-called acceleration efficiency. This efficiency is defined as the ratio of the potential and kinetic energy rise and the therefore needed fuel energy. In the cruise section the engine performance is valuated using a so-called cruise number which considers the quality of the conversion of fuel energy into propulsive

  4. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  5. Vibration signal analysis of main coolant pump flywheel based on Hilbert–Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiru Liu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT algorithm for flywheel vibration analysis. The simulation indicated that the proposed flywheel vibration signal analysis method performs well, which means that the method can lay the foundation for the detection and diagnosis in a reactor main coolant pump.

  6. Lead Coolant Test Facility Systems Design, Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Cost Estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soli Khericha; Edwin Harvego; John Svoboda; Ryan Dalling

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimate. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  7. Lead coolant test facility systems design, thermal hydraulic analysis and cost estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khericha, Soli, E-mail: slk2@inel.gov [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Harvego, Edwin; Svoboda, John; Evans, Robert [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Dalling, Ryan [ExxonMobil Gas and Power Marketing, Houston, TX 77069 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T and FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed below: Bullet Develop and demonstrate feasibility of submerged heat exchanger. Bullet Develop and demonstrate open-lattice flow in electrically heated core. Bullet Develop and demonstrate chemistry control. Bullet Demonstrate safe operation. Bullet Provision for future testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimated. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 Degree-Sign C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  8. The upgrade of intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) through the change of coolant and reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, I C; Iverson, E B

    2002-01-01

    The current intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) depleted uranium target is cooled by light water. The inner reflector material is graphite and the outer reflector material is beryllium. The presence of H sub 2 O in the target moderates neutrons and leads to a higher absorption loss in the target than is necessary. D sub 2 O coolant in the small quantities required minimizes this effect. We have studied the possible improvement in IPNS beam fluxes that would result from changing the coolant from H sub 2 O to D sub 2 O and the inner reflector from graphite to beryllium. Neutron intensities were calculated for directions normal to the viewed surface of each moderator for four different cases of combinations of target coolant and reflector materials. The simulations reported here were performed using the MCNPX (version 2.1.5) computer program. Our results show that substantial gains in neutron beam intensities can be achieved by appropriate combination of target coolant and reflector materials. The combination o...

  9. Modeling Film-Coolant Flow Characteristics at the Exit of Shower-Head Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, R. E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The coolant flow characteristics at the hole exits of a film-cooled blade are derived from an earlier analysis where the hole pipes and coolant plenum were also discretized. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with three staggered rows of shower-head holes. The present analysis applies these flow characteristics at the shower-head hole exits. A multi-block three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with Wilcox's k-omega model is used to compute the heat transfer coefficient on the film-cooled turbine blade. A reasonably good comparison with the experimental data as well as with the more complete earlier analysis where the hole pipes and coolant plenum were also gridded is obtained. If the 1/7th power law is assumed for the coolant flow characteristics at the hole exits, considerable differences in the heat transfer coefficient on the blade surface, specially in the leading-edge region, are observed even though the span-averaged values of h (heat transfer coefficient based on T(sub o)-T(sub w)) match well with the experimental data. This calls for span-resolved experimental data near film-cooling holes on a blade for better validation of the code.

  10. Contribution to the diagnosis of mixed friction in the bearings of a reactor coolant pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaev, G.P.; Shilejko, P.G.; Kail, I.T.; Proskuryakov, K.N. (Moskovskij Ehnergeticheskij Inst. (USSR)); Hippmann, N.; Kinsky, D.; Sturm, A.; Uhlemann, S. (Ingenieurhochschule Zittau (German Democratic Republic))

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed to study the vibrational behaviour of a vertical, slide-bearing, fully encapsulated reactor coolant pump at various operational conditions. Magnetical and mechanical noise is interpreted as a function of pump delivery, pressure, volume flow, and temperature, and an example of an inadmissible operational condition (mixed friction in the bearings) is diagnosed.

  11. Control of oxidizing potential of Pb and Pb-Bi coolants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vladimirovich Ulyanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical and experimental data on formation of oxygen oxidizing potential in heavy liquid metal coolants (Pb and Pb-Bi eutectic was considered. It was revealed that oxygen could be both dissolved in these coolants and included in various thermodynamically unstable oxide compounds. In case of heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC flowing in non-isothermal circuit, these compounds are broken down with oxygen release or formed fixing dissolved oxygen. The amount of oxygen, which is present in HLMC and exhibits its activity with temperature, could be much greater than the value detected by oxygen sensor. That is why HLMC possess internal oxygen reserves inhibiting corrosion in the circuits. Presence of thermodynamically unstable oxide phases in the above coolants, non-isoconcentration distribution of active oxygen, and impossibility to currently obtain the analytical relationship showing dissolved oxygen distribution make it necessary to use at least three oxygen sensors for studying processes of formation of HLMC oxidizing potential. These sensors should be located in the zones of max and min temperatures (tmax, tmin and in that at t=450-550°С. In order to assure the most accurate estimate it is reasonable to provide additional two or more sensors in the zone at t=450-550°С.

  12. OPAL REACTOR: Calculation/Experiment comparison of Neutron Flux Mapping in Flux Coolant Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbot, L.; Domergue, C.; Villard, J. F.; Destouches, C. [CEA, Paris (France); Braoudakis, G.; Wassink, D.; Sinclair, B.; Osborn, J. C.; Huayou, Wu [ANSTO, Syeney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    The measurement and calculation of the neutron flux mapping of the OPAL research reactor are presented. Following an investigation of fuel coolant channels using sub-miniature fission chambers to measure thermal neutron flux profiles, neutronic calculations were performed. Comparison between calculation and measurement shows very good agreement.

  13. Partial Discharge Measurements in HV Rotating Machines in Dependence on Pressure of Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kršňák

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the pressure of the coolant used in high voltage rotating machines on partial discharges occurring in stator insulation is discussed in this paper. The first part deals with a theoretical analysis of the topic. The second part deals with the results obtained on a real generator in industrial conditions. Finally, theoretical assumptions and obtained results are compared.

  14. Study on effects of mixing vane grids on coolant temperature distribution by subchannel analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, H.; Yang, B.W.; Han, B. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China). Science and Technology Center for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Research

    2016-07-15

    Mixing vane grids (MVG) have great influence on coolant temperature field in the rod bundle. The MVG could enhance convective heat transfer between the fuel rod wall and the coolant, and promote inter-subchannel mixing at the same time. For the influence of the MVG on convective heat transfer enhancement, many experiments have been done and several correlations have been developed based on the experimental data. However, inter-subchannel mixing promotion caused by the MVG is not well estimated in subchannel analysis because the information of mixing vanes is totally missing in most subchannel codes. This paper analyzes the influence of mixing vanes on coolant temperature distribution using the improved MVG model in subchannel analysis. The coolant temperature distributions with the MVG are analyzed, and the results show that mixing vanes lead to a more uniform temperature distribution. The performances of split vane grids under different power conditions are evaluated. The results are compared with those of spacer grids without mixing vanes and some conclusions are obtained.

  15. Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine. Volume 1, Concept evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

    1991-11-01

    The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

  16. Automatización de un Secador Convectivo de Aire Caliente para fines de Docencia en Ingeniería de Alimentos Automation of a Convective Hot Air Dryer for Teaching in Food Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A Saavedra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo describe el diseño y montaje de un dispositivo experimental para la automatización de un secador de aire caliente con flujo paralelo en co-corriente para realizar estudios de secado. El desarrollo del trabajo se dividió en dos actividades principales: (i diseño del sistema de automatización y (ii la validación de los datos entregados por el equipo. Se obtuvo un dispositivo capaz de registrar las variables del proceso de secado y de la imagen de la muestra deshidratada en tiempo real, como así mismo transmitir dicha información a través de Internet. Los datos procesados por el sistema automático comparados con experiencias manuales tradicionales (no automatizadas se validaron estadísticamente. Se concluye finalmente que la propuesta es viable, fiable y atractiva para el usuario por lo que facilita el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje en un área de especial importancia en Ingeniería de Alimentos.This paper describes the design and installation of an automated experimental device applied to a parallel co-current hot air dryer to perform drying studies in the field of food engineering. The development of this work was divided into two main activities: (i design of the automation system and (ii validation of automatically collected data. A device capable of collecting and registering real time data and images from drying processes, and transmitting them through Internet was obtained. The data processed by the automatic device was statistically validated. It is concluded that the proposed automation device is feasible, reliable and attractive for the users, facilitating the teaching-learning process in an important area of Food Engineering.

  17. Investigating Liquid CO2 as a Coolant for a MTSA Heat Exchanger Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.; Padilla, Sebastian; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO 2) control for a future Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. CO 2 removal and rejection is accomplished by driving a sorbent through a temperature swing of approximately 210 K to 280 K . The sorbent is cooled to these sub-freezing temperatures by a Sublimating Heat Exchanger (SHX) with liquid coolant expanded to sublimation temperatures. Water is the baseline coolant available on the moon, and if used, provides a competitive solution to the current baseline PLSS schematic. Liquid CO2 (LCO2) is another non-cryogenic coolant readily available from Martian resources which can be produced and stored using relatively low power and minimal infrastructure. LCO 2 expands from high pressure liquid (5800 kPa) to Mars ambient (0.8 kPa) to produce a gas / solid mixture at temperatures as low as 156 K. Analysis and experimental work are presented to investigate factors that drive the design of a heat exchanger to effectively use this sink. Emphasis is given to enabling efficient use of the CO 2 cooling potential and mitigation of heat exchanger clogging due to solid formation. Minimizing mass and size as well as coolant delivery are also considered. The analysis and experimental work is specifically performed in an MTSA-like application to enable higher fidelity modeling for future optimization of a SHX design. In doing so, the work also demonstrates principles and concepts so that the design can be further optimized later in integrated applications (including Lunar application where water might be a choice of coolant).

  18. A model for the analysis of loss of decay heat removal during loss of coolant accident in MTR pool type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousbia-salah, Anis [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleari e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: b.salah@ing.unipi.it; Meftah, Brahim [Division Reacteur - Centre de Recherche Nucleaire Draria (CRND), BP 43 Sebala DRARIA - Algiers (Algeria); Hamidouche, Tewfik [Laboratoire des Analyses de Surete, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399, 16000 Algiers (Algeria)]. E-mail: thamidouche@comena-dz.org; Si-Ahmed, El Khider [Laboratoire des Ecoulements Polyhpasiques, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Alger, Algiers (Algeria)

    2006-03-15

    During a loss of coolant accident leading to total emptying of the reactor pool, the decay heat could be removed through air natural convection. However, under partial pool emptying the core is partially submerged and the coolant circulation inside the fuel element could no more be possible. Under such conditions, a core overheat takes place, and the thermal energy is essentially diffused from the core to its periphery by combined thermal radiation and conduction. In order to predict fuel element temperature evolution under such conditions a mathematical model is performed. The model is based on a 3D geometry and takes into account a variety of core configurations including fuel elements (standard and control), reflector elements and grid plates. The homogeneous flow model is used and the fluid conservation equations are solved using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Preliminary tests of the developed model were made by considering a series of hypothetical accidents. In the current framework a loss of decay heat removal accidents in the IAEA benchmark open pool MTR-type research reactor is considered. It is shown that in the case of a low core immersion height no water boiling is observed and the fuel surface temperature rise remains below the melting point of the aluminium cladding.

  19. Predicting the conditions under which vibroacoustic resonances with external periodic loads occur in the primary coolant circuits of VVER-based NPPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, K. N.; Fedorov, A. I.; Zaporozhets, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The accident at the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) caused by an earthquake showed the need of taking further efforts aimed at improving the design and engineering solutions for ensuring seismic resistance of NPPs with due regard to mutual influence of the dynamic processes occurring in the NPP building structures and process systems. Resonance interaction between the vibrations of NPP equipment and coolant pressure pulsations leads to an abnormal growth of dynamic stresses in structural materials, accelerated exhaustion of equipment service life, and increased number of sudden equipment failures. The article presents the results from a combined calculation-theoretical and experimental substantiation of mutual amplification of two kinds of external periodic loads caused by rotation of the reactor coolant pump (RCP) rotor and an earthquake. The data of vibration measurements at an NPP are presented, which confirm the predicted multiple amplification of vibrations in the steam generator and RCP at a certain combination of coolant thermal-hydraulic parameters. It is shown that the vibration frequencies of the main equipment may fall in the frequency band corresponding to the maximal values in the envelope response spectra constructed on the basis of floor accelerograms. The article presents the results from prediction of conditions under which vibroacoustic resonances with external periodic loads take place, which confirm the occurrence of additional earthquake-induced multiple growth of pressure pulsation intensity in the steam generator at the 8.3 Hz frequency and additional multiple growth of vibrations of the RCP and the steam generator cold header at the 16.6 Hz frequency. It is shown that at the elastic wave frequency equal to 8.3 Hz in the coolant, resonance occurs with the frequency of forced vibrations caused by the rotation of the RCP rotor. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of exceeding the design level of equipment vibrations

  20. Engineering correlations of variable-property effects on laminar forced convection mass transfer for dilute vapor species and small particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple engineering correlation scheme is developed to predict the variable property effects on dilute species laminar forced convection mass transfer applicable to all vapor molecules or Brownian diffusing small particle, covering the surface to mainstream temperature ratio of 0.25 T sub W/T sub e 4. The accuracy of the correlation is checked against rigorous numerical forced convection laminar boundary layer calculations of flat plate and stagnation point flows of air containing trace species of Na, NaCl, NaOH, Na2SO4, K, KCl, KOH, or K2SO4 vapor species or their clusters. For the cases reported here the correlation had an average absolute error of only 1 percent (maximum 13 percent) as compared to an average absolute error of 18 percent (maximum 54 percent) one would have made by using the constant-property results.

  1. CFD analyses of flow structures in air-ingress and rod bundle problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong-Chan

    Two topics from nuclear engineering field are included in this dissertation. One study is the air-ingress phenomenon during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario, and the other is a 5-by-5 bundle assembly with a PWR design. The objectives were to investigate the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the gravity-driven stratified flows inside a coaxial pipe and the effects caused by two types of spacers at the downstream of the rod bundle. Richardson extrapolation was used for the grid independent study. The simulation results show good agreements with the experiments. Wavelet analysis and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) were used to study the flow behaviors and flow patterns. For the air-ingress phenomenon, Brunt-Vaisala frequency, or buoyancy frequency, predicts a frequency of 2.34 Hz; this is confirmed by the dominant frequency of 2.4 Hz obtained from the wavelet analysis between times 1.2 s and 1.85 s. For the rod bundle study, the dominant frequency at the center of the subchannel was determined to be 2.4 Hz with a secondary dominant frequency of 4 Hz and a much minor frequency of 6 Hz. Generally, wavelet analysis has much better performance than POD, in the air-ingress phenomenon, for a strongly transient scenario; they are both appropriate for the rod bundle study. Based on this study, when the fluid pair in a real condition is used, the time which air intrudes into the reactor is predictable.

  2. 电驱动和燃气驱动空气源热泵运行设备的分析%Exergy Analysis of the Operating Equipment of Electricity Engine-driven and Gas Engine-driven Air Source Heat Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史丽娜; 刘学来; 李永安

    2016-01-01

    对燃气驱动以及电驱动空气源热泵的制热过程进行了分析,得出各个运行设备的损、效率以及热力完善度。研究结果表明:空气源热泵的四大部件:蒸发器、压缩机、冷凝器、节流阀的损分别为0.372、2.722、1.219、0.322。燃气空气源热泵与电驱动空气源热泵均等效为一次能源时,系统的效率分别为22.52%、17.4%,可以看出燃气空气源热泵效率较电驱动空气源热泵高,燃气机热泵更经济节能。%The exergy analysis of the gas engine-driven and electricity engine-driven air source heat pump are made. , and the exergy loss, exergy efficiency and thermodynamic perfection degree of each equipment were obtained. The results show that the exergy losses of air source heat pump in the evaporator, compressor, condenser and throttle valve are 0. 372, 2. 722, 1. 219, 0. 322, respectively. When gas engine-driven and electricity engine-driven air source heat pump are all equivalent to primary en-ergy source,the exergy efficiency of the whole system were 22. 52%, 17. 4%,it can be seen that the exergy efficiency of the gas engine-driven air source heat pump is higher than that of the electricity engine-driven air source heat pump , and the gas engine-driven air source heat pump is more economical and energy saving.

  3. Air Pollution and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. D., Ed.

    This book is an authoritative reference and practical guide designed to help the plant engineer identify and solve industrial air pollution problems in order to be able to meet current air pollution regulations. Prepared under the editorial supervision of an experienced chemical engineer, with each chapter contributed by an expert in his field,…

  4. Advances in Forecasting and Prevention of Resonances Between Coolant Acoustical Oscillations and Fuel Rod Vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin Nicolaevich [NPP, NPEI, 14, Krasnokazarmennaya str. Moscow, 111250 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    To prevent the appearance of the conditions for resonance interaction between the fluid flow and the reactor internals (RI), fuel rod (FR ) and fuel assemblies (FA) it is necessary to de-tune Eigen frequency of coolant pressure oscillations (EFCPO) and natural frequency of mechanical element's oscillations and also of the system which is formed by the comprising of these elements. Other words it is necessary to de-tune acoustic resonance frequency and natural frequencies of RI, FR and FA. While solving these problems it is necessary to have a theoretical and settlement substantiation of an oscillation frequency band of the coolant outside of which there is no resonant interaction with structure vibrations. The presented work is devoted to finding the solution of this problem. There are results of an estimation of width of such band as well as the examples of a preliminary quantitative estimation of Q - factors of coolant acoustic oscillatory circuit formed by the equipment of the NPP. Abnormal growth of intensity of pressure pulsations in a mode with definite value of reactor capacity have been found out by measurements on VVER - 1000 reactor. This phenomenon has been found out casually and its original reason had not been identified. Paper shows that disappearance of this effect could be reached by realizing outlet of EFCPO from so-called, pass bands of frequencies (PBF). PBF is located symmetrical on both parties from frequency of own oscillations of FA. Methods, algorithms of calculations and quantitative estimations are developed for EFCPO, Q and PBF in various modes of operation NPP with VVER-1000. Results of calculations allow specifying area of resonant interaction EFCPO with vibrations of FR, FA and a basket of reactor core. For practical realization of the received results it is offered to make corresponding additions to the design documentation and maintenance instructions of the equipment of the NPP with VVER-1000. The improvement of these documents

  5. Cartilage tissue engineering application of injectable gelatin hydrogel with in situ visible-light-activated gelation capability in both air and aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hang; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Alexander, Peter G; Beck, Angela M; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-09-01

    Chondroprogenitor cells encapsulated in a chondrogenically supportive, three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold represents a promising, regenerative approach to articular cartilage repair. In this study, we have developed an injectable, biodegradable methacrylated gelatin (mGL)-based hydrogel capable of rapid gelation via visible light (VL)-activated crosslinking in air or aqueous solution. The mild photocrosslinking conditions permitted the incorporation of cells during the gelation process. Encapsulated human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) showed high, long-term viability (up to 90 days) throughout the scaffold. To assess the applicability of the mGL hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering, we have evaluated the efficacy of chondrogenesis of the encapsulated hBMSCs, using hBMSCs seeded in agarose as control. The ability of hBMSC-laden mGL constructs to integrate with host tissues after implantation was further investigated utilizing an in vitro cartilage repair model. The results showed that the mGL hydrogel, which could be photopolymerized in air and aqueous solution, supports hBMSC growth and TGF-β3-induced chondrogenesis. Compared with agarose, mGL constructs laden with hBMSCs are mechanically stronger with time, and integrate well with native cartilage tissue upon implantation based on push-out mechanical testing. VL-photocrosslinked mGL scaffold thus represents a promising scaffold for cell-based repair and resurfacing of articular cartilage defects.

  6. Investigation of Spark Ignition and Autoignition in Methane and Air Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Chemical Reaction Kinetics. A numerical Study of Ignition Processes in Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordrik, R.

    1993-12-01

    The processes in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines have received increased attention in recent years because their efficiencies are important both economically and environmentally. This doctoral thesis studies the ignition phenomena by means of numerical simulation methods. The fundamental physical relations include flow field conservation equations, thermodynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, transport properties and spark modelling. Special attention is given to the inclusion of chemical kinetics in the flow field equations. Using his No Transport of Radicals Concept method, the author reduces the computational efforts by neglecting the transport of selected intermediate species. The method is validated by comparison with flame propagation data. A computational method is described and used to simulate spark ignition in laminar premixed methane-air mixtures and the autoignition process of a methane bubble surrounded by hot air. The spark ignition simulation agrees well with experimental results from the literature. The autoignition simulation identifies the importance of diffusive and chemical processes acting together. The ignition delay times exceed the experimental values found in the literature for premixed ignition delay, presumably because of the mixing process and lack of information on low temperature reactions in the skeletal kinetic mechanism. Transient turbulent methane jet autoignition is simulated by means of the KIVA-II code. Turbulent combustion is modelled by the Eddy Dissipation Concept. 90 refs., 81 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Localized indoor air quality monitoring for indoor pollutants' healthy risk assessment using sub-principal component analysis driven model and engineering big data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Honglan; Kim, MinJeong; Lee, SeungChul; Pyo, SeHee; Esfahani, Iman Janghorban; Yoo, ChangKyoo [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in subway systems shows periodic dynamics due to the number of passengers, train schedules, and air pollutants accumulated in the system, which are considered as an engineering big data. We developed a new IAQ monitoring model using a sub-principal component analysis (sub-PCA) method to account for the periodic dynamics of the IAQ big data. In addition, the IAQ data in subway systems are different on the weekdays and weekend due to weekly effect, since the patterns of the number of passengers and their access time on the weekdays and weekend are different. Sub-PCA-based local monitoring was developed for separating the weekday and weekend environmental IAQ big data, respectively. The monitoring results for the test data at the Y-subway station clearly showed that the proposed method could analyze an environmental IAQ big data, improve the monitoring efficiency and greatly reduce the false alarm rate of the local on-line monitoring by comparison with the multi-way PCA.

  8. Study of carbonaceous nanoparticles in premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}-air flames and behind a spark ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotheer, Horst-Henning; Hoffmann, Kai; Wolf, Katrin; Kanjarkar, Santosh; Wahl, Claus; Aigner, Manfred [Institute of Combustion Technology, DLR, Pfaffenwaldring 38, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Nanoparticle size distributions and their concentrations were studied in atmospheric premixed ethylene/air flames using photo ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and total organic carbon (TOC) calibration supplemented by differential mobility analysis (DMA). Focus of this study is the evolution of nanoparticles as a function of height above burner (HAB) and of the C/O ratio of the unburned gases. It was found that especially particles of the cluster type exhibit a sharp concentration drop by more than two orders of magnitude within a narrow C/O window which is close to the sooting threshold. Using DMA a decline by two orders of magnitude was found. These results suggest that at best only small concentrations of nanoparticles should be formed significantly below the sooting threshold. As these conditions prevail in a homogeneously charged IC engine no or only very small nanoparticle emissions are expected in the exhaust gas. This was indeed found for a small Otto engine driving a power generator unit. Using flame nanoparticle profiles as standard, absolute concentrations for their emissions could be deduced. These data were supported by additional DMA measurements. The calibration using TOC did not completely match the one based on the condensation particle counter of the DMA apparatus. (author)

  9. Development of a New Type of Green Switch Air Entraining Agent for Wet-Mix Shotcrete and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoming Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air entraining agent (AEA can bring a lot of microbubbles into fresh concrete for improving its fluidity; however, high fluidity has adverse effect on the shootability of wet-mix shotcrete. In order to solve the contradictory issue, the paper developed a new type of green switch air entraining agent (GSAE that can improve both the pumpability and shootability. The single-admixture and combination tests containing foaming ability and surface tension were performed with Deer agitator and automatic tension meter. The new AEA was developed with two constituents A and B. A was prepared with Sapindus mukorossi(S-1, dodecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride(1231, and polyacrylamide. B was prepared with lauryl sodium sulfate (K12 and silicone oil. The mass mix proportion was S-1 : 1231 : polyacrylamide : K12 : silicone oil = 1 : 0.33 : 0.2 : 0.33 : 0.47. The application method of GSAE proposed that A was premixed with fresh concrete and then B was added at nozzle. Experimental investigation showed that the optimal mixing amount of GSAE was 0.1%–0.2% relative to cement. All performance measured of wet-mix shotcrete with 0.12% GSAE met the first-grade product requirements of the China National Standard. Compared with the conventional type of AEA, the proposed GSAE is capable of effectively improving pumpability and shootability.

  10. Numerical study with experimental comparison of pressure waves in the air intake system of an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Carlos E.G.; Vielmo, Horacio A. [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.], E-mails: vielmoh@mecanica.ufrgs.br; Hanriot, Sergio M. [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC-Minas), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.], E-mail: hanriot@pucminas.br

    2010-07-01

    The work investigates the pressure waves behavior in the intake system of an internal combustion engine. For the purpose of examining this problem, it was chosen an experimental study in order to validate the results of the present simulation. At the literature there are several experimental studies, and some numerical simulations, but the most of the numerical studies treat the problem only in one dimension in practical problems, or two dimensions in specific problems. Using a CFD code it is possible to analyze more complex systems, including tridimensional effects. The pulsating phenomenon is originated from the periodic movement of the intake valve, and produces waves that propagate within the system. The intake system studied was composed by a straight pipe connected to a 1000 cc engine with a single operating cylinder. The experiments were carried out in a flow bench. In the present work, the governing equations was discretized by Finite Volumes Method with an explicit formulation, and the time integration was made using the multi-stage Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. The solution is independent of mesh or time step. The numerical analysis presents a good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  11. The new Center of Competence 'Compressed Air' at the Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture; Aufbau des Druckluft-Kompetenzzentrums an der HTA Luzern. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadelmann, B.

    2006-07-01

    The Lucerne School of Engineering and Architecture was commissioned by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy in 2004 to establish (in a first phase) a Center of Competence 'Compressed Air'. The project aimed at assessing the potential improvements of compressed air systems in operation. The Center of Competence 'Compressed Air' was to be promoted through publications in professional journals and users alerted to the inefficiency of compressed air systems. Tests were performed on-site on six compressed air systems, focussing on the compressed air distribution lines. The analyses showed that while the compressed air generated in one small system did little more than cover the losses in its distribution system, leakages in the other systems were less serious. Nevertheless, all of the systems showed potential improvements, though pressure losses in all systems were acceptable. The project has raised the awareness of users of compressed air and contributed to the development of energy-efficient compressed air systems. The Swiss Federal Office of Energy's campaign 'Druckluft Schweiz' will continue with these efforts, further promoting efficient energy use. (author)

  12. Attempt of lean burn of a 4 cycle gasoline engine by the aid of low pressure air assisted in-cylinder injection; Tonai kuki nenryo funsha ni yoru lean burn no kokoromi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, S.; Kondo, M.; Sekiya, Y.; Murayama, T. [Hokkaido Automotive Engineering College, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Comparable performance and exhaust emission with conventional carburetor was obtained by a low Pressure air assisted in-cylinder injection system. And lean burn of idling and light load operation till A/F=70 was realized by installing a spark Plug and a reed type injection nozzle in a divided combustion chambaer of a 4 cycle gasoline engine. 2 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipes. 3. Investigation on diameter ratio between the coolant pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    This report presents numerical results on thermal striping characteristics at a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipe, carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. In the numerical investigations, it was considered a tee junction system consisted of a main pipe (1.33 cm{sup I.D.}) with a 90deg elbow and a branch pipe having various inner diameters, and five diameter ratio conditions between both the pipes, i.e., (D{sub main}/D{sub branch}) = 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0. From the numerical investigations, the following characteristics were obtained: (1) Maximum sodium temperature fluctuation amplitude in the downstream region of the tee junction were decreased with increasing of the diameter ratio (decreasing of the branch pipe diameter). One of the main reasons for this behavior was considered to be that the affects of the branch pipe jet for the main pipe flows was decreased with decreasing of the branch pipe diameter. (2) Auto-power spectral density levels were decreased by the increasing of the diameter ratio. It was indicated that coolant mixing characteristics in the downstream region were controlled by locally random turbulence processes. (3) To suppress sodium temperature fluctuations in the downstream region, it is a suitable combination for larger velocity ratio and larger diameter ratio. (author)

  14. Experimental investigations of flow distribution in coolant system of Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilić, M.; Schlindwein, G., E-mail: georg.schlindwein@kit.edu; Meyder, R.; Kuhn, T.; Albrecht, O.; Zinn, K.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Experimental investigations of flow distribution in HCPB TBM are presented. • Flow rates in channels close to the first wall are lower than nominal ones. • Flow distribution in central chambers of manifold 2 is close to the nominal one. • Flow distribution in the whole manifold 3 agrees well with the nominal one. - Abstract: This paper deals with investigations of flow distribution in the coolant system of the Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB TBM) for ITER. The investigations have been performed by manufacturing and testing of an experimental facility named GRICAMAN. The facility involves the upper poloidal half of HCPB TBM bounded at outlets of the first wall channels, at outlet of by-pass pipe and at outlets of cooling channels in breeding units. In this way, the focus is placed on the flow distribution in two mid manifolds of the 4-manifold system: (i) manifold 2 to which outlets of the first wall channels and inlet of by-pass pipe are attached and (ii) manifold 3 which supplies channels in breeding units with helium coolant. These two manifolds are connected with cooling channels in vertical/horizontal grids and caps. The experimental facility has been built keeping the internal structure of manifold 2 and manifold 3 exactly as designed in HCPB TBM. The cooling channels in stiffening grids, caps and breeding units are substituted by so-called equivalent channels which provide the same hydraulic resistance and inlet/outlet conditions, but have significantly simpler geometry than the real channels. Using the conditions of flow similarity, the air pressurized at 0.3 MPa and at ambient temperature has been used as working fluid instead of HCPB TBM helium coolant at 8 MPa and an average temperature of 370 °C. The flow distribution has been determined by flow rate measurements at each of 28 equivalent channels, while the pressure distribution has been obtained measuring differential pressure at more than 250 positions. The

  15. Engineering analyses and design calculations of NASA, Langley Research Center hydrogen-air-vitiated heater with oxygen replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The technical basis is presented for the design of the hydrogen-air-vitiated heater. The heater liner is subjected to a maximum thermal environment at a specified condition, where the combustion gas temperature, pressure and flow rate are 5000 F, 750 psia, and 11.0 lb/sec, respectively, and results in a heat flux of the order of 275 BTU/sec-sq ft. Cooling and stress analyses indicate that water is the logical choice for cooling of the combustor liner. A mixing analysis was undertaken to establish a good combination of combustor length and injector configuration. The analysis, using a conservative analytical approach, indicates a combustor length of the order of 5 ft combined with discrete fuel and oxidizer injection at an approximate 2-1/2 inch radial combustor position, and results in uniform combustion products at the heater exit for all specified envelope conditions.

  16. Advanced diesel engine component development program, tasks 4-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Tony S.; Weber, Karen E.

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes the Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program to develop and demonstrate critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection engine concept. Major development activities reported are the design, analysis, and fabrication of monolithic ceramic components; vapor phase and solid film lubrication; electrohydraulic valve actuation; and high pressure common rail injection. An advanced single cylinder test bed was fabricated as a laboratory tool in studying these advanced technologies. This test bed simulates the reciprocator for a system having no cooling system, turbo compounding, Rankine bottoming cycle, common rail injection, and variable valve actuation to achieve fuel consumption of 160 g/kW-hr (.26 lb/hp-hr). The advanced concepts were successfully integrated into the test engine. All ceramic components met their functional and reliability requirements. The firedeck, cast-in-place ports, valves, valve guides, piston cap, and piston ring were made from silicon nitride. Breakthroughs required to implement a 'ceramic' engine included the fabrication of air-gap cylinder heads, elimination of compression gaskets, machining of ceramic valve seats within the ceramic firedeck, fabrication of cast-in-place ceramic port liners, implementation of vapor phase lubrication, and elimination of the engine coolant system. Silicon nitride valves were successfully developed to meet several production abuse test requirements and incorporated into the test bed with a ceramic valve guide and solid film lubrication. The ADECD cylinder head features ceramic port shields to increase insulation and exhaust energy recovery. The combustion chamber includes a ceramic firedeck and piston cap. The tribological challenge posed by top ring reversal temperatures of 550 C was met through the development of vapor phase lubrication using tricresyl phosphate at the ring-liner interface. A solenoid-controlled, variable valve actuation system

  17. The effect of coolants on the performance of magnetic micro-refrigerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D J; Bordalo, B D; Pereira, A M; Ventura, J; Oliveira, J C R E; Araújo, J P

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an alternative cooling technique with envisaged technological applications on micro- and opto-electronic devices. Here, we present a magnetic micro-refrigerator cooling device with embedded micro-channels and based on the magnetocaloric effect. We studied the influence of the coolant fluid in the refrigeration process by numerically simulating the heat transfer processes using the finite element method. This allowed us to calculate the cooling power of the device. Our results show that gallium is the most efficient coolant fluid and, when used with Gd5Si2Ge2, a maximum power of 11.2 W/mm3 at a working frequency of -5 kHz can be reached. However, for operation frequencies around 50 Hz, water is the most efficient fluid with a cooling power of 0.137 W/mm3.

  18. Small-break loss-of-coolant accidents in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.; Harmony, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor developed by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). A unique feature of the PIUS concept is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is normally controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. ABB submitted the PIUS design to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for preapplication review, and Los Alamos supported the NRC`s review effort. Baseline analyses of small-break initiators at two locations were performed with the system neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis code TRAC-PF1/MOD2. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept to severe off-normal conditions having a very low probability of occurrence.

  19. Simulation of isothermal multi-phase fuel-coolant interaction using MPS method with GPU acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, W.; Zhang, S.; Zheng, Y. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Center for Engineering and Scientific Computation

    2016-07-15

    The energetic fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) has been one of the primary safety concerns in nuclear power plants. Graphical processing unit (GPU) implementation of the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method is presented and used to simulate the fuel coolant interaction problem. The governing equations are discretized with the particle interaction model of MPS. Detailed implementation on single-GPU is introduced. The three-dimensional broken dam is simulated to verify the developed GPU acceleration MPS method. The proposed GPU acceleration algorithm and developed code are then used to simulate the FCI problem. As a summary of results, the developed GPU-MPS method showed a good agreement with the experimental observation and theoretical prediction.

  20. A Model for Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction during Melt Slumping in a Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohal, Manohar Singh; Siefken, Larry James

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes a simple fuel melt slumping model to replace the current parametric model in SCDAP/RELAP5. Specifically, a fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) model is developed to analyze the slumping molten fuel, molten fuel breakup, heat transfer to coolant, relocation of the molten droplets, size of a partially solidified particles that settle to the bottom of the lower plenum, and melt-plenum interaction, if any. Considering our objectives, the molten fuel jet breakup model, and fuel droplets Lagrangian model as included in a code TEXAS-V with Eulerian thermal hydraulics for water and steam from SCDAP/RELAP5 were used. The model was assessed with experimental data from MAGICO-2000 tests performed at University of California at Santa Barbara, and FARO Test L-08 performed at Joint Research Center, Ispra, Italy. The comparison was found satisfactory.

  1. Process for regeneration of a soot particle filter situated in the exhaust pipe of an air-compressing internal combustion engine. Verfahren zur Regeneration eines in der Abgasleitung einer luftverdichtenden Brennkraftmaschine angeordneten Russpartikelfilters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abthoff, J.; Schuster, H.D.; Langer, H.J.; Strohmer, E.; Gabler, R.; Schulte, R.

    1991-05-08

    A process for the regenration of a soot particle filter situated in the exhaust pipe of an air-compressing injection internal combustion engine by burning off the soot particles is described. A device to control the suction pipe cross section depending on the load and speed is provided in the suction pipe. To prevent damage to the soot filter when changing to thrust operation of the internal combustion engine, it is proposed to move the device to control the suction air pipe cross section directly after a change to thrust operation of the internal combustion engine to a position reducing the pipe crosss ection to a minimum and then to move it continuously to its open position.

  2. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, G. [AIB Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  3. Experimental study of electroinsulating coatings in gallium coolant related to the divertor cooling loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznosov, A. V.; Sherbakov, R. V.; Karatushina, I. V.; Romanov, P. V.

    1996-10-01

    Experimental investigation of electroinsulating coatings stability on the samples made of stainless stell, vanadium alloy and beryllium has been conducted at 80-350°C. The impact of gas pressure upon the liquid gallium open surface was studied. The stability of electroinsulating film parameters on divertor structure materials was confirmed for the divertor with open liquid metal coolant surface in the vacuum chamber.

  4. Neutronic analysis of a high power density hybrid reactor using innovative coolants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Senay Yalçin; Mustafa Übeylı; Adem Acir

    2005-08-01

    In this study, neutronic investigation of a deuterium–tritium (DT) driven hybrid reactor using ceramic uranium fuels, namely UC, UO2 or UN under a high neutron wall load (NWL) of 10 MW/m2 at the first wall is conducted over a period of 24 months for fissile fuel breeding for light water reactors (LWRs). New substances, namely, Flinabe or Li20Sn80 are used as coolants in the fuel zone to facilitate heat transfer out of the blanket. Natural lithium is also utilized for comparison to these two innovative coolants. Neutron transport calculations are performed on a simple experimental hybrid blanket with cylindrical geometry with the help of the SCALE 4·3 System by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and an S8-P3 approximation. The investigated blanket using Flinabe or Li20Sn80 shows better fissile fuel breeding and fuel enrichment characteristics compared to that with natural lithium which shows that these two innovative coolants can be used in hybrid reactors for higher fissile fuel breeding performance. Furthermore, using a high NWL of 10 MW/m2 at the first wall of the investigated blanket can decrease the time for fuel rods to reach the level for charging in LWRs.

  5. Assessment of fiber optic sensors for aging monitoring of industrial liquid coolants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riziotis, Christos; El Sachat, Alexandros; Markos, Christos; Velanas, Pantelis; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Aggelos

    2015-03-01

    Lately the demand for in situ and real time monitoring of industrial assets and processes has been dramatically increased. Although numerous sensing techniques have been proposed, only a small fraction can operate efficiently under harsh industrial environments. In this work the operational properties of a proposed photonic based chemical sensing scheme, capable to monitor the ageing process and the quality characteristics of coolants and lubricants in industrial heavy machinery for metal finishing processes is presented. The full spectroscopic characterization of different coolant liquids revealed that the ageing process is connected closely to the acidity/ pH value of coolants, despite the fact that the ageing process is quite complicated, affected by a number of environmental parameters such as the temperature, humidity and development of hazardous biological content as for example fungi. Efficient and low cost optical fiber sensors based on pH sensitive thin overlayers, are proposed and employed for the ageing monitoring. Active sol-gel based materials produced with various pH indicators like cresol red, bromophenol blue and chorophenol red in tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were used for the production of those thin film sensitive layers deposited on polymer's and silica's large core and highly multimoded optical fibers. The optical characteristics, sensing performance and environmental robustness of those optical sensors are presented, extracting useful conclusions towards their use in industrial applications.

  6. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  7. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  8. Primary coolant sampling for activated corrosion product studies at Hanford N Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, D.B.

    1985-01-31

    A special system for sampling primary coolant at N Reactor during operation has been constructed and operated from 1977 to 1983. The basic criteria and design for solving the difficult problem of getting representative samples have been presented; this report details how the instrumentation was configured and sampling was done. Equipment and procedures were put together to allow one person to enter a radiation zone, check on 5 monitoring instruments, operate two batch instruments, gather five partitioned samples, record 26 pieces of information, annotate a strip chart and leave the zone in 30 minutes while expending 10 mRem of exposure. Additionally, the reduction of the samples' analysis, digitization of strip chart information and storage of all data on data management systems is maintained. As built, the system provides 0.3 to 1.0 gpm streams of coolant from upstream and downstream of a steam generator. The streams are cooled to 50 to 60/sup 0/C. The radiation environment averages 20 to 50 mR/hr to the worker. Instruments and special equipment for data gathering at the sampler include pH, conductance, dissolved oxygen, dissolved hydrogen and nitrogen, hot leg and cold leg coolant temperatures, particle sizing, turbidimetry, filtration, and continuous strip chart recording.

  9. Technological status of reactor coolant pumps in generation III+ pressurized nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, Bernhard; Bross, Stephan [KSB Aktiengesellschaft, Frankenthal (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    KSB has been developing and producing pumps for thermal power plants for nearly 90 years. Consequently, KSB also started to develop and manufacture pumps for all kinds of nuclear power plants from the very beginning of the civil use of nuclear energy. This is especially true for reactor coolant pumps for pressurized water reactors. For the generation of advanced evolutionary reactors (Generation III+ reactors), KSB developed an advanced shaft seal system which is also able to fulfill the requirements of station blackout conditions. The tests in the KSB test rigs, which were successfully completed in December 2015, proved the full functionality of the new design. For generation III+ passive plant reactors KSB developed a new reactor coolant pump type called RUV, which is based on the experience of classic reactor coolant pumps and reactor internal pumps. It is a very compact, hermetically sealed vertical pump-motor unit with a wet winding motor. A full scale prototype successfully passed the 1st stage qualification test program in October 2015.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Coolant Mixing Experiments at the ROCOM, Vattenfall, and Gidropress Test Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kliem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coolant mixing is an important mitigative mechanism against reactivity accidents caused by local boron dilution. Experiments on coolant mixing were carried out at three different test facilities representing three different reactor types. These are the ROCOM test facility modelling a German KONVOI-type reactor, the Vattenfall test facility being a model of a Westinghouse three-loop PWR, and the Gidropress test facility modelling a VVER-1000 PWR. The scenario of the start-up of the first main coolant pump was investigated in all three facilities. The experiments were accompanied by velocity measurements in the downcomer for the same scenario in the ROCOM and the Vattenfall test facilities. A similar flow structure was found in these measurements in both cases. A maximum of the velocity is measured at the opposite side in regard to the position of the loop with the starting-up pump whilst a recirculation area was found just below this inlet nozzle in both facilities. The analysis of the slug mixing experiments showed also comparable flow behaviour. In accordance with the velocity measurements, the first part of the deboration is also found on the opposite side. In this region, the maximum deboration is measured in all three cases. These maximum values are in the same order of magnitude for nearly identical initial slug volumes.

  11. Air Conditioning Does Reduce Air Pollution Indoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Bud

    1970-01-01

    Report of the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Subjects covered are--(1) title subject, (2) predictions for the human habitat in 1994, (3) fans, and (4) fire safety in buildings. (JW)

  12. Transition state performance simulation of air-turbo-ramjet engine%吸气式空气涡轮冲压发动机的过渡态性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成; 蔡元虎; 屠秋野

    2013-01-01

    为计算吸气式空气涡轮冲压(air-turbo-ramjet,ATR)发动机过渡态性能,建立了ATR发动机过渡态模型.通过与传统涡喷发动机供油原则对比得到了ATR发动机供油应遵循的规律,计算得到了给定供油规律下的ATR发动机加减速性能.结果显示ATR发动机在供油规律选择上更加灵活,并能很好地满足喘振裕度的要求.根据ATR发动机自身特点,在补足低转速特性后,本模型可直接模拟ATR发动机起动过程.%In order to simulate the transition state performance of air-turbo-ramjet (ATR) engine, an ATR engine model was established.The ATR engine fuel feeding law and the acceleration/deceleration performance were obtained through comparing to the traditional turbojet fuel feeding principle.The result shows that the ATR engine is more flexible in the selection of fuel feeding law and would satisfy the requirement of surge margin better.The engine start process could be simulated by this model after adding low speed of rotation characteristic according to the charateristic of ATR engine.

  13. 吸气式脉冲爆震发动机壁温试验%Experiment on wall temperature of an air-breathing pulse detonation engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文娟; 张群; 范玮; 彭畅新; 袁成; 杨秉玉; 严传俊

    2011-01-01

    To explore the trends of wall temperature variation with time and detonation frequency as well as wall temperature distribution along the tube outer wall, experimental study on wall temperature of an air-breathing pulse detonation engine was performed. This is a valveless air breathing pulse detonation engine with 68mm in diameter and 2000mm in length. The experiment was conducted with gasoline/air mixture at frequency of 10Hz,20Hz,40Hz, respectively. The wall temperature was measured by a thermal image camera. The results indicate that: ( 1 ) the increasing rate of outer wall temperature decreases as time increasing on the same frequency; (2) at heat balance point, outer wall temperature is higher with higher frequency; at frequency of 10Hz,20Hz,40Hz, outer wall temperatures are over 726℃, 1011.5℃, 1159.5℃, respectively at the heat balance point; (3) before heat balance, increasing rare of wall temperature increases as frequency increasing; increasing rate of wall temperature is proportional to frequency approximately; (4) along the direction of forming detonation, outer wall temperature increases by degrees; at the detonation point temperature is highest; from detonation point to engine exit, outer wall temperature decreases by degrees; (5) on each frequency, the highest temperature area is the same, about 1 350mm from the ignition location; (6) at the same axial location, outer wall temperature increases as frequency increasing. The increasing amplitude of the temperature decreases as frequency increasing.%为了探索各频率下管壁温度随时间的变化趋势及爆震管外壁面的温度分布规律,对爆震室内径68mm,长2 000mm,以汽油为燃料、空气为氧化剂的吸气式脉冲爆震发动机进行试验,用热成像仪对稳定工作在IOHz,20Hz,40Hz的管壁温度进行了监测.结果表明:同一频率下随时间的增加壁面温度增加速度减小;热平衡时壁面温度随频率的增加而增长,IOHz,20Hz,40Hz热平衡时

  14. A Real-Time Implementable NMPC Output Feedback for a Diesel Engine Air Path Commande prédictive non linéaire avec retour de sortie implémentable en temps-réel pour un circuit d’air d’un moteur Diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental validation of a parameterized Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC scheme with a Moving Horizon Observer (MHO is presented for a Diesel engine air path. The control design based on the parameterized approach leads to a low dimensional optimization problem which makes the proposed controller real-time implementable. An attractive feature of this control strategy lies in its compatibility with more elaborated and fully nonlinear models since it uses the model as a black box predictor. Dans cet article, une validation expérimentale d’un schéma de commande prédictive non linéaire (CPNL paramétrique avec un observateur à horizon glissant a été proposé pour le circuit d’air d’un moteur Diesel. La stratégie de commande basée sur l’approche paramétrique à faible dimension s’est montrée implémentable en temps réel et peut être utilisée aussi en tant qu’une solution du type boîte noire indépendamment de la structure du modèle non linéaire.

  15. Analyzing the Performance of a Dual Loop Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery of a Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baofeng Yao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A dual loop organic Rankine cycle (DORC system is designed to recover waste heat from a heavy-duty compressed natural gas engine (CNGE, and the performance of the DORC–CNGE combined system is simulated and discussed. The DORC system includes high-temperature (HT and low-temperature (LT cycles. The HT cycle recovers energy from the exhaust gas emitted by the engine, whereas the LT cycle recovers energy from intake air, engine coolant, and the HT cycle working fluid in the preheater. The mathematical model of the system is established based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The characteristics of waste heat energy from the CNGE are calculated according to engine test data under various operating conditions. Moreover, the performance of the DORC–CNGE combined system is simulated and analyzed using R245fa as the working fluid. Results show that the maximum net power output and the maximum thermal efficiency of the DORC system are 29.37 kW and 10.81%, respectively, under the rated power output condition of the engine. Compared with the original CNG engine, the maximum power output increase ratio and the maximum brake specific fuel consumption improvement ratio are 33.73% and 25%, respectively, in the DORC–CNGE combined system.

  16. Correlation between Ni base alloys surface conditioning and cation release mitigation in primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauzel, M.; Guillodo, M.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre, Le Creusot (France); Engler, N.; Chahma, F.; Brun, C. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group, Paris La Defense (France)

    2010-07-01

    The mastering of the reactor coolant system radioactive contamination is a real stake of performance for operating plants and new builds. The reduction of activated corrosion products deposited on RCS surfaces allows minimizing the global dose integrated by workers which supports the ALARA approach. Moreover, the contamination mastering limits the volumic activities in the primary coolant and thus optimizes the reactor shutdown duration and environment releases. The main contamination sources on PWR are due to Co-60 and Co-58 nuclides which come respectively Co-59 and Ni-58, naturally present in alloys used in the RCS. Co is naturally present as an impurity in alloys or as the main component of hardfacing materials (Stellites™). Ni is released mainly by SG tubes which represent the most important surface of the RCS. PWR steam generators (SG), due to the huge wetted surface are the main source of corrosion products release in the primary coolant circuit. As corrosion products may be transported throughout the whole circuit, activated in the core, and redeposited all over circuit surfaces, resulting in an increase of activity buildup, it is of primary importance to gain a better understanding of phenomenon leading to corrosion product release from SG tubes before setting up mitigation measures. Previous studies have shown that SG tubing made of the same material had different release rates. To find the origin of these discrepancies, investigations have been performed on tubes at the as-received state and after exposure to a nominal primary chemistry in titanium recirculating loop. These investigations highlighted the existence of a correlation between the inner surface metallurgical properties and the release of corrosion products in primary coolant. Oxide films formed in nominal primary chemistry are always protective, their morphology and their composition depending strongly on the geometrical, metallurgical and physico-chemical state of the surface on which they

  17. 《大气污染控制工程》教学方法探讨%Discussion on teaching methods of air pollution control engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔燕平; 曾科

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution control engineering is one of the main courses in environmental engineering colleges and universities, mainly teaching the principle and technology of atmospheric pollution prevention and control. In order to enhance teaching effectiveness, focus on the difficulties highlight, and imply heuristic teaching, the combination teaching methods of theoretical teaching and capacity building were constantly improved through making full use of modern multimedia teaching methods and blackboard advantages and introducing students to innovate experiment, which lay a good foundation for student learning and employment.%大气污染控制工程是各高校环境工程的专业主干课程之一,主要讲授大气污染防治与控制的原理与技术。为加强授课效果,针对该课程的特点,结合多年来的教学实践和体会,积极改进教学方法,充分运用多媒体现代化教学手段和板书优势,重点难点突出,实行启发式教学,老师授课与专题讨论相结合,并引入学生创新实验,不断完善理论与实践相结合,理论教学与能力培养并重的教学方法,为学生的学习和就业打下良好基础。

  18. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor, molten liquid may be introduced into a volatile coolant, which, under certain conditions, results in explosive interactions. Such fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) are characterised by an initial pre-mixing phase during which the molten liquid, metallic or oxidic in nature, undergoes a breakup (fragmentation) process which significantly increase the area available for melt-coolant contact, and thus energy transfer. Although substantial progress in the understanding of phenomenology of the FCI events has been achieved in recent years, there remain uncertainties in describing the primary and secondary breakup processes. The focus of this work is on the melt jet and drop breakup during the premixing phase of FCI. The objectives are to gain insight into the premixing phase of the FCI phenomena, to determine what fraction of the melt fragments and determine the size distribution. The approach is to perform experiments with various simulant materials, at different scales, different conditions and with variation of controlling parameters affecting jet and drop breakup processes. The analysis approach is to investigate processes at different level of detail and complexity to understand the physics, to rationalise experimental results and to develop and validate models. In the first chapter a brief introduction and review of the status of the FCI phenomena is performed. A review of previous and current experimental projects is performed. The status of the experimental projects and major findings are outlined. The first part of the second chapter deals with experimental investigation of jet breakup. Two series of experiments were performed with low and high temperature jets. The low temperature experiments employed cerrobend-70 as jet liquid. A systematic investigation of thermal hydraulic conditions and melt physical properties on the jet fragmentation and particle debris characteristics was

  19. Development and performance of a large-scale, transonic turbine blade cascade facility for aerodynamic studies of merging coolant-mainstream flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayeh, Amjad Isaaf

    1998-11-01

    A new, large scale, linear cascade facility of turbine blades has been developed for the experimental exploration of the aerodynamic aspects of film cooling technology. Primary interest is in the mixing of the ejected coolant with the mainstream, at both subsonic and supersonic mainstream Mach numbers at the cascade exit. In order to achieve a spatial resolution adequate for the exploration of details on the scale of the coolant ejection holes, the cascade dimensions were maximized, within the limitations of the air supply system. The cascade contains four blades (three passages) with 14.05 cm axial chord, 17.56 cm span and a design total turning angle of 130.6 degrees. Exit Mach numbers range from 0.6 to 1.5 and Reynolds numbers from 0.5 to 1.5 million. The air supply system capacity allows run times up to five minutes at maximum flow rates. A coolant supply system has been built to deliver mixtures of SFsb6 and air to simulate coolant/mainstream density ratios up to 2. The cascade contains several novel features. A full-perimeter bleed slot upstream of the blades is used to remove the approach boundary layer from all four walls, to improve the degree of two-dimensionality. The exit flow is bounded by two adjustable tailboards that are hinged at the trailing edges and actuated to set the exit flow direction according to the imposed pressure ratio. The boards are perforated and subjected to mass removal near the blades, to minimize the undesirable reflection of shocks and expansion waves. A probe actuator is incorporated that allows continuous positioning of probes in the exhaust stream, in both the streamwise and pitchwise directions. Diagnostic methods include extensive surface pressure taps on the approach and exhaust ducts and on the blade surfaces. The large size permitted as many as 19 taps on the trailing edge itself. Shadowgraph and schlieren are available. A three-prong wake probe has been constructed to simultaneously measure total and static pressures

  20. Proceedings of OSD Aircraft Engine Design & Life Cycle Cost Seminar Held at Naval Air Development Center, Warminster, Pennsylvania, May 17, 18 & 19, 1978,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    No. 1558 EXERCISING PROPULSION DTLCC METHODS ON ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT ENGINES By: Eli H. Benstein William Q. Wagner Teledyne CAE Toledo, Ohio Engine...METHODS ON ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT ENGINES Eli H. Benstein ** William Q. Wagner * Teledyne CAE Toledo, Ohio ABSTRACT This paper describes one engine

  1. Investigations of Air-cooled Turbine Rotors for Turbojet Engines II : Mechanical Design, Stress Analysis, and Burst Test of Modified J33 Split-disk Rotor / Richard H. Kemp and Merland L. Moseson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Richard H; Moseson, Merland L

    1952-01-01

    A full-scale J33 air-cooled split turbine rotor was designed and spin-pit tested to destruction. Stress analysis and spin-pit results indicated that the rotor in a J33 turbojet engine, however, showed that the rear disk of the rotor operated at temperatures substantially higher than the forward disk. An extension of the stress analysis to include the temperature difference between the two disks indicated that engine modifications are required to permit operation of the two disks at more nearly the same temperature level.

  2. Advanced high pressure engine study for mixed-mode vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, W. P.; Mellish, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure liquid rocket engine design, performance, weight, envelope, and operational characteristics were evaluated for a variety of candidate engines for use in mixed-mode, single-stage-to-orbit applications. Propellant property and performance data were obtained for candidate Mode 1 fuels which included: RP-1, RJ-5, hydrazine, monomethyl-hydrazine, and methane. The common oxidizer was liquid oxygen. Oxygen, the candidate Mode 1 fuels, and hydrogen were evaluated as thrust chamber coolants. Oxygen, methane, and hydrogen were found to be the most viable cooling candidates. Water, lithium, and sodium-potassium were also evaluated as auxiliary coolant systems. Water proved to be the best of these, but the system was heavier than those systems which cooled with the engine propellants. Engine weight and envelope parametric data were established for candidate Mode 1, Mode 2, and dual-fuel engines. Delivered engine performance data were also calculated for all candidate Mode 1 and dual-fuel engines.

  3. Flex Fuel Optimized SI and HCCI Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Guoming; Schock, Harold; Yang, Xiaojian; Huisjen, Andrew; Stuecken, Tom; Moran, Kevin; Zhen, Ron; Zhang, Shupeng

    2013-09-30

    the electrical variable valve timing (VVT) actuating system and satisfactory electrical VVT responses were obtained. Target engine control system was designed and fabricated at MSU for both single-cylinder optical and multi-cylinder metal engines. Finally, the developed control-oriented engine model was successfully implemented into the HIL simulation environment. The Chrysler 2.0L I4 DI engine was modified to fit the two-step vale with electrical variable valve timing actuating system. A used prototype engine was used as the base engine and the cylinder head was modified for the two-step valve with electrical VVT actuating system. Engine validation tests indicated that cylinder #3 has very high blow-by and it cannot be reduced with new pistons and rings. Due to the time constraint, it was decided to convert the four-cylinder engine into a single cylinder engine by blocking both intake and exhaust ports of the unused cylinders. The model-based combustion mode transition control algorithm was developed in the MSU HIL simulation environment and the Simulink based control strategy was implemented into the target engine controller. With both single-cylinder metal engine and control strategy ready, stable HCCI combustion was achived with COV of 2.1% Motoring tests were conducted to validate the actuator transient operations including valve lift, electrical variable valve timing, electronic throttle, multiple spark and injection controls. After the actuator operations were confirmed, 15-cycle smooth combustion mode transition from SI to HCCI combustion was achieved; and fast 8-cycle smooth combustion mode transition followed. With a fast electrical variable valve timing actuator, the number of engine cycles required for mode transition can be reduced down to five. It was also found that the combustion mode transition is sensitive to the charge air and engine coolant temperatures and regulating the corresponding temperatures to the target levels during the combustion mode

  4. Transmutation performance analysis on coolant options in a hybrid reactor system design for high level waste incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong-Hee; Siddique, Muhammad Tariq; Kim, Myung Hyun, E-mail: mhkim@khu.ac.kr

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Waste transmutation performance was compared and analyzed for seven different coolant options. • Reactions of fission and capture showed big differences depending on coolant options. • Moderation effect significantly affects on energy multiplication, tritium breeding and waste transmutation. • Reduction of radio-toxicities of TRUs showed different trend to coolant choice from performance of waste transmutation. - Abstract: A fusion–fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) is one of the most attractive candidates for high level waste transmutation. The selection of coolant affects the transmutation performance of a FFHR. LiPb coolant, as a conventional coolant for a FFHR, has problems such as reduction in neutron economic and magneto-hydro dynamics (MHD) pressure drop. Therefore, in this work, transmutation performance is evaluated and compared for various coolant options such as LiPb, H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, Na, PbBi, LiF-BeF{sub 2} and NaF-BeF{sub 2} applicable to a hybrid reactor for waste transmutation (Hyb-WT). Design parameters measuring performance of a hybrid reactor were evaluated by MCNPX. They are k{sub eff}, energy multiplication factor, neutron absorption ratio, tritium breeding ratio, waste transmutation ratio, support ratio and radiotoxicity reduction. Compared to LiPb, H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O are not suitable for waste transmutation because of neutron moderation effect. Waste transmutation performances with Na and PbBi are similar to each other and not different much from LiPb. Even though molten salt such as LiF-BeF{sub 2} and NaF-BeF{sub 2} is good for avoiding MHD pressure drop problem, waste transmutation performance is dropped compared with LiPb.

  5. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  6. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosswait, K.M.

    1994-04-01

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m{sup 2}. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ``beryllium-joint`` concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket.

  7. Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  8. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  9. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1994-03-01

    A specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions was held in Santa Barbara, CA from January 5-7, 1993. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installation (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The objectives of the meeting are to cross-fertilize on-going work, provide opportunities for mutual check points, seek to focus the technical issues on matters of practical significance and re-evaluate both the objectives as well as path of future research. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  10. Definition of loss-of-coolant accident radiation source. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-01

    Meaningful qualification testing of nuclear reactor components requires a knowledge of the radiation fields expected in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The overall objective of this program is to define the LOCA source terms and compare these with the output of various simulators employed for radiation qualification testing. The basis for comparison will be the energy deposition in a model reactor component. The results of the calculations are presented and some interpretation of the results given. The energy release rates and spectra were validated by comparison with other calculations using different codes since experimental data appropriate to these calculations do not exist.

  11. Fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in reactor safety. Current understanding and future research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speis, T.P. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Basu, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the current understanding of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) phenomena in the context of reactor safety. With increased emphasis on accident management and with emerging in-vessel core melt retention strategies for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs, recent interest in FCI has broadened to include an evaluation of potential threats to the integrity of reactor vessel lower head and ex-vessel structural support, as well as the role of FCI in debris quenching and coolability. The current understanding of FCI with regard to these issues is discussed, and future research needs to address the issues from a risk perspective are identified. (author)

  12. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Falahi, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Haennine, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Porkholm, K. [IVO International, Ltd., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  13. Improved solidification influence modelling for Eulerian fuel-coolant interaction codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ursic, Mitja, E-mail: mitja.ursic@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Leskovar, Matjaz; Mavko, Borut [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-04-15

    Steam explosion experiments revealed important differences in the efficiency between simulant alumina and oxidic corium melts. The experimentally observed differences are importantly attributed to the differences in the melt droplets solidification and void production, which are limiting phenomena in the steam explosion process and have to be adequately modelled in fuel-coolant interaction codes. This article focuses on the modelling of the solidification effect. An improved solidification influence modelling approach for Eulerian fuel-coolant interaction codes was developed and is presented herein. The solidification influence modelling in fuel-coolant interaction codes is strongly related to the modelling of the temperature profile and the mechanical effect of the crust on the fragmentation process. Therefore the first objective was to introduce an improved temperature profile modelling and a fragmentation criterion for partly solidified droplets. The fragmentation criterion was based on the established modified Weber number, which considers the crust stiffness as a stabilizing force acting to retain the crust under presence of the hydrodynamic forces. The modified Weber number was validated on experimental data. The application of the developed improved solidification influence modelling enables an improved determination of the melt droplet mass, which can be efficiently involved in the fine fragmentation during the steam explosion process. Additionally, also the void production modelling is improved, because it is strongly related to the temperature profile modelling in the frame of the solidification influence modelling. Therefore the second objective was to enable an improved solidification influence modelling in codes with an Eulerian formulation of the droplet field. Two additional transported model parameters based on the most important droplets features regarding the fuel-coolant interaction behaviour, were derived. First, the crust stiffness was

  14. Physical properties of heavy liquid-metal coolants in a wide temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisenko A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The pulse-phase method, the gamma-attenuation method and the method of dumping oscillation of a crucible with a melt were used for measuring the velocity of sound, the density and the kinematic viscosity of a set of liquid-metal coolants for perspective nuclear reactors. There are liquid gallium, indium, tin, lead, bismuth and lead-bismuth eutectic alloy among the melts investigated. The accuracy of the measurements was as high as 0.3%, 0.2 to 0.4% and 1.5% for the ultrasound velocity, the density and the viscosity, correspondingly.

  15. Experimental study of ceramic coated tip seals for turbojet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Klann, G. A.; Lassow, E. S.; Mchenry, M.; Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic gas-path seals were fabricated and successfully operated over 1000 cycles from flight idle to maximum power in a small turboshaft engine. The seals were fabricated by plasma spraying zirconia over a NiCoCrAlX bond boat on the Haynes 25 substrate. Coolant-side substrate temperatures and related engine parameters were recorded. Post-test inspection revealed mudflat surface cracking with penetration to the ceramic bond-coat interface.

  16. Commissioning of the STAR test section for experimental simulation of loss of coolant accident using the EC-208 instrumented fuel assembly of the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maprelian, Eduardo; Torres, Walmir M.; Prado, Adelk C.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Franca, Renato L.; Santos, Samuel C.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: emaprel@ipen.br, E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: acprado@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br, E-mail: rlfranca@ipen.br, E-mail: samuelcs@ipen.br, E-mail: lamacedo@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SO (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The three basic safety functions of Research Reactors (RR) are the safe shutdown of the reactor, the proper cooling of the decay heat of the fuel elements and the confinement of radioactive materials. Compared to Nuclear Power Reactors, RR power release is small, yet its three safety functions must be met to ensure the integrity of the reactor. During a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in pool type RR, partial or complete loss of pool water may occur, with consequent partial or complete uncovering of the fuel assemblies. In such an accident, the decay heat removal safety function must not be compromised. The Test Section for Experimental Simulation of Loss of Coolant Accident (STAR) is in commissioning phase. This test section will provide experimental data on partial and total uncovering of the EC-208 instrumented fuel assembly (IFA) irradiated in the IEA-R1. Experimental results will be useful in validation of computer codes for RR safety analysis, particularly on heat removal efficiency aspects (safety function) in accident conditions. STAR comprises a base on which is installed the IFA, the cylindrical stainless steel hull, the compressed air system for the test section emptying and refilling, and the instrumentation for temperature and level measurements. The commissioning tests or pre-operational check, consist of several preliminary tests to verify experimental procedures, the difficulties during assembling of STAR in the pool, the difficulties in control the emptying and refilling velocities, as well as, the repeatability capacity, tests of equipment, valves and systems and tests of instrumentation and data acquisition system. Safety, accuracy and easiness of operation will be checked. (author)

  17. Estimation of the coolant flow through a natural circulation BWR fuel channel applying and equivalent electrical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, DEPFI, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Campus Morelos en IMTA, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_ig@yahoo.com.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work presents the design and implementation of an advanced controller for a reduced order model of a BWR reactor core cooled by natural circulating water, which allows real time estimates of coolant flows through fuel assemblies about standard neutron flux strings. Nuclear power plants with boiling water reactors control individual fuel assembly coolant flows by forced circulation using external or internal water pumps and different core support plate orifices. These two elements reduce flow dependency on local channel pressure drops. In BWR reactors using only natural circulation coolant flows, these two elements are not available and therefore individual channel coolant flows are highly dependent in local conditions, such as power distributions and local pressure drops. Therefore it is expected that grater uncertainties in these variables be used during safety, fuel management and other analysis, which in turns may lead to increased operation penalties, such as tighter operating limits. The objective of this work is to asses by computer simulations means to reduce uncertainties in the measurement of fuel assembly coolant flows and eventually the associated penalties. During coolant phase transitions, pressure drops and local power may alter local natural circulation through fuel assemblies and flow estimates can be helped or not by control rod moves. This work presents the construction of an optimal controller for a core flow estimator based on a reduced order model of the coolant going though the reactor vessel components and nuclear core. This model is to be driven by plant signals from standard BWR instrumentation in order to estimate the coolant flows in selected fuel assemblies about a LPRM string. For this purpose an equivalent electrical model has been mathematically developed and numerically tested. The power-flow maps of typical BRW are used as steady state references for this equivalent model. Once these were fully reproduced for steady state

  18. The premixing and propagation phases of fuel-coolant interactions: a review of recent experimental studies and code developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antariksawan, A.R. [Reactor Safety Technology Research Center of BATAN (Indonesia); Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun-sun; Maruyama, Yu; Yang, Yanhua; Sugimoto, Jun

    1998-09-01

    A vapor explosion (or an energetic fuel-coolant interactions, FCIs) is a process in which hot liquid (fuel) transfers its internal energy to colder, more volatile liquid (coolant); thus the coolant vaporizes at high pressure and expands and does works on its surroundings. Traditionally, the energetic fuel-coolant interactions could be distinguished in subsequent stages: premixing (or coarse mixing), triggering, propagation and expansion. Realizing that better and realistic prediction of fuel-coolant interaction consequences will be available understanding the phenomenology in the premixing and propagation stages, many experimental and analytical studies have been performed during more than two decades. A lot of important achievements are obtained during the time. However, some fundamental aspects are still not clear enough; thus the works are directed to that direction. In conjunction, the model/code development is pursuit. This is aimed to provide a scaling tool to bridge the experimental results to the real geometries, e.g. reactor pressure vessel, reactor containment. The present review intends to collect the available information on the recent works performed to study the premixing and propagation phases. (author). 97 refs.

  19. Development of core design and analysis technology for integral reactor; development of coolant activity and dose evaluation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Sun; Kim, Byeong Soo; Go, Hyun Seok; Lee, Young Wook; Jang, Mee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    SMART, small- medium-sized integral reactor, is different from the customary electricity-generation PWR in design concepts and structures. The conventional coolant activity evaluation codes used in customary PWRs cannot be applied to SMART. In this study, SAEP(Specific Activity Evaluation Program) is developed that can be applied to both customary PWR and advanced reactor such as SMART. SAEP uses three methods(SAEP Ver.02, Ver.05, Ver.06) to evaluate coolant activity. They solve inhomogeneous linearly-coupled differential equations generated by considering nuclear system as N sub-components. Coolant activities of customary PWR are evaluated by use of SAEP. The results show good agreement with FSAR data. SAEP is used to evaluate coolant activities for SMART and the results are proposed in this study. These results show that SAEP is able to perform coolant activity evaluation for both customary PWR and advanced reactor such as SMART. In addition, with respect to radiation shielding optimization, conventional optimization methods and their characteristics related to radiation shielding are reviewed and analyzed. Strategies for proper usage of conventional methods are proposed to agree with the shielding design cases. 30 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  20. The feasibility of water injection into the turbine coolant to permit gas turbine contingency power for helicopter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fossen, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that in certain emergency situations it may be desirable to obtain power from a helicopter engine at levels greater than the maximum rating. Yost (1976) has reported studies concerning methods of power augmentation in the one engine inoperative (OEI) case. It was found that a combination of water/alcohol injection into the inlet and overtemperature/overspeed could provide adequate emergency power. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a feasibility study which analytically investigated the maximum possible level of augmentation with constant gas generator turbine stress rupture life as a constraint. In the proposed scheme, the increased engine output is obtained by turbine overtemperature, however, the temperature of the compressor bleed air used for hot section cooling is lowered by injecting and evaporating water.

  1. Method for calculating coolant resonance frequencies under normal and accident conditions in nuclear power plants with WWER-type pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, K.N. (Moskovskij Ehnergeticheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1983-03-01

    Mathematical models are proposed for calculating acoustic oscillation resonance frequencies in the coolant in various components of the WWER type primary circuit (core, steam generator, pressurizer, piping). Due to the correspondence between model calculations and experimental results obtained in operating nuclear power plants, the developed models can be used for practical calculations. The possibility of calculating the eigenfrequencies of the coolant oscillation under different operating conditions leads to the interpretation of operational data, to the analysis of operational conditions, to the detection of coolant boiling in the reactor, and to design changes in order to prevent resonance oscillations within the coolant.

  2. Alcohol fuels in spark ignition engines. Use characteristics and engine wear. Alkoholipolttoaineet ottomoottorissa. Kaeyttoeominaisuudet ja moottorin kuluminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, N.-O.; Kytoe, M.; Eklund, T.; Sipilae, K.

    1986-09-01

    A field test with different alcohol fuels was carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland in 1981-1984. The test involved 19 passenger cars. The engines of the test vehicles were dismantled both before and after the test. In addition to engine wear, driveability was also studied during the test. Finland's cold climate emphasizes difficulties arising with alcohol fuels. E15/M15 fuels demand only minor adjustment in the fuel systems to restore driveability. E15 fuel was used both in new and old cars and this fuel did not cause any corrosion problems. M15 is a more difficult fuel both in regard to corrosion and fuel stability. None of the test engines showed signs of accelerated wear of the kind that could have shortened the lifetime of the engine considerably. Cylinders, piston rings, earings and valve train were monitored. Temperature has a strong effect on engine wear and the driveability of engines running on neat alcohol have been presented. For these reasons the Research Centre developed, in cooperation with Oy Saab-Valmet Ab, a dual fuel system for gasoline and alcohol. The system is automatic and change-over from gasoline to alcohol takes place at a coolant temperature of 70 deg C. In two series of tests dual fuel cars and cars with a simple fuel system (gasoline as starting aid) were compared regarding engine wear and driveability. The second series of tests involved 2+2 cars. Each car was driven 50,000 km. The driveability of the dual fuel car does not differ from that of a normal gasoline vehicle. Including the portion of gasoline in the main M90 fuel, the part of energy coming gasoline was 30-40%. The cam/tappet mechanism was found critical with regard to wear. In the most severe operating conditions only the dual fuel system can prevent the engine from excessive wear. A very efficient system for preheating the inlet air was used in all neat alcohol test vehicles.

  3. TRANSPORTATION MODAL CHOICE IN COOLANT IMPORTATION THROUGH TOTAL COSTS MINIMIZATION: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Souza Leite

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transportation plays a very significant role when it comes to the costs of a company representing on average 60% of logistics costs, so its management is very important for any company. The transportation modal choice is one of the most important transportation decisions. The purpose of this article is to select the transportation mode which is able to minimize total costs, and consistent with the objectives of customer service on the coolant import, which is used in plasma cutting machines. With the installation of a distribution center in Brazil and the professionalization of the logistics department of the company, it was decided to re-evaluate the transportation mode previously chosen to import some items. To determine the best mode of transportation was used basic compensation costs, in other words the cost compensation of using the shuttle service to the indirect cost of inventory related to the modal performance. Through the study, it was possible to observe it may be possible to save up to 73% on the coolant international transportation by changing the transportation mode used by the company.

  4. Liquid metal reactor development -Studies on safety measure of LMR coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Tae; Choi, Yoon Dong; Park, Jin Hoh; Kwon, Sun Kil; Choi, Jong Hyun; Cho, Byung Ryul; Kim, Tae Joon; Kwon, Sang Woon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Kim, Byung Hoh; Hong, Soon Bok; Jung, Ji Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    A study on the safety measures of LMR coolant showed the results as follows; 1. LMR coolant safety measure. A. Analysis and improvement of sodium fire code. B. Analysis of sodium fire phenomena. 2. Sodium fire aerosol characteristics. It was carried out conceptual design and basic design for sodium fire facility of medium size composed of sodium supply tank, sodium reactor vessel, sodium fire aerosol filter system and scrubbing column, and drain tank etc. 3. Sodium purification technology. A. Construction of calibration loop. (1) Design of sodium loop for the calibration of the equipment. (2) Construction of sodium loop including test equipments and other components. B. Na-analysis technology. (1) Oxygen concentration determination by the wet method. (2) Cover gas purification preliminary experiment. 4. The characteristics of sodium-water reaction. A. Analysis of the micro and small leak phenomena. (1) Manufacture of the micro-leak test apparatus. B. Analysis of large leak events. (1) Development of preliminary code for analysis of initial spike pressure. (2) Sample calculation and comparison with previous works. C. Development of test facility for large leak event evaluation. (1) Conceptional and basic design for the water and sodium-water test facility. D. Technology development for water leak detection system. (1) Investigations for the characteristics of active acoustic detection system. (2) Testing of the characteristics of hydrogen leak detection system. 171 figs, 29 tabs, 3 refs. (Author).

  5. Numerical Investigation of Urea Freezing and Melting Characteristics Using Coolant Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Nam Il; Kim, Man Young [Chounbuk Nat' l Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Beom [Jeju College of Technology, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    UREA-SCR technology is known as one of the powerful NOx reduction systems for vehicles as well as stationary applications. For its consistent and reliable operation in vehicle applications, however, the freezing and melting of the urea solution in cold environments have to be resolved. In this study, therefore, a numerical study of three-dimensional unsteady problems was analyzed to understand the urea freezing and heating phenomena and heat transfer characteristics in terms of urea liquid volume fraction, temperature profiles, and phase change behavior in urea solutions with time by using the commercial software Fluent 6.3. As a result, it was found that the freezing phenomenon proceeds with a phase change from the tank wall to the center, whereas the melting phenomenon occurs faster in the upper part of the storage tank by natural convection and in the adjacent part of the coolant pipe than in other parts. Furthermore, approximately 190s were required to obtain 1a of urea solution using a 4-coiled coolant heater under conditions of 70 .deg. C and 200 L/h.

  6. Performance of water and diluted ethylene glycol as coolants for electronic cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gayatri,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As the number of transistors increases with new generation of microprocessor chips, the power draw and heat load to dissipate during operation increases. As a result of increasing the heat loads and heat fluxes the Conventional cooling technologies such as fan, heat sinks are unable to absorb and heat transfer excess heat dissipated by these new microprocessor. So, new technologies are needed to improve the heat removal capacity. In the present work single phase liquid cooling system with mini channel is analyzed and experimentally investigated. Mini channels are chosen as to provide higher heat transfer co-efficient than conventional channel. Copper pipes of 0.36 mm diameter are taken to fabricate heat sink and heat exchanger. A pump is used to circulate the fluid through heat sink and heat exchanger. A solid heated aluminium block to simulate heat generated electronic component is used and electrical input is supplied to the heated aluminium block and cooling system is placed over the heated block. The performance of the cooling system is analyzed from the experimental data obtained. It is experimentally observed that the mini channel liquid cooling system with water as a coolant has better performance than diluted ethylene glycol as coolant at different flow rates. The surface temperature of the heated aluminium block with convective heat transfer co-efficient is observed

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of surface vortex formation in coolant reservoirs of reactor safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandazis, Peter [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany); Babcsany, Boglarka [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques

    2016-11-15

    The reliable operation of the emergency coolant pumps and passive gravitational injection systems are an important safety issue during accident scenarios with coolant loss in pressurized water reactors. Because of the pressure drop and flow disturbances surface vortices develops at the pump intakes if the water level decreasing below a critical value. The induced swirling flow and gas entrainment lead to flow limitation and to pump failures and damages. The prediction of the critical submergence to avoid surface vortex building is difficult because it depends on many geometrical and fluid dynamical parameters. An alternative and new method has been developed for the investigation of surface vortices. The method based on the combination of CFD results with the analytical vortex model of Burgers and Rott. For further investigation the small scale experiments from the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics are used which were inspired from flow limitation problems during the draining of the bubble condenser trays at a VVER type nuclear power plants.

  8. Determination of the {sup 129}I in primary coolant of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ke Chon; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyu Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Among the radioactive wastes generated from the nuclear power plant, a radioactive nuclide such as {sup 129}I is classified as a difficult-to-measure (DTM) nuclide, owing to its low specific activity. Therefore, the establishment of an analytical procedure, including a chemical separation for {sup 129}I as a representative DTM, becomes essential. In this report, the adsorption and recovery rate were measured by adding {sup 125}I as a radio-isotopic tracer (t1/2 = 60.14 d) to the simulation sample, in order to measure the activity concentration of {sup 129}I in a pressurized-water reactor primary coolant. The optimum condition for the maximum recovery yield of iodine on the anion exchange resins (AG1 x2, 50-100 mesh, Clform) was found to be at pH 7. In this report, the effect of the boron content in a pressurized-water reactor primary coolant on the separation process of {sup 129}I was examined, as was the effect of {sup 3}H on the measurement of the activity of iodine. As a result, no influence of the boron content and of the simultaneous {sup 3}H presence was found with activity concentrations of {sup 3}H lower than 50 Bq/mL, and with a boron concentration of less than 2,000 {mu}g/mL.

  9. In-vessel ITER tubing failure rates for selected materials and coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, T.D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Cadwallader, L.C. [EG& G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Several materials have been suggested for fabrication of ITER in-vessel coolant tubing: beryllium, copper, Inconel, niobium, stainless steel, titanium, and vanadium. This report generates failure rates for the materials to identify the best performer from an operational safety and availability perspective. Coolant types considered in this report are helium gas, liquid lithium, liquid sodium, and water. Failure rates for the materials are generated by including the influence of ITER`s operating environment and anticipated tubing failure mechanisms with industrial operating experience failure rates. The analyses define tubing failure mechanisms for ITER as: intergranular attack, flow erosion, helium induced swelling, hydrogen damage, neutron irradiation embrittlement, cyclic fatigue, and thermal cycling. K-factors, multipliers, are developed to model each failure mechanism and are applied to industrial operating experience failure rates to generate tubing failure rates for ITER. The generated failure rates identify the best performer by its expected reliability. With an average leakage failure rate of 3.1e-10(m-hr){sup {minus}1}and an average rupture failure rate of 3.1e-11(m-hr){sup {minus}1}, titanium proved to be the best performer of the tubing materials. The failure rates generated in this report are intended to serve as comparison references for design safety and optimization studies. Actual material testing and analyses are required to validate the failure rates.

  10. Experimental and analytical studies of melt jet-coolant interactions: a synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Green, J.A.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    Instability and fragmentation of a core melt jet in water have been actively studied during the past ten years. Several models, and a few computer codes, have been developed. However, there are, still, large uncertainties, both, in interpreting experimental results and in predicting reactor-scale processes. Steam explosion and debris coolability, as reactor safety issues, are related to the jet fragmentation process. A better understanding of the physics of jet instability and fragmentation is crucial for assessments of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). This paper presents research, conducted at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS), Stockholm, concerning molten jet-coolant interactions, as a precursor for premixing. First, observations were obtained from scoping experiments with simulant fluids. Second, the linear perturbation method was extended and applied to analyze the interfacial-instability characteristics. Third, two innovative approachs to CFD modeling of jet fragmentation were developed and employed for analysis. The focus of the studies was placed on (a) identifying potential factors, which may affect the jet instability, (b) determining the scaling laws, and (c) predicting the jet behavior for severe accidents conditions. In particular, the effects of melt physical properties, and the thermal hydraulics of the mixing zone, on jet fragmentation were investigated. Finally, with the insights gained from a synthesis of the experimental results and analysis results, a new phenomenological concept, named `macrointeractions concept of jet fragmentation` is proposed. (author)

  11. LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACIDENT SIMULATIONS IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W D; Goodman, R L; Heaberlin, S W; Hesson, G M; Nealley, C; Kirg, L L; Marshall, R K; McNair, G W; Meitzler, W D; Neally, G W; Parchen, L J; Pilger, J P; Rausch, W N; Russcher, G E; Schreiber, R E; Wildung, N J

    1981-02-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship among the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. Subsequent experiments establish the fuel rod failure characteristics at selected peak cladding temperatures. Fuel rod cladding pressurization simulates high burnup fission gas pressure levels of modern PWRs. This document contains both an experiment overview of the LOCA simulation program and a review of the safety analyses performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to define the expected operating conditions as well as to evaluate the worst case operating conditions. The primary intent of this document is to supply safety information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to establish the overall safety of the experiment. A hazards review summarizes safety issues, normal operation and three worst case accidents that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  12. Design of coolant distribution system (CDS) for ITER PF AC/DC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Bin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Zhiquan, E-mail: zhquansong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fu, Peng; Xu, Xuesong; Li, Chuan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Dong, Lin [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Beijing 100862 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • System process and arrangement has been proposed to meet the multiple requirements from the converter system. • Thermal hydraulic analysis model has been developed to size and predict the system operation behavior. • Prototype test has been performed to validate the proposed design methodology. - Abstract: The Poloidal Field (PF) converter unit, playing an essential role in the plasma shape and position control in vertical and horizontal direction, which is an important part of ITER power supply system. As an important subsystem of the converter unit, the coolant distribution system has the function to distribute the cooling water from ITER component cooling water system (CCWS) to its main components at the required flow rate, pressure and temperature. This paper presents the thermal hydraulic design of coolant distribution system for the ITER PF converter unit. Different operational requirements of the PF converter unit regarding flow rate, temperature and pressure have been analyzed to design the system process and arrangement. A thermal-hydraulic analysis model has been built to size the system and predict the flow rate and temperature distribution of the system under the normal operation. Based on the system thermal-hydraulic analysis results, the system pressure profile has been plotted to evaluate the pressure behavior along each client flow path. A CDS prototype for the ITER PF converter has been constructed and some experiments have been performed on it. A good agreement of the flow distribution and temperature behavior between the simulated and test results validate the proposed design methodology.

  13. Heat Exchanger Can Assembly for Provision of Helium Coolant Streams for Cryomodule Testing below 2K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. N.; Eichhorn, R.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Shore, C.; Widger, D.

    2017-02-01

    A series of heat exchanger can (HXC) assemblies have been designed, constructed and built to utilize existing 4.2 K liquefaction and compressor capabilities to provide helium gas coolant streams of 80 K, 4.5 K, and liquid from 1.6 to 2.0 K for operating cryomodules containing from one to six superconducting RF cavities built for an energy recovery linear accelerator. Designs for the largest assemblies required up to 100 W of cooling at 1.8 K with precise temperature control, especially during cool-down, and up to 2000 W at 80 K (with a 40 K temperature rise). A novel feature of these assemblies was the use of relatively inexpensive brazed stainless steel plate heat exchangers intended for room-temperature operation with water or oil, but which in practice worked well at cryogenic temperatures. The choice of operating temperatures/pressures were to provide single-phase helium flow for better control of coolant distribution in the 80 K and 4.5 K streams, to take advantage of locally elevated heat capacity near the critical point for the 4.5 K stream, and in the region below 2 K to get the best possible Q from the niobium cavities under test.

  14. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the experimental section of the air-condensing unit of Scientific Production Company "Turbocon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, V. I.; Minko, K. B.; Yan'kov, G. G.; Kiryukhin, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model was developed to be used for numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer processes in the experimental section of the air condenser (ESAC) created in the Scientific Production Company (SPC) "Turbocon" and mounted on the territory of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The simulations were performed using the author's CFD code ANES. The verification of the models was carried out involving the experimental data obtained in the tests of ESAC. The operational capability of the proposed models to calculate the processes in steam-air mixture and cooling air and algorithms to take into account the maldistribution in the various rows of tube bundle was shown. Data on the influence of temperature and flow rate of the cooling air on the pressure in the upper header of ESAC, effective heat transfer coefficient, steam flow distribution by tube rows, and the dimensions of the ineffectively operating zones of tube bundle for two schemes of steam-air mixture flow (one-pass and two-pass ones) were presented. It was shown that the pressure behind the turbine (in the upper header) increases significantly at increase of the steam flow rate and reduction of the flow rate of cooling air and its temperature rise, and the maximum value of heat transfer coefficient is fully determined by the flow rate of cooling air. Furthermore, the steam flow rate corresponding to the maximum value of heat transfer coefficient substantially depends on the ambient temperature. The analysis of the effectiveness of the considered schemes of internal coolant flow was carried out, which showed that the two-pass scheme is more effective because it provides lower pressure in the upper header, despite the fact that its hydraulic resistance at fixed flow rate of steam-air mixture is considerably higher than at using the one-pass schema. This result is a consequence of the fact that, in the two-pass scheme, the condensation process involves the larger internal surface of tubes

  15. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a novel reactor design that utilizes the graphite-matrix high-temperature fuel of helium-cooled reactors, but provides cooling with a high-temperature fluoride salt. For applications at temperatures greater than 900 C the AHTR is also referred to as a Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This report provides an assessment of candidate salts proposed as the primary coolant for the AHTR based upon a review of physical properties, nuclear properties, and chemical factors. The physical properties most relevant for coolant service were reviewed. Key chemical factors that influence material compatibility were also analyzed for the purpose of screening salt candidates. Some simple screening factors related to the nuclear properties of salts were also developed. The moderating ratio and neutron-absorption cross-section were compiled for each salt. The short-lived activation products, long-lived transmutation activity, and reactivity coefficients associated with various salt candidates were estimated using a computational model. Table A presents a summary of the properties of the candidate coolant salts. Certain factors in this table, such as melting point, vapor pressure, and nuclear properties, can be viewed as stand-alone parameters for screening candidates. Heat-transfer properties are considered as a group in Sect. 3 in order to evaluate the combined effects of various factors. In the course of this review, it became apparent that the state of the properties database was strong in some areas and weak in others. A qualitative map of the state of the database and predictive capabilities is given in Table B. It is apparent that the property of thermal conductivity has the greatest uncertainty and is the most difficult to measure. The database, with respect to heat capacity, can be improved with modern instruments and modest effort. In general, ''lighter'' (low-Z) salts tend to

  16. Flex Fuel Optimized SI and HCCI Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Guoming; Schock, Harold; Yang, Xiaojian; Huisjen, Andrew; Stuecken, Tom; Moran, Kevin; Zhen, Ron; Zhang, Shupeng

    2013-09-30

    the electrical variable valve timing (VVT) actuating system and satisfactory electrical VVT responses were obtained. Target engine control system was designed and fabricated at MSU for both single-cylinder optical and multi-cylinder metal engines. Finally, the developed control-oriented engine model was successfully implemented into the HIL simulation environment. The Chrysler 2.0L I4 DI engine was modified to fit the two-step vale with electrical variable valve timing actuating system. A used prototype engine was used as the base engine and the cylinder head was modified for the two-step valve with electrical VVT actuating system. Engine validation tests indicated that cylinder #3 has very high blow-by and it cannot be reduced with new pistons and rings. Due to the time constraint, it was decided to convert the four-cylinder engine into a single cylinder engine by blocking both intake and exhaust ports of the unused cylinders. The model-based combustion mode transition control algorithm was developed in the MSU HIL simulation environment and the Simulink based control strategy was implemented into the target engine controller. With both single-cylinder metal engine and control strategy ready, stable HCCI combustion was achived with COV of 2.1% Motoring tests were conducted to validate the actuator transient operations including valve lift, electrical variable valve timing, electronic throttle, multiple spark and injection controls. After the actuator operations were confirmed, 15-cycle smooth combustion mode transition from SI to HCCI combustion was achieved; and fast 8-cycle smooth combustion mode transition followed. With a fast electrical variable valve timing actuator, the number of engine cycles required for mode transition can be reduced down to five. It was also found that the combustion mode transition is sensitive to the charge air and engine coolant temperatures and regulating the corresponding temperatures to the target levels during the combustion mode

  17. Development of additional module to neutron-physic and thermal-hydraulic computer codes for coolant acoustical characteristics calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Bogomazov, D.N.; Poliakov, N. [Moscow Power Engineering Institute (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The new special module to neutron-physic and thermal-hydraulic computer codes for coolant acoustical characteristics calculation is worked out. The Russian computer code Rainbow has been selected for joint use with a developed module. This code system provides the possibility of EFOCP (Eigen Frequencies of Oscillations of the Coolant Pressure) calculations in any coolant acoustical elements of primary circuits of NPP. EFOCP values have been calculated for transient and for stationary operating. The calculated results for nominal operating were compared with results of measured EFOCP. For example, this comparison was provided for the system: 'pressurizer + surge line' of a WWER-1000 reactor. The calculated result 0.58 Hz practically coincides with the result of measurement (0.6 Hz). The EFOCP variations in transients are also shown. The presented results are intended to be useful for NPP vibration-acoustical certification. There are no serious difficulties for using this module with other computer codes.

  18. Validation of computational fluid dynamics calculation using Rossendorf coolant mixing model flow measurements in primary loop of coolant in a pressurized water reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Istvan; Hutli, Ezddin; Faekas, Tatiana; Takacs, Antal; Guba, Attila; Toth, Ivan [Dept. of Thermohydraulics, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively) with experimental results.

  19. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipes. 1. Investigation on velocity ratio between the coolant pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-02-01

    This report presents numerical results on thermal striping characteristics at a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipe, carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. In the numerical investigations, it was considered a tee junction system consisted of a main pipe (1.33 cm{sup I.D.}) with a 90deg elbow and a branch pipe having same inner diameter to the main pipe, and five velocity ratio conditions between both the pipes, i.e., (V{sub main}/V{sub branch}) = 0.25; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0 and 4.0. From the numerical investigations the following characteristics were obtained: (1) Temperature fluctuations in the downstream region of the tee junction were formulated by lower frequency components (<7.0 Hz) due to the interactions between main pipe flows and jet flows from the branch pipe, and higher frequency components (>10.0 Hz) generated by the vortex released frequency from the outer edge of the branch pipe jet flows. (2) On the top plane of the main pipe, peak values of the temperature fluctuation amplitude was decreased with increasing flow velocity in the main pipe, and its position was shifted to downstream direction of the main pipe by the increase of the main pipe flow velocity. (3) On the bottom plane of the main pipe, contrary to (2), peak values of the temperature fluctuation amplitude was increased with increasing flow velocity in the main pipe. (author)

  20. Service Cart For Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Gim Shek

    1995-01-01

    Cart supports rear-mounted air-cooled engine from Volkswagen or Porsche automobile. One person removes, repairs, tests, and reinstalls engine of car, van, or home-built airplane. Consists of framework of wood, steel, and aluminum components supported by four wheels. Engine lifted from vehicle by hydraulic jack and gently lowered onto waiting cart. Jack removed from under engine. Rear of vehicle raised just enough that engine can be rolled out from under it. Cart easily supports 200-lb engine. Also used to hold transmission. With removable sheet-metal top, cart used as portable seat.

  1. Operating experiences with rotary air-to-air heat exchangers: hospitals, schools, nursing homes, swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Systems utilizing rotary air-to-air heat exchangers are discussed. Basic considerations of use (fresh air requirements, system configurations, cost considerations), typical system layout/design considerations, and operating observations by engineers, staff and maintenance personnel are described.

  2. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  3. Fast breeder reactors an engineering introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, A M

    1981-01-01

    Fast Breeder Reactors: An Engineering Introduction is an introductory text to fast breeder reactors and covers topics ranging from reactor physics and design to engineering and safety considerations. Reactor fuels, coolant circuits, steam plants, and control systems are also discussed. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with a brief summary of the history of fast reactors, with emphasis on international and the prospect of making accessible enormous reserves of energy. The next chapter deals with the physics of fast reactors and considers calculation methods, flux distribution,

  4. Study on the effect of the impeller and diffuser blade number on reactor coolant pump performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Y.; Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Li, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, CFD approach was employed to study how the blade number of impeller and diffuser influences reactor coolant pump performances. The three-dimensional pump internal flow channel was modelled by pro/E software, Reynolds-averaged Naiver-Stokes equations with the k-ε turbulence model were solved by the computational fluid dynamics software CFX. By post-processing on the numerical results, the performance curves of reactor coolant pump were obtained. The results are as follows, with the blade number of the impeller increasing, the head of the pump with different diffuser universally increases in the 8Q n∼1.2Q n conditions, and at different blade number of the diffuser, the head increases with the blade number of the impeller increasing. In 1.0Q n condition, when the blades number combination of impeller and diffuser chooses 4+16, 7+14 and 6+18, the head curves exist singular points. In 1.2Q n condition, the head curve still exists singular point in 6+18. With the blade number of the impeller increasing, the efficiency of the pump with different diffuser universally decreases in the 0.8Q n and 1.0Q n conditions, but in 1.2Q n condition, the efficiency of the pump with different diffuser universally increases. In 1.0Q n condition, the impellers of 4 and 5 blades are better. When the blade number combination of impeller and diffuser choose 4+11, 4+17, 4+18, 5+12, 5+17 and 5+18, the efficiencies relatively have higher values. With the blade number of the impeller increasing, the hydraulic shaft power of the pump with different diffuser universally increases in the 0.8Q n∼1.2Q n conditions, and with the blade number of the diffuser increasing, the power of different impeller overall has small fluctuation, but tends to be uniform. This means the increase of the diffuser blade number has less influence on shaft power.The influence on the head and flow by the matching relationship of the blades number between impeller and diffuser is very complicated, which

  5. Analytical model for estimating drag forces on rigid submerged structures caused by LOCA and safety relief valve ramshead air discharges. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Basic information is presented for estimating drag forces on rigid structural members submerged in a pressure suppression pool, caused by either the air discharge from a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or the air bubble oscillation following safey relief valve ramshead discharge. Methods are described for estimating acceleration (unsteady) and standard (velocity-squared) drag force components for a variety of structural geometries.

  6. Numerical investigation on thermal striping conditions for a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipes. 4. Investigation on second-order moments in coolant mixing region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-02-01

    This report presents numerical results on thermal striping characteristics at a tee junction of LMFBR coolant pipe, carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. In the numerical investigations, it was considered a tee junction system consisted of a main pipe (1.33 cm{sup I.D.}) with a 90deg elbow and a brunch pipe, and four parameters, i.e., (1) diameter ratio {alpha} between both the pipes, (2) flow velocity ratio {beta} between both the pipes, (3) angle {gamma} between both the pipes, and (4) Reynolds number Re. From the numerical investigations, the following characteristics were obtained: (1) According to the decreasing of the diameter ratio, significant area of second-order moments was expanded in the fixed condition of {beta}=1.0. (2) Significant second-order moments area was expanded for the increasing of the flow velocity ratio {beta} specified by varying of the main pipe velocity in the case of a {alpha}=1.0 constant condition. On the other hand, the area was expanded for the decreasing of the velocity ratio {beta} defined by varying of the branch pipe velocity in the case of a {alpha}=1.0 constant condition. (3) Maximum second-order moments values were generated in the case of {gamma}=180deg due to the influence of interactions between main pipe flows and jet flows from the branch pipe. (4) According to the increase of Reynolds number, significant area of second-order moments was expanded due to the activation of turbulence mixing in the main pipe. (author)

  7. Liquid Cooling of Tractive Lithium Ion Batteries Pack with Nanofluids Coolant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xie, Huaqing; Yu, Wei; Li, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The heat generated from tractive lithium ion batteries during discharge-charge process has great impacts on the performances of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. How to solve the thermal abuse in tractive lithium ion batteries pack becomes more and more urgent and important for future development of electrical vehicles. In this work, TiO2, ZnO and diamond nanofluids are prepared and utilized as coolants in indirect liquid cooling of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. The results show that nanofluids present superior cooling performance to that of pure fluids and the diamond nanofluid presents relatively excellent cooling abilities than that of TiO2 and ZnO nanofluids. During discharge process, the temperature distribution of batteries in batteries pack is uniform and stable, due to steady heat dissipation by indirect liquid cooling. It is expected that nanofluids could be considered as a potential alternative for indirect liquid cooling in electrical vehicles.

  8. Experimental simulation of asymmetric heat up of coolant channel under small break LOCA condition for PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ashwini K., E-mail: ashwinikumaryadav@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Majumdar, P., E-mail: pmajum@barc.gov.in [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Ravi, E-mail: ravikfme@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Chatterjee, B., E-mail: barun@barc.gov.in [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, Akhilesh, E-mail: akhilfme@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Mukhopadhyay, D., E-mail: dmukho@barc.gov.in [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Circumferential temperature gradient of PT for asymmetric heat-up was 440 °C. ► At 2 MPa ballooning initiated at 450 °C and with strain rate of 0.0277%/s. ► At 4 MPa ballooning initiated at 390 °C and with strain rate of 0.0305%/s. ► At 4 MPa, PT ruptured under uneven strain and steep temperature gradient. ► Integrity of PT depends on internal pressure and magnitude of decay power. -- Abstract: During postulated small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) as well as for postulated SBLOCA coincident with loss of ECCS, a stratified flow condition can arise in the coolant channels as the gravitational force dominates over the low inertial flow arising from small break flow. A Station Blackout condition without operator intervention can also lead to stratified flow condition during a slow channel boil-off condition. For all these conditions the pressure remains high and under stratified flow condition, the horizontal fuel bundles experience different heat transfer environments with respect to the stratified flow level. This causes the bundle upper portion to get heated up higher as compared to the submerged portion. This kind of asymmetrical heating of the bundle is having a direct bearing on the circumferential temperature gradient of pressure tube (PT) component of the coolant channel. The integrity of the PT is important under normal conditions as well as at different accident loading conditions as this component houses the fuel bundles and serves as a coolant pressure boundary of the reactors. An assessment of PT is required with respect to different accident loading conditions. The present investigation aims to study thermo-mechanical behaviour of PT (Zr, 2.5 wt% Nb) under a stratified flow condition under different internal pressures. The component is subjected to an asymmetrical heat-up conditions as expected during the said situation under different pressure conditions which varies from 2

  9. Coolant choice for the central beryllium pipe of the BESIII beam pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Fang; Wang, Li; Wu, Ping; Ji, Quan; Li, Xun-Feng; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2010-07-01

    In order to take away much more heat on the BESIII beam pipe to guarantee the normal particle detection, EDM-1 (oil No.1 for electric discharge machining), with good thermal and flow properties was selected as the candidate coolant for the central beryllium pipe of the BESIII beam pipe. Its cooling character was studied and dynamic corrosion experiment was undertaken to examine its corrosion on beryllium. The experiment results show that EDM-1 would corrode the beryllium 19.9 μm in the depth in 10 years, which is weak and can be neglected. Finite element simulation and experiment research were taken to check the cooling capacity of EDM-1. The results show that EDM-1 can meet the cooling requirement of the central beryllium pipe. Now EDM-1 is being used to cool the central beryllium pipe of the BESIII beam pipe.

  10. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  11. Effect of the Shrink Fit and Mechanical Tolerance on Reactor Coolant Pump Flywheel Integrity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghak [Korea KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Reactor coolant pump (RCP) flywheel should satisfy the RCP flywheel integrity criteria of the US NRC standard review plan (SRP) 5.4.1.1 and regulatory guide (RG) 1.14. Shrink-fit and rotational stresses should be calculated to evaluate the integrity. In this paper the effects of the shrink fit and mechanical tolerance on the RCP flywheel integrity evaluation are studied. The shrink fit should be determined by the joint release speed and the stresses in the flywheel will be increased by the shrink fit. The stress at the interface between the hub and the outer wheel shows the highest value. The effect of the mechanical tolerance should be considered for the stress evaluation. And the effect of the mechanical tolerance should be not considered to determine the joint release speed.

  12. Vibration signal analysis of main coolant pump flywheel based on Hilert-Huang transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Meiru; Xia, Hong; Sun, Lin; Li, Bin; Yang, Yang [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, a three-dimensional model for the dynamic analysis of a flywheel based on the finite element method is presented. The static structure analysis for the model provides stress and strain distribution cloud charts. The modal analysis provides the basis of dynamic analysis due to its ability to obtain the natural frequencies and the vibration made vectors of the first 10 orders. The results show the main faults are attrition and cracks, while also indicating the locations and patterns of faults. The harmonic response simulation was performed to gain the vibration response of the flywheel under operation. In this paper, we present a Hilberte-Huang transform (HHT) algorithm for flywheel vibration analysis. The simulation indicated that the proposed flywheel vibration signal analysis method performs well, which means that the method can lay the foundation for the detection and diagnosis in a reactor main coolant pump.

  13. Chemical and radiolytical characterization of some perfluorocarbon fluids used as coolants for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Battistin, M; Setnescu, R; Teissandier, B; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2006-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon fluids, - mainly C6F14 - used as coolants within High Energy Physics Detectors in the Large Hadrons Collider (LHC) at CERN, were characterized by applying mainly the following methods: GC, FT-IR and UV-Vis. The aim of this work was the quality control, the identification and the quantification of different impurities which could increase the radiation sensitivity of these fluids. Thus, the presence of H containing molecules within perfluorocarbons strongly influences the appearance of hydrofluoric acid during their irradiation. The procedures settled-up in this work are sensitive to the presence of such impurities and would be used for the analyses of the received perfluorocarbon fluids as well as to assess the radiation induced modifications and the efficiency of their purification treatments.

  14. An overview of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) research at NRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, S.; Speis, T.P. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, North Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-03-01

    An overview of the fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) research programs sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is presented in this paper. A historical perspective of the program is provided with particular reference to in-vessel steam explosion and its consequences on the reactor pressure vessel and the containment integrity. Emphasis is placed on research in the last decade involving fundamentals of FCI phenomenology, namely, premixing, triggering, propagation, and energetics. The status of the current understanding of in-vessel steam explosion-induced containment failure (alpha-mode) issue, and other FCI issues related to reactor vessel and containment integrity are reported, including the extensive review and discussion of these issues at the recently held second Steam Explosion Review Group Workshop (SERG-2). Ongoing NRC research programs are discussed in detail. Future research programs including those recommended at the SERG-2 workshop are outlined.

  15. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heames, T.J. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Williams, D.A.; Johns, N.A.; Chown, N.M. (UKAEA Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith (UK)); Bixler, N.E.; Grimley, A.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Wheatley, C.J. (UKAEA Safety and Reliability Directorate, Culcheth (UK))

    1990-10-01

    This document provides a description of a model of the radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident. This document serves as the user's manual for the computer code called VICTORIA, based upon the model. The VICTORIA code predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions between fission products and structural materials, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. This document provides a detailed description of each part of the implementation of the model into VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided. The VICTORIA code was developed upon a CRAY-XMP at Sandia National Laboratories in the USA and a CRAY-2 and various SUN workstations at the Winfrith Technology Centre in England. 60 refs.

  16. System approach in the investigation of coolant parametrical oscillations in passive safety injection systems (PSIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskouriakov, K.N. [Moskovskij Ehnergeticheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The use of thermal-hydraulic computer codes is an important part of the work programme for activities in the field of nuclear power plants (NPP) Safety Research as it will enable to define better the test configuration and parameter range extensions and to extrapolate the results of the small scale experiments towards full scale reactor applications. The CATHARE2, RELAP5, the WCOBRA/TRAC, and APROS codes are the estimate thermal hydraulic codes for the evaluation of large and small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). The relatively good agreement experimental data with the calculations have been presented. There was shown also some big mistakes in predicting distribution of flow when two phase are present. Model of parametrical oscillation (P.O.) worked out gives explanation for flow oscillations and indicates that the phenomenon of P.O. appears under certain combination of thermal-hydraulic parameters and structure of heat-removal system. (orig.)

  17. Prototypic Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment in NRU to Simulate Loss-of-Coolant Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, C. L.; Hesson, G. M.; Russcher, G. E.; Marsh, R. K.; King, L. L.; Wildung, N. J.; Rausch, W. N.; Bennett, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Quick-look test results are reported for the initial test series of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation in the National Research Universal {NRU) test program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This test was devoted to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a LOCA. Experimental results from 28 tests cover reflood rates of 0.74 in./sec to 11 in./sec and delay times to initiate reflood of 3 sec to 66 sec. The results indicate that current analysis methods can predict peak temperatures within 10% and measured quench times for the bundle were significantly less than predicted. For reflood rates of 1 in./sec where long quench times were predicted (>2000 sec}, measured quench times of 200 sec were found.

  18. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  19. Microstructural analysis of MTR fuel plates damaged by a coolant flow blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Joppen, F.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2009-10-01

    In 1975, as a result of a blockage of the coolant inlet flow, two plates of a fuel element of the BR2 reactor of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN) were partially melted. The fuel element consisted of Al-clad plates with 90% 235U enriched UAl x fuel dispersed in an Al matrix. The element had accumulated a burn up of 21% 235U before it was removed from the reactor. Recently, the damaged fuel plates were sent to the hot laboratory for detailed PIE. Microstructural changes and associated temperature markers were used to identify several stages in the progression to fuel melting. It was found that the temperature in the center of the fuel plate had increased above 900-950 °C before the reactor was scrammed. In view of the limited availability of such datasets, the results of this microstructural analysis provide valuable input in the analysis of accident scenarios for research reactors.

  20. Validation of advanced NSSS simulator model for loss-of-coolant accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, S.P.; Chang, S.K.; Huang, H.C. [Nuclear Training Branch, Northeast Utilities, Waterford, CT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The replacement of the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) model on the Millstone 2 full-scope simulator has significantly increased its fidelity to simulate adverse conditions in the RCS. The new simulator NSSS model is a real-time derivative of the Nuclear Plant Analyzer by ABB. The thermal-hydraulic model is a five-equation, non-homogeneous model for water, steam, and non-condensible gases. The neutronic model is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion model. In order to certify the new NSSS model for operator training, an extensive validation effort has been performed by benchmarking the model performance against RELAP5/MOD2. This paper presents the validation results for the cases of small-and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Detailed comparisons in the phenomena of reflux-condensation, phase separation, and two-phase natural circulation are discussed.

  1. CATHARE Multi-1D Modeling of Coolant Mixing in VVER-1000 for RIA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Spasov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents validation results for multichannel vessel thermal-hydraulic models in CATHARE used in coupled 3D neutronic/thermal hydraulic calculations. The mixing is modeled with cross flows governed by local pressure drops. The test cases are from the OECD VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark (V1000CT and include asymmetric vessel flow transients and main steam line break (MSLB transients. Plant data from flow mixing experiments are available for comparison. Sufficient mesh refinement with up to 24 sectors in the vessel is considered for acceptable resolution. The results demonstrate the applicability of such validated thermal-hydraulic models to MSLB scenarios involving thermal mixing, azimuthal flow rotation, and primary pump trip. An acceptable trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency can be obtained.

  2. Safety analysis of the US dual coolant liquid lead lithium ITER test blanket module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Brad; Reyes, Susana; Sawan, Mohamed; Wong, Clement

    2007-07-01

    The US is proposing a prototype of a dual coolant liquid lead-lithium DEMO blanket concept for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as an ITER test blanket module (TBM). Because safety considerations are an integral part of the design process to ensure that this TBM does not adversely impact the safety of ITER, a safety assessment has been conducted for this TBM and its ancillary systems as requested by the ITER project. Four events were selected by the ITER international team (IT) to address specific reactor safety concerns, such as vaccum vessel (VV) pressurization, confinement building pressure build-up, TBM decay heat removal capability, tritium and activation products release from the TBM system and hydrogen and heat production from chemical reactions. This paper summarizes the results of this safety assessment conducted with the MELCOR computer code.

  3. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  4. Effectiveness of non-volatile falling film absorbers with solution and coolant in counter-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.S. [Austrian Institute of Technology, Dept. Energy, Giefinggasse 2, 1210 Vienna (Austria); Infante Ferreira, C.A. [Delft University of Technology, Engineering Thermodynamics, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    Effectiveness equations are developed for non-volatile falling film absorbers with solution and coolant in counter-flow. It is shown how mixture thermodynamics and film theory can be used to simplify the problem to give eigenvalue solutions for temperature and concentration profiles and how heat and mass transfer effectiveness equations can be derived from such solutions. The results indicate that the transfer process in an absorber is driven by two driving forces, i.e. the difference between bulk solution and cooling water temperatures and the initial deviation of bulk solution from its equilibrium state. Asymptotic effectiveness equations are derived for a few limiting cases to show that they approach their counterparts in single-phase heat transfer and isothermal absorption processes. (author)

  5. Influence of coolant temperature and pressure on destructive forces at fuel failure in the NSRR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusagaya, Kazuyuki [Global Nuclear Fuel - Japan Co., Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takehiko; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-01-01

    In order to design a new experimental capsule to be used in the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) experiment with the temperature and pressure conditions in a typical commercial BWR, coolant temperature and pressure influence is estimated for destructive forces during fuel rod failure in the experiment simulating reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). Considering steam property dependence on temperature and pressure, it is qualitatively shown that the destructive forces in the BWR operation condition are smaller than those in the room temperature and atmospheric pressure condition. Water column velocity, which determines impact by water hammer, is further investigated quantitatively by modeling the experimental system and water hammer phenomenon. As a result, the maximum velocity of the water column in the BWR operation conditions is calculated to be only about 10% of that in the room temperature and atmospheric pressure condition. (author)

  6. Mathematical Model-Based Temperature Preparation of Liquid-Propellant Components Cooled by Liquid Nitrogen in the Heat Exchanger with a Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Pavlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Before fuelling the tanks of missiles, boosters, and spacecraft with liquid-propellant components (LPC their temperature preparation is needed. The missile-system ground equipment performs this operation during prelaunch processing of space-purpose missiles (SPM. Usually, the fuel cooling is necessary to increase its density and provide heat compensation during prelaunch operation of SPM. The fuel temperature control systems (FTCS using different principles of operation and types of coolants are applied for fuel cooling.To determine parameters of LPC cooling process through the fuel heat exchange in the heat exchanger with coolant, which is cooled by liquid nitrogen upon contact heat exchange in the coolant reservoir, a mathematical model of this process and a design technique are necessary. Both allow us to determine design parameters of the cooling system and the required liquid nitrogen reserve to cool LPC to the appropriate temperature.The article presents an overview of foreign and domestic publications on cooling processes research and implementation using cryogenic products such as liquid nitrogen. The article draws a conclusion that it is necessary to determine the parameters of LPC cooling process through the fuel heat exchange in the heat exchanger with coolant, which is liquid nitrogen-cooled upon contact heat exchange in the coolant reservoir allowing to define rational propellant cooling conditions to the specified temperature.The mathematical model describes the set task on the assumption that a heat exchange between the LPC and the coolant in the heat exchanger and with the environment through the walls of tanks and pipelines of circulation loops is quasi-stationary.The obtained curves allow us to calculate temperature changes of LPC and coolant, cooling time and liquid nitrogen consumption, depending on the process parameters such as a flow rate of liquid nitrogen, initial coolant temperature, pump characteristics, thermal

  7. Experimental investigations of heat transfer and temperature fields in models simulating fuel assemblies used in the core of a nuclear reactor with a liquid heavy-metal coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Genin, L. G.; Krylov, S. G.; Novikov, A. O.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is to obtain information on the temperature fields and heat transfer coefficients during flow of liquid-metal coolant in models simulating an elementary cell in the core of a liquid heavy metal cooled fast-neutron reactor. Two design versions for spacing fuel rods in the reactor core were considered. In the first version, the fuel rods were spaced apart from one another using helical wire wound on the fuel rod external surface, and in the second version spacer grids were used for the same purpose. The experiments were carried out on the mercury loop available at the Moscow Power Engineering Institute National Research University's Chair of Engineering Thermal Physics. Two experimental sections simulating an elementary cell for each of the fuel rod spacing versions were fabricated. The temperature fields were investigated using a dedicated hinged probe that allows temperature to be measured at any point of the studied channel cross section. The heat-transfer coefficients were determined using the wall temperature values obtained at the moment when the probe thermocouple tail end touched the channel wall. Such method of determining the wall temperature makes it possible to alleviate errors that are unavoidable in case of measuring the wall temperature using thermocouples placed in slots milled in the wall. In carrying out the experiments, an automated system of scientific research was applied, which allows a large body of data to be obtained within a short period of time. The experimental investigations in the first test section were carried out at Re = 8700, and in the second one, at five values of Reynolds number. Information about temperature fields was obtained by statistically processing the array of sampled probe thermocouple indications at 300 points in the experimental channel cross section. Reach material has been obtained for verifying the codes used for calculating velocity and temperature fields in channels with

  8. Reverse osmosis for the recovery of boric acid from the primary coolant at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bártová, Šárka, E-mail: sarka.bartova@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Řež Ltd., Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Kůs, Pavel [Research Centre Řež Ltd., Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Skala, Martin [Research Centre Řež Ltd., Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); University of Chemical Technology, Prague, Department of Chemical Engineering, Technická 5, Prague 166 28 (Czech Republic); Vonková, Kateřina [Research Centre Řež Ltd., Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • RO membranes tested for boric acid recovery from primary coolant of nuclear power plants. • Scanning electron microscopy was used for the characterization of the membranes. • Lab scale experiments performed under various operation conditions. • We proposed configuration of and operation conditions for RO unit in nuclear power plant. - Abstract: At nuclear power plants (NPP), evaporators are used for the treatment of primary coolant and other liquid radioactive waste containing H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}. Because the operation of evaporators is expensive, a number of more cost-effective alternatives has been considered, one of which is reverse osmosis. We tested reverse osmosis modules from several manufactures on a batch laboratory apparatus. SEM images of the tested membranes were taken to distinguish the differences between the membranes. Water permeability through membranes was evaluated from the experiments with pure water. The experiments were performed with feed solutions containing various concentrations of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} in a range commonly occurring in radioactive waste. The pH of the feed solutions ranged from 5.2 to 11.2. Our results confirmed that the pH of the feed solution plays the most important role in membrane separation efficiency of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}. Certain modifications to the pH of the feed solution were needed to enable the tested membranes to concentrate the H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} in the retentate stream, separate from the pure water in the permeate stream. On this basis, we propose the configuration of and operational conditions for a reverse osmosis unit at NPP.

  9. Surface Treatment to Improve Corrosion Resistance in Lead-Alloy Coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen; Kumar Sridharan; McLean T. Machut; Lizhen Tan

    2007-08-29

    One of the six proposed advanced reactor designs of the Generation IV Initiative, the Leadcooled Fast Reactor (LFR) possesses many characteristics that make it a desirable candidate for future nuclear energy production and responsible actinide management. These characteristics include favorable heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and neutronic performance compared to other candidate coolants. However, the use of a heavy liquid metal coolant presents a challenge for reactor designers in regards to reliable structural and fuel cladding materials in both a highly corrosive high temperature liquid metal and an intense radiation fieldi. Flow corrosion studies at the University of Wisconsin have examined the corrosion performance of candidate materials for application in the LFR concept as well as the viability of various surface treatments to improve the materials’ compatibility. To date this research has included several focus areas, which include the formulation of an understanding of corrosion mechanisms and the examination of the effects of chemical and mechanical surface modifications on the materials’ performance in liquid lead-bismuth by experimental testing in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s DELTA Loop, as well as comparison of experimental findings to numerical and physical models for long term corrosion prediction. This report will first review the literature and introduce the experiments and data that will be used to benchmark theoretical calculations. The experimental results will be followed by a brief review of the underlying theory and methodology for the physical and theoretical models. Finally, the results of theoretical calculations as well as experimentally obtained benchmarks and comparisons to the literature are presented.

  10. Turbine ram jet engine. Turbinen-Staustrahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabs, A.

    1991-04-25

    A turbine ram jet engine is described with a ram compressed air duct, which is formed between an outer duct wall and a housing-like jacket of a basic turbine engine and is to be shut off on the incoming air side with means of shutting off, by which the ram compressed air duct is shut off with the basic engine switched on and the ram jet engine switched off with simultaneous release of suction air into the basic engine. The jacket should form an air shaft opening out polygonally in the direction of the end of the ram compressed air duct on the inlet side and should have penetrations, where the means of shutting off at the penetrations are hinged flaps, which open up the penetrations with the ram jet engine switched on and thus form a shut-off body of the air shaft symmetrically opposite the ram air flow.

  11. Characterization of Industrial Coolant Fluids and Continuous Ageing Monitoring by Wireless Node-Enabled Fiber Optic Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachat, Alexandros El; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Markos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    and spectroscopic characteristics of specific industrial-grade coolant fluids were analyzed along their entire life cycle range, and proper parameters for their efficient monitoring were identified. Based on multimode polymer or silica optical fibers, wide range (3-11) pH sensors were developed by employing sol-gel...

  12. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  13. Analysis and design of a dish/Stirling system for solar electric generation with a 2.7 kW air-cooled engine; Analisis y diseno de un sistema de generacion electrica termosolar con concentrador de disco parabolico y motor Stirling de 2.7 kW enfriado por aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran-Chacon, R.; Velazquez-Limon, N. [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Baja California (Mexico)]. E-mails: rbeltran1@uabc.edu.mx; nicolas.velazquez@uabc.edu.mx; Sauceda-Carvajal, D. [Universidad Politecnica de Baja California, Baja California (Mexico)]. E-mail: dsaucedac@upbc.edu.mx

    2012-01-15

    This paper presents a mathematical modeling, simulation and design of a solar power system of a parabolic dish with an air-cooled Stirling engine of 2.7 kW. The model used for the solar concentrator, the cavity and the Stirling engine were successfully validated against experimental data. Based on a parametric study, the design of the components of the engine is carried out. The study shows that as system capacity increases, the overall efficiency is limited by the power required by the fan, since the design of the cooler needs greater amounts of heat removal by increasing the air flow without affecting the internal conditions of the process (mass flow of working gas and internal dimensions of the same). The system was optimized and achieves an overall efficiency of solar to electric energy conversion of 26.7%. This study shows that the use of an air-cooled Stirling engine is potentially attractive for power generation at low capacities. [Spanish] Este trabajo presenta un modelado matematico, la simulacion y diseno de un sistema de generacion electrica termosolar de disco parabolico con motor Stirling de 2.7 kW enfriado directamente por aire. El modelo utilizado para el concentrador, la cavidad y el motor Stirling, fueron validados satisfactoriamente con datos experimentales. Con base en un estudio parametrico se realizo el dimensionamiento de los componentes del motor. El estudio realizado muestra que conforme se incrementa la capacidad del sistema, la eficiencia global se ve limitada por la potencia requerida por el ventilador, dado que el diseno del enfriador necesita retirar mayores cantidades de calor aumentando el flujo de aire, sin afectar las condiciones internas del proceso (flujo masico del gas de trabajo y dimensiones internas del mismo). El sistema fue optimizado obteniendo una eficiencia global de conversion de energia solar a electrica de 26.7%. Este estudio muestra que el uso de un motor Stirling enfriado directamente por aire es potencialmente

  14. Experimental approach to investigate the dynamics of mixing coolant flow in complex geometry using PIV and PLIF techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutli Ezddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate experimentally the increase of mixing phenomenon in a coolant flow in order to improve the heat transfer, the economical operation and the structural integrity of Light Water Reactors-Pressurized Water Reactors (LWRs-PWRs. Thus the parameters related to the heat transfer process in the system will be investigated. Data from a set of experiments, obtained by using high precision measurement techniques, Particle Image Velocimetry and Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PIV and PLIF, respectively are to improve the basic understanding of turbulent mixing phenomenon and to provide data for CFD code validation. The coolant mixing phenomenon in the head part of a fuel assembly which includes spacer grids has been investigated (the fuel simulator has half-length of a VVER 440 reactor fuel. The two-dimensional velocity vector and temperature fields in the area of interest are obtained by PIV and PLIF technique, respectively. The measurements of the turbulent flow in the regular tube channel around the thermocouple proved that there is rotation and asymmetry in the coolant flow caused by the mixing grid and the geometrical asymmetry of the fuel bundle. Both PIV and PLIF results showed that at the level of the core exit thermocouple the coolant is homogeneous. The discrepancies that could exist between the outlet average temperature of the coolant and the temperature at in-core thermocouple were clarified. Results of the applied techniques showed that both of them can be used as good provider for data base and to validate CFD results.

  15. Analysis of Air Force Wartime Contracted Construction Project Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Hoff, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENV-15-M-174 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air...Systems Engineering and Management Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and...experienced delays from poor design, and 15.4% experienced delays from change orders. 18 Overall, all project genres had a mean actual completion time

  16. The Effects of Cylinder Head Gasket Opening on Engine Temperature Distribution for a Water-Cooled Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. Y.; Chi, G. X.

    2017-02-01

    In a liquid-cooled engine, coolant is pumped throughout the water jacket of the engine, drawing heat from the cylinder head, pistons, combustion chambers, cylinder walls, and valves, etc. If the engine temperature is too high or too low, various problems will occur. These include overheating of the lubricating oil and engine parts, excessive stresses between engine parts, loss of power, incomplete burning of fuel, etc. Thus, the engine should be maintained at the proper operating temperature. This study investigated the effects of different cylinder head gasket opening on the engine temperature distributions in a water-cooled motorcycle engine. The numerical predictions for the temperature distribution are in good agreement with the experimental data within 20%.

  17. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  18. Refrigeration, heating and air conditioning pocket book 2012; Kaelte, Waerme, Klima. Taschenbuch 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaedlich, Sylvia (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    The refrigeration, heating and air conditioning pocket book 2012 contains a calendar of important events and technical fairs. A publication of this type requires constant updating, and this is what was done in this pocket book. The technical documentation contains the following aspects: General working basis; special working basis of refrigeration; coolants; refrigeration; air-conditioning technology; heating technology; measurement and control technology; general information.

  19. Modelling of a Spark Ignition Engine for Power-Heat Production Optimization Modèle de moteur à allumage commandé en vue de l’optimisation de la production chaleur-force

    OpenAIRE

    Descieux D.; Feidt M.

    2011-01-01

    Spark ignition gas engine is more and more used in order to produce electricity and heat simultaneously. The engine crankshaft drives a synchronous electric generator. The thermal power output is recovered from the engine coolant system and exhaust gas, and is used to produce generally hot water for heating system. In order to have a better adequacy between supply (production of the engine) and user demand, good knowledge of the engine and implemented phenomena are necessary. A generic method...

  20. Characterization of thermal-hydraulic and ignition phenomena in prototypic, full-length boiling water reactor spent fuel pool assemblies after a complete loss-of-coolant accident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric Richard; Durbin, Samuel G

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide basic thermal-hydraulic data associated with a SFP complete loss-of-coolant accident. The accident conditions of interest for the SFP were simulated in a full-scale prototypic fashion (electrically-heated, prototypic assemblies in a prototypic SFP rack) so that the experimental results closely represent actual fuel assembly responses. A major impetus for this work was to facilitate code validation (primarily MELCOR) and reduce questions associated with interpretation of the experimental results. It was necessary to simulate a cluster of assemblies to represent a higher decay (younger) assembly surrounded by older, lower-power assemblies. Specifically, this program provided data and analysis confirming: (1) MELCOR modeling of inter-assembly radiant heat transfer, (2) flow resistance modeling and the natural convective flow induced in a fuel assembly as it heats up in air, (3) the potential for and nature of thermal transient (i.e., Zircaloy fire) propagation, and (4) mitigation strategies concerning fuel assembly management.