WorldWideScience

Sample records for air drop

  1. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  2. How microstructures affect air film dynamics prior to drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der R.C.A.; Hendrix, M.H.W.; Tran, A.T.; Sun, C.; Tsai, P.A.; Lohse, D.

    2014-01-01

    When a drop impacts a surface, a dimple can be formed due to the increased air pressure beneath the drop before it wets the surface. We employ a high-speed color interferometry technique to measure the evolution of the air layer profiles under millimeter-sized drops impacting hydrophobic micropatter

  3. Maximal air bubble entrainment at liquid drop impact

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Tran, Tuan; Keij, Diederik L; Winkels, Koen G; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface an air bubble can be entrapped. Here we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: For large drop impact velocity and large droplets the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.

  4. Impact of ultra-viscous drops: air-film gliding and extreme wetting

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, K.

    2017-01-23

    A drop impacting on a solid surface must push away the intervening gas layer before making contact. This entails a large lubricating air pressure which can deform the bottom of the drop, thus entrapping a bubble under its centre. For a millimetric water drop, the viscous-dominated flow in the thin air layer counteracts the inertia of the drop liquid. For highly viscous drops the viscous stresses within the liquid also affect the interplay between the drop and the gas. Here the drop also forms a central dimple, but its outer edge is surrounded by an extended thin air film, without contacting the solid. This is in sharp contrast with impacts of lower-viscosity drops where a kink in the drop surface forms at the edge of the central disc and makes a circular contact with the solid. Larger drop viscosities make the central air dimple thinner. The thin outer air film subsequently ruptures at numerous random locations around the periphery, when it reaches below 150 nm thickness. This thickness we measure using high-speed two-colour interferometry. The wetted circular contacts expand rapidly, at orders of magnitude larger velocities than would be predicted by a capillary-viscous balance. The spreading velocity of the wetting spots is independent of the liquid viscosity. This may suggest enhanced slip of the contact line, assisted by rarefied-gas effects, or van der Waals forces in what we call extreme wetting. Myriads of micro-bubbles are captured between the local wetting spots.

  5. A Systems Engineering Approach to Analyzing Weather Input Sensitivities of the Joint Precision Air Drop System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    British airborne troops “watched in despair as thirty-five Stirling bomber-cargo planes dropped supplies everywhere but on the [drop] zones. Of eighty...must fly the aircraft to a specific point in the sky , known as the Computed Air Release Point (CARP). The CARP is calculated using variables such as

  6. Drop Impact on Liquid Surfaces: Formation of Lens and Spherical Drops at the Air-Liquid Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Yakhshi-Tafti, Ehsan; Kumar, Ranganathan; 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.06.029

    2010-01-01

    Droplets at the air-liquid interface of immiscible liquids usually form partially-submerged lens shapes (e.g. water on oil). In addition to this structure, we showed that droplets released from critical heights above the target liquid can sustain the impact and at the end maintain a spherical ball-shape configuration above the surface, despite undergoing large deformation. Spherical drops are unstable and will transform into the lens mode due to slight disturbances. Precision dispensing needles with various tip diameter sizes were used to release pendant drops of deionized water onto the surface of fluorocarbon liquid (FC-43, 3M). A cubic relationship was found between the nozzle tip diameter and the released droplet diameter. Drop impact was recorded by a high speed camera at a rate of 2000 frames per second. In order for the water drops to sustain the impact and retain a spherical configuration at the surface of the target liquid pool, it is required that they be of a critical size and be released from a ce...

  7. Failure Mechanisms of Air Entrainment in Drop Impact on Lubricated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Min; Hu, Han; Kim, Dong-Ook; Zheng, Zhong; Stone, Howard; Sun, Ying; Drexel University Team; Princeton University Team

    2016-11-01

    Lubricated surfaces have recently been introduced and studied due to their potential benefit in various applications. Combining the techniques of total internal reflection microscopy and reflection interference microscopy, we examine the dynamics of an underlying air film upon drop impact on a lubricated substrate. In contrast to drop impact on solid surfaces where asperities cause random breakup of the entraining air film, we report two air film failure mechanisms on lubricated surfaces. In particular, using thin liquid films of high viscosity, we show that air film rupture shifts from a randomly driven to a controlled event. At low Weber numbers (We) the droplet bounces. At intermediate We, the air film fails at the center as the drop top surface crashes downward owing to impact-induced capillary waves; the resulting liquid-liquid contact time is found to be independent of We. In contrast, at high We, the air film failure occurs much earlier in time at the first inflection point of the air film shape away from the drop center, where the liquid-liquid van der Waals interactions become important. The predictable failure modes of the air film upon drop impact sheds light on droplet deposition in applications such as lubricant-infused self-cleaning surfaces. Support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1401438 to Y.S.

  8. An airbag for drops: high speed interferometry studies of air film lubrication in drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, de Jolet

    2014-01-01

    The impact of droplets on solid surfaces is of wide-spread relevance in for example pesticide spraying, fluid coating, and ink-jet printing. The impact process includes the formation and spreading of an air film between the droplet and the surface before the droplet actually touches the surface. Thi

  9. A device for precision neutralization of electric charge of small drops using ionized air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sewan; Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Rogers, Howard; Loomba, Dinesh

    2003-10-01

    For use in our Millikan type liquid drop searches for fractional charge elementary particles we have developed a simple ionized air device for neutralizing a narrow stream of small drops. The neutralizer has been used for drops ranging in diameter from 10 to 25 μm. The width of the produced charge distribution is given by the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution and the mean of the distribution is set by a bias voltage. Using the bias voltage, the mean can be set with a precision of better than e, the electron charge. The use of the neutralizer is illustrated in an application to mineral oil drops produced with charges of the order of 1000e. We also show the interesting case of silicone oil drops that are produced in our drop generator with a charge distribution narrower than the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution, the charge distribution being broadened by the neutralizer.

  10. A Device for Precision Neutralization of Electric Charge of Small Drops Using Ionized Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Sewan

    2003-03-17

    For use in our Millikan type liquid drop searches for fractional charge elementary particles we have developed a simple ionized air device for neutralizing a narrow stream of small drops. The neutralizer has been used for drops ranging in diameter from 10 to 25 {micro}m. The width of the produced charge distribution is given by the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution and the mean of the distribution is set by a bias voltage. Using the bias voltage, the mean can be set with a precision of better than e, the electron charge. The use of the neutralizer is illustrated in an application to mineral oil drops produced with charges of the order of 1000e. We also show the interesting case of silicone oil drops that are produced in our drop generator with a charge distribution narrower than the Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution, the charge distribution being broadened by the neutralizer.

  11. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  12. Compressible Air Entrapment in High-Speed Drop Impacts on Solid Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan; Xu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Using high-speed photography coupled with optical interference, we experimentally study the air entrapment during a liquid drop impacting a solid substrate. We observe the formation of a compressed air film before the liquid touches the substrate, with internal pressure considerably higher than the atmospheric value. The degree of compression highly depends on the impact velocity, as explained by balancing the liquid deceleration with the large pressure of compressed air. After contact, the air film expands vertically at the edge, reducing its pressure within a few tens of microseconds and producing a thick rim on the perimeter. This thick-rimmed air film subsequently contracts into an air bubble, governed by the complex interaction between surface tension, inertia and viscous drag. Such a process is universally observed for impacts above a few centimeters high.

  13. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-03-17

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

  14. Kelvin Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

  15. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorji-Bandpy Mofid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  16. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  17. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, V., E-mail: vkulkarn@purdue.edu; Sojka, P. E. [Maurice J. Zucrow Laboratories, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ∼12 < We < ∼16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We=12(1+2/3Oh{sup 2}), is found to match well with experimental data ([L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545–560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, “Formation of drops and bubbles,” in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]). An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  18. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, V.; Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-01

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ˜12 < We < ˜16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We = 12( {1 + 2/3 Oh^2 } ), is found to match well with experimental data {[L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545-560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, "Formation of drops and bubbles," in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]}. An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  19. Antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic air filter with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Hyun-Seol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated an antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic (ES) air filter. Antimicrobial natural-product Sophora flavescens nanoparticles were produced using an aerosol process, and were continuously deposited onto the surface of air filter media. For the electrostatic activation of the filter medium, a corona discharge electrification system was used before and after antimicrobial treatment of the filter. In the antimicrobial treatment process, the deposition efficiency of S. flavescens nanoparticles on the ES filter was ~12% higher than that on the pristine (Non-ES) filter. In the evaluation of filtration performance using test particles (a nanosized KCl aerosol and submicron-sized Staphylococcus epidermidis bioaerosol), the ES filter showed better filtration efficiency than the Non-ES filter. However, antimicrobial treatment with S. flavescens nanoparticles affected the filtration efficiency of the filter differently depending on the size of the test particles. While the filtration efficiency of the KCl nanoparticles was reduced on the ES filter after the antimicrobial treatment, the filtration efficiency was improved after the recharging process. In summary, we prepared an antimicrobial ES air filter with >99% antimicrobial activity, ~92.5% filtration efficiency (for a 300-nm KCl aerosol), and a ~0.8 mmAq pressure drop (at 13 cm/s). This study provides valuable information for the development of a hybrid air purification system that can serve various functions and be used in an indoor environment.

  20. Time-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2015-09-07

    When a drop impacts on a solid surface, its rapid deceleration is cushioned by a thin layer of air, which leads to the entrapment of a bubble under its centre. For large impact velocities the lubrication pressure in this air layer becomes large enough to compress the air. Herein we use high-speed interferometry, with 200 ns time-resolution, to directly observe the thickness evolution of the air layer during the entire bubble entrapment process. The initial disc radius and thickness shows excellent agreement with available theoretical models, based on adiabatic compression. For the largest impact velocities the air is compressed by as much as a factor of 14. Immediately following the contact, the air disc shows rapid vertical expansion. The radial speed of the surface minima just before contact, can reach 50 times the impact velocity of the drop.

  1. Mechanics of Air-Inflated Drop-Stitch Fabric Panels Subject to Bending Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    materials such as textiles , elastomers, and flexible composites are used for the structure, significant load-carrying capacity per unit weight (or...Drop-Stitch Fabrics Finite Element Analysis Experimental Mechanics Technical Textiles 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...27 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1 Example of a Drop-Stitch Fabric with Rubber- Laminated

  2. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Performance assessment of HC-290 as a drop-in substitute to HCFC-22 in a window air conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devotta, S. [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India); Padalkar, A.S. [National Chemical Laboratory, Pune (India). Process Development Division; Sane, N.K. [Walchand College of Engineering, Sangli (India). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-06-01

    As per the Montreal Protocol, CFCs and HCFCs are being phased out. HCFC-22 is used in window air conditioners. This paper presents the experimental performance study of a window air conditioner with propane (HC-290), a natural refrigerant, as a drop-in substitute to HCFC-22. Experimental results showed that HC-290 had 6.6% lower cooling capacity for the lower operating conditions and 9.7% lower for the higher operating conditions with respect to HCFC-22. The coefficient of performance for HC-290 was 7.9% higher for the lower operating conditions and 2.8% higher for the higher operating conditions. The energy consumption of the unit with HC-290 was lower in the range 12.4-13.5% than HCFC-22. The discharge pressures for HC-290 were lower in the range 13.7-18.2% than HCFC-22. For HC-290, the pressure drop was lower than HCFC-22 in both heat exchangers. This paper also presents simulation results for the heat exchangers of an HCFC-22 window air conditioner with HC-290 as a drop-in substitute. The simulation has been carried out using EVAP-COND, a heat exchanger model developed by NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology. EVAP-COND: simulation models for finned-tube heat exchangers, Maryland, USA (2003). http://www2.bfrl.nist.gov/software/evap-cond/ [18

  4. Study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of air heat exchanger using PCM for free cooling applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaiselvam Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Free cooling is the process of storing the cool energy available in the night ambient air and using it during the day. The heat exchanger used in this work is a modular type which is similar to the shell and tube heat exchanger. The shell side is filled with Phase Change Materials (PCM and air flow is through the tubes in the module. The modules of the heat exchanger are arranged one over other with air spacers in between each module. The air space provided in between the module in-creases the retention time of the air for better heat transfer. Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling is carried out for single air passage in a modular heat exchanger. It shows that the PCM phase transition time in the module in which different shape of fins is adopted. The module with rectangular fins has 17.2 % reduction in solidification compared with the plain module. Then steady state numerical analysis is accomplished to the whole module having the fin of high heat transfer, so that pressure drop, flow and thermal characteristics across the module and the air spacers are deter-mined for various air inlet velocities of 0.4 to 1.6 m/s. To validate the computational results, experiments are carried out and the agreement was found to be good.

  5. Environmental Assessment of Proposed White Lakes Drop Zones for Kirtland Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    measuring 2’ X 3’, filled with rubber ballast (each weighing approximately 45 pounds [lbs]). Half of these drops would occur with parachutes...Santa Fe, NM Rayo McCollough Data Services Manager New Mexico Natural Heritage Program UNM Biology Dept. University of New Mexico Terry...5270 Mr. Rayo McCollough Information Coordinator Natural Heritage New Mexico UNM Biology Department MSC03 2020 1 University of New Mexico

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP CHARACTERISTICS OF AIR FLOW OVER A STAGGERED FLAT TUBE BANK IN CROSSFLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ishak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of air flow in a staggered flat tube bank in crossflow with laminar-forced convection. Measurements were conducted for sixteen tubes in the direction of flow and four tubes in rows. The air velocity varies between 0.6–1.0 m/s and the Reynolds number varied from 373 to 623. The total heat flux supplied in all tubes are changed from 967.92 to 3629.70 W/m2. The results indicate that the average Nusselt number for all the flat tubes increased by 11.46–46.42%, with the Reynolds numbers varying from 373 to 623 at the fixed heat flux. The average Nusselt number increased by 21.39–84%, and the total heat flux varyied between 967.92–3629.70 W/m2 with a constant Reynolds number Re = 498. In addition, the pressure drop decreased with an increase in the Reynolds number. A new mean Nusselt number-Reynolds number correlation was found, and the correlation yielded good predictions for the measured data with a confidence interval of 98.9%.

  7. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  8. Evaluation of Low-Pressure Drop Antimicrobial and Hybrid Air Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Pass Bioaerosol Removal Efficiencies of a Room Air Cleaner,” Karin K. Foarde, James T. Hanley, David S. Ensor , Peter Roessler Aerosol Science...Karin K. Foarde, James T. Hanley, Alan C. Veeck ASHRAE Journal 52-58 (2000) “Determine the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Treatments of Fibrous...Air Filters,” Karin K. Foarde, James T. Hanley ASHRAE Transactions: Research 4429 (RP-909): 156–170. “Development of a Method for Measuring Single

  9. In-air microfluidics: Drop and jet coalescence enables rapid multi-phase 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Kamperman, Tom; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Marcel; University of Twente Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we connect and integrate the fields of microfluidics and additive manufacturing, by presenting a unifying technology that we call In-air microfluidics (IAMF). We impact two liquid jets or a jet and a droplet train while flying in-air, and control their coalescence and solidification. This approach enables producing monodisperse emulsions, particles, and fibers with controlled shape and size (10 to 300 µm) and production rates 100x higher than droplet microfluidics. A single device is sufficient to process a variety of materials, and to produce different particle or fiber shapes, in marked contrast to current microfluidic devices or printers. In-air microfluidics also enables rapid deposition onto substrates, for example to form 3D printed (bio)materials which are partly-liquid but still shape-stable.

  10. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  11. Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Laboratory (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2008-01-15

    Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

  12. Hydrodynamics of evaporating sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Several dynamical stages of the Marangoni convection of an evaporating sessile drop are obtained. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop and the diffusion of vapor in air. The stages are characterized by different number of vortices in the drop and the spatial location of vortices. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a non-monotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size, which is calculated similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. The number of vortices quickly decreases with time, resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortex structure finally evolves into the single convection vortex in the drop, existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  13. Study on Collection Efficiency and Pressure Drop of Pleated Air Filters%褶型空气滤清器捕集效率及压力损失

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付海明; 尹峰

    2009-01-01

    For pressure drop reduction and collecting efficiency incretion of the air filter,using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation technology and combineing with the way of experimental test,particles trajectories and distribution rate of deposition in air filters were calculated simulatively,the position where the particles reside easily was obtained.According to experimental data of collecting efficiency,multi-relation calculation formula of filtration media collecting efficiency was proposed.By building 2D and 3D model of CFD,flow field distribution and filtration pressure drop of air filters were simulated,the results of computer simulation were in agreement with experimental test results basically.Using simulation model and changing structural parameters of air filters to instead parts of experimental research,variation and formula of relationship between the filtration pressure drop and its significant single-factor impact of air filters were obtained.Based on a large number of simulation data,multi-relation calculation formula of relationship between the pressure drop and its structural parameters of air filters was proposed using regression analysis.%为提高空气滤清器的减阻增效,采用计算流体力学(CFD)模拟技术,结合实验测试的方法,模拟计算颗粒在空气滤清器中的运动轨迹和颗粒在滤清器中沉积的分布率,得出颗粒在滤清器中容易沉积的部位.根据捕集效率实验数据,提出过滤介质捕集效率的多元关联计算式.通过建立二维及三维的CFD模型,模拟计算空气滤清器的流场分布和过滤压力损失,其计算机模拟结果与实验测试结果基本吻合.利用已建立的模拟模型,改变空气滤清器结构参数,替代部分实验模拟研究,得出空气滤清器的过滤压力损失与其各自影响因素的变化规律,以及空气滤清器过滤压力损失与其主要影响因素的单因素关联式.利用大量的模拟数据,回归分析提出空

  14. Soft Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Soyez, Gregory; Thaler, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new jet substructure technique called "soft drop declustering", which recursively removes soft wide-angle radiation from a jet. The soft drop algorithm depends on two parameters--a soft threshold $z_\\text{cut}$ and an angular exponent $\\beta$--with the $\\beta = 0$ limit corresponding roughly to the (modified) mass drop procedure. To gain an analytic understanding of soft drop and highlight the $\\beta$ dependence, we perform resummed calculations for three observables on soft-dropped jets: the energy correlation functions, the groomed jet radius, and the energy loss due to soft drop. The $\\beta = 0$ limit of the energy loss is particularly interesting, since it is not only "Sudakov safe" but also largely insensitive to the value of the strong coupling constant. While our calculations are strictly accurate only to modified leading-logarithmic order, we also include a discussion of higher-order effects such as multiple emissions and (the absence of) non-global logarithms. We compare our analytic r...

  15. Experimental study of a R-407C drop-in test on an off-the-shelf air conditioner with a counter-cross-flow evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, V.C.; Domitrovic, R.; Chen, F.C.

    1998-03-01

    An off-the-shelf 2-ton window air conditioner having an energy efficiency ratio of 10 was used to perform a drop-in test with R-407C. Laboratory tests were performed using a parallel-cross-flow (PCF) evaporator and a counter-cross-flow (CCF) evaporator. The CCF configuration is designed to take advantage of the temperature glide of R-407C so that the warm evaporator inlet air will be in contact with the higher temperature part of the evaporator coils first. The test results indicated that, at the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute-rated indoor and outdoor conditions, the cooling capacity was 8% higher and system coefficient of performance about 3.8% higher for the CCF evaporator than for the PCF evaporator. The test results also showed that the latent load for CCF was 30.6% higher than for PCF. The far better dehumidification effect provided by the CCF evaporator design is desirable for areas where the latent load is high. The experimental findings should be useful for future efforts to design a dehumidifier that uses a zeotropic refrigerant that provides a significant temperature glide. R-22 test data from a previous project are included as a reference.

  16. Air atmospheric pressure plasma jet pretreatment for drop-wise loading of dexamethasone on hydroxyapatite scaffold for increase of osteoblast attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-10-01

    Periodontal disease affects alveolar bone resorption around the involved teeth. To gain bone height, bone graft materials have been widely used with drug carriers. Application of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment is widely studied due to its ability to change surface characteristics without topographical change. The aim of this study is to identify whether the air APPJ (AAPPJ) treatment before drop-wise loading performance could change loaded amount of dexamethasone, and induce increase of cell attachment and proliferation. The results suggested that AAPPJ treatment decreased the contact angle down to about 13 degrees, which increased gradually but significantly lowered at least 4 days compared to no-treated group. After AAPPJ treatment, hydrocarbon was removed with change of zeta potential into positive charge. However, the AAPPJ treatment did not change the quantity or releasing profile of dexamethasone (p > 0.05). Confocal analysis combined with DNA proliferation analysis showed increase of osteoblast attachment and proliferation. Hence, AAPPJ could be a useful pretreatment method before drop-wise loading on HA scaffold with dexamethasone for increase of osteoblast attachment.

  17. Spread mixed monolayers of deoxycholic and dehydrocholic acids at the air-water interface, effect of subphase pH. Characterization by axisymmetric drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Fernández-Leyes, Marcos D; Prieto, Gerardo; Ruso, Juan M; Sarmiento, Félix; Schulz, Pablo C

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (deoxycholic and dehydrocholic acids) spread mixed monolayers behavior at the air/water interface were studied as a function of subphase pH using a constant surface pressure penetration Langmuir balance based on the Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA). We examined the influence of electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydration forces on the interaction between amphiphilic molecules at the interface by the collapse area values, the thermodynamic parameters and equation of state virial coefficients analysis. The obtained results showed that at neutral (pH=6.7) or basic (pH=10) subphase conditions the collapse areas values are similar to that of cholanoic acid and consistent with the cross-sectional area of the steroid nucleus (approximately 40 A(2)). The Gibbs energy of mixing values (DeltaG(mix) or =1). Such behavior indicates that the polar groups of the molecules interacts each other more strongly by repulsive electrostatic forces than with the more hydrophobic part of the molecule.

  18. Pressure Drop Measurement of Column Weight in Disc and Doughnut Pulsed Extraction Column by External Air Purge Method%外置吹气杯测量折流板脉冲萃取柱柱重压降

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王悦云; 李少伟; 景山

    2013-01-01

    The pressure drop of column weight was measured in a disc and doughnut pulsed extraction column with the inertial diameter of 0.3 m and height of 5.6 m by in-ternal and external air purge methods ,respectively .The experimental results show that the pressure drops of column weight measured by external air purge method are in good agreement with those by internal air purge method ,therefore ,the external air purge method is recommended to measure the pressure drop of column weight in the pulsed extraction column in plutonium purification cycle .%在内径为0.3m和高度为5.6m的折流板脉冲萃取柱中,分别采用内置吹气杯和外置吹气杯对柱重压降信号进行了测量和比较。实验结果表明,两种吹气杯安装方式所测量的结果一致。因此,为了避免由于内置吹气杯所造成的钚纯化循环脉冲萃取柱异形下澄清段的设计和加工难度,推荐可使用外置吹气杯来测量该工段的脉冲萃取柱柱重压降。

  19. 大吨位蒸(空)模锻锤改造技术%Modification technology of large tonnage steam (air) drop hammer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董建虎; 曹文胜; 杨丹锋; 辛宏斌; 谢建国; 黄继忠

    2012-01-01

    The working principle of all hydraulic electric-liquid hammer is introduced. The innovation technology is described, offered hy China National Heavy Machinery Research Institute Co. , Ltd. lo First Tractor Co. , Ltd. , and needed for changing the large tonnage steam (air) drop hammer into an all hydraulic electric-liquid hammer whose hydrolic system adopts a heavy-calibre special service valve set, hammer rod and hammer head adopt the spherical hinge linkage, hammer return stroke is designed as a double-limit buffer unit to avoid the shatter crack of the pipeline, and partial pipeline uses hose. The modified equipment works well, and has low failure rate and high reliability. Its energy saving rate is 90%.%介绍了全液压电液锤的工作原理,以及中国重型机械研究院有限公司为第一拖拉机股份有限公司将大吨位蒸(空)模锻锤改造成全液压电液锤项目中所采用的创新技术:液压系统采用专利技术的大口径专用阀组,锤杆与锤头采用球铰活动联接,锤头回程设计为双限位缓冲装置,为避免管道被震裂,部分管路采用软管联接等.改造后的设备使用情况良好,故障率低,可靠性高,节能率90%以上.

  20. Static shapes of levitated viscous drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, L.; Lister, J. R.; Lange, U.

    2005-06-01

    We consider the levitation of a drop of molten glass above a spherical porous mould, through which air is injected with constant velocity. The glass is assumed to be sufficiently viscous compared to air that motion in the drop is negligible. Thus static equilibrium shapes are determined by the coupling between the lubricating pressure in the supporting air cushion and the Young-Laplace equation. The upper surface of the drop is under constant atmospheric pressure; the static shape of the lower surface of the drop is computed using lubrication theory for the thin air film. Matching of the sessile curvature of the upper surface to the curvature of the mould gives rise to a series of capillary "brim" waves near the edge of the drop which scale with powers of a modified capillary number. Several branches of static solutions are found, such that there are multiple solutions for some drop volumes, but no physically reasonable solutions for other drop volumes. Comparison with experiments and full Navier-Stokes calculations suggests that the stability of the process can be predicted from the solution branches for the static shapes, and related to the persistence of brim waves to the centre of the drop. This suggestion remains to be confirmed by a formal stability analysis.

  1. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  2. Mass Remaining During Evaporation of Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    to> \\fyj Greek Symbols P Contact angle of sessile drop . n Droplet shape factor = h/d 6 Non-dimensional time = t/i V Air kinematic viscosity...factor n, = h / d (where h = maximum height of the drop ), which can also be directly related to the contact angle (P) of the drop , that is r| = (l-cos(P...three drop size (initial mass or volume) conditions with all other conditions the same. These runs have a constant contact angle , (3 = 16.5° ± 1.5

  3. Drops moving along and across a filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of oil drop motion both along and across a filament due to the air jet blowing. In case of drop moving along the filament, phenomena such as drop stick-slip motion, shape oscillations, shedding of a tail along the filament, the tail capillary instability and drop recoil motion were observed which were rationalized in the framework of simplified models. Experiments with cross-flow of the surrounding gas relative to the filament with an oil drop on it were conducted, with air velocity in the range of 7.23 to 22.7 m s-1. The Weber number varied from 2 to 40 and the Ohnesorge number varied from 0.07 to 0.8. The lower and upper critical Weber numbers were introduced to distinguish between the beginning of the drop blowing off the filament and the onset of the bag-stamen breakup. The range of the Weber number between these two critical values is filled with three types of vibrational breakup: V1 (a balloon-like drop being blown off), V2 (a drop on a single stamen being blown off), and V3 (a drop on a double stamen being blown off). The Weber number/Ohnesorge number plane was delineated into domains of different breakup regimes. The work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  4. Eye Drop Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  5. Dilating Eye Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ... Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy of Prematurity Strabismus Stye (defined) Vision ...

  6. Distribution Characteristic of Air Negative Ion Concentration in Three Landscape Dropping Waterscape Environment%3种小跌水景观空气负离子浓度分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭广文; 郭淑红; 曾非凡

    2014-01-01

    Distribution of microscale negative air ion concentration of three kinds of landscape dropping waterscape,in coastal tourist area of Yangjiang were investigated in this paper.The surveys were randomly conducted every quarter from December 2012 to October 2013, we carried out twelve experiments. Experimental results showed that, as wind speed was 1.1 m/s ~2.3 m/s, ,the negative air ion concentration of three landscape dropping waterscape were significantly higher than negative air ion concentration of tourist area road., high concentrations were determined in water body centered radius within 1.5 m, when distance is more than 1.5 m,concentrations sharply fell with increase of distance, till stable near bottom line; Aeroanion concentrations of small dropping waterscape was positively correlated with distance and humidity, little correlation with temperature. dropping waterscape is the most commonly form used in landscape design.It is concluded that distance between activity field and water body should be shorted, with two contact surfaces increased, appropriate planting shade trees is good for achieving favorable wind direction, so as to maximize realization of negative air ions to human body health benefits.%本研究以阳江银滩滨海旅游区3种景观小跌水为研究对象,进行微尺度下空气负离子浓度的分布观测。研究周期约为一年,按季度随机选择检测时间,2012年12月至2013年10月期间共检测12次,结果表明:在风速范围为1.1~2.3 m·s-1的情况下,滨海景观小跌水环境空气负离子浓度明显高于旅游区无水体的内路段,且高浓度尺度为以水体为中心半径0~1.5 m 处,1.5 m 之外随距离增加而浓度急剧下降,渐趋底线后缓和持平;小跌水负离子浓度与距离和湿度呈正相关关系,与温度相关性不大。小跌水是园林景观水体中最常用的形式,建议设计应缩短活动场地与水体间距离,增大两者接触面;适

  7. Drag on Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  8. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  9. The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2010-05-15

    Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

  10. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  11. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  12. Oscillating and star-shaped drops levitated by an airflow

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Peters, Ivo R; Brunet, Philippe; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous oscillations of drops levitated above an air cushion, eventually inducing a breaking of axisymmetry and the appearance of `star drops'. This is strongly reminiscent of the Leidenfrost stars that are observed for drops floating above a hot substrate. The key advantage of this work is that we inject the airflow at a constant rate below the drop, thus eliminating thermal effects and allowing for a better control of the flow rate. We perform experiments with drops of different viscosities and observe stable states, oscillations and chimney instabilities. We find that for a given drop size the instability appears above a critical flow rate, where the latter is largest for small drops. All these observations are reproduced by numerical simulations, where we treat the drop using potential flow and the gas as a viscous lubrication layer. Qualitatively, the onset of instability agrees with the experimental results, although the typical flow rates are too large by a factor 10. Our results...

  13. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  14. Conically shaped drops in electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Howard A.; Brenner, Michael P.; Lister, John R.

    1996-11-01

    When an electric field is applied to a dielectric liquid containing a suspended immiscible fluid drop, the drop deforms into a prolate ellipsoidal shape. Above a critical field strength the drop develops conical ends, as first observed by Zeleny [Phys. Rev. 10, 1 (1917)] and Wilson & Taylor [Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 22, 728 (1925)] for, respectively, the case of conducting drops and soap films in air. The case of two dielectric liquids was studied recently using a slender drop approximation by Li, Halsey & Lobkovsky [Europhys. Lett 27, 575 (1994)]. In this presentation we further develop the slender body approximation to obtain coupled ordinary differential equations for the electric field and the drop shape. Analytical formulae are derived which approximately give the cone angle as a function of the dielectric constant ratio between the two fluids, and the minimum applied electric field at which conical tips first form as a function of the dielectric constant ratio. Finally, drops shapes are calculated numerically and compared with the common prolate shape assumption.

  15. Water drops dancing on ice: how sublimation leads to drop rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Bernagozzi, I; Jung, S; Poulikakos, D; Marengo, M

    2013-07-05

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces but can also be induced through the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here we demonstrate that drop rebound can also originate from another physical phenomenon, the solid substrate sublimation. Through drop impact experiments on a superhydrophobic surface, a hot plate, and solid carbon dioxide (commonly known as dry ice), we compare drop rebound based on three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation, and sublimation), but lead to the same rebound phenomenon in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300 °C down to even below -79 °C. The formation and unprecedented visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop are also reported.

  16. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface.

  17. Diseño en cosmosfloworks del conducto experimental para la medición de la caída de presión del aire al paso de bandejas metálicas Cosmosfloworks design of an experimental duct for measurement of the drop in air pressure after its passage through metal trays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Escalante

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available En el siguiente artículo se presenta el proceso de desarrollo de diseño del conducto experimental que facilita la medición de la caída de presión del aire tras su paso por bandejas metálicas. El diseño se fundamenta en los resultados arrojados por las simulaciones realizadas a diferentes disposiciones en la etapa inicial del conducto, y la validación de los datos de la simulación más representativa con un prototipo del conducto real con esta misma distribución. Para este estudio se usó software Cosmosfloworks [1], con el cual se analizaron las líneas de corriente y la caída de presión del fluido en el conducto.The following article presents the development’s process of designing an experimental duct which facilitates the measurement of the drop in air pressure after its going through metal trays. The design is based on the results of simulations conducted at various provisions of the duct, and validation of data from the most representative simulation through actual prototype with the same distribution. For this study, we used [1], with which curves of fluid and pressure drop of the fluid were analyzed.

  18. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  19. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Leal, L. Gary; Thomas, D. A.; Crouch, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Free drops and bubbles are weakly nonlinear mechanical systems that are relatively simple to characterize experimentally in 1-G as well as in microgravity. The understanding of the details of their motion contributes to the fundamental study of nonlinear phenomena and to the measurement of the thermophysical properties of freely levitated melts. The goal of this Glovebox-based experimental investigation is the low-gravity assessment of the capabilities of a modular apparatus based on ultrasonic resonators and on the pseudo- extinction optical method. The required experimental task is the accurate measurements of the large-amplitude dynamics of free drops and bubbles in the absence of large biasing influences such as gravity and levitation fields. A single-axis levitator used for the positioning of drops in air, and an ultrasonic water-filled resonator for the trapping of air bubbles have been evaluated in low-gravity and in 1-G. The basic feasibility of drop positioning and shape oscillations measurements has been verified by using a laptop-interfaced automated data acquisition and the optical extinction technique. The major purpose of the investigation was to identify the salient technical issues associated with the development of a full-scale Microgravity experiment on single drop and bubble dynamics.

  20. Stokes flow near the contact line of an evaporating drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.; Bloemen, O.; Snoeijer, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation of sessile drops in quiescent air is usually governed by vapour diffusion. For contact angles below , the evaporative flux from the droplet tends to diverge in the vicinity of the contact line. Therefore, the description of the flow inside an evaporating drop has remained a challenge

  1. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    ;rbæk's case study presented at PEPM '95, most polyvariant specializers for procedural programs operate on recursive equations. To this end, in a pre-processing phase, they lambda-lift source programs into recursive equations, As a result, residual programs are also expressed as recursive equations, often......Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... with dozens of parameters, which most compilers do not handle efficiently. Lambda-dropping in a post-processing phase restores their block structure and lexical scope thereby significantly reducing both the compile time and the run time of residual programs....

  2. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  3. 变频空调中翅片管蒸发器换热与压降特性%Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of fin - and - tube evaporators in variable frequency air- condition system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金平; 祁元龙; 邹永胜

    2011-01-01

    通过试验研究了变频空调系统中翅片管蒸发器管内外侧换热与压降特性,分析了压缩机频率对波纹翅片和百叶窗翅片管蒸发器管内沸腾换热系数、空气侧换热因子和摩擦因子的影响.结果表明:随着压缩机频率的增加,两种翅片的管内沸腾换热系数hi均增加;摩擦因子f都减小,百叶窗翅片的摩擦因子f是波纹翅片的2倍多;换热因子j随着压缩机频率增加而减小,波纹翅片的j因子随Re数变化明显,百叶窗翅片的则变化不大.%The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of outside and inside of the fin - and - tube evaporators in variable frequency air - condition system were studied. The effects of compressor frequency on inside boiling heat transfer coefficient, airside heat transfer factor and friction factor of wavy fin and louver fin were investigated. The results indicated that with the increase of compressor frequency, the boiling heat transfer coefficients in two - phase region of two fins increased. The friction factors f of both fins decreased, and the factor f of louver fin almost was two times higher than that of wavy fin. The factors j of the two fins also decreased and the factor j of wavy fin changed obviously than louver fin with the variety of Re number.

  4. Coalescence of sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Pomeau, Yves; Andrieu, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical description of the kinetics of coalescence of two water drops on a plane solid surface. The case of partial wetting is considered. The drops are in an atmosphere of nitrogen saturated with water where they grow by condensation and eventually touch each other and coalesce. A new convex composite drop is rapidly formed that then exponentially and slowly relaxes to an equilibrium hemispherical cap. The characteristic relaxation time is proportional to the drop radius R * at final equilibrium. This relaxation time appears to be nearly 10 7 times larger than the bulk capillary relaxation time t b = R * $\\eta$/$\\sigma$, where $\\sigma$ is the gas--liquid surface tension and $\\eta$ is the liquid shear viscosity. In order to explain this extremely large relaxation time, we consider a model that involves an Arrhenius kinetic factor resulting from a liquid--vapour phase change in the vicinity of the contact line. The model results in a large relaxation time of order t b exp(L/R...

  5. Sessile drops in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces with a liquid are governing several phenomena. For instance, these interfaces are giving the shape of sessile droplets and rule the spread of liquids on surfaces. Here we analyze the shape of sessile axisymmetric drops and how it is depending on the gravity, obtaining results in agreement with experimental observations under conditions of microgravity.

  6. Studies of the Stability and Dynamics of Levitated Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikumar, A.; Lee, Chun Ping; Wang, T. G.

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of our experimental and theoretical studies relating to equilibrium and stability of liquid drops, typically of low viscosity, levitated in air by a sound field. The major emphasis here is on the physical principles and understanding behind the stability of levitated drops. A comparison with experimental data is also given, along with some fascinating pictures from high-speed photography. One of the aspects we shall deal with is how a drop can suddenly burst in an intense sound field; a phenomenon which can find applications in atomization technology. Also, we are currently investigating the phenomenon of suppression of coalescence between drops levitated in intense acoustic fields.

  7. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  8. Coalescence of bubbles and drops in an outer fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Paulsen, Joseph D; Kannan, Anerudh; Burton, Justin C; Nagel, Sidney R

    2014-01-01

    When two liquid drops touch, a microscopic connecting liquid bridge forms and rapidly grows as the two drops merge into one. Whereas coalescence has been thoroughly studied when drops coalesce in vacuum or air, many important situations involve coalescence in a dense surrounding fluid, such as oil coalescence in brine. Here we study the merging of gas bubbles and liquid drops in an external fluid. Our data indicate that the flows occur over much larger length scales in the outer fluid than inside the drops themselves. Thus we find that the asymptotic early regime is always dominated by the viscosity of the drops, independent of the external fluid. A phase diagram showing the crossovers into the different possible late-time dynamics identifies a dimensionless number that signifies when the external viscosity can be important.

  9. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  10. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J; Stone, H A; Eggers, Jens; Lister, John R.; Stone, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    When two drops of radius $R$ touch, surface tension drives an initially singular motion which joins them into a bigger drop with smaller surface area. This motion is always viscously dominated at early times. We focus on the early-time behavior of the radius $\\rmn$ of the small bridge between the two drops. The flow is driven by a highly curved meniscus of length $2\\pi \\rmn$ and width $\\Delta\\ll\\rmn$ around the bridge, from which we conclude that the leading-order problem is asymptotically equivalent to its two-dimensional counterpart. An exact two-dimensional solution for the case of inviscid surroundings [Hopper, J. Fluid Mech. ${\\bf 213}$, 349 (1990)] shows that R)]$; and thus the same is true in three dimensions. The case of coalescence with an external viscous fluid is also studied in detail both analytically and numerically. A significantly different structure is found in which the outer fluid forms a toroidal bubble of radius $\\Delta \\propto \\rmn^{3/2}$ at the meniscus and $\\rmn \\sim (t\\gamma/4\\pi\\eta)...

  11. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  12. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces.

  13. Understanding (sessile/constrained) bubble and drop oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, A J B; Defez, B; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M; Amirfazli, A

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse literature on drop oscillation is reviewed, with an emphasis on capillary wave oscillations of constrained drops. Based on the review, a unifying conceptual framework is presented for drop and bubble oscillations, which considers free and constrained drops/bubbles, oscillation of the surface or the bulk (i.e. center of mass) of the drop/bubble, as well as different types of restoring forces (surface tension, gravity, electromagnetic, etc). Experimental results (both from literature and from a new set of experiments studying sessile drops in cross flowing air) are used to test mathematical models from literature, using a novel whole profile analysis technique for the new experiments. The cause of oscillation (cross flowing air, vibrated surface, etc.) is seen not to affect oscillation frequency. In terms of models, simplified models are seen to poorly predict oscillation frequencies. The most advanced literature models are found to be relatively accurate at predicting frequency. However it is seen that no existing models are reliably accurate across a wide range of contact angles, indicating the need for advanced models/empirical relations especially for drops undergoing the lowest frequency mode of oscillation (the order 1 degree 1 non-axisymmetric 'bending' mode that corresponds to a lateral 'rocking' motion of the drop).

  14. Superheated drop neutron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Das, M; Roy, B; Roy, S C; Das, Mala

    2000-01-01

    Superheated drops are known to detect neutrons through the nucleation caused by the recoil nuclei produced by the interactions of neutrons with the atoms constituting the superheated liquid molecule. A novel method of finding the neutron energy from the temperature dependence response of SDD has been developed. From the equivalence between the dependence of threshold energy for nucleation on temperature of SDD and the dependence of dE/dx of the recoil ions with the energy of the neutron, a new method of finding the neutron energy spectrum of a polychromatic as well as monochromatic neutron source has been developed.

  15. Pressure Drop in Cyclone Separator at High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For the design of pressurized circulating fluidized beds, experiments were conducted in a small cyclone with 120 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height at high pressures and at atmospheric temperatures. Influence of air leakage from the stand pipe into the cyclone was specially focused. A semi-empirical model was developed for the predic tion of the pressure drop of the cyclone separator at different operate pressures with the effect of air leakage and inlet solid loading. The operate pressure, air leakage and inlet solid loading act as significant roles in cyclone pressure drop. The pressure drop increases with the increasing of pressure and decreases with the increasing of the flow rate of air leakage from the standpipe and with the increasing of the inlet solid loading.

  16. Evaporation and fluid dynamics of a sessile drop of capillary size

    OpenAIRE

    Barash, L. Yu.; Bigioni, T. P.; Vinokur, V.M.; Shchur, L. N.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical description and numerical simulation of an evaporating sessile drop are developed. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop and the diffusion of vapor in air. A shape of the rotationally symmetric drop is determined within the quasistationary approximation. Nonstationary effects in the diffusion of the vapor are also taken into account. Simulation results agree well with the data of evaporation rat...

  17. Drop impact on thin liquid films using TIRM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Min; Ying Sun Team

    2015-11-01

    Drop impact on thin liquid films is relevant to a number of industrial processes such as pesticide spraying and repellent surface research such as self-cleaning applications. In this study, we systematically investigate the drop impact dynamics on thin liquid films on plain glass substrates by varying the film thickness, viscosity and impact velocity. High speed imaging is used to track the droplet morphology and trajectory over time as well as observing instability developments at high Weber number impacts. Moreover, the air layer between the drop and thin film upon drop impact is probed by total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) where the grayscale intensity is used to measure the air layer thickness and spreading radius over time. For low We impact on thick films (We ~ 10), the effect of the air entrainment is pronounced where the adhesion of the droplet to the wall is delayed by the air depletion and liquid film drainage, whereas for high We impact (We >100) the air layer is no longer formed and instead, the drop contact with the wall is limited only to the film drainage for all film thicknesses. In addition, the maximum spreading radius of the droplet is analyzed for varying thin film thickness and viscosity.

  18. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, M -J; Etoh, T G; Thoroddsen, S T

    2012-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting onto a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 264506 (2012)]. These dynamics occur mostly within 50 {\\mu}s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million frames/sec. For a water drop impacting onto a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Re above about 12 000, up to 10 partial bubble-rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is about 20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into microbubbles. The different refractive index in the pool l...

  19. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called \\textit{jet drops}. In this paper, the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine, and discuss, the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, in the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a new scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity and surface tension in the \\textit{end-pinching} of the bubble bursting jet.

  20. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accep...

  1. Stokes flow near the contact line of an evaporating drop

    OpenAIRE

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Bloemen, Oscar; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2011-01-01

    The evaporation of sessile drops in quiescent air is usually governed by vapour diffusion. For contact angles below $90^\\circ$, the evaporative flux from the droplet tends to diverge in the vicinity of the contact line. Therefore, the description of the flow inside an evaporating drop has remained a challenge. Here, we focus on the asymptotic behaviour near the pinned contact line, by analytically solving the Stokes equations in a wedge geometry of arbitrary contact angle. The flow field is d...

  2. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  3. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  4. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2016-03-29

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.

  5. Drop splashing is independent of substrate wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, Andrzej; Nagel, Sidney R; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    A liquid drop impacting a dry solid surface with sufficient kinetic energy will splash, breaking apart into numerous secondary droplets. This phenomenon shows many similarities to forced wetting, including the entrainment of air at the contact line. Because of these similarities and the fact that forced wetting has been shown to depend on the wetting properties of the surface, existing theories predict splashing to depend on wetting properties as well. However, using high-speed interference imaging we observe that wetting properties have no effect on splashing for various liquid-surface combinations. Additionally, by fully resolving the Navier-Stokes equations at length and time scales inaccessible to experiments, we find that the shape and motion of the air-liquid interface at the contact line are independent of wettability. We use these findings to evaluate existing theories and to compare splashing with forced wetting.

  6. Liquid drops on soft solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2014-03-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract each other due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  7. Antibubbles and fine cylindrical sheets of air

    KAUST Repository

    Beilharz, D.

    2015-08-14

    Drops impacting at low velocities onto a pool surface can stretch out thin hemispherical sheets of air between the drop and the pool. These air sheets can remain intact until they reach submicron thicknesses, at which point they rupture to form a myriad of microbubbles. By impacting a higher-viscosity drop onto a lower-viscosity pool, we have explored new geometries of such air films. In this way we are able to maintain stable air layers which can wrap around the entire drop to form repeatable antibubbles, i.e. spherical air layers bounded by inner and outer liquid masses. Furthermore, for the most viscous drops they enter the pool trailing a viscous thread reaching all the way to the pinch-off nozzle. The air sheet can also wrap around this thread and remain stable over an extended period of time to form a cylindrical air sheet. We study the parameter regime where these structures appear and their subsequent breakup. The stability of these thin cylindrical air sheets is inconsistent with inviscid stability theory, suggesting stabilization by lubrication forces within the submicron air layer. We use interferometry to measure the air-layer thickness versus depth along the cylindrical air sheet and around the drop. The air film is thickest above the equator of the drop, but thinner below the drop and up along the air cylinder. Based on microbubble volumes, the thickness of the cylindrical air layer becomes less than 100 nm before it ruptures.

  8. Internal flow measurements of drop impacting a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Santosh; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the fundamental physical process involved in drop impacts is important for a variety of engineering and scientific applications. Despite exhaustive research efforts on the dynamics of drop morphology upon impact, very few studies investigate the fluid dynamics induced within a drop upon impact. This study employs planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) with fluorescent particles to quantify the internal flow field of a drop impact on a solid surface. The image distortion caused by the curved liquid-air interface at the drop boundary is corrected using a ray-tracing algorithm. PIV analysis using the corrected images has yielded interesting insights into the flow initiated within a drop upon impact. Depending on the pre-impact conditions, characterized by impact number, different vortex modes are observed in the recoil phase of the drop impact. Further, the strength of these vortices and the kinetic energy of the internal flow field have been quantified. Our studies show a consistent negative power law correlation between vortex strength, internal kinetic energy and the impact number.

  9. Excited Sessile Drops Perform Harmonically

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul H

    2013-01-01

    In our fluid dynamics video, we demonstrate our method of visualizing and identifying various mode shapes of mechanically oscillated sessile drops. By placing metal mesh under an oscillating drop and projecting light from below, the drop's shape is visualized by the visually deformed mesh pattern seen in the top view. The observed modes are subsequently identified by their number of layers and sectors. An alternative identification associates them with spherical harmonics, as demonstrated in the tutorial. Clips of various observed modes are presented, followed by a 10-second quiz of mode identification.

  10. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  11. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated v...

  12. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  13. Interferometric technique for nanoscale dynamics of fluid drops on arbitrary substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Pandey, Mrityunjay; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a simple interferometric probe to detect nanoscale dynamics of sessile fluid drops on arbitrary rough or flexible substrates. The technique relies on producing high-contrast Newton-ring like dynamical fringes by interference between a weak Fresnel reflection from the air-fluid interface of the drop and an air-glass interface of a convex lens placed above the drop in quasi-normal geometry. By analyzing the dynamical fringes, we observed 100-700 nm/s fluctuations in water drops evaporating on metal, leaves, insect wing, and sand paper due to their surface roughness. Similar fluctuations were also observed during spreading of non-volatile glycerin drops on various rough surfaces. Another application of the technique is demonstrated in precision measurement of change in evaporation rate of a water drop due to cooling of a metal substrate. This technique can be further miniaturized with a microscope objective with potential for wide applications.

  14. A Mathematical Scheme for Calculating Flows and Pressure Drops in Lit and Unlit Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwyer RW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A computational methodology is presented for evaluating the flows and pressure drops in both lit and unlit cigarettes. The flows and pressure drops across rows of tipping-paper perforations are considered explicitly, as are the locations and relative sizes of the ventilation holes. The flows and pressure drops across air-permeable cigarette papers are included. The influence of plugwrappermeabilities on filter ventilation is developed. Lit cigarettes are mimicked by adding a “coal” pressure drop to the upstream end of the cigarette. The computational scheme is used to predict the effects of tobacco-rod length, puff volume, and vent blocking on cigarette ventilation and pressure drop. A derivation of the pressure-drop and flow equations for a cigarette with an upstream pressure drop is included in an appendix.

  15. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  16. Dislodging a sessile drop by a high-Reynolds-number shear flow at subfreezing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisman, Ilia V; Criscione, Antonio; Tropea, Cameron; Mandal, Deepak Kumar; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2015-08-01

    The drop, exposed to an air flow parallel to the substrate, starts to dislodge when the air velocity reaches some threshold value, which depends on the substrate wetting properties and drop volume. In this study the critical air velocity is measured for different drop volumes, on substrates of various wettabilities. The substrate initial temperatures varied between the normal room temperature (24.5∘C) and subfreezing temperatures (-5∘C and -1∘C). The physics of the drop did not change at the subfreezing temperatures of the substrates, which clearly indicates that the drop does not freeze and remains liquid for a relatively long time. During this time solidification is not initiated, neither by the air flow nor by mechanical disturbances. An approximate theoretical model is proposed that allows estimation of the aerodynamic forces acting on the sessile drop. The model is valid for the case when the drop height is of the same order as the thickness of the viscous boundary in the airflow, but the inertial effects are still dominant. Such a situation, relevant to many practical applications, was never modeled before. The theoretical predictions for the critical velocity of drop dislodging agree well with the experimental data for both room temperature and lower temperatures of the substrates.

  17. Capillary-Inertial Colloidal Catapult upon Drop Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Roger; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2014-11-01

    To discharge micron-sized particles such as colloidal contaminants and biological spores, an enormous power density is needed to compete against the strong adhesive forces between the small particles and the supporting surface as well as the significant air friction exerted on the particles. Here, we demonstrate a colloidal catapult that achieves such a high power density by extracting surface energy released upon drop coalescence within an extremely short time period, which is governed by the capillary-inertial process converting the released surface energy into the bulk inertia of the merged drop. When two drops coalesce on top of a spherical particle, the resulting capillary-inertial oscillation is perturbed by the solid particle, giving rise to a net momentum eventually propelling the particle to launch from the supporting surface. The measured launching velocity follows a scaling law that accounts for the redistribution of the momentum of the merged drop onto the particle-drop complex, and is therefore proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity characterizing the coalescing drops. The interfacial flow process associated with the colloidal catapult is elucidated with both high-speed imaging and phase-field simulations.

  18. Viscous Coalescence of Two Drops in a Saturated Vapor Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Lina; Nagel, Sidney R.; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Lee, Taehun

    2016-11-01

    When two liquid drops come into contact, a microscopic liquid bridge forms between them and rapidly expands until the two drops merge into a single bigger drop. Numerous studies have been devoted to the investigation of the coalescence singularity in the case where the drops coalesce in a medium of negligible vapor pressure such as vacuum or air. However, coalescence of liquid drops may also take place in a medium of relatively high vapor pressure (condensable vapor phase), where the effect of the surrounding vapor phase should not be neglected, such as the merging of drops in clouds. In this study, we carry out Lattice Boltzmann numerical simulations to investigate the dynamics of viscous coalescence in a saturated vapor phase. Attention is paid to the effect of the vapor phase on the formation and growth dynamics of the liquid bridge in the viscous regime. We observe that the onset of the coalescence occurs earlier and the expansion of the bridge initially proceeds faster when the coalescence takes place in a saturated vapor compared to the coalescence in a non-condensable gas. The initially faster evolution of the coalescence process in the saturated vapor is caused by the vapor transport through condensation during the early stages of the coalescence.

  19. Drop stability in wind: theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungyon

    2015-11-01

    Water drops may remain pinned on a solid substrate against external forcing due to contact angle hysteresis. Schmucker and White investigated this phenomenon experimentally in a high Reynolds number regime, by measuring the critical wind velocity at which partially wetting water drops depin inside a wind tunnel. Due to the unsteady turbulent boundary layer, droplets are observed to undergo vortex-shedding induced oscillations. By contrast, the overall elongation of the drop prior to depinning occurs on a much slower timescale with self-similar droplet shapes at the onset. Based on these observations, a simple, quasi-static model of depinning droplet is developed by implementing the phenomenological description of the boundary layer. The resultant model successfully captures the critical onset of droplet motion and is the first of on-going studies that connect the classical boundary layer theory with droplet dynamics.

  20. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  1. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  2. Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2013-01-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

  3. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu'ena, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, Anne-Marie; Gu\\'{e}na, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  4. Drops, contact lines, and electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behaviour of drops and contact lines under the influence of electric fields, and how these can answer fundamental and industrial questions. Our focus is on studying the varying balance of the electric field, hysteresis forces and inertia as the speed of a contact line chan

  5. Evaporating Drops of Alkane Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Poulard, Christophe; Cazabat, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    22 pages 9 figures; Alkane mixtures are model systems where the influence of surface tension gradients during the spreading and the evaporation of wetting drops can be easily studied. The surface tension gradients are mainly induced by concentration gradients, mass diffusion being a stabilising process. Depending on the relative concentration of the mixture, a rich pattern of behaviours is obtained.

  6. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also pr

  7. New identities for sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Hajirahimi, Maryam; Fatollahi, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    A new set of mathematical identities is presented for axi-symmetric sessile drops on flat and curved substrates. The geometrical parameters, including the apex curvature and height, and the contact radius, are related by the identities. The validity of the identities are checked by various numerical solutions both for flat and curved substrates.

  8. Drops spreading on flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somszor, Katarzyna; Boulogne, François; Sauret, Alban; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Fibrous media are encountered in many engineered systems such as textile, paper and insulating materials. In most of these materials, fibers are randomly oriented and form a complex network in which drops of wetting liquid tend to accumulate at the nodes of the network. Here we investigate the role of the fiber flexibility on the spreading of a small volume of liquid on a pair of crossed flexible fibers. A drop of silicone oil is dispensed at the point of contact of the fibers and we characterize the liquid morphologies as we vary the volume of liquid, the angle between the fibers, and the length and bending modulus of the fibers. Drop morphologies previously reported for rigid fibers, i.e. a drop, a column and a mixed morphology, are also observed on flexible fibers with modified domains of existence. Moreover, at small inclination angles of the fibers, a new behavior is observed: the fibers bend and collapse. Depending on the volume, the liquid can adopt a column or a mixed morphology on the collapsed fibers. We rationalize our observations with a model based on energetic considerations. Our study suggests that the fiber flexibility adds a rich variety of behaviors that can be crucial for industrial applications.

  9. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  10. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  11. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  12. Evaporation and fluid dynamics of a sessile drop of capillary size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, L Yu; Bigioni, T P; Vinokur, V M; Shchur, L N

    2009-04-01

    Theoretical description and numerical simulation of an evaporating sessile drop are developed. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop, and the diffusion of vapor in air. A shape of the rotationally symmetric drop is determined within the quasistationary approximation. Nonstationary effects in the diffusion of the vapor are also taken into account. Simulation results agree well with the data of evaporation rate measurements for the toluene drop. Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension generate fluid convection in the sessile drop. Our results demonstrate several dynamical stages of the convection characterized by different number of vortices in the drop. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a nonmonotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The initial number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size which is similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. This number quickly decreases with time resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortices finally transform into the single convection vortex in the drop existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  13. Dynamics of a drop trapped inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Duchesne, Alexis; Lebon, Luc; Pirat, Christophe; Limat, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    A drop of moderate size deposited inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid remains trapped at the shock front and does not coalesce. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

  14. Persistence of memory in drop breakup: the breakdown of universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Pankaj; Cohen, Itai; Zhang, Wendy W; Siegel, Michael; Howell, Peter; Basaran, Osman A; Nagel, Sidney R

    2003-11-14

    A low-viscosity drop breaking apart inside a viscous fluid is encountered when air bubbles, entrained in thick syrup or honey, rise and break apart. Experiments, simulations, and theory show that the breakup under conditions in which the interior viscosity can be neglected produces an exceptional form of singularity. In contrast to previous studies of drop breakup, universality is violated so that the final shape at breakup retains an imprint of the initial and boundary conditions. A finite interior viscosity, no matter how small, cuts off this form of singularity and produces an unexpectedly long and slender thread. If exterior viscosity is large enough, however, the cutoff does not occur because the minimum drop radius reaches subatomic dimensions first.

  15. Vortex ring induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    CERN Document Server

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2016-01-01

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops which are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and pool, controls the crater deformations and pinch-off. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings which are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices which can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts, are not produced by oblate dro...

  16. Stability of a compound sessile drop at the axisymmetric configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chatain, Dominique; Anna, Shelley L; Garoff, Stephen

    2016-01-15

    The equilibrium configuration of compound sessile drops has been calculated previously in the absence of gravity. Using the Laplace equations, we establish seven dimensionless parameters describing the axisymmetric configuration in the presence of gravity. The equilibrium axisymmetric configuration can be either stable or unstable depending on the fluid properties. A stability criterion is established by calculating forces on a perturbed Laplacian shape. In the zero Bond number limit, the stability criterion depends on the density ratio, two ratios of interfacial tensions, the volume ratio of the two drops, and the contact angle. We use Surface Evolver to examine the stability of compound sessile drops at small and large Bond numbers and compare with the zero Bond number approximation. Experimentally, we realize a stable axisymmetric compound sessile drop in air, where the buoyancy force exerted by the air is negligible. Finally, using a pair of fluids in which the density ratio can be tuned nearly independently of the interfacial tensions, the stability transition is verified for the axisymmetric configuration. Even though the perturbations are different for the theory, simulations and experiments, both simulations and experiments agree closely with the zero Bond number approximation, exhibiting a small discrepancy at large Bond number.

  17. Induction of Marangoni convection in pure water drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yutaku; Askounis, Alexandros; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-10-01

    We report on experimental observations/visualization of thermocapillary or Marangoni flows in a pure water drop via infrared thermography. The Marangoni flows were induced by imposing a temperature gradient on the drop by locally heating the substrate directly below the center with a laser. Evidently, a temperature gradient along the liquid-air interface of ca. 2.5 °C was required for the Marangoni flows to be initiated as twin vortices and a subsequent gradient of ca. 1.5 °C to maintain them. The vortices exhibited an oscillatory behavior where they merged and split in order for the drop to compensate for the non-uniform heating and cooling. The origin of these patterns was identified by comparing the dimensionless Marangoni and Rayleigh numbers, which showed the dominance of the Marangoni convection. This fact was further supported by a second set of experiments where the same flow patterns were observed when the drop was inverted (pendant drop).

  18. Universal mechanism for air entrainment during liquid impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrix, Maurice H.W.; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Meer, van der Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2016-01-01

    When a millimetre-sized liquid drop approaches a deep liquid pool, both the interface of the drop and the pool deform before the drop touches the pool. The build-up of air pressure prior to coalescence is responsible for this deformation. Due to this deformation, air can be entrained at the bottom o

  19. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  20. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ristenpart, W D; Belmonte, A; Dollar, F; Stone, H A

    2009-01-01

    Oppositely charged drops have long been assumed to experience an attractive force that favors their coalescence. In this fluid dynamics video we demonstrate the existence of a critical field strength above which oppositely charged drops do not coalesce. We observe that appropriately positioned and oppositely charged drops migrate towards one another in an applied electric field; but whereas the drops coalesce as expected at low field strengths, they are repelled from one another after contact at higher field strengths. Qualitatively, the drops appear to `bounce' off one another. We directly image the transient formation of a meniscus bridge between the bouncing drops.

  1. Probing the nanoscale: the first contact of an impacting drop

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2015-11-16

    When a drop impacts onto a solid surface, the lubrication pressure in the air deforms its bottom into a dimple. This makes the initial contact with the substrate occur not at a point but along a ring, thereby entrapping a central disc of air. We use ultra-high-speed imaging, with 200 ns time resolution, to observe the structure of this first contact between the liquid and a smooth solid surface. For a water drop impacting onto regular glass we observe a ring of microbubbles, due to multiple initial contacts just before the formation of the fully wetted outer section. These contacts are spaced by a few microns and quickly grow in size until they meet, thereby leaving behind a ring of microbubbles marking the original air-disc diameter. On the other hand, no microbubbles are left behind when the drop impacts onto molecularly smooth mica sheets. We thereby conclude that the localized contacts are due to nanometric roughness of the glass surface, and the presence of the microbubbles can therefore distinguish between glass with 10 nm roughness and perfectly smooth glass. We contrast this entrapment topology with the initial contact of a drop impacting onto a film of extremely viscous immiscible liquid, where the initial contact appears to be continuous along the ring. Here, an azimuthal instability occurs during the rapid contraction at the triple line, also leaving behind microbubbles. For low impact velocities the nature of the initial contact changes to one initiated by ruptures of a thin lubricating air film.

  2. Possible Causes for the Sudden Drop of Air Temperature in the Northern Hemisphere from Early- to Mid-Winter%2015/2016年前冬至隆冬北半球中高纬度暖冷急转及环流特征初析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂羽; 孙冷; 王东阡; 李多

    2016-01-01

    During December 2015,the averaged surface air temperature over most regions in the mid-lati-tude of Northern Hemisphere was above normal.Some regions in North America experienced the warmest December in the record.However,the temperature dropped suddenly in January 2016.Extreme cold weather events such as cold surges,winter storms attacked Europe,North America and East Asia.Using the NCEP reanalysis and station observation data,the possible causes for the sudden drop of air tempera-ture during the winter were discussed.The analysis reveals that the Arctic oscillation turned from positive phase in December 2015 to negative phase in January 2016,leading to the warmer Arctic but the colder mid-latitude continent.The development and decay of mid-latitude atmospheric blocking also contributed to the sudden drop of air temperature.Furthermore,in the context of global warming,the sea surface temperature of tropical eastern Pacific is often above normal during the year of El Ni~no,which gives rise to larger temperature gradient between the equator and the pole,causing a more unstable climate system,and further leading to more frequent extreme cold events.%2015年12月,北半球中纬度大部地区气温明显偏高,北美多地气温突破历史同期最高值。而2016年1月,北半球中纬度地区的气温迅速转为偏低,欧洲、北美、东亚等多地发生强寒潮、暴风雪等极端天气气候事件。本文结合再分析资料和台站观测资料,通过对大气环流异常的诊断分析,初步探讨了2015/2016年冬季北半球发生暖冷急转的环流特征及可能原因。分析指出,2016年1月初,北极涛动从正位相突然转为负位相,是造成北半球中纬度气温陡降的主要原因。中高纬度阻塞活动的交替建立和崩溃也加剧了气温变化的程度。此外,在厄尔尼诺年,赤道太平洋海温偏高,赤极温差增大,易造成海气系统的不稳定,再配合以全球变暖的

  3. Star-shaped Oscillations of Leidenfrost Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-organized, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with $n = 2-13$ lobes around the drop periphery. We find that both the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations depend only on the capillary length of the liquid, and are independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depend sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations under the drop is approximately twice that the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results suggest that the star-shaped oscillations are hydrodynamic in origin, and are driven by capillary waves beneath the drop. The exact mechanism by which the vapor flow initiates the capillary waves is likely related to static "brim waves" in levitated, viscous drops.

  4. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  5. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  6. Study on evaporation characteristics of a sessile drop of sulfur mustard on glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunsook; Myung, Sung Min; Park, Myung Kyu; Lee, Hae Wan; Ryu, Sam Gon

    2012-05-01

    The evaporation characteristics (evaporation rates and process) of a sessile drop of sulfur mustard on glass has been studied using a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, gas chromatograph mass spectrometry, and drop shape analysis. It showed that the evaporation rates of the droplet increased with temperature and air flow. The effect of temperature on the rates was more pronounced at lower air flow. Air flow was less effective at lower temperature. The contact angle of the droplet was initially observed as θ = 19.5° ± 0.7 and decreased linearly with time until it switched to a constant mode.

  7. Surfactant-Enhanced Spreading of Sessile Water Drops on Polypropylene Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Venzmer, Joachim; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2016-08-23

    Spreading of water drops resting in equilibrium on polypropylene surfaces was initiated by dispensing surfactant-laden droplets on their apex. Upon contact of the two drops two processes were kicked-off: surfactant from the droplets spread along the water/air interface of the sessile drops and a train of capillary waves propagated along the sessile drops. The contact line of the sessile drops remained initially pinned and started spreading only when surfactant reached it while the capillary waves did not have an apparent effect on initiating drop spreading. However, surfactant influenced the propagation velocity of the capillary waves. Though the spreading dynamics of such nonhomogeneously mixed surfactant/water drops on polypropylene surfaces was initially different from that of homogeneously mixed drops, the later spreading dynamics was similar and was dominated by viscosity and surface tension in both cases. These results can help in discriminating the path of action of surfactants in bulk and at the water/air interface, which is also relevant for understanding phenomena such as superspreading.

  8. Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

  9. Unstable Leidenfrost Drops on Roughened Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, Jonathan B

    2010-01-01

    Drops placed on a surface with a temperature above the Leidenfrost point float atop an evaporative vapor layer. In this fluid dynamics video, it is shown that for roughened surfaces the Leidenfrost point depends on the drop size, which runs contrary to previous claims of size independence. The thickness of the vapor layer is known to increase with drop radius, suggesting that the surface roughness will not be able to penetrate the vapor layer for drops above a critical size. This size dependence was experimentally verified: at a given roughness and temperature, drops beneath a critical size exhibited transition boiling while drops above the critical size were in the Leidenfrost regime. These Leidenfrost drops were unstable; upon evaporation down to the critical size the vapor film suddenly collapsed.

  10. Transition from Cassie to impaled state during drop impact on groove-textured solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikuntanathan, V; Sivakumar, D

    2014-05-07

    Liquid drops impacted on textured surfaces undergo a transition from the Cassie state characterized by the presence of air pockets inside the roughness valleys below the drop to an impaled state with at least one of the roughness valleys filled with drop liquid. This occurs when the drop impact velocity exceeds a particular value referred to as the critical impact velocity. The present study investigates such a transition process during water drop impact on surfaces textured with unidirectional parallel grooves referred to as groove-textured surfaces. The process of liquid impalement into a groove in the vicinity of drop impact through de-pinning of the three-phase contact line (TPCL) beneath the drop as well as the critical impact velocity were identified experimentally from high speed video recordings of water drop impact on six different groove-textured surfaces made from intrinsically hydrophilic (stainless steel) as well as intrinsically hydrophobic (PDMS and rough aluminum) materials. The surface energy of various 2-D configurations of liquid-vapor interface beneath the drop near the drop impact point was theoretically investigated to identify the locally stable configurations and establish a pathway for the liquid impalement process. A force balance analysis performed on the liquid-vapor interface configuration just prior to TPCL de-pinning provided an expression for the critical drop impact velocity, Uo,cr, beyond which the drop state transitions from the Cassie to an impaled state. The theoretical model predicts that Uo,cr increases with the increase in pillar side angle, α, and intrinsic hydrophobicity whereas it decreases with the increase in groove top width, w, of the groove-textured surface. The quantitative predictions of the theoretical model were found to show good agreement with the experimental measurements of Uo,cr plotted against the surface texture geometry factor in our model, {tan(α/2)/w}(0.5).

  11. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Pressure Drop Hysteresis in a Cocurrent Gas-Liquid Upflow Packed Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红彬; 毛在砂

    2001-01-01

    Extensive experimental work on hysteresis in a cocurrent gas-liquid upflow packed bed was carried out with three kinds of packings and the air-water system. However, only when packed with small glass beads (φ1.4 mm) was the bed pressure drop hysteresis observed. Two more liquids with different liquid properties were employed to further examine the influence of parameters on pressure drop hysteresis. The similarity of pressure drop hysteresis in packed beds was concluded in combination of experimental evidence reported in literature.

  13. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  14. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Sarwat E-mail: sarwathussain@hotmail.com

    2001-12-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis.

  15. Footprint Geometry and Sessile Drop Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2016-11-01

    How does a sessile drop resonate if its footprint is square (square drop)? In this talk, we discuss the two distinct families of observed modes in our experiments. One family (spherical modes) is identified with the natural modes of capillary spherical caps, and the other (grid modes) with Faraday waves on a square bath (square Faraday waves). A square drop exhibits grid or spherical modes depending on its volume, and the two families of modes arise depending on how wavenumber selection of footprint geometry and capillarity compete. For square drops, a dominant effect of footprint constraint leads to grid modes which are constrained response; otherwise the drops exhibit spherical modes, the characteristic of sessile drops on flat plates. Chun-Ti Chang takes his new position at National Taiwan University on Aug. 15th, 2016. Until then, Chun-Ti Chang is affiliated with Technical University Dortmund, Germany.

  16. Rapid Drop Dynamics During Superhydrophobic Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2008-11-01

    Rapid drop motion is observed on superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation; condensate drops with diameter of order 10 μm can move at above 100G and 0.1 m/s. When water vapor condenses on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface, condensate drops move in a seemingly random direction. The observed motion is attributed to the energy released through coalescence of neighboring condensate drops. A scaling analysis captured the initial acceleration and terminal velocity. Our work is a step forward in understanding the dynamics of superhydrophobic condensation occurring in both natural water-repellant plants and engineered dropwise condensers.

  17. Impact force of a falling drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Xavier Boutillon Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Controlling droplet deposition is crucial in many industrial processes such as spraying pesticides on crops, inkjet printing or spray coating. Therefore, the dynamics of drop impacts have been extensively studied for more than one century. However, few literature describe the impacting force of a drop on a solid flat surface, although it might be a way to measure the size distribution of a collection of falling drops. We investigated experimentally how the instantaneous force at impact depends on impact velocity and drop radius. We also propose a new model to understand our observations. Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, CNRS, ESPCI, Paris France & Ladhyx, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France.

  18. Drop deformation by laser-pulse impact

    CERN Document Server

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Klein, Alexander L; Bouwhuis, Wilco; Lohse, Detlef; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    A free-falling absorbing liquid drop hit by a nanosecond laser-pulse experiences a strong recoil-pressure kick. As a consequence, the drop propels forward and deforms into a thin sheet which eventually fragments. We study how the drop deformation depends on the pulse shape and drop properties. We first derive the velocity field inside the drop on the timescale of the pressure pulse, when the drop is still spherical. This yields the kinetic-energy partition inside the drop, which precisely measures the deformation rate with respect to the propulsion rate, before surface tension comes into play. On the timescale where surface tension is important the drop has evolved into a thin sheet. Its expansion dynamics is described with a slender-slope model, which uses the impulsive energy-partition as an initial condition. Completed with boundary integral simulations, this two-stage model explains the entire drop dynamics and its dependance on the pulse shape: for a given propulsion, a tightly focused pulse results in a...

  19. Numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    A vibrated drop constitutes a very rich physical system, blending both interfacial and volume phenomena. A remarkable experimental study was performed by M. Costalonga highlighting sessile drop motion subject to horizontal, vertical and oblique vibration. Several intriguing phenomena are observed such as drop walking and rapid droplet ejection. We perform three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of vibrating sessile drops where the phenomena described above are computed using the massively parallel multiphase code BLUE. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  20. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  1. Determination of pressure drop across activated carbon fiber respirator cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) is considered as an alternative adsorbent to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the development of thinner, lighter, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area and adsorption capacities, thinner critical bed depth, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to measure the pressure drop across different types of commercially available ACFs in respirator cartridges to determine the ACF composition and density that will result in acceptably breathable respirators. Seven ACF types in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were tested. ACFs in cartridges were challenged with pre-conditioned constant air flow (43 LPM, 23°C, 50% RH) at different compositions (single- or combination-ACF type) in a test chamber. Pressure drop across ACF cartridges were obtained using a micromanometer, and compared among different cartridge configurations, to those of the GAC cartridge, and to the NIOSH breathing resistance requirements for respirator cartridges. Single-ACF type cartridges filled with any ACFF had pressure drop measurements (23.71-39.93 mmH2O) within the NIOSH inhalation resistance requirement of 40 mmH2O, while those of the ACFC cartridges (85.47±3.67 mmH2O) exceeded twice the limit due possibly to the denser weaving of ACFC fibers. All single ACFF-type cartridges had higher pressure drop compared to the GAC cartridge (23.13±1.14 mmH2O). Certain ACF combinations (2 ACFF or ACFC/ACFF types) resulted to pressure drop (26.39-32.81 mmH2O) below the NIOSH limit. All single-ACFF type and all combination-ACF type cartridges with acceptable pressure drop had much lower adsorbent weights than GAC (≤15.2% of GAC weight), showing potential for light-weight respirator cartridges. 100% ACFC in cartridges may result to respirators with high breathing resistance and, thus, is not recommended. The more dense ACFF and ACFC types may still be possibly used in respirators by combining them with less dense ACFF materials and/or by

  2. Self-Excited Drop Oscillations in Electrowetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Decre, Michel M.J.; Mugele, Frieder

    2007-01-01

    We studied millimeter-sized aqueous sessile drops in an ambient oil environment in a classical electrowetting configuration with a wire-shaped electrode placed at a variable height above the substrate. Within a certain range of height and above a certain threshold voltage, the drop oscillates period

  3. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  4. Total Site Heat Integration Considering Pressure Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew Hong Chew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop is an important consideration in Total Site Heat Integration (TSHI. This is due to the typically large distances between the different plants and the flow across plant elevations and equipment, including heat exchangers. Failure to consider pressure drop during utility targeting and heat exchanger network (HEN synthesis may, at best, lead to optimistic energy targets, and at worst, an inoperable system if the pumps or compressors cannot overcome the actual pressure drop. Most studies have addressed the pressure drop factor in terms of pumping cost, forbidden matches or allowable pressure drop constraints in the optimisation of HEN. This study looks at the implication of pressure drop in the context of a Total Site. The graphical Pinch-based TSHI methodology is extended to consider the pressure drop factor during the minimum energy requirement (MER targeting stage. The improved methodology provides a more realistic estimation of the MER targets and valuable insights for the implementation of the TSHI design. In the case study, when pressure drop in the steam distribution networks is considered, the heating and cooling duties increase by 14.5% and 4.5%.

  5. Many Drops Make a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya S. Mudgal

    2014-03-01

    greater knowledge, better skills and disseminate this knowledge through this journal to influence as many physicians and their patients as possible. They have taken the knowledge of their teachers, recognized their giants and are now poised to see further than ever before. My grandmother often used to quote to me a proverb from India, which when translated literally means “Many drops make a lake”. I cannot help but be amazed by the striking similarities between the words of Newton and this Indian saying. Therefore, while it may seem intuitive, I think it must be stated that it is vital for the betterment of all our patients that we recognize our own personal lakes to put our drops of knowledge into. More important is that we recognize that it is incumbent upon each and every one of us to contribute to our collective lakes of knowledge such as ABJS. And finally and perhaps most importantly we need to be utterly cognizant of never letting such lakes of knowledge run dry.... ever.

  6. Universality in freezing of an asymmetric drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Md Farhad; Waghmare, Prashant R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the evidence of universality in conical tip formation during the freezing of arbitrary-shaped sessile droplets. The focus is to demonstrate the relationship between this universality and the liquid drop shape. We observe that, in the case of asymmetric drops, this universal shape is achieved when the tip reconfigures by changing its location, which subsequently alters the frozen drop shape. The proposed "two-triangle" model quantifies the change in the tip configuration as a function of the asymmetry of the drop that shows a good agreement with the experimental evidence. Finally, based on the experimental and theoretical exercise, we propose the scaling dependence between the variations in the tip configuration and the asymmetry of the drop.

  7. Pressure drop in CIM disk monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelic, Igor; Nemec, Damjan; Podgornik, Ales; Koloini, Tine

    2005-02-11

    Pressure drop analysis in commercial CIM disk monolithic columns is presented. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are compared to hydrodynamic models usually employed for prediction of pressure drop in packed beds, e.g. free surface model and capillary model applying hydraulic radius concept. However, the comparison between pressure drop in monolith and adequate packed bed give unexpected results. Pressure drop in a CIM disk monolithic column is approximately 50% lower than in an adequate packed bed of spheres having the same hydraulic radius as CIM disk monolith; meaning they both have the same porosity and the same specific surface area. This phenomenon seems to be a consequence of the monolithic porous structure which is quite different in terms of the pore size distribution and parallel pore nonuniformity compared to the one in conventional packed beds. The number of self-similar levels for the CIM monoliths was estimated to be between 1.03 and 2.75.

  8. Dynamic Stability of Equilibrium Capillary Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William M.; Kim, Inwon C.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a model for contact angle motion of quasi-static capillary drops resting on a horizontal plane. We prove global in time existence and long time behavior (convergence to equilibrium) in a class of star-shaped initial data for which we show that topological changes of drops can be ruled out for all times. Our result applies to any drop which is initially star-shaped with respect to a small ball inside the drop, given that the volume of the drop is sufficiently large. For the analysis, we combine geometric arguments based on the moving-plane type method with energy dissipation methods based on the formal gradient flow structure of the problem.

  9. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  10. Temperature Effect on Photovoltaic Modules Power Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Mohammed Aish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine what type of photovoltaic solar module could best be used in a thermoelectric photovoltaic power generation. Changing in powers due to higher temperatures (25oC, 35oC, and 45oC have been done for three types of solar modules: monocrystalline , polycrystalline, and copper indium gallium (di selenide (CIGS. The Prova 200 solar panel analyzer is used for the professional testing of three solar modules at different ambient temperatures; 25oC, 35oC, and 45oC and solar radiation range 100-1000 W/m2. Copper indium gallium (di selenide module has the lowest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.38%/oC while monocrystalline module has the highest power drop (with the average percentage power drop 0.54%/oC, while polycrystalline module has a percentage power drop of 0.49%/oC.

  11. Patients dropping out of treatment in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlino, M; Martucci, G; Musella, V; Bolzan, M; de Girolamo, G

    1995-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the extent and the specific features of drop-out for patients having a first contact with an university psychiatric outpatient clinic in Italy over the course of 1 year and to determine which variables were associated with early termination of treatment. Of the 158 patients selected for this study, there was an overall 3-month drop-out rate following the first visit of 63%. Of the 59 patients who had returned once after the initial contact, 28 interrupted subsequently the treatment, although the therapist's plan included further visits. The overall drop-out rate at 3 months was thus 82%. The only 2 variables associated with drop-out rates were the patients' perception of the severity of their disorder and the psychiatric history: continuing patients were more frequently in agreement with the clinician's judgment as compared with those who dropped out and were more likely to have already been in psychiatric treatment.

  12. Condensation on surface energy gradient shifts drop size distribution toward small drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley M; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H

    2014-02-25

    During dropwise condensation from vapor onto a cooled surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Drop surface coverage dictates the heat transfer characteristics and depends on both drop size and number of drops present on the surface at any given time. Thus, manipulating drop distributions is crucial to maximizing heat transfer. On earth, manipulation is achieved with gravity. However, in applications with small length scales or in low gravity environments, other methods of removal, such as a surface energy gradient, are required. This study examines how chemical modification of a cooled surface affects drop growth and coalescence, which in turn influences how a population of drops evolves. Steam is condensed onto a horizontally oriented surface that has been treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact angle (hydrophilic, hydrophobic) or a continuous radial gradient of contact angles (hydrophobic to hydrophilic). The time evolution of number density and associated drop size distributions are measured. For a uniform surface, the shape of the drop size distribution is unique and can be used to identify the progress of condensation. In contrast, the drop size distribution for a gradient surface, relative to a uniform surface, shifts toward a population of small drops. The frequent sweeping of drops truncates maturation of the first generation of large drops and locks the distribution shape at the initial distribution. The absence of a shape change indicates that dropwise condensation has reached a steady state. Previous reports of heat transfer enhancement on chemical gradient surfaces can be explained by this shift toward smaller drops, from which the high heat transfer coefficients in dropwise condensation are attributed to. Terrestrial applications using gravity as the primary removal mechanism also stand to benefit from inclusion of gradient surfaces because the critical threshold size required for

  13. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  14. Vibration-induced drop atomization and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, A.

    2003-02-01

    A liquid drop placed on a vibrating diaphragm will burst into a fine spray of smaller secondary droplets if it is driven at the proper frequency and amplitude. The process begins when capillary waves appear on the free surface of the drop and then grow in amplitude and complexity as the acceleration amplitude of the diaphragm is slowly increased from zero. When the acceleration of the diaphragm rises above a well-defined critical value, small secondary droplets begin to be ejected from the free-surface wave crests. Then, quite suddenly, the entire volume of the drop is ejected from the vibrating diaphragm in the form of a spray. This event is the result of an interaction between the fluid dynamical process of droplet ejection and the vibrational dynamics of the diaphragm. During droplet ejection, the effective mass of the drop diaphragm system decreases and the resonance frequency of the system increases. If the initial forcing frequency is above the resonance frequency of the system, droplet ejection causes the system to move closer to resonance, which in turn causes more vigorous vibration and faster droplet ejection. This ultimately leads to drop bursting. In this paper, the basic phenomenon of vibration-induced drop atomization and drop bursting will be introduced, demonstrated, and characterized. Experimental results and a simple mathematical model of the process will be presented and used to explain the basic physics of the system.

  15. Interaction of Drops on a Soft Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract eachother due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  16. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Brandenbourger, Martin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a non-volatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can experience a Leidenfrost effect even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014)] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrea...

  17. Terminal Effect of Drop Coalescence on Single Drop Mass Transfer Measurements and Its Minimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For the mass transfer to single drops during the stage of steady buoyancy-driven motion, experimental measurement is complicated with the terminal effect of additional mass transfer during drop formation and coa lescence at the drop collector. Analysis reveals that consistent operating conditions and experimental procedure are of critical significance for minimizing the terminal effect of drop coalescence on the accuracy of mass transfer measurements. The novel design of a totally-closed extraction column is proposed for this purpose, which guaran tees that the volumetric rate of drop phase injection is exactly equal to that of withdrawal of drops. Tests in two extraction systems demonstrate that the experimental repeatability is improved greatly and the terminal effect of mass transfer during drop coalescence is brought well under control.

  18. Laplacian drop shapes and effect of random perturbations on accuracy of surface tension measurement for different drop constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical drop shapes are calculated for three drop constellations: pendant drops, constrained sessile drops, and unconstrained sessile drops. Based on total Gaussian curvature, shape parameter and critical shape parameter are discussed as a function of different drop sizes and surface tensions. The shape parameter is linked to physical parameters for every drop constellation. The as yet unavailable detailed dimensional analysis for the unconstrained sessile drop is presented. Results show that the unconstrained sessile drop shape depends on a dimensionless volume term and the contact angle. Random perturbations are introduced and the accuracy of surface tension measurement is assessed for precise and perturbed profiles of the three drop constellations. It is concluded that pendant drops are the best method for accurate surface tension measurement, followed by constrained sessile drops. The unconstrained sessile drops come last because they tend to be more spherical at low and moderate contact angles. Of course, unconstrained sessile drops are the only option if contact angles are to be measured.

  19. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  20. An Efficient Algorithm to Solve the Problem of Dropped Call in CDMA Cellular Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the mobile environment, the dropped calls can be resulted from shadowing and rapid signal loss. As the cells shrink to accommodate an increasingly large demand for services, the dropped-call recovery procedure will become more important over the air interface. But in the current protocols, the recovery procedure is too simple to demonstrate the procedure. In this paper, we present a Transparent Reconnection Procedure (TRP) which is an efficient algorithm that can be adapted easily to the benefit of decreased dropped calls. In the simulation of a typical cellular system, it is shown that there are fewer dropped calls using TRP compared to the conventional procedure. This benefit comes at the expense of a slight increase (less than percent 1) in blocked call percentage. It depends on some relevant system parameters, the values of which are decided by the operators accordingly.

  1. Temperature drop in normal term newborn infants born at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, S; Shahla, A

    1992-05-01

    A prospective study of temperature drop in 141 normal term newborn infants delivered vaginally at the labour ward, University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur were studied. The effect of various manoeuvres on the temperature drop were also studied. They were randomized into 3 study groups, 63 cases where the babies were wiped with dry cloth alone, 37 cases where the babies were put into a plastic bag immediately after birth and lastly 41 cases where the babies were wiped with dry cloth and then inserted into a plastic bag. There was significant temperature drop in all the 3 groups maximum in the first 15 minutes and the fall continued for 1 hour after delivery (p less than 0.001). This shows that in an air-conditioned labour ward in a tropical country the temperature fall in newborn infants can be significant. This study also showed that plastic is a poor insulator against significant temperature drop.

  2. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolchenko Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam-air mixture becomes nonflammable. As a result of solve of a heat balance equation it was made the following conclusion: water drops which size is equal to 100 μm will completely evaporate in a zone of combustion with extent of 1 m if the flying speed of drops is even 16 mps (acc. to Stokes v = 3 mps; whereas drops of larger size will evaporate only partially.

  3. Phagocytosis and hydrophobicity: a method of calculating contact angles based on the diameter of sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, C; Sunqvist, T

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between the contact angle and degree of phagocytosis of different yeast particles has been investigated. To facilitate the estimation of the contact angle, we have tested the hypothesis that the shape of a small liquid drop put on a flat surface is that of a truncated sphere. By making this approximation it is possible to calculate the contact angle, i.e. the tangent to the drop in the 3-phase liquid/solid/air meeting point, by measuring the drop diameter. Known volumes of saline were put on different surfaces and the diameters of the drops were measured from above. Calculation of the contact angle with drops of different volumes, and comparison between expected and measured height of 10 microl drops, indicated that the assumption that the shape of a drop is that of a truncated sphere is valid. Monolayers of leukocytes was shown to give rise to a contact angle of 17.9 degrees. Particles with a lower contact angle than the phagocytic cells resisted phagocytosis, but opsonization of the particles with normal human serum rendered them susceptible to phagocytosis, conferring a higher contact angle than that of the phagocytic cells.

  4. On the Deepwater Horizon drop size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Peischl, J.; Brock, C. A.; McKeen, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations of the fate of gas and oil released following the Deepwater Horizon blowout in 2012 depend critically on the assumed drop size distributions. We use direct observations of surfacing time, surfacing location, and atmospheric chemical composition to infer an average drop size distribution for June 10, 2012, providing robust first-order constraints on parameterizations in models. We compare the inferred drop size distribution to published work on Deepwater Horizon and discuss the ability of this approach to determine the efficacy of subsurface dispersant injection.

  5. Deviation of viscous drops at chemical steps

    CERN Document Server

    Semprebon, Ciro; Filippi, Daniele; Perlini, Luca; Pierno, Matteo; Brinkmann, Martin; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic wetting experiments and numerical simulations of gravity driven liquid drops sliding on a plane substrate decorated with a linear chemical step. Surprisingly, the optimal direction to observe crossing is not the one perpendicular to the step, but a finite angle that depends on the material parameters. We computed the landscapes of the force acting on the drop by means of a contact line mobility model showing that contact angle hysteresis dominates the dynamics at the step and determines whether the drop passes onto the lower substrate. This analysis is very well supported by the experimental dynamic phase diagram in terms of pinning, crossing, sliding and sliding followed by pinning.

  6. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  7. New Hydrodynamic Mechanism for Drop Coarsening

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolayev, Vadim; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a new mechanism of drop coarsening due to coalescence only, which describes the late stages of phase separation in fluids. Depending on the volume fraction of the minority phase, we identify two different regimes of growth, where the drops are interconnected and their characteristic size grows linearly with time, and where the spherical drops are disconnected and the growth follows (time) 1/3. The transition between the two regimes is sharp and occurs at a well defined volume fraction of order 30%.

  8. Proceedings of the Second International Colloquium on Drops and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecroissette, D. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Applications of bubble and drop technologies are discussed and include: low gravity manufacturing, containerless melts, microballoon fabrication, ink printers, laser fusion targets, generation of organic glass and metal shells, and space processing. The fluid dynamics of bubbles and drops were examined. Thermomigration, capillary flow, and interfacial tension are discussed. Techniques for drop control are presented and include drop size control and drop shape control.

  9. Relating water and air flow characteristics in coarse granular materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Canga, Eriona; Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm

    2013-01-01

    Water pressure drop as a function of velocity controls w 1 ater cleaning biofilter operation 2 cost. At present this relationship in biofilter materials must be determined experimentally as no 3 universal link between pressure drop, velocity and filter material properties have been established. 4...... Pressure drop - velocity in porous media is much simpler and faster to measure for air than for water. 5 For soils and similar materials, observations show a strong connection between pressure drop – 6 velocity relations for air and water, indicating that water pressure drop – velocity may be estimated 7...... from air flow data. The objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate if this approach is valid 8 also for coarse granular biofilter media which usually consists of much larger particles than soils. In 9 this paper the connection between the pressure drop – velocity relationships for air...

  10. Drop impact of shear thickening liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Francois; Dijksman, J Frits; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The impact of drops of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions (cornstarch and polystyrene spheres) onto a solid surface is investigated experimentally. The spreading dynamics and maxi- mal deformation of the droplet of such shear thickening liquids are found to be markedly different from the impact of Newtonian drops. A particularly striking observation is that the maximal de- formation is independent of the drop velocity and that the deformation suddenly stops during the impact phase. Both observations are due to the shear-thickening rheology of the suspensions, as is theoretically explained from a balance between the kinetic energy and the viscously-dissipated en- ergy, from which we establish a scaling relation between drop maximal deformation and rheological parameters of concentrated suspensions.

  11. How to Use Nose Drops Properly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use nose drops only as long as directed Store medications out of reach of children Copyright 2013, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced, displayed, modified, or distributed ...

  12. How to Use Eye Drops Properly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doses Use the exact number of drops recommended Store medications out of reach of children Copyright 2013, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced, displayed, modified, or distributed ...

  13. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-07-18

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  14. Electric field induced deformation of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Lindsey; Tsakonas, Costas; Duffy, Brian; Mottram, Nigel; Brown, Carl; Wilson, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to control the shape of a drop with the application of an electric field has been exploited for many technological applications including measuring surface tension, producing an optical display device, and optimising the optical properties of microlenses. In this work we consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation of pinned sessile drops with contact angles close to either 0° or 90° resting on the lower substrate inside a parallel plate capacitor due to an A.C. electric field. Using both asymptotic and numerical approaches we obtain predictive equations for the static and dynamic drop shape deformations as functions of the key experimental parameters (drop size, capacitor plate separation, electric field magnitude and contact angle). The asymptotic results agree well with the experimental results for a range of liquids. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of EPSRC via research Grants EP/J009865 and EP/J009873.

  15. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    The spreading of small liquid drops over thin and thick porous layers (dry or saturated with the same liquid) has been investigated in the case of both complete wetting (silicone oils of different viscosities) and partial wetting (aqueous SDS solutions of different concentrations). Nitrocellulose membranes of different porosity and different average pore size have been used as a model of thin porous layers, glass and metal filters have been used as a model of thick porous substrates. The first problem under investigation has been the spreading of small liquid drops over thin porous layers saturated with the same liquid. An evolution equation describing the drop spreading has been deduced, which showed that both an effective lubrication and the liquid exchange between the drop and the porous substrates are equally important. Spreading of silicone oils over different nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes was carried out. The experimental laws of the radius of spreading on time confirmed the theory predictions. The spreading of small liquid drops over thin dry porous layers has also been investigated from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The drop motion over a dry porous layer appears caused by the interplay of two processes: (a). the spreading of the drop over already saturated parts of the porous layer, which results in a growth of the drop base, and (b). the imbibition of the liquid from the drop into the porous substrate, which results in a shrinkage of the drop base and a growth of the wetted region inside the porous layer. As a result of these two competing processes the radius of the drop base goes through a maximum as time proceeds. A system of two differential equations has been derived to describe the time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer. This system includes two parameters, one accounts for the effective lubrication coefficient of the liquid over the wetted porous substrate, and

  16. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number.

  17. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis.

  18. Fluid Flower : Microliquid Patterning via Drop Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Minhee

    2008-01-01

    In microfluidic technologies, direct patterning of liquid without resorting to micromachined solid structures has various advantages including reduction of the frictional dissipation and the fabrication cost. This fluid dynamics video illustrates the method to micropattern a liquid on a solid surface with drop impact. We experimentally show that a water drop impacting with the wettability-patterned solid retracts fast on the hydrophobic regions while being arrested on the hydrophilic areas.

  19. Drop Performance Test of CRDMs for JRTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun [POSCO Plandtec Co. Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan-Hee [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The drop test results of CRDMs with AC-type electromagnet show that the initial delay times are not satisfied with the requirement, 0.15 seconds. After the replacement of the electromagnet from AC-type to DCtype, the drop times of CARs and accelerations due to the impact of moving parts are satisfied with all requirements. As a result, it is found that four CRDMs to be installed at site have a good drop performance, and meet all performance requirements. A control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) is a device to control the position of a control absorber rod (CAR) in the core by using a stepping motor which is commanded by the reactor regulating system (RRS) to control the reactivity during the normal operation of the reactor. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the performances such as the stepping, drop, endurance, vibration, seismic and structural integrity for active components. Especially, the CAR drop curves are important data for the safety analysis. This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performances of a prototype and 4 CRDMs to be installed at site. The tests are carried out at a test rig simulating the actual reactor's conditions.

  20. Transition Mode Shapes in a Vibrating Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2000-11-01

    Vertical, time-periodic vibration of a diaphragm has been used to atomize a primary sessile drop into a fine spray of secondary droplets. The evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the sessile drop and the piezoelectrically-driven, low-mass diaphragm. The evolution of the free surface of the drop is characterized by the appearance of a hierarchy of surface waves that we investigated using high-speed imaging and laser vibrometry. At low-driving amplitudes, we see the appearance of time-harmonic axisymmetric waves on the drop's free surface induced by the motion of the contact line. As the vibration amplitude increases, azimuthal waves at the subharmonic of the forcing frequency appear around the periphery of the drop and propagate towards its center. A striking lattice mode emerges upon the breakdown of the axisymmetric wave pattern, followed by the appearance of the highly-agitated free surface of the pre-ejection mode shape. Subsequent to the breakdown of the lattice structure, the frequency of the most energetic mode is a subharmonic of the driving frequency. The complex interaction of the fundamental and subharmonic waves ultimately leads to the breakdown of the free surface and the atomization of the drop.

  1. Spreading of Electrolyte Drops on Charged Surfaces: Electric Double Layer Effects on Drop Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyeong; Sinha, Shayandev; Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Drop spreading is one of the most fundamental topics of wetting. Here we study the spreading of electrolyte drops on charged surfaces. The electrolyte solution in contact with the charged solid triggers the formation of an electric double layer (EDL). We develop a theory to analyze how the EDL affects the drop spreading. The drop dynamics is studied by probing the EDL effects on the temporal evolution of the contact angle and the base radius (r). The EDL effects are found to hasten the spreading behaviour - this is commensurate to the EDL effects causing a ``philic'' tendency in the drops (i.e., drops attaining a contact angle smaller than its equilibrium value), as revealed by some of our recent papers. We also develop scaling laws to illustrate the manner in which the EDL effects make the r versus time (t) variation deviate from the well known r ~tn variation, thereby pinpointing the attainment of different EDL-mediated spreading regimes.

  2. Connectable solar air collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestergaard Jensen, S.; Bosanac, M.

    2002-02-01

    The project has proved that it is possible to manufacture solar air collector panels, which in an easy way can be connected into large collector arrays with integrated ducting without loss of efficiency. The developed connectable solar air collectors are based on the use of matrix absorbers in the form of perforated metal sheets. Three interconnected solar air collectors of the above type - each with an transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} - was tested and compared with parallel tests on two single solar air collectors also with a transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} One of the single solar air collectors has an identical absorber as the connectable solar air collectors while the absorber of the other single solar air collector was a fibre cloth. The efficiency of the three solar air collectors proved to be almost identical in the investigated range of mass flow rates and temperature differences. The solar air collectors further proved to be very efficient - as efficient as the second most efficient solar air collectors tested in the IEA task 19 project Solar Air Systems. Some problems remain although to be solved: the pressure drop across especially the connectable solar air collectors is too high - mainly across the inlets of the solar air collectors. It should, however, be possible to considerably reduce the pressure losses with a more aerodynamic design of the inlet and outlet of the solar air collectors; The connectable solar air collectors are easy connectable but the air tightness of the connections in the present form is not good enough. As leakage leads to lower efficiencies focus should be put on making the connections more air tight without loosing the easiness in connecting the solar air collectors. As a spin off of the project a simple and easy way to determine the efficiency of solar, air collectors for pre-heating of fresh air has been validated. The simple method of determining the efficiency has with success been compared with an advance method

  3. Charge and Size Distributions of Electrospray Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan L; de la Mora JF

    1997-02-15

    The distributions of charge q and diameter d of drops emitted from electrified liquid cones in the cone-jet mode are investigated with two aerosol instruments. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA, Vienna type) first samples the spray drops, selects those with electrical mobilities within a narrow band, and either measures the associated current or passes them to a second instrument. The drops may also be individually counted optically and sized by sampling them into an aerodynamic size spectrometer (API's Aerosizer). For a given cone-jet, the distribution of charge q for the main electrospray drops is some 2.5 times broader than their distribution of diameters d, with qmax/qmin approximately 4. But mobility-selected drops have relative standard deviations of only 5% for both d and q, showing that the support of the (q, d) distribution is a narrow band centered around a curve q(d). The approximate one-dimensionality of this support region is explained through the mechanism of jet breakup, which is a random process with only one degree of freedom: the wavelength of axial modulation of the jet. The observed near constancy of the charge over volume ratio (q approximately d3) shows that the charge is frozen in the liquid surface at the time scale of the breakup process. The charge over volume ratio of the primary drops varies between 98 and 55% of the ratio of spray current I over liquid flow rate Q, and decreases at increasing Q. I/Q is therefore an unreliable measure of the charge density of these drops.

  4. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, MS 400 076 India and S. S. G. M. College of Engineering Shegaon, MS 444 203 (India); Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, MS 400 076 (India)

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  5. Drops with non-circular footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D.; González, Alejandro G.; Diez, Javier A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. These drops are consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to the hysteresis of the contact angle since there is a wetting process in some parts of the contact line, while a dewetting occurs in other parts. Here, we obtain a characteristic drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate. We analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non-trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and we compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equation, where we emulate the hysteretic effects with an appropriate spatial distribution of the static contact angle over the substrate.

  6. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  7. Drops with non-circular footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D; Diez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. This type of drops is a consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to hysteresis effects of the contact angle since some parts of the contact line are wetting, while others are dewetting. Here, we obtain a peculiar drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate, and analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non--trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of...

  8. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Spencer D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  9. Binary drop interaction on surfaces: onset and bounding ligaments of Crescent-Moon fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouiba, Lydia; Wang, Yongji

    2016-11-01

    Drop impacts on surfaces can splash and create secondary droplets. These have important implications for industrial, environmental, and health processes such as air contamination by secondary pathogen-bearing droplets shaping disease transmission. Most studies of splash on surfaces have focused on the impact of one drop on a dry surface. Nevertheless, the outcome of impacts by spray or rain are shaped by the presence of adjacent sessile drops on the surface. Recently, in the context of rain and spray-induced disease transmission in crops, one particular binary drop interaction, the crescent-moon splash, was identified as a frequent and efficient source of secondary droplets (Gilet and Bourouiba ICB 2014 and JRSI 2015). The crescent-moon results from the interaction of an impacting drop with a sessile drop in the neighborhood of the impact point. Here, we report and rationalize the existence of a critical transition of impact parameters that enables the crescent-moon fragmentation to emerge. We also report and rationalize the peculiar, yet universal emergence of two bounding ligaments that are important in shaping the crescent-moon sheet.

  10. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector by the pressure sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MALA DAS; NILANJAN BISWAS

    2017-01-01

    Superheated drop detector consisting of drops of superheated liquid suspended in polymer or gel matrix is of great demand, mainly because of its insensitivity to β-particles and γ -rays and also because of the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released duringthe nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by using the pressure sensor. The associated circuits for the measurement are described in this article. The detection of events is verified by measuring the events with the acoustic sensor. The measurement was done using drops of various sizes to study the effect of the size of the drop on the pressure recovery time. Probability of detection of events has increased for larger size of the superheated drops and lesser volume of air in contact with the gel matrix. The exponential decay fitting to the pressure sensor signals shows the dead time for pressure recovery of such a drop detector to be a few microseconds.

  11. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector by the pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mala; Biswas, Nilanjan

    2017-01-01

    Superheated drop detector consisting of drops of superheated liquid suspended in polymer or gel matrix is of great demand, mainly because of its insensitivity to ß-particles and ?-rays and also because of the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released during the nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by using the pressure sensor. The associated circuits for the measurement are described in this article. The detection of events is verified by measuring the events with the acoustic sensor. The measurement was done using drops of various sizes to study the effect of the size of the drop on the pressure recovery time. Probability of detection of events has increased for larger size of the superheated drops and lesser volume of air in contact with the gel matrix. The exponential decay fitting to the pressure sensor signals shows the dead time for pressure recovery of such a drop detector to be a few microseconds.

  12. Liquid Drop Measuring Device for Analyzing Liquid Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the correlation between certain properties of liquid and the properties of the corresponding liquid drop formed under given conditions, a liquid drop measuring device is utilized to monitor the drop formation process of the liquid sample with photoelectric measuring methods. The mechanical and optical characteristic of the liquid is explored with the optical fibers from the internal of the liquid drop during its formation. The drop head capacitor is utilized to monitor the growth process of the liquid drop to gain the drop volume information related to the physical property of liquid. The unique liquid drop trace containing the integrated properties of liquid is generated, and it is proved by experiment that for different liquids their liquid drop traces are different. The analysis on liquid properties and discrimination between different liquids can be proceeded with the liquid drop trace obtained by the liquid drop measuring device.

  13. Secondary breakup of coal water slurry drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2011-11-01

    To investigate secondary atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), deformation and breakup of eight kinds of CWS drops are presented using high speed digital camera. Based on morphology, deformation and breakup regimes of CWS drops can be termed some different modes: deformation, multimode breakup (including two sub-modes: hole breakup and tensile breakup), and shear breakup. Correlations on the ranges of breakup modes are also obtained. The conventional Weber number and Ohnesorge number are found to be insufficient to classify all breakup modes of CWS drops, so two other non-dimensional numbers based on rheology of CWS are suggested to use in the deformation and breakup regime map. Finally, total breakup time is studied and correlated, which increases with Ohnesorge number.

  14. Drop impact on a flexible fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Dressaire, Emilie; Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    When droplets impact fibrous media, the liquid can be captured by the fibers or contact then break away. Previous studies have shown that the efficiency of drop capture by a rigid fiber depends on the impact velocity and defined a threshold velocity below which the drop is captured. However, it is necessary to consider the coupling of elastic and capillary effects to achieve a greater understanding of the capture process for soft substrates. Here, we study experimentally the dynamics of a single drop impacting on a thin flexible fiber. Our results demonstrate that the threshold capture velocity depends on the flexibility of fibers in a non-monotonic way. We conclude that tuning the mechanical properties of fibers can optimize the efficiency of droplet capture.

  15. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  16. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  17. The Temperature of the Dimethylhydrazine Drops Moving in the Atmosphere after Depressurization of the Fuel Tank Rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulba Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work includes the results of the numerical modeling of temperature changes process of the dimethylhydrazine (DMH drops, taking into account the radial temperature gradient in the air after the depressurization of the fuel compartments rockets at high altitude. There is formulated a mathematical model describing the process of DMH drops thermal state modifying when it's moving to the Earth's surface. There is the evaluation of the influence of the characteristic size of heptyl drops on the temperature distribution. It's established that the temperatures of the small size droplets practically completely coincide with the distribution of temperature in the atmosphere at altitudes of up to 40 kilometers.

  18. Electrohydrodynamic removal of particles from drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudurupati, S.; Janjua, M.; Singh, P.; Aubry, N.

    2009-07-01

    A uniform electric field is used for cleaning drops of the particles they often carry on their surface. In a first step, particles migrate to either the drop’s poles or equator. This is due to the presence of an electrostatic force for which an analytical expression is derived. In a second step, particles concentrated near the poles are released into the ambient liquid via tip streaming, and those near the equator are removed by stretching the drop and breaking it into several droplets. In the latter case, particles are all concentrated in a small middle daughter droplet.

  19. The new Drop Tower catapult system

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Rath, Hans J.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of the "Drop Tower" began. Since then, the eye-catching tower with a height of 146 m and its characteristic glass roof has become the emblem of the technology centre in Bremen. The Drop Tower Bremen provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness. Items are considered weightless, when they are in "free fall", i.e. moving without propulsion within the gravity field of the earth. The height of the tower limits the simple "free fall" experiment period to max. 4.74 s. With the inauguration of the catapult system in December 2004, the ZARM is entering a new dimension. This world novelty will meet scientists' demands of extending the experiment period up to 9.5 s. Since turning the first sod on May 3rd, 1988, the later installation of the catapult system has been taken into account by building the necessary chamber under the tower. The catapult system is located in a chamber 10 m below the base of the tower. This chamber is almost completely occupied by 12 huge pressure tanks. These tanks are placed around the elongation of the vacuum chamber of the drop tube. In its centre there is the pneumatic piston that accelerates the drop capsule by the pressure difference between the vacuum inside the drop tube and the pressure inside the tanks. The acceleration level is adjusted by means of a servo hydraulic breaking system controlling the piston velocity. After only a quarter of a second the drop capsule achieves its lift-off speed of 175 km/h. With this exact speed, the capsule will rise up to the top of the tower and afterwards fall down again into the deceleration unit which has been moved under the drop tube in the meantime. The scientific advantages of the doubled experiment time are obvious: during almost 10 s of high

  20. Millikan "oil drop" stabilized by growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L K; Gertler, A W; Reiss, H

    1979-01-26

    A diffusion cloud chamber has been used to qualitatively study some dynamic properties of liquid drops by suspending them in an electric field at the plane of saturation (p/ps = 1, where p is the actual partial pressure of the vapor at a given elevation and ps is the equilibrium pressure at that temperature characteristic of that elevation). By varying the strength of the electric field, it is possible to change the size of the suspended droplets and even, if desired, to isolate a single drop.

  1. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  2. Drop rebound after impact: the role of the receding contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Villa, F; Bernagozzi, I; Amirfazli, A; Marengo, M

    2013-12-31

    Data from the literature suggest that the rebound of a drop from a surface can be achieved when the wettability is low, i.e., when contact angles, measured at the triple line (solid-liquid-air), are high. However, no clear criterion exists to predict when a drop will rebound from a surface and which is the key wetting parameter to govern drop rebound (e.g., the "equilibrium" contact angle, θeq, the advancing and the receding contact angles, θA and θR, respectively, the contact angle hysteresis, Δθ, or any combination of these parameters). To clarify the conditions for drop rebound, we conducted experimental tests on different dry solid surfaces with variable wettability, from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic surfaces, with advancing contact angles 108° contact angles 89° contact angle is the key wetting parameter that influences drop rebound, along with surface hydrophobicity: for the investigated impact conditions (drop diameter 2.4 contact angles higher than 100°. Also, the drop rebound time decreased by increasing the receding contact angle. It was also shown that in general care must be taken when using statically defined wetting parameters (such as advancing and receding contact angles) to predict the dynamic behavior of a liquid on a solid surface because the dynamics of the phenomenon may affect surface wetting close to the impact point (e.g., as a result of the transition from the Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel state in the case of the so-called superhydrophobic surfaces) and thus affect the drop rebound.

  3. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  4. Best Measuring Time for a Millikan Oil Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    In a Millikan oil drop experiment, there is a best measuring time for observing the drop, due to Brownian motion of the drop and the experimenter's reaction time. Derives an equation for the relative error in the measurement of the drop's excess charge, and obtains a formula for the best measuring time. (Author/MLH)

  5. Worm-like instability of a vibrated sessile drop

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmerle, Arnaud; Bergeron, Vance; Charitat, Thierry; Farago, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of vertical sinusoidal vibrations on a liquid droplet with a low surface tension (ethanol) deposited on a solid substrate. In a precise range of amplitudes and frequencies, the drop exhibits a dramatic worm-like shape instability with a strong symmetry breaking, comparable to the one observed by Pucci et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 024503) on a vibrated floating lens. However, the geometry of our system is much simpler since it does not involve the oscillation and deformation of a liquid-liquid-air contact line. We show that the Faraday waves appearing on the surface of the droplet control its shape and we draw a systematic phase diagram of the instability. A simple theoretical model allows us to derive a relation between the elongation of the droplet and the amplitude of the Faraday wave, in good agreement with measurements of both quantities.

  6. Drop Shaping by Laser-Pulse Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.L.; Bouwhuis, W.; Visser, C.W.; Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Villermaux, E.; Lohse, D.; Gelderblom, H.

    2015-01-01

    We show how the deposition of laser energy induces propulsion and strong deformation of an absorbing liquid body. Combining high speed with stroboscopic imaging, we observe that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a millijoule nanosecond laser pulse propels forward at several meters per second

  7. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  8. Equilibrium drop surface profiles in electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, F.; Buehrle, J.

    2007-01-01

    Electrowetting is becoming a more and more frequently used tool to manipulate liquids in various microfluidic applications. On the scale of the entire drop, the effect of electrowetting is to reduce the apparent contact angle of partially wetting conductive liquids upon application of an external vo

  9. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  10. Liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Inwon

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional model describing the motion of liquid drops sliding down an inclined plane (the so-called quasi-static approximation model). We prove existence and uniqueness of a solution and investigate its long time behavior for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous medium (i.e. constant and non-constant contact angle). We also obtain some homogenization results.

  11. Scaling the drop size in coflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Hernandez, E; Gordillo, J M [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gundabala, V; Fernandez-Nieves, A [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)], E-mail: jgordill@us.es

    2009-07-15

    We perform extensive experiments with coflowing liquids in microfluidic devices and provide a closed expression for the drop size as a function of measurable parameters in the jetting regime that accounts for the experimental observations; this expression works irrespective of how the jets are produced, providing a powerful design tool for this type of experiments.

  12. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  13. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  14. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  15. Film-wise and drop-wise condensation of steam on short inclined plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Bum Jin; Kim, Min Chan [Cheju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Ahmadinejad, Mehrdad [Johnson Matthey Blount' s Court, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    Film-wise and drop-wise condensation experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure varying the condensing plates, their inclinations and orientations (upward or downward facing), and the air concentrations. As expected, dropwise condensation showed much higher heat transfer rates than corresponding film-wise condensation in the pure steam cases. However, with the presence of air, both modes of condensation showed similar heat transfer rates due to the high thermal resistance of the air-rich layer. Both modes of condensation showed systematic decreases in heat transfer as the angle of the plate to the horizontal decreased and as the concentration of air increased. A noteworthy observation made during the tests on the plate orientation showed that condensation heat transfer rates on the upward facing plate were slightly higher than those beneath the downward facing plate in the pure steam cases but that the trends were reversed in the steam and air mixture cases

  16. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of dry tower extended surfaces. Part I. Heat transfer and pressure drop data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    A compilation is presented of heat transfer and pressure drop data which were collected from literature reports on extended surface heat exchangers. The type of extended surfaces considered are tubular finned tubes as distinct from compact heat exchangers. These surfaces have a base tube to which additional surface was added by mechanical means. This additional surface is in the form of fins attached to the outside surface of the tube. These tubes are normally employed for heat transfer between a liquid and a gas. The liquid flows inside the tubes and the gas, normally air, flows outside the tubes. The fins are oriented so that their surface is transverse to the axis of the tubes. The gas flows across the tubes in a direction parallel to the fin surface.

  17. Pattern formation during the evaporation of a colloidal nanoliter drop: a numerical and experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An efficient way to precisely pattern particles on solid surfaces is to dispense and evaporate colloidal drops, as for bioassays. The dried deposits often exhibit complex structures exemplified by the coffee ring pattern, where most particles have accumulated at the periphery of the deposit. In this work, the formation of deposits during the drying of nanoliter colloidal drops on a flat substrate is investigated numerically and experimentally. A finite-element numerical model is developed that solves the Navier-Stokes, heat and mass transport equations in a Lagrangian framework. The diffusion of vapor in the atmosphere is solved numerically, providing an exact boundary condition for the evaporative flux at the droplet-air interface. Laplace stresses and thermal Marangoni stresses are accounted for. The particle concentration is tracked by solving a continuum advection-diffusion equation. Wetting line motion and the interaction of the free surface of the drop with the growing deposit are modeled based on crite...

  18. Oscillations of a sessile droplet in open air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenchenko, A. E., E-mail: korenchenko@physics.susu.ac.ru [Optics and Spectroscopy Department, National Research South Ural State University, 76 Lenin Avenue, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Beskachko, V. P. [General and Theoretical Physics Department, National Research South Ural State University, 76 Lenin Avenue, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The open system consisting of a sessile drop, a neutral gas, and a substrate is analyzed by numerical methods. The mode with constant contact angle is considered. The model takes into account evaporation from drop surface, free and forced convection in gas, buoyancy, and Marangoni effect in the liquid phase. It was established that every considered mechanical and thermodynamical disturbance of the system leads to the drop surface oscillations, and thus a drop in an open air oscillates almost inevitably. The displacement of the liquid-gas interface due to oscillations is analyzed in terms of its impact on the accuracy of measurement of the surface tension by sessile drop method.

  19. Oscillations of a sessile droplet in open air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenchenko, A. E.; Beskachko, V. P.

    2013-11-01

    The open system consisting of a sessile drop, a neutral gas, and a substrate is analyzed by numerical methods. The mode with constant contact angle is considered. The model takes into account evaporation from drop surface, free and forced convection in gas, buoyancy, and Marangoni effect in the liquid phase. It was established that every considered mechanical and thermodynamical disturbance of the system leads to the drop surface oscillations, and thus a drop in an open air oscillates almost inevitably. The displacement of the liquid-gas interface due to oscillations is analyzed in terms of its impact on the accuracy of measurement of the surface tension by sessile drop method.

  20. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  1. Bubble formation during the collision of a sessile drop with a meniscus

    CERN Document Server

    Keij, Diederik L; Castelijns, Hein; Riepen, Michel; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    The impact of a sessile droplet with a moving meniscus, as encountered in processes such as dip-coating, generically leads to the entrapment of small air bubbles. Here we experimentally study this process of bubble formation by looking through the liquid using high-speed imaging. Our central finding is that the size of the entrapped bubble crucially depends on the location where coalescence between the drop and the moving meniscus is initiated: (i) at a finite height above the substrate, or (ii) exactly at the contact line. In the first case, we typically find bubble sizes of the order of a few microns, independent of the size and speed of the impacting drop. By contrast, the bubbles that are formed when coalescence starts at the contact line become increasingly large, as the size or the velocity of the impacting drop is increased. We show how these observations can be explained from a balance between the lubrication pressure in the air layer and the capillary pressure of the drop.

  2. Evaluation of membrane oxygenators and reservoirs in terms of capturing gaseous microemboli and pressure drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yulong; Palanzo, David; Kunselman, Allen; Undar, Akif

    2009-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence points to cerebral embolization during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) as the principal etiologic factor of neurologic complications. In this study, the capability of capturing and classification of gaseous emboli and pressure drop of three different membrane oxygenators (Sorin Apex, Terumo Capiox SX25, Maquet QUADROX) were measured in a simulated adult model of CPB using a novel ultrasound detection and classification quantifier system. The circuit was primed with 1000 mL heparinized human packed red blood cells and 1000 mL lactated Ringer's solution (total volume 2000 mL, corrected hematocrit 26-28%). After the injection of 5 mL air into the venous line, an Emboli Detection and Classification Quantifier was used to simultaneously record microemboli counts at post-pump, post-oxygenator, and post-arterial filter sites. Trials were conducted at normothermic (35 degrees C) and hypothermic (25 degrees C) conditions. Pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator pressure were recorded in real time and pressure drop was calculated. Maquet QUADROX membrane oxygenator has the lowest pressure drops compared to the other two oxygenators (P pressure drop. Based on this investigation, Maquet QUADROX membrane oxygenator has the lowest pressure drop and better capability for capturing gaseous microemboli.

  3. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  4. SURVEY OF PACKET DROPPING ATTACK IN MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Janani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad-hoc NETwork (MANET is an application of wireless network with self-configuring mobile nodes. MANET does not require any fixed infrastructure. Its development never has any threshold range. Nodes in MANET can communicate with each other if and only if all the nodes are in the same range. This wide distribution of nodes makes MANET vulnerable to various attacks, packet dropping attack or black hole attack is one of the possible attack. It is very hard to detect and prevent. To prevent from packet dropping attack, detection of misbehavior links and selfish nodes plays a vital role in MANETs. In this paper, a omprehensive investigation on detection of misbehavior links and malicious nodes is carried out.

  5. Semisupervised Community Detection by Voltage Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications show that semisupervised community detection is one of the important topics and has attracted considerable attention in the study of complex network. In this paper, based on notion of voltage drops and discrete potential theory, a simple and fast semisupervised community detection algorithm is proposed. The label propagation through discrete potential transmission is accomplished by using voltage drops. The complexity of the proposal is OV+E for the sparse network with V vertices and E edges. The obtained voltage value of a vertex can be reflected clearly in the relationship between the vertex and community. The experimental results on four real networks and three benchmarks indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective and flexible. Furthermore, this algorithm is easily applied to graph-based machine learning methods.

  6. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; Hossain, A.; Islam, M A

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  7. Impact of water drops on small targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  8. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  9. Low-Pressure-Drop Shutoff Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornborrow, John

    1994-01-01

    Flapper valve remains open under normal flow conditions but closes upon sudden increases to high rate of flow and remains closed until reset. Valve is fluid/mechanical analog of electrical fuse or circuit breaker. Low-pressure-drop shutoff valve contains flapper machined from cylindrical surface. During normal flow conditions, flapper presents small cross section to flow. (Useful in stopping loss of fluid through leaks in cooling systems.)

  10. Probable warfarin interaction with menthol cough drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderre, Karen; Faria, Claudio; Dyer, Earl

    2010-01-01

    Warfarin is a widely used and effective oral anticoagulant; however, the agent has an extensive drug and food interaction profile. We describe a 46-year-old African-American man who was receiving warfarin for a venous thromboembolism and experienced a decrease in his international normalized ratio (INR). No corresponding reduction had been made in his warfarin dosage, and no changes had been made in his concomitant drug therapy or diet. The patient's INR fell from a therapeutic value of 2.6 (target range 2-3) to 1.6 while receiving a weekly warfarin dose of 50 mg. His INR remained stable at 1.6 for 3 weeks despite incremental increases in his warfarin dose. The patient reported that he had been taking 8-10 menthol cough drops/day due to dry conditions at his workplace during the time period that the INR decreased. Five days after discontinuing the cough drops, his INR increased from 1.6 to 2.9. Over the subsequent 5 weeks, his INR was stabilized at a much lower weekly warfarin dose of 40 mg. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated that the decreased INR was probably related to the concomitant use of menthol cough drops during warfarin therapy. The mechanism for this interaction may be related to the potential for menthol to affect the cytochrome P450 system as an inducer and inhibitor of certain isoenzymes that would potentially interfere with the metabolism of warfarin. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of an interaction between warfarin and menthol. Patients receiving warfarin should be closely monitored, as they may choose to take over-the-counter products without considering the potential implications, and counseled about a possible interaction with menthol cough drops.

  11. Measuring Pressure Drop Under Non Ideal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The method of measurement of the pressure drop (PD of cigarette filter rods and the draw resistance of cigarettes is defined in ISO 6565-2002 (1. This standard defines the calibration and use of a transfer standard to calibrate the measuring instrument and also defines the measurement procedure for cigarette and filter samples. The procedure described in the standard assumes that the measurement conditions are constant and that the sample is in equilibrium with the measurement environment.

  12. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  13. Drop floating on a granular raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  14. Cusp formation in drops inside Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2005-11-01

    Here, we report the formation of cusp in insulating drops inside compound Taylor cones. The action of the electrical shear stress acting on the outer interface, which is transmitted by viscous forces inside the Taylor cone, tends to deform the drop of insulating liquid placed inside. For appropriate values of the capillary number, the insulating drop develops a steady cusp angle which depends on both the capillary number and the conducting to insulating viscosity ratio. A self-similar analysis has been developed to qualitatively describe the flow inside these compounds Taylor cones. Any perturbation of the cusp gives rise to an intermittent emission of tiny droplets; this effect may recall the tip-streaming observed by G.I. Taylor in his four-roll mill device. This emission can be stabilized by an appropriate control of the injected flow rate of the insulating liquid. When the capillary number increases, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of nanocapsules, coaxial nanofibers and nanotubes (Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; JACS 126, 5376, 2004).

  15. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Characteristics of H-type Finned Tube Banks

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    H-type finned tube heat exchanger elements maintain a high capacity for heat transfer, possess superior self-cleaning properties and retain the ability to effect flue gas waste heat recovery in boiler renovations. In this paper, the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of H-type finned tube banks are studied via an experimental open high-temperature wind tunnel system. The effects of fin width, fin height, fin pitch and air velocity on fin efficiency, convective heat transfer coe...

  17. Surfactant and nonlinear drop dynamics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovsky, Joseph Charles

    2000-11-01

    Large amplitude drop dynamics in microgravity were conducted during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission carried onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (20 October-5 November 1995). Centimeter- sized drops were statically deformed by acoustic radiation pressure and released to oscillate freely about a spherical equilibrium. Initial aspect ratios of up to 2.0 were achieved. Experiments using pure water and varying aqueous concentrations of Triton-X 100 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were performed. The axisymmetric drop shape oscillations were fit using the degenerate spherical shape modes. The frequency and decay values of the fundamental quadrupole and fourth order shape mode were analyzed. Several large amplitude nonlinear oscillation dynamics were observed. Shape entrainment of the higher modes by the fundamental quadrupole mode occurred. Amplitude- dependent effects were observed. The nonlinear frequency shift, where the oscillation frequency is found to decrease with larger amplitudes, was largely unaffected by the presence of surfactants. The percentage of time spent in the prolate shape over one oscillation cycle was found to increase with oscillation amplitude. This prolate shape bias was also unaffected by the addition of surfactants. These amplitude-dependent effects indicate that the nonlinearities are a function of the bulk properties and not the surface properties. BSA was found to greatly enhance the surface viscoelastic properties by increasing the total damping of the oscillation, while Triton had only a small influence on damping. The surface concentration of BSA was found to be diffusion-controlled over the time of the experiments, while the Triton diffusion rate was very rapid. Using the experimental frequency and decay values, the suface viscoelastic properties of surface dilatational viscosity ( ks ) and surface shear viscosity ( ms ) were found for varying surfactant concentrations using the transcendental equation of Lu

  18. Dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop in the presence of non-uniform DC electric field is investigated analytically and numerically. Considering the presence of bulk-insoluble surfactants at the drop interface, we first perform asymptotic solution for both low and high surface Péclet numbers, where the surface Péclet number signifies the strength of surface convection of surfactants as compared to the diffusion at the drop interface. Neglecting fluid inertia and interfacial charge convection effects, we obtain explicit expression for dielectrophoretic drop velocity for low and high Péclet numbers by assuming small deviation of drop shape from sphericity and small deviation of surfactant concentration from the equilibrium uniform distribution. We then depict a numerical solution, assuming spherical drop, for arbitrary values of Péclet number. Our analyses demonstrate that the asymptotic solution shows excellent agreement with the numerical solution in the limiting conditions of low and high Péclet numbers. The present analysis shows that the flow-induced redistribution of the surfactants at the drop interface generates Marangoni stress, owing to the influence of the surfactant distribution on the local interfacial tension, at the drop interface and significantly alters the drop velocity at steady state. For a perfectly conducting/dielectric drop suspended in perfectly dielectric medium, Marangoni stress always retards the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop as compared with a surfactant-free drop. For a leaky dielectric drop suspended in another leaky dielectric medium, in the low Péclet number limit, depending on the electrical conductivity and permittivity of both the liquids, the Marangoni stress may aid or retard the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop. The Marangoni stress also has the ability to move the drop in the opposite direction as compared with a surfactant-free drop. This non-intuitive reverse motion of the drop is

  19. Particle-area dependence of mineral dust in the immersion mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Diehl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured by using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows to freely suspending single drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. Heterogeneous nucleation caused by several mineral dust particles (montmorillonite, two types of illite was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 \\unit{mm} in radius were monitored by a~video camera during cooling down to −28 °C to simulate the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was remotely determined with an infra-red thermometer so that the onset of freezing was indicated. For comparisons, measurements with one particle type were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 \\unit{{\\mu}m} radius freely suspended. The data were interpreted regarding the particle surfaces immersed in the drops. Immersion freezing was observed in a~temperature range between −13 and −26 °C in dependence of particle type and surface area per drop. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model.

  20. Rolling ferrofluid drop on the surface of a liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Sterr, V; Morozov, K I; Rehberg, I; Engel, A; Richter, R

    2008-01-01

    We report on the controlled transport of drops of magnetic liquid, which are swimming on top of a non-magnetic liquid layer. A magnetic field which is rotating in a vertical plane creates a torque on the drop. Due to surface stresses within the immiscible liquid beneath, the drop is propelled forward. We measure the drop speed for different field amplitudes, field frequencies and drop volumes. Simplifying theoretical models describe the drop either as a solid sphere with a Navier slip boundary condition, or as a liquid half-sphere. An analytical expression for the drop speed is obtained which is free of any fitting parameters and is well in accordance with the experimental measurements. Possible microfluidic applications of the rolling drop are also discussed.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Pendant and Sessile Drops in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Brutin, David; Liu, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Mourembles, Alexandre; Xie, Jing-Chang; Tadrist, Lounes

    2010-09-01

    The experiments regarding the contact angle behavior of pendant and sessile evaporating drops were carried out in microgravity environment. All the experiments were performed in the Drop Tower of Beijing, which could supply about 3.6 s of microgravity (free-fall) time. In the experiments, firstly, drops were injected to create before microgravity. The wettability at different surfaces, contact angles dependance on the surface temperature, contact angle variety in sessile and pendant drops were measured. Different influence of the surface temperature on the contact angle of the drops were found for different substrates. To verify the feasibility of drops creation in microgravity and obtain effective techniques for the forthcoming satellite experiments, we tried to inject liquid to create bigger drop as soon as the drop entering microgravity condition. The contact angle behaviors during injection in microgravity were also obtained.

  2. Simplified procedure for determining of drop and stilling basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. Vatankhah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drops are used to effectively dissipate the surplus energy of the water flow. A closed conduit drop conveys water and stills it at its downstream. I-type pipe drop is one kind of the closed conduit drops which is used in irrigation networks as a typical hydraulic structure. Sump elevation is an important design parameter for I-type pipe drop. Similarly, in supercritical flow structures, such as open channel chutes, determination of stilling basin invert elevation is very important. At present, these key design parameters are determined by the momentum and energy equations using tedious trial-and-error procedure. In this study, square conduit drop, pipe drop, and rectangular stilling basin are considered, and three explicit equations have been developed by (multiple nonlinear regression technique to determine the sump and stilling basin invert elevations. Being very simple and accurate, these equations can be easily used to design the closed conduit drops and stilling basins by hydraulic engineers.

  3. RHELP (Regenerative High Efficiency Low Pressure) Air Purification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-18

    4 (3), 269. 10. Allen, M. D. and Raabe, O. G., "Re-evaluation of millikan’s oil drop data for the motion of small particles in air," Journal of...rigorous physical filtration testing for collection efficiency, pressure drop , most penetrating particle size, and microwave sensitivity, among other...increased quality factor. More importantly, the synthesized filters were found to exceed military standards for HEPA filter with lower pressure drop . This

  4. Hydrodynamics and evaporation of a sessile drop of capillary size

    CERN Document Server

    Barash, L Yu

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video of an evaporating sessile drop of capillary size is presented. The corresponding simulation represents the description taking into account jointly time dependent hydrodynamics, vapor diffusion and thermal conduction in an evaporating sessile drop. The fluid convection in the drop is driven by Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. For the first time the evolution of the vortex structure in the drop during an evaporation process is obtained.

  5. Hydrodynamics and evaporation of a sessile drop of capillary size

    OpenAIRE

    Barash, L. Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video of an evaporating sessile drop of capillary size is presented. The corresponding simulation represents the description taking into account jointly time dependent hydrodynamics, vapor diffusion and thermal conduction in an evaporating sessile drop. The fluid convection in the drop is driven by Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. For the first time the evolution of the vortex structure in the drop during an evaporation process...

  6. The Galileo Bias: A Naive Conceptual Belief That Influences People's Perceptions and Performance in a Ball-Dropping Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Crystal D.; McBeath, Michael K.; Madigan, Sean C.; Sugar, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    This research introduces a new naive physics belief, the Galileo bias, whereby people ignore air resistance and falsely believe that all objects fall at the same rate. Survey results revealed that this bias is held by many and is surprisingly strongest for those with formal physics instruction. In 2 experiments, 98 participants dropped ball pairs…

  7. Delayed Frost Growth on Jumping-Drop Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an inter-drop frost wave. The growth of this inter-drop frost front is shown to be up to three times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of inter-drop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an inter-drop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser was found to be superior to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by minimizing the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  8. Inverse Leidenfrost Effect: Levitating Drops on Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adda-Bedia, M; Kumar, S; Lechenault, F; Moulinet, S; Schillaci, M; Vella, D

    2016-05-03

    We explore the interaction between a liquid drop (initially at room temperature) and a bath of liquid nitrogen. In this scenario, heat transfer occurs through film-boiling: a nitrogen vapor layer develops that may cause the drop to levitate at the bath surface. We report the phenomenology of this inverse Leidenfrost effect, investigating the effect of the drop size and density by using an aqueous solution of a tungsten salt to vary the drop density. We find that (depending on its size and density) a drop either levitates or instantaneously sinks into the bulk nitrogen. We begin by measuring the duration of the levitation as a function of the radius R and density ρd of the liquid drop. We find that the levitation time increases roughly linearly with drop radius but depends weakly on the drop density. However, for sufficiently large drops, R ≥ Rc(ρd), the drop sinks instantaneously; levitation does not occur. This sinking of a (relatively) hot droplet induces film-boiling, releasing a stream of vapor bubbles for a well-defined length of time. We study the duration of this immersed-drop bubbling finding similar scalings (but with different prefactors) to the levitating drop case. With these observations, we study the physical factors limiting the levitation and immersed-film-boiling times, proposing a simple model that explains the scalings observed for the duration of these phenomena, as well as the boundary of (R,ρd) parameter space that separates them.

  9. Pressure Drop Hysteresis of Hydrodynamic States in Packed Tower for Foaming Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Sodhi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the effects of gas and liquid flow velocities and surface tension on the two-phase phase pressure drop a in a downflow trickle bed reactor. Water and non- Newtonian foaming solutions were employed as liquid phase. More than 240 experimental points for the trickle flow (GCF and foaming pulsing flow (PF/FPF regime were obtained for present study. Hydrodynamic characteristics involving two-phase pressure drop significantly influenced by gas and liquid flow rates. For 15 and 30 ppm air-aqueous surfactant solutions, two-phase pressure drop increases with higher liquid and gas flow velocities in trickle flow and foaming/pulsing flow regimes. With decrease in surface tension i.e. for 45 and 60 ppm air-aqueous surfactant systems, two-phase pressure drop increases very sharply during change in regime transition at significantly low liquid and gas velocities. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 14th March 2011, Revised: 29th June 2011; Accepted: 4th July 2011[How to Cite: V. Sodhi, and R. Gupta. (2011. Pressure Drop Hysteresis of Hydrodynamic States in Packed Tower for Foaming Systems. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(2: 115-122. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.828.115-122][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.828.115-122 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/828 ] | View in 

  10. DNA Dynamics in A Water Drop

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, A K

    2002-01-01

    Due to its polyionic character the DNA double helix is stable and biologically active only in salty aqueous media where its charge is compensated by solvent counterions. Monovalent metal ions are ubiquitous in DNA environment and they are usually considered as the possible driving force of sequence-dependent modulations of DNA structure that make it recognizable by proteins. In an effort to directly examine this hypothesis, MD simulations of DNA in a water drop surrounded by vacuum were carried out, which relieves the requirement of charge neutrality. Surprisingly, with zero concentration of counterions a dodecamer DNA duplex appears metastable and its structure remains similar to that observed in experiments.

  11. Dynamics of Ferrofluidic Drops Impacting Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bolleddula, D A; Alliseda, A; Bhosale, P; Berg, J C

    2010-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video illustrating the impact of ferrofluidic droplets on surfaces of variable wettability. Surfaces studied include mica, teflon, and superhydrophobic. A magnet is placed beneath each surface, which modifies the behavior of the ferrofluid by applying additional downward force apart from gravity resulting in reduced droplet size and increased droplet velocity. For the superhydrophobic droplet a jetting phenomena is shown which only occurs in a limited range of impact speeds, higher than observed before, followed by amplified oscillation due to magnetic field as the drop stabilizes on the surface.

  12. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  13. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  14. Universal mechanism for air entrainment during liquid impact

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrix, Maurice H W; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2015-01-01

    When a mm-sized liquid drop approaches a deep liquid pool, both the interface of the drop and the pool deform before the drop touches the pool. The build up of air pressure prior to coalescence is responsible for this deformation. Due to this deformation, air can be entrained at the bottom of the drop during the impact. We quantify the amount of entrained air numerically, using the Boundary Integral Method (BIM) for potential flow for the drop and the pool, coupled to viscous lubrication theory for the air film that has to be squeezed out during impact. We compare our results to various experimental data and find excellent agreement for the amount of air that is entrapped during impact onto a pool. Next, the impact of a rigid sphere onto a pool is numerically investigated and the air that is entrapped in this case also matches with available experimental data. In both cases of drop and sphere impact onto a pool the numerical air bubble volume V_b is found to be in agreement with the theoretical scaling V_b/V_...

  15. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavin, P.M. [Gavin Consulting, Newark, OH (United States)

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  16. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ryżak

    Full Text Available The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa. We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop. The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  17. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  18. Resuspension of Aerosol Particles from Evaporated Rain Drops to the Coarse Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Ganguly, D.; Singh, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation scavenging (i.e., wet removal) has long been recognized as one of the major removal processes for tropospheric aerosol particles, and the dominant one for accumulation-mode size particles. When rain drops evaporate, the aerosol material contained in drops is resuspended, and this process has received much less attention. Unlike the resuspension from evaporated cloud droplets, the aerosol particles resuspended from evaporated rain drops have much larger sizes than most of the aerosol particles that acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), became cloud borne, and then were collected by rain drops, because each rain drop generally collects thousands of cloud droplets. Here we present some aspects of this resuspension process obtained from modeling studies. First, we investigate some details of the process using a simple drop-size resolved model of raindrop evaporation in sub-saturated air below cloud base. Using these results, we then investigate different treatments of this process in a global aerosol and climate model that employs a modal aerosol representation. Compared to the model's original treatment of this process in which rain-borne aerosol is resuspended to the mode that it came from with its original size, the new treatment that resuspends to the coarse mode produces notable reductions in global CCN concentrations, as well as sulfate, black carbon, and organic aerosol mass, because the resuspended aerosol particles have much shorter lifetimes due to their larger sizes. Somewhat surprisingly, there are also notable reductions in coarse-mode sea salt and mineral dust burdens. These species are resuspended to the coarse mode in both the original and new treatments, but these resuspended particles are fewer in number and larger in size in the new treatment. This finding highlights some issues of the modal aerosol treatment for coarse mode particles.

  19. Detailed model of bouncing drops on a bounded, vibrated bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Francois; Gilet, Tristan

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed model of drops bouncing on a bounded vibrated bath. These drops are known to bounce indefinitely and to exhibit complex and varied vertical dynamics depending on the acceleration of the bath. In addition, in a narrow parameter regime, these drops travel horizontally while being guided by the waves they generate. Our model tracks the drop's vertical radius and position, as well as the eigenmodes of the waves generated via ordinary differential equations only. We accurately capture the vertical dynamics, as well as some of the horizontal dynamics. Our model may be extended to account for interactions with other drops or obstacles, such as slits and corrals.

  20. Deformed liquid marbles: Freezing drop oscillations with powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2012-09-01

    In this work we show that when a liquid drop impacts onto a fine-grained hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. In all cases, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we find that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a near-complete coverage of powder, which then freezes the drop oscillations during rebound. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. The bounce-splash of a viscoelastic drop

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Federico; Zenit, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 61st Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD (fluid dynamics videos). This video shows the collision and rebound of viscoelastic drops against a solid wall. Using a high speed camera, the process of approach, contact and rebound of drops of a viscoelastic liquid is observed. We found that these drops first splash, similar to what is observed in Newtonian colliding drops; after a few instants, the liquid recoils, recovering its original drop shape and bounce off the wall.

  2. Development of a Drop Tester for Portable Electronic Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Portable electronic products are susceptible to accidental drop impact which can cause various functional and physical damage. This paper first presents a patent pending drop tester which allows portable electronic products free drop at any orientation and drop height, and then introduces the drop tester experiment setup and its design principle. Using a cellular phone as an experiment object, we obtain some data such as the impact forces, the impact accelerations, and the strain of an interested spot. By analyzing experiment data the influence of impact to products in various states is investigated with the aim to provide help for the design of products and improvement of reliability.

  3. Characterization of biofluids prepared by sessile drop formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A; Esmonde-White, Francis W L; Morris, Michael D; Roessler, Blake J

    2014-06-07

    Sessile drop formation, also called drop deposition, has been studied as a potential medical diagnostic, but the effects of complex biofluid rheology on the final deposition pattern are not well understood. We studied two model biofluids, blood plasma and synovial fluid, when deposited onto slightly hydrophilic substrates forming a contact angle of 50-90°. Drops were imaged during the evaporation process and geometric properties of the drop, such as contact angle and drop height, were calculated from the images. The resulting dried biofluid drops were then examined using light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to assess morphological and chemical composition of the dried drop. The effect of substrate contact angle (surface wetting) and fluid concentration was examined. We found that when biofluids are deposited onto slightly hydrophilic surfaces, with a contact angle of 50-90°, a ring-shaped deposit was formed. Analysis of the drying drop's geometric properties indicates that biofluid dynamics follow the piling model of drop formation, as proposed by Deegan et al. The final deposition pattern varied with substrate surface and concentration, as shown by light microscopy photos of dried drops. The chemical composition of the outer ring was minimally affected by substrate surface, but the spatial heterogeneity of protein distribution within the ring varied with concentration. These results indicate that biofluid drop deposition produces ring-shaped deposits which can be examined by multiple analytical techniques.

  4. Destabilising Pickering emulsions by drop flocculation and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Catherine P; Khairul Anwar, Hunainah; Hughes, James

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated how emulsions of water drops coated by organoclay particles destabilise in organic solvents. The drops destabilise and the emulsions undergo a fluid-solid transition if the particles are poorly wetted by the solvent. We show that the drops adhere together and form three-dimensional networks as the fraction of the poor-quality solvent in the mixture increases. Microscopic observations revealed that the drops coalesce into buckled, non-spherical shapes in mixtures rich in poor-quality solvent. A key finding is that destabilisation is favoured under conditions where the energy of adhesion between the particle layers coating drops is comparable to the energy required to detach the particles from the drops. Rupture of the interfacial layer produces particle flocs and uncoated, unstable water drops that settle out of the emulsion.

  5. Asymmetry of Drop Impacts on Patterned Hydrophobic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Geoff; Robson, Simon; Broom, Matheu

    2016-11-01

    When a water drop falls on to a flat solid surface, asymmetries in the geometry of the spreading drop can be specifically determined by patterned surface microstructures. For hydrophobic (or superhydrophobic) micropillar arrays, the most important asymmetric mechanisms appear to be the surface energy of contact lines, and pathways for gas escaping from penetrated microstructure. In this presentation, static wetting and drop impact experiments will be discussed in relation to drop asymmetries. In addition to micropillar arrays, natural superhydrophobic surfaces (leaves) have been studied, and may suggest possibilities for controlling drop impacts in applications. Some of the clearest large scale drop asymmetries on leaves, which are similar to those associated with low drop impact contact times on synthetic surfaces, appear to be caused by features which generate high contact angle hysteresis, and are therefore indicative of poor superhydrophocity.

  6. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  7. The Vibration of an Inviscid Incompressible Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marc

    2009-11-01

    The fundamental frequencies and normal modes of vibration of a sessile drop supported on a horizontal planar surface are found using an integrated analytical and numerical technique. Spherical coordinates are used to describe the interface shape, but the potential flow field inside the drop is computed numerically using the finite element method. The numerical velocity potentials at the interface for both the fluid inside the drop and outside are fitted using a Legendre series. When these series are combined in the interfacial normal-stress balance the result is a linear eigenvalue problem that is solved numerically. Results will be presented for sessile drops with different contact angles without gravity and compared to experimental data. This technique can also be extended to sessile drops with gravity, in which the drop shape is flattened, and to substrate geometries that are not planar, such as a drop in a shallow cavity or hole.

  8. The Oil Drop Experiment: How Did Millikan Decide What Was an Appropriate Drop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2003-01-01

    The oil drop experiment is considered an important contribution to the understanding of modern physics and chemistry. The objective of this investigation is to study and contrast the views and understanding with respect to the experiment of physicists or philosophers of science with those of authors of physics or chemistry textbooks and…

  9. Hydrogen sulfide gas emission under turbulent conditions - an experimental approach for free-fall drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, N M; Matos, J S; Ferreira, F

    2014-01-01

    Odor nuisance and sulfide corrosion in sewers carrying septic wastewater are accelerated at points of turbulence such as drops in manholes, but accurate methods or empirical expressions to evaluate the gas stripping rate at those particular sites are still missing. With the aim of improving the current knowledge on the influence of free-fall drops on the release of hydrogen sulfide gas, an experimental set-up was built allowing different free-fall drops heights and flows. Three types of experiments were carried out: reaeration tests without sulfide; sulfide oxidation tests; and hydrogen sulfide release tests. With the increase of the free-fall drop height or of the flow, a higher rate of air-to-water mass oxygen transfer was observed. Results regarding sulfide oxidation tests with reaeration through the free-fall have shown that the oxidation rate was correlated with flow. In the hydrogen sulfide release tests, the maximum concentration in the atmosphere reached 500 ppm. Results also showed that increasing the flow rate decreased the time at which the maximum concentrations in the atmosphere were observed.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Characteristics of H-type Finned Tube Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available H-type finned tube heat exchanger elements maintain a high capacity for heat transfer, possess superior self-cleaning properties and retain the ability to effect flue gas waste heat recovery in boiler renovations. In this paper, the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of H-type finned tube banks are studied via an experimental open high-temperature wind tunnel system. The effects of fin width, fin height, fin pitch and air velocity on fin efficiency, convective heat transfer coefficient, integrated heat transfer capacity and pressure drop are examined. The results indicate that as air velocity, fin height and fin width increase, fin efficiency decreases. Convective heat transfer coefficient is proportional to fin pitch, but inversely proportional to fin height and fin width. Integrated heat transfer capacity is related to fin efficiency, convective heat transfer coefficient and finned ratio. Pressure drop increases with the increase of fin height and fin width. Finally, predictive correlations of fin efficiency, Nusselt number and Euler Number are developed based on the experimental data.

  11. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  12. Nonlinear Resonance of Mechanically Excited Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The spectrum of frequencies and mode shapes for an inviscid drop on a planar substrate have recently been documented. For vertical excitation, zonal modes respond to the driving frequency harmonically and non-zonal modes subharmonically, consistent with the prior literature. In this study, we report observations from the regime of nonlinear response. Here, zonals can respond non-harmonically, both sub- and super-harmonic responses are reported. The principal challenge to generating and observing superharmonic resonances of higher zonal modes is a mode-mixing behavior. However, using a simple visual simulation based on the ray-tracing technique, the individual contributions to the mixed resonance behavior can be extracted. In summary, results from experiment and theory show that the zonal modes, which respond harmonically and can mix with non-zonal modes without interfering with one another in the linear regime, tend to respond sub- or superharmonically and compete with non-zonal modes in the nonlinear regime.

  13. Drop Impact on a Solid Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Josserand, C.

    2015-09-22

    © Copyright 2016 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved. A drop hitting a solid surface can deposit, bounce, or splash. Splashing arises from the breakup of a fine liquid sheet that is ejected radially along the substrate. Bouncing and deposition depend crucially on the wetting properties of the substrate. In this review, we focus on recent experimental and theoretical studies, which aim at unraveling the underlying physics, characterized by the delicate interplay of not only liquid inertia, viscosity, and surface tension, but also the surrounding gas. The gas cushions the initial contact; it is entrapped in a central microbubble on the substrate; and it promotes the so-called corona splash, by lifting the lamella away from the solid. Particular attention is paid to the influence of surface roughness, natural or engineered to enhance repellency, relevant in many applications.

  14. Dynamic Air Route Open-Close Problem for Airspace Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic airspace management plans and assigns airspace resources to airspace users on demand to increase airspace capacity. Although many studies of air traffic flow management (ATFM) have sought to optimally allocate air traffic to get the best use of given airspace resources, few studies have focused on how to build an efficient air traffic network or how to adjust the current network in real time. This paper presents an integer program model named the dynamic air route open-close problem (DROP). DROP has a cost-based objective function which takes into account constraints such as the shortest occupancy time of routes, which are not considered in ATFM models. The aim of DROP is to determine which routes will be opened to a certain user during a given time period. Simulation results show that DROP can facilitate utilization of air routes. DROP, a simplified version of an air traffic network constructing problem, is the first step towards realizing dynamic airspace management. The combination of ATFM and DROP can facilitate decisions toward more reasonable, efficient use of limited airspace resources.

  15. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mozumder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot metallic surface was measured and compared with a proposed correlation as well. With the time temperature plot of these experimental data, the Leidenfrost phenomena had been elucidated. In the pool boiling curve for liquid, just after the transition boiling region and before the film boiling region, the heat transfer approaches its minimum value. The corresponding temperature of this minimum value was termed as the Leidenfrost temperature and the phenomenon is known as Leidenfrost phenomena. According to the experimental data, the Leidenfrost temperature was within a range of 150-200°C for all the experimental conditions. Results: This revealed that Leidenfrost temperature was independent of thermo-physical properties of solid and liquid. Sessile drop evaporation time was the maximum for water, then decreases gradually for Nacl solution, methanol and was the minimum for ethanol for a particular solid material. On the other hand, this time was the highest for copper and the lowest for mild steel for a specific liquid. Conclusion: The experimental data for the evaporation time fairly agree with the proposed correlation within a certain range. The collected time and temperature data may be used as a good data bank for the researchers.

  16. Interaction of two deformable viscous drops under external temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Berejnov, V V; Nir, A

    2001-01-01

    The axisymmetric deformation and motion of interacting droplets in an imposed temperature gradient is considered using boundary-integral techniques for slow viscous motion. Results showing temporal drop motion, deformations and separation are presented for equal-viscosity fluids. The focus is on cases when the drops are of equal radii or when the smaller drop trails behind the larger drop. For equal-size drops, our analysis shows that the motion of a leading drop is retarded while the motion of the trailing one is enchanced compared to the undeformable case. The distance between the centers of equal-sized deformable drops decreases with time. When a small drop follows a large one, two patterns of behavior may exist. For moderate or large initial separation the drops separate. However, if the initial separation is small there is a transient period in which the separation distance initially decreases and only afterwards the drops separate. This behavior stems from the multiple time scales that exist in the syst...

  17. Micro-bubble morphologies following drop impacts onto a pool surface

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-10-01

    When a drop impacts at low velocity onto a pool surface, a hemispheric air layer cushions and can delay direct contact. Herein we use ultra-high-speed video to study the rupture of this layer, to explain the resulting variety of observed distribution of bubbles. The size and distribution of micro-bubbles is determined by the number and location of the primary punctures. Isolated holes lead to the formation of bubble necklaces when the edges of two growing holes meet, whereas bubble nets are produced by regular shedding of micro-bubbles from a sawtooth edge instability. For the most viscous liquids the air film contracts more rapidly than the capillary-viscous velocity through repeated spontaneous ruptures of the edge. From the speed of hole opening and the total volume of micro-bubbles we conclude that the air sheet ruptures when its thickness approaches ?100.

  18. Some Misunderstandings about Millikan's Oil Drop Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellion, Mary E.; Bailar, John C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Clarifies misunderstanding of Millikan's experiment measuring charge on electrons. Most books describing the experiment indicate ionization of air in the apparatus caused liberation of electrons, and that these electrons were picked up by oil droplets. However, in Millikan's discussion, it is stated clearly that ions were attached to oil droplets.…

  19. Environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the fine structure of the triple line and cassie-wenzel wetting transition for sessile drops deposited on rough polymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Stein, Tamir; Whyman, Gene; Pogreb, Roman; Barkay, Zahava

    2007-04-10

    The wetting of rough honeycomb micrometrically scaled polymer substrates was studied. A very strong dependence of the apparent contact angle on the drop volume has been established experimentally. The environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the fine structure of the triple line is reported first. The triple line is not smooth and prefers grasping the polymer matrix over air holes. The precursor rim surrounding the drop has been observed. The revealed dependence of the apparent contact angle on the drop volume is explained by the transition between the pure Cassie and combined Wenzel-Cassie wetting regimes, which is induced by capillarity penetration of water into the holes of relief.

  20. Acoustics and hydrodynamics of a drop impact on a water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrodynamic and acoustic processes associated with a drop impact on a water surface were studied experimentally. Acoustic signals were detected underwater (with a hydrophone) and in air (with a microphone), the flow pattern was recorded with a high-speed camera, and the surface perturbation was monitored with a laser detector. The dimensionless parameters of flows (Reynolds, Froude, and Weber numbers) induced by the impact varied with fall height within the ranges of 5000 noted in a series of experiments performed at a constant fall height. The analysis of video data showed that the signal variability was induced by considerable differences in the scenarios of water entry of a drop, which assumed an ovoid shape at the end trajectory segment, in the mentioned experiments.

  1. Experimental investigation of fluid drop spreading on heterogeneous and anisotropic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Deepak; Deshpande, Abhijit P; Chakravarthy, S R

    2006-01-15

    Study of spreading phenomena on porous substrates is important from theoretical as well as applications point of view. An example of such applications is composite processing, where operations involve displacement of air/volatiles by polymeric fluids through porous media composed of fibers. In this work, dynamics of drop spreading was investigated on fibrous porous substrates used in composite processing. These porous media are heterogeneous and anisotropic. Spreading front of silicon oil drops was tracked on borosilicate glass, quartz, and two different kinds of glass fiber mats: woven fabric and unidirectional. For the woven fabric, spreading front was observed to progress in steps of increasing and decreasing rate. For the unidirectional mat, the spreading front progressed with decreasing rate. The dynamics of spreading were fitted to power law in order to compare results with other porous substrates.

  2. Transport of Substances on Different Stages of Processes Initiated by Free Fallen Drop Impact on Surface of Quiescent Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyinykh, A. Yu.

    2012-04-01

    Collision of a free fallen drop with a surface of quiescent layer of water initiates a sequence of processes including initial shock, formation of cavern and crown with a chevron edge emitted small water drops, wide central trough surrounding by a train of running surface circular capillary waves, splash, secondary cavern collapsing with a streamer discharge and gradual decal of all disturbances. Fine structure of the drop splashes and transport of substances carrying by the drop inside accepting target fluid are studied by methods of direct registering of flow images by fast video- and photo cameras. Different directions of observations were realized that are side, top and bottom view of flow patterns. Flow patterns produced by clean and coloured water, alcohol (changing the surface tension) and oil drops were investigated. Attention was concentrated on small scale processes dynamics studying which produce fast variations of water surface shapes with sharp local irregularities. Shapes and textures of craters and surrounding rim surfaces as well as coloured filaments of a drop substance inside the fluid body were registered and analyzed. Two groups of flows with relatively large scales defined by the drop diameter and very fine scales were identified. It is supposed that short living and fast changing flow components are result of strong short-acting forces impact. Their manifestations depend on surface tension on the boundaries fluid-fluid and fluid-air. Effects of surface tension gradients on the drop dye propagation pattern are also demonstrated and discussed. Experiments were performed on set-up USU "HPC IPMec RAS" under support of Ministry of Education and Science RF (Goscontract No. 16.518.11.7059).

  3. How geometry determines the coalescence of low-viscosity drops

    CERN Document Server

    Eddi, A; Snoeijer, J H

    2013-01-01

    The coalescence of water drops on a substrate is studied experimentally. We focus on the rapid growth of the bridge connecting the two drops, which very quickly after contact ensues from a balance of surface tension and liquid inertia. For drops with contact angles below $90^\\circ$, we find that the bridge grows with a self-similar dynamics that is characterized by a height $h\\sim t^{2/3}$. By contrast, the geometry of coalescence changes dramatically for contact angles at $90^\\circ$, for which we observe $h\\sim t^{1/2}$, just as for freely suspended spherical drops in the inertial regime. We present a geometric model that quantitatively captures the transition from 2/3 to 1/2 exponent, and unifies the inertial coalescence of sessile drops and freely suspended drops.

  4. Microwave Dielectric Heating of Drops in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Issadore, David; Brown, Keith A; Sandberg, Lori; Weitz, David; Westervelt, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique to locally and rapidly heat water drops in microfluidic devices with microwave dielectric heating. Water absorbs microwave power more efficiently than polymers, glass, and oils due to its permanent molecular dipole moment that has a large dielectric loss at GHz frequencies. The relevant heat capacity of the system is a single thermally isolated picoliter drop of water and this enables very fast thermal cycling. We demonstrate microwave dielectric heating in a microfluidic device that integrates a flow-focusing drop maker, drop splitters, and metal electrodes to locally deliver microwave power from an inexpensive, commercially available 3.0 GHz source and amplifier. The temperature of the drops is measured by observing the temperature dependent fluorescence intensity of cadmium selenide nanocrystals suspended in the water drops. We demonstrate characteristic heating times as short as 15 ms to steady-state temperatures as large as 30 degrees C above the base temperature of the microfluidi...

  5. Drop Impact on Textile Material: Effect of Fabric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romdhani Zouhaier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of impact of water drop on a surface in a spreading regime with no splashing. Three surfaces were studied: virgin glass, coating film and woven cotton fabric at different construction parameters. All experiments were carried out using water drop with the same free fall high. Digidrop with high-resolution camera is used to measure the different parameters characterising this phenomenon. Results show an important effect of the height of the free fall on the drop profile and the spreading behaviour. An important drop deformation at the surface impact was observed. Then, fabric construction as the weft count deeply affects the drop impact. For plain weave, an increase of weft count causes a decrease in penetration and increase in the spreading rate. The same result was obtained for coated fabric. Therefore, the impact energy was modified and the drop shape was affected, which directly influenced the spreading rate.

  6. Drop motion due to oscillations of an inclined substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    A sessile drop on a stationary inclined substrate remains pinned unless the angle of inclination is greater than some critical value. Alternatively, when shaken at even small angles of inclination, the drop undergoes shape deflections which may lead to drop translation. Translation occurs when large contact angle fluctuations, favored by oscillations at resonance, overcome contact angle hysteresis. In this study, resonance is triggered by substrate-normal oscillations. The drop translation is typically observed to be of constant speed for a given set of parameters. The speed is measured experimentally as a function of resonance mode, driving amplitude and drop volume. This technique of activating the motion of drops having a particular volume can be utilized for applications of droplet selection and transport.

  7. Collision between chemically-driven self-propelled drops

    CERN Document Server

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    We consider analytically and numerically head-on collision between two self-propelled drops. Each drop is driven by chemical reactions that produce or consume the concentration isotropically. The isotropic distribution of the concentration field is destabilized by motion of the drop which is itself made by Marangoni flow from concentration-dependent surface tension. This symmetry-breaking self-propulsion is distinct from other self-propulsion mechanisms due to the intrinsic polarity such as squirmers and self-phoretic motion; there is a bifurcation point below which the drop is stationary and above which it moves spontaneously. When two drops moving along the same axis with opposite direction, the interactions arise both from hydrodynamics and concentration overlap. We found that two drops exhibit either elastic collision or fusion depending on the distance from the bifurcation point controlled, for instance, by viscosity. The elastic collision results from the balance between dissipation and energy injection...

  8. On the coalescence of sessile drops with miscible liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, R; Bestehorn, M

    2011-08-01

    Sessile drops sitting on highly wettable solid substrates fuse in qualitatively different ways after contact, depending on the surface tension gradients between the mixing droplets. In early time evolution the drop coalescence can be fast or delayed (intermittent). In long time evolution a secondary drop formation can occur. We study numerically droplet dynamics during coalescence in two and three spatial dimensions, within a phase field approach. We discuss criteria to distinguish different coalescence regimes. A comparison with recent experiments will be done.

  9. Shaping and Capturing Leidenfrost drops with a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2012-01-01

    Liquid oxygen, which is intrinsically paramagnetic, also undergoes Leidenfrost effect at room temperature. In this article, we first study the deformation of oxygen drops in a magnetic field via an effective capillary length, that includes the magnetic force. In a second part, we show that these ultra-mobile drops passing above a magnet significantly slow down and can even be trapped if slow enough. The critical velocity below which a drop is captured is determined from the deformation induced by the field.

  10. Behavior of liquid drop situated between two oscillating planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenchenko, A E [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Science, Ural Branch, 101 Amundsen str., Ekaterinburg 620219 (Russian Federation); Beskachko, V P [South Ural State University, 76 Lenin str., Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: korenchenko@physics.susu.ac.ru

    2008-02-15

    The levitation drop technique is widely used for the measurement of the surface tension and viscosity of liquids. An experiment with a drop situated between two horizontal rigid planes gives the same possibilities. The dynamic problem is solved numerically in the following cases: (1) the free oscillations of the drop when the plates are motionless; (2) the forced oscillations when the upper plate makes a translational vibration in the normal direction. The possibility of viscosity determination in such experiments is shown.

  11. Student Drop Tower Competitions: Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) and What If No Gravity? (WING)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nancy R.; Stocker, Dennis P.; DeLombard, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two student competition programs that allow student teams to conceive a science or engineering experiment for a microgravity environment. Selected teams design and build their experimental hardware, conduct baseline tests, and ship their experiment to NASA where it is operated in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. The hardware and acquired data is provided to the teams after the tests are conducted so that the teams can prepare their final reports about their findings.

  12. How to optimize the drop plate method for enumerating bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herigstad, B; Hamilton, M; Heersink, J

    2001-03-01

    The drop plate (DP) method can be used to determine the number of viable suspended bacteria in a known beaker volume. The drop plate method has some advantages over the spread plate (SP) method. Less time and effort are required to dispense the drops onto an agar plate than to spread an equivalent total sample volume into the agar. By distributing the sample in drops, colony counting can be done faster and perhaps more accurately. Even though it has been present in the laboratory for many years, the drop plate method has not been standardized. Some technicians use 10-fold dilutions, others use twofold. Some technicians plate a total volume of 0.1 ml, others plate 0.2 ml. The optimal combination of such factors would be useful to know when performing the drop plate method. This investigation was conducted to determine (i) the standard deviation of the bacterial density estimate, (ii) the cost of performing the drop plate procedure, (iii) the optimal drop plate design, and (iv) the advantages of the drop plate method in comparison to the standard spread plate method. The optimal design is the combination of factor settings that achieves the smallest standard deviation for a fixed cost. Computer simulation techniques and regression analysis were used to express the standard deviation as a function of the beaker volume, dilution factor, and volume plated. The standard deviation expression is also applicable to the spread plate method.

  13. "Drop in" gastroscopy outpatient clinic - experience after 9 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huppertz-Hauss Gert

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Logistics handling referrals for gastroscopy may be more time consuming than the examination itself. For the patient, "drop in" gastroscopy may reduce uncertainty, inadequate therapy and time off work. Methods After an 8-9 month run-in period we asked patients, hospital staff and GPs to fill in a questionnaire to evaluate their experience with "drop in" gastroscopy and gastroscopy by appointment, respectively. The diagnostic gain was evaluated. Results 112 patients had "drop in" gastroscopy and 101 gastroscopy by appointment. The number of "drop in" patients varied between 3 and 12 per day (mean 6.5. Mean time from first GP consultation to gastroscopy was 3.6 weeks in the "drop in" group and 14 weeks in the appointment group. The half-yearly number of outpatient gastroscopies increased from 696 before introducing "drop in" to 1022 after (47% increase and the proportion of examinations with pathological findings increased from 42% to 58%. Patients and GPs expressed great satisfaction with "drop in". Hospital staff also acclaimed although it caused more unpredictable working days with no additional staff. Conclusions "Drop in" gastroscopy was introduced without increase in staff. The observed increase in gastroscopies was paralleled by a similar increase in pathological findings without any apparent disadvantages for other groups of patients. This should legitimise "drop in" outpatient gastroscopies, but it requires meticulous observation of possible unwanted effects when implemented.

  14. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B; Steen, Paul H; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  15. Communications: Wall free capillarity and pendant drop removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Siang-Jie; Chang, Feng-Ming; Chan, Seong Heng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2010-04-28

    When a sessile drop encounters a pendant drop through a hole, it is generally anticipated that they will coalesce and flow downward due to gravity. However, like "wall-free" capillarity, we show that the pendant drop may be sucked up by a sliding drop instantaneously if the radius of the curvature of the former is smaller than that of the later. This phenomenon can be explained by Laplace-Young equation and convective Ostwald ripening. Our results indicate that superhydrophilic perforated surface can be used as an effective way for the removal of small droplets adhering to the inner walls of microchannel systems.

  16. Symmetric and Asymmetric Coalescence of Drops on a Substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Sanchez, J F; Eddi, A; Snoeijer, J H

    2012-01-01

    The coalescence of viscous drops on a substrate is studied experimentally and theoretically. We consider cases where the drops can have different contact angles, leading to a very asymmetric coalescence process. Side view experiments reveal that the "bridge" connecting the drops evolves with self-similar dynamics, providing a new perspective on the coalescence of sessile drops. We show that the universal shape of the bridge is accurately described by similarity solutions of the one-dimensional lubrication equation. Our theory predicts a bridge that grows linearly in time and stresses the strong dependence on the contact angles. Without any adjustable parameters, we find quantitative agreement with all experimental observations.

  17. Substrate constraint modifies the Rayleigh spectrum of vibrating sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Bostwick, Joshua B.; Steen, Paul H.; Daniel, Susan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we study the resonance behavior of mechanically oscillated, sessile water drops. By mechanically oscillating sessile drops vertically and within prescribed ranges of frequencies and amplitudes, a rich collection of resonance modes are observed and their dynamics subsequently investigated. We first present our method of identifying each mode uniquely, through association with spherical harmonics and according to their geometric patterns. Next, we compare our measured resonance frequencies of drops to theoretical predictions using both the classical theory of Lord Rayleigh and Lamb for free, oscillating drops, and a prediction by Bostwick and Steen that explicitly considers the effect of the solid substrate on drop dynamics. Finally, we report observations and analysis of drop mode mixing, or the simultaneous coexistence of multiple mode shapes within the resonating sessile drop driven by one sinusoidal signal of a single frequency. The dynamic response of a deformable liquid drop constrained by the substrate it is in contact with is of interest in a number of applications, such as drop atomization and ink jet printing, switchable electronically controlled capillary adhesion, optical microlens devices, as well as digital microfluidic applications where control of droplet motion is induced by means of a harmonically driven substrate.

  18. Numerical investigation of phase relationships in an oscillating sessile drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenchenko, A. E.; Malkova, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    Forced linear oscillations of a viscous drop placed on a horizontal surface vibrating in perpendicular direction are investigated. The problem is solved for two cases: (1) constant contact angle, and (2) pinned contact line. Phase-frequency and amplitude-frequency characteristics of oscillations of the drop apex are found for the first axisymmetrical mode of oscillations. The independence of the difference of oscillation phases of the drop apex and the substrate on fluid density, viscosity, surface tension, and drop size as well as on presence or absence of the gravity force was demonstrated.

  19. Wetting and absorption of water drops on Nafion films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sharonmoyee; Klaus, Shannon; Benziger, Jay

    2008-08-19

    Water drops on Nafion films caused the surface to switch from being hydrophobic to being hydrophilic. Contact angle hysteresis of >70 degrees between advancing and receding values were obtained by the Wilhelmy plate technique. Sessile drop measurements were consistent with the advancing contact angle; the sessile drop contact angle was 108 degrees . Water drop adhesion, as measured by the detachment angle on an inclined plane, showed much stronger water adhesion on Nafion than Teflon. Sessile water and methanol drops caused dry Nafion films to deflect. The flexure went through a maximum with time. Flexure increased with contact area of the drop, but was insensitive to the film thickness. Methanol drops spread more on Nafion and caused larger film flexure than water. The results suggest that the Nafion surface was initially hydrophobic but water and methanol drops caused hydrophilic sulfonic acid domains to be drawn to the Nafion surface. Local swelling of the film beneath the water drop caused the film to buckle. The maximum flexure is suggested to result from motion of a water swelling front through the Nafion film.

  20. Underwater sound produced by individual drop impacts and rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Crum, L. A.; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of the underwater sound produced by water drop impacts on the surface is described. It is found that sound may be produced in two ways: first when the drop strikes the surface and, second, when a bubble is created in the water. The first process occurs for every drop......; the second occurs for some impacts but not others. A range of conditions is described in which a bubble is produced for every drop impact, and it is shown that these conditions are likely to be met by a significant fraction of the raindrops in a typical shower. Underwater sound produced by artificial as well...

  1. UNSTEADY MODEL OF DROP MARANGONI MIGRATION IN MICROGRAVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿荣慧; 胡文瑞; 金友兰; 敖超

    2002-01-01

    The experiments of drop Marangoni migration have been performed by the drop shift facility of short period of 4.5 s, and the drop accelerates gradually to an asymptotic velocity during the free fall. The unsteady and axisymmetric model is developed to study the drop migration for the case of moderate Reynolds number Re = O(1), and the results are compared with the experimental ones in the present paper. Both numerical and experimental results show that the migration velocity for moderate Reynolds number is several times smaller than that given by the linear YGB theory.

  2. PRESERVATIVES FROM THE EYE DROPS AND THE OCULAR SURFACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroi, Mihaela Cristina; Bungau, Simona; Tit, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The use of preservatives in eye drops (eyewashes) has known glory at the beginning, but the side effects that they have on the ocular surface have led to a decrease of their popularity. Lachrymal film dysfunction, ocular hyperemia, dotted keratitis or toxic keratopathy were reported and analyzed in terms of pathophysiological mechanism of the role played by preservatives in ophthalmic drops (eyewashes). This article reviews the most common preservatives and the existing alternatives for the maintenance of the eye sterile drops. Keywords: preservatives, eye drops, ocular surface

  3. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 μm and 20 μm were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition

  4. The viruses of wild pigeon droppings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Gia Phan

    Full Text Available Birds are frequent sources of emerging human infectious diseases. Viral particles were enriched from the feces of 51 wild urban pigeons (Columba livia from Hong Kong and Hungary, their nucleic acids randomly amplified and then sequenced. We identified sequences from known and novel species from the viral families Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, Reoviridae, Adenovirus, Astroviridae, and Caliciviridae (listed in decreasing number of reads, as well as plant and insect viruses likely originating from consumed food. The near full genome of a new species of a proposed parvovirus genus provisionally called Aviparvovirus contained an unusually long middle ORF showing weak similarity to an ORF of unknown function from a fowl adenovirus. Picornaviruses found in both Asia and Europe that are distantly related to the turkey megrivirus and contained a highly divergent 2A1 region were named mesiviruses. All eleven segments of a novel rotavirus subgroup related to a chicken rotavirus in group G were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. This study provides an initial assessment of the enteric virome in the droppings of pigeons, a feral urban species with frequent human contact.

  5. Pressure drop in saturated flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Francisco J. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    A new mass balance for flow boiling have been recently suggested by the author following a quite simple idea: if the phases have different velocities, they can not cover the same distance -the control volume length for a 1-d system- in the same time. Thus, the time scales of the phases have to be different, and we should scale the time dependent magnitudes of one phase to the other one before combining them. Furthermore, it is reasonable to think that conservation equations should have to include in some manner this evident physical fact. In complete coherence with the former mass balance, a new energy balance, which does include the slip ratio has been also stated. This work, whilst reviews these new fundamentals for saturated flow boiling, stresses those aspects related with the prediction of the pressure drop in saturated flow boiling. The new correlations found for the data carefully measured by Thom during the Cambridge project would confirm the new two-phase flowapproach.

  6. On the spreading of impacting drops

    CERN Document Server

    Wildeman, Sander; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The energy budget and dissipation mechanisms during droplet impact on solid surfaces are studied numerically and theoretically. We find that for high impact velocities and negligible surface friction, about one half of the initial kinetic energy is transformed into surface energy, independent of the impact parameters and the detailed energy loss mechanism(s). We argue that this seemingly universal rule is related to the deformation mode of the droplet and is reminiscent of pipe flow undergoing a sudden expansion, for which the head loss can be calculated by multiplying the kinetic energy of the incoming flow by a geometrical factor. For impacts on a no-slip surface also dissipation in the shear boundary layer at the solid surface is important. In this case the head loss acts as a lower bound on the total dissipation for small viscosities. This new view on the impact problem allows for simple analytical estimates of the maximum spreading diameter of impacting drops as a function of the impact parameters and th...

  7. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  8. That's one small drop for Mankind...

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    In August, the members of an ISOLDE project called LOI88 successfully employed a new technique to study the interaction of metal ions in a liquid. It’s the first time that specific ions have been studied in a liquid medium - a technical achievement that opens promising doors for biochemistry.   In the heart of the LOI88 experiment: this is the point where the metal ions (from the left) enter the drop.  “More than half of the proteins in the human body contain metal ions such as magnesium, zinc and copper,” explains Monika Stachura, a biophysicist at the University of Copenhagen and the LOI88 project leader. “We know that these elements are crucial to a protein’s structure and function but their behaviour and interactions are not known in detail.” Detecting these ions directly in  a body-like environment is problematic as their closed atomic shells make them invisible to most spectroscopic techniques. However, using ...

  9. Low-Bond Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis for Surface Tension and Contact Angle Measurements of Sessile Drops

    OpenAIRE

    Stalder, A.F.; Melchior, T.; Müller, M.; Sage, D; T. Blu; Unser, M

    2010-01-01

    A new method based on the Young-Laplace equation for measuring contact angles and surface tensions is presented. In this approach, a first-order perturbation technique helps to analytically solve the Young-Laplace equation according to photographic images of axisymmetric sessile drops. When appropriate, the calculated drop contour is extended by mirror symmetry so that reflection of the drop into substrate allows the detection of position of the contact points. To keep a wide range of applica...

  10. Wettability-independent bouncing on flat surfaces mediated by thin air films

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of drops onto solid surfaces plays a crucial role in a variety of processes, including inkjet printing, fog harvesting, anti-icing, dropwise condensation and spray coating. Recent efforts in understanding and controlling drop impact behaviour focused on superhydrophobic surfaces with specific surface structures enabling drop bouncing with reduced contact time. Here, we report a different universal bouncing mechanism that occurs on both wetting and non-wetting flat surfaces for both high and low surface tension liquids. Using high-speed multiple-wavelength interferometry, we show that this bouncing mechanism is based on the continuous presence of an air film for moderate drop impact velocities. This submicrometre `air cushion' slows down the incoming drop and reverses its momentum. Viscous forces in the air film play a key role in this process: they provide transient stability of the air cushion against squeeze-out, mediate momentum transfer, and contribute a substantial part of the energy dissipation during bouncing.

  11. Axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD): a film balance technique for high collapse pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2008-10-07

    Collapse pressure of insoluble monolayers is a property determined from surface pressure/area isotherms. Such isotherms are commonly measured by a Langmuir film balance or a drop shape technique using a pendant drop constellation (ADSA-PD). Here, a different embodiment of a drop shape analysis, called axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD) is used as a film balance. It is shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The ability to measure very low surface tension values (e.g., drop setup, and leak-proof design make the constrained sessile drop constellation a better choice than the pendant drop constellation in many situations. Results of compression isotherms are obtained on three different monolayers: octadecanol, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC), and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG). The collapse pressures are found to be reproducible and in agreement with previous methods. For example, the collapse pressure of DPPC is found to be 70.2 mJ/m2. Such values are not achievable with a pendant drop. The collapse pressure of octadecanol is found to be 61.3 mJ/m2, while that of DPPG is 59.0 mJ/m2. The physical reasons for these differences are discussed. The results also show a distinctive difference between the onset of collapse and the ultimate collapse pressure (ultimate strength) of these films. ADSA-CSD allows detailed study of this collapse region.

  12. Square wave voltammetry at the dropping mercury electrode: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, J.H.; Turner, J.A.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of square wave voltammetry at the dropping mercury electrode are presented. The technique involves scanning the entire potential range of interest on a single drop of a DME. Asymmetries in the waveform as well as variations in current measurement parameters are discussed. Indications are that previous uses of the waveform may not have utilized all its capabilities.

  13. Delayed frost growth on jumping-drop superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, C Patrick

    2013-02-26

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an interdrop frost wave. The growth of this interdrop frost front is shown to be up to 3 times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of interdrop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an interdrop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser minimized frost formation relative to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by limiting the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  14. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  15. Simulation of the drop impact test for moulded thermoplastic containers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, P.E.; Breedveld, G.; Lim, B.C.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis is made of the drop impact test for moulded plastics containers, as a first step towards the simulation of the impact event for design and development purposes. Experimental data are analysed from instrumented base drop impact testing of water-filled blow-moulded bottles, 20 and 210 l dr

  16. Electrowetting-driven oscillating drops sandwiched between two substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Eral, H.B.; Staicu, A.D.; Mugele, F.; Ende, van den D.

    2013-01-01

    Drops sandwiched between two substrates are often found in lab-on-chip devices based on digital microfluidics. We excite azimuthal oscillations of such drops by periodically modulating the contact line via ac electrowetting. By tuning the frequency of the applied voltage, several shape modes can be

  17. Segregation in desiccated sessile drops of biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevich, Yu Yu; Pravoslavnova, D M

    2007-04-01

    It is shown here that concurrence between advection and diffusion in a drying sessile drop of a biological fluid can produce spatial redistribution of albumen and salt. The result gives an explanation for the patterns observed in the dried drops of the biological fluids.

  18. Simple Model of Shape Evolution of Desiccated Colloidal Sessile Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasevich, Yu. Yu.; Vodolazskaya, I. V.; Isakova, O. P.

    2011-01-01

    We propose simple model of colloidal sessile drop desiccation. The model describes correctly both evolution of the phase boundary between sol and gel inside such a drop and the final shape of the dried film (deposit). The model is based on mass conservation and natural assumption that deposit (gel phase) prevents flows and evaporation.

  19. Pressure Drop of Non-Newtonian Liquid Flow Through Elbows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on the pressure drop across different types of elbow for non-Newtonian pseudoplastic liquid flow in laminar condition have been presented. A generalized correlation has been developed for predicting the frictional pressure drop across the elbows in the horizontal plane.

  20. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  1. Why Did They Not Drop Out? Narratives from Resilient Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Anne; Fortin, Laurier; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Pierre; Royer, Egide

    2009-01-01

    There is much to be learned from students who were at-risk for dropping out of school but persevered and graduated. The purpose of the study on which this article is based, was to describe how students who were at-risk for dropping out of school persevered and graduated. The voices of two students are introduced, highlighting the challenges they…

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  3. Did Millikan observe fractional charges on oil drops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbank, William M.; Franklin, Allan

    1982-05-01

    We have reanalyzed Millikan's 1913 data on oil drops to examine the evidence for charge quantization and for fractional residual charge. We find strong evidence in favor of charge quantization and no convincing evidence for fractional residual charges on the oil drops.

  4. Millikan Oil-Drop Experiment in the Introductory Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Mark A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a simplified Millikan oil-drop experiment which emphasizes the enplanation of basic concepts in mechanics and electrostatics, the use of home-made apparatus, the request for an individual's observation of his own drop, and the application of statistical analysis in data interpretation. (CC)

  5. Total sleep time severely drops during adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Leger

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Restricted sleep duration among young adults and adolescents has been shown to increase the risk of morbidities such as obesity, diabetes or accidents. However there are few epidemiological studies on normal total sleep time (TST in representative groups of teen-agers which allow to get normative data. PURPOSE: To explore perceived total sleep time on schooldays (TSTS and non schooldays (TSTN and the prevalence of sleep initiating insomnia among a nationally representative sample of teenagers. METHODS: Data from 9,251 children aged 11 to 15 years-old, 50.7% of which were boys, as part of the cross-national study 2011 HBSC were analyzed. Self-completion questionnaires were administered in classrooms. An estimate of TSTS and TSTN (week-ends and vacations was calculated based on specifically designed sleep habits report. Sleep deprivation was estimated by a TSTN - TSTS difference >2 hours. Sleep initiating nsomnia was assessed according to International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD 2. Children who reported sleeping 7 hours or less per night were considered as short sleepers. RESULTS: A serious drop of TST was observed between 11 yo and 15 yo, both during the schooldays (9 hours 26 minutes vs. 7 h 55 min.; p<0.001 and at a lesser extent during week-ends (10 h 17 min. vs. 9 h 44 min.; p<0.001. Sleep deprivation concerned 16.0% of chidren aged of 11 yo vs. 40.5% of those of 15 yo (p<0.001. Too short sleep was reported by 2.6% of the 11 yo vs. 24.6% of the 15 yo (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Despite the obvious need for sleep in adolescence, TST drastically decreases with age among children from 11 to 15 yo which creates significant sleep debt increasing with age.

  6. Capillary-inertial colloidal catapults upon drop coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Roger L.; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James J.; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Surface energy released upon drop coalescence is known to power the self-propelled jumping of liquid droplets on superhydrophobic solid surfaces, and the jumping droplets can additionally carry colloidal payloads toward self-cleaning. Here, we show that drop coalescence on a spherical particle leads to self-propelled launching of the particle from virtually any solid surface. The main prerequisite is an intermediate wettability of the particle, such that the momentum from the capillary-inertial drop coalescence process can be transferred to the particle. By momentum conservation, the launching velocity of the particle-drop complex is proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity based on the drop radius and to the fraction of the liquid mass in the total mass. The capillary-inertial catapult is not only an alternative mechanism for removing colloidal contaminants, but also a useful model system for studying ballistospore launching.

  7. Deformation and stability of surfactant - or particle - laden drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Quentin; Pradillo, Gerardo; Oberlander, Andrew; Vlahovska, Petia; SoftMech@Brown Team

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the behavior of a drop covered with insoluble surfactant or colloidal particles in a uniform DC electric field. Steady drop shapes, drop evolution upon application of the field, and drop relaxation after the field is turned off are observed for leaky dielectric fluids: Polybutadiene (PB), Silicon oil (PDMS), and Castor oil (CO). The surfactant is generated at the drop interface by reaction between end-functionalized PB and PDMS. The experimental data is compared with existing theoretical models for the steady shape of surfactant covered droplet, and adjusted models taking into account the presence of colloidal spheres with range of electrical properties. We will discuss the complex interplay of shape deformation, surfactant elasticity, particle redistribution, and interfacial charging in droplet electrohydrodynamics. Our results are important for understanding electrorheology of emulsions commonly found in the petroleum industry. We acknowledge grant NSF CBET 1437545 for funding.

  8. Building micro-soccer-balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Marín, Álvaro G.; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Housselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    Drop evaporation can be used to self-assemble particles into three-dimensional microstructures on a scale where direct manipulation is impossible. We present a unique method to create highly-ordered colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion drops from a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the drop remains in Cassie-Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the drop consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the drop evaporation dynamics, particle size, and number of particles in the system.

  9. Electrowetting-driven oscillating drops sandwiched between two substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Eral, H Burak; Staicu, Adrian; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    Drops sandwiched between two substrates are often found in lab-on-chip devices based on digital microfluidics. We excite azimuthal oscillations of such drops by periodically modulating the contact line via ac electrowetting. By tuning the frequency of the applied voltage, several shape modes can be selected one by one. The frequency of the oscillations is half the frequency of the contact angle modulation by electrowetting, indicating a parametric excitation. The drop response to sinusoidal driving deviates substantially from sinusoidal behavior in a "stop and go" fashion. Although our simple theoretical model describes the observed behavior qualitatively, the resonances appear at lower frequencies than expected. Moreover, the oscillations produce a nonperiodic fluid transport within the drop with a typical velocity of 1 mm/s. In digital microfluidic devices, where the typical drop size is less than 1 mm, this flow can result in very fast mixing on the spot.

  10. A Comparative Study on Pro-drop and Non-pro-drop Language-Taking Chi-nese (Pro-drop Language) and English (Non-pro-drop Language) as the Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li

    2014-01-01

    In Chomsky’s Government and Binding theory, null subject is a kind of Empty Category, namely“pro”. Whether subject can be empty constitutes an important parameter of universal grammar, called pro-drop Parameter which is often used to indicate the syntactic difference in human language. According to that, Chomsky divides human language into two categories:pro-drop language and non pro-drop language. The former one allows the loss of the subject, stood for by Italian, Spanish, Chi-nese, etc. The latter consists of English, French, etc. whose subjects cannot be omitted. Through a comparative study, taking Chi-nese and English as the examples, this paper aims to disclose the differences between pro-drop language and non pro-drop lan-guage.

  11. Tunable transport of drops on a vibrating inclined fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bick, Alison; Sauret, Alban; Stone, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Transport of liquid drops in fibrous media occurs in various engineering systems such as fog harvesting or cleaning of textiles. The ability to tune or to control liquid movement can increase the system efficiency and enable new engineering applications. In this Letter, we experimentally investigate how partially wetting drops on a single fiber can be manipulated by vibrating the fiber. We show that a sliding motion along the fiber or a dripping of the drop can be triggered by standing waves. We identify the conditions on the drop volume, the fiber tilt angle and the amplitude and frequency of oscillations to observe these different behaviors. Finally, we experimentally illustrate that vibrations can be used to control the transport and the collection of water drops along a fiber using a combination of the sliding and dripping transitions.

  12. As-placed contact angles for sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Rafael; Yadav, Preeti S

    2008-01-01

    As-placed contact angle is the contact angle a drop adapts as a result of its placement on a surface. As expected, the as-placed contact angle, thetaAP, of a sessile drop on a horizontal surface decreases with the drop size due to the increase in hydrostatic pressure. We present a theoretical prediction for thetaAP which shows that it is a unique function of the advancing contact angle, thetaA, drop size, and material properties (surface tensions and densities). We test our prediction with published and new data. The theory agrees with the experiments. From the relation of the as-placed contact angle to drop size the thermodynamic equilibrium contact angle is also calculated.

  13. [The antiallergic eye drops "polynadyme": development, experimental and clinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭchuk, Iu F; Pozdniakov, V I; Pozdniakova, V V; Iakushina, L N

    2006-01-01

    The antiallergic eye drops "Polynadyme", proposed by the Helmgolz Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases, have been prepared by the "Sintez" PJSC (Kurgan). The drops exert a combination of antihistaminic and vasoconstrictive effects and, for better tolerability, contain a low-toxic preserving complex. The drops are polymer-based, which ensures a long action and an artificial tear effect. Preclinical rabbit trials have shown the safety of the "Polynadyme" eye drops, their specific activity in preventing an allergic reaction, and their antiallergic effect on a model of allergic conjunctivitis. Comparative clinical trials covering 150 patients have yielded excellent and good results in 93% of cases. In acute allergic reactions, hyperemia, itch, and burning diminished just 5 minutes after administration. The "Polynadyme" eye drops are effective in treating pollinous conjunctivitis, spring (vernal) keratoconjunctivitis, allergic reactions when wearing contact lenses, the dry eye syndrome, drug-induced and toxicoallergic conjunctivitis, and other ocular allergic reactions.

  14. Drop oscillation and mass transfer in alternating electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carleson, T.E.

    1992-06-24

    In certain cases droplet direct contact heat transfer rates can be significantly enhanced by the application of an alternating electric field. This field can produce shape oscillations in a droplet which will enhance mixing. The theoretical evaluation of the effect of the interaction of the field with drop charge on the hydrodynamics has been completed for small amplitude oscillations. Previous work with a zero order perturbation method was followed up with a first order perturbation method to evaluate the effect of drop distortion on drop charge and field distribution. The first order perturbation results show secondary drop oscillations of four modes and two frequencies in each mode. The most significant secondary oscillation has the same mode and frequency as the second mode oscillation predicted from the first order perturbation work. The resonant frequency of all oscillations decrease with increasing electric field strength and drop charge. Work is currently underway to evaluate the heat transfer enhancement from an applied alternating electric field.

  15. Temperature effect on the pressure drop across the cake of coal gasification ash formed on a ceramic filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Liang, Y.; Sakong, K.M.; Choi, J.H.; Bak, Y.C. [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Biology & Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-15

    In order to predict the pressure drop across the cake of coal gasification (CG) ash formed on ceramic filter, an empirical equation was developed taking into account several factors, such as the face velocity, ash load, shape factor and size of particles, and especially the operating temperature. The hot air stream of well classified fine particles of CG ash was simulated as the syngas derived from the coal gasification process. The pressure drop behavior and cleaning efficiency of the filter were carefully investigated within the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K. The pressure drop across the ash cake was dominantly governed by the air viscosity, which increased with temperature. It was well expressed by the previously reported-empirical equation (J.H. Choi, Y.C. Bak, H.J. Jang, J.H. Kim, and J.H. Kim, Korean J. Chern. Eng., 21(3) (2004) 726.) with the modification of the viscosity term in the equation for different temperatures. The residual pressure drop rate across the ash cake also increased while the cleaning efficiency of the ceramic filter decreased as temperature increased.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH-FIELD Q-DROP IN A LARGE-GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITY FOR DIFFERENT OXIDATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Alex Gurevich

    2008-01-23

    In this contribution, we present the results from a series of RF tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes. After initial buffered chemical polishing, anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C was applied with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system was used allowing to measure the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to RF losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution on the RF surface. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the cavity surface showed that grain-boundaries are not the preferred location. An interesting correlation was found between the Q-drop onset, the quench field and the low-field energy gap, which supports the hypothesis of thermo-magnetic instability governing the Q-drop and the baking effect.

  17. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  18. Impact of particle-laden drops: Particle distribution on the substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishaev, Viktor; Iorio, Carlo Saverio; Dubois, Frank; Amirfazli, A

    2017-03-15

    The splat morphology after the impact of suspension drops on hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polycarbonate) substrates was investigated. The suspensions were mixtures of water and spherical hydrophobic particles with diameter of 200μm or 500μm. The impact was studied by side, bottom and angled view images. At Reynolds and Weber numbers in the range 150⩽We⩽750 and 7100⩽Re⩽16,400, the particles distributed in a monolayer on the hydrophilic substrates. It was found that the 200μm particles self-arranged as rings or disks on the hydrophilic substrates. On hydrophobic substrates, many particles were at the air-water interface and 200μm formed a crown-like structure. The current study for impact of particle-laden drops shows that the morphology of splats depends on the substrate wettability, the particle size and impact velocity. We developed correlations for the inner and outer diameter of the particle distribution on the hydrophilic substrates, and for the crown height on hydrophobic substrates. The proposed correlations capture the character of the particle distributions after drop impact that depends on particle volume fraction, the wettability of both particles and the substrate, and the dimensionless numbers such as Reynolds and Weber.

  19. Drop size effect on contact angle explained by nonextensive thermodynamics. Young's equation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Pierre; Mayaffre, Alain; Turmine, Mireille

    2007-10-15

    We applied the concepts of nonextensive thermodynamics [Turmine et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 18980], to describe the equilibrium of a liquid drop placed on a solid substrate. This approach provides a consistent formal framework for analyzing the contact angle according to the nature and structure of the substrate, and also the size of the drops. The introduction, for the solid/liquid interface, of the concept of "fuzzy interface" characterized by a thermodynamic dimension, different from 2/3 (surface) allowed description of the case of substrates with ill-defined geometry (such as porous, structured systems, fractal structure systems, etc.) and straightforward explanation of the phenomenon of super hydrophobicity without using a layer of trapped air in possible anfractuosities. The application of the nonextensive thermodynamics relationships, allowed explanation of all the usual behaviors described in the literature (Young, modified Young, Wenzel, Cassie-Baxter) including the case of the composite interfaces made of materials with different natures and spatial structures (smooth, rough, homogeneous and heterogeneous surfaces). We show that the contact angle can vary with the drop volume according to a power law, and this was validated against values published in the literature. This study also has consequences for the relations between "thermodynamic dimension" and "fractal dimension."

  20. Real-world ballistics: A dropped bucket

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, David W

    2007-01-01

    I discuss an apparently simple ballistics problem: the time it takes an object to fall a small vertical distance near the surface of the Earth. It turns out to be not so simple; I spend a great deal of time on the quantitative assessment of the assumptions involved, especially with regards to the influence of the air. The point is \\emph{not} to solve the problem; indeed I don't even end up solving the problem exactly. I introduce dimensional analysis to perform all of the calculations approximately. The principal theme of the lecture is that \\emph{real} physics can be very different from ``textbook'' physics, since in the real world you aren't ever told what equations are appropriate, or why.

  1. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  2. Application of Proteomics to the Study of Pollination Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Prior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Pollination drops are a formative component in gymnosperm pollen-ovule interactions. Proteomics offers a direct method for the discovery of proteins associated with this early stage of sexual reproduction. Methods: Pollination drops were sampled from eight gymnosperm species: Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Port Orford cedar, Ephedra monosperma, Ginkgo biloba, Juniperus oxycedrus (prickly juniper, Larix ×marschlinsii, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir, Taxus ×media, and Welwitschia mirabilis. Drops were collected by micropipette using techniques focused on preventing sample contamination. Drop proteins were separated using both gel and gel-free methods. Tandem mass spectrometric methods were used including a triple quadrupole and an Orbitrap. Results: Proteins are present in all pollination drops. Consistency in the protein complement over time was shown in L. ×marschlinsii. Representative mass spectra from W. mirabilis chitinase peptide and E. monosperma serine carboxypeptidase peptide demonstrated high quality results. We provide a summary of gymnosperm pollination drop proteins that have been discovered to date via proteomics. Discussion: Using proteomic methods, a dozen classes of proteins have been identified to date. Proteomics presents a way forward in deepening our understanding of the biological function of pollination drops.

  3. Modeling drop impacts on inclined flowing soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saikat; Yawar, Ali; Concha, Andres; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Small drops impinging on soap films flowing at an angle primarily exhibit three fundamental regimes of post-impact dynamics: (a) the drop bounces off the film surface, (b) it coalesces with the downstream flow, and (c) it pierces through the film. During impact, the drop deforms along with a simultaneous, almost elastic deformation of the film transverse to the stream direction. Hence, the governing dynamics for this interaction present the rare opportunity to explore the in-tandem effects of elasticity and hydrodynamics alike. In this talk, we outline the analytical framework to study the drop impact dynamics. The model assumes a deformable drop and a deformable three-dimensional soap film and invokes a parametric study to qualify the three mentioned impact types. The physical parameters include the impact angle, drop impact speed, and the diameters of the drop prior to and during impact when it deforms and spreads out. Our model system offers a path towards optimization of interactions between a spray and a flowing liquid.

  4. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  5. Trapped liquid drop at the end of capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjia; Yen, Hung-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-10-01

    The liquid drop captured at the capillary end, which is observed in capillary valve and pendant drop technique, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Because of contact line pinning of the lower meniscus, the lower contact angle is able to rise from the intrinsic contact angle (θ*) so that the external force acting on the drop can be balanced by the capillary force. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis (CAH), the upper contact angle remains at θ*. However, in the presence of CAH, the upper contact angle can descend to provide more capillary force. The coupling between the lower and upper contact angles determines the equilibrium shape of the captured drop. In a capillary valve, the pinned contact line can move across the edge as the pressure difference exceeds the valving pressure, which depends on the geometrical characteristic and wetting property of the valve opening. When CAH is considered, the valving pressure is elevated because the capillary force is enhanced by the receding contact angle. For a pendant drop under gravity, the maximal capillary force is achieved as the lower contact angle reaches 180° in the absence of CAH. However, in the presence of CAH, four regimes can be identified by three critical drop volumes. The lower contact angle can exceed 180°, and therefore the drop takes on the shape of a light bulb, which does not exist in the absence of CAH. The comparisons between Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are quite well.

  6. Collision between chemically driven self-propelled drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke; Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    We consider analytically and numerically head-on collision between two self-propelled drops. Each drop is driven by chemical reactions that produce or consume the concentration isotropically. The isotropic distribution of the concentration field is destabilized by motion of the drop which is itself made by Marangoni flow from concentration-dependent surface tension. This symmetry-breaking self-propulsion is distinct from other self-propulsion mechanisms due to the intrinsic polarity such as squirmers and self-phoretic motion; there is a bifurcation point below which the drop is stationary and above which it moves spontaneously. When two drops moving along the same axis with opposite direction, the interactions arise both from hydrodynamics and concentration overlap. We found that two drops exhibit either elastic collision or fusion depending on the distance from the bifurcation point controlled, for instance, by viscosity. The elastic collision results from the balance between dissipation and energy injection by chemical reactions. We derive the reduced equations for the collision between two drops and analyze the contributions from the two interactions. The concentration-mediated interaction is found to dominate the hydrodynamic interaction.

  7. Thermal infrared mapping of the Leidenfrost drop evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wciślik, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an author complementary study on the Leidenfrost drop evaporation. The research was conducted under ambient conditions and in the film boiling regime. Large water drops were placed on the copper substrate of the constant temperature Tw ranging from 297.6 to 404oC. The initial single drop diameter and its mass was D0 ≈ 1cm and m0 ≈ 1g respectively. One of the obtained results, for each Tw are the drop thermal images versus time. They were used to calculate an average temperature over the drop upper surface (Td). For an exemplary heating surface temperature of Tw = 297.6oC the average drop temperature is approximately 11oC lower than the saturation one and equals Td = 88,95oC. This value is estimated for the first 200s of evaporation and with time step size Δt = 0,5s. The drop upper surface temperature is highly variable and indicates strong convection inside it. This is due to the complex nature of heat and mass transfer. The maximum standard deviation from Td = 88,95oC is SD = 1.21.

  8. Air Cleaning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    , and personal protection methods. Engineering methods that are usually carried out by the building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system function to prevent the spread of airborne infectious pathogens by diluting (dilution ventilation) and removing (exhaust ventilation) contaminated air from a room, controlling the direction of airflow and the air flow patterns in a building. However, general wear and tear over time may compromise the HVAC system’s effectiveness to maintain adequate indoor air quality. Likewise, economic issues may curtail the completion of necessary renovations to increase its effectiveness. Therefore, when exposure to airborne infectious pathogens is a risk, the use of an in-room air cleaner to reduce the concentration of airborne pathogens and prevent the spread of airborne infectious diseases has been proposed as an alternative to renovating a HVAC system. Airborne transmission is the spread of infectious pathogens over large distances through the air. Infectious pathogens, which may include fungi, bacteria, and viruses, vary in size and can be dispersed into the air in drops of moisture after coughing or sneezing. Small drops of moisture carrying infectious pathogens are called droplet nuclei. Droplet nuclei are about 1 to 5μm in diameter. This small size in part allows them to remain suspended in the air for several hours and be carried by air currents over considerable distances. Large drops of moisture carrying infectious pathogens are called droplets. Droplets being larger than droplet nuclei, travel shorter distances (about 1 metre) before rapidly falling out of the air to the ground. Because droplet nuclei remain airborne for longer periods than do droplets, they are more amenable to engineering infection control methods than are droplets. Droplet nuclei are responsible for the airborne transmission of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, chicken pox (varicella), measles (rubeola), and dessiminated herpes

  9. Air Quality of Beijing and Impacts of the New Ambient Air Quality Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Beijing has been publishing daily reports on its air quality since 2000, and while the air pollution index (API shows that the air quality has improved greatly since 2000, this is not the perception of Beijing’s residents. The new national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS-2012, which includes the monitoring of PM2.5, has posed stricter standards for evaluating air quality. With the new national standard, the air quality in Beijing is calculated using both NAAQS-2012 and the previous standard. The annual attainment rate has dropped from 75.5% to 50.7%. The spatial analysis of air quality shows that only a background station could attain the national standard, while urban and suburban stations exceed the national standard. Among the six pollutants included in the NAAQS-2012, PM2.5 is the major contributor to the air quality index (AQI comparing with the five other pollutants. The results indicate that under previous NAAQS without PM2.5 monitoring, the air quality has improved greatly in the past decade.  By considering PM2.5, the air quality attainment has dropped greatly. Furthermore, a great effort is needed for local government to bring down the PM2.5 concentration.

  10. Understanding the drop impact on moving hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohammadi, H; Amirfazli, A

    2017-03-08

    In this paper, a systematic study was performed to understand the drop impact on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces that were moving in the horizontal direction. Drops (D0 = 2.5 mm) of liquids with three different viscosities were used. Wide ranges of drop normal velocity (0.5 to 3.4 m s(-1)) and surface velocity (0 to 17 m s(-1)) were studied. High speed imaging from the top and side was used to capture the impact phenomena. It was found that drop impact behavior on a moving surface significantly differs from that on a stationary surface at both the lamella extension stage (i.e. t ≤ tmax) and the retraction stage (t > tmax). Starting with the lamella extension stage, it was observed that the drop spreads asymmetrically over a moving surface. It was also found that the splashing behavior of the drop upon impact on a moving surface, unlike the understanding in the literature, is azimuthally different along the lamella contact line. In the case of the drop spreading over a moving surface, the surface movement stretches the expanded lamella in the direction of the surface motion. For hydrophilic surfaces, the stretched lamella pins to the surface and moves with the surface velocity; however, for hydrophobic surfaces, the lamella recoils during such stretching. A new model was developed to determine the splashing threshold of the drop impact on a moving surface. The model is capable of describing the azimuthally different behavior of the splashing which is a function of normal capillary and Weber numbers, surface velocity, and surface wettability. It was also found that the increase of the viscosity decreases the splashing threshold. Finally, comprehensive regime maps of the drop impact outcome on a moving surface were provided for both t ≤ tmax and t > tmax stages.

  11. Update on the Purdue University 2-second Drop Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collicott, Steven

    an update on progress for the micro-gravity community. The most noticeable current activity is testing of the air-bag decelerator. The tower is one that will use a free-falling experiment inside of a drag shield to avoid most aerodynamic drag. The airbag is designed from experiences of others yet the small, triangular room in which the tower terminates imposes challenges. The airbag is approximately 1.5m diameter and 1.5m tall. Initial testing led to a desire to increase vent area, and just this week the bag has returned from the shop that was modifying it. On-board computer, battery packs, lighting, and cameras have been acquired. Thanks to Lockheed Martin, one camera is 500 frames per second with 1.3 million 12-bit gray scale pixels per frame. The Spincraft company donated steel hemisphere-cylinders to serve as the nose of the drag shield. Wind tunnel and CFD modeling of the drag shield has been performed by Purdue undergraduate aerospace students. Currently the drag shield structure and experiment package structure are being design and analyzed. The experiment volume is approximately a cylinder 0.45m diameter and 0.6m tall. Tower operation is intended to commence in fall 2010 with inert package drops at full mass and full height. Developing the operations procedures, especially operational safety, are the goals of this work. First science is then expected in the winter. References 1. Y. Chen, "A Study of Capillary Flow in a Vane-wall Gap in Zero Gravity," Ph.D. thesis, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University. August 2003. 2. Y. Chen and S. H. Collicott, "Investigation of the Symmetric Wetting of a Vane-Wall Gap in Propellant Tanks," AIAA Journal, 42, No. 2, pp. 305-314, February 2004. 3. Y. Chen, and S. H. Collicott, "Experimental Study on the Capillary Flow in a Vane-Wall Gap Geometry," AIAA Journal, 43, No. 11, pp. 2395-2403, November, 2005. 4. Y. Chen and S. H. Collicott, "Study of Wetting in an Asymmetrical Vane-Wall Gap in Propellant Tanks

  12. PERSAMAAN DROP SIZE DI DALAM KOLOM BERPENGADUK CAKRAM (RDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martunus Martunus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Perpindahan massa dari satu fase cair ke fase cair lainnya di dalam kolom ekstraksi cair-cair ditentukan dengan luas perpindahan antara kedua fase. Luas perpindahan ini dapat dinyatakan dengan drop size yang merupakan faktor yang sangat penting dalam perancangan kolom ekstraksi cair-cair berpengaduk (Rotating Disc Contactor, RDC. Tiga model yang berhubungan dengan drop size dikembangkan untuk variabel operasi kolom yang didasarkan pada kecepatan putaran yaitu yaitu model untuk ekstraksi tanpa pengadukan atau pengadukan dengan putaran sangat rendah, model dengan kecepatan pengadukan medium, dan model pengadukan dengan putaran tinggi. Artikel ini berisi pembahasan persamaan drop size yang sudah dipublikasikan menyangkut ketiga kondisi operasi tersebut.

  13. Contact angle hysteresis of a drop spreading over metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Geniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental data on the contact angle hysteresis of the distilled water drop spreading over the surfaces of non-ferrous metals. The measurements of the advancing and receding contact angles were carried out by method of sitting drop on the horizontal surface during increasing and decreasing drop volume with a syringe pump. It was found that the contact line speed has a great influence on the hysteresis of the polished non-elastic substrates. The mechanism of spreading was described using the balance of the forces from the physical point of view.

  14. Drop interaction with solid boundaries in liquid/liquid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep

    The present experimental work was motivated primarily by the CO 2 sequestration process. In a possible scenario during this process, gravity driven CO2 bubbles coalesce at an interface near the rock surface. In another scenario, trapped CO2 fluid may escape from a porous matrix overcoming interfacial force inside a pore. Based on these potential scenarios, the current research was divided into two broad experimental studies. In the first part, coalescence at a quiescent interface of two analogous fluids (silicone oil and water/glycerin mixture) was investigated for water/glycerin drops with Bond number (Bo) ~7 and Ohnesorge number ~ 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic PIV. Two perturbation cases with a solid particle wetted in oil and water/glycerin placed adjacent to the coalescing drop were considered. The results were compared with coalescence of a single drop and that of a drop neighBored by a second drop of equivalent size. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location, subsequent film retraction and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The trends in local retraction speed of the ruptured film and the overall dynamics of the collapsing drops were discussed in detail. In the second part, the motion of gravity driven drops (B o~0.8-11) through a confining orifice d/Dwater/glycerin, surrounded by silicone oil, fall toward and encounter the orifice plate after reaching terminal speed. The effects of surface wettability were investigated for Both round-edged and sharp-edged orifices. For the round-edged case, a thin film of surrounding oil prevented the drop fluid from contacting the orifice surface, such that the flow outcomes of the drops were independent of surface wettability. For d/Dsurface tension time scale. For the sharp-edged case

  15. Exact Solution of a Drop-Push Model for Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Dean, David S.

    2002-08-01

    Motivated by a computer science algorithm known as ``linear probing with hashing,'' we study a new type of percolation model whose basic features include a sequential ``dropping'' of particles on a substrate followed by their transport via a ``pushing'' mechanism. Our exact solution in one dimension shows that, unlike the ordinary random percolation model, the drop-push model has nontrivial spatial correlations generated by the dynamics itself. The critical exponents in the drop-push model are also different from those of the ordinary percolation. The relevance of our results to computer science is pointed out.

  16. Drop impact on soft surfaces: beyond the static contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioboo, Romain; Voué, Michel; Adão, Helena; Conti, Joséphine; Vaillant, Alexandre; Seveno, David; De Coninck, Joël

    2010-04-06

    The wettability of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer films and of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers with water has been measured and compared using various methods. Contact angle hysteresis values were compared with values reported in the literature. A new method to characterize advancing, receding contact angles, and hysteresis using drop impact have been tested and compared with usual methods. It has been found that for the rigid surfaces the drop impact method is comparable with other methods but that for elastomer surfaces the hysteresis is function of the drop impact velocity which influences the extent of the deformation of the soft surface at the triple line.

  17. Partial coalescence of sessile drops with different liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We examine numerically the interaction between two deformable drops consisting of two perfectly miscible liquids sitting on a solid substrate under a given contact angle. Driven by solutal Marangoni forces, several distinct coalescence regimes are achieved after the droplets collision. Phase diagrams for different control parameters are emphasized, which give predictions about drop behavior along the solid substrates, control of various interfacial effects, manipulations of tiny droplets in micro- and nano-fluidic devices without power supply, design of droplets or cleaning surfaces. This work was partially supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the project ``Dynamics of interfaces between drops with miscible liquids''.

  18. Self-assembly and manipulation of particles on drop surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, M.; Fischer, I. S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    We have recently shown that particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop can be self-assembled at the poles or the equator of the drop by applying a uniform electric field, and that this method can be used to separate on the surface of a drop particles experiencing positive dielectrophoresis from those experiencing negative dielectrophoresis. In this talk we show that the frequency of the electric field is an important parameter which can be used to modify the distribution of self-assembled monolayers.

  19. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-03

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine.

  20. Experimental investigation of air pressure affecting filtration performance of fibrous filter sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Xiao; Wu, Ya; Lin, Zhongping

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the effect of air pressure on their filtration performance is important for assessing the effectiveness of fibrous filters under different practical circumstances. The effectiveness of three classes of air filter sheets were investigated in laboratory-based measurements at a wide range of air pressures (60-130 KPa). The filtration efficiency was found most sensitive to the air pressure change at smaller particle sizes. As the air pressure increased from 60 to 130 KPa, significant decrease in filtration efficiency (up to 15%) and increase in pressure drop (up to 90 Pa) were observed. The filtration efficiency of the filter sheet with largest fiber diameter and smallest solid volume fraction was affected most, while the pressure drop of the filter sheet with smallest fiber diameter and largest solid volume fraction was affected most. The effect of air pressure on the filtration efficiency was slightly larger at greater filter face air velocity. However, the effect of air pressure on the pressure drop was negligible. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop were explicitly expressed as functions of the air pressure. Two coefficients were empirically derived and successfully accounted for the effects of air pressure on filtration efficiency and pressure drop.

  1. A Review of Solar Desiccant Air Conditioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. U. V. Kongre, D. P. Mahure, P. A. Zamre

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a detailed study and description of a new solar-based air-conditioning technique. It uses solar energy to produce cold or hot air. This technology can be used to reduce the energy consumption and environmental impact of mechanical cooling system. The use of Desiccant cooling is used to perform air dehumidification operation by utilizing low grade heat source. The solar desiccant air conditioner uses solar power as the main energy source to help in the thermodynamic heat transfer process as well as heat transfer principles to convert ambient air into cooling air. With our constructed design we have seen temperature as well as humidity level drops throughout the desiccant cooling system. A significant advantage of this system is, it have no moving parts consequently they are noiseless, non-corrosive, cheap to maintain, long lasting in addition to being environmentally friendly with zero ozone depletion as well as zero global warming potentials.

  2. Universal evolution of a viscous-capillary spreading drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Adhikari, Ronojoy; Govindarajan, Rama

    2016-07-13

    The rate of spreading or retraction of a drop on a flat substrate is determined through a balance of surface tension and hydrodynamic flow. While asymptotic regimes are known, no general rate equation has hitherto been available. Here, we revisit this classic problem, in a regime governed by capillary and viscous forces, by performing an exhaustive numerical study of drop evolution as a function of the contact angle with the substrate. Our study reveals a universal evolution of the drop radius parameterised only by the substrate wettability. Two limits of this evolution recover the familiar exponential and algebraic regimes. Our results show quantitative comparison with the evolution derived from lubrication theory, indicating that dissipation at the contact line is the key determinant in drop evolution. Our work, both numerical and theoretical, provides a foundation for studying the full temporal dynamics of droplet evolution under the influence of external fields and thermal fluctuations, which are of importance in nanofluidics.

  3. Oblique drop impact onto a deep liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Gielen, Marise V; Benschop, Jos; Riepen, Michel; Voronina, Victoria; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Versluis, Michel; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-01-01

    Oblique impact of drops on a solid or liquid surface is frequently observed in nature. Most studies on drop impact and splashing, however, focus on perpendicular impact. Here, we study oblique impact onto a deep liquid pool, where we quantify the splashing threshold, maximal cavity dimensions and cavity collapse by high-speed imaging above and below the water surface. Three different impact regimes are identified: smooth deposition onto the pool, splashing in the direction of impact only, and splashing in all directions. We provide scaling arguments that delineate these regimes by accounting for drop impact angle and Weber number. The angle of the axis of the cavity created below the water surface follows the impact angle of the drop independent of the Weber number, while cavity depth and its displacement with respect to the impact position depend on the Weber number. Weber number dependency of both the cavity depth and displacement is modeled using an energy argument.

  4. Spontaneous Jumping of Coalescing Drops on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2009-11-01

    When micrometric drops coalesce in-plane on a superhydrophobic surface, a surprising out-of-plane jumping motion was observed. Such jumping motion triggered by drop coalescence was reproduced on a Leidenfrost surface. High-speed imaging revealed that this jumping motion results from the elastic interaction of the bridged drops with the superhydrophobic/Leidenfrost surface. Experiments on both the superhydrophobic and Leidenfrost surfaces compare favorably to a simple scaling model relating the kinetic energy of the merged drop to the surface energy released upon coalescence. The spontaneous jumping motion on water repellent surfaces enables the autonomous removal of water condensate independently of gravity; this process is highly desirable for sustained dropwise condensation.

  5. Spontaneous Jumping of Coalescing Drops on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Boreyko, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    When micrometric drops coalesce in-plane on a superhydrophobic surface, a surprising out-of-plane jumping motion was observed. Such jumping motion triggered by drop coalescence was reproduced on a Leidenfrost surface. High-speed imaging revealed that this jumping motion results from the elastic interaction of the bridged drops with the superhydrophobic/Leidenfrost surface. Experiments on both the superhydrophobic and Leidenfrost surfaces compare favorably to a simple scaling model relating the kinetic energy of the merged drop to the surface energy released upon coalescence. The spontaneous jumping motion on water repellent surfaces enables the autonomous removal of water condensate independently of gravity; this process is highly desirable for sustained dropwise condensation.

  6. Queues with Dropping Functions and General Arrival Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chydzinski, Andrzej; Mrozowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    In a queueing system with the dropping function the arriving customer can be denied service (dropped) with the probability that is a function of the queue length at the time of arrival of this customer. The potential applicability of such mechanism is very wide due to the fact that by choosing the shape of this function one can easily manipulate several performance characteristics of the queueing system. In this paper we carry out analysis of the queueing system with the dropping function and a very general model of arrival process--the model which includes batch arrivals and the interarrival time autocorrelation, and allows for fitting the actual shape of the interarrival time distribution and its moments. For such a system we obtain formulas for the distribution of the queue length and the overall customer loss ratio. The analytical results are accompanied with numerical examples computed for several dropping functions.

  7. The effect of dropping impact on bruising pomegranate fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohammad Shafie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pomegranate journey from orchard to supermarket is very complex and pomegranates are subjected to the variety of static and dynamic loads that could result in this damage and bruise occurring. Bruise area and bruise volume are the most important parameters to evaluate fruit damage occurred in harvest and postharvest stages. The bruising is defined as damage to fruit flesh usually with no abrasion of the peel. The two different types of dynamic loading which can physically cause fruit bruising are impact and vibration. The impact and vibration loadings may occur during picking or sorting as the pomegranates are dropped into storage bins and during transportation. The focus of this work was on the impact loading as this appeared to be the most prevalent. In view of the limitations of conventional testing methods (ASTM D3332 Standard Test Methods for Mechanical Shock Fragility of Products, the method and procedure for determining dropping bruise boundary of fruit were also established by adapting free-fall dropping tests. Materials and Methods: After the ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ pomegranates had been selected, they were numbered, and the weight and dimension of each sample were measured and recorded. Firmness in cheek region of each fruit was also measured. Fruit firmness was determined by measuring the maximum force during perforating the sample to a depth of 10 mm at a velocity of 100 mm min-1 with an 8 mm diameter cylindrical penetrometer mounted onto a STM-5 Universal Testing Machine (SANTAM, Design CO. LTD., England. Free-fall dropping tests with a series of drop heights (6, 7, 10, 15, 30 and 60 cm were conducted on fresh ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ pomegranates. Three samples were used for each dropping height, and each sample was subjected to impact on two different positions. Before the test was started, it was necessary to control the sample's drop position. The cheek of sample was placed on the fruit holder. An aluminum plate mounted

  8. Emulsion Design. Analysis of Drop Deformations in Mixed Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm, Runi Ditlev

    2008-01-01

    terms is carried out as a summation of contributions from the VOF mesh. This corresponds to letting the curvature vary within elements of the FE mesh. The implemented model is tested in terms of spatial and temporal convergence by simulating the deformation of a single drop in a simple shear flow field...... ratio, A, between the drop and the continuous phase is one. More thorough tests are carried out both in simple shear and planar elongation. These simulations include dependence of steady-state deformations on the capillary number, drop-break and drop merging. Generally the test results agree well......) tracking procedure. The FE solver is based on Q2PO elements while the VOF procedure is based on PLIC (Piecewise Linear Interface Calculation) interface reconstruction and a split operator Lagrangian advection procedure which CQILSerVes mass rigorously. The model is fully 3D and can be used for simulating...

  9. Sticking around: an up-close look at drop adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Paxson, Adam T

    2013-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the adhesion of a drop to a superhydrophobic surface. We use environmental scanning electron microscopy to observe depinning events at the microscale. As the drop moves along the surface, the advancing portion of the contact line simply lies down onto the upcoming roughness features, contributing negligibly to adhesion. After measuring the local receding contact angle of capillary bridges formed on a micropillar array, we find that these depinning events follow the Gibbs depinning criterion. We further extend this technique to two-scale hierarchical structures to reveal a self-similar depinning mechanism in which the adhesion of the entire drop depends only on the pinning at the very smallest level of roughness hierarchy. With this self-similar depinning mechanism we develop a model to predict the adhesion of drops to superhydrophobic surfaces that explains both the low adhesion on sparsely structured surfaces and the surprisingly high adhesion on surfaces whose featu...

  10. MHD pressure drop in ferritic pipes of fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, J.; Buehler, Leo E-mail: leo.buehler@iket.fzk.de; Messadek, K.; Stieglitz, R

    2003-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows in pipes of ferromagnetic material is an important issue for liquid metal blanket concepts using MANET as wall material. Fusion relevant magnetic fields of 4-8 T cause high pressure drop in the blanket header where a massive structure of ferromagnetic material exists. It is briefly outlined that in the blanket the reduction of pressure drop due to magnetic shielding is limited to about 10%. Remarkable reduction of pressure drop is possible by means of electrical insulation that prevents currents from short-circuiting through the very thick walls of the headers. Direct contact of the insulating material with the liquid metal is excluded by using metallic liners. Results are reported on the fabrication of such a test section and corresponding pressure drop measurements confirm the effective contribution of the electrical decoupling.

  11. Ready-made allogeneic ABO-specific serum eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Nielsen, Connie; Ullum, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    , registered and stored at -30°C in the blood bank. Upon request, frozen ABO-identical serum drops in lots of 14 bottles could be provided immediately. Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 34 patients with severe ocular surface disease refractory to conventional medical therapy. Patients were treated six...... serum treatment. CONCLUSION: Ready-made ABO-identical allogeneic serum eye drops were straightforwardly produced, quality-assured and registered as a safe standard blood product for the treatment of certain cases of severe dry eye disease. Therapeutic efficacy was comparable to previous reports......PURPOSE: To overcome problems and delays of the preparation of autologous serum eye drops, a production line of ABO-specific allogeneic serum eye drops from male blood donors was set up in a blood bank. Feasibility, clinical routine, safety and efficacy were evaluated in a cohort of patients...

  12. Deceleration Driven Wetting Transition Druing "Gentle" Drop Depostion

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Varanasi, Kripa K; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2010-01-01

    We present high speed video of Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel drop transition during gentle deposition of droplets where the modest amount of energy is channeled via rapid deceleration into a high water hammer pressure.

  13. Drag-shield drop tower residual acceleration optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, A.; Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Fernandez De Pierola, M.; Duran, J.

    2016-07-01

    Among the forces that appear in drop towers for microgravity experiments, aerodynamic drag plays a crucial role in the residual acceleration. Buoyancy can also be critical, especially at the first instances of the drop when the low speed of the experimental platform makes the aerodynamic drag small compared with buoyancy. In this paper the perturbation method is used to formulate an analytical model which has been validated experimentally. The experimental test was conduced by undergraduate students of aerospace engineering at the Institute of Microgravity ‘Ignacio Da Riva’ of the Technical University of Madrid (IDR/UPM) microgravity tower. The test helped students to understand the influence of the buoyancy on the residual acceleration of the experiment platform. The objective of the students was to understand the physical process during the drop, identify the main parameters involved in the residual acceleration and determine the most suitable configuration for the next drop tower proposed to be built at UPM.

  14. Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163856.html Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50 Report ... be an estimated 95,500 new cases of colon cancer and 39,900 new cases of rectal cancer ...

  15. Digital video microscopy in the Millikan oil-drop experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kenneth J.; Mahendra, Jacquelyn C.

    2005-08-01

    We report on the ease and efficacy of using digital video microscopy techniques and computer software for analyzing data from the Millikan oil-drop experiment in an introductory physics laboratory course setting with applications for more advanced laboratories.

  16. Satellite Formation during Coalescence of Unequal Size Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2009-03-12

    The coalescence of a drop with a flat liquid surface pinches off a satellite from its top, in the well-known coalescence cascade, whereas the coalescence of two equally sized drops does not appear to leave such a satellite. Herein we perform experiments to identify the critical diameter ratio of two drops, above which a satellite is produced during their coalescence. We find that the critical parent ratio is as small as 1.55, but grows monotonically with the Ohnesorge number. The daughter size is typically about 50% of the mother drop. However, we have identified novel pinch-off dynamics close to the critical size ratio, where the satellite does not fully separate, but rather goes directly into a second stage of the coalescence cascade, thus generating a much smaller satellite droplet.

  17. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunizations Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It Language: English Español (Spanish) Format: Select one PDF [ ... eating and drinking while they are sick. Is it serious? Rotavirus can be very harmful. Diarrhea, vomiting, ...

  18. DIME Students Discuss Final Drop Tower Experiment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Students discuss fine points of their final design for the Drop Tower experiment during the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  19. Blast Mitigation Seat Analysis: Drop Tower Data Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-15

    particular seat with green or red, respectively, for the 5 th percentile female during 350 g tests . Lumbar compression is red or yellow (meaning at least...occurs, which is not common in drop tower testing unless a roof structure is installed over the seat. The 5 th percentile female was most sensitive...MODELING & SIMULATION, TESTING AND VALIDATION (MSTV) TECHNICAL SESSION AUGUST 12-14, 2014 - NOVI, MICHIGAN BLAST MITIGATION SEAT ANALYSIS – DROP TOWER

  20. Modeling evaporation of sessile drops with moving contact lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murisic, N; Kondic, L

    2008-12-01

    We consider evaporation of pure liquid drops on a thermally conductive substrate. Two commonly used evaporative models are considered: one that concentrates on the liquid phase in determining the evaporative flux and the other one that centers on the gas-vapor phase. A single governing equation for the evolution of drop thickness, including both models, is developed. We show how the derived governing equation can be used to predict which evaporation model is appropriate for different considered experimental conditions.

  1. Drop Impact on Textile Material: Effect of Fabric Properties

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of impact of water drop on a surface in a spreading regime with no splashing. Three surfaces were studied: virgin glass, coating film and woven cotton fabric at different construction parameters. All experiments were carried out using water drop with the same free fall high. Digidrop with high-resolution camera is used to measure the different parameters characterising this phenomenon. Results show an important effect of the height of the free fall on...

  2. Fiber Concrete under Temperature Drop Load with Stochastic FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Feng; ZHANG Wen-jin

    2008-01-01

    Plain concrete plate and fiber concrete plate subjected to temperature drop load were analyzed on stochastic finite element method (FEM). It is found that fibers can enhance concrete ability to resist temperature drop load for improving concrete's fracture energy and deferring the crack process. It is found for concrete not to improve apparently its tensile strength and fracture energy is recommended to be its appraisal parameter.

  3. Fundamental Studies of Jumping-Drop Thermal Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder superhydrophilic surface. ............... 2 Figure 2. Fabrication of the jumping-drop thermal diode...mode, Figure 1b), liquid water is trapped by it and no phase-change heat transfer takes place; heat mainly escapes through ineffective conduction...self- propelled jumping drops returning the working fluid from the colder superhydrophobic surface; (b) Reverse mode with liquid trapped by the colder

  4. Drop impact and wettability: From hydrophilic to superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Carlo; Amirfazli, Alidad; Marengo, Marco

    2012-10-01

    Experiments to understand the effect of surface wettability on impact characteristics of water drops onto solid dry surfaces were conducted. Various surfaces were used to cover a wide range of contact angles (advancing contact angle from 48° to 166°, and contact angle hysteresis from 5° to 56°). Several different impact conditions were analyzed (12 impact velocities on 9 different surfaces, among which 2 were superhydrophobic). Results from impact tests with millimetric drops show that two different regimes can be identified: a moderate Weber number regime (30 200), in which wettability effect is secondary, because capillary forces are overcome by inertial effects. In particular, results show the role of advancing contact angle and contact angle hysteresis as fundamental wetting parameters to allow understanding of different phases of drop spreading and beginning of recoiling. It is also shown that drop spreading on hydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces occurs with different time scales. Finally, if the surface is superhydrophobic, eventual impalement, i.e., transition from Cassie to Wenzel wetting state, which might occur in the vicinity of the drop impact area, does not influence drop maximum spreading.

  5. A measurement of a control rod drop using an LVDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Ho; Huh, Hyung; Yu, Je-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2010-03-01

    A control element drive mechanism is a reactor regulating system, which is to insert, withdraw, or maintain a control rod containing neutron-absorbing material within a reactor core to control the reactivity of the reactor. The ball-screw type CEDM for the small and medium research reactor has a spring-hydraulic damper to reduce the impact force due to the free drop of the CEDM. This paper describes the experimental results to obtain the drop characteristics of the CEDM. The tests are performed by using a full-scale structure except the control element assembly, and a drop time and displacement after an impact are measured by using an LVDT. The influences of the rod weight and the drop height on the drop behavior are also estimated on the basis of test results. In case of the longest stroke, the drop time of the control rod is within 4.5 seconds to meet the design requirement. The behavior after the impact shows a general damping motion of the spring-damper system, and the maximum displacement is measured as 15.6 mm.

  6. Wetting of sessile water drop under an external electrical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancauwenberghe, Valerie; di Marco, Paolo; Brutin, David; Amu Collaboration; Unipi Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    The enhancement of heat and mass transfer using a static electric field is an interesting process for industrial applications, due to its low energy consumption and potentially high level of evaporation rate enhancement. However, to date, this phenomenon is still not understood in the context of the evaporation of sessile drops. We previously synthesized the state of the art concerning the effect of an electric field on sessile drops with a focus on the change of contact angle and shape and the influence of the evaporation rate [1]. We present here the preliminary results of an new experiment set-up. The novelty of the set-up is the drop injection from the bottom that allows to generate safety the droplet under the electrostatic field. The evaporation at room temperature of water drops having three different volumes has been investigated under an electric field up to 10.5 kV/cm. The time evolutions of the contact angles, volumes and diameters have been analysed. As reported in the literature, the drop elongate along the direction of the electric field. Despite the hysteresis effect of the contact angle, the receding contact angle increases with the strength of the electric field. This is clearly observable for the small drops for which the gravity effect can be neglected.

  7. Drop detachment and motion on fuel cell electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Eric; Hellstern, Thomas; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Benziger, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Liquid water is pushed through flow channels of fuel cells, where one surface is a porous carbon electrode made up of carbon fibers. Water drops grow on the fibrous carbon surface in the gas flow channel. The drops adhere to the superficial fiber surfaces but exhibit little penetration into the voids between the fibers. The fibrous surfaces are hydrophobic, but there is a substantial threshold force necessary to initiate water drop motion. Once the water drops begin to move, however, the adhesive force decreases and drops move with minimal friction, similar to motion on superhydrophobic materials. We report here studies of water wetting and water drop motion on typical porous carbon materials (carbon paper and carbon cloth) employed in fuel cells. The static coefficient of friction on these textured surfaces is comparable to that for smooth Teflon. But the dynamic coefficient of friction is several orders of magnitude smaller on the textured surfaces than on smooth Teflon. Carbon cloth displays a much smaller static contact angle hysteresis than carbon paper due to its two-scale roughness. The dynamic contact angle hysteresis for carbon paper is greatly reduced compared to the static contact angle hysteresis. Enhanced dynamic hydrophobicity is suggested to result from the extent to which a dynamic contact line can track topological heterogeneities of the liquid/solid interface.

  8. New directions for gravitational wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Raymond Y

    2009-01-01

    "Millikan oil drops" are drops of superfluid helium coated with electrons, and levitated in a strong, inhomogeneous magnetic field. When the temperature of the system becomes very low compared to the cyclotron gap energy, the system remains in its quantum ground state. Two such levitated charged drops can have their charge-to-mass ratio critically adjusted so that the forces of gravity and electricity between the drops are in balance. Then it is predicted that the amount of scattered electromagnetic and gravitational radiation from the drops are equalized, along with these two kinds of forces. The cross sections for the scattering of the two kinds of radiation can become large, hard-sphere cross-sections at the first Mie resonance, due to the hard-wall boundary conditions on the surfaces of the spheres for both kinds of radiations. An efficient quantum transduction process between electromagnetic and gravitational radiation by such a pair of drops is predicted at microwave frequencies, and a Hertz-like experi...

  9. Drop formation of black liquor spraying; Mustalipeaen pisaroituminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelholm, C.J.; Kankkunen, A.; Nieminen, K.; Laine, J.; Miikkulainen, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland): Lab. of Energy Technology and Environmental Protection

    1997-10-01

    Black liquor is a spent liquor of the pulp and paper industry. It is burned in kraft recovery boilers for chemical and energy recovery. The high dry solids content and viscosity of black liquor require a high spraying temperature. This affects the performance of the boiler. Kraft recovery boiler deposit formation, emissions and chemical recovery are strongly affected by the drop size and the velocity of the black liquor spray formed by a splashplate nozzle. The sheet breakup mechanism is studied with a system based on a video and image-analysis. The drop size of mill-scale nozzles was measured also with an image-analysis-system. Measurements were carried out in a spray test chamber. The sheet breakup mechanism and drop size tests were carried out both below and over the boiling point of black liquor. Special attention was paid to the effect of flashing on drop formation. Temperature increase normally decreases drop size. In the temperature where the wavy-sheet disintegration changes to perforated-sheet disintegration the drop size increases. Spray velocity rises when the temperature is increased above the boiling point. (orig.)

  10. Strength of self-pinning in coffee drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Andrzej; Kawczinski, Kimberly; Nagel, Sidney

    The equilibrium contact angle θe of a liquid drop placed on a solid surface is uniquely determined by a balance of surface tension forces according to Young's Equation, yet is rarely observed in real systems. Due to contact angle hysteresis, liquids can make contact with a surface at any angle between the receding and advancing contact angle: θR coffee stain. For coffee θR = 0 , thus as the drop evaporates the contact line remains pinned at its initial location. This results in the majority of the coffee being deposited in a characteristic ring at the drop's original boundary. We investigate how solid particles suspended in a liquid could so strongly influence contact angle hysteresis, by measuring the receding contact angle of a drop at various times during the evaporation process. For low solute concentrations, θR slowly decreases as the drop evaporates, but remains positive. Surprisingly, we find that increasing the solute concentration results in θR = 0 and a fully pinned contact line almost immediately after the drop is deposited.

  11. [A correct understanding of preservatives in eye drops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuguo; Huang, Caihong

    2015-09-01

    Eye drops are the most commonly used preparations in ophthalmology. Preservatives are usually added in order to protect eye drops against pathogenic organisms and increase the solubility of the drugs in multi-dose containers. Ophthalmologists have paid a lot of attention to the preservatives in eye drops because they remain one of the main reasons for ocular surface damage, and even may lead to serious visual impairment in patients with inappropriate use of eye drops. However, it should be noted that the dangers of preservatives become overstated nowadays. It is necessary to completely evaluate the effects of preservatives in ophthalmic preparations, so that ophthalmologists can guide patients to correctly select eye drops containing preservatives and avoid dangerous side effects, according to their eye disease situation, state of tear function and ocular surface changes, cultural background and financial income, cost and benefit and convenience of the use of drugs, and other factors. The direction of the future development in this field is to establish the clinical guideline for use of eye drops containing preservatives, carry out continuing education courses on preservatives and develop ideal preservatives.

  12. Air cooling using a matrix of ceramic tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Zeitoun, O.; Al-Ansary, H.; Nuhait, A.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study is conducted to cool the outdoor air using a humidification technique. A wind tunnel was built with a matrix of ceramic tube test section. An outdoor air passes over the ceramic tube matrix (cross flow) where water passing through the ceramic tubes. Air temperatures and relative humidity are measured before and after the test section for several air and water speeds. Air speed is measured at different locations along the centerline of the cross section. Results show that the ambient temperature drops by about 10 °C when the relative humidity increases from 2% to 5.4%.

  13. Drop by drop backscattered signal of a 50 × 50 × 50 m3 volume: A numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to analyse the influence of individual drop positions on a backscattered radar signal. This is achieved through a numerical experiment: a 3D rain drop field generator is developed and implemented over a volume of 50 × 50 × 50 m3, and then the sum of the electromagnetic waves backscattered by its hydrometeors is computed. Finally the temporal evolution over 1 s is modelled with simplistic assumptions. For the rainfall generator, the liquid water content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help of a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. Within each 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops, located randomly uniformly according to a pre-defined drop size distribution (DSD). Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops being uniformly distributed over the entire 50 × 50 × 50 m3 volume. Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the size of a rainfall "patch", it appears that, in agreement with the theory, we retrieve an exponential distribution for potential measures on horizontal reflectivity. Much thinner dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable the reproduction of radar observations, and turbulence should be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  14. Impact of a Liquid Drop on a Granular Medium: inertia, viscosity and surface tension effects on the drop deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Nefzaoui, Elyes

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study of liquid drop impacts on a granular medium is proposed. Four fluids were used to vary physical properties: pure distilled water, water with glycerol at 2 concentrations 1:1 and 1:2 v/v and water with Tween 20 at the concentration of 0.1g/l. The drop free fall height was varied to obtain a Weber number (We) between 10 and 2000. Results showed that obtained crater morphologies highly depend on the impacting drop kinetic energy E_{K}. Different behaviours during the drop spreading, receding and absorption are highlighted as function of the fluids viscosity and surface tension. Experimental absorption times are also commented and compared with a simplified theoretical model. Drops maximal extensions and craters diameters were found to scale as $We^{1/5}$ and $E_K^{1/5}$ respectively. In both cases, found dependencies are smaller than those reported in literature: $We^{1/4}$ for drop impacts on solid or granular surfaces and $E_K^{1/4}$ for spherical solid impacts on granular media.

  15. Contraction of an air disk caught between two different liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-12-17

    When a drop impacts a pool of liquid it entraps a thin disk of air under its center. This disk contracts rapidly into a bubble to minimize surface energy. Herein we use ultra-high-speed imaging to measure the contraction speed of this disk when the drop and pool are of different liquids. For miscible liquids the contraction rate is governed by the weaker of the two surface tensions. Some undulations are observed on the edge of the disk for a water drop impacting a pool of water, but not on a pool of lower surface tension. Similar results are observed for a pair of immiscible liquids.

  16. Improving Earthquake Stress Drop Measurements - What can we Really Resolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Ruhl, C. J.; Kozlowska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake stress drop is fundamental to understanding the physics of the rupture process. Although it is superficially simple to calculate an estimate of stress drop from the corner frequency of the radiated spectrum, it is much harder to be certain that measurements are reliable and accurate. The same is true of other measurements of stress drop and radiated energy. The large number of studies of earthquake stress drop, the high variability in results (~0.1-100 MPa), the large uncertainties, and the ongoing scaling controversy are evidence for this. We investigate the resolution and uncertainties of stress drops calculated using an empirical Green's function (EGF) approach. Earthquakes in 3 sequences at Parkfield, California are recorded by multiple borehole stations and have abundant smaller earthquakes to use as EGFs (Abercrombie, 2014). The earthquakes in the largest magnitude cluster (M~2.1) exhibit clear temporal variation of stress drop. Independent studies obtained a similar pattern implying that it is resolvable for these well-recorded, simple sources. The borehole data reveal a similar temporal pattern for another sequence, not resolvable in an earlier study using surface recordings. The earthquakes in the third sequence have complex sources; corner frequency measurements for this sequence are highly variable and poorly resolved. We use the earthquakes in the first cluster to quantify the uncertainties likely to arise in less optimal settings. The limited signal bandwidth and the quality of the EGF assumption are major sources of error. Averaging across multiple stations improves the resolution, as does using multiple good EGFs (Abercrombie, 2015). We adapt the approach to apply to larger data sets. We focus on New Zealand, with the aim of resolving stress drop variability in a variety of tectonic settings. We investigate stacking over stations and multiple EGFs, and compare earthquakes (M~3-6) from both the overlying and the subducting plates.

  17. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldareili, Charles; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    removes a significant amount of the surface water. In this presentation, we report the results of measurements of the molecular packing and rates of kinetic exchange of the trisiloxane surfactants at the air/water interface in order to confirm our picture of trisiloxane packing, and provide additional insight into the superspreading process. We used the pendant bubble technique as a Langmuir trough to measure the trisiloxane equation of state which relates the tension to the surface concentration. From these measurements we obtain accurate values for the maximum packing density. We find that trisiloxanes with 4 and 8 ethoxylate groups have the same maximum packing concentration, indicating that the maximum packing is controlled by the cross section of the head group. For trisiloxanes with larger than eight ethoxylates, the maximum packing increases with ethoxylate number, indicating that the disposition of the ethoxylate chain (i.e., its effective size) is controlling. This supports our picture of superspreading: The superspreading ability of trisiloxanes decreases considerably for trisiloxanes with larger than eight ethoxylates; the packing measurements indicate that for the higher ethoxylate number trisiloxanes, the compact nonpolar head groups are pushed apart by the ethoxylate chain. They leave spaces of surface water on adsorption and do not lower the solid tension as much as their lower chain analogues. Finally the report measurements of the dynamic tension reduction accompanying the adsorption of trisiloxanes onto an initially clean interface using the pendant bubble technique, and we obtain from these relaxations, the equation of state and a mass transfer model, the rate constants for kinetic exchange. We find that the rate constants for desorption of trisiloxanes are generally much slower than for analogous aliphatic polyethoxylate surfactants with identical ethoxylate chain lengths. When an aqueous drop of a superspreader solution is placed on a hydrophobic

  18. Dynamics of Drop Formation in an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz; Basaran

    1999-05-01

    The effect of an electric field on the formation of a drop of an inviscid, perfectly conducting liquid from a capillary which protrudes from the top plate of a parallel-plate capacitor into a surrounding dynamically inactive, insulating gas is studied computationally. This free boundary problem which is comprised of the surface Bernoulli equation for the transient drop shape and the Laplace equation for the velocity potential inside the drop and the electrostatic potential outside the drop is solved by a method of lines incorporating the finite element method for spatial discretization. The finite element algorithm employed relies on judicious use of remeshing and element addition to a two-region adaptive mesh to accommodate large domain deformations, and allows the computations to proceed until the thickness of the neck connecting an about to form drop to the rest of the liquid in the capillary is less than 0.1% of the capillary radius. The accuracy of the computations is demonstrated by showing that in the absence of an electric field predictions made with the new algorithm are in excellent agreement with boundary integral calculations (Schulkes, R. M. S. M. J. Fluid Mech. 278, 83 (1994)) and experimental measurements on water drops (Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. Phys. Fluids 7(6), 1184 (1995)). In the presence of an electric field, the algorithm predicts that as the strength of the applied field increases, the mode of drop formation changes from simple dripping to jetting to so-called microdripping, in accordance with experimental observations (Cloupeau, M., and Prunet-Foch, B. J. Aerosol Sci. 25(6), 1021 (1994); Zhang, X., and Basaran, O. A. J. Fluid Mech. 326, 239 (1996)). Computational predictions of the primary drop volume and drop length at breakup are reported over a wide range of values of the ratios of electrical, gravitational, and inertial forces to surface tension force. In contrast to previously mentioned cases where both the flow rate in the tube

  19. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ad de Groof

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained enigmatic. By using a next-generation virus discovery technique, VIDISCA-454, sequences of an unknown virus were detected in serum of diseased fish. The near complete genome sequence of the virus was determined, which shows a unique genome organization, and low levels of identity to known members of the Iridoviridae. Based on homology of a series of putatively encoded proteins, the virus is a novel member of the Megalocytivirus genus of the Iridoviridae family. The virus was isolated and propagated in cell culture, where it caused a cytopathogenic effect in infected Asian seabass kidney and brain cells. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral virions of about 140 nm, characteristic for the Iridoviridae. In vitro cultured virus induced scale drop syndrome in Asian seabass in vivo and the virus could be reisolated from these infected fish. These findings show that the virus is the causative agent for the scale drop syndrome, as each of Koch's postulates is fulfilled. We have named the virus Scale Drop Disease Virus. Vaccines prepared from BEI- and formalin inactivated virus, as well as from E. coli produced major capsid protein provide efficacious protection against scale drop disease.

  20. Clinical utility of voriconazole eye drops in ophthalmic fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoud Al-Badriyeh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Daoud Al-Badriyeh, Chin Fen Neoh, Kay Stewart, David CM KongCentre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Fungal keratitis is one of the major causes of ophthalmic mycosis and is difficult to treat. The range of common antifungal agents available for fungal keratitis remains inadequate and is generally associated with poor clinical outcomes. Voriconazole is a new generation triazole antifungal agent. Only marketed in systemic formulation and, with broad-spectrum activity and high intraocular penetration, voriconazole has demonstrated effectiveness against fungal keratitis. Systemic voriconazole, however, is not without side effects and is costly. Voriconazole eye drops have been prepared extemporaneously and used for the treatment of ophthalmic fungal keratitis. The current article sought to review the literature for evidence related to the effectiveness and safety of topical voriconazole and its corneal penetration into the aqueous humor of the eye. The voriconazole eye drops used are typically of 1% concentration, well tolerated by the eye, and are stable. Despite existing evidence to suggest that the eye drops are effective in the treatment of fungal keratitis, more studies are needed, especially in relation to using the eye drops as first-line and stand-alone treatment, preparation of higher concentrations, and optimal dosing frequency.Keywords: voriconazole, fungal keratitis, eye drops, corneal penetration

  1. Experimental study of drop impacts on soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawar, Ali; Basu, Saikat; Concha, Andres; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Impinging drops on flowing and static soap films demonstrate at least three distinct types of impact regimes: (a) the drop bounces off the film surface, (b) it coalesces with the downstream flow for a moving film and for static films it gets assimilated within the film, and (c) it pierces through the film. The interaction presents a unique opportunity to explore the impact of a quasi one-dimensional object on a two-dimensional fluid, much like a comet impacting on a thin atmosphere. We present a detailed experimental study of droplet impacts on soap film flow, for a number of film inclination angles and falling heights of the drop. Imaging techniques employed include sodium lamp interferometry to measure film thickness fluctuations and particle tracking velocimetry to measure the velocity field. Film thickness measures approximately 10 microns and the drop diameter is 1 mm. We mostly observe the bouncing-off regime for smaller inclination angles. However, at higher impact angles, puncturing of the film becomes a more common occurrence. We show that when the drop bounces off the film, there is a momentum transfer leading to vortex dipole shedding, along with the generation of capillary waves; an impulsive regime that may share correspondence with the locomotion of water striders.

  2. Perturbation solution of the shape of a nonaxisymmetric sessile drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Bharadwaj; Panchagnula, Mahesh; Subramanian, Venkat R; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2010-07-06

    We develop an approximate analytical solution for the shape of a nonaxisymmetric sessile drop using regular perturbation methods and ignoring gravity. We assume that the pinned, contorted triple-line shape is known and is a small perturbation of the circular footprint of a spherical cap. We obtain an analytical solution using regular perturbation methods that we validate by comparing to the numerical solution of the Young-Laplace equation obtained using publicly available Surface Evolver software. In this process, we also show that the pressure inside the perturbed drop is unchanged and relate this to the curvature of the drop using the Young-Laplace equation. The rms error between the perturbation and Evolver solutions is calculated for a range of contact angles and amplitudes of triple-line perturbations. We show that the perturbation solution matches the numerical results well for a wide range of contact angles. In addition, we calculate the extent to which the drop surface is affected by triple-line contortions. We discuss the applicability of this solution to the possibility of real time hybrid experimental/computational characterization of the 3D sessile drop shapes, including obtaining local contact angle information.

  3. The Millikan oil-drop experiment: Making it worthwhile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ray C.

    1995-11-01

    Improvements to the Millikan oil drop experiment as it is performed in teaching laboratories are described. Enhancement of the optics in the oil-drop apparatus greatly improves the visibility of the drops. Accurate timing of their motion becomes possible since they are now bright and sharply focused. With improved timing, the parameters such as microscope calibration and plate separation can become the principal sources of experimental error. Methods are described to accurately determine these experimental parameters. The workload for the experimenter is greatly reduced by using a computer to: act as a smart stopwatch, calculate the drop charge in real time, perform the statistics, and make records of the experiment. The convenience and speed offered by the computer, coupled with improved optics, relieves the eyestrain, fatigue, and frustration usually associated with this experiment. Nye's watch oil was used in this study. A return to Millikan's original iteration method for the correction to Stokes' law lowers the calculated charge for small drops by about 2%. With these improvements the calculated charges are sufficiently accurate that guesswork as to the multiplicity of their charge is essentially eliminated. A student typically obtains the value of the electronic charge accurate to about 1% with 1 h of experimentation. Student and instructor satisfaction are much improved.

  4. Vortex Ring generation during drop impact into a shallow pool

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkens, Andreas; van Heijst, GertJan

    2013-01-01

    When a drop falls from a moderate height into a shallow fluid pool whose depth is of the order of the drop-radius two pairs of vortex rings are generated. The inner pair forms at the edge of the crater created by the impacting drop while the outer pair is laid off from the spreading wave. One ring of each of these pairs is short-lived while the other persists. Each of the rings has a measureable non-zero circulation (whose sign, however, is opposite to that of the well-known deep-water drop vortex rings) which persists long after the wave has receded. Furthermore under certain conditions they develop instabilities typical to ring vortices. Although the rings are well reproducible, aspects of their later development are very sensitive to changes in some of the experimental parameters. This paper reports on experiments distinguishing reproducible aspects of these drop- generated rings and documenting their dependence on material and geometrical parameters.

  5. He II heat transfer through random packed spheres: Pressure drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlaan, M. H.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2014-09-01

    Heat flow induced pressure drop through superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. In this experiment, heat was applied to one side of a He II column containing a random pack of uniform size polyethylene spheres. Measured results include steady state pressure drops across the random packs of spheres (nominally 35 μm, 49 μm, and 98 μm diameter) for different heat inputs. Laminar, turbulent, and transition fluid flow regimes are examined. The laminar permeability and equivalent channel shape factor are compared to our past studies of the temperature drop through He II in the same porous media of packed spheres. Results from the pressure drop experiments are more accurate than temperature drop experiments due to reduced measurement errors achieved with the pressure transducer. Turbulent results are fitted to models with empirically derived friction factors. A turbulent model considering only dynamic pressure losses in the normal fluid yields the most consistent friction factors. The addition of the laminar and turbulent heat flow equations into a unifying prediction fits all regimes to within 10%.

  6. In situ built-up air collector with glass cover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Finn Harken; Engelmark, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    as an absorber. Efficiency and aair pressure drop were measured. The efficiency of the two air solar collectors was almost similar and at the same level as other corresponding air solar collectors. The air pressure drop was somewhat larger in the case of the solar collector where the air flows behind...... with a cover of glass where the horizontal joints were made by means of different methods and materials. As a general principle a water-damming border at the horizontal glass joints was avoided. The test box was built as a solar collector with 14 different horizontal joints between the glasses. The box...... the absorber. This is due to the narrower air gap behind the absorber. Condensation has been observed in both the solar collectors, this has not been investigated more explicitly,...

  7. Syracuse University Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Z; Zhang, J S

    2010-09-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in{sup 3} (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft{sup 3} (24.1 m{sup 3}). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can at a height of 8 feet from the bottom of the can to the impacting surface. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 μm and 20

  8. Influence of the outlet air temperature on the thermohydraulic behaviour of air coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Emila M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the optimal process conditions for the operation of air coolers demands a detailed analysis of their thermohydraulic behaviour on the one hand, and the estimation of the operating costs, on the other. One of the main parameters of the thermohydraulic behaviour of this type of equipment, is the outlet air temperature. The influence of the outlet air temperature on the performance of air coolers (heat transfer coefficient overall heat transfer coefficient, required surface area for heat transfer air-side pressure drop, fan power consumption and sound pressure level was investigated in this study. All the computations, using AirCooler software [1], were applied to cooling of the process fluid and the condensation of a multicomponent vapour mixture on two industrial devices of known geometries.

  9. Research of the Temperature and Humidity Processes in the Air Conditioning Apparatus Varying Air Ion Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko V. G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To create comfortable conveniences for people in the room, we have to process the indoor air in the AC apparatus. Depending on given air parameters in the room, the air processing comprises the next steps: heating, cooling, wetting, drying. Except the compliance of the temperature and humidity parameters of air, we must control its ionic composition. Thereby, the experimental analysis of the air preparing in the AC apparatus is given in this article. Thank to that analysis, we can estimate the ionic and deionic impact on the air space in the specific processes of the air preparing. According to the results of experiments, we have identified, that the air temperature varying does not have significant effect on the ionic concentration. The ionic increasing after electric heater is not associated with air temperature. It is the consequence of the electron extrication from the surface of the heating element. Reducing ion moving the high air humidity decreases the concentration of the lightweight ions. The increasing of the ions in the spray-type air washers is explained by ballo-electric effect of spraying water drops, but not the air humidity rising.

  10. Selection of the air heat exchanger operating in a gas turbine air bottoming cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielniak, Tadeusz; Czaja, Daniel; Lepszy, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    A gas turbine air bottoming cycle consists of a gas turbine unit and the air turbine part. The air part includes a compressor, air expander and air heat exchanger. The air heat exchanger couples the gas turbine to the air cycle. Due to the low specific heat of air and of the gas turbine exhaust gases, the air heat exchanger features a considerable size. The bigger the air heat exchanger, the higher its effectiveness, which results in the improvement of the efficiency of the gas turbine air bottoming cycle. On the other hand, a device with large dimensions weighs more, which may limit its use in specific locations, such as oil platforms. The thermodynamic calculations of the air heat exchanger and a preliminary selection of the device are presented. The installation used in the calculation process is a plate heat exchanger, which is characterized by a smaller size and lower values of the pressure drop compared to the shell and tube heat exchanger. Structurally, this type of the heat exchanger is quite similar to the gas turbine regenerator. The method on which the calculation procedure may be based for real installations is also presented, which have to satisfy the economic criteria of financial profitability and cost-effectiveness apart from the thermodynamic criteria.

  11. Colloidal assembly in Leidenfrost drops for noniridescent structural color pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Che Ho; Kang, Hyelim; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-07-22

    Noniridescent structural color pigments have great potential as alternatives to conventional chemical color pigments in many coloration applications due to their nonbleaching and color-tunable properties. In this work, we report a novel method to create photonic microgranules composed of glassy packing of silica particles and small fraction of carbon black nanoparticles, which show pronounced structural colors with low angle-dependency. To prepare isotropic random packing in each microgranule, a Leidenfrost drop, which is a drop levitated by its own vapor on a hot surface, is employed as a template for fast consolidation of silica particles. The drop randomly migrates over the hot surface and rapidly shrinks, while maintaining its spherical shape, thereby consolidating silica particles to granular structures. Carbon black nanoparticles incorporated in the microgranules suppress incoherent multiple scattering, thereby providing improved color contrast. Therefore, photonic microgranules in a full visible range can be prepared by adjusting the size of silica particles with insignificant whitening.

  12. Hemolymph drop impact outcomes on surfaces with varying wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milionis, Athanasios; Ghokulla Krishnan, K.; Loth, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Insect fouling from coagulated hemolymph and exoskeleton parts is a major challenge in the aerospace industry for the next generation of aerodynamic surfaces, which will employ laminar flow that requires extremely smooth surfaces. However, the wetting physics and dynamics of hemolymph (insect blood) on surfaces are not well understood. The present study seeks to gain a fundamental insight on the effect of surface wetting characteristics and dynamics resulting from a hemolymph drop impact, the first such study. In particular, hemolymph drops extracted from Acheta domesticus were dispensed from a range of heights to vary the kinetic impact on surfaces, which had widely varying water wetting behavior (from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic). The impact dynamics were investigated with high-speed imaging while the dried residues were studied with optical microscopy. It was found that a superhydrophobic surface (based on thermoplastic with silica nano-particles) was able to significantly reduce hemolymph drop spreading, and even provide complete rebound when impacting on inclined surfaces.

  13. Meso-scale controlled motion for a microfluidic drop ejector.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Givler, Richard C.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Czaplewski, David A.; Luck, David L.; Braithwaite, Mark J.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Benavides, Gilbert Lawrence

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop a uniquely capable, novel droplet solution based manufacturing system built around a new MEMS drop ejector. The development all the working subsystems required was completed, leaving the integration of these subsystems into a working prototype still left to accomplish. This LDRD report will focus on the three main subsystems: (1) MEMS drop ejector--the MEMS ''sideshooter'' effectively ejected 0.25 pl drops at 10 m/s, (2) packaging--a compact ejector package based on a modified EMDIP (Electro-Microfluidic Dual In-line Package--SAND2002-1941) was fabricated, and (3) a vision/stage system allowing precise ejector package positioning in 3 dimensions above a target was developed.

  14. Green chemistry and nanofabrication in a levitated Leidenfrost drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Disci-Zayed, Duygu; Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Zillohu, Ahnaf Usman; Erkartal, Burak; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Duppel, Viola; Kienle, Lorenz; Elbahri, Mady

    2013-01-01

    Green nanotechnology focuses on the development of new and sustainable methods of creating nanoparticles, their localized assembly and integration into useful systems and devices in a cost-effective, simple and eco-friendly manner. Here we present our experimental findings on the use of the Leidenfrost drop as an overheated and charged green chemical reactor. Employing a droplet of aqueous solution on hot substrates, this method is capable of fabricating nanoparticles, creating nanoscale coatings on complex objects and designing porous metal in suspension and foam form, all in a levitated Leidenfrost drop. As examples of the potential applications of the Leidenfrost drop, fabrication of nanoporous black gold as a plasmonic wideband superabsorber, and synthesis of superhydrophilic and thermal resistive metal-polymer hybrid foams are demonstrated. We believe that the presented nanofabrication method may be a promising strategy towards the sustainable production of functional nanomaterials.

  15. Surface tension of molten tin investigated with sessile drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; YUAN Zhang-fu; FAN Jian-feng; KE Jia-jun

    2005-01-01

    The surface tension of molten tin was determined by a set of self-developed digital equipment with sessile drop method at oxygen partial pressure of 1.0 × 10-6 MPa under different temperatures, and the dependence of surface tension of molten tin on temperature was also discussed. The emphasis was placed on the comparison of surface tension of the same molten tin sample measured by using different equipments with sessile drop method. Results of the comparison indicate that the measurement results with sessile drop method under the approximate experimental conditions are coincident, and the self-developed digital equipment for surface tension measurement has higher stability and accuracy. The relationships of surface tension of molten tin and its temperature coefficient with temperature and oxygen partial pressure were also elucidated from the thermodynamic equilibrium analysis.

  16. Collecting responses through Web page drag and drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, M Anne; Gabrys, Gareth

    2004-02-01

    This article describes how to collect responses from experimental participants using drag and drop on a Web page. In particular, we describe how drag and drop can be used in a text search task in which participants read a text and then locate and categorize certain elements of the text (e.g., to identify the main claim of a persuasive paragraph). Using this technique, participants respond by clicking on a text segment and dragging it to a screen field or icon. We have successfully used this technique in both the argument element identification experiment that we describe here and a tutoring system that we created to teach students to identify source characteristics while reading historical texts (Britt, Perfetti, Van Dyke, & Gabrys, 2000). The implementation described here exploits the capability of recent versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer Web browser to handle embedded XML documents and drag and drop events.

  17. Drops subjected to surface acoustic waves: flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Bou Matar, Olivier; Dynamique Des Systèmes Hors Equilibre Team; Aiman-Films Team

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves of frequency beyond the MHz are known to induce streaming flow in fluids that can be suitable to perform elementary operations in microfluidics systems. One of the currently appealing geometry is that of a sessile drop subjected to surface acoustic waves (SAW). Such Rayleigh waves produce non-trival actuation in the drop leading to internal flow, drop displacement, free-surface oscillations and atomization. We recently carried out experiments and numerical simulations that allowed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms that couple acoustic propagation and fluid actuation. We varied the frequency and amplitude of actuation, as well as the properties of the fluid, and we measured the effects of these parameters on the dynamics of the flow. We compared these results to finite-elements numerical simulations.

  18. Spray characterization during vibration-induced drop atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2004-02-01

    Vibration-induced drop atomization is a process of rapid droplet ejection from a larger liquid drop. This occurs when a liquid drop resting on a thin diaphragm is vibrated under the appropriate forcing conditions using an attached piezoelectric actuator. The resulting spray of small droplets is characterized in this work using high-speed imaging and particle-tracking techniques. The results show that the average spatial and velocity distributions of the spray droplets are fairly axisymmetric during all stages of the atomization. The mean diameter of the droplets depends on the forcing frequency to the -2/3 power. The ejection velocity of the spray droplets depends on both the magnitude and the rate of change of the forcing amplitude. Thus, controlling the characteristics of the forcing signal may lead to strategies for controlling the spray process in specific applications.

  19. Green chemistry and nanofabrication in a levitated Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Disci-Zayed, Duygu; Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Zillohu, Ahnaf Usman; Erkartal, Burak; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Duppel, Viola; Kienle, Lorenz; Elbahri, Mady

    2013-10-01

    Green nanotechnology focuses on the development of new and sustainable methods of creating nanoparticles, their localized assembly and integration into useful systems and devices in a cost-effective, simple and eco-friendly manner. Here we present our experimental findings on the use of the Leidenfrost drop as an overheated and charged green chemical reactor. Employing a droplet of aqueous solution on hot substrates, this method is capable of fabricating nanoparticles, creating nanoscale coatings on complex objects and designing porous metal in suspension and foam form, all in a levitated Leidenfrost drop. As examples of the potential applications of the Leidenfrost drop, fabrication of nanoporous black gold as a plasmonic wideband superabsorber, and synthesis of superhydrophilic and thermal resistive metal-polymer hybrid foams are demonstrated. We believe that the presented nanofabrication method may be a promising strategy towards the sustainable production of functional nanomaterials.

  20. Drops transformed from a continuous flow on a superhydrophobic incline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katariya, Mayur; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2013-08-01

    Biochemical analysis with discrete drops on superhydrophobic surfaces will benefit from low loss, low contamination and open access features, but is challenged by the ability to generate them. A simple approach for delivering the drops from a continuous flow through an inclined superhydrophobic surface here showed the rear pinning contact line to be strongly influential in retention, providing potential for volume control, yet without any lossy daughter droplet formation. At a high flowrate regime prior to jetting, the liquid body was found to develop a grown out section that was able to flip up and down to be airborne, depending on the gravitational effect. While the section was airborne, the drop was able to increase its volume without the action of the three-phase mechanics dictating detachment.

  1. Estimation of pressure drop in gasket plate heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neagu Anisoara Arleziana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present comparatively different methods of pressure drop calculation in the gasket plate heat exchangers (PHEs, using correlations recommended in literature on industrial data collected from a vegetable oil refinery. The goal of this study was to compare the results obtained with these correlations, in order to choose one or two for practical purpose of pumping power calculations. We concluded that pressure drop values calculated with Mulley relationship and Buonopane & Troupe correlation were close and also Bond’s equation gave results pretty close to these but the pressure drop is slightly underestimated. Kumar correlation gave results far from all the others and its application will lead to oversize. In conclusion, for further calculations we will chose either the Mulley relationship or the Buonopane & Troupe correlation.

  2. Interfacial Dynamics of Thin Viscoelastic Films and Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Barra, Valeria; Kondic, Lou

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational investigation of thin viscoelastic films and drops on a solid substrate subject to the van der Waals interaction force. The governing equations are obtained within a long-wave approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations with Jeffreys model for viscoelastic stresses. We investigate the effects of viscoelasticity, Newtonian viscosity, and the substrate slippage on the dynamics of thin viscoelastic films. We also study the effects of viscoelasticity on drops that spread or recede on a prewetted substrate. For dewetting films, the numerical results show the presence of multiple secondary droplets for higher values of elasticity, consistently with experimental findings. For drops, we find that elastic effects lead to deviations from the Cox-Voinov law for partially wetting fluids. In general, elastic effects enhance spreading, and suppress retraction, compared to Newtonian ones.

  3. Clinical utility of caspofungin eye drops in fungal keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neoh, Chin Fen; Daniell, Mark; Chen, Sharon C-A; Stewart, Kay; Kong, David C M

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of fungal keratitis remains challenging. To date, only the polyenes and azoles are commonly used topically in the management of fungal keratitis. Natamycin, a polyene, is the only antifungal eye drop that is commercially available; the remainder are prepared in-house and are used in an 'off-label' manner. Failure of medical treatment for fungal keratitis is common, hence there is a need for more effective topical antifungal therapy. To increase the antifungal eye drop armamentarium, it is important to investigate the utility of other classes of antifungal agents for topical use. Caspofungin, an echinocandin antifungal agent, could potentially be used to address the existing shortcomings. However, little is known about the usefulness of topically administered caspofungin. This review will briefly explore the incidence, epidemiology and antifungal treatment of fungal keratitis. It will focus primarily on evidence related to the efficacy, safety and practicality of using caspofungin eye drops in fungal keratitis.

  4. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  5. Investigating Call Drops with Field Measurements on Commercial Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messina, Alessandro; Caragea, Gabriel; Compta, Pol Torres

    2013-01-01

    can be done per day. In this paper we present a new methodology to investigate call drops by using mobile phones to do the measurements following the concept of citizen sensing. Therefore, a mobile application for Android is made that collects all necessary data and dumps the measurement results......One of the biggest problems nowadays for network operators are occurring call drops. This problem has been increasing in the last years specially since the advent of 3G. The investigation in the operator's network is very time intensive and due to the highly priced hardware only a few measurements...... in a centralized database where the measurements are evaluated and represented on Google Maps. With a post analysis of the measurements, a classification of the call drops results is made. The collected data is also used to show some statistics related to the battery level and the received signal strength between...

  6. Experimental Research on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of Two Configurations of Pin Finned—Tubes in an In—line Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShouGuangYao; DeShuZhu

    1994-01-01

    In this paper,a local simulation method is employed to investigate the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of two configurations of pin finned tubes deployed in an in-line array,In this research,heat pipes are adopted as heating elements.Therefore,the experimental equipment becomes simple and has an advantage of sufficient reducibility.The air-side heat transfer and pressure drop correlations for each type of pin fin surface including the effect of the tube-row number are obtained in the Reynolds number range commonly encountered in engineering.These correlations may be used in the design of pin finned tube heat exchangers.

  7. Progress on Concepts for Next-Generation Drop Tower Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM about 100 scientists, engineers, and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important research center for space sciences and technologies in Europe. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM's ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10-6 g (microgravity), which is one of the best achievable for ground-based flight opportunities. Scientists may choose up to three times a day between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and an experiment in ZARM's worldwide unique catapult system with 9.3 s in weightlessness. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 7500 drops or catapult launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like fundamental physics, combustion, fluid dynamics, planetary formation / astrophysics, biology and materials sciences have been accomplished so far. In addition, more and more technology tests have been conducted under microgravity conditions at the Bremen Drop Tower in order to effectively prepare appropriate space missions in advance. In this paper we report on the progress on concepts for next-generation drop tower systems based on the GraviTower idea utilizing a guided electro-magnetic linear drive. Alternative concepts motivated by the scientific demand for higher

  8. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-02-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  9. Changes in biomechanical properties during drop jumps of incremental height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsien-Te

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changing biomechanical properties with increasing drop jump height. Sixteen physically active college students participated in this study and performed drop jumps from heights of 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 cm (DJ20-DJ60). Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using 11 Eagle cameras and 2 force platforms. Data pertaining to the dominant leg for each of 3 trials for each drop height were recorded and analyzed. Statistical comparisons of vertical ground reaction force (vGRF), impulse, moment, power, work, and stiffness were made between different drop jump heights. The peak vGRF of the dominant leg exceeded 3 times the body weight during DJ50 and DJ60; these values were significantly greater than those for DJ20, DJ30, and DJ40 (all p height jumped during DJ60 was significantly less than that during DJ20 and DJ30 (both p = 0.010). Both the landing impulse and total impulse during the contact phase were significantly different between each drop height (all p height. There were no significant differences in the takeoff impulse. Peak and mean power absorption and negative work at the knee and ankle joints during DJ40, DJ50, and DJ60 were significantly greater than those during DJ20 and DJ30 (all p heights >40 cm offered no advantages in terms of mechanical efficiency (SSC power output) and stiffness. Drop jumps from heights in excess of 60 cm are not recommended because of the lack of biomechanical efficiency and the potentially increased risk of injury.

  10. Contact angles of liquid drops on super hydrophobic surfaces: understanding the role of flattening of drops by gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2010-11-16

    Measurement of contact angles on super hydrophobic surfaces by conventional methods can produce ambiguous results. Experimental difficulties in constructing tangent lines, gravitational distortion or erroneous assumptions regarding the extent of spreading can lead to underestimation of contact angles. Three models were used to estimate drop shape and perceived contact angles on completely nonwetting super hydrophobic surfaces. One of the models employed the classic numerical solutions from Bashforth and Adams. Additionally, two approximate models were derived as part of this work. All three showed significant distortion of microliter-sized drops and similar trends in perceived contact angles. Liquid drops of several microliters are traditionally used in sessile contact angle measurements. Drops of this size are expected to and indeed undergo significant flattening on super hydrophobic surfaces, even if the wetting interactions are minimal. The distortion is more pronounced if the liquid has a lesser surface tension or greater density. For surfaces that are completely nonwetting, underestimation of contact angles can be tens of degrees. Our modeling efforts suggest that accurate contact angle measurements on super hydrophobic surfaces would require very small sessile drops, on the order of hundreds of picoliters.

  11. Frozen impacted drop: From fragmentation to hierarchical crack patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the quenching of a liquid pancake, obtained through the impact of a water drop on a cold solid substrate ($0$ to $-60^\\circ$C). We show that, below a certain substrate temperature, fractures appear on the frozen pancake and the crack patterns change from a 2D fragmentation regime to a hierarchical fracture regime as the thermal shock is stronger. The different regimes are discussed and the transition temperatures are estimated through classical fracture scaling arguments. Finally, a phase diagram presents how these regimes can be controlled by the drop impact parameters.

  12. Analysis of drop deformation dynamics in turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie Nachtigall; Daniel Zedel; Matthias Kraume

    2016-01-01

    Drop breakage and coalescence influence the particle formation in liquid–liquid dispersions. In order to reduce the influencing factors of the whole dispersion process, single drops where coalescence processes can be neglected were analyzed in this work. Drops passing the turbulent vicinity of a single stirrer blade were investi-gated by high-speed imaging. In order to gain a statistical y relevant amount of drops passing the area of interest and corresponding breakage events, at least 1600 droplets were considered for each parameter set of this work. A specially developed fully automatic image analysis based on Matlab® was used for the evaluation of the resulting high amount of image data. This al owed the elimination of the time-consuming manual analysis and further-more, al owed the objective evaluation of the drops' behavior. Different deformation parameters were consid-ered in order to describe the drop deformation dynamics properly. Regarding the ratio of both main particle axes (θaxes), which was therefore approximated through an el ipse, al owed the determination of very small de-viations from the spherical shape. The perimeter of the particle (θperi) was used for the description of highly de-formed shapes. In this work the results of a higher viscosity paraffin oil (ηd=127 mPa·s) and a low viscosity solvent (petroleum,ηd=1.7 mPa·s) are presented with and without the addition of SDS to the continuous water phase. All results show that the experimental y determined oscil ation but also deformation times underlie a wide spreading. Drop deformations significantly increased not only with increasing droplet viscosity, but also with decreasing interfacial tension. Highly deformed particles of one droplet species were more likely to break than more or less spherical particles. As droplet fragmentation results from a variety of different macro-scale de-formed particles, it is not assumed that a critical deformation value must be reached for the

  13. Drop formation by thermal fluctuations at an ultralow surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, Y; Aarts, D G A L; van der Wiel, J H; Wegdam, G; Eggers, J; Lekkerkerker, H N W; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-12-15

    We present experimental evidence that drop breakup is caused by thermal noise in a system with a surface tension that is more than 10(6) times smaller than that of water. We observe that at very small scales classical hydrodynamics breaks down and the characteristic signatures of pinch-off due to thermal noise are observed. Surprisingly, the noise makes the drop size distribution more uniform, by suppressing the formation of satellite droplets of the smallest sizes. The crossover between deterministic hydrodynamic motion and stochastic thermally driven motion has repercussions for our understanding of small-scale hydrodynamics, important in many problems such as micro- or nanofluidics and interfacial singularities.

  14. A liquid drop model for embedded atom method cluster energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, C. W.; Abel, P. B.; Ferrante, J.

    1996-01-01

    Minimum energy configurations for homonuclear clusters containing from two to twenty-two atoms of six metals, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt have been calculated using the Embedded Atom Method (EAM). The average energy per atom as a function of cluster size has been fit to a liquid drop model, giving estimates of the surface and curvature energies. The liquid drop model gives a good representation of the relationship between average energy and cluster size. As a test the resulting surface energies are compared to EAM surface energy calculations for various low-index crystal faces with reasonable agreement.

  15. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova Evgenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  16. Drop Size Dependence of the Contact Angle of Nanodroplets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-Kai; FANG Hai-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The contact angle of nanosized non-polarized argon sessile droplets on a solid substrate is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations.It is found that the drop size dependence of the contact angle is sensitive to the interaction between the liquid molecules and solid molecules.The contact angle decreases with the decreasing drop size for larger interaction between the liquid molecules and the solid substrate, and vice versa.This observation is consistent with most of the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  17. Drops and bubbles in contact with solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The third volume in a series dedicated to colloids and interfaces, Drops and Bubbles in Contact with Solid Surfaces presents an up-to-date overview of the fundamentals and applications of drops and bubbles and their interaction with solid surfaces. The chapters cover the theoretical and experimental aspects of wetting and wettability, liquid-solid interfacial properties, and spreading dynamics on different surfaces, including a special section on polymers. The book examines issues related to interpretation of contact angle from nano to macro systems. Expert contributors discuss interesting pec

  18. Medium carbon vanadium micro alloyed steels for drop forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1992-12-31

    Growing competitiveness of alternative manufacturing routes requires cost minimization in the production of drop forged components. The authors analyse the potential of medium carbon, vanadium microalloyed steels for drop forging. Laboratory and industrial experiments have been carried out emphasizing deformation and temperature cycles, strain rates and dwell times showing a typical processing path, associated mechanical properties and corresponding microstructures. The steels the required levels of mechanical properties on cooling after forging, eliminating subsequent heat treatment. The machinability of V-microalloyed steels is also improved when compared with plain medium carbon steels. (author) 17 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Egg Drop Competition Involving Only Toothpicks and Glue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Stephen

    2004-04-01

    The Winston Science Egg Drop Competition is held annually in November, one of a large group of science competitions organized by Lehman Marks of the Winston School in Dallas, TX. The rules for the competition state that the egg package may be constructed of toothpicks and glue only, with a mass limit of 50 g, not including the egg. Once the egg is placed inside the package, it is dropped from a height of 8 m. The winning entry is the one that makes impact in the least amount of time while still protecting the egg. Timing is electronic.

  20. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Feoktistov, Dmitriy; Kuznetsov, Geniy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  1. Observer-based H∞ control over packet dropping networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new controller design problem of networked control systems with packet dropping is proposed. Depending on the place that the observer is put in the system, the network control systems with packet dropping are modeled as stochastic systems with the random variables satisfying the Bernoulli random binary distribution. The observer-based controller is designed to stabilize the networked system in the sense of mean square, and the prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level is achieved. The controller design problem is formulated as the feasibility of the convex optimization problem, which can be solved by a linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  2. Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Short Range Air Drop Target System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    surrounding areas. 3.10.2 Range of Conditions The ROI could include a wide range of landcover types, from desert, to forest, to tundra, to coastal areas...relatively flat areas adjoining inland and coastal waters, including flood-prone areas of offshore islands, and encompassing (at a minimum) areas subject...two general types of floodplains: riverine and coastal . Riverine floodplains are valley areas adjacent to streams and rivers that are subject to

  3. Effect of substrate temperature on pattern formation of nanoparticles from volatile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Maryam; Harmand, Souad; Sefiane, Khellil; Bigerelle, Maxence; Deltombe, Raphaël

    2015-03-24

    This study investigates pattern formation during evaporation of water-based nanofluid sessile droplets placed on a smooth silicon surface at various temperatures. An infrared thermography technique was employed to observe the temperature distribution along the air-liquid interface of evaporating droplets. In addition, an optical interferometry technique is used to quantify and characterize the deposited patterns. Depending on the substrate temperature, three distinctive deposition patterns are observed: a nearly uniform coverage pattern, a "dual-ring" pattern, and multiple rings corresponding to "stick-slip" pattern. At all substrate temperatures, the internal flow within the drop builds a ringlike cluster of the solute on the top region of drying droplets, which is found essential for the formation of the secondary ring deposition onto the substrate for the deposits with the "dual-ring" pattern. The size of the secondary ring is found to be dependent on the substrate temperature. For the deposits with the rather uniform coverage pattern, the ringlike cluster of the solute does not deposit as a distinct secondary ring; instead, it is deformed by the contact line depinning. In the case of the "stick-slip" pattern, the internal flow behavior is complex and found to be vigorous with rapid circulating flow which appears near the edge of the drop.

  4. Determination of slug permeability factor for pressure drop prediction of slug flow pneumatic conveying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengming Tan; Kenneth C.Williams; Mark G.Jones; Tobias Krull

    2008-01-01

    Current models for pressure drop prediction of slug flow pneumatic conveying in a horizontal pipeline system assume some type of steady state conditions for prediction,which limits their capability for increased predictive accuracy relative to experimental data.This is partly because of the nature of slug flow pneumatic conveying system,which,as a dynamic system,never becomes stable.By utilising conservation of mass (airflow),a dynamic pressure analysis model is proposed on the basis of the derivative of the upstream pressure behaviour.The rate of air permeation through slug,one of the important factors in the conservation model,is expressed as a function of a slug permeability factor.Other factors such as slug velocity,slug length and the fraction of stationary layer were also considered.Several test materials were conveyed in single-slug tests to verify the proposed pressure drop model,showing good agreement between the model and experimental results.

  5. Drop Fragmentation at Impact onto a Bath of an Immiscible Liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, C.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of a drop onto a deep bath of an immiscible liquid is studied with emphasis on the drop fragmentation into a collection of noncoalescing daughter drops. At impact the drop flattens and spreads at the surface of the crater it transiently opens in the bath and reaches a maximum deformation,

  6. Comparison of the lateral retention forces on sessile and pendant water drops on a solid surface

    OpenAIRE

    de la Madrid, Rafael; Whitehead, Taylor; Irwin, George

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple experiment that demonstrates how a water drop hanging from a Plexiglas surface (pendant drop) experiences a lateral retention force that is comparable to, and in some cases larger than, the lateral retention force on a drop resting on top of the surface (sessile drop). The experiment also affords a simple demonstration of the Coriolis effect in two dimensions.

  7. Comparison of the lateral retention forces on sessile and pendant water drops on a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Madrid, Rafael; Whitehead, Taylor; Irwin, George M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple experiment that demonstrates how a water drop hanging from a Plexiglas surface (pendant drop) experiences a lateral retention force that is comparable to, and in some cases larger than, the lateral retention force on a drop resting on top of the surface (sessile drop). The experiment also affords a simple demonstration of the Coriolis effect in two dimensions.

  8. Interactions between two in-line drops rising in pure glycerin☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Rao; Zhengming Gao; Ziqi Cai; Yuyun Bao

    2016-01-01

    The behaviors of time-dependent interaction between two buoyancy-driven in-line deformable drops rising in pure glycerin at Re b 1 were studied, where the diameter for the leading drops ranged from 9.51 mm to 12.6 mm and for trailing drops from 12.7 mm to 15.8 mm. The situation while a larger drop chasing a smal er one was specifically considered which typical y led to the smal er drop“coating”the larger one. Two approaches, the geometric feature approach and the energy change one, were used to judge the starting and ending times of the interaction between two drops. Based on a conical wake model, the drag coefficient of two approaching drops was calculated. Due to the approaching effect of the trailing drop, the leading drop was accelerated and the average drag coefficient was smal er than that for a free rising single drop. The frequency spectrums of the lateral oscillation of two drops during the interaction were obtained by using Fourier analysis. The oscillation frequency of the interactional drops was also different from that for a free rising single drop because of the wake effect produced by the leading drop. Due to a superposition of the drop shape oscil ation and the drop internal circula-tion, the transverse oscil ation frequencies of two drops have the same trend during the approaching process. © 2016 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  9. Numerical modelling of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochan, Agata; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was validation of a numerical model of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase system of immiscible fluids. The drop impact phenomenon was recorded using a high-speed camera (Vision Research MIRO M310) and the data were recorded at 2000 frames per second. The numerical calculations were performed with the Finite Volume Method (FVM) solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for three phases: air and two selected immiscible fluids. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique was employed for modelling of the boundaries between the phases. Numerical modelling was done with the Finite Volume Method using an available OpenFOAM software. The experiment was based on three variables: • the height from which the drop of the selected fluids fell (the speed of the drop), • the thickness of the layers of the two selected immiscible fluids (a thin layer of the fluid with a lower density was spread over the higher-density fluid), • the size of the fluid droplet. The velocity and radius of the falling drop was calculated based on the recorded images. The used parameters allowed adequate projection of the impact of fluid droplets on a system of two immiscible liquids. Development of the numerical model of splash may further have practical applications in environmental protection (spraying of hazardous fluids, spread of fuels and other hazardous substances as a result of disasters, spraying (water cooling) of hot surfaces), and in agriculture (prevention of soil erosion). The study was partially funded from the National Science Centre (Poland) based on the decision no. DEC-2012/07/N/ST10/03280.

  10. Simple analytical model of capillary flow in an evaporating sessile drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu

    2005-02-01

    An analytical expression of hydrodynamic potential inside an evaporating sessile drop with pinned contact line is found. The problem is considered for a hemispherical drop (with the contact angle of 90 degrees ) at the very early stages of the evaporation process when the shape of the drop is still a hemisphere and the evaporation field is uniform. The capillary flow carries a fluid from the drop apex to the contact line. Comparison with the published calculations performed using lubrication approximation (very thin drop) suggests that qualitative picture of the capillary flow is insensitive to the ratio of initial drop height to the drop radius.

  11. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... than 18.7 inches. (b) If the effect of wing lift is provided for in free drop tests, the landing gear... the airplane in the level attitude (with the nose wheel clear in the case of nose wheel type...

  12. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic dro...

  13. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K., E-mail: richard.bowles@usask.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5C9 (Canada)

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  14. Predicting Drop-Out from Social Behaviour of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Jaroslav; Bydzovska, Hana; Geryk, Jan; Obsivac, Tomas; Popelinsky, Lubomir

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on predicting drop-outs and school failures when student data has been enriched with data derived from students social behaviour. These data describe social dependencies gathered from e-mail and discussion board conversations, among other sources. We describe an extraction of new features from both student data and behaviour…

  15. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    cultured in 'hanging drops' and effects of activin A and follistatin treatment were investigated in seminoma cultures. RESULTS: Testis fragments with normal spermatogenesis or CIS cells were cultured for 14 days with sustained proliferation of germ cells and CIS cells and without increased apoptosis...

  16. Playing with Water Drops: From Wetting to Optics through Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domps, A.; Roques-Carmes, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a consistent series of activities, including experiments and basic computational studies, investigating the shape and optical properties of water drops in connection with novel technological devices. Most of the work can be carried out with simple teaching equipment and is well suited to undergraduate students. Firstly, we show how the…

  17. Mass-spring model of a self-pulsating drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Charles; Pimienta, Véronique

    2013-12-03

    Self-pulsating sessile drops are a striking example of the richness of far-from-equilibrium liquid/liquid systems. The complex dynamics of such systems is still not fully understood, and simple models are required to grasp the mechanisms at stake. In this article, we present a simple mass-spring mechanical model of the highly regular drop pulsations observed in Pimienta, V.; Brost, M.; Kovalchuk, N.; Bresch, S.; Steinbock, O. Complex shapes and dynamics of dissolving drops of dichloromethane. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 10728-10731. We introduce an effective time-dependent spreading coefficient that sums up all of the forces (due to evaporation, solubilization, surfactant transfer, coffee ring effect, solutal and thermal Marangoni flows, drop elasticity, etc.) that pull or push the edge of a dichloromethane liquid lens, and we show how to account for the periodic rim breakup. The model is examined and compared against experimental observations. The spreading parts of the pulsations are very rapid and cannot be explained by a constant positive spreading coefficient or superspreading.

  18. Don’t drop the patient: teamwork for cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daksha Patel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of a team is to work together towards a common goal. On an athletics track, relay race teams run with a baton that is passed from one team member to another, without breaking the pace. If the baton is dropped, the team is disqualified.

  19. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs and bounce drop jumps (BDJs. The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p < 0.05 between RSI values for CDJs and BDJs were recorded for jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than the values recorded for BDJs. Times of contact, amortization and take-off during BDJs were significantly shorter (p < 0.05 than the respective values obtained for CDJs. Therefore, the use of the RSI to monitor plyometric training should be based on the drop jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  20. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2013-01-01

    In certain crime cases, information about a perpetrator's phenotype, including eye colour, may be a valuable tool if no DNA profile of any suspect or individual in the DNA database matches the DNA profile found at the crime scene. Often, the available DNA material is sparse and allelic drop-out o...

  1. On the morphology of sigma-drop galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Comerón, S; Beckman, J E

    2008-01-01

    Context: Local reductions of the stellar velocity dispersion in the central regions of galaxies are known as sigma-drops. Knowing the origin of these features can lead to better understanding of inner galactic dynamics. Aims: We present a sample of 20 sigma-drop galaxies matched with a control sample of galaxies without sigma-drop in order to search for correlations between sigma-drops and the properties, primarily morphological, of the nuclear zones and discs of their host galaxies. Methods: We study the dust and Halpha distribution at 0.1 arcsec scale, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging, in the circumnuclear zones of the two samples of galaxies, searching for differences and trying to establish a link between the nuclear kinematics and the host morphology. We have also considered the CO and HI emission of the galaxies and their luminosity profiles. Results: We classify the two samples following both morphological parameters and the luminosity profiles. We find a larger fraction of nuclear dust spirals and...

  2. Vibration spectroscopy of a sessile drop and its contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, S; Chaudhury, M K

    2012-10-02

    Resonance frequencies of small sessile liquid drops (1-20 μL) were estimated from the power spectra of their height fluctuations after subjecting them to white noise vibration. Various resonance modes could be identified with this method as a function of the mass of the drop. Studies with water drops on such supports as polystyrene (θ ≈ 80°) and a superhydrophobic surface of microfibrillar silicone rubber (θ ≈ 162°) demonstrated that the resonant frequency decreases with the contact angle, θ. This trend is in remarkable agreement with the current models of the resonant vibration of sessile drops. A novel aspect of this study is the analysis of the modes of a slipping contact line that indicated that its higher frequency modes are more severely damped than its lower ones. Another case is with the glycerol-water solutions, where the resonance frequency decreases with the concentration of glycerol purely due to the capillary effects. The interface fluctuation, on the other hand, is strongly correlated with the kinematic viscosity of the liquid. Thus, these experiments provide a means to measure the surface tension and the viscosity of very small droplets.

  3. Dynamic trapping of sliding drops on wetting defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalli, A.; Musterd, M.; Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.; Ende, van den H.T.M.; Mugele, F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Submitted for the DFD14 Meeting of The American Physical Society Dynamic trapping of sliding drops on wetting defects ANDREA CAVALLI, University of Twente, MICHIEL MUSTERD, TU Delft, DIETER ’T MANNETJE, DIRK VAN DEN ENDE, FRIEDER MUGELE, University of Twente —We present a numerical analysi

  4. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  5. Students drop out of STEM fields due to poor grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    College students planning to major in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields often drop out of those fields because of poorer than expected grades, according to a recent study. Conducted by Ralph Stinebrickner of Berea College in Kentucky and Todd Stinebrickner of the University of Western Ontario, the study is a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper published in June 2013.

  6. The Reasons Why Farm Children Drop Out of School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Alberto

    To study the relationship between the school and the rural family, and particularly to establish reasons for student dropout, a questionnaire was administered in 1973 to 103 students who dropped out of school in 2 large rural towns in the Veneto, Italy. Responses indicated that about 60% of the adolescents left school to help out the family or…

  7. Quasi-static relaxation of arbitrarily shaped sessile drops

    CERN Document Server

    Iliev, S; Nikolayev, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We study a spontaneous relaxation dynamics of arbitrarily shaped liquid drops on solid surfaces in the partial wetting regime. It is assumed that the energy dissipated near the contact line is much larger than that in the bulk of the fluid. We have shown rigorously in the case of quasi-static relaxation using the standard mechanical description of dissipative system dynamics that the introduction of a dissipation term proportional to the contact line length leads to the well known local relation between the contact line velocity and the dynamic contact angle at every point of an arbitrary contact line shape. A numerical code is developed for 3D drops to study the dependence of the relaxation dynamics on the initial drop shape. The available asymptotic solutions are tested against the obtained numerical data. We show how the relaxation at a given point of the contact line is influenced by the dynamics of the whole drop which is a manifestation of the non-local

  8. La Gotita de Agua (The Little Drop of Water).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palandra, Maria; Puigdollers, Carmen

    This Spanish reader for children in kindergarten and first grade is about a drop of water that comes to life in a trip through the water cycle of evaporation, condensation, and subsequent return to a drier part of the earth's surface environment. The story is suitable for reading aloud or independent reading. The text is entirely in Spanish.…

  9. Growing bubbles and freezing drops: depletion effects and tip singularities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enríquez Paz y Puente, Oscar Raúl

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the author investigates the growth of gas bubbles in a supersaturated solution and the freezing of water drops when placed on a cold plate. Supersaturated solutions are common in nature and industry; perhaps the best know examples are carbonated drinks, such as beer or soda. These ar

  10. Drop-in Security for Distributed and Portable Computing Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevelakis, Vassilis; Keromytis, Angelos

    2003-01-01

    Proposes the use of a special purpose drop-in firewall/VPN gateway called Sieve, that can be inserted between the mobile workstation and the network to provide individualized security services for that particular station. Discusses features and advantages of the system and demonstrates how Sieve was used in various application areas such as at…

  11. Effects of relative humidity on banana fruit drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saengpook, C.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial ripening of banana fruit occurs at high relative humidity (RH), which prevents browning of damaged skin areas. In experiments with ripening at high RH (94 ± 1%) the individual fruit (fingers) of `Sucrier¿ (Musa acuminata, AA Group) banana exhibited a high rate of drop. The falling off of

  12. Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, Hrishikesh; Barik, Manas R; Reddy, Mamatha M; Mittal, Ruchi; Das, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD) is a rare autosomal recessive form of corneal dystrophy characterised by subepithelial and stromal amyloid deposits. It is relatively common in Japan. It usually presents in the first two decades of life with subepithelial nodular lesions that later coalesce to form mulberry-like opacities. Although various surgical modalities have been attempted, recurrence remains a major challenge.

  13. Monte Carlo studies of nuclei and quantum liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in application of variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods to nuclei is reviewed. The nature of single-particle orbitals in correlated quantum liquid drops is discussed, and it is suggested that the difference between quasi-particle and mean-field orbitals may be of importance in nuclear structure physics. 27 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Capillarity and wetting phenomena drops, bubbles, pearls, waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gennes, Pierre-Gilles; Quéré, David

    2004-01-01

    As I glance out my window in the early morning, I can see beads of droplets gracing a spider web. The film of dew that has settled on the threads is unstable and breaks up spontaneously into droplets. This phenomenon has implications for the treatment of textile fibers (the process known as "oiling"), glass, and carbon. It is no less important when applying mascara! I take my morning shower. The moment I step out, I dry off by way of evaporation (which makes me feel cold) and by dewetting (the process by which dry areas form spontaneously and expand on my skin). As I rush into my car under a pelting rain, my attention is caught by small drops stuck on my windshield. I also notice larger drops rolling down and others larger still that, like snails, leave behind them a trail of water. I ask myself what the difference is between these rolling drops and grains of sand tumbling down an incline. I wonder why the smallest drops remain stuck. The answers to such questions do help car manufacturers treat the surface o...

  15. Acidogenic Potential of “Sugar-Free” Cough Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, John A; Ritchie, John R

    2009-01-01

    A patient presented with extensive marginal ditching around restorations recently placed during whole-mouth rehabilitation. The patient was not xerostomic and was otherwise normal except for the self-reported excessive use of “sugar-free” cough drops sweetened with sorbitol and Isomalt® (an equimolar mix of glucosyl-mannitol and glucosylsorbitol). This prompted an in vitro investigation to determine whether Streptococcus sobrinus 6715, a cariogenic streptococcus, could grow and produce acid in growth medium containing an aqueous extract of such “sugar-free” cough drops. The results indicate that S. sobrinus 6715 uses Isomalt® and sorbitol extensively, producing terminal culture pH as low as 4.2 when grown on medium with cough drop extract containing these sugars. This pH is sufficient to demineralize dental enamel. Patients should be cautioned against the chronic overuse of “sugar-free” cough drops and other “sugar-free” confections sweetened with a mixture of Isomalt® and sorbitol. PMID:19444340

  16. Acidogenic potential of "sugar-free" cough drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, John A; Ritchie, John R

    2009-03-06

    A patient presented with extensive marginal ditching around restorations recently placed during whole-mouth rehabilitation. The patient was not xerostomic and was otherwise normal except for the self-reported excessive use of "sugar-free" cough drops sweetened with sorbitol and Isomalt® (an equimolar mix of glucosyl-mannitol and glucosylsorbitol). This prompted an in vitro investigation to determine whether Streptococcus sobrinus 6715, a cariogenic streptococcus, could grow and produce acid in growth medium containing an aqueous extract of such "sugar-free" cough drops. The results indicate that S. sobrinus 6715 uses Isomalt® and sorbitol extensively, producing terminal culture pH as low as 4.2 when grown on medium with cough drop extract containing these sugars. This pH is sufficient to demineralize dental enamel. Patients should be cautioned against the chronic overuse of "sugar-free" cough drops and other "sugar-free" confections sweetened with a mixture of Isomalt® and sorbitol.

  17. Control and Stabilization: Making Millikan's Oil Drop Experiment Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Hill, Christoph; Heering, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Educational versions of Millikan's oil-drop experiment have frequently been criticized; suggestions for improvement either focus on technical innovations of the setup or on replacing the experiment by other approaches of familiarization, such as computer simulations. In our approach, we have analysed experimental procedures. In doing so, we were…

  18. Millikan's Oil-Drop Experiment as a Remotely Controlled Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Bodo; Grober, Sebastian; Vetter, Martin; Jodl, Hans-Jorg

    2012-01-01

    The Millikan oil-drop experiment, to determine the elementary electrical charge e and the quantization of charge Q = n [middle dot] e, is an essential experiment in physics teaching but it is hardly performed in class for several reasons. Therefore, we offer this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL). We describe the interactivity…

  19. Novel approach to the oil-drop experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papirio, Anthony; Penchina, Claude M.; Sakai, Hajime

    2000-01-01

    Millikan's oil-drop experiment has limited accuracy. Using video-imaging techniques, students find the experiment less tedious and more interesting than using the microscope. By providing absolute calibration in the viewing field, and measuring distance directly, students now obtain improved accuracy.

  20. Water drop impact onto oil covered solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ningli; Chen, Huanchen; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2016-11-01

    Droplet impact onto an oily surface can be encountered routinely in industrial applications; e.g., in spray cooling. It is not clear from literature what impact an oil film may have on the impact process. In this work, water drop impact onto both hydrophobic (glass) and hydrophilic (OTS) substrates which were covered by oil films (silicone) of different thickness (5um-50um) and viscosity (5cst-100cst) were performed. The effects of drop impact velocity, film thickness, and viscosity of the oil film and wettability of the substrate were studied. Our results show that when the film viscosity and impact velocity is low, the water drop deformed into the usual disk shape after impact, and rebounded from the surface. Such rebound phenomena disappears, when the viscosity of oil becomes very large. With the increase of the impact velocity, crown and splashing appears in the spreading phase. The crown and splashing behavior appears more easily with the increase of film thickness and decrease of its viscosity. It was also found that the substrate wettability can only affect the impact process in cases which drop has a large Webber number (We = 594), and the film's viscosity and thickness are small. This work was support by National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Project Number is 51506084.

  1. Mathematics Anxiety and the Affective Drop in Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Mark H.; Moore, Alex M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors provide a brief review of the history and assessment of math anxiety, its relationship to personal and educational consequences, and its important impact on measures of performance. Overall, math anxiety causes an "affective drop," a decline in performance when math is performed under timed, high-stakes conditions, both in laboratory…

  2. Physiological and biochemical changes during banana ripening and finger drop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imsabai, W.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Fruit drop of banana is due to breaking at the junction of the pedicel and pulp, and we found no true abscission zone. The breakage seems therefore due to weakening of the peel. We investigated pectin hydrolysis and some properties at the rupture zone, using `Hom Thong` (Musa acuminata, AAA Group) a

  3. Shear shedding of drops and the use of superhydrophobic surfaces in microgravity: PFC and ground based results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Andrew; Amirfazli, Alidad

    In free fall, the absence of gravity poses many challenges for fluid handling systems. One such example of this is condensers. On earth, the condensed liquid is removed from the tilted condenser plate by gravity forced shedding. In microgravity, proposed solutions include the use of surfaces with gradients in wettability [1], the use of electrowetting [2], and shearing airflow [3]. In this talk, shear shedding results for a variety of surface (hydrophilic to superhydrophobic (extremely water repelling)) will be presented. Surface science and aerodynamics are used to reveal fundamental parameters controlling incipient motion for drops exposed to shearing airflow. It is found that wetting parameters such as contact angle and surface tension are very influential in determining the minimum required air velocity for drop shedding. Based on experimental results for drops of water and hexadecane (0.5-100 l) on PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic aluminum surface, an exponential function is proposed that relates the critical air velocity for shedding to the ratio of drop base length to projected area. The results for the water systems can be collapsed to a self similar curve by normalization, which also explains results from other researchers. Since shedding from superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) is seen to be easier compared to other surfaces, the behaviour of SHS is also probed in this talk. SHS have space-based applications to shedding, self cleaning, anti-icing (spacecraft launch/re-entry), anti-fouling, fluid actuation, and decreased fluid friction. The mechanism for SHS is understood to be the existence of an air layer between large portions of the drop and solid. The first concrete visual evidence of this was gained performing a parabolic flight experiment with the ESA. Results of this experi-ment will be discussed, showing the extreme water repelling potential of SHS in microgravity, and demonstrating how the wetting behaviours seen (partial penetration, transition

  4. Fission product removal by containment spray - influence of the distance between the drops on the aerosol collection efficiency; Influence de la densite spatiale des gouttes d'aspersion sur l'efficacite de collecte des produits de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauchet, N

    2000-07-01

    This work is within the framework of the studies that are conducted at the IPSN concerning the loss of coolant in a nuclear reactor. During this kind of accident, a spray system in the reactor containment induces the scrubbing of fission products in the atmosphere, and allows the decrease of their concentration in the containment. Our objective is to study the influence of the distance between the drops of their aerosol collection efficiency. This is not taken into account in the existing models. We stimulate the various aerosol collection mechanisms with one free falling drop using computational fluid dynamics codes. The mechanisms are: deposition by brownian diffusion, impaction and interception of the particles by the drop, and collection of particles in the presence of steam condensation at the surface of the drop. These phenomena are studied for drops ranging in diameter from 100 to 700 micrometers, falling in a saturated air-steam mixture whose temperature varies between 20 and 140 degrees Celsius, and total pressure varies between 1 and 5 bars. We validate these models with results available in the literature and with experimental results CARAIDAS. Then we apply these models to the case of three aligned drops, which constitutes a case for which the proximity of the drops has a strong influence on the collection of aerosols. While varying the distance between the drop from 5 to 25 drop diameters, we can highlight the modification of the collection efficiency of each mechanism related to the disturbance of the velocity and concentration fields in the vicinity of the drops. We note that the strongest variations of efficiency observed are in the field of impaction, and that the steam condensation at the surface of the drops limits the decrease. (authors)

  5. Microgravity Experiment Programs for Students at the Bremen Drop Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM established as a research center and currently headed by Prof. Dr. Claus Lämmerzahl is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM more than 70 scientists, engineers and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important university institutes for space sciences and technologies in Europe as well as worldwide well known in the space community. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM’s ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10 (-6) g (microgravity). The provided quality is one of the purest for experiments under weightlessness worldwide achieved. The scientists may choose between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and a catapult experiment with 9.3 s of weightlessness. Either in the drop or in the worldwide unique catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM are always the same, generally up to 3 times per day. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 6750 launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like Fundamental Physics, Combustion, Fluid Dynamics, Planetary Formation / Astrophysics, Biology and Materials Sciences have been successfully accomplished so far. In our paper we will report and inform about microgravity experiment programs for students like „Drop Your Thesis!“ by ESA and

  6. Drop Axis Ratio Distributions in Stratiform and Convective Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurai, M.; Bringi, V. N.; Petersen, W. A.; Schultz, C.

    2010-01-01

    A fully calibrated low profile 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) has been recording many different rainfall events in Northern Alabama (USA) since June 2007. An earlier publication reported drop shapes and axis ratio distributions determined for some of the events. For one of the cases examined, a noticeable shift in the 3.5 - 3.75 mm drop axis ratio distribution was noted. In this paper, we extend the earlier work by separating the 2DVD measurements into stratiform and convective rain. The separation is made possible by using the minute-by-minute drop size distribution (DSD) measured by the 2DVD. The 1-minute DSDs are fitted to a gamma distribution, and using a simple indexing technique which involves two of the fitted parameters, periods of convective and stratiform rain are separated for a given event. The output of the DSD indexing technique is qualitatively confirmed by comparing with simultaneous time series observations from a co-located UHF profiler which continuously records height profiles of reflectivity, Doppler mean and spectral width, all of which enable the identification of bright-band periods and, furthermore, periods of moderate and deep convection. Excellent consistency is found between the output of the DSD-based separation method and the profiler observations. Next, we utilize the output of DSD index-based separation method to flag the periods of severe convection for a given event. Drop axis ratios during the flagged periods are derived and compared with those during stratiform rain periods. Five cases have been considered. Axis ratio distributions do not show appreciable differences between stratiform and convective periods for four of the cases. The fifth case (the same case as reported earlier) shows a shift in the 3.5 - 3.75 mm drop axis ratios during a prolonged period of convection. The contoured shapes for these drops determined from the 2DVD camera data indicate the possibility of non-axisymmetric oscillations, compared with the contoured

  7. Influence of turbulence on the drop growth in warm clouds, Part I: comparison of numerically and experimentally determined collision kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Siewert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the comparison of numerically and experimentally determined collision kernels of water drops in air turbulence. The numerical and experimental setups are matched as closely as possible. However, due to the individual numerical and experimental restrictions, it could not be avoided that the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate of the measurement and the simulations differ. Direct numerical simulations (DNS are performed resulting in a very large database concerning geometric collision kernels with 1470 individual entries. Based on this database a fit function for the turbulent enhancement of the collision kernel is developed. In the experiments, the collision rates of large drops (radius >7.5μm$> 7.5\\,\\text{\\textmu{}m}$ are measured. These collision rates are compared with the developed fit, evaluated at the measurement conditions. Since the total collision rates match well for all occurring dissipation rates the distribution information of the fit could be used to enhance the statistical reliability and for the first time an experimental collision kernel could be constructed. In addition to the collision rates, the drop size distributions at three consecutive streamwise positions are measured. The drop size distributions contain mainly small drops (radius <7.5μm$< 7.5\\,\\text{\\textmu{}m}$. The measured evolution of the drop size distribution is confronted with model calculations based on the newly derived fit of the collision kernel. It turns out that the observed fast evolution of the drop size distribution can only be modeled if the collision kernel for small drops is drastically increased. A physical argument for this amplification is missing since for such small drops, neither DNSs nor experiments have been performed. For large drops, for which a good agreement of the collision rates was found in the DNS and the experiment, the time for the evolution of the spectrum in the wind tunnel is too short to draw

  8. Student Drop-Out Trends at Sultan Qaboos University and Kuwait University: 2000-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghanboosi, Salim Saleem; Alqahtani, Abdulmuhsen Ayedh

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to explore the drop-out trends at Sultan Qaboos. University and Kuwait University. Archival data of the period 2000-2011 were used to achieve this goal. Main findings showed that (a) male drop-out rates are higher than female drop-out rates; (b) drop- out rates at scientific colleges are higher; (c) drop-out rates of…

  9. Assessment of the relative error in sessile drop method automation task

    OpenAIRE

    Levitskaya T.О.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the relative error in the sessile drop method automation. Further development of the sessile drop method is directly related to the development of new techniques and specially developed algorithms enabling automatic computer calculation of surface properties. The sessile drop method mathematical apparatus improvement, drop circuit equation transformation to a form suitable for working, the drop surface calculation method automation, analysis of relative errors in the calculation...

  10. Air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for nanoparticles synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Song, Yu L.; Chen, C. Y.; Tseng, T. K.; Tsai, Chen S.

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents new findings regarding the effects of precursor drop size and concentration on product particle size and morphology in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of zirconium hydroxyl acetate solutions. Large precursor drops (diameter >30μm) generated by ultrasonic atomization at 120kHz yielded particles with holes. Precursor drops 6-9 μm in diameter, generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer at 1.65MHz and 23.5W electric drive power, yielded uniform spherical particles 150nm in diameter under proper control of heating rate and precursor concentration. Moreover, air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at 120kHz and 2.3W yielded spherical particles of which nearly half were smaller than those produced by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of the 6-9 μm precursor drops, desprite the much larger precursor drop sizes (28 μm peak diameter versus 7 μm mean diameter). These particles are much smaller than those predicted by the conventional one particle per drop mechanism, suggesting that a vapor condensation mechanism may also be involved in spray pyrolysis. It may be concluded that through this new mechanism air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis can become a viable process for mass production of nanoparticles.

  11. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to view this content or go to source URL . What NIEHS is Doing on Air Pollution Who ... Junction Last Reviewed: February 06, 2017 This page URL: NIEHS website: https://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Email ...

  12. Capacity drop: A comparison between stop-and-go wave and standing queue at lane-drop bottleneck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, K.; Knoop, V.L.; Leclercq, L.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    In freeways, the maximum traffic flow through a bottleneck is usually higher than the outflow of congestion there. This phenomenon is called the capacity drop. In literature, there are considerable debates about the mechanism causing this phenomenon. This paper studies the mechanism by analyzing rea

  13. Blueberry fruit drop associated virus: A new member of the family Caulimoviridae isolated from blueberry exhibiting fruit drop symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes the nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a new DNA virus isolated from ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry plants named Blueberry fruit drop associated virus (BFDaV). Infected bushes lose nearly 100% of their fruit prior to harvest, and in springtime young leaves and flowers develop ...

  14. INFLUENCE OF SURFACTANT ON TWO-PHASE FLOW REGIME AND PRESSURE DROP IN UPWARD INCLINED PIPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Guo-dong; CHAI Lei

    2012-01-01

    The influence of a surfactant on the two-phase flow regime and the pressure drop in upward inclined pipes is investigated for various gas/liquid flow rates.The air/water and air/100 ppm sodium dodecyl sulphate aqueous solution are used as the working fluids.The influence of the surfactant on the two-phase flow regime in upward inclined pipes is investigated using the electrical tomographic technique.For 0°,2.5° and 5° pipe inclinations,the surfactant has obvious effect on the transition from the stratified wavy flow to the annular flow,and the range of the stratified smooth flow regime is also extended to higher gas velocities.For 10°pipe inclination,no stratified flow regime is observed in the air/water flow.In the air/surfactant solution system,however,the stratified flow regime can be found in the range of USG =10m/s-28m/s and USL =0.07 m/s-0.2 m/s.For all inclination angles,the changes of the pressure gradient characteristics are accompanied with the flow pattern transitions.Adding surfactant in a two-phase flow would reduce the pressure gradient significantly in the slug flow and annular flow regimes.In the annular flow regime,the pressure gradient gradually becomes free of the influence of the upward inclined angle,and is only dependent on the property of the two-phase flow.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF SWIRL GENERATOR HAVING WINGS WITH HOLES ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN TUBE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki ARGUNHAN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of turbulance creators on heat transfer and pressure drop used in concentric heat exchanger experimentaly. Heat exchanger has an inlet tube with 60 mm in diameter. The angle of swirl generators wings is 55º with each wing which has single, double, three and four holes. Swirl generators is designed to easily set to heat exchanger entrance. Air is passing through inner tube of heat exhanger as hot fluid and water is passing outer of inner tube as cool fluid.

  16. Fast H-DROP: A thirty times accelerated version of H-DROP for interactive SVM-based prediction of helical domain linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Tambi; Ide, Soichiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Ebina, Teppei; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    Efficient and rapid prediction of domain regions from amino acid sequence information alone is often required for swift structural and functional characterization of large multi-domain proteins. Here we introduce Fast H-DROP, a thirty times accelerated version of our previously reported H-DROP (Helical Domain linker pRediction using OPtimal features), which is unique in specifically predicting helical domain linkers (boundaries). Fast H-DROP, analogously to H-DROP, uses optimum features selected from a set of 3000 ones by combining a random forest and a stepwise feature selection protocol. We reduced the computational time from 8.5 min per sequence in H-DROP to 14 s per sequence in Fast H-DROP on an 8 Xeon processor Linux server by using SWISS-PROT instead of Genbank non-redundant (nr) database for generating the PSSMs. The sensitivity and precision of Fast H-DROP assessed by cross-validation were 33.7 and 36.2%, which were merely 2% lower than that of H-DROP. The reduced computational time of Fast H-DROP, without affecting prediction performances, makes it more interactive and user-friendly. Fast H-DROP and H-DROP are freely available from http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/.

  17. Fast H-DROP: A thirty times accelerated version of H-DROP for interactive SVM-based prediction of helical domain linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Tambi; Ide, Soichiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Ebina, Teppei; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    Efficient and rapid prediction of domain regions from amino acid sequence information alone is often required for swift structural and functional characterization of large multi-domain proteins. Here we introduce Fast H-DROP, a thirty times accelerated version of our previously reported H-DROP (Helical Domain linker pRediction using OPtimal features), which is unique in specifically predicting helical domain linkers (boundaries). Fast H-DROP, analogously to H-DROP, uses optimum features selected from a set of 3000 ones by combining a random forest and a stepwise feature selection protocol. We reduced the computational time from 8.5 min per sequence in H-DROP to 14 s per sequence in Fast H-DROP on an 8 Xeon processor Linux server by using SWISS-PROT instead of Genbank non-redundant (nr) database for generating the PSSMs. The sensitivity and precision of Fast H-DROP assessed by cross-validation were 33.7 and 36.2%, which were merely 2% lower than that of H-DROP. The reduced computational time of Fast H-DROP, without affecting prediction performances, makes it more interactive and user-friendly. Fast H-DROP and H-DROP are freely available from http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/.

  18. The Flow Induced by the Coalescence of Two Initially Stationary Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobari, M. R.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    The coalescence of two initially stationary drops of different size is investigated by solving the unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations numerically, using a Front-Tracking/Finite Difference method. Initially, the drops are put next to each other and the film between them ruptured. Due to surface tension forces, the drops coalesce rapidly and the fluid from the small drop is injected into the larger one. For low nondimensional viscosity, or Ohnesorge number, little mixing takes place and the small drop fluid forms a blob near the point where the drops touched initially. For low Ohnesorge number, on the other hand, the small drop forms a jet that penetrates far into the large drop. The penetration depth also depends on the size of the drops and shows that for a given fluid of sufficiently low viscosity, there is a maximum penetration depth for intermediate size ratios.

  19. The effect of spherical hub-nose position on pressure drop in an oscillating water column system for wave energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ghazilla, R.A.R.; Yap, H.J.; Ya, T.Y.T.; Passarella, R.; Hasanuddin, I.; Yunus, M. [Malaya Univ. (Malaysia). Centre for Product Design and Manufacturing; Sugiyono [Malaya Univ., (Malaysia). Centre for Product Design and Manufacturing; Gadjah Mada Univ. (Indonesia). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The use of renewable energy sources as an alternative to conventional fuels was discussed with particular reference to ocean wave energy and its potential to contribute to the energy requirements of coastal nations. Ocean wave energy has been harnessed and converted into electricity using processes and technologies that are environmentally sound. The oscillating water column (OWC) system is considered to be among the most promising technology for harnessing wave energy. This paper presented the results of a study that investigated the pressure drop in an OWC system and the effect of spherical hub-nose position in an annular duct. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used under steady flow conditions for several hub-nose positions to determine the characteristic of pressure drop. The study showed that the hub-nose position influenced the pressure drop in the OWC system. The highest value of the pressure drop in this study occurred when the hub-nose was at the position of 0.0 m relative to the end of the converging cone. The pressure drop decreased when the hub-nose position moved away from the end of converging cone. The lowest value occurred at the position of -0.5 m. It was concluded that despite the numerically small change in pressure drop, this phenomenon should be considered in the design process of the OWC system because of the operational condition of the system at low-pressure pneumatic power. The pressure drop actually reduces the amount of energy that will be converted by the air turbine. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  20. Dynamics of sessile drops. Part 3. Theory of forced oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Bostwick, Joshua B

    2016-01-01

    A partially-wetting sessile drop is driven by a sinusoidal pressure field that produces capillary waves on the liquid/gas interface. The analysis presented in Part 1 of this series (Bostwick & Steen 2014) is extended by computing response diagrams and phase shifts for the viscous droplet, whose three phase contact-line moves with contact-angle that is a smooth function of the contact line speed. Viscous dissipation is incorporated through the viscous potential flow approximation and the critical Ohnesorge number bounding regions beyond which a given mode becomes over-damped is computed. Davis dissipation originating from the contact-line speed condition leads to damped oscillations for drops with finite contact-line mobility, even for inviscid fluids. The critical mobility and associated driving frequency to generate the largest Davis dissipation is computed. Lastly, regions of modal coexistence where two modes can be simultaneously excited by a single forcing frequency are identified. Predictions compare...